Science.gov

Sample records for advanced machine learning

  1. Recent Advances in Predictive (Machine) Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, J

    2004-01-24

    Prediction involves estimating the unknown value of an attribute of a system under study given the values of other measured attributes. In prediction (machine) learning the prediction rule is derived from data consisting of previously solved cases. Most methods for predictive learning were originated many years ago at the dawn of the computer age. Recently two new techniques have emerged that have revitalized the field. These are support vector machines and boosted decision trees. This paper provides an introduction to these two new methods tracing their respective ancestral roots to standard kernel methods and ordinary decision trees.

  2. Using Machine Learning for Advanced Anomaly Detection and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, B.; Poole, M.; Camp, M.; Murray-Krezan, J.

    2016-09-01

    Machine Learning (ML) techniques have successfully been used in a wide variety of applications to automatically detect and potentially classify changes in activity, or a series of activities by utilizing large amounts data, sometimes even seemingly-unrelated data. The amount of data being collected, processed, and stored in the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) domain has grown at an exponential rate and is now better suited for ML. This paper describes development of advanced algorithms to deliver significant improvements in characterization of deep space objects and indication and warning (I&W) using a global network of telescopes that are collecting photometric data on a multitude of space-based objects. The Phase II Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) project Autonomous Characterization Algorithms for Change Detection and Characterization (ACDC), contracted to ExoAnalytic Solutions Inc. is providing the ability to detect and identify photometric signature changes due to potential space object changes (e.g. stability, tumble rate, aspect ratio), and correlate observed changes to potential behavioral changes using a variety of techniques, including supervised learning. Furthermore, these algorithms run in real-time on data being collected and processed by the ExoAnalytic Space Operations Center (EspOC), providing timely alerts and warnings while dynamically creating collection requirements to the EspOC for the algorithms that generate higher fidelity I&W. This paper will discuss the recently implemented ACDC algorithms, including the general design approach and results to date. The usage of supervised algorithms, such as Support Vector Machines, Neural Networks, k-Nearest Neighbors, etc., and unsupervised algorithms, for example k-means, Principle Component Analysis, Hierarchical Clustering, etc., and the implementations of these algorithms is explored. Results of applying these algorithms to EspOC data both in an off

  3. Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Achim; Mahidadia, Ashesh

    The purpose of this chapter is to present fundamental ideas and techniques of machine learning suitable for the field of this book, i.e., for automated scientific discovery. The chapter focuses on those symbolic machine learning methods, which produce results that are suitable to be interpreted and understood by humans. This is particularly important in the context of automated scientific discovery as the scientific theories to be produced by machines are usually meant to be interpreted by humans. This chapter contains some of the most influential ideas and concepts in machine learning research to give the reader a basic insight into the field. After the introduction in Sect. 1, general ideas of how learning problems can be framed are given in Sect. 2. The section provides useful perspectives to better understand what learning algorithms actually do. Section 3 presents the Version space model which is an early learning algorithm as well as a conceptual framework, that provides important insight into the general mechanisms behind most learning algorithms. In section 4, a family of learning algorithms, the AQ family for learning classification rules is presented. The AQ family belongs to the early approaches in machine learning. The next, Sect. 5 presents the basic principles of decision tree learners. Decision tree learners belong to the most influential class of inductive learning algorithms today. Finally, a more recent group of learning systems are presented in Sect. 6, which learn relational concepts within the framework of logic programming. This is a particularly interesting group of learning systems since the framework allows also to incorporate background knowledge which may assist in generalisation. Section 7 discusses Association Rules - a technique that comes from the related field of Data mining. Section 8 presents the basic idea of the Naive Bayesian Classifier. While this is a very popular learning technique, the learning result is not well suited for

  4. Recent machine learning advancements in sensor-based mobility analysis: Deep learning for Parkinson's disease assessment.

    PubMed

    Eskofier, Bjoern M; Lee, Sunghoon I; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Golabchi, Fatemeh N; Ferreira-Carvalho, Gabriela; Vergara-Diaz, Gloria; Sapienza, Stefano; Costante, Gianluca; Klucken, Jochen; Kautz, Thomas; Bonato, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    The development of wearable sensors has opened the door for long-term assessment of movement disorders. However, there is still a need for developing methods suitable to monitor motor symptoms in and outside the clinic. The purpose of this paper was to investigate deep learning as a method for this monitoring. Deep learning recently broke records in speech and image classification, but it has not been fully investigated as a potential approach to analyze wearable sensor data. We collected data from ten patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease using inertial measurement units. Several motor tasks were expert-labeled and used for classification. We specifically focused on the detection of bradykinesia. For this, we compared standard machine learning pipelines with deep learning based on convolutional neural networks. Our results showed that deep learning outperformed other state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms by at least 4.6 % in terms of classification rate. We contribute a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of deep learning for sensor-based movement assessment and conclude that deep learning is a promising method for this field.

  5. Advancing Research in Second Language Writing through Computational Tools and Machine Learning Techniques: A Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an agenda for replication studies focusing on second language (L2) writing and the use of natural language processing (NLP) tools and machine learning algorithms. Specifically, it introduces a range of the available NLP tools and machine learning algorithms and demonstrates how these could be used to replicate seminal studies…

  6. Machine Learning in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Deo, Rahul C

    2015-11-17

    Spurred by advances in processing power, memory, storage, and an unprecedented wealth of data, computers are being asked to tackle increasingly complex learning tasks, often with astonishing success. Computers have now mastered a popular variant of poker, learned the laws of physics from experimental data, and become experts in video games - tasks that would have been deemed impossible not too long ago. In parallel, the number of companies centered on applying complex data analysis to varying industries has exploded, and it is thus unsurprising that some analytic companies are turning attention to problems in health care. The purpose of this review is to explore what problems in medicine might benefit from such learning approaches and use examples from the literature to introduce basic concepts in machine learning. It is important to note that seemingly large enough medical data sets and adequate learning algorithms have been available for many decades, and yet, although there are thousands of papers applying machine learning algorithms to medical data, very few have contributed meaningfully to clinical care. This lack of impact stands in stark contrast to the enormous relevance of machine learning to many other industries. Thus, part of my effort will be to identify what obstacles there may be to changing the practice of medicine through statistical learning approaches, and discuss how these might be overcome.

  7. Gravity Spy: integrating advanced LIGO detector characterization, machine learning, and citizen science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevin, M.; Coughlin, S.; Bahaadini, S.; Besler, E.; Rohani, N.; Allen, S.; Cabero, M.; Crowston, K.; Katsaggelos, A. K.; Larson, S. L.; Lee, T. K.; Lintott, C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lundgren, A.; Østerlund, C.; Smith, J. R.; Trouille, L.; Kalogera, V.

    2017-03-01

    With the first direct detection of gravitational waves, the advanced laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) has initiated a new field of astronomy by providing an alternative means of sensing the universe. The extreme sensitivity required to make such detections is achieved through exquisite isolation of all sensitive components of LIGO from non-gravitational-wave disturbances. Nonetheless, LIGO is still susceptible to a variety of instrumental and environmental sources of noise that contaminate the data. Of particular concern are noise features known as glitches, which are transient and non-Gaussian in their nature, and occur at a high enough rate so that accidental coincidence between the two LIGO detectors is non-negligible. Glitches come in a wide range of time-frequency-amplitude morphologies, with new morphologies appearing as the detector evolves. Since they can obscure or mimic true gravitational-wave signals, a robust characterization of glitches is paramount in the effort to achieve the gravitational-wave detection rates that are predicted by the design sensitivity of LIGO. This proves a daunting task for members of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration alone due to the sheer amount of data. In this paper we describe an innovative project that combines crowdsourcing with machine learning to aid in the challenging task of categorizing all of the glitches recorded by the LIGO detectors. Through the Zooniverse platform, we engage and recruit volunteers from the public to categorize images of time-frequency representations of glitches into pre-identified morphological classes and to discover new classes that appear as the detectors evolve. In addition, machine learning algorithms are used to categorize images after being trained on human-classified examples of the morphological classes. Leveraging the strengths of both classification methods, we create a combined method with the aim of improving the efficiency and accuracy of each individual

  8. Advances in Climate Informatics: Accelerating Discovery in Climate Science with Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteleoni, C.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the scientific consensus on climate change, drastic uncertainties remain. The climate system is characterized by complex phenomena that are imperfectly observed and even more imperfectly simulated. Climate data is Big Data, yet the magnitude of data and climate model output increasingly overwhelms the tools currently used to analyze them. Computational innovation is therefore needed. Machine learning is a cutting-edge research area at the intersection of computer science and statistics, focused on developing algorithms for big data analytics. Machine learning has revolutionized scientific discovery (e.g. Bioinformatics), and spawned new technologies (e.g. Web search). The impact of machine learning on climate science promises to be similarly profound. The goal of the novel interdisciplinary field of Climate Informatics is to accelerate discovery in climate science with machine learning, in order to shed light on urgent questions about climate change. In this talk, I will survey my research group's progress in the emerging field of climate informatics. Our work includes algorithms to improve the combined predictions of the IPCC multi-model ensemble, applications to seasonal and subseasonal prediction, and a data-driven technique to detect and define extreme events.

  9. Introduction to machine learning.

    PubMed

    Baştanlar, Yalin; Ozuysal, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The machine learning field, which can be briefly defined as enabling computers make successful predictions using past experiences, has exhibited an impressive development recently with the help of the rapid increase in the storage capacity and processing power of computers. Together with many other disciplines, machine learning methods have been widely employed in bioinformatics. The difficulties and cost of biological analyses have led to the development of sophisticated machine learning approaches for this application area. In this chapter, we first review the fundamental concepts of machine learning such as feature assessment, unsupervised versus supervised learning and types of classification. Then, we point out the main issues of designing machine learning experiments and their performance evaluation. Finally, we introduce some supervised learning methods.

  10. Advances in Patient Classification for Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Machine Learning Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changbo; Li, Guo-Zheng; Wang, Chengjun; Niu, Jinling

    2015-01-01

    As a complementary and alternative medicine in medical field, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has drawn great attention in the domestic field and overseas. In practice, TCM provides a quite distinct methodology to patient diagnosis and treatment compared to western medicine (WM). Syndrome (ZHENG or pattern) is differentiated by a set of symptoms and signs examined from an individual by four main diagnostic methods: inspection, auscultation and olfaction, interrogation, and palpation which reflects the pathological and physiological changes of disease occurrence and development. Patient classification is to divide patients into several classes based on different criteria. In this paper, from the machine learning perspective, a survey on patient classification issue will be summarized on three major aspects of TCM: sign classification, syndrome differentiation, and disease classification. With the consideration of different diagnostic data analyzed by different computational methods, we present the overview for four subfields of TCM diagnosis, respectively. For each subfield, we design a rectangular reference list with applications in the horizontal direction and machine learning algorithms in the longitudinal direction. According to the current development of objective TCM diagnosis for patient classification, a discussion of the research issues around machine learning techniques with applications to TCM diagnosis is given to facilitate the further research for TCM patient classification.

  11. Advances in Patient Classification for Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Machine Learning Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changbo; Li, Guo-Zheng; Wang, Chengjun; Niu, Jinling

    2015-01-01

    As a complementary and alternative medicine in medical field, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has drawn great attention in the domestic field and overseas. In practice, TCM provides a quite distinct methodology to patient diagnosis and treatment compared to western medicine (WM). Syndrome (ZHENG or pattern) is differentiated by a set of symptoms and signs examined from an individual by four main diagnostic methods: inspection, auscultation and olfaction, interrogation, and palpation which reflects the pathological and physiological changes of disease occurrence and development. Patient classification is to divide patients into several classes based on different criteria. In this paper, from the machine learning perspective, a survey on patient classification issue will be summarized on three major aspects of TCM: sign classification, syndrome differentiation, and disease classification. With the consideration of different diagnostic data analyzed by different computational methods, we present the overview for four subfields of TCM diagnosis, respectively. For each subfield, we design a rectangular reference list with applications in the horizontal direction and machine learning algorithms in the longitudinal direction. According to the current development of objective TCM diagnosis for patient classification, a discussion of the research issues around machine learning techniques with applications to TCM diagnosis is given to facilitate the further research for TCM patient classification. PMID:26246834

  12. Leveraging advanced data analytics, machine learning, and metrology models to enable critical dimension metrology solutions for advanced integrated circuit nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Narender; Zhang, Yunlin; Kagalwala, Taher; Bailey, Todd

    2014-10-01

    the useful and more accurate CD and profile information of the structures. This paper presents the optimization of scatterometry and MBIR model calibration and the feasibility to extrapolate not only in design and process space but also from one process step to a previous process step. A well-calibrated scatterometry model or patterning simulation model can be used to accurately extrapolate and interpolate in the design and process space for lithography patterning where AFM is not capable of accurately measuring sub-40 nm trenches. The uncertainty associated with extrapolation can be large and needs to be minimized. We have made use of measurements from CD-SEM and CD-AFM, along with the patterning and scatterometry simulation models to estimate the uncertainty associated with extrapolation and the methods to reduce it. For the first time, we have reported the application of machine learning (artificial neural networks) to the resist shrinkage systematic phenomenon to accurately predict the preshrink CD based on supervised learning using the CD-AFM data. The study lays out various basic concepts, approaches, and protocols of multiple source data processing and integration for a hybrid metrology approach. Impacts of this study include more accurate metrology, patterning models, and better process controls for advanced IC nodes.

  13. An open-source solution for advanced imaging flow cytometry data analysis using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Holger; Rees, Paul; Blasi, Thomas; Kamentsky, Lee; Hung, Jane; Dao, David; Carpenter, Anne E; Filby, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Imaging flow cytometry (IFC) enables the high throughput collection of morphological and spatial information from hundreds of thousands of single cells. This high content, information rich image data can in theory resolve important biological differences among complex, often heterogeneous biological samples. However, data analysis is often performed in a highly manual and subjective manner using very limited image analysis techniques in combination with conventional flow cytometry gating strategies. This approach is not scalable to the hundreds of available image-based features per cell and thus makes use of only a fraction of the spatial and morphometric information. As a result, the quality, reproducibility and rigour of results are limited by the skill, experience and ingenuity of the data analyst. Here, we describe a pipeline using open-source software that leverages the rich information in digital imagery using machine learning algorithms. Compensated and corrected raw image files (.rif) data files from an imaging flow cytometer (the proprietary .cif file format) are imported into the open-source software CellProfiler, where an image processing pipeline identifies cells and subcellular compartments allowing hundreds of morphological features to be measured. This high-dimensional data can then be analysed using cutting-edge machine learning and clustering approaches using "user-friendly" platforms such as CellProfiler Analyst. Researchers can train an automated cell classifier to recognize different cell types, cell cycle phases, drug treatment/control conditions, etc., using supervised machine learning. This workflow should enable the scientific community to leverage the full analytical power of IFC-derived data sets. It will help to reveal otherwise unappreciated populations of cells based on features that may be hidden to the human eye that include subtle measured differences in label free detection channels such as bright-field and dark-field imagery.

  14. Machine Learning and Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  15. Paradigms for machine learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlimmer, Jeffrey C.; Langley, Pat

    1991-01-01

    Five paradigms are described for machine learning: connectionist (neural network) methods, genetic algorithms and classifier systems, empirical methods for inducing rules and decision trees, analytic learning methods, and case-based approaches. Some dimensions are considered along with these paradigms vary in their approach to learning, and the basic methods are reviewed that are used within each framework, together with open research issues. It is argued that the similarities among the paradigms are more important than their differences, and that future work should attempt to bridge the existing boundaries. Finally, some recent developments in the field of machine learning are discussed, and their impact on both research and applications is examined.

  16. Machine learning and statistical methods for the prediction of maximal oxygen uptake: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Abut, Fatih; Akay, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) indicates how many milliliters of oxygen the body can consume in a state of intense exercise per minute. VO2max plays an important role in both sport and medical sciences for different purposes, such as indicating the endurance capacity of athletes or serving as a metric in estimating the disease risk of a person. In general, the direct measurement of VO2max provides the most accurate assessment of aerobic power. However, despite a high level of accuracy, practical limitations associated with the direct measurement of VO2max, such as the requirement of expensive and sophisticated laboratory equipment or trained staff, have led to the development of various regression models for predicting VO2max. Consequently, a lot of studies have been conducted in the last years to predict VO2max of various target audiences, ranging from soccer athletes, nonexpert swimmers, cross-country skiers to healthy-fit adults, teenagers, and children. Numerous prediction models have been developed using different sets of predictor variables and a variety of machine learning and statistical methods, including support vector machine, multilayer perceptron, general regression neural network, and multiple linear regression. The purpose of this study is to give a detailed overview about the data-driven modeling studies for the prediction of VO2max conducted in recent years and to compare the performance of various VO2max prediction models reported in related literature in terms of two well-known metrics, namely, multiple correlation coefficient (R) and standard error of estimate. The survey results reveal that with respect to regression methods used to develop prediction models, support vector machine, in general, shows better performance than other methods, whereas multiple linear regression exhibits the worst performance. PMID:26346869

  17. Machine learning and statistical methods for the prediction of maximal oxygen uptake: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Abut, Fatih; Akay, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) indicates how many milliliters of oxygen the body can consume in a state of intense exercise per minute. VO2max plays an important role in both sport and medical sciences for different purposes, such as indicating the endurance capacity of athletes or serving as a metric in estimating the disease risk of a person. In general, the direct measurement of VO2max provides the most accurate assessment of aerobic power. However, despite a high level of accuracy, practical limitations associated with the direct measurement of VO2max, such as the requirement of expensive and sophisticated laboratory equipment or trained staff, have led to the development of various regression models for predicting VO2max. Consequently, a lot of studies have been conducted in the last years to predict VO2max of various target audiences, ranging from soccer athletes, nonexpert swimmers, cross-country skiers to healthy-fit adults, teenagers, and children. Numerous prediction models have been developed using different sets of predictor variables and a variety of machine learning and statistical methods, including support vector machine, multilayer perceptron, general regression neural network, and multiple linear regression. The purpose of this study is to give a detailed overview about the data-driven modeling studies for the prediction of VO2max conducted in recent years and to compare the performance of various VO2max prediction models reported in related literature in terms of two well-known metrics, namely, multiple correlation coefficient (R) and standard error of estimate. The survey results reveal that with respect to regression methods used to develop prediction models, support vector machine, in general, shows better performance than other methods, whereas multiple linear regression exhibits the worst performance.

  18. Remediating radium contaminated legacy sites: Advances made through machine learning in routine monitoring of "hot" particles.

    PubMed

    Varley, Adam; Tyler, Andrew; Smith, Leslie; Dale, Paul; Davies, Mike

    2015-07-15

    The extensive use of radium during the 20th century for industrial, military and pharmaceutical purposes has led to a large number of contaminated legacy sites across Europe and North America. Sites that pose a high risk to the general public can present expensive and long-term remediation projects. Often the most pragmatic remediation approach is through routine monitoring operating gamma-ray detectors to identify, in real-time, the signal from the most hazardous heterogeneous contamination (hot particles); thus facilitating their removal and safe disposal. However, current detection systems do not fully utilise all spectral information resulting in low detection rates and ultimately an increased risk to the human health. The aim of this study was to establish an optimised detector-algorithm combination. To achieve this, field data was collected using two handheld detectors (sodium iodide and lanthanum bromide) and a number of Monte Carlo simulated hot particles were randomly injected into the field data. This allowed for the detection rate of conventional deterministic (gross counts) and machine learning (neural networks and support vector machines) algorithms to be assessed. The results demonstrated that a Neural Network operated on a sodium iodide detector provided the best detection capability. Compared to deterministic approaches, this optimised detection system could detect a hot particle on average 10cm deeper into the soil column or with half of the activity at the same depth. It was also found that noise presented by internal contamination restricted lanthanum bromide for this application.

  19. Probabilistic machine learning and artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-05-28

    How can a machine learn from experience? Probabilistic modelling provides a framework for understanding what learning is, and has therefore emerged as one of the principal theoretical and practical approaches for designing machines that learn from data acquired through experience. The probabilistic framework, which describes how to represent and manipulate uncertainty about models and predictions, has a central role in scientific data analysis, machine learning, robotics, cognitive science and artificial intelligence. This Review provides an introduction to this framework, and discusses some of the state-of-the-art advances in the field, namely, probabilistic programming, Bayesian optimization, data compression and automatic model discovery.

  20. Probabilistic machine learning and artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-05-01

    How can a machine learn from experience? Probabilistic modelling provides a framework for understanding what learning is, and has therefore emerged as one of the principal theoretical and practical approaches for designing machines that learn from data acquired through experience. The probabilistic framework, which describes how to represent and manipulate uncertainty about models and predictions, has a central role in scientific data analysis, machine learning, robotics, cognitive science and artificial intelligence. This Review provides an introduction to this framework, and discusses some of the state-of-the-art advances in the field, namely, probabilistic programming, Bayesian optimization, data compression and automatic model discovery.

  1. Approximate learning algorithm in Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Muneki; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2009-11-01

    Boltzmann machines can be regarded as Markov random fields. For binary cases, they are equivalent to the Ising spin model in statistical mechanics. Learning systems in Boltzmann machines are one of the NP-hard problems. Thus, in general we have to use approximate methods to construct practical learning algorithms in this context. In this letter, we propose new and practical learning algorithms for Boltzmann machines by using the belief propagation algorithm and the linear response approximation, which are often referred as advanced mean field methods. Finally, we show the validity of our algorithm using numerical experiments.

  2. Development of Machine Learning Tools in ROOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleyzer, S. V.; Moneta, L.; Zapata, Omar A.

    2016-10-01

    ROOT is a framework for large-scale data analysis that provides basic and advanced statistical methods used by the LHC experiments. These include machine learning algorithms from the ROOT-integrated Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis (TMVA). We present several recent developments in TMVA, including a new modular design, new algorithms for variable importance and cross-validation, interfaces to other machine-learning software packages and integration of TMVA with Jupyter, making it accessible with a browser.

  3. Quantum-Enhanced Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Dunjko, Vedran; Taylor, Jacob M; Briegel, Hans J

    2016-09-23

    The emerging field of quantum machine learning has the potential to substantially aid in the problems and scope of artificial intelligence. This is only enhanced by recent successes in the field of classical machine learning. In this work we propose an approach for the systematic treatment of machine learning, from the perspective of quantum information. Our approach is general and covers all three main branches of machine learning: supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning. While quantum improvements in supervised and unsupervised learning have been reported, reinforcement learning has received much less attention. Within our approach, we tackle the problem of quantum enhancements in reinforcement learning as well, and propose a systematic scheme for providing improvements. As an example, we show that quadratic improvements in learning efficiency, and exponential improvements in performance over limited time periods, can be obtained for a broad class of learning problems.

  4. Quantum-Enhanced Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Taylor, Jacob M.; Briegel, Hans J.

    2016-09-01

    The emerging field of quantum machine learning has the potential to substantially aid in the problems and scope of artificial intelligence. This is only enhanced by recent successes in the field of classical machine learning. In this work we propose an approach for the systematic treatment of machine learning, from the perspective of quantum information. Our approach is general and covers all three main branches of machine learning: supervised, unsupervised, and reinforcement learning. While quantum improvements in supervised and unsupervised learning have been reported, reinforcement learning has received much less attention. Within our approach, we tackle the problem of quantum enhancements in reinforcement learning as well, and propose a systematic scheme for providing improvements. As an example, we show that quadratic improvements in learning efficiency, and exponential improvements in performance over limited time periods, can be obtained for a broad class of learning problems.

  5. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudenz, Kristen L.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. This approach consists of two quantum phases, with some amount of classical preprocessing to set up the quantum problems. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. All quantum processing is strictly limited to two-qubit interactions so as to ensure physical feasibility. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation, with a specific example of the learning phase applied to a problem of interest in flight control systems. Beyond this example, the algorithm can be used to attack a broad class of anomaly detection problems.

  6. Stacked Extreme Learning Machines.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongming; Huang, Guang-Bin; Lin, Zhiping; Wang, Han; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2015-09-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) has recently attracted many researchers' interest due to its very fast learning speed, good generalization ability, and ease of implementation. It provides a unified solution that can be used directly to solve regression, binary, and multiclass classification problems. In this paper, we propose a stacked ELMs (S-ELMs) that is specially designed for solving large and complex data problems. The S-ELMs divides a single large ELM network into multiple stacked small ELMs which are serially connected. The S-ELMs can approximate a very large ELM network with small memory requirement. To further improve the testing accuracy on big data problems, the ELM autoencoder can be implemented during each iteration of the S-ELMs algorithm. The simulation results show that the S-ELMs even with random hidden nodes can achieve similar testing accuracy to support vector machine (SVM) while having low memory requirements. With the help of ELM autoencoder, the S-ELMs can achieve much better testing accuracy than SVM and slightly better accuracy than deep belief network (DBN) with much faster training speed.

  7. Machine Learning for Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Bradley J; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Akkus, Zeynettin; Kline, Timothy L

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning is a technique for recognizing patterns that can be applied to medical images. Although it is a powerful tool that can help in rendering medical diagnoses, it can be misapplied. Machine learning typically begins with the machine learning algorithm system computing the image features that are believed to be of importance in making the prediction or diagnosis of interest. The machine learning algorithm system then identifies the best combination of these image features for classifying the image or computing some metric for the given image region. There are several methods that can be used, each with different strengths and weaknesses. There are open-source versions of most of these machine learning methods that make them easy to try and apply to images. Several metrics for measuring the performance of an algorithm exist; however, one must be aware of the possible associated pitfalls that can result in misleading metrics. More recently, deep learning has started to be used; this method has the benefit that it does not require image feature identification and calculation as a first step; rather, features are identified as part of the learning process. Machine learning has been used in medical imaging and will have a greater influence in the future. Those working in medical imaging must be aware of how machine learning works. (©)RSNA, 2017.

  8. Machine learning: An artificial intelligence approach. Vol. II

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, R.S.; Carbonell, J.G.; Mitchell, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book reflects the expansion of machine learning research through presentation of recent advances in the field. The book provides an account of current research directions. Major topics covered include the following: learning concepts and rules from examples; cognitive aspects of learning; learning by analogy; learning by observation and discovery; and an exploration of general aspects of learning.

  9. Learning thermodynamics with Boltzmann machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torlai, Giacomo; Melko, Roger G.

    2016-10-01

    A Boltzmann machine is a stochastic neural network that has been extensively used in the layers of deep architectures for modern machine learning applications. In this paper, we develop a Boltzmann machine that is capable of modeling thermodynamic observables for physical systems in thermal equilibrium. Through unsupervised learning, we train the Boltzmann machine on data sets constructed with spin configurations importance sampled from the partition function of an Ising Hamiltonian at different temperatures using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. The trained Boltzmann machine is then used to generate spin states, for which we compare thermodynamic observables to those computed by direct MC sampling. We demonstrate that the Boltzmann machine can faithfully reproduce the observables of the physical system. Further, we observe that the number of neurons required to obtain accurate results increases as the system is brought close to criticality.

  10. Model-based machine learning.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Christopher M

    2013-02-13

    Several decades of research in the field of machine learning have resulted in a multitude of different algorithms for solving a broad range of problems. To tackle a new application, a researcher typically tries to map their problem onto one of these existing methods, often influenced by their familiarity with specific algorithms and by the availability of corresponding software implementations. In this study, we describe an alternative methodology for applying machine learning, in which a bespoke solution is formulated for each new application. The solution is expressed through a compact modelling language, and the corresponding custom machine learning code is then generated automatically. This model-based approach offers several major advantages, including the opportunity to create highly tailored models for specific scenarios, as well as rapid prototyping and comparison of a range of alternative models. Furthermore, newcomers to the field of machine learning do not have to learn about the huge range of traditional methods, but instead can focus their attention on understanding a single modelling environment. In this study, we show how probabilistic graphical models, coupled with efficient inference algorithms, provide a very flexible foundation for model-based machine learning, and we outline a large-scale commercial application of this framework involving tens of millions of users. We also describe the concept of probabilistic programming as a powerful software environment for model-based machine learning, and we discuss a specific probabilistic programming language called Infer.NET, which has been widely used in practical applications.

  11. Model-based machine learning

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Several decades of research in the field of machine learning have resulted in a multitude of different algorithms for solving a broad range of problems. To tackle a new application, a researcher typically tries to map their problem onto one of these existing methods, often influenced by their familiarity with specific algorithms and by the availability of corresponding software implementations. In this study, we describe an alternative methodology for applying machine learning, in which a bespoke solution is formulated for each new application. The solution is expressed through a compact modelling language, and the corresponding custom machine learning code is then generated automatically. This model-based approach offers several major advantages, including the opportunity to create highly tailored models for specific scenarios, as well as rapid prototyping and comparison of a range of alternative models. Furthermore, newcomers to the field of machine learning do not have to learn about the huge range of traditional methods, but instead can focus their attention on understanding a single modelling environment. In this study, we show how probabilistic graphical models, coupled with efficient inference algorithms, provide a very flexible foundation for model-based machine learning, and we outline a large-scale commercial application of this framework involving tens of millions of users. We also describe the concept of probabilistic programming as a powerful software environment for model-based machine learning, and we discuss a specific probabilistic programming language called Infer.NET, which has been widely used in practical applications. PMID:23277612

  12. Web Mining: Machine Learning for Web Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Chau, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Presents an overview of machine learning research and reviews methods used for evaluating machine learning systems. Ways that machine-learning algorithms were used in traditional information retrieval systems in the "pre-Web" era are described, and the field of Web mining and how machine learning has been used in different Web mining…

  13. Advanced Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hijon-Neira, Raquel, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The education industry has obviously been influenced by the Internet revolution. Teaching and learning methods have changed significantly since the coming of the Web and it is very likely they will keep evolving many years to come thanks to it. A good example of this changing reality is the spectacular development of e-Learning. In a more…

  14. Machine Shop. Student Learning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains eight modules for completing a course in machine shop. It is designed especially for use in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities and resources, information sheets, student self-check with answer key,…

  15. Game-powered machine learning.

    PubMed

    Barrington, Luke; Turnbull, Douglas; Lanckriet, Gert

    2012-04-24

    Searching for relevant content in a massive amount of multimedia information is facilitated by accurately annotating each image, video, or song with a large number of relevant semantic keywords, or tags. We introduce game-powered machine learning, an integrated approach to annotating multimedia content that combines the effectiveness of human computation, through online games, with the scalability of machine learning. We investigate this framework for labeling music. First, a socially-oriented music annotation game called Herd It collects reliable music annotations based on the "wisdom of the crowds." Second, these annotated examples are used to train a supervised machine learning system. Third, the machine learning system actively directs the annotation games to collect new data that will most benefit future model iterations. Once trained, the system can automatically annotate a corpus of music much larger than what could be labeled using human computation alone. Automatically annotated songs can be retrieved based on their semantic relevance to text-based queries (e.g., "funky jazz with saxophone," "spooky electronica," etc.). Based on the results presented in this paper, we find that actively coupling annotation games with machine learning provides a reliable and scalable approach to making searchable massive amounts of multimedia data.

  16. Game-powered machine learning

    PubMed Central

    Barrington, Luke; Turnbull, Douglas; Lanckriet, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Searching for relevant content in a massive amount of multimedia information is facilitated by accurately annotating each image, video, or song with a large number of relevant semantic keywords, or tags. We introduce game-powered machine learning, an integrated approach to annotating multimedia content that combines the effectiveness of human computation, through online games, with the scalability of machine learning. We investigate this framework for labeling music. First, a socially-oriented music annotation game called Herd It collects reliable music annotations based on the “wisdom of the crowds.” Second, these annotated examples are used to train a supervised machine learning system. Third, the machine learning system actively directs the annotation games to collect new data that will most benefit future model iterations. Once trained, the system can automatically annotate a corpus of music much larger than what could be labeled using human computation alone. Automatically annotated songs can be retrieved based on their semantic relevance to text-based queries (e.g., “funky jazz with saxophone,” “spooky electronica,” etc.). Based on the results presented in this paper, we find that actively coupling annotation games with machine learning provides a reliable and scalable approach to making searchable massive amounts of multimedia data. PMID:22460786

  17. Energy landscapes for machine learning.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Andrew J; Das, Ritankar; Martiniani, Stefano; Mehta, Dhagash; Sagun, Levent; Stevenson, Jacob D; Wales, David J

    2017-04-03

    Machine learning techniques are being increasingly used as flexible non-linear fitting and prediction tools in the physical sciences. Fitting functions that exhibit multiple solutions as local minima can be analysed in terms of the corresponding machine learning landscape. Methods to explore and visualise molecular potential energy landscapes can be applied to these machine learning landscapes to gain new insight into the solution space involved in training and the nature of the corresponding predictions. In particular, we can define quantities analogous to molecular structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics, and relate these emergent properties to the structure of the underlying landscape. This Perspective aims to describe these analogies with examples from recent applications, and suggest avenues for new interdisciplinary research.

  18. Machine learning methods in chemoinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, John B O

    2014-01-01

    Machine learning algorithms are generally developed in computer science or adjacent disciplines and find their way into chemical modeling by a process of diffusion. Though particular machine learning methods are popular in chemoinformatics and quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSAR), many others exist in the technical literature. This discussion is methods-based and focused on some algorithms that chemoinformatics researchers frequently use. It makes no claim to be exhaustive. We concentrate on methods for supervised learning, predicting the unknown property values of a test set of instances, usually molecules, based on the known values for a training set. Particularly relevant approaches include Artificial Neural Networks, Random Forest, Support Vector Machine, k-Nearest Neighbors and naïve Bayes classifiers. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2014, 4:468–481. How to cite this article: WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2014, 4:468–481. doi:10.1002/wcms.1183 PMID:25285160

  19. A Machine Learning System for Recognizing Subclasses (Demo)

    SciTech Connect

    Vatsavai, Raju

    2012-01-01

    Thematic information extraction from remote sensing images is a complex task. In this demonstration, we present *Miner machine learning system. In particular, we demonstrate an advanced subclass recognition algorithm that is specifically designed to extract finer classes from aggregate classes.

  20. Photonic Neurocomputers And Learning Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Nabil H.

    1990-05-01

    The study of complex multidimensional nonlinear dynamical systems and the modeling and emulation of cognitive brain-like processing of sensory information (neural network research), including the study of chaos and its role in such systems would benefit immensely from the development of a new generation of programmable analog computers capable of carrying out collective, nonlinear and iterative computations at very high speed. The massive interconnectivity and nonlinearity needed in such analog computing structures indicate that a mix of optics and electronics mediated by judicial choice of device physics offer benefits for realizing networks with the following desirable properties: (a) large scale nets, i.e. nets with high number of decision making elements (neurons), (b) modifiable structure, i.e. ability to partition the net into any desired number of layers of prescribed size (number of neurons per layer) with any prescribed pattern of communications between them (e.g. feed forward or feedback (recurrent)), (c) programmable and/or adaptive connectivity weights between the neurons for self-organization and learning, (d) both synchroneous or asynchroneous update rules be possible, (e) high speed update i.e. neurons with lisec response time to enable rapid iteration and convergence, (f) can be used in the study and evaluation of a variety of adaptive learning algorithms, (g) can be used in rapid solution by fast simulated annealing of complex optimization problems of the kind encountered in adaptive learning, pattern recognition, and image processing. The aim of this paper is to describe recent efforts and progress made towards achieving these desirable attributes in analog photonic (optoelectronic and/or electron optical) hardware that utilizes primarily incoherent light. A specific example, hardware implementation of a stochastic Boltzmann learning machine, is used as vehicle for identifying generic issues and clarify research and development areas for further

  1. Representational issues in machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Liepins, G.E.; Hilliard, M.R.

    1986-10-25

    Classifier systems are numeric machine learning systems. They are machine counterparts to the natural genetic process and learn by reproduction, crossover, and mutation. Much publicity has been attended to their ability to demonstrate significant learning from a random start and without human intervention. Less well publicized is the considerable care that must be given to the choices of parameter settings and representation. Without the proper ''nurturing environment'' genetic algorithms are apt to learn very little. This infusion of human intelligence is often discounted, but the choice of appropriate representation forms the core of much of the current genetic algorithm research. This paper will address some of the representational issues from the perspective of two current experiments, one with scheduling and the other with a simulated robot. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Advanced analytical methodologies for measuring healthy ageing and its determinants, using factor analysis and machine learning techniques: the ATHLOS project.

    PubMed

    Félix Caballero, Francisco; Soulis, George; Engchuan, Worrawat; Sánchez-Niubó, Albert; Arndt, Holger; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis; Haro, Josep Maria; Chatterji, Somnath; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

    2017-03-10

    A most challenging task for scientists that are involved in the study of ageing is the development of a measure to quantify health status across populations and over time. In the present study, a Bayesian multilevel Item Response Theory approach is used to create a health score that can be compared across different waves in a longitudinal study, using anchor items and items that vary across waves. The same approach can be applied to compare health scores across different longitudinal studies, using items that vary across studies. Data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) are employed. Mixed-effects multilevel regression and Machine Learning methods were used to identify relationships between socio-demographics and the health score created. The metric of health was created for 17,886 subjects (54.6% of women) participating in at least one of the first six ELSA waves and correlated well with already known conditions that affect health. Future efforts will implement this approach in a harmonised data set comprising several longitudinal studies of ageing. This will enable valid comparisons between clinical and community dwelling populations and help to generate norms that could be useful in day-to-day clinical practice.

  3. Advanced analytical methodologies for measuring healthy ageing and its determinants, using factor analysis and machine learning techniques: the ATHLOS project

    PubMed Central

    Félix Caballero, Francisco; Soulis, George; Engchuan, Worrawat; Sánchez-Niubó, Albert; Arndt, Holger; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis; Haro, Josep Maria; Chatterji, Somnath; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.

    2017-01-01

    A most challenging task for scientists that are involved in the study of ageing is the development of a measure to quantify health status across populations and over time. In the present study, a Bayesian multilevel Item Response Theory approach is used to create a health score that can be compared across different waves in a longitudinal study, using anchor items and items that vary across waves. The same approach can be applied to compare health scores across different longitudinal studies, using items that vary across studies. Data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) are employed. Mixed-effects multilevel regression and Machine Learning methods were used to identify relationships between socio-demographics and the health score created. The metric of health was created for 17,886 subjects (54.6% of women) participating in at least one of the first six ELSA waves and correlated well with already known conditions that affect health. Future efforts will implement this approach in a harmonised data set comprising several longitudinal studies of ageing. This will enable valid comparisons between clinical and community dwelling populations and help to generate norms that could be useful in day-to-day clinical practice. PMID:28281663

  4. Machine learning phases of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasquilla, Juan; Stoudenmire, Miles; Melko, Roger

    We show how the technology that allows automatic teller machines read hand-written digits in cheques can be used to encode and recognize phases of matter and phase transitions in many-body systems. In particular, we analyze the (quasi-)order-disorder transitions in the classical Ising and XY models. Furthermore, we successfully use machine learning to study classical Z2 gauge theories that have important technological application in the coming wave of quantum information technologies and whose phase transitions have no conventional order parameter.

  5. Learning Machine Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavesson, N.

    2010-01-01

    This correspondence reports on a case study conducted in the Master's-level Machine Learning (ML) course at Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden. The students participated in a self-assessment test and a diagnostic test of prerequisite subjects, and their results on these tests are correlated with their achievement of the course's learning…

  6. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  7. Toward Harnessing User Feedback For Machine Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-02

    feedback and to understand what kinds of feedback users could give . Users were shown explanations of machine learning predictions and asked to provide... learning algorithm. The results show that user feedback has the potential to significantly improve machine learning systems, but that learning ...machine learning predictions and asked to provide feedback to improve the predictions. We found that users had no difficulty providing generous amounts

  8. The Higgs Machine Learning Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam-Bourdarios, C.; Cowan, G.; Germain-Renaud, C.; Guyon, I.; Kégl, B.; Rousseau, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Higgs Machine Learning Challenge was an open data analysis competition that took place between May and September 2014. Samples of simulated data from the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC corresponding to signal events with Higgs bosons decaying to τ+τ- together with background events were made available to the public through the website of the data science organization Kaggle (kaggle.com). Participants attempted to identify the search region in a space of 30 kinematic variables that would maximize the expected discovery significance of the signal process. One of the primary goals of the Challenge was to promote communication of new ideas between the Machine Learning (ML) and HEP communities. In this regard it was a resounding success, with almost 2,000 participants from HEP, ML and other areas. The process of understanding and integrating the new ideas, particularly from ML into HEP, is currently underway.

  9. Galaxy Classification using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Lucas; Schawinski, Kevin; Brandt, Ben-Elias; widmer, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    We present our current research into the use of machine learning to classify galaxy imaging data with various convolutional neural network configurations in TensorFlow. We are investigating how five-band Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data can be used to train on physical properties such as redshift, star formation rate, mass and morphology. We also investigate the performance of artificially redshifted images in recovering physical properties as image quality degrades.

  10. Finding New Perovskite Halides via Machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-01

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach towards rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning) via building a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 181 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. The trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.

  11. Finding new perovskite halides via machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-26

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach toward rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning, henceforth referred to as ML) via building a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br, or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 185 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor, and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. As a result, the trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.

  12. Finding new perovskite halides via machine learning

    DOE PAGES

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; ...

    2016-04-26

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach toward rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning, henceforth referred to as ML) via building a support vectormore » machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br, or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 185 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor, and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. As a result, the trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.« less

  13. Machine learning for medical images analysis.

    PubMed

    Criminisi, A

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the application of machine learning for the analysis of medical images. Specifically: (i) We show how a special type of learning models can be thought of as automatically optimized, hierarchically-structured, rule-based algorithms, and (ii) We discuss how the issue of collecting large labelled datasets applies to both conventional algorithms as well as machine learning techniques. The size of the training database is a function of model complexity rather than a characteristic of machine learning methods.

  14. Application of advanced machine learning methods on resting-state fMRI network for identification of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khazaee, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Ata; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas

    2016-09-01

    The study of brain networks by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) is a promising method for identifying patients with dementia from healthy controls (HC). Using graph theory, different aspects of the brain network can be efficiently characterized by calculating measures of integration and segregation. In this study, we combined a graph theoretical approach with advanced machine learning methods to study the brain network in 89 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 34 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 45 age-matched HC. The rs-fMRI connectivity matrix was constructed using a brain parcellation based on a 264 putative functional areas. Using the optimal features extracted from the graph measures, we were able to accurately classify three groups (i.e., HC, MCI, and AD) with accuracy of 88.4 %. We also investigated performance of our proposed method for a binary classification of a group (e.g., MCI) from two other groups (e.g., HC and AD). The classification accuracies for identifying HC from AD and MCI, AD from HC and MCI, and MCI from HC and AD, were 87.3, 97.5, and 72.0 %, respectively. In addition, results based on the parcellation of 264 regions were compared to that of the automated anatomical labeling atlas (AAL), consisted of 90 regions. The accuracy of classification of three groups using AAL was degraded to 83.2 %. Our results show that combining the graph measures with the machine learning approach, on the basis of the rs-fMRI connectivity analysis, may assist in diagnosis of AD and MCI.

  15. Application of advanced materials to rotating machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triner, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    In discussing the application of advanced materials to rotating machinery, the following topics are covered: the torque speed characteristics of ac and dc machines, motor and transformer losses, the factors affecting core loss in motors, advanced magnetic materials and conductors, and design tradeoffs for samarium cobalt motors.

  16. Preliminary study on wilcoxon learning machines.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, J G; Lin, Y L; Jeng, J H

    2008-02-01

    As is well known in statistics, the resulting linear regressors by using the rank-based Wilcoxon approach to linear regression problems are usually robust against (or insensitive to) outliers. This motivates us to introduce in this paper the Wilcoxon approach to the area of machine learning. Specifically, we investigate four new learning machines, namely Wilcoxon neural network (WNN), Wilcoxon generalized radial basis function network (WGRBFN), Wilcoxon fuzzy neural network (WFNN), and kernel-based Wilcoxon regressor (KWR). These provide alternative learning machines when faced with general nonlinear learning problems. Simple weights updating rules based on gradient descent will be derived. Some numerical examples will be provided to compare the robustness against outliers for various learning machines. Simulation results show that the Wilcoxon learning machines proposed in this paper have good robustness against outliers. We firmly believe that the Wilcoxon approach will provide a promising methodology for many machine learning problems.

  17. Machine learning applications in cell image analysis.

    PubMed

    Kan, Andrey

    2017-04-04

    Machine learning (ML) refers to a set of automatic pattern recognition methods that have been successfully applied across various problem domains, including biomedical image analysis. This review focuses on ML applications for image analysis in light microscopy experiments with typical tasks of segmenting and tracking individual cells, and modelling of reconstructed lineage trees. After describing a typical image analysis pipeline and highlighting challenges of automatic analysis (for example, variability in cell morphology, tracking in presence of clutters) this review gives a brief historical outlook of ML, followed by basic concepts and definitions required for understanding examples. This article then presents several example applications at various image processing stages, including the use of supervised learning methods for improving cell segmentation, and the application of active learning for tracking. The review concludes with remarks on parameter setting and future directions.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 4 April 2017; doi:10.1038/icb.2017.16.

  18. Introducing Machine Learning Concepts with WEKA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tony C; Frank, Eibe

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to data mining with machine learning. It gives an overview of various types of machine learning, along with some examples. It explains how to download, install, and run the WEKA data mining toolkit on a simple data set, then proceeds to explain how one might approach a bioinformatics problem. Finally, it includes a brief summary of machine learning algorithms for other types of data mining problems, and provides suggestions about where to find additional information.

  19. Machine learning in genetics and genomics

    PubMed Central

    Libbrecht, Maxwell W.; Noble, William Stafford

    2016-01-01

    The field of machine learning promises to enable computers to assist humans in making sense of large, complex data sets. In this review, we outline some of the main applications of machine learning to genetic and genomic data. In the process, we identify some recurrent challenges associated with this type of analysis and provide general guidelines to assist in the practical application of machine learning to real genetic and genomic data. PMID:25948244

  20. Quantum Machine Learning over Infinite Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Pooser, Raphael; Siopsis, George; Weedbrook, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Machine learning is a fascinating and exciting field within computer science. Recently, this excitement has been transferred to the quantum information realm. Currently, all proposals for the quantum version of machine learning utilize the finite-dimensional substrate of discrete variables. Here we generalize quantum machine learning to the more complex, but still remarkably practical, infinite-dimensional systems. We present the critical subroutines of quantum machine learning algorithms for an all-photonic continuous-variable quantum computer that can lead to exponential speedups in situations where classical algorithms scale polynomially. Finally, we also map out an experimental implementation which can be used as a blueprint for future photonic demonstrations.

  1. Graph Embedded Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Iosifidis, Alexandros; Tefas, Anastasios; Pitas, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel extension of the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm for single-hidden layer feedforward neural network training that is able to incorporate subspace learning (SL) criteria on the optimization process followed for the calculation of the network's output weights. The proposed graph embedded ELM (GEELM) algorithm is able to naturally exploit both intrinsic and penalty SL criteria that have been (or will be) designed under the graph embedding framework. In addition, we extend the proposed GEELM algorithm in order to be able to exploit SL criteria in arbitrary (even infinite) dimensional ELM spaces. We evaluate the proposed approach on eight standard classification problems and nine publicly available datasets designed for three problems related to human behavior analysis, i.e., the recognition of human face, facial expression, and activity. Experimental results denote the effectiveness of the proposed approach, since it outperforms other ELM-based classification schemes in all the cases.

  2. Applying Machine Learning to Star Cluster Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorenko, Kristina; Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Catalogs describing populations of star clusters are essential in investigating a range of important issues, from star formation to galaxy evolution. Star cluster catalogs are typically created in a two-step process: in the first step, a catalog of sources is automatically produced; in the second step, each of the extracted sources is visually inspected by 3-to-5 human classifiers and assigned a category. Classification by humans is labor-intensive and time consuming, thus it creates a bottleneck, and substantially slows down progress in star cluster research.We seek to automate the process of labeling star clusters (the second step) through applying supervised machine learning techniques. This will provide a fast, objective, and reproducible classification. Our data is HST (WFC3 and ACS) images of galaxies in the distance range of 3.5-12 Mpc, with a few thousand star clusters already classified by humans as a part of the LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) project. The classification is based on 4 labels (Class 1 - symmetric, compact cluster; Class 2 - concentrated object with some degree of asymmetry; Class 3 - multiple peak system, diffuse; and Class 4 - spurious detection). We start by looking at basic machine learning methods such as decision trees. We then proceed to evaluate performance of more advanced techniques, focusing on convolutional neural networks and other Deep Learning methods. We analyze the results, and suggest several directions for further improvement.

  3. Using Machine Learning in Adversarial Environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Warren Leon Davis

    2016-02-01

    Intrusion/anomaly detection systems are among the first lines of cyber defense. Commonly, they either use signatures or machine learning (ML) to identify threats, but fail to account for sophisticated attackers trying to circumvent them. We propose to embed machine learning within a game theoretic framework that performs adversarial modeling, develops methods for optimizing operational response based on ML, and integrates the resulting optimization codebase into the existing ML infrastructure developed by the Hybrid LDRD. Our approach addresses three key shortcomings of ML in adversarial settings: 1) resulting classifiers are typically deterministic and, therefore, easy to reverse engineer; 2) ML approaches only address the prediction problem, but do not prescribe how one should operationalize predictions, nor account for operational costs and constraints; and 3) ML approaches do not model attackers’ response and can be circumvented by sophisticated adversaries. The principal novelty of our approach is to construct an optimization framework that blends ML, operational considerations, and a model predicting attackers reaction, with the goal of computing optimal moving target defense. One important challenge is to construct a realistic model of an adversary that is tractable, yet realistic. We aim to advance the science of attacker modeling by considering game-theoretic methods, and by engaging experimental subjects with red teaming experience in trying to actively circumvent an intrusion detection system, and learning a predictive model of such circumvention activities. In addition, we will generate metrics to test that a particular model of an adversary is consistent with available data.

  4. Advanced mean-field theory of the restricted Boltzmann machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haiping; Toyoizumi, Taro

    2015-05-01

    Learning in restricted Boltzmann machine is typically hard due to the computation of gradients of log-likelihood function. To describe the network state statistics of the restricted Boltzmann machine, we develop an advanced mean-field theory based on the Bethe approximation. Our theory provides an efficient message-passing-based method that evaluates not only the partition function (free energy) but also its gradients without requiring statistical sampling. The results are compared with those obtained by the computationally expensive sampling-based method.

  5. Machine learning in motion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Renjeng; Kermiche, Noureddine

    1989-01-01

    The existing methodologies for robot programming originate primarily from robotic applications to manufacturing, where uncertainties of the robots and their task environment may be minimized by repeated off-line modeling and identification. In space application of robots, however, a higher degree of automation is required for robot programming because of the desire of minimizing the human intervention. We discuss a new paradigm of robotic programming which is based on the concept of machine learning. The goal is to let robots practice tasks by themselves and the operational data are used to automatically improve their motion performance. The underlying mathematical problem is to solve the problem of dynamical inverse by iterative methods. One of the key questions is how to ensure the convergence of the iterative process. There have been a few small steps taken into this important approach to robot programming. We give a representative result on the convergence problem.

  6. Defect Classification Using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, A; Kegelmeyer, L; Liao, Z M; Abdulla, G; Cross, D; Kegelmeyer, W P; Raviza, F; Carr, C W

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced damage growth on the surface of fused silica optics has been extensively studied and has been found to depend on a number of factors including fluence and the surface on which the damage site resides. It has been demonstrated that damage sites as small as a few tens of microns can be detected and tracked on optics installed a fusion-class laser, however, determining the surface of an optic on which a damage site resides in situ can be a significant challenge. In this work demonstrate that a machine-learning algorithm can successfully predict the surface location of the damage site using an expanded set of characteristics for each damage site, some of which are not historically associated with growth rate.

  7. Adaptive Learning Systems: Beyond Teaching Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kara, Nuri; Sevim, Nese

    2013-01-01

    Since 1950s, teaching machines have changed a lot. Today, we have different ideas about how people learn, what instructor should do to help students during their learning process. We have adaptive learning technologies that can create much more student oriented learning environments. The purpose of this article is to present these changes and its…

  8. Machine learning: An artificial intelligence approach

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, R.S.; Carbonell, J.G.; Mitchell, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    This book contains tutorial overviews and research papers on contemporary trends in the area of machine learning viewed from an AI perspective. Research directions covered include: learning from examples, modeling human learning strategies, knowledge acquisition for expert systems, learning heuristics, discovery systems, and conceptual data analysis.

  9. Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning (NLP/ML): Applying Advances in Biomedicine to the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, R.; Myers, S.; Palmer, M.; Jenkins, C. J.; Thessen, A.; Martin, J.

    2015-12-01

    Semantics underlie many of the tools and services available from and on the web. From improving search results to enabling data mashups and other forms of interoperability, semantic technologies have proven themselves. But creating semantic resources, especially re-usable semantic resources, is extremely time consuming and labor intensive. Why? Because it is not just a matter of technology but also of obtaining rough consensus if not full agreement amongst community members on the meaning and order of things. One way to develop these resources in a more automated way would be to use NLP/ML techniques to extract the required resources from large corpora of subject-specific text such as peer-reviewed papers where presumably a rough consensus has been achieved at least about the basics of the particular discipline involved. While not generally applied to Earth Sciences, considerable resources have been spent in other fields such as medicine on these types of techniques with some success. The NSF-funded ClearEarth project is applying the techniques developed for biomedicine to the cryosphere, geology, and biology in order to spur faster development of the semantic resources needed in these fields. The first area being addressed by the project is the cryosphere, specifically sea ice nomenclature where an existing set of sea ice ontologies are being used as the "Gold Standard" against which to test and validate the NLP/ML techniques. The processes being used, lessons learned and early results will be described.

  10. Accurate Identification of Cancerlectins through Hybrid Machine Learning Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Cancerlectins are cancer-related proteins that function as lectins. They have been identified through computational identification techniques, but these techniques have sometimes failed to identify proteins because of sequence diversity among the cancerlectins. Advanced machine learning identification methods, such as support vector machine and basic sequence features (n-gram), have also been used to identify cancerlectins. In this study, various protein fingerprint features and advanced classifiers, including ensemble learning techniques, were utilized to identify this group of proteins. We improved the prediction accuracy of the original feature extraction methods and classification algorithms by more than 10% on average. Our work provides a basis for the computational identification of cancerlectins and reveals the power of hybrid machine learning techniques in computational proteomics. PMID:27478823

  11. Advanced Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubal, Robert C.; Helms, Robert F.; Triplett, Suzanne E.

    Leading-edge technologies, integrated with emerging educational methodologies, make the Advanced Learning Environment (ALE) model cost effective and efficient for learning. The ALE integrates virtual reality and other enabling technologies such as natural language processing, animation, video, courseware, sound, projection, CD-ROM, and distance…

  12. Precision machining of advanced materials with waterjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. T.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in abrasive waterjet technology have elevated to the state that it often competes on equal footing with lasers and EDM for precision machining. Under the support of a National Science Foundation SBIR Phase II grant, OMAX has developed and commercialized micro abrasive water technology that is incorporated into a MicroMAX® JetMa- chining® Center. Waterjet technology, combined both abrasive waterjet and micro abrasive waterjet technology, is capable of machining most materials from macro to micro scales for a wide range of part size and thickness. Waterjet technology has technological and manufacturing merits that cannot be matched by most existing tools. As a cold cutting tool that creates no heat-affected zone, for example, waterjet cuts much faster than wire EDM and laser when measures to minimize a heat-affected zone are taken into account. In addition, waterjet is material independent; it cuts materials that cannot be cut or are difficult to cut otherwise. The versatility of waterjet has also demonstrated machining simulated nanomaterials with large gradients of material properties from metal, nonmetal, to anything in between. This paper presents waterjet-machined samples made of a wide range of advanced materials from macro to micro scales.

  13. Man-machine interface requirements - advanced technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, R. W.; Wiener, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Research issues and areas are identified where increased understanding of the human operator and the interaction between the operator and the avionics could lead to improvements in the performance of current and proposed helicopters. Both current and advanced helicopter systems and avionics are considered. Areas critical to man-machine interface requirements include: (1) artificial intelligence; (2) visual displays; (3) voice technology; (4) cockpit integration; and (5) pilot work loads and performance.

  14. Machine Translation-Assisted Language Learning: Writing for Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Ignacio; Pena, Maria Isabel

    2011-01-01

    The few studies that deal with machine translation (MT) as a language learning tool focus on its use by advanced learners, never by beginners. Yet, freely available MT engines (i.e. Google Translate) and MT-related web initiatives (i.e. Gabble-on.com) position themselves to cater precisely to the needs of learners with a limited command of a…

  15. Machine Learning Techniques in Clinical Vision Sciences.

    PubMed

    Caixinha, Miguel; Nunes, Sandrina

    2017-01-01

    This review presents and discusses the contribution of machine learning techniques for diagnosis and disease monitoring in the context of clinical vision science. Many ocular diseases leading to blindness can be halted or delayed when detected and treated at its earliest stages. With the recent developments in diagnostic devices, imaging and genomics, new sources of data for early disease detection and patients' management are now available. Machine learning techniques emerged in the biomedical sciences as clinical decision-support techniques to improve sensitivity and specificity of disease detection and monitoring, increasing objectively the clinical decision-making process. This manuscript presents a review in multimodal ocular disease diagnosis and monitoring based on machine learning approaches. In the first section, the technical issues related to the different machine learning approaches will be present. Machine learning techniques are used to automatically recognize complex patterns in a given dataset. These techniques allows creating homogeneous groups (unsupervised learning), or creating a classifier predicting group membership of new cases (supervised learning), when a group label is available for each case. To ensure a good performance of the machine learning techniques in a given dataset, all possible sources of bias should be removed or minimized. For that, the representativeness of the input dataset for the true population should be confirmed, the noise should be removed, the missing data should be treated and the data dimensionally (i.e., the number of parameters/features and the number of cases in the dataset) should be adjusted. The application of machine learning techniques in ocular disease diagnosis and monitoring will be presented and discussed in the second section of this manuscript. To show the clinical benefits of machine learning in clinical vision sciences, several examples will be presented in glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration

  16. Machine learning research 1989-90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Bruce W.; Souther, Arthur

    1990-01-01

    Multifunctional knowledge bases offer a significant advance in artificial intelligence because they can support numerous expert tasks within a domain. As a result they amortize the costs of building a knowledge base over multiple expert systems and they reduce the brittleness of each system. Due to the inevitable size and complexity of multifunctional knowledge bases, their construction and maintenance require knowledge engineering and acquisition tools that can automatically identify interactions between new and existing knowledge. Furthermore, their use requires software for accessing those portions of the knowledge base that coherently answer questions. Considerable progress was made in developing software for building and accessing multifunctional knowledge bases. A language was developed for representing knowledge, along with software tools for editing and displaying knowledge, a machine learning program for integrating new information into existing knowledge, and a question answering system for accessing the knowledge base.

  17. Alternating minimization and Boltzmann machine learning.

    PubMed

    Byrne, W

    1992-01-01

    Training a Boltzmann machine with hidden units is appropriately treated in information geometry using the information divergence and the technique of alternating minimization. The resulting algorithm is shown to be closely related to gradient descent Boltzmann machine learning rules, and the close relationship of both to the EM algorithm is described. An iterative proportional fitting procedure for training machines without hidden units is described and incorporated into the alternating minimization algorithm.

  18. A review of supervised machine learning applied to ageing research.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Fabio; Magalhães, João Pedro de; Freitas, Alex A

    2017-04-01

    Broadly speaking, supervised machine learning is the computational task of learning correlations between variables in annotated data (the training set), and using this information to create a predictive model capable of inferring annotations for new data, whose annotations are not known. Ageing is a complex process that affects nearly all animal species. This process can be studied at several levels of abstraction, in different organisms and with different objectives in mind. Not surprisingly, the diversity of the supervised machine learning algorithms applied to answer biological questions reflects the complexities of the underlying ageing processes being studied. Many works using supervised machine learning to study the ageing process have been recently published, so it is timely to review these works, to discuss their main findings and weaknesses. In summary, the main findings of the reviewed papers are: the link between specific types of DNA repair and ageing; ageing-related proteins tend to be highly connected and seem to play a central role in molecular pathways; ageing/longevity is linked with autophagy and apoptosis, nutrient receptor genes, and copper and iron ion transport. Additionally, several biomarkers of ageing were found by machine learning. Despite some interesting machine learning results, we also identified a weakness of current works on this topic: only one of the reviewed papers has corroborated the computational results of machine learning algorithms through wet-lab experiments. In conclusion, supervised machine learning has contributed to advance our knowledge and has provided novel insights on ageing, yet future work should have a greater emphasis in validating the predictions.

  19. Machine learning: an indispensable tool in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Inza, Iñaki; Calvo, Borja; Armañanzas, Rubén; Bengoetxea, Endika; Larrañaga, Pedro; Lozano, José A

    2010-01-01

    The increase in the number and complexity of biological databases has raised the need for modern and powerful data analysis tools and techniques. In order to fulfill these requirements, the machine learning discipline has become an everyday tool in bio-laboratories. The use of machine learning techniques has been extended to a wide spectrum of bioinformatics applications. It is broadly used to investigate the underlying mechanisms and interactions between biological molecules in many diseases, and it is an essential tool in any biomarker discovery process. In this chapter, we provide a basic taxonomy of machine learning algorithms, and the characteristics of main data preprocessing, supervised classification, and clustering techniques are shown. Feature selection, classifier evaluation, and two supervised classification topics that have a deep impact on current bioinformatics are presented. We make the interested reader aware of a set of popular web resources, open source software tools, and benchmarking data repositories that are frequently used by the machine learning community.

  20. Machine learning for precise quantum measurement.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, Alexander; Sanders, Barry C

    2010-02-12

    Adaptive feedback schemes are promising for quantum-enhanced measurements yet are complicated to design. Machine learning can autonomously generate algorithms in a classical setting. Here we adapt machine learning for quantum information and use our framework to generate autonomous adaptive feedback schemes for quantum measurement. In particular, our approach replaces guesswork in quantum measurement by a logical, fully automatic, programable routine. We show that our method yields schemes that outperform the best known adaptive scheme for interferometric phase estimation.

  1. Implementing Machine Learning in the PCWG Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, Andrew; Ding, Yu; Stuart, Peter

    2016-12-13

    The Power Curve Working Group (www.pcwg.org) is an ad-hoc industry-led group to investigate the performance of wind turbines in real-world conditions. As part of ongoing experience-sharing exercises, machine learning has been proposed as a possible way to predict turbine performance. This presentation provides some background information about machine learning and how it might be implemented in the PCWG exercises.

  2. Machine learning for Big Data analytics in plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuang; Zhang, Hao Helen; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2014-12-01

    Rapid advances in high-throughput genomic technology have enabled biology to enter the era of 'Big Data' (large datasets). The plant science community not only needs to build its own Big-Data-compatible parallel computing and data management infrastructures, but also to seek novel analytical paradigms to extract information from the overwhelming amounts of data. Machine learning offers promising computational and analytical solutions for the integrative analysis of large, heterogeneous and unstructured datasets on the Big-Data scale, and is gradually gaining popularity in biology. This review introduces the basic concepts and procedures of machine-learning applications and envisages how machine learning could interface with Big Data technology to facilitate basic research and biotechnology in the plant sciences.

  3. Machine Learning for Biomedical Literature Triage

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Hayda; Meurs, Marie-Jean; Kosseim, Leila; Butler, Greg; Tsang, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a machine learning system for supporting the first task of the biological literature manual curation process, called triage. We compare the performance of various classification models, by experimenting with dataset sampling factors and a set of features, as well as three different machine learning algorithms (Naive Bayes, Support Vector Machine and Logistic Model Trees). The results show that the most fitting model to handle the imbalanced datasets of the triage classification task is obtained by using domain relevant features, an under-sampling technique, and the Logistic Model Trees algorithm. PMID:25551575

  4. Visual human+machine learning.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Raphael; Waser, Jürgen; Gröller, Meister Eduard

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel method to integrate interactive visual analysis and machine learning to support the insight generation of the user. The suggested approach combines the vast search and processing power of the computer with the superior reasoning and pattern recognition capabilities of the human user. An evolutionary search algorithm has been adapted to assist in the fuzzy logic formalization of hypotheses that aim at explaining features inside multivariate, volumetric data. Up to now, users solely rely on their knowledge and expertise when looking for explanatory theories. However, it often remains unclear whether the selected attribute ranges represent the real explanation for the feature of interest. Other selections hidden in the large number of data variables could potentially lead to similar features. Moreover, as simulation complexity grows, users are confronted with huge multidimensional data sets making it almost impossible to find meaningful hypotheses at all. We propose an interactive cycle of knowledge-based analysis and automatic hypothesis generation. Starting from initial hypotheses, created with linking and brushing, the user steers a heuristic search algorithm to look for alternative or related hypotheses. The results are analyzed in information visualization views that are linked to the volume rendering. Individual properties as well as global aggregates are visually presented to provide insight into the most relevant aspects of the generated hypotheses. This novel approach becomes computationally feasible due to a GPU implementation of the time-critical parts in the algorithm. A thorough evaluation of search times and noise sensitivity as well as a case study on data from the automotive domain substantiate the usefulness of the suggested approach.

  5. An introduction to quantum machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuld, Maria; Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Machine learning algorithms learn a desired input-output relation from examples in order to interpret new inputs. This is important for tasks such as image and speech recognition or strategy optimisation, with growing applications in the IT industry. In the last couple of years, researchers investigated if quantum computing can help to improve classical machine learning algorithms. Ideas range from running computationally costly algorithms or their subroutines efficiently on a quantum computer to the translation of stochastic methods into the language of quantum theory. This contribution gives a systematic overview of the emerging field of quantum machine learning. It presents the approaches as well as technical details in an accessible way, and discusses the potential of a future theory of quantum learning.

  6. Machine learning in cell biology - teaching computers to recognize phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Christoph; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2013-12-15

    Recent advances in microscope automation provide new opportunities for high-throughput cell biology, such as image-based screening. High-complex image analysis tasks often make the implementation of static and predefined processing rules a cumbersome effort. Machine-learning methods, instead, seek to use intrinsic data structure, as well as the expert annotations of biologists to infer models that can be used to solve versatile data analysis tasks. Here, we explain how machine-learning methods work and what needs to be considered for their successful application in cell biology. We outline how microscopy images can be converted into a data representation suitable for machine learning, and then introduce various state-of-the-art machine-learning algorithms, highlighting recent applications in image-based screening. Our Commentary aims to provide the biologist with a guide to the application of machine learning to microscopy assays and we therefore include extensive discussion on how to optimize experimental workflow as well as the data analysis pipeline.

  7. Machine learning methods without tears: a primer for ecologists.

    PubMed

    Olden, Julian D; Lawler, Joshua J; Poff, N LeRoy

    2008-06-01

    Machine learning methods, a family of statistical techniques with origins in the field of artificial intelligence, are recognized as holding great promise for the advancement of understanding and prediction about ecological phenomena. These modeling techniques are flexible enough to handle complex problems with multiple interacting elements and typically outcompete traditional approaches (e.g., generalized linear models), making them ideal for modeling ecological systems. Despite their inherent advantages, a review of the literature reveals only a modest use of these approaches in ecology as compared to other disciplines. One potential explanation for this lack of interest is that machine learning techniques do not fall neatly into the class of statistical modeling approaches with which most ecologists are familiar. In this paper, we provide an introduction to three machine learning approaches that can be broadly used by ecologists: classification and regression trees, artificial neural networks, and evolutionary computation. For each approach, we provide a brief background to the methodology, give examples of its application in ecology, describe model development and implementation, discuss strengths and weaknesses, explore the availability of statistical software, and provide an illustrative example. Although the ecological application of machine learning approaches has increased, there remains considerable skepticism with respect to the role of these techniques in ecology. Our review encourages a greater understanding of machin learning approaches and promotes their future application and utilization, while also providing a basis from which ecologists can make informed decisions about whether to select or avoid these approaches in their future modeling endeavors.

  8. Advances in Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains three symposium papers on advances in distance learning. "The Adoption of Computer Technology and Telecommunications: A Case Study" (Larry M. Dooley, Teri Metcalf, Ann Martinez) reports on a study of the possible applications of two theoretical models (Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations model and the Concerns-Based…

  9. Machine learning for real time remote detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labbé, Benjamin; Fournier, Jérôme; Henaff, Gilles; Bascle, Bénédicte; Canu, Stéphane

    2010-10-01

    Infrared systems are key to providing enhanced capability to military forces such as automatic control of threats and prevention from air, naval and ground attacks. Key requirements for such a system to produce operational benefits are real-time processing as well as high efficiency in terms of detection and false alarm rate. These are serious issues since the system must deal with a large number of objects and categories to be recognized (small vehicles, armored vehicles, planes, buildings, etc.). Statistical learning based algorithms are promising candidates to meet these requirements when using selected discriminant features and real-time implementation. This paper proposes a new decision architecture benefiting from recent advances in machine learning by using an effective method for level set estimation. While building decision function, the proposed approach performs variable selection based on a discriminative criterion. Moreover, the use of level set makes it possible to manage rejection of unknown or ambiguous objects thus preserving the false alarm rate. Experimental evidences reported on real world infrared images demonstrate the validity of our approach.

  10. Advancing apparatus for a multi-unit mining machine

    SciTech Connect

    Schupphaus, H.; Pulger, H.

    1984-11-20

    Apparatus to advance a multi-unit mining machine along a face conveyor in an underground mine includes a hydraulic unit with an advancing mechanism that extends around a toothed rack. The rack extends over the length of machine movement. The hydraulic unit is an independent unit on a machine body of the mining machine and is used for increasing the advancing force provided by other existing advancing units for the mining machine. The hydraulic unit is narrower than the other units on the machine body and is attached by vertical flanges to adjacent units on the machine body. The hydraulic unit receives a winch casing between oppositely-disposed flanges for guided vertical movement of the casing. The casing has pins extending in the direction of machine movement from opposite top portions thereof to engage with members that slide vertically between guide bars on the flanges for vertical mobility. Clearances between the parts provide limited horizontal mobility.

  11. Machine learning: Trends, perspectives, and prospects.

    PubMed

    Jordan, M I; Mitchell, T M

    2015-07-17

    Machine learning addresses the question of how to build computers that improve automatically through experience. It is one of today's most rapidly growing technical fields, lying at the intersection of computer science and statistics, and at the core of artificial intelligence and data science. Recent progress in machine learning has been driven both by the development of new learning algorithms and theory and by the ongoing explosion in the availability of online data and low-cost computation. The adoption of data-intensive machine-learning methods can be found throughout science, technology and commerce, leading to more evidence-based decision-making across many walks of life, including health care, manufacturing, education, financial modeling, policing, and marketing.

  12. Machine Learning for Biological Trajectory Classification Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Theriot, Julie; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2002-01-01

    Machine-learning techniques, including clustering algorithms, support vector machines and hidden Markov models, are applied to the task of classifying trajectories of moving keratocyte cells. The different algorithms axe compared to each other as well as to expert and non-expert test persons, using concepts from signal-detection theory. The algorithms performed very well as compared to humans, suggesting a robust tool for trajectory classification in biological applications.

  13. Introduction to machine learning for brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Lemm, Steven; Blankertz, Benjamin; Dickhaus, Thorsten; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2011-05-15

    Machine learning and pattern recognition algorithms have in the past years developed to become a working horse in brain imaging and the computational neurosciences, as they are instrumental for mining vast amounts of neural data of ever increasing measurement precision and detecting minuscule signals from an overwhelming noise floor. They provide the means to decode and characterize task relevant brain states and to distinguish them from non-informative brain signals. While undoubtedly this machinery has helped to gain novel biological insights, it also holds the danger of potential unintentional abuse. Ideally machine learning techniques should be usable for any non-expert, however, unfortunately they are typically not. Overfitting and other pitfalls may occur and lead to spurious and nonsensical interpretation. The goal of this review is therefore to provide an accessible and clear introduction to the strengths and also the inherent dangers of machine learning usage in the neurosciences.

  14. Extreme Learning Machines for spatial environmental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuenberger, Michael; Kanevski, Mikhail

    2015-12-01

    The use of machine learning algorithms has increased in a wide variety of domains (from finance to biocomputing and astronomy), and nowadays has a significant impact on the geoscience community. In most real cases geoscience data modelling problems are multivariate, high dimensional, variable at several spatial scales, and are generated by non-linear processes. For such complex data, the spatial prediction of continuous (or categorical) variables is a challenging task. The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential of the recently developed Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) for environmental data analysis, modelling and spatial prediction purposes. An important contribution of this study deals with an application of a generic self-consistent methodology for environmental data driven modelling based on Extreme Learning Machine. Both real and simulated data are used to demonstrate applicability of ELM at different stages of the study to understand and justify the results.

  15. Geological Mapping Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, A. S.; Fotopoulos, G.

    2016-06-01

    Remotely sensed spectral imagery, geophysical (magnetic and gravity), and geodetic (elevation) data are useful in a variety of Earth science applications such as environmental monitoring and mineral exploration. Using these data with Machine Learning Algorithms (MLA), which are widely used in image analysis and statistical pattern recognition applications, may enhance preliminary geological mapping and interpretation. This approach contributes towards a rapid and objective means of geological mapping in contrast to conventional field expedition techniques. In this study, four supervised MLAs (naïve Bayes, k-nearest neighbour, random forest, and support vector machines) are compared in order to assess their performance for correctly identifying geological rocktypes in an area with complete ground validation information. Geological maps of the Sudbury region are used for calibration and validation. Percent of correct classifications was used as indicators of performance. Results show that random forest is the best approach. As expected, MLA performance improves with more calibration clusters, i.e. a more uniform distribution of calibration data over the study region. Performance is generally low, though geological trends that correspond to a ground validation map are visualized. Low performance may be the result of poor spectral images of bare rock which can be covered by vegetation or water. The distribution of calibration clusters and MLA input parameters affect the performance of the MLAs. Generally, performance improves with more uniform sampling, though this increases required computational effort and time. With the achievable performance levels in this study, the technique is useful in identifying regions of interest and identifying general rocktype trends. In particular, phase I geological site investigations will benefit from this approach and lead to the selection of sites for advanced surveys.

  16. Intelligent Vehicle Power Management Using Machine Learning and Fuzzy Logic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    machine learning and fuzzy logic. A machine learning algorithm, LOPPS, has been developed to learn about optimal power source combinations with... machine learning algorithm combined with fuzzy logic is a promising technology for vehicle power management. I. INTRODUCTION ROWING...sources, and the complex configuration and operation modes, the control strategy of a hybrid vehicle is more complicated than that of a conventional

  17. Paradigms for Realizing Machine Learning Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Agneeswaran, Vijay Srinivas; Tonpay, Pranay; Tiwary, Jayati

    2013-12-01

    The article explains the three generations of machine learning algorithms-with all three trying to operate on big data. The first generation tools are SAS, SPSS, etc., while second generation realizations include Mahout and RapidMiner (that work over Hadoop), and the third generation paradigms include Spark and GraphLab, among others. The essence of the article is that for a number of machine learning algorithms, it is important to look beyond the Hadoop's Map-Reduce paradigm in order to make them work on big data. A number of promising contenders have emerged in the third generation that can be exploited to realize deep analytics on big data.

  18. Distributed fuzzy learning using the MULTISOFT machine.

    PubMed

    Russo, M

    2001-01-01

    Describes PARGEFREX, a distributed approach to genetic-neuro-fuzzy learning which has been implemented using the MULTISOFT machine, a low-cost form of personal computers built at the University of Messina. The performance of the serial version is hugely enhanced with the simple parallelization scheme described in the paper. Once a learning dataset is fixed, there is a very high super linear speedup in the average time needed to reach a prefixed learning error, i.e., if the number of personal computers increases by n times, the mean learning time becomes less than 1/n times.

  19. Perspective: Machine learning potentials for atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behler, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, computer simulations have become a standard tool in essentially all fields of chemistry, condensed matter physics, and materials science. In order to keep up with state-of-the-art experiments and the ever growing complexity of the investigated problems, there is a constantly increasing need for simulations of more realistic, i.e., larger, model systems with improved accuracy. In many cases, the availability of sufficiently efficient interatomic potentials providing reliable energies and forces has become a serious bottleneck for performing these simulations. To address this problem, currently a paradigm change is taking place in the development of interatomic potentials. Since the early days of computer simulations simplified potentials have been derived using physical approximations whenever the direct application of electronic structure methods has been too demanding. Recent advances in machine learning (ML) now offer an alternative approach for the representation of potential-energy surfaces by fitting large data sets from electronic structure calculations. In this perspective, the central ideas underlying these ML potentials, solved problems and remaining challenges are reviewed along with a discussion of their current applicability and limitations.

  20. Advancing apparatus for coal-mining machine in underground mine

    SciTech Connect

    Schupphaus, H.

    1984-05-29

    A coal-mining machine is advanced along a face conveyor by providing a rack extending along the conveyor and a plurality of advancing units. Each advancing unit includes a hydraulic motor to rotate a drive wheel while meshing with the teeth of the gear rack. The advancing units arranged side-by-side along the mining machine have curved end faces to abut against one another. Runners are provided on the advancing units at the opposite ends of the mining machine which extend partially around the rack for guiding and maintaining the drive wheel engaged with the teeth of the rack.

  1. Machine Learning and Data Mining Methods in Diabetes Research.

    PubMed

    Kavakiotis, Ioannis; Tsave, Olga; Salifoglou, Athanasios; Maglaveras, Nicos; Vlahavas, Ioannis; Chouvarda, Ioanna

    2017-01-01

    The remarkable advances in biotechnology and health sciences have led to a significant production of data, such as high throughput genetic data and clinical information, generated from large Electronic Health Records (EHRs). To this end, application of machine learning and data mining methods in biosciences is presently, more than ever before, vital and indispensable in efforts to transform intelligently all available information into valuable knowledge. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is defined as a group of metabolic disorders exerting significant pressure on human health worldwide. Extensive research in all aspects of diabetes (diagnosis, etiopathophysiology, therapy, etc.) has led to the generation of huge amounts of data. The aim of the present study is to conduct a systematic review of the applications of machine learning, data mining techniques and tools in the field of diabetes research with respect to a) Prediction and Diagnosis, b) Diabetic Complications, c) Genetic Background and Environment, and e) Health Care and Management with the first category appearing to be the most popular. A wide range of machine learning algorithms were employed. In general, 85% of those used were characterized by supervised learning approaches and 15% by unsupervised ones, and more specifically, association rules. Support vector machines (SVM) arise as the most successful and widely used algorithm. Concerning the type of data, clinical datasets were mainly used. The title applications in the selected articles project the usefulness of extracting valuable knowledge leading to new hypotheses targeting deeper understanding and further investigation in DM.

  2. Machine Learning Toolkit for Extreme Scale

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-31

    Support Vector Machines (SVM) is a popular machine learning technique, which has been applied to a wide range of domains such as science, finance, and social networks for supervised learning. MaTEx undertakes the challenge of designing a scalable parallel SVM training algorithm for large scale systems, which includes commodity multi-core machines, tightly connected supercomputers and cloud computing systems. Several techniques are proposed for improved speed and memory space usage including adaptive and aggressive elimination of samples for faster convergence , and sparse format representation of data samples. Several heuristics for earliest possible to lazy elimination of non-contributing samples are considered in MaTEx. In many cases, where an early sample elimination might result in a false positive, low overhead mechanisms for reconstruction of key data structures are proposed. The proposed algorithm and heuristics are implemented and evaluated on various publicly available datasets

  3. Dimension Reduction with Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Liyanaarachchi Lekamalage, Chamara; Yang, Yan; Huang, Guang-Bin; Zhang, Zhengyou

    2016-05-18

    Data may often contain noise or irrelevant information which negatively affect the generalization capability of machine learning algorithms. The objective of dimension reduction algorithms such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF), random projection (RP) and auto-encoder (AE) is to reduce the noise or irrelevant information of the data. The features of PCA (eigenvectors) and linear AE is not able to represent data as parts (e.g. nose in a face image); On the other hand, NMF and non-linear AE is maimed by slow learning speed and RP only represents a subspace of original data. This paper introduces a dimension reduction framework which to some extend represents data as parts, has fast learning speed and learns the between-class scatter subspace. To this end, this paper investigates a linear and nonlinear dimension reduction framework referred to as Extreme Learning Machine Auto-Encoder (ELM-AE) and Sparse Extreme Learning Machine Auto-Encoder (SELM-AE). In contrast to tied weight auto-encoder (TAE), the hidden neurons in ELMAE and SELM-AE need not be tuned, their parameters (e.g, input weights in additive neurons) are initialized using orthogonal and sparse random weights respectively. Experimental results on USPS handwritten digit recognition dataset, CIFAR-10 object recognition and NORB object recognition data set show the efficacy of linear and non-linear ELM-AE and SELM-AE in terms of discriminative capability, sparsity, training time and Normalized Mean Square Error (NMSE).

  4. Using Simple Machines to Leverage Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotger, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    What would your students say if you told them they could lift you off the ground using a block and a board? Using a simple machine, they'll find out they can, and they'll learn about work, energy, and motion in the process! In addition, this integrated lesson gives students the opportunity to investigate variables while practicing measurement…

  5. Vitrification: Machines learn to recognize glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of a viscous liquid undergo a dramatic slowdown when it is cooled to form a solid glass. Recognizing the structural changes across such a transition remains a major challenge. Machine-learning methods, similar to those Facebook uses to recognize groups of friends, have now been applied to this problem.

  6. Machine learning for neuroimaging with scikit-learn.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Alexandre; Pedregosa, Fabian; Eickenberg, Michael; Gervais, Philippe; Mueller, Andreas; Kossaifi, Jean; Gramfort, Alexandre; Thirion, Bertrand; Varoquaux, Gaël

    2014-01-01

    Statistical machine learning methods are increasingly used for neuroimaging data analysis. Their main virtue is their ability to model high-dimensional datasets, e.g., multivariate analysis of activation images or resting-state time series. Supervised learning is typically used in decoding or encoding settings to relate brain images to behavioral or clinical observations, while unsupervised learning can uncover hidden structures in sets of images (e.g., resting state functional MRI) or find sub-populations in large cohorts. By considering different functional neuroimaging applications, we illustrate how scikit-learn, a Python machine learning library, can be used to perform some key analysis steps. Scikit-learn contains a very large set of statistical learning algorithms, both supervised and unsupervised, and its application to neuroimaging data provides a versatile tool to study the brain.

  7. Fast, Continuous Audiogram Estimation using Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xinyu D.; Wallace, Brittany M.; Gardner, Jacob R.; Ledbetter, Noah M.; Weinberger, Kilian Q.; Barbour, Dennis L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pure-tone audiometry has been a staple of hearing assessments for decades. Many different procedures have been proposed for measuring thresholds with pure tones by systematically manipulating intensity one frequency at a time until a discrete threshold function is determined. The authors have developed a novel nonparametric approach for estimating a continuous threshold audiogram using Bayesian estimation and machine learning classification. The objective of this study is to assess the accuracy and reliability of this new method relative to a commonly used threshold measurement technique. Design The authors performed air conduction pure-tone audiometry on 21 participants between the ages of 18 and 90 years with varying degrees of hearing ability. Two repetitions of automated machine learning audiogram estimation and 1 repetition of conventional modified Hughson-Westlake ascending-descending audiogram estimation were acquired by an audiologist. The estimated hearing thresholds of these two techniques were compared at standard audiogram frequencies (i.e., 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 kHz). Results The two threshold estimate methods delivered very similar estimates at standard audiogram frequencies. Specifically, the mean absolute difference between estimates was 4.16 ± 3.76 dB HL. The mean absolute difference between repeated measurements of the new machine learning procedure was 4.51 ± 4.45 dB HL. These values compare favorably to those of other threshold audiogram estimation procedures. Furthermore, the machine learning method generated threshold estimates from significantly fewer samples than the modified Hughson-Westlake procedure while returning a continuous threshold estimate as a function of frequency. Conclusions The new machine learning audiogram estimation technique produces continuous threshold audiogram estimates accurately, reliably, and efficiently, making it a strong candidate for widespread application in clinical and research audiometry. PMID

  8. Learning algorithms for human-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Zachary; Fishbach, Alon; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2009-05-01

    The goal of this study is to create and examine machine learning algorithms that adapt in a controlled and cadenced way to foster a harmonious learning environment between the user and the controlled device. To evaluate these algorithms, we have developed a simple experimental framework. Subjects wear an instrumented data glove that records finger motions. The high-dimensional glove signals remotely control the joint angles of a simulated planar two-link arm on a computer screen, which is used to acquire targets. A machine learning algorithm was applied to adaptively change the transformation between finger motion and the simulated robot arm. This algorithm was either LMS gradient descent or the Moore-Penrose (MP) pseudoinverse transformation. Both algorithms modified the glove-to-joint angle map so as to reduce the endpoint errors measured in past performance. The MP group performed worse than the control group (subjects not exposed to any machine learning), while the LMS group outperformed the control subjects. However, the LMS subjects failed to achieve better generalization than the control subjects, and after extensive training converged to the same level of performance as the control subjects. These results highlight the limitations of coadaptive learning using only endpoint error reduction.

  9. Machine Learning Techniques for Persuasion Detection in Conversation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES FOR PERSUASION DECTECTION IN CONVERSATION by Pedro Ortiz June 2010...2008-06-01—2010-06-31 Machine Learning Techniques for Persuasion Dectection in Conversation Pedro Ortiz Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943...automatically detect persuasion in conversations using three traditional machine learning techniques, naive bayes, maximum entropy, and support vector

  10. Interpreting Medical Information Using Machine Learning and Individual Conditional Expectation.

    PubMed

    Nohara, Yasunobu; Wakata, Yoshifumi; Nakashima, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Recently, machine-learning techniques have spread many fields. However, machine-learning is still not popular in medical research field due to difficulty of interpreting. In this paper, we introduce a method of interpreting medical information using machine learning technique. The method gave new explanation of partial dependence plot and individual conditional expectation plot from medical research field.

  11. The Learning Machine: Home Remedies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntington, Fred

    1984-01-01

    Presents a list of Apple software that helps students develop specific skills through supplemental learning at home. Software, including program, manufacturer, grade level(s), and price, is provided for: writing; spelling; grammar; vocabulary; reading comprehension; computational mathematics; and mathematics concepts/applications. Also provides…

  12. Recent advances in micro- and nano-machining technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shang; Huang, Han

    2016-12-01

    Device miniaturization is an emerging advanced technology in the 21st century. The miniaturization of devices in different fields requires production of micro- and nano-scale components. The features of these components range from the sub-micron to a few hundred microns with high tolerance to many engineering materials. These fields mainly include optics, electronics, medicine, bio-technology, communications, and avionics. This paper reviewed the recent advances in micro- and nano-machining technologies, including micro-cutting, micro-electrical-discharge machining, laser micro-machining, and focused ion beam machining. The four machining technologies were also compared in terms of machining efficiency, workpiece materials being machined, minimum feature size, maximum aspect ratio, and surface finish.

  13. Modeling electronic quantum transport with machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2014-06-01

    We present a machine learning approach to solve electronic quantum transport equations of one-dimensional nanostructures. The transmission coefficients of disordered systems were computed to provide training and test data sets to the machine. The system's representation encodes energetic as well as geometrical information to characterize similarities between disordered configurations, while the Euclidean norm is used as a measure of similarity. Errors for out-of-sample predictions systematically decrease with training set size, enabling the accurate and fast prediction of new transmission coefficients. The remarkable performance of our model to capture the complexity of interference phenomena lends further support to its viability in dealing with transport problems of undulatory nature.

  14. A review of protein function prediction under machine learning perspective.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Juliana S; Pedreira, Carlos E

    2013-08-01

    Protein function prediction is one of the most challenging problems in the post-genomic era. The number of newly identified proteins has been exponentially increasing with the advances of the high-throughput techniques. However, the functional characterization of these new proteins was not incremented in the same proportion. To fill this gap, a large number of computational methods have been proposed in the literature. Early approaches have explored homology relationships to associate known functions to the newly discovered proteins. Nevertheless, these approaches tend to fail when a new protein is considerably different (divergent) from previously known ones. Accordingly, more accurate approaches, that use expressive data representation and explore sophisticate computational techniques are required. Regarding these points, this review provides a comprehensible description of machine learning approaches that are currently applied to protein function prediction problems. We start by defining several problems enrolled in understanding protein function aspects, and describing how machine learning can be applied to these problems. We aim to expose, in a systematical framework, the role of these techniques in protein function inference, sometimes difficult to follow up due to the rapid evolvement of the field. With this purpose in mind, we highlight the most representative contributions, the recent advancements, and provide an insightful categorization and classification of machine learning methods in functional proteomics.

  15. Man-machine cooperation in advanced teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Das, Hari; Lee, Sukhan

    1993-01-01

    Teleoperation experiments at JPL have shown that advanced features in a telerobotic system are a necessary condition for good results, but that they are not sufficient to assure consistently good performance by the operators. Two or three operators are normally used during training and experiments to maintain the desired performance. An alternative to this multi-operator control station is a man-machine interface embedding computer programs that can perform some of the operator's functions. In this paper we present our first experiments with these concepts, in which we focused on the areas of real-time task monitoring and interactive path planning. In the first case, when performing a known task, the operator has an automatic aid for setting control parameters and camera views. In the second case, an interactive path planner will rank different path alternatives so that the operator will make the correct control decision. The monitoring function has been implemented with a neural network doing the real-time task segmentation. The interactive path planner was implemented for redundant manipulators to specify arm configurations across the desired path and satisfy geometric, task, and performance constraints.

  16. Protein function in precision medicine: deep understanding with machine learning.

    PubMed

    Rost, Burkhard; Radivojac, Predrag; Bromberg, Yana

    2016-08-01

    Precision medicine and personalized health efforts propose leveraging complex molecular, medical and family history, along with other types of personal data toward better life. We argue that this ambitious objective will require advanced and specialized machine learning solutions. Simply skimming some low-hanging results off the data wealth might have limited potential. Instead, we need to better understand all parts of the system to define medically relevant causes and effects: how do particular sequence variants affect particular proteins and pathways? How do these effects, in turn, cause the health or disease-related phenotype? Toward this end, deeper understanding will not simply diffuse from deeper machine learning, but from more explicit focus on understanding protein function, context-specific protein interaction networks, and impact of variation on both.

  17. AZOrange - High performance open source machine learning for QSAR modeling in a graphical programming environment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Machine learning has a vast range of applications. In particular, advanced machine learning methods are routinely and increasingly used in quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) modeling. QSAR data sets often encompass tens of thousands of compounds and the size of proprietary, as well as public data sets, is rapidly growing. Hence, there is a demand for computationally efficient machine learning algorithms, easily available to researchers without extensive machine learning knowledge. In granting the scientific principles of transparency and reproducibility, Open Source solutions are increasingly acknowledged by regulatory authorities. Thus, an Open Source state-of-the-art high performance machine learning platform, interfacing multiple, customized machine learning algorithms for both graphical programming and scripting, to be used for large scale development of QSAR models of regulatory quality, is of great value to the QSAR community. Results This paper describes the implementation of the Open Source machine learning package AZOrange. AZOrange is specially developed to support batch generation of QSAR models in providing the full work flow of QSAR modeling, from descriptor calculation to automated model building, validation and selection. The automated work flow relies upon the customization of the machine learning algorithms and a generalized, automated model hyper-parameter selection process. Several high performance machine learning algorithms are interfaced for efficient data set specific selection of the statistical method, promoting model accuracy. Using the high performance machine learning algorithms of AZOrange does not require programming knowledge as flexible applications can be created, not only at a scripting level, but also in a graphical programming environment. Conclusions AZOrange is a step towards meeting the needs for an Open Source high performance machine learning platform, supporting the efficient development of

  18. Research on machine learning framework based on random forest algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Qiong; Cheng, Hui; Han, Hai

    2017-03-01

    With the continuous development of machine learning, industry and academia have released a lot of machine learning frameworks based on distributed computing platform, and have been widely used. However, the existing framework of machine learning is limited by the limitations of machine learning algorithm itself, such as the choice of parameters and the interference of noises, the high using threshold and so on. This paper introduces the research background of machine learning framework, and combined with the commonly used random forest algorithm in machine learning classification algorithm, puts forward the research objectives and content, proposes an improved adaptive random forest algorithm (referred to as ARF), and on the basis of ARF, designs and implements the machine learning framework.

  19. Fast linear algorithms for machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yichao

    Nowadays linear methods like Regression, Principal Component Analysis and Canonical Correlation Analysis are well understood and widely used by the machine learning community for predictive modeling and feature generation. Generally speaking, all these methods aim at capturing interesting subspaces in the original high dimensional feature space. Due to the simple linear structures, these methods all have a closed form solution which makes computation and theoretical analysis very easy for small datasets. However, in modern machine learning problems it's very common for a dataset to have millions or billions of features and samples. In these cases, pursuing the closed form solution for these linear methods can be extremely slow since it requires multiplying two huge matrices and computing inverse, inverse square root, QR decomposition or Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) of huge matrices. In this thesis, we consider three fast algorithms for computing Regression and Canonical Correlation Analysis approximate for huge datasets.

  20. Machine learning: how to get more out of HEP data and the Higgs Boson Machine Learning Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    Multivariate techniques using machine learning algorithms have become an integral part in many High Energy Physics (HEP) data analyses. The article shows the gain in physics reach of the physics experiments due to the adaptation of machine learning techniques. Rapid development in the field of machine learning in the last years is a challenge for the HEP community. The open competition for machine learning experts "Higgs Boson Machine Learning Challenge" shows, that the modern techniques developed outside HEP can significantly improve the analysis of data from HEP experiments and improve the sensitivity of searches for new particles and processes.

  1. Machine Learning methods for Quantitative Radiomic Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Chintan; Grossmann, Patrick; Bussink, Johan; Lambin, Philippe; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Radiomics extracts and mines large number of medical imaging features quantifying tumor phenotypic characteristics. Highly accurate and reliable machine-learning approaches can drive the success of radiomic applications in clinical care. In this radiomic study, fourteen feature selection methods and twelve classification methods were examined in terms of their performance and stability for predicting overall survival. A total of 440 radiomic features were extracted from pre-treatment computed tomography (CT) images of 464 lung cancer patients. To ensure the unbiased evaluation of different machine-learning methods, publicly available implementations along with reported parameter configurations were used. Furthermore, we used two independent radiomic cohorts for training (n = 310 patients) and validation (n = 154 patients). We identified that Wilcoxon test based feature selection method WLCX (stability = 0.84 ± 0.05, AUC = 0.65 ± 0.02) and a classification method random forest RF (RSD = 3.52%, AUC = 0.66 ± 0.03) had highest prognostic performance with high stability against data perturbation. Our variability analysis indicated that the choice of classification method is the most dominant source of performance variation (34.21% of total variance). Identification of optimal machine-learning methods for radiomic applications is a crucial step towards stable and clinically relevant radiomic biomarkers, providing a non-invasive way of quantifying and monitoring tumor-phenotypic characteristics in clinical practice. PMID:26278466

  2. Machine Learning methods for Quantitative Radiomic Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Chintan; Grossmann, Patrick; Bussink, Johan; Lambin, Philippe; Aerts, Hugo J W L

    2015-08-17

    Radiomics extracts and mines large number of medical imaging features quantifying tumor phenotypic characteristics. Highly accurate and reliable machine-learning approaches can drive the success of radiomic applications in clinical care. In this radiomic study, fourteen feature selection methods and twelve classification methods were examined in terms of their performance and stability for predicting overall survival. A total of 440 radiomic features were extracted from pre-treatment computed tomography (CT) images of 464 lung cancer patients. To ensure the unbiased evaluation of different machine-learning methods, publicly available implementations along with reported parameter configurations were used. Furthermore, we used two independent radiomic cohorts for training (n = 310 patients) and validation (n = 154 patients). We identified that Wilcoxon test based feature selection method WLCX (stability = 0.84 ± 0.05, AUC = 0.65 ± 0.02) and a classification method random forest RF (RSD = 3.52%, AUC = 0.66 ± 0.03) had highest prognostic performance with high stability against data perturbation. Our variability analysis indicated that the choice of classification method is the most dominant source of performance variation (34.21% of total variance). Identification of optimal machine-learning methods for radiomic applications is a crucial step towards stable and clinically relevant radiomic biomarkers, providing a non-invasive way of quantifying and monitoring tumor-phenotypic characteristics in clinical practice.

  3. Scaling up: Distributed machine learning with cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, F.J.; Hennessy, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    Machine-learning methods are becoming increasingly popular for automated data analysis. However, standard methods do not scale up to massive scientific and business data sets without expensive hardware. This paper investigates a practical alternative for scaling up: the use of distributed processing to take advantage of the often dormant PCs and workstations available on local networks. Each workstation runs a common rule-learning program on a subset of the data. We first show that for commonly used rule-evaluation criteria, a simple form of cooperation can guarantee that a rule will look good to the set of cooperating learners if and only if it would look good to a single learner operating with the entire data set. We then show how such a system can further capitalize on different perspectives by sharing learned knowledge for significant reduction in search effort. We demonstrate the power of the method by learning from a massive data set taken from the domain of cellular fraud detection. Finally, we provide an overview of other methods for scaling up machine learning.

  4. Dimension Reduction With Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Kasun, Liyanaarachchi Lekamalage Chamara; Yang, Yan; Huang, Guang-Bin; Zhang, Zhengyou

    2016-08-01

    Data may often contain noise or irrelevant information, which negatively affect the generalization capability of machine learning algorithms. The objective of dimension reduction algorithms, such as principal component analysis (PCA), non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), random projection (RP), and auto-encoder (AE), is to reduce the noise or irrelevant information of the data. The features of PCA (eigenvectors) and linear AE are not able to represent data as parts (e.g. nose in a face image). On the other hand, NMF and non-linear AE are maimed by slow learning speed and RP only represents a subspace of original data. This paper introduces a dimension reduction framework which to some extend represents data as parts, has fast learning speed, and learns the between-class scatter subspace. To this end, this paper investigates a linear and non-linear dimension reduction framework referred to as extreme learning machine AE (ELM-AE) and sparse ELM-AE (SELM-AE). In contrast to tied weight AE, the hidden neurons in ELM-AE and SELM-AE need not be tuned, and their parameters (e.g, input weights in additive neurons) are initialized using orthogonal and sparse random weights, respectively. Experimental results on USPS handwritten digit recognition data set, CIFAR-10 object recognition, and NORB object recognition data set show the efficacy of linear and non-linear ELM-AE and SELM-AE in terms of discriminative capability, sparsity, training time, and normalized mean square error.

  5. Machine Learning Capabilities of a Simulated Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Hausknecht, Matthew; Li, Wen-Ke; Mauk, Michael; Stone, Peter

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the learning and control capabilities of a biologically constrained bottom-up model of the mammalian cerebellum. Results are presented from six tasks: 1) eyelid conditioning; 2) pendulum balancing; 3) proportional-integral-derivative control; 4) robot balancing; 5) pattern recognition; and 6) MNIST handwritten digit recognition. These tasks span several paradigms of machine learning, including supervised learning, reinforcement learning, control, and pattern recognition. Results over these six domains indicate that the cerebellar simulation is capable of robustly identifying static input patterns even when randomized across the sensory apparatus. This capability allows the simulated cerebellum to perform several different supervised learning and control tasks. On the other hand, both reinforcement learning and temporal pattern recognition prove problematic due to the delayed nature of error signals and the simulator's inability to solve the credit assignment problem. These results are consistent with previous findings which hypothesize that in the human brain, the basal ganglia is responsible for reinforcement learning, while the cerebellum handles supervised learning.

  6. Multilayer Extreme Learning Machine With Subnetwork Nodes for Representation Learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yimin; Wu, Q M Jonathan

    2015-10-09

    The extreme learning machine (ELM), which was originally proposed for ''generalized'' single-hidden layer feedforward neural networks, provides efficient unified learning solutions for the applications of clustering, regression, and classification. It presents competitive accuracy with superb efficiency in many applications. However, ELM with subnetwork nodes architecture has not attracted much research attentions. Recently, many methods have been proposed for supervised/unsupervised dimension reduction or representation learning, but these methods normally only work for one type of problem. This paper studies the general architecture of multilayer ELM (ML-ELM) with subnetwork nodes, showing that: 1) the proposed method provides a representation learning platform with unsupervised/supervised and compressed/sparse representation learning and 2) experimental results on ten image datasets and 16 classification datasets show that, compared to other conventional feature learning methods, the proposed ML-ELM with subnetwork nodes performs competitively or much better than other feature learning methods.

  7. Multilayer Extreme Learning Machine With Subnetwork Nodes for Representation Learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yimin; Wu, Q M Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    The extreme learning machine (ELM), which was originally proposed for "generalized" single-hidden layer feedforward neural networks, provides efficient unified learning solutions for the applications of clustering, regression, and classification. It presents competitive accuracy with superb efficiency in many applications. However, ELM with subnetwork nodes architecture has not attracted much research attentions. Recently, many methods have been proposed for supervised/unsupervised dimension reduction or representation learning, but these methods normally only work for one type of problem. This paper studies the general architecture of multilayer ELM (ML-ELM) with subnetwork nodes, showing that: 1) the proposed method provides a representation learning platform with unsupervised/supervised and compressed/sparse representation learning and 2) experimental results on ten image datasets and 16 classification datasets show that, compared to other conventional feature learning methods, the proposed ML-ELM with subnetwork nodes performs competitively or much better than other feature learning methods.

  8. WORMHOLE: Novel Least Diverged Ortholog Prediction through Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Sutphin, George L.; Mahoney, J. Matthew; Sheppard, Keith; Walton, David O.; Korstanje, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement of technology in genomics and targeted genetic manipulation has made comparative biology an increasingly prominent strategy to model human disease processes. Predicting orthology relationships between species is a vital component of comparative biology. Dozens of strategies for predicting orthologs have been developed using combinations of gene and protein sequence, phylogenetic history, and functional interaction with progressively increasing accuracy. A relatively new class of orthology prediction strategies combines aspects of multiple methods into meta-tools, resulting in improved prediction performance. Here we present WORMHOLE, a novel ortholog prediction meta-tool that applies machine learning to integrate 17 distinct ortholog prediction algorithms to identify novel least diverged orthologs (LDOs) between 6 eukaryotic species—humans, mice, zebrafish, fruit flies, nematodes, and budding yeast. Machine learning allows WORMHOLE to intelligently incorporate predictions from a wide-spectrum of strategies in order to form aggregate predictions of LDOs with high confidence. In this study we demonstrate the performance of WORMHOLE across each combination of query and target species. We show that WORMHOLE is particularly adept at improving LDO prediction performance between distantly related species, expanding the pool of LDOs while maintaining low evolutionary distance and a high level of functional relatedness between genes in LDO pairs. We present extensive validation, including cross-validated prediction of PANTHER LDOs and evaluation of evolutionary divergence and functional similarity, and discuss future applications of machine learning in ortholog prediction. A WORMHOLE web tool has been developed and is available at http://wormhole.jax.org/. PMID:27812085

  9. WORMHOLE: Novel Least Diverged Ortholog Prediction through Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Sutphin, George L; Mahoney, J Matthew; Sheppard, Keith; Walton, David O; Korstanje, Ron

    2016-11-01

    The rapid advancement of technology in genomics and targeted genetic manipulation has made comparative biology an increasingly prominent strategy to model human disease processes. Predicting orthology relationships between species is a vital component of comparative biology. Dozens of strategies for predicting orthologs have been developed using combinations of gene and protein sequence, phylogenetic history, and functional interaction with progressively increasing accuracy. A relatively new class of orthology prediction strategies combines aspects of multiple methods into meta-tools, resulting in improved prediction performance. Here we present WORMHOLE, a novel ortholog prediction meta-tool that applies machine learning to integrate 17 distinct ortholog prediction algorithms to identify novel least diverged orthologs (LDOs) between 6 eukaryotic species-humans, mice, zebrafish, fruit flies, nematodes, and budding yeast. Machine learning allows WORMHOLE to intelligently incorporate predictions from a wide-spectrum of strategies in order to form aggregate predictions of LDOs with high confidence. In this study we demonstrate the performance of WORMHOLE across each combination of query and target species. We show that WORMHOLE is particularly adept at improving LDO prediction performance between distantly related species, expanding the pool of LDOs while maintaining low evolutionary distance and a high level of functional relatedness between genes in LDO pairs. We present extensive validation, including cross-validated prediction of PANTHER LDOs and evaluation of evolutionary divergence and functional similarity, and discuss future applications of machine learning in ortholog prediction. A WORMHOLE web tool has been developed and is available at http://wormhole.jax.org/.

  10. [Advances in biomolecular machine: methane monooxygenases].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixue; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-07-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMO), regarded as "an amazing biomolecular machine", catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol under aerobic conditions. MMO catalyze the oxidation of methane elaborately, which is a novel way to catalyze methane to methanol. Furthermore, MMO can inspire the biomolecular machine design. In this review, we introduced MMO including structure, gene and catalytic mechanism. The history and the taxonomy of MMO were also introduced.

  11. Entanglement-based machine learning on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Cai, X-D; Wu, D; Su, Z-E; Chen, M-C; Wang, X-L; Li, Li; Liu, N-L; Lu, C-Y; Pan, J-W

    2015-03-20

    Machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, learns from previous experience to optimize performance, which is ubiquitous in various fields such as computer sciences, financial analysis, robotics, and bioinformatics. A challenge is that machine learning with the rapidly growing "big data" could become intractable for classical computers. Recently, quantum machine learning algorithms [Lloyd, Mohseni, and Rebentrost, arXiv.1307.0411] were proposed which could offer an exponential speedup over classical algorithms. Here, we report the first experimental entanglement-based classification of two-, four-, and eight-dimensional vectors to different clusters using a small-scale photonic quantum computer, which are then used to implement supervised and unsupervised machine learning. The results demonstrate the working principle of using quantum computers to manipulate and classify high-dimensional vectors, the core mathematical routine in machine learning. The method can, in principle, be scaled to larger numbers of qubits, and may provide a new route to accelerate machine learning.

  12. Entanglement-Based Machine Learning on a Quantum Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.-D.; Wu, D.; Su, Z.-E.; Chen, M.-C.; Wang, X.-L.; Li, Li; Liu, N.-L.; Lu, C.-Y.; Pan, J.-W.

    2015-03-01

    Machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, learns from previous experience to optimize performance, which is ubiquitous in various fields such as computer sciences, financial analysis, robotics, and bioinformatics. A challenge is that machine learning with the rapidly growing "big data" could become intractable for classical computers. Recently, quantum machine learning algorithms [Lloyd, Mohseni, and Rebentrost, arXiv.1307.0411] were proposed which could offer an exponential speedup over classical algorithms. Here, we report the first experimental entanglement-based classification of two-, four-, and eight-dimensional vectors to different clusters using a small-scale photonic quantum computer, which are then used to implement supervised and unsupervised machine learning. The results demonstrate the working principle of using quantum computers to manipulate and classify high-dimensional vectors, the core mathematical routine in machine learning. The method can, in principle, be scaled to larger numbers of qubits, and may provide a new route to accelerate machine learning.

  13. Sparse Extreme Learning Machine for Classification

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Zuo; Huang, Guang-Bin; Wang, Danwei; Wang, Han; Westover, M. Brandon

    2016-01-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) was initially proposed for single-hidden-layer feedforward neural networks (SLFNs). In the hidden layer (feature mapping), nodes are randomly generated independently of training data. Furthermore, a unified ELM was proposed, providing a single framework to simplify and unify different learning methods, such as SLFNs, least square support vector machines, proximal support vector machines, and so on. However, the solution of unified ELM is dense, and thus, usually plenty of storage space and testing time are required for large-scale applications. In this paper, a sparse ELM is proposed as an alternative solution for classification, reducing storage space and testing time. In addition, unified ELM obtains the solution by matrix inversion, whose computational complexity is between quadratic and cubic with respect to the training size. It still requires plenty of training time for large-scale problems, even though it is much faster than many other traditional methods. In this paper, an efficient training algorithm is specifically developed for sparse ELM. The quadratic programming problem involved in sparse ELM is divided into a series of smallest possible sub-problems, each of which are solved analytically. Compared with SVM, sparse ELM obtains better generalization performance with much faster training speed. Compared with unified ELM, sparse ELM achieves similar generalization performance for binary classification applications, and when dealing with large-scale binary classification problems, sparse ELM realizes even faster training speed than unified ELM. PMID:25222727

  14. Sparse extreme learning machine for classification.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zuo; Huang, Guang-Bin; Wang, Danwei; Wang, Han; Westover, M Brandon

    2014-10-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) was initially proposed for single-hidden-layer feedforward neural networks (SLFNs). In the hidden layer (feature mapping), nodes are randomly generated independently of training data. Furthermore, a unified ELM was proposed, providing a single framework to simplify and unify different learning methods, such as SLFNs, least square support vector machines, proximal support vector machines, and so on. However, the solution of unified ELM is dense, and thus, usually plenty of storage space and testing time are required for large-scale applications. In this paper, a sparse ELM is proposed as an alternative solution for classification, reducing storage space and testing time. In addition, unified ELM obtains the solution by matrix inversion, whose computational complexity is between quadratic and cubic with respect to the training size. It still requires plenty of training time for large-scale problems, even though it is much faster than many other traditional methods. In this paper, an efficient training algorithm is specifically developed for sparse ELM. The quadratic programming problem involved in sparse ELM is divided into a series of smallest possible sub-problems, each of which are solved analytically. Compared with SVM, sparse ELM obtains better generalization performance with much faster training speed. Compared with unified ELM, sparse ELM achieves similar generalization performance for binary classification applications, and when dealing with large-scale binary classification problems, sparse ELM realizes even faster training speed than unified ELM.

  15. Accelerating materials property predictions using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Wang, Chenchen; Jiang, Xun; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar; Ramprasad, Ramamurthy

    2013-09-30

    The materials discovery process can be significantly expedited and simplified if we can learn effectively from available knowledge and data. In the present contribution, we show that efficient and accurate prediction of a diverse set of properties of material systems is possible by employing machine (or statistical) learning methods trained on quantum mechanical computations in combination with the notions of chemical similarity. Using a family of one-dimensional chain systems, we present a general formalism that allows us to discover decision rules that establish a mapping between easily accessible attributes of a system and its properties. It is shown that fingerprints based on either chemo-structural (compositional and configurational information) or the electronic charge density distribution can be used to make ultra-fast, yet accurate, property predictions. Harnessing such learning paradigms extends recent efforts to systematically explore and mine vast chemical spaces, and can significantly accelerate the discovery of new application-specific materials.

  16. Discriminative clustering via extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gao; Liu, Tianchi; Yang, Yan; Lin, Zhiping; Song, Shiji; Wu, Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Discriminative clustering is an unsupervised learning framework which introduces the discriminative learning rule of supervised classification into clustering. The underlying assumption is that a good partition (clustering) of the data should yield high discrimination, namely, the partitioned data can be easily classified by some classification algorithms. In this paper, we propose three discriminative clustering approaches based on Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). The first algorithm iteratively trains weighted ELM (W-ELM) classifier to gradually maximize the data discrimination. The second and third methods are both built on Fisher's Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA); but one approach adopts alternative optimization, while the other leverages kernel k-means. We show that the proposed algorithms can be easily implemented, and yield competitive clustering accuracy on real world data sets compared to state-of-the-art clustering methods.

  17. Improving the Caenorhabditis elegans genome annotation using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Rätsch, Gunnar; Sonnenburg, Sören; Srinivasan, Jagan; Witte, Hanh; Müller, Klaus-R; Sommer, Ralf-J; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2007-02-23

    For modern biology, precise genome annotations are of prime importance, as they allow the accurate definition of genic regions. We employ state-of-the-art machine learning methods to assay and improve the accuracy of the genome annotation of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The proposed machine learning system is trained to recognize exons and introns on the unspliced mRNA, utilizing recent advances in support vector machines and label sequence learning. In 87% (coding and untranslated regions) and 95% (coding regions only) of all genes tested in several out-of-sample evaluations, our method correctly identified all exons and introns. Notably, only 37% and 50%, respectively, of the presently unconfirmed genes in the C. elegans genome annotation agree with our predictions, thus we hypothesize that a sizable fraction of those genes are not correctly annotated. A retrospective evaluation of the Wormbase WS120 annotation [] of C. elegans reveals that splice form predictions on unconfirmed genes in WS120 are inaccurate in about 18% of the considered cases, while our predictions deviate from the truth only in 10%-13%. We experimentally analyzed 20 controversial genes on which our system and the annotation disagree, confirming the superiority of our predictions. While our method correctly predicted 75% of those cases, the standard annotation was never completely correct. The accuracy of our system is further corroborated by a comparison with two other recently proposed systems that can be used for splice form prediction: SNAP and ExonHunter. We conclude that the genome annotation of C. elegans and other organisms can be greatly enhanced using modern machine learning technology.

  18. Extreme Learning Machine for Multilayer Perceptron.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiexiong; Deng, Chenwei; Huang, Guang-Bin

    2016-04-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) is an emerging learning algorithm for the generalized single hidden layer feedforward neural networks, of which the hidden node parameters are randomly generated and the output weights are analytically computed. However, due to its shallow architecture, feature learning using ELM may not be effective for natural signals (e.g., images/videos), even with a large number of hidden nodes. To address this issue, in this paper, a new ELM-based hierarchical learning framework is proposed for multilayer perceptron. The proposed architecture is divided into two main components: 1) self-taught feature extraction followed by supervised feature classification and 2) they are bridged by random initialized hidden weights. The novelties of this paper are as follows: 1) unsupervised multilayer encoding is conducted for feature extraction, and an ELM-based sparse autoencoder is developed via l1 constraint. By doing so, it achieves more compact and meaningful feature representations than the original ELM; 2) by exploiting the advantages of ELM random feature mapping, the hierarchically encoded outputs are randomly projected before final decision making, which leads to a better generalization with faster learning speed; and 3) unlike the greedy layerwise training of deep learning (DL), the hidden layers of the proposed framework are trained in a forward manner. Once the previous layer is established, the weights of the current layer are fixed without fine-tuning. Therefore, it has much better learning efficiency than the DL. Extensive experiments on various widely used classification data sets show that the proposed algorithm achieves better and faster convergence than the existing state-of-the-art hierarchical learning methods. Furthermore, multiple applications in computer vision further confirm the generality and capability of the proposed learning scheme.

  19. An Evolutionary Machine Learning Framework for Big Data Sequence Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamath, Uday Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Sequence classification is an important problem in many real-world applications. Unlike other machine learning data, there are no "explicit" features or signals in sequence data that can help traditional machine learning algorithms learn and predict from the data. Sequence data exhibits inter-relationships in the elements that are…

  20. Machine Learning Interface for Medical Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi C; Kagen, Alexander C

    2016-10-11

    TensorFlow is a second-generation open-source machine learning software library with a built-in framework for implementing neural networks in wide variety of perceptual tasks. Although TensorFlow usage is well established with computer vision datasets, the TensorFlow interface with DICOM formats for medical imaging remains to be established. Our goal is to extend the TensorFlow API to accept raw DICOM images as input; 1513 DaTscan DICOM images were obtained from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) database. DICOM pixel intensities were extracted and shaped into tensors, or n-dimensional arrays, to populate the training, validation, and test input datasets for machine learning. A simple neural network was constructed in TensorFlow to classify images into normal or Parkinson's disease groups. Training was executed over 1000 iterations for each cross-validation set. The gradient descent optimization and Adagrad optimization algorithms were used to minimize cross-entropy between the predicted and ground-truth labels. Cross-validation was performed ten times to produce a mean accuracy of 0.938 ± 0.047 (95 % CI 0.908-0.967). The mean sensitivity was 0.974 ± 0.043 (95 % CI 0.947-1.00) and mean specificity was 0.822 ± 0.207 (95 % CI 0.694-0.950). We extended the TensorFlow API to enable DICOM compatibility in the context of DaTscan image analysis. We implemented a neural network classifier that produces diagnostic accuracies on par with excellent results from previous machine learning models. These results indicate the potential role of TensorFlow as a useful adjunct diagnostic tool in the clinical setting.

  1. Modeling quantum physics with machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Arsenault, Louis-Francois; Millis, Andrew; Littlewood, Peter; von Lilienfeld, Anatole

    2014-03-01

    Machine Learning (ML) is a systematic way of inferring new results from sparse information. It directly allows for the resolution of computationally expensive sets of equations by making sense of accumulated knowledge and it is therefore an attractive method for providing computationally inexpensive 'solvers' for some of the important systems of condensed matter physics. In this talk a non-linear regression statistical model is introduced to demonstrate the utility of ML methods in solving quantum physics related problem, and is applied to the calculation of electronic transport in 1D channels. DOE contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Predicting Networked Strategic Behavior via Machine Learning and Game Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-13

    Report: Predicting Networked Strategic Behavior via Machine Learning and Game Theory The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report...2211 machine learning, game theory , microeconomics, behavioral data REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR...Strategic Behavior via Machine Learning and Game Theory Report Title The funding for this project was used to develop basic models, methodology

  3. Advances in learning for intelligent mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Ernest L.; Ghaffari, Masoud; Liao, Xiaoqun S.; Alhaj Ali, Souma M.

    2004-10-01

    Intelligent mobile robots must often operate in an unstructured environment cluttered with obstacles and with many possible action paths to accomplish a variety of tasks. Such machines have many potential useful applications in medicine, defense, industry and even the home so that the design of such machines is a challenge with great potential rewards. Even though intelligent systems may have symbiotic closure that permits them to make a decision or take an action without external inputs, sensors such as vision permit sensing of the environment and permit precise adaptation to changes. Sensing and adaptation define a reactive system. However, in many applications some form of learning is also desirable or perhaps even required. A further level of intelligence called understanding may involve not only sensing, adaptation and learning but also creative, perceptual solutions involving models of not only the eyes and brain but also the mind. The purpose of this paper is to present a discussion of recent technical advances in learning for intelligent mobile robots with examples of adaptive, creative and perceptual learning. The significance of this work is in providing a greater understanding of the applications of learning to mobile robots that could lead to important beneficial applications.

  4. Medical Dataset Classification: A Machine Learning Paradigm Integrating Particle Swarm Optimization with Extreme Learning Machine Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Subbulakshmi, C. V.; Deepa, S. N.

    2015-01-01

    Medical data classification is a prime data mining problem being discussed about for a decade that has attracted several researchers around the world. Most classifiers are designed so as to learn from the data itself using a training process, because complete expert knowledge to determine classifier parameters is impracticable. This paper proposes a hybrid methodology based on machine learning paradigm. This paradigm integrates the successful exploration mechanism called self-regulated learning capability of the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm with the extreme learning machine (ELM) classifier. As a recent off-line learning method, ELM is a single-hidden layer feedforward neural network (FFNN), proved to be an excellent classifier with large number of hidden layer neurons. In this research, PSO is used to determine the optimum set of parameters for the ELM, thus reducing the number of hidden layer neurons, and it further improves the network generalization performance. The proposed method is experimented on five benchmarked datasets of the UCI Machine Learning Repository for handling medical dataset classification. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is able to achieve good generalization performance, compared to the results of other classifiers. PMID:26491713

  5. Medical Dataset Classification: A Machine Learning Paradigm Integrating Particle Swarm Optimization with Extreme Learning Machine Classifier.

    PubMed

    Subbulakshmi, C V; Deepa, S N

    2015-01-01

    Medical data classification is a prime data mining problem being discussed about for a decade that has attracted several researchers around the world. Most classifiers are designed so as to learn from the data itself using a training process, because complete expert knowledge to determine classifier parameters is impracticable. This paper proposes a hybrid methodology based on machine learning paradigm. This paradigm integrates the successful exploration mechanism called self-regulated learning capability of the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm with the extreme learning machine (ELM) classifier. As a recent off-line learning method, ELM is a single-hidden layer feedforward neural network (FFNN), proved to be an excellent classifier with large number of hidden layer neurons. In this research, PSO is used to determine the optimum set of parameters for the ELM, thus reducing the number of hidden layer neurons, and it further improves the network generalization performance. The proposed method is experimented on five benchmarked datasets of the UCI Machine Learning Repository for handling medical dataset classification. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is able to achieve good generalization performance, compared to the results of other classifiers.

  6. Unsupervised Feature Learning Classification With Radial Basis Function Extreme Learning Machine Using Graphic Processors.

    PubMed

    Lam, Dao; Wunsch, Donald

    2017-01-01

    Ever-increasing size and complexity of data sets create challenges and potential tradeoffs of accuracy and speed in learning algorithms. This paper offers progress on both fronts. It presents a mechanism to train the unsupervised learning features learned from only one layer to improve performance in both speed and accuracy. The features are learned by an unsupervised feature learning (UFL) algorithm. Then, those features are trained by a fast radial basis function (RBF) extreme learning machine (ELM). By exploiting the massive parallel computing attribute of modern graphics processing unit, a customized compute unified device architecture (CUDA) kernel is developed to further speed up the computing of the RBF kernel in the ELM. Results tested on Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and Mixed National Institute of Standards and Technology data sets confirm the UFL RBF ELM achieves high accuracy, and the CUDA implementation is up to 20 times faster than CPU and the naive parallel approach.

  7. Learning to Control Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Devika

    2004-01-01

    Advanced life support systems have many interacting processes and limited resources. Controlling and optimizing advanced life support systems presents unique challenges. In particular, advanced life support systems are nonlinear coupled dynamical systems and it is difficult for humans to take all interactions into account to design an effective control strategy. In this project. we developed several reinforcement learning controllers that actively explore the space of possible control strategies, guided by rewards from a user specified long term objective function. We evaluated these controllers using a discrete event simulation of an advanced life support system. This simulation, called BioSim, designed by Nasa scientists David Kortenkamp and Scott Bell has multiple, interacting life support modules including crew, food production, air revitalization, water recovery, solid waste incineration and power. They are implemented in a consumer/producer relationship in which certain modules produce resources that are consumed by other modules. Stores hold resources between modules. Control of this simulation is via adjusting flows of resources between modules and into/out of stores. We developed adaptive algorithms that control the flow of resources in BioSim. Our learning algorithms discovered several ingenious strategies for maximizing mission length by controlling the air and water recycling systems as well as crop planting schedules. By exploiting non-linearities in the overall system dynamics, the learned controllers easily out- performed controllers written by human experts. In sum, we accomplished three goals. We (1) developed foundations for learning models of coupled dynamical systems by active exploration of the state space, (2) developed and tested algorithms that learn to efficiently control air and water recycling processes as well as crop scheduling in Biosim, and (3) developed an understanding of the role machine learning in designing control systems for

  8. Machine learning techniques and drug design.

    PubMed

    Gertrudes, J C; Maltarollo, V G; Silva, R A; Oliveira, P R; Honório, K M; da Silva, A B F

    2012-01-01

    The interest in the application of machine learning techniques (MLT) as drug design tools is growing in the last decades. The reason for this is related to the fact that the drug design is very complex and requires the use of hybrid techniques. A brief review of some MLT such as self-organizing maps, multilayer perceptron, bayesian neural networks, counter-propagation neural network and support vector machines is described in this paper. A comparison between the performance of the described methods and some classical statistical methods (such as partial least squares and multiple linear regression) shows that MLT have significant advantages. Nowadays, the number of studies in medicinal chemistry that employ these techniques has considerably increased, in particular the use of support vector machines. The state of the art and the future trends of MLT applications encompass the use of these techniques to construct more reliable QSAR models. The models obtained from MLT can be used in virtual screening studies as well as filters to develop/discovery new chemicals. An important challenge in the drug design field is the prediction of pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties, which can avoid failures in the clinical phases. Therefore, this review provides a critical point of view on the main MLT and shows their potential ability as a valuable tool in drug design.

  9. Machine learning of user profiles: Representational issues

    SciTech Connect

    Bloedorn, E.; Mani, I.; MacMillan, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    As more information becomes available electronically, tools for finding information of interest to users becomes increasingly important. The goal of the research described here is to build a system for generating comprehensible user profiles that accurately capture user interest with minimum user interaction. The research described here focuses on the importance of a suitable generalization hierarchy and representation for learning profiles which are predictively accurate and comprehensible. In our experiments we evaluated both traditional features based on weighted term vectors as well as subject features corresponding to categories which could be drawn from a thesaurus. Our experiments, conducted in the context of a content-based profiling system for on-line newspapers on the World Wide Web (the IDD News Browser), demonstrate the importance of a generalization hierarchy and the promise of combining natural language processing techniques with machine learning (ML) to address an information retrieval (ER) problem.

  10. Machine learning approaches to personalize early prediction of asthma exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Jeong, In Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Patient telemonitoring results in an aggregation of significant amounts of information about patient disease trajectory. However, the potential use of this information for early prediction of exacerbations in adult asthma patients has not been systematically evaluated. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of telemonitoring data for building machine learning algorithms that predict asthma exacerbations before they occur. The study dataset comprised daily self-monitoring reports consisting of 7001 records submitted by adult asthma patients during home telemonitoring. Predictive modeling included preparation of stratified training datasets, predictive feature selection, and evaluation of resulting classifiers. Using a 7-day window, a naive Bayesian classifier, adaptive Bayesian network, and support vector machines were able to predict asthma exacerbation occurring on day 8, with sensitivity of 0.80, 1.00, and 0.84; specificity of 0.77, 1.00, and 0.80; and accuracy of 0.77, 1.00, and 0.80, respectively. Our study demonstrated that machine learning techniques have significant potential in developing personalized decision support for chronic disease telemonitoring systems. Future studies may benefit from a comprehensive predictive framework that combines telemonitoring data with other factors affecting the likelihood of developing acute exacerbation. Approaches implemented for advanced asthma exacerbation prediction may be extended to prediction of exacerbations in patients with other chronic health conditions.

  11. Teacher Leaders: Advancing Mathematics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzer, Cathy J.; Rincón, Mari; Ward, Jana; Rincón, Ricardo; Gomez, Lesli

    2014-01-01

    Four elementary school instructors offer insights into their classrooms, their unique professional roles, and their leadership approaches as they reflect on their journey to advance teacher and student mathematics learning. They note a "teacher leader" serves as an example to other educators and strives to impact student learning;…

  12. Galaxy morphology - An unsupervised machine learning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutter, A.; Shamir, L.

    2015-09-01

    Structural properties poses valuable information about the formation and evolution of galaxies, and are important for understanding the past, present, and future universe. Here we use unsupervised machine learning methodology to analyze a network of similarities between galaxy morphological types, and automatically deduce a morphological sequence of galaxies. Application of the method to the EFIGI catalog show that the morphological scheme produced by the algorithm is largely in agreement with the De Vaucouleurs system, demonstrating the ability of computer vision and machine learning methods to automatically profile galaxy morphological sequences. The unsupervised analysis method is based on comprehensive computer vision techniques that compute the visual similarities between the different morphological types. Rather than relying on human cognition, the proposed system deduces the similarities between sets of galaxy images in an automatic manner, and is therefore not limited by the number of galaxies being analyzed. The source code of the method is publicly available, and the protocol of the experiment is included in the paper so that the experiment can be replicated, and the method can be used to analyze user-defined datasets of galaxy images.

  13. A Fast Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wan-Yu; Ong, Yew-Soon; Zheng, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a fast and accurate kernel-based supervised algorithm referred to as the Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine (RKELM). In contrast to the work on Support Vector Machine (SVM) or Least Square SVM (LS-SVM), which identifies the support vectors or weight vectors iteratively, the proposed RKELM randomly selects a subset of the available data samples as support vectors (or mapping samples). By avoiding the iterative steps of SVM, significant cost savings in the training process can be readily attained, especially on Big datasets. RKELM is established based on the rigorous proof of universal learning involving reduced kernel-based SLFN. In particular, we prove that RKELM can approximate any nonlinear functions accurately under the condition of support vectors sufficiency. Experimental results on a wide variety of real world small instance size and large instance size applications in the context of binary classification, multi-class problem and regression are then reported to show that RKELM can perform at competitive level of generalized performance as the SVM/LS-SVM at only a fraction of the computational effort incurred.

  14. Measure Transformer Semantics for Bayesian Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgström, Johannes; Gordon, Andrew D.; Greenberg, Michael; Margetson, James; van Gael, Jurgen

    The Bayesian approach to machine learning amounts to inferring posterior distributions of random variables from a probabilistic model of how the variables are related (that is, a prior distribution) and a set of observations of variables. There is a trend in machine learning towards expressing Bayesian models as probabilistic programs. As a foundation for this kind of programming, we propose a core functional calculus with primitives for sampling prior distributions and observing variables. We define combinators for measure transformers, based on theorems in measure theory, and use these to give a rigorous semantics to our core calculus. The original features of our semantics include its support for discrete, continuous, and hybrid measures, and, in particular, for observations of zero-probability events. We compile our core language to a small imperative language that has a straightforward semantics via factor graphs, data structures that enable many efficient inference algorithms. We use an existing inference engine for efficient approximate inference of posterior marginal distributions, treating thousands of observations per second for large instances of realistic models.

  15. Photometric Supernova Classification with Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochner, Michelle; McEwen, Jason D.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K.

    2016-08-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques that fit parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and boosted decision trees (BDTs). We test the pipeline on simulated multi-band DES light curves from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Using the commonly used area under the curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic as a metric, we find that the SALT2 fits and the wavelet approach, with the BDTs algorithm, each achieve an AUC of 0.98, where 1 represents perfect classification. We find that a representative training set is essential for good classification, whatever the feature set or algorithm, with implications for spectroscopic follow-up. Importantly, we find that by using either the SALT2 or the wavelet feature sets with a BDT algorithm, accurate classification is possible purely from light curve data, without the need for any redshift information.

  16. Machine Learning Techniques for Decision Support in Intelligent Data Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynnes, C.; Miller, J.; Ramapriyan, H.; Isaac, D.; Harberts, R.

    2002-12-01

    NASA's growth in remote sensing data volumes has kept pace with Moore's Law, i.e., doubling every 18 months, with future growth likely from new instruments. Also, advances in instrumental design (e.g., hyperspectral scanners) and science algorithms are enabling more near-real-time applications of the data. The confluence of low-latency requirements with high data volumes and numbers of files poses major challenges for archive data management. In order to make the right data available at the right time, an archive will need to apply knowledge of the data content in its data management decisions. This decision support domain includes aspects such as automatic quality assessment, feature detection to support caching decisions, and content-based metadata to support efficient data selection. In this study, we evaluate a variety of machine learning algorithms for use in several decision support roles in intelligent data management. Machine learning algorithms such as neural networks and clustering have been used for decision support in business and policy domains. These techniques have found some use in remote sensing, e.g., for cloud and land cover classification. Yet most research on remote sensing data rests on science-based algorithms, such as those based on radiative transfer equations. Machine learning for scientific applications faces challenges such as discretization constraints, non-physical basis, and the difficulty of assembling training sets. However, these difficulties may be less significant in the decision support role. For instance, it is often enough to know whether a data attribute exceeds a certain threshold when selecting it for an application, without knowing the exact value. The training data problem can be surmounted by using products output by the science-based algorithms. On the other hand, an advantage of machine learning algorithms for decision support is their speed once they have been trained. Data management decisions must be made while the

  17. Industrial Inspection with Open Eyes: Advance with Machine Vision Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng; Ukida, H.; Niel, Kurt; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2015-10-01

    Machine vision systems have evolved significantly with the technology advances to tackle the challenges from modern manufacturing industry. A wide range of industrial inspection applications for quality control are benefiting from visual information captured by different types of cameras variously configured in a machine vision system. This chapter screens the state of the art in machine vision technologies in the light of hardware, software tools, and major algorithm advances for industrial inspection. The inspection beyond visual spectrum offers a significant complementary to the visual inspection. The combination with multiple technologies makes it possible for the inspection to achieve a better performance and efficiency in varied applications. The diversity of the applications demonstrates the great potential of machine vision systems for industry.

  18. Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine With Kernels.

    PubMed

    Scardapane, Simone; Comminiello, Danilo; Scarpiniti, Michele; Uncini, Aurelio

    2015-09-01

    The extreme learning machine (ELM) was recently proposed as a unifying framework for different families of learning algorithms. The classical ELM model consists of a linear combination of a fixed number of nonlinear expansions of the input vector. Learning in ELM is hence equivalent to finding the optimal weights that minimize the error on a dataset. The update works in batch mode, either with explicit feature mappings or with implicit mappings defined by kernels. Although an online version has been proposed for the former, no work has been done up to this point for the latter, and whether an efficient learning algorithm for online kernel-based ELM exists remains an open problem. By explicating some connections between nonlinear adaptive filtering and ELM theory, in this brief, we present an algorithm for this task. In particular, we propose a straightforward extension of the well-known kernel recursive least-squares, belonging to the kernel adaptive filtering (KAF) family, to the ELM framework. We call the resulting algorithm the kernel online sequential ELM (KOS-ELM). Moreover, we consider two different criteria used in the KAF field to obtain sparse filters and extend them to our context. We show that KOS-ELM, with their integration, can result in a highly efficient algorithm, both in terms of obtained generalization error and training time. Empirical evaluations demonstrate interesting results on some benchmarking datasets.

  19. Learning Activity Packets for Milling Machines. Unit I--Introduction to Milling Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) outlines the study activities and performance tasks covered in a related curriculum guide on milling machines. The course of study in this LAP is intended to help students learn to identify parts and attachments of vertical and horizontal milling machines, identify work-holding devices, state safety rules, and…

  20. Broiler chickens can benefit from machine learning: support vector machine analysis of observational epidemiological data.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Philip J; Nefedov, Alexey V; Muchnik, Ilya B; Morgan, Kenton L

    2012-08-07

    Machine-learning algorithms pervade our daily lives. In epidemiology, supervised machine learning has the potential for classification, diagnosis and risk factor identification. Here, we report the use of support vector machine learning to identify the features associated with hock burn on commercial broiler farms, using routinely collected farm management data. These data lend themselves to analysis using machine-learning techniques. Hock burn, dermatitis of the skin over the hock, is an important indicator of broiler health and welfare. Remarkably, this classifier can predict the occurrence of high hock burn prevalence with accuracy of 0.78 on unseen data, as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. We also compare the results with those obtained by standard multi-variable logistic regression and suggest that this technique provides new insights into the data. This novel application of a machine-learning algorithm, embedded in poultry management systems could offer significant improvements in broiler health and welfare worldwide.

  1. Dropout Prediction in E-Learning Courses through the Combination of Machine Learning Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykourentzou, Ioanna; Giannoukos, Ioannis; Nikolopoulos, Vassilis; Mpardis, George; Loumos, Vassili

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a dropout prediction method for e-learning courses, based on three popular machine learning techniques and detailed student data, is proposed. The machine learning techniques used are feed-forward neural networks, support vector machines and probabilistic ensemble simplified fuzzy ARTMAP. Since a single technique may fail to…

  2. Applying Machine Learning to Facilitate Autism Diagnostics: Pitfalls and Promises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bone, Daniel; Goodwin, Matthew S.; Black, Matthew P.; Lee, Chi-Chun; Audhkhasi, Kartik; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning has immense potential to enhance diagnostic and intervention research in the behavioral sciences, and may be especially useful in investigations involving the highly prevalent and heterogeneous syndrome of autism spectrum disorder. However, use of machine learning in the absence of clinical domain expertise can be tenuous and lead…

  3. Large-Scale Machine Learning for Classification and Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Wei

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of the Internet, nowadays tremendous amounts of data including images and videos, up to millions or billions, can be collected for training machine learning models. Inspired by this trend, this thesis is dedicated to developing large-scale machine learning techniques for the purpose of making classification and nearest…

  4. Newton Methods for Large Scale Problems in Machine Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Samantha Leigh

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on practical ways of designing optimization algorithms for minimizing large-scale nonlinear functions with applications in machine learning. Chapter 1 introduces the overarching ideas in the thesis. Chapters 2 and 3 are geared towards supervised machine learning applications that involve minimizing a sum of loss…

  5. Holographic On-Line Learning Machine for Multicategory Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Eung Gi; Wullert, John R.; Patel, J. S.

    1990-07-01

    A holographic on-line learning machine that is capable of multicategory classification is described. The system exactly implements the single-layer perceptron algorithm in a fully parallel and analog fashion. The performance of the adaptive network is successfully tested for up to 24 characters with different scale and rotation. Also, a compact and robust version of the holographic learning machine is proposed.

  6. The mutual inspirations of machine learning and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-04-08

    Neuroscientists are generating data sets of enormous size, which are matching the complexity of real-world classification tasks. Machine learning has helped data analysis enormously but is often not as accurate as human data analysis. Here, Helmstaedter discusses the challenges and promises of neuroscience-inspired machine learning that lie ahead.

  7. Machine learning and genome annotation: a match meant to be?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    By its very nature, genomics produces large, high-dimensional datasets that are well suited to analysis by machine learning approaches. Here, we explain some key aspects of machine learning that make it useful for genome annotation, with illustrative examples from ENCODE. PMID:23731483

  8. Evolutionary Cost-Sensitive Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, David

    2016-10-11

    Conventional extreme learning machines (ELMs) solve a Moore-Penrose generalized inverse of hidden layer activated matrix and analytically determine the output weights to achieve generalized performance, by assuming the same loss from different types of misclassification. The assumption may not hold in cost-sensitive recognition tasks, such as face recognition-based access control system, where misclassifying a stranger as a family member may result in more serious disaster than misclassifying a family member as a stranger. Though recent cost-sensitive learning can reduce the total loss with a given cost matrix that quantifies how severe one type of mistake against another, in many realistic cases, the cost matrix is unknown to users. Motivated by these concerns, this paper proposes an evolutionary cost-sensitive ELM, with the following merits: 1) to the best of our knowledge, it is the first proposal of ELM in evolutionary cost-sensitive classification scenario; 2) it well addresses the open issue of how to define the cost matrix in cost-sensitive learning tasks; and 3) an evolutionary backtracking search algorithm is induced for adaptive cost matrix optimization. Experiments in a variety of cost-sensitive tasks well demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches, with about 5%-10% improvements.

  9. Morphological Neuron Classification Using Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Vasques, Xavier; Vanel, Laurent; Villette, Guillaume; Cif, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Classification and quantitative characterization of neuronal morphologies from histological neuronal reconstruction is challenging since it is still unclear how to delineate a neuronal cell class and which are the best features to define them by. The morphological neuron characterization represents a primary source to address anatomical comparisons, morphometric analysis of cells, or brain modeling. The objectives of this paper are (i) to develop and integrate a pipeline that goes from morphological feature extraction to classification and (ii) to assess and compare the accuracy of machine learning algorithms to classify neuron morphologies. The algorithms were trained on 430 digitally reconstructed neurons subjectively classified into layers and/or m-types using young and/or adult development state population of the somatosensory cortex in rats. For supervised algorithms, linear discriminant analysis provided better classification results in comparison with others. For unsupervised algorithms, the affinity propagation and the Ward algorithms provided slightly better results.

  10. Machine Learning for Dynamical Mean Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-Francois; Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Littlewood, P. B.; Millis, Andy

    2014-03-01

    Machine Learning (ML), an approach that infers new results from accumulated knowledge, is in use for a variety of tasks ranging from face and voice recognition to internet searching and has recently been gaining increasing importance in chemistry and physics. In this talk, we investigate the possibility of using ML to solve the equations of dynamical mean field theory which otherwise requires the (numerically very expensive) solution of a quantum impurity model. Our ML scheme requires the relation between two functions: the hybridization function describing the bare (local) electronic structure of a material and the self-energy describing the many body physics. We discuss the parameterization of the two functions for the exact diagonalization solver and present examples, beginning with the Anderson Impurity model with a fixed bath density of states, demonstrating the advantages and the pitfalls of the method. DOE contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  11. Morphological Neuron Classification Using Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Vasques, Xavier; Vanel, Laurent; Villette, Guillaume; Cif, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Classification and quantitative characterization of neuronal morphologies from histological neuronal reconstruction is challenging since it is still unclear how to delineate a neuronal cell class and which are the best features to define them by. The morphological neuron characterization represents a primary source to address anatomical comparisons, morphometric analysis of cells, or brain modeling. The objectives of this paper are (i) to develop and integrate a pipeline that goes from morphological feature extraction to classification and (ii) to assess and compare the accuracy of machine learning algorithms to classify neuron morphologies. The algorithms were trained on 430 digitally reconstructed neurons subjectively classified into layers and/or m-types using young and/or adult development state population of the somatosensory cortex in rats. For supervised algorithms, linear discriminant analysis provided better classification results in comparison with others. For unsupervised algorithms, the affinity propagation and the Ward algorithms provided slightly better results. PMID:27847467

  12. A Machine-Learning-Driven Sky Model.

    PubMed

    Satylmys, Pynar; Bashford-Rogers, Thomas; Chalmers, Alan; Debattista, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Sky illumination is responsible for much of the lighting in a virtual environment. A machine-learning-based approach can compactly represent sky illumination from both existing analytic sky models and from captured environment maps. The proposed approach can approximate the captured lighting at a significantly reduced memory cost and enable smooth transitions of sky lighting to be created from a small set of environment maps captured at discrete times of day. The author's results demonstrate accuracy close to the ground truth for both analytical and capture-based methods. The approach has a low runtime overhead, so it can be used as a generic approach for both offline and real-time applications.

  13. CD process control through machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utzny, Clemens

    2016-10-01

    For the specific requirements of the 14nm and 20nm site applications a new CD map approach was developed at the AMTC. This approach relies on a well established machine learning technique called recursive partitioning. Recursive partitioning is a powerful technique which creates a decision tree by successively testing whether the quantity of interest can be explained by one of the supplied covariates. The test performed is generally a statistical test with a pre-supplied significance level. Once the test indicates significant association between the variable of interest and a covariate a split performed at a threshold value which minimizes the variation within the newly attained groups. This partitioning is recurred until either no significant association can be detected or the resulting sub group size falls below a pre-supplied level.

  14. Tracking medical genetic literature through machine learning.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Aaron T; McLoughlin, Matthew H; Aguilar, Jesus; Wong, Wendy S W; Solomon, Benjamin D

    2016-08-01

    There has been remarkable progress in identifying the causes of genetic conditions as well as understanding how changes in specific genes cause disease. Though difficult (and often superficial) to parse, an interesting tension involves emphasis on basic research aimed to dissect normal and abnormal biology versus more clearly clinical and therapeutic investigations. To examine one facet of this question and to better understand progress in Mendelian-related research, we developed an algorithm that classifies medical literature into three categories (Basic, Clinical, and Management) and conducted a retrospective analysis. We built a supervised machine learning classification model using the Azure Machine Learning (ML) Platform and analyzed the literature (1970-2014) from NCBI's Entrez Gene2Pubmed Database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene) using genes from the NHGRI's Clinical Genomics Database (http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/CGD/). We applied our model to 376,738 articles: 288,639 (76.6%) were classified as Basic, 54,178 (14.4%) as Clinical, and 24,569 (6.5%) as Management. The average classification accuracy was 92.2%. The rate of Clinical publication was significantly higher than Basic or Management. The rate of publication of article types differed significantly when divided into key eras: Human Genome Project (HGP) planning phase (1984-1990); HGP launch (1990) to publication (2001); following HGP completion to the "Next Generation" advent (2009); the era following 2009. In conclusion, in addition to the findings regarding the pace and focus of genetic progress, our algorithm produced a database that can be used in a variety of contexts including automating the identification of management-related literature.

  15. A novel ensemble machine learning for robust microarray data classification.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yonghong

    2006-06-01

    Microarray data analysis and classification has demonstrated convincingly that it provides an effective methodology for the effective diagnosis of diseases and cancers. Although much research has been performed on applying machine learning techniques for microarray data classification during the past years, it has been shown that conventional machine learning techniques have intrinsic drawbacks in achieving accurate and robust classifications. This paper presents a novel ensemble machine learning approach for the development of robust microarray data classification. Different from the conventional ensemble learning techniques, the approach presented begins with generating a pool of candidate base classifiers based on the gene sub-sampling and then the selection of a sub-set of appropriate base classifiers to construct the classification committee based on classifier clustering. Experimental results have demonstrated that the classifiers constructed by the proposed method outperforms not only the classifiers generated by the conventional machine learning but also the classifiers generated by two widely used conventional ensemble learning methods (bagging and boosting).

  16. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology Program (MAST). Overview and Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    The Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology Program (MAST) is a geographical partnership of six of the nation's best two-year colleges located in the six states that have about one-third of the density of metals-related industries in the United States. The purpose of the MAST grant is to develop and implement a national training model to overcome…

  17. Precision Parameter Estimation and Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2008-12-01

    I discuss the strategy of ``Acceleration by Parallel Precomputation and Learning'' (AP-PLe) that can vastly accelerate parameter estimation in high-dimensional parameter spaces and costly likelihood functions, using trivially parallel computing to speed up sequential exploration of parameter space. This strategy combines the power of distributed computing with machine learning and Markov-Chain Monte Carlo techniques efficiently to explore a likelihood function, posterior distribution or χ2-surface. This strategy is particularly successful in cases where computing the likelihood is costly and the number of parameters is moderate or large. We apply this technique to two central problems in cosmology: the solution of the cosmological parameter estimation problem with sufficient accuracy for the Planck data using PICo; and the detailed calculation of cosmological helium and hydrogen recombination with RICO. Since the APPLe approach is designed to be able to use massively parallel resources to speed up problems that are inherently serial, we can bring the power of distributed computing to bear on parameter estimation problems. We have demonstrated this with the CosmologyatHome project.

  18. Intelligent machine learning analysis for phosphoric acid fuel cell operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, W.; Foote, J.P.; Murphy, R.W.; Chen, F.C.

    1998-07-01

    Several fuel cell types are available and are in various stages of technology development. The complex nature of the balance of plant and fuel cell interface poses many technical challenges to achieve proper system control under commercial operating conditions. Real-time predictive diagnostic computer systems based on advanced intelligent machine learning technologies offer a means to facilitate the detection, understanding, and control of fuel cell subsystems to avoid system instabilities and failures that can result in costly plant shutdowns. The objectives reported herein are the development of physical and empirical computer models for application and testing of predictive control strategies based on intelligent machine learning techniques for fuel cells. A physical/empirical model was built and validated using available operating data from commercial fuel cells. Neural networks were then used to build an empirical model from the original physical/empirical model. Using the neural network model, a predictive, feedforward strategy was developed to control the fuel flow for a phosphoric acid fuel cell physical/empirical model. The predictive control strategy was compared to traditional proportional integral derivative control schemes.

  19. ATCA for Machines-- Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2008-04-22

    The Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture is a new industry open standard for electronics instrument modules and shelves being evaluated for the International Linear Collider (ILC). It is the first industrial standard designed for High Availability (HA). ILC availability simulations have shown clearly that the capabilities of ATCA are needed in order to achieve acceptable integrated luminosity. The ATCA architecture looks attractive for beam instruments and detector applications as well. This paper provides an overview of ongoing R&D including application of HA principles to power electronics systems.

  20. Abrasives and Grinding Machines; Machine Shop Work--Advanced: 9557.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline has been prepared as a guide to assist the instructor in systematically planning and presenting a variety of meaningful lessons to facilitate the necessary training for the machine shop student. The material contained in the outline is designed to enable the student to learn the manipulative skills and related knowledge…

  1. Precision Machining and Technology; Machine Shop Work--Advanced: 9557.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline has been prepared as a guide to assist the instructor in systematically planning and presenting a variety of meaningful lessons to facilitate the necessary training for the machine shop student. The material is designed to enable the student to learn the manipulative skills and related knowledge necessary to understand the jig…

  2. Prediction of stroke thrombolysis outcome using CT brain machine learning.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Paul; Ganesalingam, Jeban; Carlton Jones, Anoma Lalani; Mahady, Kate; Epton, Sarah; Rinne, Paul; Sharma, Pankaj; Halse, Omid; Mehta, Amrish; Rueckert, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    A critical decision-step in the emergency treatment of ischemic stroke is whether or not to administer thrombolysis - a treatment that can result in good recovery, or deterioration due to symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (SICH). Certain imaging features based upon early computerized tomography (CT), in combination with clinical variables, have been found to predict SICH, albeit with modest accuracy. In this proof-of-concept study, we determine whether machine learning of CT images can predict which patients receiving tPA will develop SICH as opposed to showing clinical improvement with no haemorrhage. Clinical records and CT brains of 116 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis were collected retrospectively (including 16 who developed SICH). The sample was split into training (n = 106) and test sets (n = 10), repeatedly for 1760 different combinations. CT brain images acted as inputs into a support vector machine (SVM), along with clinical severity. Performance of the SVM was compared with established prognostication tools (SEDAN and HAT scores; original, or after adaptation to our cohort). Predictive performance, assessed as area under receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AUC), of the SVM (0.744) compared favourably with that of prognostic scores (original and adapted versions: 0.626-0.720; p < 0.01). The SVM also identified 9 out of 16 SICHs, as opposed to 1-5 using prognostic scores, assuming a 10% SICH frequency (p < 0.001). In summary, machine learning methods applied to acute stroke CT images offer automation, and potentially improved performance, for prediction of SICH following thrombolysis. Larger-scale cohorts, and incorporation of advanced imaging, should be tested with such methods.

  3. Studying depression using imaging and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Meenal J; Khalaf, Alexander; Aizenstein, Howard J

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a complex clinical entity that can pose challenges for clinicians regarding both accurate diagnosis and effective timely treatment. These challenges have prompted the development of multiple machine learning methods to help improve the management of this disease. These methods utilize anatomical and physiological data acquired from neuroimaging to create models that can identify depressed patients vs. non-depressed patients and predict treatment outcomes. This article (1) presents a background on depression, imaging, and machine learning methodologies; (2) reviews methodologies of past studies that have used imaging and machine learning to study depression; and (3) suggests directions for future depression-related studies.

  4. 2014 Bio-Acoustics Data Challenge for the International Community on Machine Learning and Bioacoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    advanced machine learning techniques for detection and classification of marine mammal sounds. OBJECTIVES The objective is to engage a broad... mammal sounds. APPROACH This research project will utilize an existing website, Kaggle.com, to host a bioacoustic detection- classification data...challenging to analyze for the acoustic occurrence of marine mammals . Novel detection- classification technologies are needed to process these data. The

  5. Machine Learning for High-Throughput Stress Phenotyping in Plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arti; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Singh, Asheesh Kumar; Sarkar, Soumik

    2016-02-01

    Advances in automated and high-throughput imaging technologies have resulted in a deluge of high-resolution images and sensor data of plants. However, extracting patterns and features from this large corpus of data requires the use of machine learning (ML) tools to enable data assimilation and feature identification for stress phenotyping. Four stages of the decision cycle in plant stress phenotyping and plant breeding activities where different ML approaches can be deployed are (i) identification, (ii) classification, (iii) quantification, and (iv) prediction (ICQP). We provide here a comprehensive overview and user-friendly taxonomy of ML tools to enable the plant community to correctly and easily apply the appropriate ML tools and best-practice guidelines for various biotic and abiotic stress traits.

  6. Predicting Increased Blood Pressure Using Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Golino, Hudson Fernandes; Amaral, Liliany Souza de Brito; Duarte, Stenio Fernando Pimentel; Soares, Telma de Jesus; dos Reis, Luciana Araujo

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the prediction of increased blood pressure by body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip circumference (HC), and waist hip ratio (WHR) using a machine learning technique named classification tree. Data were collected from 400 college students (56.3% women) from 16 to 63 years old. Fifteen trees were calculated in the training group for each sex, using different numbers and combinations of predictors. The result shows that for women BMI, WC, and WHR are the combination that produces the best prediction, since it has the lowest deviance (87.42), misclassification (.19), and the higher pseudo R2 (.43). This model presented a sensitivity of 80.86% and specificity of 81.22% in the training set and, respectively, 45.65% and 65.15% in the test sample. For men BMI, WC, HC, and WHC showed the best prediction with the lowest deviance (57.25), misclassification (.16), and the higher pseudo R2 (.46). This model had a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 86.25% in the training set and, respectively, 58.38% and 69.70% in the test set. Finally, the result from the classification tree analysis was compared with traditional logistic regression, indicating that the former outperformed the latter in terms of predictive power. PMID:24669313

  7. Optimal interference code based on machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ye; Chen, Qian; Hu, Xiaobo; Cao, Ercong; Qian, Weixian; Gu, Guohua

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we analyze the characteristics of pseudo-random code, by the case of m sequence. Depending on the description of coding theory, we introduce the jamming methods. We simulate the interference effect or probability model by the means of MATLAB to consolidate. In accordance with the length of decoding time the adversary spends, we find out the optimal formula and optimal coefficients based on machine learning, then we get the new optimal interference code. First, when it comes to the phase of recognition, this study judges the effect of interference by the way of simulating the length of time over the decoding period of laser seeker. Then, we use laser active deception jamming simulate interference process in the tracking phase in the next block. In this study we choose the method of laser active deception jamming. In order to improve the performance of the interference, this paper simulates the model by MATLAB software. We find out the least number of pulse intervals which must be received, then we can make the conclusion that the precise interval number of the laser pointer for m sequence encoding. In order to find the shortest space, we make the choice of the greatest common divisor method. Then, combining with the coding regularity that has been found before, we restore pulse interval of pseudo-random code, which has been already received. Finally, we can control the time period of laser interference, get the optimal interference code, and also increase the probability of interference as well.

  8. Image Segmentation for Connectomics Using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Tasdizen, Tolga; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Liu, TIng; Jones, Cory; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.

    2014-12-01

    Reconstruction of neural circuits at the microscopic scale of individual neurons and synapses, also known as connectomics, is an important challenge for neuroscience. While an important motivation of connectomics is providing anatomical ground truth for neural circuit models, the ability to decipher neural wiring maps at the individual cell level is also important in studies of many neurodegenerative diseases. Reconstruction of a neural circuit at the individual neuron level requires the use of electron microscopy images due to their extremely high resolution. Computational challenges include pixel-by-pixel annotation of these images into classes such as cell membrane, mitochondria and synaptic vesicles and the segmentation of individual neurons. State-of-the-art image analysis solutions are still far from the accuracy and robustness of human vision and biologists are still limited to studying small neural circuits using mostly manual analysis. In this chapter, we describe our image analysis pipeline that makes use of novel supervised machine learning techniques to tackle this problem.

  9. Creating Situational Awareness in Spacecraft Operations with the Machine Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a machine learning approach for the situational awareness capability in spacecraft operations. There are two types of time dependent data patterns for spacecraft datasets: the absolute time pattern (ATP) and the relative time pattern (RTP). The machine learning captures the data patterns of the satellite datasets through the data training during the normal operations, which is represented by its time dependent trend. The data monitoring compares the values of the incoming data with the predictions of machine learning algorithm, which can detect any meaningful changes to a dataset above the noise level. If the difference between the value of incoming telemetry and the machine learning prediction are larger than the threshold defined by the standard deviation of datasets, it could indicate the potential anomaly that may need special attention. The application of the machine-learning approach to the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) on Japanese Himawari spacecraft series is presented, which has the same configuration as the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on Geostationary Environment Operational Satellite (GOES) R series. The time dependent trends generated by the data-training algorithm are in excellent agreement with the datasets. The standard deviation in the time dependent trend provides a metric for measuring the data quality, which is particularly useful in evaluating the detector quality for both AHI and ABI with multiple detectors in each channel. The machine-learning approach creates the situational awareness capability, and enables engineers to handle the huge data volume that would have been impossible with the existing approach, and it leads to significant advances to more dynamic, proactive, and autonomous spacecraft operations.

  10. Acceleration of saddle-point searches with machine learning.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Andrew A

    2016-08-21

    In atomistic simulations, the location of the saddle point on the potential-energy surface (PES) gives important information on transitions between local minima, for example, via transition-state theory. However, the search for saddle points often involves hundreds or thousands of ab initio force calls, which are typically all done at full accuracy. This results in the vast majority of the computational effort being spent calculating the electronic structure of states not important to the researcher, and very little time performing the calculation of the saddle point state itself. In this work, we describe how machine learning (ML) can reduce the number of intermediate ab initio calculations needed to locate saddle points. Since machine-learning models can learn from, and thus mimic, atomistic simulations, the saddle-point search can be conducted rapidly in the machine-learning representation. The saddle-point prediction can then be verified by an ab initio calculation; if it is incorrect, this strategically has identified regions of the PES where the machine-learning representation has insufficient training data. When these training data are used to improve the machine-learning model, the estimates greatly improve. This approach can be systematized, and in two simple example problems we demonstrate a dramatic reduction in the number of ab initio force calls. We expect that this approach and future refinements will greatly accelerate searches for saddle points, as well as other searches on the potential energy surface, as machine-learning methods see greater adoption by the atomistics community.

  11. Man-machine interface builders at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is constructing a 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source for use as a synchrotron radiation source in basic and applied research. The controls and computing environment for this accelerator complex includes graphical operator interfaces to the machine based on Motif, X11, and PHIGS/PEX. Construction and operation of the control system for this accelerator relies upon interactive interface builder and diagram/editor type tools, as well as a run-time environment for the constructed displays which communicate with the physical machine via network connections. This paper discusses our experience with several commercial CUI builders, the inadequacies found in these, motivation for the development of an application- specific builder, and design and implementation strategies employed in the development of our own Man-Machine Interface builder. 5 refs.

  12. Man-machine interface builders at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.D.

    1991-12-31

    Argonne National Laboratory is constructing a 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source for use as a synchrotron radiation source in basic and applied research. The controls and computing environment for this accelerator complex includes graphical operator interfaces to the machine based on Motif, X11, and PHIGS/PEX. Construction and operation of the control system for this accelerator relies upon interactive interface builder and diagram/editor type tools, as well as a run-time environment for the constructed displays which communicate with the physical machine via network connections. This paper discusses our experience with several commercial CUI builders, the inadequacies found in these, motivation for the development of an application- specific builder, and design and implementation strategies employed in the development of our own Man-Machine Interface builder. 5 refs.

  13. Learning Machine, Vietnamese Based Human-Computer Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The sixth session of IT@EDU98 consisted of seven papers on the topic of the learning machine--Vietnamese based human-computer interface, and was chaired by Phan Viet Hoang (Informatics College, Singapore). "Knowledge Based Approach for English Vietnamese Machine Translation" (Hoang Kiem, Dinh Dien) presents the knowledge base approach,…

  14. Learn about Physical Science: Simple Machines. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This CD-ROM, designed for students in grades K-2, explores the world of simple machines. It allows students to delve into the mechanical world and learn the ways in which simple machines make work easier. Animated demonstrations are provided of the lever, pulley, wheel, screw, wedge, and inclined plane. Activities include practical matching and…

  15. Machine learning challenges in Mars rover traverse science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castano, R.; Judd, M.; Anderson, R. C.; Estlin, T.

    2003-01-01

    The successful implementation of machine learning in autonomous rover traverse science requires addressing challenges that range from the analytical technical realm, to the fuzzy, philosophical domain of entrenched belief systems within scientists and mission managers.

  16. Parameter Identifiability in Statistical Machine Learning: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ran, Zhi-Yong; Hu, Bao-Gang

    2017-02-09

    This review examines the relevance of parameter identifiability for statistical models used in machine learning. In addition to defining main concepts, we address several issues of identifiability closely related to machine learning, showing the advantages and disadvantages of state-of-the-art research and demonstrating recent progress. First, we review criteria for determining the parameter structure of models from the literature. This has three related issues: parameter identifiability, parameter redundancy, and reparameterization. Second, we review the deep influence of identifiability on various aspects of machine learning from theoretical and application viewpoints. In addition to illustrating the utility and influence of identifiability, we emphasize the interplay among identifiability theory, machine learning, mathematical statistics, information theory, optimization theory, information geometry, Riemann geometry, symbolic computation, Bayesian inference, algebraic geometry, and others. Finally, we present a new perspective together with the associated challenges.

  17. Reduced multiple empirical kernel learning machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Lu, MingZhe; Gao, Daqi

    2015-02-01

    Multiple kernel learning (MKL) is demonstrated to be flexible and effective in depicting heterogeneous data sources since MKL can introduce multiple kernels rather than a single fixed kernel into applications. However, MKL would get a high time and space complexity in contrast to single kernel learning, which is not expected in real-world applications. Meanwhile, it is known that the kernel mapping ways of MKL generally have two forms including implicit kernel mapping and empirical kernel mapping (EKM), where the latter is less attracted. In this paper, we focus on the MKL with the EKM, and propose a reduced multiple empirical kernel learning machine named RMEKLM for short. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to reduce both time and space complexity of the MKL with EKM. Different from the existing MKL, the proposed RMEKLM adopts the Gauss Elimination technique to extract a set of feature vectors, which is validated that doing so does not lose much information of the original feature space. Then RMEKLM adopts the extracted feature vectors to span a reduced orthonormal subspace of the feature space, which is visualized in terms of the geometry structure. It can be demonstrated that the spanned subspace is isomorphic to the original feature space, which means that the dot product of two vectors in the original feature space is equal to that of the two corresponding vectors in the generated orthonormal subspace. More importantly, the proposed RMEKLM brings a simpler computation and meanwhile needs a less storage space, especially in the processing of testing. Finally, the experimental results show that RMEKLM owns a much efficient and effective performance in terms of both complexity and classification. The contributions of this paper can be given as follows: (1) by mapping the input space into an orthonormal subspace, the geometry of the generated subspace is visualized; (2) this paper first reduces both the time and space complexity of the EKM-based MKL; (3

  18. Big Data and machine learning in radiation oncology: State of the art and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Giraud, Philippe; Burgun, Anita

    2016-11-01

    Precision medicine relies on an increasing amount of heterogeneous data. Advances in radiation oncology, through the use of CT Scan, dosimetry and imaging performed before each fraction, have generated a considerable flow of data that needs to be integrated. In the same time, Electronic Health Records now provide phenotypic profiles of large cohorts of patients that could be correlated to this information. In this review, we describe methods that could be used to create integrative predictive models in radiation oncology. Potential uses of machine learning methods such as support vector machine, artificial neural networks, and deep learning are also discussed.

  19. Machine Learning Strategy for Accelerated Design of Polymer Dielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, Arun; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Huan, Tran Doan; Lookman, Turab; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2016-01-01

    The ability to efficiently design new and advanced dielectric polymers is hampered by the lack of sufficient, reliable data on wide polymer chemical spaces, and the difficulty of generating such data given time and computational/experimental constraints. Here, we address the issue of accelerating polymer dielectrics design by extracting learning models from data generated by accurate state-of-the-art first principles computations for polymers occupying an important part of the chemical subspace. The polymers are ‘fingerprinted’ as simple, easily attainable numerical representations, which are mapped to the properties of interest using a machine learning algorithm to develop an on-demand property prediction model. Further, a genetic algorithm is utilised to optimise polymer constituent blocks in an evolutionary manner, thus directly leading to the design of polymers with given target properties. While this philosophy of learning to make instant predictions and design is demonstrated here for the example of polymer dielectrics, it is equally applicable to other classes of materials as well. PMID:26876223

  20. Machine Learning Strategy for Accelerated Design of Polymer Dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, Arun; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Huan, Tran Doan; Lookman, Turab; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2016-02-15

    The ability to efficiently design new and advanced dielectric polymers is hampered by the lack of sufficient, reliable data on wide polymer chemical spaces, and the difficulty of generating such data given time and computational/experimental constraints. Here, we address the issue of accelerating polymer dielectrics design by extracting learning models from data generated by accurate state-of-the-art first principles computations for polymers occupying an important part of the chemical subspace. The polymers are 'fingerprinted' as simple, easily attainable numerical representations, which are mapped to the properties of interest using a machine learning algorithm to develop an on-demand property prediction model. Further, a genetic algorithm is utilised to optimise polymer constituent blocks in an evolutionary manner, thus directly leading to the design of polymers with given target properties. While this philosophy of learning to make instant predictions and design is demonstrated here for the example of polymer dielectrics, it is equally applicable to other classes of materials as well.

  1. Machine learning strategy for accelerated design of polymer dielectrics

    DOE PAGES

    Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, Arun; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Huan, Tran Doan; ...

    2016-02-15

    The ability to efficiently design new and advanced dielectric polymers is hampered by the lack of sufficient, reliable data on wide polymer chemical spaces, and the difficulty of generating such data given time and computational/experimental constraints. Here, we address the issue of accelerating polymer dielectrics design by extracting learning models from data generated by accurate state-of-the-art first principles computations for polymers occupying an important part of the chemical subspace. The polymers are ‘fingerprinted’ as simple, easily attainable numerical representations, which are mapped to the properties of interest using a machine learning algorithm to develop an on-demand property prediction model. Further,more » a genetic algorithm is utilised to optimise polymer constituent blocks in an evolutionary manner, thus directly leading to the design of polymers with given target properties. Furthermore, while this philosophy of learning to make instant predictions and design is demonstrated here for the example of polymer dielectrics, it is equally applicable to other classes of materials as well.« less

  2. Machine learning strategy for accelerated design of polymer dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, Arun; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Huan, Tran Doan; Lookman, Turab; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2016-02-15

    The ability to efficiently design new and advanced dielectric polymers is hampered by the lack of sufficient, reliable data on wide polymer chemical spaces, and the difficulty of generating such data given time and computational/experimental constraints. Here, we address the issue of accelerating polymer dielectrics design by extracting learning models from data generated by accurate state-of-the-art first principles computations for polymers occupying an important part of the chemical subspace. The polymers are ‘fingerprinted’ as simple, easily attainable numerical representations, which are mapped to the properties of interest using a machine learning algorithm to develop an on-demand property prediction model. Further, a genetic algorithm is utilised to optimise polymer constituent blocks in an evolutionary manner, thus directly leading to the design of polymers with given target properties. Furthermore, while this philosophy of learning to make instant predictions and design is demonstrated here for the example of polymer dielectrics, it is equally applicable to other classes of materials as well.

  3. Risk prediction with machine learning and regression methods.

    PubMed

    Steyerberg, Ewout W; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Van Calster, Ben

    2014-07-01

    This is a discussion of issues in risk prediction based on the following papers: "Probability estimation with machine learning methods for dichotomous and multicategory outcome: Theory" by Jochen Kruppa, Yufeng Liu, Gérard Biau, Michael Kohler, Inke R. König, James D. Malley, and Andreas Ziegler; and "Probability estimation with machine learning methods for dichotomous and multicategory outcome: Applications" by Jochen Kruppa, Yufeng Liu, Hans-Christian Diener, Theresa Holste, Christian Weimar, Inke R. König, and Andreas Ziegler.

  4. Behavioral Profiling of Scada Network Traffic Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    Conference on, 1–10. IEEE, 2011. [9] Cheung, S., B . Dutertre, M. Fong, U. Lindqvist, K. Skinner , and A. Valdes. “Using model-based intrusion detection for... BEHAVIORAL PROFILING OF SCADA NETWORK TRAFFIC USING MACHINE LEARNING ALGORITHMS THESIS Jessica R. Werling, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENG-14-M-81 DEPARTMENT...subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-14-M-81 BEHAVIORAL PROFILING OF SCADA NETWORK TRAFFIC USING MACHINE LEARNING

  5. Protocol for secure quantum machine learning at a distant place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jeongho; Lee, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hyunseok

    2015-10-01

    The application of machine learning to quantum information processing has recently attracted keen interest, particularly for the optimization of control parameters in quantum tasks without any pre-programmed knowledge. By adapting the machine learning technique, we present a novel protocol in which an arbitrarily initialized device at a learner's location is taught by a provider located at a distant place. The protocol is designed such that any external learner who attempts to participate in or disrupt the learning process can be prohibited or noticed. We numerically demonstrate that our protocol works faithfully for single-qubit operation devices. A trade-off between the inaccuracy and the learning time is also analyzed.

  6. New machine-learning algorithms for prediction of Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Indrajit; Sairam, N.

    2014-03-01

    This article presents an enhanced prediction accuracy of diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) to prevent the delay and misdiagnosis of patients using the proposed robust inference system. New machine-learning methods are proposed and performance comparisons are based on specificity, sensitivity, accuracy and other measurable parameters. The robust methods of treating Parkinson's disease (PD) includes sparse multinomial logistic regression, rotation forest ensemble with support vector machines and principal components analysis, artificial neural networks, boosting methods. A new ensemble method comprising of the Bayesian network optimised by Tabu search algorithm as classifier and Haar wavelets as projection filter is used for relevant feature selection and ranking. The highest accuracy obtained by linear logistic regression and sparse multinomial logistic regression is 100% and sensitivity, specificity of 0.983 and 0.996, respectively. All the experiments are conducted over 95% and 99% confidence levels and establish the results with corrected t-tests. This work shows a high degree of advancement in software reliability and quality of the computer-aided diagnosis system and experimentally shows best results with supportive statistical inference.

  7. Bio-Inspired Human-Level Machine Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-25

    cue integration , grounded concept learning , and interaction of vision and language . We believe that the bio-inspired human-level machine learning ...hypernetwork model, and designed in vitro experimental protocols to implement online language learning from a stream of text corpus. In the third year, we...model, and designed in vitro experimental protocols to implement online language learning from a stream of text corpus. In the third year, we

  8. Generative Modeling for Machine Learning on the D-Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Thulasidasan, Sunil

    2016-11-15

    These are slides on Generative Modeling for Machine Learning on the D-Wave. The following topics are detailed: generative models; Boltzmann machines: a generative model; restricted Boltzmann machines; learning parameters: RBM training; practical ways to train RBM; D-Wave as a Boltzmann sampler; mapping RBM onto the D-Wave; Chimera restricted RBM; mapping binary RBM to Ising model; experiments; data; D-Wave effective temperature, parameters noise, etc.; experiments: contrastive divergence (CD) 1 step; after 50 steps of CD; after 100 steps of CD; D-Wave (experiments 1, 2, 3); D-Wave observations.

  9. Machine Learning Assessments of Soil Drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, E. J.; Minsker, B. S.; Wenzel, C.; Gilmore, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural activities require the use of heavy equipment and vehicles on unpaved farmlands. When soil conditions are wet, equipment can cause substantial damage, leaving deep ruts. In extreme cases, implements can sink and become mired, causing considerable delays and expense to extricate the equipment. Farm managers, who are often located remotely, cannot assess sites before allocating equipment, causing considerable difficulty in reliably assessing conditions of countless sites with any reliability and frequency. For example, farmers often trace serpentine paths of over one hundred miles each day to assess the overall status of various tracts of land spanning thirty, forty, or fifty miles in each direction. One means of assessing the moisture content of a field lies in the strategic positioning of remotely-monitored in situ sensors. Unfortunately, land owners are often reluctant to place sensors across their properties due to the significant monetary cost and complexity. This work aspires to overcome these limitations by modeling the process of wetting and drying statistically - remotely assessing field readiness using only information that is publically accessible. Such data includes Nexrad radar and state climate network sensors, as well as Twitter-based reports of field conditions for validation. Three algorithms, classification trees, k-nearest-neighbors, and boosted perceptrons are deployed to deliver statistical field readiness assessments of an agricultural site located in Urbana, IL. Two of the three algorithms performed with 92-94% accuracy, with the majority of misclassifications falling within the calculated margins of error. This demonstrates the feasibility of using a machine learning framework with only public data, knowledge of system memory from previous conditions, and statistical tools to assess "readiness" without the need for real-time, on-site physical observation. Future efforts will produce a workflow assimilating Nexrad, climate network

  10. Learning Activity Packets for Milling Machines. Unit II--Horizontal Milling Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) outlines the study activities and performance tasks covered in a related curriculum guide on milling machines. The course of study in this LAP is intended to help students learn to set up and operate a horizontal mill. Tasks addressed in the LAP include mounting style "A" or "B" arbors and adjusting arbor…

  11. Learning Activity Packets for Milling Machines. Unit III--Vertical Milling Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) outlines the study activities and performance tasks covered in a related curriculum guide on milling machines. The course of study in this LAP is intended to help students learn to set up and operate a vertical mill. Tasks addressed in the LAP include mounting and removing cutters and cutter holders for vertical…

  12. Machine Learning Technologies and Their Applications for Science and Engineering Domains Workshop -- Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Manjula; Schwartz, Katherine G.; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2016-01-01

    The fields of machine learning and big data analytics have made significant advances in recent years, which has created an environment where cross-fertilization of methods and collaborations can achieve previously unattainable outcomes. The Comprehensive Digital Transformation (CDT) Machine Learning and Big Data Analytics team planned a workshop at NASA Langley in August 2016 to unite leading experts the field of machine learning and NASA scientists and engineers. The primary goal for this workshop was to assess the state-of-the-art in this field, introduce these leading experts to the aerospace and science subject matter experts, and develop opportunities for collaboration. The workshop was held over a three day-period with lectures from 15 leading experts followed by significant interactive discussions. This report provides an overview of the 15 invited lectures and a summary of the key discussion topics that arose during both formal and informal discussion sections. Four key workshop themes were identified after the closure of the workshop and are also highlighted in the report. Furthermore, several workshop attendees provided their feedback on how they are already utilizing machine learning algorithms to advance their research, new methods they learned about during the workshop, and collaboration opportunities they identified during the workshop.

  13. In silico machine learning methods in drug development.

    PubMed

    Dobchev, Dimitar A; Pillai, Girinath G; Karelson, Mati

    2014-01-01

    Machine learning (ML) computational methods for predicting compounds with pharmacological activity, specific pharmacodynamic and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) properties are being increasingly applied in drug discovery and evaluation. Recently, machine learning techniques such as artificial neural networks, support vector machines and genetic programming have been explored for predicting inhibitors, antagonists, blockers, agonists, activators and substrates of proteins related to specific therapeutic targets. These methods are particularly useful for screening compound libraries of diverse chemical structures, "noisy" and high-dimensional data to complement QSAR methods, and in cases of unavailable receptor 3D structure to complement structure-based methods. A variety of studies have demonstrated the potential of machine-learning methods for predicting compounds as potential drug candidates. The present review is intended to give an overview of the strategies and current progress in using machine learning methods for drug design and the potential of the respective model development tools. We also regard a number of applications of the machine learning algorithms based on common classes of diseases.

  14. Prediction of antiepileptic drug treatment outcomes using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colic, Sinisa; Wither, Robert G.; Lang, Min; Zhang, Liang; Eubanks, James H.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments produce inconsistent outcomes, often necessitating patients to go through several drug trials until a successful treatment can be found. This study proposes the use of machine learning techniques to predict epilepsy treatment outcomes of commonly used AEDs. Approach. Machine learning algorithms were trained and evaluated using features obtained from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings of the epileptiform discharges observed in Mecp2-deficient mouse model of the Rett Syndrome. Previous work have linked the presence of cross-frequency coupling (I CFC) of the delta (2-5 Hz) rhythm with the fast ripple (400-600 Hz) rhythm in epileptiform discharges. Using the I CFC to label post-treatment outcomes we compared support vector machines (SVMs) and random forest (RF) machine learning classifiers for providing likelihood scores of successful treatment outcomes. Main results. (a) There was heterogeneity in AED treatment outcomes, (b) machine learning techniques could be used to rank the efficacy of AEDs by estimating likelihood scores for successful treatment outcome, (c) I CFC features yielded the most effective a priori identification of appropriate AED treatment, and (d) both classifiers performed comparably. Significance. Machine learning approaches yielded predictions of successful drug treatment outcomes which in turn could reduce the burdens of drug trials and lead to substantial improvements in patient quality of life.

  15. Interactive machine learning for health informatics: when do we need the human-in-the-loop?

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Machine learning (ML) is the fastest growing field in computer science, and health informatics is among the greatest challenges. The goal of ML is to develop algorithms which can learn and improve over time and can be used for predictions. Most ML researchers concentrate on automatic machine learning (aML), where great advances have been made, for example, in speech recognition, recommender systems, or autonomous vehicles. Automatic approaches greatly benefit from big data with many training sets. However, in the health domain, sometimes we are confronted with a small number of data sets or rare events, where aML-approaches suffer of insufficient training samples. Here interactive machine learning (iML) may be of help, having its roots in reinforcement learning, preference learning, and active learning. The term iML is not yet well used, so we define it as "algorithms that can interact with agents and can optimize their learning behavior through these interactions, where the agents can also be human." This "human-in-the-loop" can be beneficial in solving computationally hard problems, e.g., subspace clustering, protein folding, or k-anonymization of health data, where human expertise can help to reduce an exponential search space through heuristic selection of samples. Therefore, what would otherwise be an NP-hard problem, reduces greatly in complexity through the input and the assistance of a human agent involved in the learning phase.

  16. Stellar classification from single-band imaging using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntzer, T.; Tewes, M.; Courbin, F.

    2016-06-01

    Information on the spectral types of stars is of great interest in view of the exploitation of space-based imaging surveys. In this article, we investigate the classification of stars into spectral types using only the shape of their diffraction pattern in a single broad-band image. We propose a supervised machine learning approach to this endeavour, based on principal component analysis (PCA) for dimensionality reduction, followed by artificial neural networks (ANNs) estimating the spectral type. Our analysis is performed with image simulations mimicking the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in the F606W and F814W bands, as well as the Euclid VIS imager. We first demonstrate this classification in a simple context, assuming perfect knowledge of the point spread function (PSF) model and the possibility of accurately generating mock training data for the machine learning. We then analyse its performance in a fully data-driven situation, in which the training would be performed with a limited subset of bright stars from a survey, and an unknown PSF with spatial variations across the detector. We use simulations of main-sequence stars with flat distributions in spectral type and in signal-to-noise ratio, and classify these stars into 13 spectral subclasses, from O5 to M5. Under these conditions, the algorithm achieves a high success rate both for Euclid and HST images, with typical errors of half a spectral class. Although more detailed simulations would be needed to assess the performance of the algorithm on a specific survey, this shows that stellar classification from single-band images is well possible.

  17. Applications of Machine Learning in Cancer Prediction and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Joseph A.; Wishart, David S.

    2006-01-01

    Machine learning is a branch of artificial intelligence that employs a variety of statistical, probabilistic and optimization techniques that allows computers to “learn” from past examples and to detect hard-to-discern patterns from large, noisy or complex data sets. This capability is particularly well-suited to medical applications, especially those that depend on complex proteomic and genomic measurements. As a result, machine learning is frequently used in cancer diagnosis and detection. More recently machine learning has been applied to cancer prognosis and prediction. This latter approach is particularly interesting as it is part of a growing trend towards personalized, predictive medicine. In assembling this review we conducted a broad survey of the different types of machine learning methods being used, the types of data being integrated and the performance of these methods in cancer prediction and prognosis. A number of trends are noted, including a growing dependence on protein biomarkers and microarray data, a strong bias towards applications in prostate and breast cancer, and a heavy reliance on “older” technologies such artificial neural networks (ANNs) instead of more recently developed or more easily interpretable machine learning methods. A number of published studies also appear to lack an appropriate level of validation or testing. Among the better designed and validated studies it is clear that machine learning methods can be used to substantially (15–25%) improve the accuracy of predicting cancer susceptibility, recurrence and mortality. At a more fundamental level, it is also evident that machine learning is also helping to improve our basic understanding of cancer development and progression. PMID:19458758

  18. Application of Learning Machines and Combinatorial Algorithms in Water Resources Management and Hydrologic Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Abedalrazq F.; Kaheil, Yasir H.; Gill, Kashif; Mckee, Mac

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary and water resources engineering and management rely increasingly on pattern recognition techniques that have the ability to capitalize on the unrelenting accumulation of data that is made possible by modern information technology and remote sensing methods. In response to the growing information needs of modern water systems, advanced computational models and tools have been devised to identify and extract relevant information from the mass of data that is now available. This chapter presents innovative applications from computational learning science within the fields of hydrology, hydrogeology, hydroclimatology, and water management. The success of machine learning is evident from the growing number of studies involving the application of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), Support Vector Machines (SVM), Relevance Vector Machines (RVM), and Locally Weighted Projection Regression (LWPR) to address various issues in hydrologic sciences. The applications that will be discussed within the chapter employ the abovementioned machine learning techniques for intelligent modeling of reservoir operations, temporal downscaling of precipitation, spatial downscaling of soil moisture and evapotranspiration, comparisons of various techniques for groundwater quality modeling, and forecasting of chaotic time series behavior. Combinatorial algorithms to capture the intrinsic complexities in the modeled phenomena and to overcome disparate scales are developed; for example, learning machines have been coupled with geostatistical techniques, non-homogenous hidden Markov models, wavelets, and evolutionary computing techniques. This chapter does not intend to be exhaustive; it reviews the progress that has been made over the past decade in the use of learning machines in applied hydrologic sciences and presents a summary of future needs and challenges for further advancement of these methods.

  19. Machine Learning Based Classification of Microsatellite Variation: An Effective Approach for Phylogeographic Characterization of Olive Populations.

    PubMed

    Torkzaban, Bahareh; Kayvanjoo, Amir Hossein; Ardalan, Arman; Mousavi, Soraya; Mariotti, Roberto; Baldoni, Luciana; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Hosseini-Mazinani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Finding efficient analytical techniques is overwhelmingly turning into a bottleneck for the effectiveness of large biological data. Machine learning offers a novel and powerful tool to advance classification and modeling solutions in molecular biology. However, these methods have been less frequently used with empirical population genetics data. In this study, we developed a new combined approach of data analysis using microsatellite marker data from our previous studies of olive populations using machine learning algorithms. Herein, 267 olive accessions of various origins including 21 reference cultivars, 132 local ecotypes, and 37 wild olive specimens from the Iranian plateau, together with 77 of the most represented Mediterranean varieties were investigated using a finely selected panel of 11 microsatellite markers. We organized data in two '4-targeted' and '16-targeted' experiments. A strategy of assaying different machine based analyses (i.e. data cleaning, feature selection, and machine learning classification) was devised to identify the most informative loci and the most diagnostic alleles to represent the population and the geography of each olive accession. These analyses revealed microsatellite markers with the highest differentiating capacity and proved efficiency for our method of clustering olive accessions to reflect upon their regions of origin. A distinguished highlight of this study was the discovery of the best combination of markers for better differentiating of populations via machine learning models, which can be exploited to distinguish among other biological populations.

  20. Machine Learning Based Classification of Microsatellite Variation: An Effective Approach for Phylogeographic Characterization of Olive Populations

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Soraya; Mariotti, Roberto; Baldoni, Luciana; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Hosseini-Mazinani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Finding efficient analytical techniques is overwhelmingly turning into a bottleneck for the effectiveness of large biological data. Machine learning offers a novel and powerful tool to advance classification and modeling solutions in molecular biology. However, these methods have been less frequently used with empirical population genetics data. In this study, we developed a new combined approach of data analysis using microsatellite marker data from our previous studies of olive populations using machine learning algorithms. Herein, 267 olive accessions of various origins including 21 reference cultivars, 132 local ecotypes, and 37 wild olive specimens from the Iranian plateau, together with 77 of the most represented Mediterranean varieties were investigated using a finely selected panel of 11 microsatellite markers. We organized data in two ‘4-targeted’ and ‘16-targeted’ experiments. A strategy of assaying different machine based analyses (i.e. data cleaning, feature selection, and machine learning classification) was devised to identify the most informative loci and the most diagnostic alleles to represent the population and the geography of each olive accession. These analyses revealed microsatellite markers with the highest differentiating capacity and proved efficiency for our method of clustering olive accessions to reflect upon their regions of origin. A distinguished highlight of this study was the discovery of the best combination of markers for better differentiating of populations via machine learning models, which can be exploited to distinguish among other biological populations. PMID:26599001

  1. Can Machine Learning Methods Predict Extubation Outcome in Premature Infants as well as Clinicians?

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Martina; Almeida, Jonas S.; Stanislaus, Romesh; Wagner, Carol L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Though treatment of the prematurely born infant breathing with assistance of a mechanical ventilator has much advanced in the past decades, predicting extubation outcome at a given point in time remains challenging. Numerous studies have been conducted to identify predictors for extubation outcome; however, the rate of infants failing extubation attempts has not declined. Objective To develop a decision-support tool for the prediction of extubation outcome in premature infants using a set of machine learning algorithms Methods A dataset assembled from 486 premature infants on mechanical ventilation was used to develop predictive models using machine learning algorithms such as artificial neural networks (ANN), support vector machine (SVM), naïve Bayesian classifier (NBC), boosted decision trees (BDT), and multivariable logistic regression (MLR). Performance of all models was evaluated using area under the curve (AUC). Results For some of the models (ANN, MLR and NBC) results were satisfactory (AUC: 0.63–0.76); however, two algorithms (SVM and BDT) showed poor performance with AUCs of ~0.5. Conclusion Clinician's predictions still outperform machine learning due to the complexity of the data and contextual information that may not be captured in clinical data used as input for the development of the machine learning algorithms. Inclusion of preprocessing steps in future studies may improve the performance of prediction models. PMID:25419493

  2. Thutmose - Investigation of Machine Learning-Based Intrusion Detection Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    goal of the experiment was to learn how susceptible an HMM is to a targeted causative integrity attack. In the first set of trials, the adversary...to a Targeted Causative attack against the Integrity of the learning system. In such an attack, an adversary chooses a specific anomalous point and...THUTMOSE – INVESTIGATION OF MACHINE LEARNING -BASED INTRUSION DETECTION SYSTEMS BAE SYSTEMS INFORMATION AND SECURITY JUNE 2016

  3. Osteoporosis risk prediction using machine learning and conventional methods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Kean; Yoo, Tae Keun; Oh, Ein; Kim, Deok Won

    2013-01-01

    A number of clinical decision tools for osteoporosis risk assessment have been developed to select postmenopausal women for the measurement of bone mineral density. We developed and validated machine learning models with the aim of more accurately identifying the risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and compared with the ability of a conventional clinical decision tool, osteoporosis self-assessment tool (OST). We collected medical records from Korean postmenopausal women based on the Korea National Health and Nutrition Surveys (KNHANES V-1). The training data set was used to construct models based on popular machine learning algorithms such as support vector machines (SVM), random forests (RF), artificial neural networks (ANN), and logistic regression (LR) based on various predictors associated with low bone density. The learning models were compared with OST. SVM had significantly better area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) than ANN, LR, and OST. Validation on the test set showed that SVM predicted osteoporosis risk with an AUC of 0.827, accuracy of 76.7%, sensitivity of 77.8%, and specificity of 76.0%. We were the first to perform comparisons of the performance of osteoporosis prediction between the machine learning and conventional methods using population-based epidemiological data. The machine learning methods may be effective tools for identifying postmenopausal women at high risk for osteoporosis.

  4. Data Triage of Astronomical Transients: A Machine Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebbapragada, U.

    This talk presents real-time machine learning systems for triage of big data streams generated by photometric and image-differencing pipelines. Our first system is a transient event detection system in development for the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a fully-automated synoptic sky survey that has demonstrated real-time discovery of optical transient events. The system is tasked with discriminating between real astronomical objects and bogus objects, which are usually artifacts of the image differencing pipeline. We performed a machine learning forensics investigation on PTF’s initial system that led to training data improvements that decreased both false positive and negative rates. The second machine learning system is a real-time classification engine of transients and variables in development for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), an upcoming wide-field radio survey with unprecedented ability to investigate the radio transient sky. The goal of our system is to classify light curves into known classes with as few observations as possible in order to trigger follow-up on costlier assets. We discuss the violation of standard machine learning assumptions incurred by this task, and propose the use of ensemble and hierarchical machine learning classifiers that make predictions most robustly.

  5. Feasibility of Active Machine Learning for Multiclass Compound Classification.

    PubMed

    Lang, Tobias; Flachsenberg, Florian; von Luxburg, Ulrike; Rarey, Matthias

    2016-01-25

    A common task in the hit-to-lead process is classifying sets of compounds into multiple, usually structural classes, which build the groundwork for subsequent SAR studies. Machine learning techniques can be used to automate this process by learning classification models from training compounds of each class. Gathering class information for compounds can be cost-intensive as the required data needs to be provided by human experts or experiments. This paper studies whether active machine learning can be used to reduce the required number of training compounds. Active learning is a machine learning method which processes class label data in an iterative fashion. It has gained much attention in a broad range of application areas. In this paper, an active learning method for multiclass compound classification is proposed. This method selects informative training compounds so as to optimally support the learning progress. The combination with human feedback leads to a semiautomated interactive multiclass classification procedure. This method was investigated empirically on 15 compound classification tasks containing 86-2870 compounds in 3-38 classes. The empirical results show that active learning can solve these classification tasks using 10-80% of the data which would be necessary for standard learning techniques.

  6. Task 8.6 -- Advanced man machine interface (MMI)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The Solar/DOE ATS engine program seeks to improve the utilization of turbomachinery resources through the development of an Advanced Man Machine Interface (MMI). The program goals include timely and succinct feedback to the operations personnel to enhance their decision making process. As part of the Solar ATS Phase 2 technology development program, enabling technologies, including graphics environments, communications technology, and operating systems were explored to determine their viability to support the overall MMI requirements. This report discusses the research and prototyping effort, as well as the conclusions reached.

  7. Learning Processes in Man, Machine and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malita, Mircea

    1977-01-01

    Deciphering the learning mechanism which exists in man remains to be solved. This article examines the learning process with respect to association and cybernetics. It is recommended that research should focus on the transdisciplinary processes of learning which could become the next key concept in the science of man. (Author/MA)

  8. Programmed Learning, Programmed Textbooks, Teaching Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokof'yev, A. V.

    The overall idea of programed learning plays an important role in the learning process, but it does not contain any sensational discoveries or unusual points. Importance resides in the perfection of the existing systems and methods of learning with the use of the achievements of modern science, and particularly of radio electronics and…

  9. Building Artificial Vision Systems with Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    LeCun, Yann

    2011-02-23

    Three questions pose the next challenge for Artificial Intelligence (AI), robotics, and neuroscience. How do we learn perception (e.g. vision)? How do we learn representations of the perceptual world? How do we learn visual categories from just a few examples?

  10. Machine Learning Search for Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows in Optical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topinka, M.

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to the advances in robotic telescopes, time domain astronomy leads to a large number of transient events detected in images every night. Data mining and machine learning tools used for object classification are presented. The goal is to automatically classify transient events for both further follow-up by a larger telescope and for statistical studies of transient events. Special attention is given to the identification of gamma-ray burst afterglows. Machine learning techniques are used to identify GROND gamma-ray burst afterglow among the astrophysical objects present in the SDSS archival images based on the g'-r', r'-i' and i'-z' color indices. The performance of the support vector machine, random forest and neural network algorithms is compared. A joint meta-classifier, built on top of the individual classifiers, can identify GRB afterglows with the overall accuracy of ≳ 90%.

  11. Machine Learning: A Crucial Tool for Sensor Design.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixiang; Bhushan, Abhinav; Santamaria, Anthony D; Simon, Melinda G; Davis, Cristina E

    2008-12-01

    Sensors have been widely used for disease diagnosis, environmental quality monitoring, food quality control, industrial process analysis and control, and other related fields. As a key tool for sensor data analysis, machine learning is becoming a core part of novel sensor design. Dividing a complete machine learning process into three steps: data pre-treatment, feature extraction and dimension reduction, and system modeling, this paper provides a review of the methods that are widely used for each step. For each method, the principles and the key issues that affect modeling results are discussed. After reviewing the potential problems in machine learning processes, this paper gives a summary of current algorithms in this field and provides some feasible directions for future studies.

  12. Machine Learning: A Crucial Tool for Sensor Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weixiang; Bhushan, Abhinav; Santamaria, Anthony D.; Simon, Melinda G.; Davis, Cristina E.

    2009-01-01

    Sensors have been widely used for disease diagnosis, environmental quality monitoring, food quality control, industrial process analysis and control, and other related fields. As a key tool for sensor data analysis, machine learning is becoming a core part of novel sensor design. Dividing a complete machine learning process into three steps: data pre-treatment, feature extraction and dimension reduction, and system modeling, this paper provides a review of the methods that are widely used for each step. For each method, the principles and the key issues that affect modeling results are discussed. After reviewing the potential problems in machine learning processes, this paper gives a summary of current algorithms in this field and provides some feasible directions for future studies. PMID:20191110

  13. Predicting Market Impact Costs Using Nonparametric Machine Learning Models.

    PubMed

    Park, Saerom; Lee, Jaewook; Son, Youngdoo

    2016-01-01

    Market impact cost is the most significant portion of implicit transaction costs that can reduce the overall transaction cost, although it cannot be measured directly. In this paper, we employed the state-of-the-art nonparametric machine learning models: neural networks, Bayesian neural network, Gaussian process, and support vector regression, to predict market impact cost accurately and to provide the predictive model that is versatile in the number of variables. We collected a large amount of real single transaction data of US stock market from Bloomberg Terminal and generated three independent input variables. As a result, most nonparametric machine learning models outperformed a-state-of-the-art benchmark parametric model such as I-star model in four error measures. Although these models encounter certain difficulties in separating the permanent and temporary cost directly, nonparametric machine learning models can be good alternatives in reducing transaction costs by considerably improving in prediction performance.

  14. Predicting Market Impact Costs Using Nonparametric Machine Learning Models

    PubMed Central

    Park, Saerom; Lee, Jaewook; Son, Youngdoo

    2016-01-01

    Market impact cost is the most significant portion of implicit transaction costs that can reduce the overall transaction cost, although it cannot be measured directly. In this paper, we employed the state-of-the-art nonparametric machine learning models: neural networks, Bayesian neural network, Gaussian process, and support vector regression, to predict market impact cost accurately and to provide the predictive model that is versatile in the number of variables. We collected a large amount of real single transaction data of US stock market from Bloomberg Terminal and generated three independent input variables. As a result, most nonparametric machine learning models outperformed a-state-of-the-art benchmark parametric model such as I-star model in four error measures. Although these models encounter certain difficulties in separating the permanent and temporary cost directly, nonparametric machine learning models can be good alternatives in reducing transaction costs by considerably improving in prediction performance. PMID:26926235

  15. Diamagnetic loop measurement in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research machine.

    PubMed

    Bak, J G; Lee, S G; Kim, H S

    2011-06-01

    Diamagnetic loop (DL), which consists of two poloidal loops inside the vacuum vessel, is used to measure the diamagnetic flux during a plasma discharge in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) machine. The vacuum fluxes in the DL signal can be compensated up to 0.1 mWb by using the coefficients, which are obtained from experimental investigations, in the vacuum flux measurements during vacuum shots under same operational conditions of magnetic coils for plasma experiment in the KSTAR machine. The maximum error in the diamagnetic flux measurement due to the errors of the coefficients was estimated as ∼0.22 mWb. From the diamagnetic flux measurements for the ohmically heated circular plasmas in the KSTAR machine, the stored energy agrees well with the estimated kinetic energy within the discrepancy of 25%. When the electron cyclotron heating, the neutral beam injection, and the ion cyclotron resonance heating are added to the ohmically heated limiter plasmas, the additional heating effects can be clearly observed from the increase of the stored energy evaluated in the DL measurement.

  16. Diamagnetic loop measurement in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research machine

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, J. G.; Lee, S. G.; Kim, H. S.

    2011-06-15

    Diamagnetic loop (DL), which consists of two poloidal loops inside the vacuum vessel, is used to measure the diamagnetic flux during a plasma discharge in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) machine. The vacuum fluxes in the DL signal can be compensated up to 0.1 mWb by using the coefficients, which are obtained from experimental investigations, in the vacuum flux measurements during vacuum shots under same operational conditions of magnetic coils for plasma experiment in the KSTAR machine. The maximum error in the diamagnetic flux measurement due to the errors of the coefficients was estimated as {approx}0.22 mWb. From the diamagnetic flux measurements for the ohmically heated circular plasmas in the KSTAR machine, the stored energy agrees well with the estimated kinetic energy within the discrepancy of 25%. When the electron cyclotron heating, the neutral beam injection, and the ion cyclotron resonance heating are added to the ohmically heated limiter plasmas, the additional heating effects can be clearly observed from the increase of the stored energy evaluated in the DL measurement.

  17. A strategy for quantum algorithm design assisted by machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jeongho; Ryu, Junghee; Yoo, Seokwon; Pawłowski, Marcin; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2014-07-01

    We propose a method for quantum algorithm design assisted by machine learning. The method uses a quantum-classical hybrid simulator, where a ‘quantum student’ is being taught by a ‘classical teacher’. In other words, in our method, the learning system is supposed to evolve into a quantum algorithm for a given problem, assisted by a classical main-feedback system. Our method is applicable for designing quantum oracle-based algorithms. We chose, as a case study, an oracle decision problem, called a Deutsch-Jozsa problem. We showed by using Monte Carlo simulations that our simulator can faithfully learn a quantum algorithm for solving the problem for a given oracle. Remarkably, the learning time is proportional to the square root of the total number of parameters, rather than showing the exponential dependence found in the classical machine learning-based method.

  18. A machine learning approach to quantifying noise in medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Aritra; Sevinsky, Christopher J.; Yener, Bülent; Aggour, Kareem S.; Gustafson, Steven M.

    2016-03-01

    As advances in medical imaging technology are resulting in significant growth of biomedical image data, new techniques are needed to automate the process of identifying images of low quality. Automation is needed because it is very time consuming for a domain expert such as a medical practitioner or a biologist to manually separate good images from bad ones. While there are plenty of de-noising algorithms in the literature, their focus is on designing filters which are necessary but not sufficient for determining how useful an image is to a domain expert. Thus a computational tool is needed to assign a score to each image based on its perceived quality. In this paper, we introduce a machine learning-based score and call it the Quality of Image (QoI) score. The QoI score is computed by combining the confidence values of two popular classification techniques—support vector machines (SVMs) and Naïve Bayes classifiers. We test our technique on clinical image data obtained from cancerous tissue samples. We used 747 tissue samples that are stained by four different markers (abbreviated as CK15, pck26, E_cad and Vimentin) leading to a total of 2,988 images. The results show that images can be classified as good (high QoI), bad (low QoI) or ugly (intermediate QoI) based on their QoI scores. Our automated labeling is in agreement with the domain experts with a bi-modal classification accuracy of 94%, on average. Furthermore, ugly images can be recovered and forwarded for further post-processing.

  19. Machine learning and spectral techniques for lithological classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parakh, Khushboo; Thakur, Sanchari; Chudasama, Bijal; Tirodkar, Siddhesh; Porwal, Alok; Bhattacharya, Avik

    2016-04-01

    Experimentations with applications of machine learning algorithms such as random forest (RF), support vector machines (SVM) and fuzzy inference system (FIS) to lithological classification of multispectral datasets are described. The input dataset such as LANDSAT-8 and Advanced Space-borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) in conjunction with Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation are used. The training data included image pixels with known lithoclasses as well as the laboratory spectra of field samples of the major lithoclasses. The study area is a part of Ajmer and Pali Districts, Western Rajasthan, India. The main lithoclasses exposed in the area are amphibolite, granite, calc-silicates, mica-schist, pegmatite and carbonates. In a parallel implementation, spectral parameters derived from the continuum-removed laboratory spectra of the field samples (e.g., band depth) were used in spectral matching algorithms to generate geological maps from the LANDSAT-8 and ASTER data. The classification results indicate that, as compared to the SVM, the RF algorithm provides higher accuracy for the minority class, while for the rest of the classes the two algorithms are comparable. The RF algorithm effectively deals with outliers and also ranks the input spectral bands based on their importance in classification. The FIS approach provides an efficient expert-driven system for lithological classification. It based on matching the image spectral features with the absorption features of the laboratory spectra of the field samples, and returns comparable results for some lithoclasses. The study also establishes spectral parameters of amphibolite, granite, calc-silicates, mica-schist, pegmatite and carbonates that can be used in generating geological maps from multispectral data using spectral matching algorithms.

  20. The cerebellum: a neuronal learning machine?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, J. L.; Lisberger, S. G.; Mauk, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    Comparison of two seemingly quite different behaviors yields a surprisingly consistent picture of the role of the cerebellum in motor learning. Behavioral and physiological data about classical conditioning of the eyelid response and motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex suggests that (i) plasticity is distributed between the cerebellar cortex and the deep cerebellar nuclei; (ii) the cerebellar cortex plays a special role in learning the timing of movement; and (iii) the cerebellar cortex guides learning in the deep nuclei, which may allow learning to be transferred from the cortex to the deep nuclei. Because many of the similarities in the data from the two systems typify general features of cerebellar organization, the cerebellar mechanisms of learning in these two systems may represent principles that apply to many motor systems.

  1. Oceanic eddy detection and lifetime forecast using machine learning methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkezari, Mohammad D.; Hill, Christopher N.; Follett, Christopher N.; Forget, Gaël.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    We report a novel altimetry-based machine learning approach for eddy identification and characterization. The machine learning models use daily maps of geostrophic velocity anomalies and are trained according to the phase angle between the zonal and meridional components at each grid point. The trained models are then used to identify the corresponding eddy phase patterns and to predict the lifetime of a detected eddy structure. The performance of the proposed method is examined at two dynamically different regions to demonstrate its robust behavior and region independency.

  2. RECONCILE: a machine-learning coreference resolution system

    SciTech Connect

    Cardie, Claire; Stoyanov, Veselin; Golland, David; Gilbert, Nathan; Riloff, Ellen; Butler, David; Hysom, David

    2007-12-10

    RECONCILE is a noun phrase conference resolution system: it identifies noun phrases in a text document and determines which subsets refer to each real world entity referenced in the text. The heart of the system is a combination of supervised and unsupervised machine learning systems. It uses a machine learning algorithm (chosen from an extensive suite, including Weka) for training noun phrase coreference classifier models and implements a variety of clustering algorithms to coordinate the pairwise classifications. A number of features have been implemented, including all of the features employed in Ng & Cardie [2002].

  3. 3D Visualization of Machine Learning Algorithms with Astronomical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    We present innovative machine learning (ML) methods using unsupervised clustering with minimum spanning trees (MSTs) to study 3D astronomical catalogs. Utilizing Python code to build trees based on galaxy catalogs, we can render the results with the visualization suite Blender to produce interactive 360 degree panoramic videos. The catalogs and their ML results can be explored in a 3D space using mobile devices, tablets or desktop browsers. We compare the statistics of the MST results to a number of machine learning methods relating to optimization and efficiency.

  4. Inverse-Free Extreme Learning Machine With Optimal Information Updating.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; You, Zhu-Hong; Guo, Hongliang; Luo, Xin; Zhao, Zhong-Qiu

    2016-05-01

    The extreme learning machine (ELM) has drawn insensitive research attentions due to its effectiveness in solving many machine learning problems. However, the matrix inversion operation involved in the algorithm is computational prohibitive and limits the wide applications of ELM in many scenarios. To overcome this problem, in this paper, we propose an inverse-free ELM to incrementally increase the number of hidden nodes, and update the connection weights progressively and optimally. Theoretical analysis proves the monotonic decrease of the training error with the proposed updating procedure and also proves the optimality in every updating step. Extensive numerical experiments show the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithm.

  5. Supervised machine learning algorithms to diagnose stress for vehicle drivers based on physiological sensor signals.

    PubMed

    Barua, Shaibal; Begum, Shahina; Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning algorithms play an important role in computer science research. Recent advancement in sensor data collection in clinical sciences lead to a complex, heterogeneous data processing, and analysis for patient diagnosis and prognosis. Diagnosis and treatment of patients based on manual analysis of these sensor data are difficult and time consuming. Therefore, development of Knowledge-based systems to support clinicians in decision-making is important. However, it is necessary to perform experimental work to compare performances of different machine learning methods to help to select appropriate method for a specific characteristic of data sets. This paper compares classification performance of three popular machine learning methods i.e., case-based reasoning, neutral networks and support vector machine to diagnose stress of vehicle drivers using finger temperature and heart rate variability. The experimental results show that case-based reasoning outperforms other two methods in terms of classification accuracy. Case-based reasoning has achieved 80% and 86% accuracy to classify stress using finger temperature and heart rate variability. On contrary, both neural network and support vector machine have achieved less than 80% accuracy by using both physiological signals.

  6. Learning Activity Packets for Grinding Machines. Unit I--Grinding Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) is one of three that accompany the curriculum guide on grinding machines. It outlines the study activities and performance tasks for the first unit of this curriculum guide. Its purpose is to aid the student in attaining a working knowledge of this area of training and in achieving a skilled or moderately…

  7. A Development of Automatic Audit System for Written Informed Consent using Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hitomi; Takemura, Tadamasa; Asai, Takahiro; Okamoto, Kazuya; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kuwata, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, most of all the university and advanced hospitals have implemented both electronic order entry systems and electronic charting. In addition, all medical records are subjected to inspector audit for quality assurance. The record of informed consent (IC) is very important as this provides evidence of consent from the patient or patient's family and health care provider. Therefore, we developed an automatic audit system for a hospital information system (HIS) that is able to evaluate IC automatically using machine learning.

  8. Outsmarting neural networks: an alternative paradigm for machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Protopopescu, V.; Rao, N.S.V.

    1996-10-01

    We address three problems in machine learning, namely: (i) function learning, (ii) regression estimation, and (iii) sensor fusion, in the Probably and Approximately Correct (PAC) framework. We show that, under certain conditions, one can reduce the three problems above to the regression estimation. The latter is usually tackled with artificial neural networks (ANNs) that satisfy the PAC criteria, but have high computational complexity. We propose several computationally efficient PAC alternatives to ANNs to solve the regression estimation. Thereby we also provide efficient PAC solutions to the function learning and sensor fusion problems. The approach is based on cross-fertilizing concepts and methods from statistical estimation, nonlinear algorithms, and the theory of computational complexity, and is designed as part of a new, coherent paradigm for machine learning.

  9. Design method of machine-learning system used for autonomous land vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Han-gen; Chang, Wensen

    1999-07-01

    The control of Autonomous Land Vehicle (ALV) is a kind of typical nonlinear control. Because the state of traffic and road are complex, so the control of ALV is complex and uncertain. Especially if the ALV runs in normal state of traffic, the control of ALV is becoming more complex and difficult. A good idea is that to let the control system of ALV to simulate human driver and develop a machine-leaning system in the control system of ALV. So that as the control system of ALV is driving ALV along road, the control system can learn from the experience of human driver according to the state of traffic and road. In other words, the control system of ALV is able to become more and more 'clever.' Of course it is a challenging and very difficult task. This paper analyzes the principle of machine-leaning system used for ALV and discusses the engineering method of developing a machine- leaning system used for ALV, when the ALV runs along highway in normal traffic. This paper advances the administrative levels of machine-leaning system and a method of fusing human intelligence into machine intelligence. This paper introduces our preliminary research on machine-leaning system used for ALV also, which is a kind of online machine-leaning system without teacher.

  10. Refining fuzzy logic controllers with machine learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the GARIC (Generalized Approximate Reasoning-Based Intelligent Control) architecture, which learns from its past performance and modifies the labels in the fuzzy rules to improve performance. It uses fuzzy reinforcement learning which is a hybrid method of fuzzy logic and reinforcement learning. This technology can simplify and automate the application of fuzzy logic control to a variety of systems. GARIC has been applied in simulation studies of the Space Shuttle rendezvous and docking experiments. It has the potential of being applied in other aerospace systems as well as in consumer products such as appliances, cameras, and cars.

  11. Health Informatics via Machine Learning for the Clinical Management of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Niehaus, K. E.; Charlton, P.; Colopy, G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To review how health informatics systems based on machine learning methods have impacted the clinical management of patients, by affecting clinical practice. Methods We reviewed literature from 2010-2015 from databases such as Pubmed, IEEE xplore, and INSPEC, in which methods based on machine learning are likely to be reported. We bring together a broad body of literature, aiming to identify those leading examples of health informatics that have advanced the methodology of machine learning. While individual methods may have further examples that might be added, we have chosen some of the most representative, informative exemplars in each case. Results Our survey highlights that, while much research is taking place in this high-profile field, examples of those that affect the clinical management of patients are seldom found. We show that substantial progress is being made in terms of methodology, often by data scientists working in close collaboration with clinical groups. Conclusions Health informatics systems based on machine learning are in their infancy and the translation of such systems into clinical management has yet to be performed at scale. PMID:26293849

  12. Biomarkers for Musculoskeletal Pain Conditions: Use of Brain Imaging and Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Boissoneault, Jeff; Sevel, Landrew; Letzen, Janelle; Robinson, Michael; Staud, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain condition often shows poor correlations between tissue abnormalities and clinical pain. Therefore, classification of pain conditions like chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia depends mostly on self report and less on objective findings like X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. However, recent advances in structural and functional brain imaging have identified brain abnormalities in chronic pain conditions that can be used for illness classification. Because the analysis of complex and multivariate brain imaging data is challenging, machine learning techniques have been increasingly utilized for this purpose. The goal of machine learning is to train specific classifiers to best identify variables of interest on brain MRIs (i.e., biomarkers). This report describes classification techniques capable of separating MRI-based brain biomarkers of chronic pain patients from healthy controls with high accuracy (70-92%) using machine learning, as well as critical scientific, practical, and ethical considerations related to their potential clinical application. Although self-report remains the gold standard for pain assessment, machine learning may aid in the classification of chronic pain disorders like chronic back pain and fibromyalgia as well as provide mechanistic information regarding their neural correlates.

  13. Effects of Plasma Transfusion on Perioperative Bleeding Complications: A Machine Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ngufor, Che; Murphree, Dennis; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nageswar; Kor, Daryl; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative bleeding (PB) is associated with increased patient morbidity and mortality, and results in substantial health care resource utilization. To assess bleeding risk, a routine practice in most centers is to use indicators such as elevated values of the International Normalized Ratio (INR). For patients with elevated INR, the routine therapy option is plasma transfusion. However, the predictive accuracy of INR and the value of plasma transfusion still remains unclear. Accurate methods are therefore needed to identify early the patients with increased risk of bleeding. The goal of this work is to apply advanced machine learning methods to study the relationship between preoperative plasma transfusion (PPT) and PB in patients with elevated INR undergoing noncardiac surgery. The problem is cast under the framework of causal inference where robust meaningful measures to quantify the effect of PPT on PB are estimated. Results show that both machine learning and standard statistical methods generally agree that PPT negatively impacts PB and other important patient outcomes. However, machine learning methods show significant results, and machine learning boosting methods are found to make less errors in predicting PB. PMID:26262146

  14. Predicting Mouse Liver Microsomal Stability with “Pruned” Machine Learning Models and Public Data

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, Alexander L.; Stratton, Thomas P.; Ekins, Sean; Freundlich, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mouse efficacy studies are a critical hurdle to advance translational research of potential therapeutic compounds for many diseases. Although mouse liver microsomal (MLM) stability studies are not a perfect surrogate for in vivo studies of metabolic clearance, they are the initial model system used to assess metabolic stability. Consequently, we explored the development of machine learning models that can enhance the probability of identifying compounds possessing MLM stability. Methods Published assays on MLM half-life values were identified in PubChem, reformatted, and curated to create a training set with 894 unique small molecules. These data were used to construct machine learning models assessed with internal cross-validation, external tests with a published set of antitubercular compounds, and independent validation with an additional diverse set of 571 compounds (PubChem data on percent metabolism). Results “Pruning” out the moderately unstable/moderately stable compounds from the training set produced models with superior predictive power. Bayesian models displayed the best predictive power for identifying compounds with a half-life ≥1 hour. Conclusions Our results suggest the pruning strategy may be of general benefit to improve test set enrichment and provide machine learning models with enhanced predictive value for the MLM stability of small organic molecules. This study represents the most exhaustive study to date of using machine learning approaches with MLM data from public sources. PMID:26415647

  15. Effects of Plasma Transfusion on Perioperative Bleeding Complications: A Machine Learning Approach.

    PubMed

    Ngufor, Che; Murphree, Dennis; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nageswar; Kor, Daryl; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative bleeding (PB) is associated with increased patient morbidity and mortality, and results in substantial health care resource utilization. To assess bleeding risk, a routine practice in most centers is to use indicators such as elevated values of the International Normalized Ratio (INR). For patients with elevated INR, the routine therapy option is plasma transfusion. However, the predictive accuracy of INR and the value of plasma transfusion still remains unclear. Accurate methods are therefore needed to identify early the patients with increased risk of bleeding. The goal of this work is to apply advanced machine learning methods to study the relationship between preoperative plasma transfusion (PPT) and PB in patients with elevated INR undergoing noncardiac surgery. The problem is cast under the framework of causal inference where robust meaningful measures to quantify the effect of PPT on PB are estimated. Results show that both machine learning and standard statistical methods generally agree that PPT negatively impacts PB and other important patient outcomes. However, machine learning methods show significant results, and machine learning boosting methods are found to make less errors in predicting PB.

  16. Concrete Condition Assessment Using Impact-Echo Method and Extreme Learning Machines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Kui; Yan, Weizhong; Cui, De-Mi

    2016-03-26

    The impact-echo (IE) method is a popular non-destructive testing (NDT) technique widely used for measuring the thickness of plate-like structures and for detecting certain defects inside concrete elements or structures. However, the IE method is not effective for full condition assessment (i.e., defect detection, defect diagnosis, defect sizing and location), because the simple frequency spectrum analysis involved in the existing IE method is not sufficient to capture the IE signal patterns associated with different conditions. In this paper, we attempt to enhance the IE technique and enable it for full condition assessment of concrete elements by introducing advanced machine learning techniques for performing comprehensive analysis and pattern recognition of IE signals. Specifically, we use wavelet decomposition for extracting signatures or features out of the raw IE signals and apply extreme learning machine, one of the recently developed machine learning techniques, as classification models for full condition assessment. To validate the capabilities of the proposed method, we build a number of specimens with various types, sizes, and locations of defects and perform IE testing on these specimens in a lab environment. Based on analysis of the collected IE signals using the proposed machine learning based IE method, we demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in performing full condition assessment of concrete elements or structures.

  17. Concrete Condition Assessment Using Impact-Echo Method and Extreme Learning Machines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Kui; Yan, Weizhong; Cui, De-Mi

    2016-01-01

    The impact-echo (IE) method is a popular non-destructive testing (NDT) technique widely used for measuring the thickness of plate-like structures and for detecting certain defects inside concrete elements or structures. However, the IE method is not effective for full condition assessment (i.e., defect detection, defect diagnosis, defect sizing and location), because the simple frequency spectrum analysis involved in the existing IE method is not sufficient to capture the IE signal patterns associated with different conditions. In this paper, we attempt to enhance the IE technique and enable it for full condition assessment of concrete elements by introducing advanced machine learning techniques for performing comprehensive analysis and pattern recognition of IE signals. Specifically, we use wavelet decomposition for extracting signatures or features out of the raw IE signals and apply extreme learning machine, one of the recently developed machine learning techniques, as classification models for full condition assessment. To validate the capabilities of the proposed method, we build a number of specimens with various types, sizes, and locations of defects and perform IE testing on these specimens in a lab environment. Based on analysis of the collected IE signals using the proposed machine learning based IE method, we demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in performing full condition assessment of concrete elements or structures. PMID:27023563

  18. Probability and Statistics in Astronomical Machine Learning and Data Minin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey

    2012-03-01

    Statistical issues peculiar to astronomy have implications for machine learning and data mining. It should be obvious that statistics lies at the heart of machine learning and data mining. Further it should be no surprise that the passive observational nature of astronomy, the concomitant lack of sampling control, and the uniqueness of its realm (the whole universe!) lead to some special statistical issues and problems. As described in the Introduction to this volume, data analysis technology is largely keeping up with major advances in astrophysics and cosmology, even driving many of them. And I realize that there are many scientists with good statistical knowledge and instincts, especially in the modern era I like to call the Age of Digital Astronomy. Nevertheless, old impediments still lurk, and the aim of this chapter is to elucidate some of them. Many experiences with smart people doing not-so-smart things (cf. the anecdotes collected in the Appendix here) have convinced me that the cautions given here need to be emphasized. Consider these four points: 1. Data analysis often involves searches of many cases, for example, outcomes of a repeated experiment, for a feature of the data. 2. The feature comprising the goal of such searches may not be defined unambiguously until the search is carried out, or perhaps vaguely even then. 3. The human visual system is very good at recognizing patterns in noisy contexts. 4. People are much easier to convince of something they want to believe, or already believe, as opposed to unpleasant or surprising facts. One can argue that all four are good things during the initial, exploratory phases of most data analysis. They represent the curiosity and creativity of the scientific process, especially during the exploration of data collections from new observational programs such as all-sky surveys in wavelengths not accessed before or sets of images of a planetary surface not yet explored. On the other hand, confirmatory scientific

  19. OP-ELM: optimally pruned extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Miche, Yoan; Sorjamaa, Antti; Bas, Patrick; Simula, Olli; Jutten, Christian; Lendasse, Amaury

    2010-01-01

    In this brief, the optimally pruned extreme learning machine (OP-ELM) methodology is presented. It is based on the original extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm with additional steps to make it more robust and generic. The whole methodology is presented in detail and then applied to several regression and classification problems. Results for both computational time and accuracy (mean square error) are compared to the original ELM and to three other widely used methodologies: multilayer perceptron (MLP), support vector machine (SVM), and Gaussian process (GP). As the experiments for both regression and classification illustrate, the proposed OP-ELM methodology performs several orders of magnitude faster than the other algorithms used in this brief, except the original ELM. Despite the simplicity and fast performance, the OP-ELM is still able to maintain an accuracy that is comparable to the performance of the SVM. A toolbox for the OP-ELM is publicly available online.

  20. Machine learning of fault characteristics from rocket engine simulation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, Min; Ali, Moonis

    1990-01-01

    Transformation of data into knowledge through conceptual induction has been the focus of our research described in this paper. We have developed a Machine Learning System (MLS) to analyze the rocket engine simulation data. MLS can provide to its users fault analysis, characteristics, and conceptual descriptions of faults, and the relationships of attributes and sensors. All the results are critically important in identifying faults.

  1. Acquiring Software Design Schemas: A Machine Learning Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harandi, Mehdi T.; Lee, Hing-Yan

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach based on machine learning that acquires software design schemas from design cases of existing applications. An overview of the technique, design representation, and acquisition system are presented. the paper also addresses issues associated with generalizing common features such as biases. The generalization process is illustrated using an example.

  2. Predicting single-molecule conductance through machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A.; Breneman, Curt M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a robust machine learning model that is trained on the experimentally determined electrical conductance values of approximately 120 single-molecule junctions used in scanning tunnelling microscope molecular break junction (STM-MBJ) experiments. Quantum mechanical, chemical, and topological descriptors are used to correlate each molecular structure with a conductance value, and the resulting machine-learning model can predict the corresponding value of conductance with correlation coefficients of r 2 = 0.95 for the training set and r 2 = 0.78 for a blind testing set. While neglecting entirely the effects of the metal contacts, this work demonstrates that single molecule conductance can be qualitatively correlated with a number of molecular descriptors through a suitably trained machine learning model. The dominant features in the machine learning model include those based on the electronic wavefunction, the geometry/topology of the molecule as well as the surface chemistry of the molecule. This model can be used to identify promising molecular structures for use in single-molecule electronic circuits and can guide synthesis and experiments in the future.

  3. Machine Learning Through Signature Trees. Applications to Human Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, George M.

    A signature tree is a binary decision tree used to classify unknown patterns. An attempt was made to develop a computer program for manipulating signature trees as a general research tool for exploring machine learning and pattern recognition. The program was applied to the problem of speech recognition to test its effectiveness for a specific…

  4. Machine learning techniques for fault isolation and sensor placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, James R.; Fisher, Douglas H.

    1993-01-01

    Fault isolation and sensor placement are vital for monitoring and diagnosis. A sensor conveys information about a system's state that guides troubleshooting if problems arise. We are using machine learning methods to uncover behavioral patterns over snapshots of system simulations that will aid fault isolation and sensor placement, with an eye towards minimality, fault coverage, and noise tolerance.

  5. Relative optical navigation around small bodies via Extreme Learning Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Andrew M.

    To perform close proximity operations under a low-gravity environment, relative and absolute positions are vital information to the maneuver. Hence navigation is inseparably integrated in space travel. Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) is presented as an optical navigation method around small celestial bodies. Optical Navigation uses visual observation instruments such as a camera to acquire useful data and determine spacecraft position. The required input data for operation is merely a single image strip and a nadir image. ELM is a machine learning Single Layer feed-Forward Network (SLFN), a type of neural network (NN). The algorithm is developed on the predicate that input weights and biases can be randomly assigned and does not require back-propagation. The learned model is the output layer weights which are used to calculate a prediction. Together, Extreme Learning Machine Optical Navigation (ELM OpNav) utilizes optical images and ELM algorithm to train the machine to navigate around a target body. In this thesis the asteroid, Vesta, is the designated celestial body. The trained ELMs estimate the position of the spacecraft during operation with a single data set. The results show the approach is promising and potentially suitable for on-board navigation.

  6. Plasma disruption prediction using machine learning methods: DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupin-Jimenez, L.; Kolemen, E.; Eldon, D.; Eidietis, N.

    2016-10-01

    Plasma disruption prediction is becoming more important with the development of larger tokamaks, due to the larger amount of thermal and magnetic energy that can be stored. By accurately predicting an impending disruption, the disruption's impact can be mitigated or, better, prevented. Recent approaches to disruption prediction have been through implementation of machine learning methods, which characterize raw and processed diagnostic data to develop accurate prediction models. Using disruption trials from the DIII-D database, the effectiveness of different machine learning methods are characterized. Developed real time disruption prediction approaches are focused on tearing and locking modes. Machine learning methods used include random forests, multilayer perceptrons, and traditional regression analysis. The algorithms are trained with data within short time frames, and whether or not a disruption occurs within the time window after the end of the frame. Initial results from the machine learning algorithms will be presented. Work supported by US DOE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. An efficient learning procedure for deep Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2012-08-01

    We present a new learning algorithm for Boltzmann machines that contain many layers of hidden variables. Data-dependent statistics are estimated using a variational approximation that tends to focus on a single mode, and data-independent statistics are estimated using persistent Markov chains. The use of two quite different techniques for estimating the two types of statistic that enter into the gradient of the log likelihood makes it practical to learn Boltzmann machines with multiple hidden layers and millions of parameters. The learning can be made more efficient by using a layer-by-layer pretraining phase that initializes the weights sensibly. The pretraining also allows the variational inference to be initialized sensibly with a single bottom-up pass. We present results on the MNIST and NORB data sets showing that deep Boltzmann machines learn very good generative models of handwritten digits and 3D objects. We also show that the features discovered by deep Boltzmann machines are a very effective way to initialize the hidden layers of feedforward neural nets, which are then discriminatively fine-tuned.

  8. A 128-Channel Extreme Learning Machine-Based Neural Decoder for Brain Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Yao, Enyi; Basu, Arindam

    2016-06-01

    Currently, state-of-the-art motor intention decoding algorithms in brain-machine interfaces are mostly implemented on a PC and consume significant amount of power. A machine learning coprocessor in 0.35- μm CMOS for the motor intention decoding in the brain-machine interfaces is presented in this paper. Using Extreme Learning Machine algorithm and low-power analog processing, it achieves an energy efficiency of 3.45 pJ/MAC at a classification rate of 50 Hz. The learning in second stage and corresponding digitally stored coefficients are used to increase robustness of the core analog processor. The chip is verified with neural data recorded in monkey finger movements experiment, achieving a decoding accuracy of 99.3% for movement type. The same coprocessor is also used to decode time of movement from asynchronous neural spikes. With time-delayed feature dimension enhancement, the classification accuracy can be increased by 5% with limited number of input channels. Further, a sparsity promoting training scheme enables reduction of number of programmable weights by ≈ 2X.

  9. Intracortical Brain-Machine Interfaces Advance Sensorimotor Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Karen E.; Chestek, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) decode brain activity to control external devices. Over the past two decades, the BMI community has grown tremendously and reached some impressive milestones, including the first human clinical trials using chronically implanted intracortical electrodes. It has also contributed experimental paradigms and important findings to basic neuroscience. In this review, we discuss neuroscience achievements stemming from BMI research, specifically that based upon upper limb prosthetic control with intracortical microelectrodes. We will focus on three main areas: first, we discuss progress in neural coding of reaches in motor cortex, describing recent results linking high dimensional representations of cortical activity to muscle activation. Next, we describe recent findings on learning and plasticity in motor cortex on various time scales. Finally, we discuss how bidirectional BMIs have led to better understanding of somatosensation in and related to motor cortex. PMID:27445663

  10. Recent Advances in Technologies Required for a ``Salad Machine''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliss, M.; Heyenga, A. G.; Hoehn, A.; Stodieck, L. S.

    Future long duration, manned space flight missions will require life support systems that minimize resupply requirements and ultimately approach self-sufficiency in space. Bioregenerative life support systems are a promising approach, but they are far from mature. Early in the development of the NASA Controlled Ecological Life Support System Program, the idea of onboard cultivation of salad-type vegetables for crew consumption was proposed as a first step away from the total reliance on resupply for food in space. Since that time, significant advances in space-based plant growth hardware have occurred, and considerable flight experience has been gained. This paper revisits the ``Salad Machine'' concept and describes recent developments in subsystem technologies for both plant root and shoot environments that are directly relevant to the development of such a facility

  11. Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, March 9-10, 1999. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees were from NASA, other government agencies, industry, and universities. The objective of the workshop was to assess the status and effectiveness of different advanced training technologies and learning environments.

  12. Committee of machine learning predictors of hydrological models uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayastha, Nagendra; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2014-05-01

    In prediction of uncertainty based on machine learning methods, the results of various sampling schemes namely, Monte Carlo sampling (MCS), generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE), Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), shuffled complex evolution metropolis algorithm (SCEMUA), differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and adaptive cluster covering (ACCO)[1] used to build a predictive models. These models predict the uncertainty (quantiles of pdf) of a deterministic output from hydrological model [2]. Inputs to these models are the specially identified representative variables (past events precipitation and flows). The trained machine learning models are then employed to predict the model output uncertainty which is specific for the new input data. For each sampling scheme three machine learning methods namely, artificial neural networks, model tree, locally weighted regression are applied to predict output uncertainties. The problem here is that different sampling algorithms result in different data sets used to train different machine learning models which leads to several models (21 predictive uncertainty models). There is no clear evidence which model is the best since there is no basis for comparison. A solution could be to form a committee of all models and to sue a dynamic averaging scheme to generate the final output [3]. This approach is applied to estimate uncertainty of streamflows simulation from a conceptual hydrological model HBV in the Nzoia catchment in Kenya. [1] N. Kayastha, D. L. Shrestha and D. P. Solomatine. Experiments with several methods of parameter uncertainty estimation in hydrological modeling. Proc. 9th Intern. Conf. on Hydroinformatics, Tianjin, China, September 2010. [2] D. L. Shrestha, N. Kayastha, and D. P. Solomatine, and R. Price. Encapsulation of parameteric uncertainty statistics by various predictive machine learning models: MLUE method, Journal of Hydroinformatic, in press

  13. Machine Learning for Outcome Prediction of Acute Ischemic Stroke Post Intra-Arterial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Hamed; Dowling, Richard; Yan, Bernard; Mitchell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Accurately predicting stroke outcome from a set of predictive variables may identify high-risk patients and guide treatment approaches, leading to decreased morbidity. Logistic regression models allow for the identification and validation of predictive variables. However, advanced machine learning algorithms offer an alternative, in particular, for large-scale multi-institutional data, with the advantage of easily incorporating newly available data to improve prediction performance. Our aim was to design and compare different machine learning methods, capable of predicting the outcome of endovascular intervention in acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke. Method We conducted a retrospective study of a prospectively collected database of acute ischaemic stroke treated by endovascular intervention. Using SPSS®, MATLAB®, and Rapidminer®, classical statistics as well as artificial neural network and support vector algorithms were applied to design a supervised machine capable of classifying these predictors into potential good and poor outcomes. These algorithms were trained, validated and tested using randomly divided data. Results We included 107 consecutive acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients treated by endovascular technique. Sixty-six were male and the mean age of 65.3. All the available demographic, procedural and clinical factors were included into the models. The final confusion matrix of the neural network, demonstrated an overall congruency of ∼80% between the target and output classes, with favourable receiving operative characteristics. However, after optimisation, the support vector machine had a relatively better performance, with a root mean squared error of 2.064 (SD: ±0.408). Discussion We showed promising accuracy of outcome prediction, using supervised machine learning algorithms, with potential for incorporation of larger multicenter datasets, likely further

  14. Active machine learning-driven experimentation to determine compound effects on protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Naik, Armaghan W; Kangas, Joshua D; Sullivan, Devin P; Murphy, Robert F

    2016-02-03

    High throughput screening determines the effects of many conditions on a given biological target. Currently, to estimate the effects of those conditions on other targets requires either strong modeling assumptions (e.g. similarities among targets) or separate screens. Ideally, data-driven experimentation could be used to learn accurate models for many conditions and targets without doing all possible experiments. We have previously described an active machine learning algorithm that can iteratively choose small sets of experiments to learn models of multiple effects. We now show that, with no prior knowledge and with liquid handling robotics and automated microscopy under its control, this learner accurately learned the effects of 48 chemical compounds on the subcellular localization of 48 proteins while performing only 29% of all possible experiments. The results represent the first practical demonstration of the utility of active learning-driven biological experimentation in which the set of possible phenotypes is unknown in advance.

  15. Stacking for machine learning redshifts applied to SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitlau, Roman; Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Weller, Jochen; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella

    2016-08-01

    We present an analysis of a general machine learning technique called `stacking' for the estimation of photometric redshifts. Stacking techniques can feed the photometric redshift estimate, as output by a base algorithm, back into the same algorithm as an additional input feature in a subsequent learning round. We show how all tested base algorithms benefit from at least one additional stacking round (or layer). To demonstrate the benefit of stacking, we apply the method to both unsupervised machine learning techniques based on self-organizing maps (SOMs), and supervised machine learning methods based on decision trees. We explore a range of stacking architectures, such as the number of layers and the number of base learners per layer. Finally we explore the effectiveness of stacking even when using a successful algorithm such as AdaBoost. We observe a significant improvement of between 1.9 per cent and 21 per cent on all computed metrics when stacking is applied to weak learners (such as SOMs and decision trees). When applied to strong learning algorithms (such as AdaBoost) the ratio of improvement shrinks, but still remains positive and is between 0.4 per cent and 2.5 per cent for the explored metrics and comes at almost no additional computational cost.

  16. Efficiently Ranking Hyphotheses in Machine Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve

    1997-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of learning the ranking of a set of alternatives based upon incomplete information (e.g. a limited number of observations). At each decision cycle, the system can output a complete ordering on the hypotheses or decide to gather additional information (e.g. observation) at some cost.

  17. Tunneling Activities Detection Using Machine Learning Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    time is quite short. The implementation has been realized on a 3.06 Ghz PC platform running under a Debian distribution. The langage used is Java...therefore this computation time could be reduced using a faster langage such as C if needed. Phase Time Learning Phase 1143 ms Challenge Phase 223 µs Table

  18. Combining data mining and machine learning for effective user profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, T.; Provost, F.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the automatic design of methods for detecting fraudulent behavior. Much of the design is accomplished using a series of machine learning methods. In particular, we combine data mining and constructive induction with more standard machine learning techniques to design methods for detecting fraudulent usage of cellular telephones based on profiling customer behavior. Specifically, we use a rule-learning program to uncover indicators of fraudulent behavior from a large database of cellular calls. These indicators are used to create profilers, which then serve as features to a system that combines evidence from multiple profilers to generate high-confidence alarms. Experiments indicate that this automatic approach performs nearly as well as the best hand-tuned methods for detecting fraud.

  19. Research on knowledge representation, machine learning, and knowledge acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Bruce G.

    1987-01-01

    Research in knowledge representation, machine learning, and knowledge acquisition performed at Knowledge Systems Lab. is summarized. The major goal of the research was to develop flexible, effective methods for representing the qualitative knowledge necessary for solving large problems that require symbolic reasoning as well as numerical computation. The research focused on integrating different representation methods to describe different kinds of knowledge more effectively than any one method can alone. In particular, emphasis was placed on representing and using spatial information about three dimensional objects and constraints on the arrangement of these objects in space. Another major theme is the development of robust machine learning programs that can be integrated with a variety of intelligent systems. To achieve this goal, learning methods were designed, implemented and experimented within several different problem solving environments.

  20. Application of Machine Learning to Rotorcraft Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, Tyler; Dempsey, Paula J.

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning is a powerful tool for data exploration and model building with large data sets. This project aimed to use machine learning techniques to explore the inherent structure of data from rotorcraft gear tests, relationships between features and damage states, and to build a system for predicting gear health for future rotorcraft transmission applications. Classical machine learning techniques are difficult, if not irresponsible to apply to time series data because many make the assumption of independence between samples. To overcome this, Hidden Markov Models were used to create a binary classifier for identifying scuffing transitions and Recurrent Neural Networks were used to leverage long distance relationships in predicting discrete damage states. When combined in a workflow, where the binary classifier acted as a filter for the fatigue monitor, the system was able to demonstrate accuracy in damage state prediction and scuffing identification. The time dependent nature of the data restricted data exploration to collecting and analyzing data from the model selection process. The limited amount of available data was unable to give useful information, and the division of training and testing sets tended to heavily influence the scores of the models across combinations of features and hyper-parameters. This work built a framework for tracking scuffing and fatigue on streaming data and demonstrates that machine learning has much to offer rotorcraft health monitoring by using Bayesian learning and deep learning methods to capture the time dependent nature of the data. Suggested future work is to implement the framework developed in this project using a larger variety of data sets to test the generalization capabilities of the models and allow for data exploration.

  1. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, G.; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, A.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Ramprasad, R.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions on bandgaps of double perovskites is of much practical interest for a range of applications. While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning approaches can be a promising alternative. Here we demonstrate a systematic feature-engineering approach and a robust learning framework for efficient and accurate predictions of electronic bandgaps of double perovskites. After evaluating a set of more than 1.2 million features, we identify lowest occupied Kohn-Sham levels and elemental electronegativities of the constituent atomic species as the most crucial and relevant predictors. The developed models are validated and tested using the best practices of data science and further analyzed to rationalize their prediction performance.

  2. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, Arun; Uberuaga, Blas; Ramprasad, Rampi; Gubernatis, James; Lookman, Turab

    The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions of bandgaps for double perovskites is of much practical interest for a range of applications. While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning approaches can be a promising alternative. Here we demonstrate a systematic feature-engineering approach and a robust learning framework for efficient and accurate predictions of electronic bandgaps for double perovskites. After evaluating a set of nearly 1.2 million features, we identify several elemental features of the constituent atomic species as the most crucial and relevant predictors. The developed models are validated and tested using the best practices of data science (on a dataset of more than 1300 double perovskite bandgaps) and further analyzed to rationalize their prediction performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory LDRD program and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences.

  3. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites.

    PubMed

    Pilania, G; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, A; Uberuaga, B P; Ramprasad, R; Gubernatis, J E; Lookman, T

    2016-01-19

    The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions on bandgaps of double perovskites is of much practical interest for a range of applications. While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning approaches can be a promising alternative. Here we demonstrate a systematic feature-engineering approach and a robust learning framework for efficient and accurate predictions of electronic bandgaps of double perovskites. After evaluating a set of more than 1.2 million features, we identify lowest occupied Kohn-Sham levels and elemental electronegativities of the constituent atomic species as the most crucial and relevant predictors. The developed models are validated and tested using the best practices of data science and further analyzed to rationalize their prediction performance.

  4. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Pilania, G.; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, A.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Ramprasad, R.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions on bandgaps of double perovskites is of much practical interest for a range of applications. While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning approaches can be a promising alternative. Here we demonstrate a systematic feature-engineering approach and a robust learning framework for efficient and accurate predictions of electronic bandgaps of double perovskites. After evaluating a set of more than 1.2 million features, we identify lowest occupied Kohn-Sham levels and elemental electronegativities of the constituent atomic species as the most crucial and relevant predictors. The developed models are validated and tested using the best practices of data science and further analyzed to rationalize their prediction performance. PMID:26783247

  5. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Pilania, G.; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, A.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Ramprasad, R.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2016-01-19

    The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions on bandgaps of double perovskites is of much practical interest for a range of applications. While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning approaches can be a promising alternative. Here we demonstrate a systematic feature-engineering approach and a robust learning framework for efficient and accurate predictions of electronic bandgaps of double perovskites. After evaluating a set of more than 1.2 million features, we identify lowest occupied Kohn-Sham levels and elemental electronegativities of the constituent atomic species as the most crucial and relevant predictors. As a result, the developed models are validated and tested using the best practices of data science and further analyzed to rationalize their prediction performance.

  6. Machine learning bandgaps of double perovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Pilania, G.; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, A.; Uberuaga, B. P.; ...

    2016-01-19

    The ability to make rapid and accurate predictions on bandgaps of double perovskites is of much practical interest for a range of applications. While quantum mechanical computations for high-fidelity bandgaps are enormously computation-time intensive and thus impractical in high throughput studies, informatics-based statistical learning approaches can be a promising alternative. Here we demonstrate a systematic feature-engineering approach and a robust learning framework for efficient and accurate predictions of electronic bandgaps of double perovskites. After evaluating a set of more than 1.2 million features, we identify lowest occupied Kohn-Sham levels and elemental electronegativities of the constituent atomic species as the mostmore » crucial and relevant predictors. As a result, the developed models are validated and tested using the best practices of data science and further analyzed to rationalize their prediction performance.« less

  7. Machine learning approach to optimizing combined stimulation and medication therapies for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Reuben R.; Dolber, Trygve; Noecker, Angela M.; Walter, Benjamin L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic region is an established therapy for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, patients often require time-intensive postoperative management to balance their coupled stimulation and medication treatments. Given the large and complex parameter space associated with this task, we propose that clinical decision support systems (CDSS) based on machine learning algorithms could assist in treatment optimization. Objective Develop a proof-of-concept implementation of a CDSS that incorporates patient-specific details on both stimulation and medication. Methods Clinical data from 10 patients, and 89 post-DBS surgery visits, were used to create a prototype CDSS. The system was designed to provide three key functions: 1) information retrieval; 2) visualization of treatment, and; 3) recommendation on expected effective stimulation and drug dosages, based on three machine learning methods that included support vector machines, Naïve Bayes, and random forest. Results Measures of medication dosages, time factors, and symptom-specific preoperative response to levodopa were significantly correlated with postoperative outcomes (p<0.05) and their effect on outcomes was of similar magnitude to that of DBS. Using those results, the combined machine learning algorithms were able to accurately predict 86% (12/14) of the motor improvement scores at one year after surgery. Conclusions Using patient-specific details, an appropriately parameterized CDSS could help select theoretically optimal DBS parameter settings and medication dosages that have potential to improve the clinical management of PD patients. PMID:26140956

  8. Machine Shop Suggested Job and Task Sheets. Part II. 21 Advanced Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This volume consists of advanced job and task sheets adaptable for use in the regular vocational industrial education programs for the training of machinists and machine shop operators. Twenty-one advanced machine shop job sheets are included. Some or all of this material is provided for each job: an introductory sheet with aim, checking…

  9. Revisiting Warfarin Dosing Using Machine Learning Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sharabiani, Ashkan; Bress, Adam; Douzali, Elnaz; Darabi, Houshang

    2015-01-01

    Determining the appropriate dosage of warfarin is an important yet challenging task. Several prediction models have been proposed to estimate a therapeutic dose for patients. The models are either clinical models which contain clinical and demographic variables or pharmacogenetic models which additionally contain the genetic variables. In this paper, a new methodology for warfarin dosing is proposed. The patients are initially classified into two classes. The first class contains patients who require doses of >30 mg/wk and the second class contains patients who require doses of ≤30 mg/wk. This phase is performed using relevance vector machines. In the second phase, the optimal dose for each patient is predicted by two clinical regression models that are customized for each class of patients. The prediction accuracy of the model was 11.6 in terms of root mean squared error (RMSE) and 8.4 in terms of mean absolute error (MAE). This was 15% and 5% lower than IWPC and Gage models (which are the most widely used models in practice), respectively, in terms of RMSE. In addition, the proposed model was compared with fixed-dose approach of 35 mg/wk, and the model proposed by Sharabiani et al. and its outperformance were proved in terms of both MAE and RMSE. PMID:26146514

  10. Developing a PLC-friendly state machine model: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessemier, Wim; Deconinck, Geert; Raskin, Gert; Saey, Philippe; Van Winckel, Hans

    2014-07-01

    Modern Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) have become an attractive platform for controlling real-time aspects of astronomical telescopes and instruments due to their increased versatility, performance and standardization. Likewise, vendor-neutral middleware technologies such as OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) have recently demonstrated that they can greatly facilitate the integration of these industrial platforms into the overall control system. Many practical questions arise, however, when building multi-tiered control systems that consist of PLCs for low level control, and conventional software and platforms for higher level control. How should the PLC software be structured, so that it can rely on well-known programming paradigms on the one hand, and be mapped to a well-organized OPC UA interface on the other hand? Which programming languages of the IEC 61131-3 standard closely match the problem domains of the abstraction levels within this structure? How can the recent additions to the standard (such as the support for namespaces and object-oriented extensions) facilitate a model based development approach? To what degree can our applications already take advantage of the more advanced parts of the OPC UA standard, such as the high expressiveness of the semantic modeling language that it defines, or the support for events, aggregation of data, automatic discovery, ... ? What are the timing and concurrency problems to be expected for the higher level tiers of the control system due to the cyclic execution of control and communication tasks by the PLCs? We try to answer these questions by demonstrating a semantic state machine model that can readily be implemented using IEC 61131 and OPC UA. One that does not aim to capture all possible states of a system, but rather one that attempts to organize the course-grained structure and behaviour of a system. In this paper we focus on the intricacies of this seemingly simple task, and on the lessons that we

  11. Machine learning strategies for systems with invariance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Julia; Jones, Reese; Templeton, Jeremy

    2016-08-01

    In many scientific fields, empirical models are employed to facilitate computational simulations of engineering systems. For example, in fluid mechanics, empirical Reynolds stress closures enable computationally-efficient Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes simulations. Likewise, in solid mechanics, constitutive relations between the stress and strain in a material are required in deformation analysis. Traditional methods for developing and tuning empirical models usually combine physical intuition with simple regression techniques on limited data sets. The rise of high performance computing has led to a growing availability of high fidelity simulation data. These data open up the possibility of using machine learning algorithms, such as random forests or neural networks, to develop more accurate and general empirical models. A key question when using data-driven algorithms to develop these empirical models is how domain knowledge should be incorporated into the machine learning process. This paper will specifically address physical systems that possess symmetry or invariance properties. Two different methods for teaching a machine learning model an invariance property are compared. In the first method, a basis of invariant inputs is constructed, and the machine learning model is trained upon this basis, thereby embedding the invariance into the model. In the second method, the algorithm is trained on multiple transformations of the raw input data until the model learns invariance to that transformation. Results are discussed for two case studies: one in turbulence modeling and one in crystal elasticity. It is shown that in both cases embedding the invariance property into the input features yields higher performance at significantly reduced computational training costs.

  12. Machine learning strategies for systems with invariance properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Julia; Jones, Reese E.; Templeton, Jeremy Alan

    2016-05-06

    Here, in many scientific fields, empirical models are employed to facilitate computational simulations of engineering systems. For example, in fluid mechanics, empirical Reynolds stress closures enable computationally-efficient Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. Likewise, in solid mechanics, constitutive relations between the stress and strain in a material are required in deformation analysis. Traditional methods for developing and tuning empirical models usually combine physical intuition with simple regression techniques on limited data sets. The rise of high-performance computing has led to a growing availability of high-fidelity simulation data, which open up the possibility of using machine learning algorithms, such as random forests or neural networks, to develop more accurate and general empirical models. A key question when using data-driven algorithms to develop these models is how domain knowledge should be incorporated into the machine learning process. This paper will specifically address physical systems that possess symmetry or invariance properties. Two different methods for teaching a machine learning model an invariance property are compared. In the first , a basis of invariant inputs is constructed, and the machine learning model is trained upon this basis, thereby embedding the invariance into the model. In the second method, the algorithm is trained on multiple transformations of the raw input data until the model learns invariance to that transformation. Results are discussed for two case studies: one in turbulence modeling and one in crystal elasticity. It is shown that in both cases embedding the invariance property into the input features yields higher performance with significantly reduced computational training costs.

  13. Machine learning strategies for systems with invariance properties

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Julia; Jones, Reese E.; Templeton, Jeremy Alan

    2016-05-06

    Here, in many scientific fields, empirical models are employed to facilitate computational simulations of engineering systems. For example, in fluid mechanics, empirical Reynolds stress closures enable computationally-efficient Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. Likewise, in solid mechanics, constitutive relations between the stress and strain in a material are required in deformation analysis. Traditional methods for developing and tuning empirical models usually combine physical intuition with simple regression techniques on limited data sets. The rise of high-performance computing has led to a growing availability of high-fidelity simulation data, which open up the possibility of using machine learning algorithms, such as random forests or neuralmore » networks, to develop more accurate and general empirical models. A key question when using data-driven algorithms to develop these models is how domain knowledge should be incorporated into the machine learning process. This paper will specifically address physical systems that possess symmetry or invariance properties. Two different methods for teaching a machine learning model an invariance property are compared. In the first , a basis of invariant inputs is constructed, and the machine learning model is trained upon this basis, thereby embedding the invariance into the model. In the second method, the algorithm is trained on multiple transformations of the raw input data until the model learns invariance to that transformation. Results are discussed for two case studies: one in turbulence modeling and one in crystal elasticity. It is shown that in both cases embedding the invariance property into the input features yields higher performance with significantly reduced computational training costs.« less

  14. A Machine Learning Approach to Identifying the Thought Markers of Suicidal Subjects: A Prospective Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Pestian, John P; Sorter, Michael; Connolly, Brian; Bretonnel Cohen, Kevin; McCullumsmith, Cheryl; Gee, Jeffry T; Morency, Louis-Philippe; Scherer, Stefan; Rohlfs, Lesley

    2017-02-01

    Death by suicide demonstrates profound personal suffering and societal failure. While basic sciences provide the opportunity to understand biological markers related to suicide, computer science provides opportunities to understand suicide thought markers. In this novel prospective, multimodal, multicenter, mixed demographic study, we used machine learning to measure and fuse two classes of suicidal thought markers: verbal and nonverbal. Machine learning algorithms were used with the subjects' words and vocal characteristics to classify 379 subjects recruited from two academic medical centers and a rural community hospital into one of three groups: suicidal, mentally ill but not suicidal, or controls. By combining linguistic and acoustic characteristics, subjects could be classified into one of the three groups with up to 85% accuracy. The results provide insight into how advanced technology can be used for suicide assessment and prevention.

  15. Learning by Design: Good Video Games as Learning Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, James Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article asks how good video and computer game designers manage to get new players to learn long, complex and difficult games. The short answer is that designers of good games have hit on excellent methods for getting people to learn and to enjoy learning. The longer answer is more complex. Integral to this answer are the good principles of…

  16. Multivariate Mapping of Environmental Data Using Extreme Learning Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuenberger, Michael; Kanevski, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    In most real cases environmental data are multivariate, highly variable at several spatio-temporal scales, and are generated by nonlinear and complex phenomena. Mapping - spatial predictions of such data, is a challenging problem. Machine learning algorithms, being universal nonlinear tools, have demonstrated their efficiency in modelling of environmental spatial and space-time data (Kanevski et al. 2009). Recently, a new approach in machine learning - Extreme Learning Machine (ELM), has gained a great popularity. ELM is a fast and powerful approach being a part of the machine learning algorithm category. Developed by G.-B. Huang et al. (2006), it follows the structure of a multilayer perceptron (MLP) with one single-hidden layer feedforward neural networks (SLFNs). The learning step of classical artificial neural networks, like MLP, deals with the optimization of weights and biases by using gradient-based learning algorithm (e.g. back-propagation algorithm). Opposed to this optimization phase, which can fall into local minima, ELM generates randomly the weights between the input layer and the hidden layer and also the biases in the hidden layer. By this initialization, it optimizes just the weight vector between the hidden layer and the output layer in a single way. The main advantage of this algorithm is the speed of the learning step. In a theoretical context and by growing the number of hidden nodes, the algorithm can learn any set of training data with zero error. To avoid overfitting, cross-validation method or "true validation" (by randomly splitting data into training, validation and testing subsets) are recommended in order to find an optimal number of neurons. With its universal property and solid theoretical basis, ELM is a good machine learning algorithm which can push the field forward. The present research deals with an extension of ELM to multivariate output modelling and application of ELM to the real data case study - pollution of the sediments in

  17. Nonlinear programming for classification problems in machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astorino, Annabella; Fuduli, Antonio; Gaudioso, Manlio

    2016-10-01

    We survey some nonlinear models for classification problems arising in machine learning. In the last years this field has become more and more relevant due to a lot of practical applications, such as text and web classification, object recognition in machine vision, gene expression profile analysis, DNA and protein analysis, medical diagnosis, customer profiling etc. Classification deals with separation of sets by means of appropriate separation surfaces, which is generally obtained by solving a numerical optimization model. While linear separability is the basis of the most popular approach to classification, the Support Vector Machine (SVM), in the recent years using nonlinear separating surfaces has received some attention. The objective of this work is to recall some of such proposals, mainly in terms of the numerical optimization models. In particular we tackle the polyhedral, ellipsoidal, spherical and conical separation approaches and, for some of them, we also consider the semisupervised versions.

  18. Stochastic Synapses Enable Efficient Brain-Inspired Learning Machines

    PubMed Central

    Neftci, Emre O.; Pedroni, Bruno U.; Joshi, Siddharth; Al-Shedivat, Maruan; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that synaptic unreliability is a robust and sufficient mechanism for inducing the stochasticity observed in cortex. Here, we introduce Synaptic Sampling Machines (S2Ms), a class of neural network models that uses synaptic stochasticity as a means to Monte Carlo sampling and unsupervised learning. Similar to the original formulation of Boltzmann machines, these models can be viewed as a stochastic counterpart of Hopfield networks, but where stochasticity is induced by a random mask over the connections. Synaptic stochasticity plays the dual role of an efficient mechanism for sampling, and a regularizer during learning akin to DropConnect. A local synaptic plasticity rule implementing an event-driven form of contrastive divergence enables the learning of generative models in an on-line fashion. S2Ms perform equally well using discrete-timed artificial units (as in Hopfield networks) or continuous-timed leaky integrate and fire neurons. The learned representations are remarkably sparse and robust to reductions in bit precision and synapse pruning: removal of more than 75% of the weakest connections followed by cursory re-learning causes a negligible performance loss on benchmark classification tasks. The spiking neuron-based S2Ms outperform existing spike-based unsupervised learners, while potentially offering substantial advantages in terms of power and complexity, and are thus promising models for on-line learning in brain-inspired hardware. PMID:27445650

  19. Machine Learning Methods for Attack Detection in the Smart Grid.

    PubMed

    Ozay, Mete; Esnaola, Inaki; Yarman Vural, Fatos Tunay; Kulkarni, Sanjeev R; Poor, H Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Attack detection problems in the smart grid are posed as statistical learning problems for different attack scenarios in which the measurements are observed in batch or online settings. In this approach, machine learning algorithms are used to classify measurements as being either secure or attacked. An attack detection framework is provided to exploit any available prior knowledge about the system and surmount constraints arising from the sparse structure of the problem in the proposed approach. Well-known batch and online learning algorithms (supervised and semisupervised) are employed with decision- and feature-level fusion to model the attack detection problem. The relationships between statistical and geometric properties of attack vectors employed in the attack scenarios and learning algorithms are analyzed to detect unobservable attacks using statistical learning methods. The proposed algorithms are examined on various IEEE test systems. Experimental analyses show that machine learning algorithms can detect attacks with performances higher than attack detection algorithms that employ state vector estimation methods in the proposed attack detection framework.

  20. Stochastic Synapses Enable Efficient Brain-Inspired Learning Machines.

    PubMed

    Neftci, Emre O; Pedroni, Bruno U; Joshi, Siddharth; Al-Shedivat, Maruan; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that synaptic unreliability is a robust and sufficient mechanism for inducing the stochasticity observed in cortex. Here, we introduce Synaptic Sampling Machines (S2Ms), a class of neural network models that uses synaptic stochasticity as a means to Monte Carlo sampling and unsupervised learning. Similar to the original formulation of Boltzmann machines, these models can be viewed as a stochastic counterpart of Hopfield networks, but where stochasticity is induced by a random mask over the connections. Synaptic stochasticity plays the dual role of an efficient mechanism for sampling, and a regularizer during learning akin to DropConnect. A local synaptic plasticity rule implementing an event-driven form of contrastive divergence enables the learning of generative models in an on-line fashion. S2Ms perform equally well using discrete-timed artificial units (as in Hopfield networks) or continuous-timed leaky integrate and fire neurons. The learned representations are remarkably sparse and robust to reductions in bit precision and synapse pruning: removal of more than 75% of the weakest connections followed by cursory re-learning causes a negligible performance loss on benchmark classification tasks. The spiking neuron-based S2Ms outperform existing spike-based unsupervised learners, while potentially offering substantial advantages in terms of power and complexity, and are thus promising models for on-line learning in brain-inspired hardware.

  1. Randomized Prediction Games for Adversarial Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Rota Bulo, Samuel; Biggio, Battista; Pillai, Ignazio; Pelillo, Marcello; Roli, Fabio

    2016-08-04

    In spam and malware detection, attackers exploit randomization to obfuscate malicious data and increase their chances of evading detection at test time, e.g., malware code is typically obfuscated using random strings or byte sequences to hide known exploits. Interestingly, randomization has also been proposed to improve security of learning algorithms against evasion attacks, as it results in hiding information about the classifier to the attacker. Recent work has proposed game-theoretical formulations to learn secure classifiers, by simulating different evasion attacks and modifying the classification function accordingly. However, both the classification function and the simulated data manipulations have been modeled in a deterministic manner, without accounting for any form of randomization. In this paper, we overcome this limitation by proposing a randomized prediction game, namely, a noncooperative game-theoretic formulation in which the classifier and the attacker make randomized strategy selections according to some probability distribution defined over the respective strategy set. We show that our approach allows one to improve the tradeoff between attack detection and false alarms with respect to the state-of-the-art secure classifiers, even against attacks that are different from those hypothesized during design, on application examples including handwritten digit recognition, spam, and malware detection.

  2. Icing detection from geostationary satellite data using machine learning approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Ha, S.; Sim, S.; Im, J.

    2015-12-01

    Icing can cause a significant structural damage to aircraft during flight, resulting in various aviation accidents. Icing studies have been typically performed using two approaches: one is a numerical model-based approach and the other is a remote sensing-based approach. The model based approach diagnoses aircraft icing using numerical atmospheric parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, and vertical thermodynamic structure. This approach tends to over-estimate icing according to the literature. The remote sensing-based approach typically uses meteorological satellite/ground sensor data such as Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and Dual-Polarization radar data. This approach detects icing areas by applying thresholds to parameters such as liquid water path and cloud optical thickness derived from remote sensing data. In this study, we propose an aircraft icing detection approach which optimizes thresholds for L1B bands and/or Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) from Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite-Meteorological Imager (COMS MI) and newly launched Himawari-8 Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) over East Asia. The proposed approach uses machine learning algorithms including decision trees (DT) and random forest (RF) for optimizing thresholds of L1B data and/or COT. Pilot Reports (PIREPs) from South Korea and Japan were used as icing reference data. Results show that RF produced a lower false alarm rate (1.5%) and a higher overall accuracy (98.8%) than DT (8.5% and 75.3%), respectively. The RF-based approach was also compared with the existing COMS MI and GOES-R icing mask algorithms. The agreements of the proposed approach with the existing two algorithms were 89.2% and 45.5%, respectively. The lower agreement with the GOES-R algorithm was possibly due to the high uncertainty of the cloud phase product from COMS MI.

  3. Challenges in representation learning: a report on three machine learning contests.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Ian J; Erhan, Dumitru; Luc Carrier, Pierre; Courville, Aaron; Mirza, Mehdi; Hamner, Ben; Cukierski, Will; Tang, Yichuan; Thaler, David; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Zhou, Yingbo; Ramaiah, Chetan; Feng, Fangxiang; Li, Ruifan; Wang, Xiaojie; Athanasakis, Dimitris; Shawe-Taylor, John; Milakov, Maxim; Park, John; Ionescu, Radu; Popescu, Marius; Grozea, Cristian; Bergstra, James; Xie, Jingjing; Romaszko, Lukasz; Xu, Bing; Chuang, Zhang; Bengio, Yoshua

    2015-04-01

    The ICML 2013 Workshop on Challenges in Representation Learning(1) focused on three challenges: the black box learning challenge, the facial expression recognition challenge, and the multimodal learning challenge. We describe the datasets created for these challenges and summarize the results of the competitions. We provide suggestions for organizers of future challenges and some comments on what kind of knowledge can be gained from machine learning competitions.

  4. Security Aspects of Smart Cards vs. Embedded Security in Machine-to-Machine (M2M) Advanced Mobile Network Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerstein, Mike; Cha, Inhyok; Shah, Yogendra

    The Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) standardisation group currently discusses advanced applications of mobile networks such as Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communication. Several security issues arise in these contexts which warrant a fresh look at mobile networks’ security foundations, resting on smart cards. This paper contributes a security/efficiency analysis to this discussion and highlights the role of trusted platform technology to approach these issues.

  5. Edu-mining: A Machine Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimani, P. K.; Patil, Malini M.

    2011-12-01

    Mining Educational data is an emerging interdisciplinary research area that mainly deals with the development of methods to explore the data stored in educational institutions. The educational data is referred as Edu-DATA. Queries related to Edu-DATA are of practical interest as SQL approach is insufficient and needs to be focused in a different way. The paper aims at developing a technique called Edu-MINING which converts raw data coming from educational institutions using data mining techniques into useful information. The discovered knowledge will have a great impact on the educational research and practices. Edu-MINING explores Edu-DATA, discovers new knowledge and suggests useful methods to improve the quality of education with regard to teaching-learning process. This is illustrated through a case study.

  6. Weka machine learning for predicting the phospholipidosis inducing potential.

    PubMed

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu

    2008-01-01

    The drug discovery and development process is lengthy and expensive, and bringing a drug to market may take up to 18 years and may cost up to 2 billion $US. The extensive use of computer-assisted drug design techniques may considerably increase the chances of finding valuable drug candidates, thus decreasing the drug discovery time and costs. The most important computational approach is represented by structure-activity relationships that can discriminate between sets of chemicals that are active/inactive towards a certain biological receptor. An adverse effect of some cationic amphiphilic drugs is phospholipidosis that manifests as an intracellular accumulation of phospholipids and formation of concentric lamellar bodies. Here we present structure-activity relationships (SAR) computed with a wide variety of machine learning algorithms trained to identify drugs that have phospholipidosis inducing potential. All SAR models are developed with the machine learning software Weka, and include both classical algorithms, such as k-nearest neighbors and decision trees, as well as recently introduced methods, such as support vector machines and artificial immune systems. The best predictions are obtained with support vector machines, followed by perceptron artificial neural network, logistic regression, and k-nearest neighbors.

  7. Prototype Vector Machine for Large Scale Semi-Supervised Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Kwok, James T.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-29

    Practicaldataminingrarelyfalls exactlyinto the supervisedlearning scenario. Rather, the growing amount of unlabeled data poses a big challenge to large-scale semi-supervised learning (SSL). We note that the computationalintensivenessofgraph-based SSLarises largely from the manifold or graph regularization, which in turn lead to large models that are dificult to handle. To alleviate this, we proposed the prototype vector machine (PVM), a highlyscalable,graph-based algorithm for large-scale SSL. Our key innovation is the use of"prototypes vectors" for effcient approximation on both the graph-based regularizer and model representation. The choice of prototypes are grounded upon two important criteria: they not only perform effective low-rank approximation of the kernel matrix, but also span a model suffering the minimum information loss compared with the complete model. We demonstrate encouraging performance and appealing scaling properties of the PVM on a number of machine learning benchmark data sets.

  8. Introduction to machine learning: k-nearest neighbors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2016-06-01

    Machine learning techniques have been widely used in many scientific fields, but its use in medical literature is limited partly because of technical difficulties. k-nearest neighbors (kNN) is a simple method of machine learning. The article introduces some basic ideas underlying the kNN algorithm, and then focuses on how to perform kNN modeling with R. The dataset should be prepared before running the knn() function in R. After prediction of outcome with kNN algorithm, the diagnostic performance of the model should be checked. Average accuracy is the mostly widely used statistic to reflect the kNN algorithm. Factors such as k value, distance calculation and choice of appropriate predictors all have significant impact on the model performance.

  9. Survey of Machine Learning Methods for Database Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamra, Ashish; Ber, Elisa

    Application of machine learning techniques to database security is an emerging area of research. In this chapter, we present a survey of various approaches that use machine learning/data mining techniques to enhance the traditional security mechanisms of databases. There are two key database security areas in which these techniques have found applications, namely, detection of SQL Injection attacks and anomaly detection for defending against insider threats. Apart from the research prototypes and tools, various third-party commercial products are also available that provide database activity monitoring solutions by profiling database users and applications. We present a survey of such products. We end the chapter with a primer on mechanisms for responding to database anomalies.

  10. Introduction to machine learning: k-nearest neighbors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Machine learning techniques have been widely used in many scientific fields, but its use in medical literature is limited partly because of technical difficulties. k-nearest neighbors (kNN) is a simple method of machine learning. The article introduces some basic ideas underlying the kNN algorithm, and then focuses on how to perform kNN modeling with R. The dataset should be prepared before running the knn() function in R. After prediction of outcome with kNN algorithm, the diagnostic performance of the model should be checked. Average accuracy is the mostly widely used statistic to reflect the kNN algorithm. Factors such as k value, distance calculation and choice of appropriate predictors all have significant impact on the model performance. PMID:27386492

  11. Stochastic Local Interaction (SLI) model: Bridging machine learning and geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    2015-12-01

    Machine learning and geostatistics are powerful mathematical frameworks for modeling spatial data. Both approaches, however, suffer from poor scaling of the required computational resources for large data applications. We present the Stochastic Local Interaction (SLI) model, which employs a local representation to improve computational efficiency. SLI combines geostatistics and machine learning with ideas from statistical physics and computational geometry. It is based on a joint probability density function defined by an energy functional which involves local interactions implemented by means of kernel functions with adaptive local kernel bandwidths. SLI is expressed in terms of an explicit, typically sparse, precision (inverse covariance) matrix. This representation leads to a semi-analytical expression for interpolation (prediction), which is valid in any number of dimensions and avoids the computationally costly covariance matrix inversion.

  12. A machine learning approach for the prediction of settling velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Evan B.; Coco, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    We use a machine learning approach based on genetic programming to predict noncohesive particle settling velocity. The genetic programming routine is coupled to a novel selection algorithm that determines training data from a collected database of published experiments (985 measurements). While varying the training data set size and retaining an invariant validation set we perform multiple iterations of genetic programming to determine the least data needed to train the algorithm. This method retains a maximum quantity of data for testing against published predictors. The machine learning predictor for settling velocity performs better than two common predictors in the literature and indicates that particle settling velocity is a nonlinear function of all the provided independent variables: nominal diameter of the settling particle, kinematic viscosity of the fluid, and submerged specific gravity of the particle.

  13. Robust Extreme Learning Machine With its Application to Indoor Positioning.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoxuan; Zou, Han; Zhou, Hongming; Xie, Lihua; Huang, Guang-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demands of location-based services have spurred the rapid development of indoor positioning system and indoor localization system interchangeably (IPSs). However, the performance of IPSs suffers from noisy measurements. In this paper, two kinds of robust extreme learning machines (RELMs), corresponding to the close-to-mean constraint, and the small-residual constraint, have been proposed to address the issue of noisy measurements in IPSs. Based on whether the feature mapping in extreme learning machine is explicit, we respectively provide random-hidden-nodes and kernelized formulations of RELMs by second order cone programming. Furthermore, the computation of the covariance in feature space is discussed. Simulations and real-world indoor localization experiments are extensively carried out and the results demonstrate that the proposed algorithms can not only improve the accuracy and repeatability, but also reduce the deviation and worst case error of IPSs compared with other baseline algorithms.

  14. Studies of Machine Learning Photometric Classification of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, Joseph Nicholas; Cunningham, John; Kuhlmann, Stephen; Gupta, Ravi; Kovacs, Eve

    2017-01-01

    We studied the use of machine learning for the photometuric classification of Type Ia (SNIa) and core collapse (SNcc) supernovae. We used a combination of simulated data for the Dark Energy survey (DES) and real data from SDSS and chose our metrics to be the sample purity and the efficiency of identifying SNIa supernovae. Our focus was to quantify the effects of varying the training and parameters for random-forest decision-tree algorithms.

  15. Machine-learning-assisted materials discovery using failed experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccuglia, Paul; Elbert, Katherine C.; Adler, Philip D. F.; Falk, Casey; Wenny, Malia B.; Mollo, Aurelio; Zeller, Matthias; Friedler, Sorelle A.; Schrier, Joshua; Norquist, Alexander J.

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid materials such as organically templated metal oxides, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and organohalide perovskites have been studied for decades, and hydrothermal and (non-aqueous) solvothermal syntheses have produced thousands of new materials that collectively contain nearly all the metals in the periodic table. Nevertheless, the formation of these compounds is not fully understood, and development of new compounds relies primarily on exploratory syntheses. Simulation- and data-driven approaches (promoted by efforts such as the Materials Genome Initiative) provide an alternative to experimental trial-and-error. Three major strategies are: simulation-based predictions of physical properties (for example, charge mobility, photovoltaic properties, gas adsorption capacity or lithium-ion intercalation) to identify promising target candidates for synthetic efforts; determination of the structure-property relationship from large bodies of experimental data, enabled by integration with high-throughput synthesis and measurement tools; and clustering on the basis of similar crystallographic structure (for example, zeolite structure classification or gas adsorption properties). Here we demonstrate an alternative approach that uses machine-learning algorithms trained on reaction data to predict reaction outcomes for the crystallization of templated vanadium selenites. We used information on ‘dark’ reactions—failed or unsuccessful hydrothermal syntheses—collected from archived laboratory notebooks from our laboratory, and added physicochemical property descriptions to the raw notebook information using cheminformatics techniques. We used the resulting data to train a machine-learning model to predict reaction success. When carrying out hydrothermal synthesis experiments using previously untested, commercially available organic building blocks, our machine-learning model outperformed traditional human strategies, and successfully predicted

  16. Smarter Instruments, Smarter Archives: Machine Learning for Tactical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Kiran, R.; Allwood, A.; Altinok, A.; Estlin, T.; Flannery, D.

    2014-12-01

    There has been a growing interest by Earth and Planetary Sciences in machine learning, visualization and cyberinfrastructure to interpret ever-increasing volumes of instrument data. Such tools are commonly used to analyze archival datasets, but they can also play a valuable real-time role during missions. Here we discuss ways that machine learning can benefit tactical science decisions during Earth and Planetary Exploration. Machine learning's potential begins at the instrument itself. Smart instruments endowed with pattern recognition can immediately recognize science features of interest. This allows robotic explorers to optimize their limited communications bandwidth, triaging science products and prioritizing the most relevant data. Smart instruments can also target their data collection on the fly, using principles of experimental design to reduce redundancy and generally improve sampling efficiency for time-limited operations. Moreover, smart instruments can respond immediately to transient or unexpected phenomena. Examples include detections of cometary plumes, terrestrial floods, or volcanism. We show recent examples of smart instruments from 2014 tests including: aircraft and spacecraft remote sensing instruments that recognize cloud contamination, field tests of a "smart camera" for robotic surface geology, and adaptive data collection by X-Ray fluorescence spectrometers. Machine learning can also assist human operators when tactical decision making is required. Terrestrial scenarios include airborne remote sensing, where the decision to re-fly a transect must be made immediately. Planetary scenarios include deep space encounters or planetary surface exploration, where the number of command cycles is limited and operators make rapid daily decisions about where next to collect measurements. Visualization and modeling can reveal trends, clusters, and outliers in new data. This can help operators recognize instrument artifacts or spot anomalies in real time

  17. Machine-learning-assisted materials discovery using failed experiments.

    PubMed

    Raccuglia, Paul; Elbert, Katherine C; Adler, Philip D F; Falk, Casey; Wenny, Malia B; Mollo, Aurelio; Zeller, Matthias; Friedler, Sorelle A; Schrier, Joshua; Norquist, Alexander J

    2016-05-05

    Inorganic-organic hybrid materials such as organically templated metal oxides, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and organohalide perovskites have been studied for decades, and hydrothermal and (non-aqueous) solvothermal syntheses have produced thousands of new materials that collectively contain nearly all the metals in the periodic table. Nevertheless, the formation of these compounds is not fully understood, and development of new compounds relies primarily on exploratory syntheses. Simulation- and data-driven approaches (promoted by efforts such as the Materials Genome Initiative) provide an alternative to experimental trial-and-error. Three major strategies are: simulation-based predictions of physical properties (for example, charge mobility, photovoltaic properties, gas adsorption capacity or lithium-ion intercalation) to identify promising target candidates for synthetic efforts; determination of the structure-property relationship from large bodies of experimental data, enabled by integration with high-throughput synthesis and measurement tools; and clustering on the basis of similar crystallographic structure (for example, zeolite structure classification or gas adsorption properties). Here we demonstrate an alternative approach that uses machine-learning algorithms trained on reaction data to predict reaction outcomes for the crystallization of templated vanadium selenites. We used information on 'dark' reactions--failed or unsuccessful hydrothermal syntheses--collected from archived laboratory notebooks from our laboratory, and added physicochemical property descriptions to the raw notebook information using cheminformatics techniques. We used the resulting data to train a machine-learning model to predict reaction success. When carrying out hydrothermal synthesis experiments using previously untested, commercially available organic building blocks, our machine-learning model outperformed traditional human strategies, and successfully predicted conditions

  18. Learning in higher order Boltzmann machines using linear response.

    PubMed

    Leisink, M A; Kappen, H J

    2000-04-01

    We introduce an efficient method for learning and inference in higher order Boltzmann machines. The method is based on mean field theory with the linear response correction. We compute the correlations using the exact and the approximated method for a fully connected third order network of ten neurons. In addition, we compare the results of the exact and approximate learning algorithm. Finally we use the presented method to solve the shifter problem. We conclude that the linear response approximation gives good results as long as the couplings are not too large.

  19. Machine Learning for Flood Prediction in Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, C.; Tellman, B.; Max, S. A.; Schwarz, B.

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing availability of high-resolution satellite imagery, dynamic flood mapping in near real time is becoming a reachable goal for decision-makers. This talk describes a newly developed framework for predicting biophysical flood vulnerability using public data, cloud computing and machine learning. Our objective is to define an approach to flood inundation modeling using statistical learning methods deployed in a cloud-based computing platform. Traditionally, static flood extent maps grounded in physically based hydrologic models can require hours of human expertise to construct at significant financial cost. In addition, desktop modeling software and limited local server storage can impose restraints on the size and resolution of input datasets. Data-driven, cloud-based processing holds promise for predictive watershed modeling at a wide range of spatio-temporal scales. However, these benefits come with constraints. In particular, parallel computing limits a modeler's ability to simulate the flow of water across a landscape, rendering traditional routing algorithms unusable in this platform. Our project pushes these limits by testing the performance of two machine learning algorithms, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Random Forests, at predicting flood extent. Constructed in Google Earth Engine, the model mines a suite of publicly available satellite imagery layers to use as algorithm inputs. Results are cross-validated using MODIS-based flood maps created using the Dartmouth Flood Observatory detection algorithm. Model uncertainty highlights the difficulty of deploying unbalanced training data sets based on rare extreme events.

  20. Classifying black and white spruce pollen using layered machine learning.

    PubMed

    Punyasena, Surangi W; Tcheng, David K; Wesseln, Cassandra; Mueller, Pietra G

    2012-11-01

    Pollen is among the most ubiquitous of terrestrial fossils, preserving an extended record of vegetation change. However, this temporal continuity comes with a taxonomic tradeoff. Analytical methods that improve the taxonomic precision of pollen identifications would expand the research questions that could be addressed by pollen, in fields such as paleoecology, paleoclimatology, biostratigraphy, melissopalynology, and forensics. We developed a supervised, layered, instance-based machine-learning classification system that uses leave-one-out bias optimization and discriminates among small variations in pollen shape, size, and texture. We tested our system on black and white spruce, two paleoclimatically significant taxa in the North American Quaternary. We achieved > 93% grain-to-grain classification accuracies in a series of experiments with both fossil and reference material. More significantly, when applied to Quaternary samples, the learning system was able to replicate the count proportions of a human expert (R(2) = 0.78, P = 0.007), with one key difference - the machine achieved these ratios by including larger numbers of grains with low-confidence identifications. Our results demonstrate the capability of machine-learning systems to solve the most challenging palynological classification problem, the discrimination of congeneric species, extending the capabilities of the pollen analyst and improving the taxonomic resolution of the palynological record.

  1. Classification of ABO3 perovskite solids: a machine learning study.

    PubMed

    Pilania, G; Balachandran, P V; Gubernatis, J E; Lookman, T

    2015-10-01

    We explored the use of machine learning methods for classifying whether a particular ABO3 chemistry forms a perovskite or non-perovskite structured solid. Starting with three sets of feature pairs (the tolerance and octahedral factors, the A and B ionic radii relative to the radius of O, and the bond valence distances between the A and B ions from the O atoms), we used machine learning to create a hyper-dimensional partial dependency structure plot using all three feature pairs or any two of them. Doing so increased the accuracy of our predictions by 2-3 percentage points over using any one pair. We also included the Mendeleev numbers of the A and B atoms to this set of feature pairs. Doing this and using the capabilities of our machine learning algorithm, the gradient tree boosting classifier, enabled us to generate a new type of structure plot that has the simplicity of one based on using just the Mendeleev numbers, but with the added advantages of having a higher accuracy and providing a measure of likelihood of the predicted structure.

  2. Dana-Farber repository for machine learning in immunology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Lin, Hong Huang; Keskin, Derin B; Reinherz, Ellis L; Brusic, Vladimir

    2011-11-30

    The immune system is characterized by high combinatorial complexity that necessitates the use of specialized computational tools for analysis of immunological data. Machine learning (ML) algorithms are used in combination with classical experimentation for the selection of vaccine targets and in computational simulations that reduce the number of necessary experiments. The development of ML algorithms requires standardized data sets, consistent measurement methods, and uniform scales. To bridge the gap between the immunology community and the ML community, we designed a repository for machine learning in immunology named Dana-Farber Repository for Machine Learning in Immunology (DFRMLI). This repository provides standardized data sets of HLA-binding peptides with all binding affinities mapped onto a common scale. It also provides a list of experimentally validated naturally processed T cell epitopes derived from tumor or virus antigens. The DFRMLI data were preprocessed and ensure consistency, comparability, detailed descriptions, and statistically meaningful sample sizes for peptides that bind to various HLA molecules. The repository is accessible at http://bio.dfci.harvard.edu/DFRMLI/.

  3. Anomaly detection for machine learning redshifts applied to SDSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Ben; Rau, Markus Michael; Paech, Kerstin; Bonnett, Christopher; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    We present an analysis of anomaly detection for machine learning redshift estimation. Anomaly detection allows the removal of poor training examples, which can adversely influence redshift estimates. Anomalous training examples may be photometric galaxies with incorrect spectroscopic redshifts, or galaxies with one or more poorly measured photometric quantity. We select 2.5 million `clean' SDSS DR12 galaxies with reliable spectroscopic redshifts, and 6730 `anomalous' galaxies with spectroscopic redshift measurements which are flagged as unreliable. We contaminate the clean base galaxy sample with galaxies with unreliable redshifts and attempt to recover the contaminating galaxies using the Elliptical Envelope technique. We then train four machine learning architectures for redshift analysis on both the contaminated sample and on the preprocessed `anomaly-removed' sample and measure redshift statistics on a clean validation sample generated without any preprocessing. We find an improvement on all measured statistics of up to 80 per cent when training on the anomaly removed sample as compared with training on the contaminated sample for each of the machine learning routines explored. We further describe a method to estimate the contamination fraction of a base data sample.

  4. Optimization of Unsteady Fluid-Body Interactions via Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John; Moret, Lionel; Zhang, Jun; Tedrake, Russ

    2008-11-01

    Optimization of the interactions between a moving body and its surrounding fluid can be extremely complicated; even optimization on simple models can be tremendously computationally expensive. In this work we demonstrate that using a state-of-art machine learning algorithm we are able to efficiently optimize a flapping strokeform for energy efficiency entirely on a laboratory experimental system (i.e., without the use of any simulation). The learning is performed in real-time on a vertically heaving wing that is free to rotate about its center in the horizontal plane as a model of forward flapping flight (Re˜30,000). The learning algorithm must contend with the stochasticity and long-term correlations inherent in its being run online and on an experimental system. Despite these difficulties, we demonstrate its success at learning using several wing forms, where it is able to optimize a strokeform in approximately 1,000 flaps (less than twenty minutes).

  5. Applying machine learning techniques to DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlik, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing a machine learning system that modifies existing knowledge about specific types of biological sequences. It does this by considering sample members and nonmembers of the sequence motif being learned. Using this information (which we call a domain theory''), our learning algorithm produces a more accurate representation of the knowledge needed to categorize future sequences. Specifically, the KBANN algorithm maps inference rules, such as consensus sequences, into a neural (connectionist) network. Neural network training techniques then use the training examples of refine these inference rules. We have been applying this approach to several problems in DNA sequence analysis and have also been extending the capabilities of our learning system along several dimensions.

  6. Machine Learning Techniques in Optimal Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerbone, Giuseppe

    1992-01-01

    to the problem, is then obtained by solving in parallel each of the sub-problems in the set and computing the one with the minimum cost. In addition to speeding up the optimization process, our use of learning methods also relieves the expert from the burden of identifying rules that exactly pinpoint optimal candidate sub-problems. In real engineering tasks it is usually too costly to the engineers to derive such rules. Therefore, this paper also contributes to a further step towards the solution of the knowledge acquisition bottleneck [Feigenbaum, 1977] which has somewhat impaired the construction of rulebased expert systems.

  7. Amp: A modular approach to machine learning in atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshidi, Alireza; Peterson, Andrew A.

    2016-10-01

    Electronic structure calculations, such as those employing Kohn-Sham density functional theory or ab initio wavefunction theories, have allowed for atomistic-level understandings of a wide variety of phenomena and properties of matter at small scales. However, the computational cost of electronic structure methods drastically increases with length and time scales, which makes these methods difficult for long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations or large-sized systems. Machine-learning techniques can provide accurate potentials that can match the quality of electronic structure calculations, provided sufficient training data. These potentials can then be used to rapidly simulate large and long time-scale phenomena at similar quality to the parent electronic structure approach. Machine-learning potentials usually take a bias-free mathematical form and can be readily developed for a wide variety of systems. Electronic structure calculations have favorable properties-namely that they are noiseless and targeted training data can be produced on-demand-that make them particularly well-suited for machine learning. This paper discusses our modular approach to atomistic machine learning through the development of the open-source Atomistic Machine-learning Package (Amp), which allows for representations of both the total and atom-centered potential energy surface, in both periodic and non-periodic systems. Potentials developed through the atom-centered approach are simultaneously applicable for systems with various sizes. Interpolation can be enhanced by introducing custom descriptors of the local environment. We demonstrate this in the current work for Gaussian-type, bispectrum, and Zernike-type descriptors. Amp has an intuitive and modular structure with an interface through the python scripting language yet has parallelizable fortran components for demanding tasks; it is designed to integrate closely with the widely used Atomic Simulation Environment (ASE), which

  8. Mining the Galaxy Zoo Database: Machine Learning Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, Kirk D.; Wallin, J.; Vedachalam, A.; Baehr, S.; Lintott, C.; Darg, D.; Smith, A.; Fortson, L.

    2010-01-01

    The new Zooniverse initiative is addressing the data flood in the sciences through a transformative partnership between professional scientists, volunteer citizen scientists, and machines. As part of this project, we are exploring the application of machine learning techniques to data mining problems associated with the large and growing database of volunteer science results gathered by the Galaxy Zoo citizen science project. We will describe the basic challenge, some machine learning approaches, and early results. One of the motivators for this study is the acquisition (through the Galaxy Zoo results database) of approximately 100 million classification labels for roughly one million galaxies, yielding a tremendously large and rich set of training examples for improving automated galaxy morphological classification algorithms. In our first case study, the goal is to learn which morphological and photometric features in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database correlate most strongly with user-selected galaxy morphological class. As a corollary to this study, we are also aiming to identify which galaxy parameters in the SDSS database correspond to galaxies that have been the most difficult to classify (based upon large dispersion in their volunter-provided classifications). Our second case study will focus on similar data mining analyses and machine leaning algorithms applied to the Galaxy Zoo catalog of merging and interacting galaxies. The outcomes of this project will have applications in future large sky surveys, such as the LSST (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope) project, which will generate a catalog of 20 billion galaxies and will produce an additional astronomical alert database of approximately 100 thousand events each night for 10 years -- the capabilities and algorithms that we are exploring will assist in the rapid characterization and classification of such massive data streams. This research has been supported in part through NSF award #0941610.

  9. Automatic pathology classification using a single feature machine learning support - vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepes-Calderon, Fernando; Pedregosa, Fabian; Thirion, Bertrand; Wang, Yalin; Lepore, Natasha

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been gaining popularity in the clinic in recent years as a safe in-vivo imaging technique. As a result, large troves of data are being gathered and stored daily that may be used as clinical training sets in hospitals. While numerous machine learning (ML) algorithms have been implemented for Alzheimer's disease classification, their outputs are usually difficult to interpret in the clinical setting. Here, we propose a simple method of rapid diagnostic classification for the clinic using Support Vector Machines (SVM)1 and easy to obtain geometrical measurements that, together with a cortical and sub-cortical brain parcellation, create a robust framework capable of automatic diagnosis with high accuracy. On a significantly large imaging dataset consisting of over 800 subjects taken from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, classification-success indexes of up to 99.2% are reached with a single measurement.

  10. NMF-Based Image Quality Assessment Using Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuigen; Deng, Chenwei; Lin, Weisi; Huang, Guang-Bin; Zhao, Baojun

    2017-01-01

    Numerous state-of-the-art perceptual image quality assessment (IQA) algorithms share a common two-stage process: distortion description followed by distortion effects pooling. As for the first stage, the distortion descriptors or measurements are expected to be effective representatives of human visual variations, while the second stage should well express the relationship among quality descriptors and the perceptual visual quality. However, most of the existing quality descriptors (e.g., luminance, contrast, and gradient) do not seem to be consistent with human perception, and the effects pooling is often done in ad-hoc ways. In this paper, we propose a novel full-reference IQA metric. It applies non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) to measure image degradations by making use of the parts-based representation of NMF. On the other hand, a new machine learning technique [extreme learning machine (ELM)] is employed to address the limitations of the existing pooling techniques. Compared with neural networks and support vector regression, ELM can achieve higher learning accuracy with faster learning speed. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed metric has better performance and lower computational complexity in comparison with the relevant state-of-the-art approaches.

  11. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker's yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities.

  12. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker’s yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities. PMID:27441920

  13. Sparse Bayesian extreme learning machine for multi-classification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiahua; Vong, Chi-Man; Wong, Pak-Kin

    2014-04-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) has become a popular topic in machine learning in recent years. ELM is a new kind of single-hidden layer feedforward neural network with an extremely low computational cost. ELM, however, has two evident drawbacks: 1) the output weights solved by Moore-Penrose generalized inverse is a least squares minimization issue, which easily suffers from overfitting and 2) the accuracy of ELM is drastically sensitive to the number of hidden neurons so that a large model is usually generated. This brief presents a sparse Bayesian approach for learning the output weights of ELM in classification. The new model, called Sparse Bayesian ELM (SBELM), can resolve these two drawbacks by estimating the marginal likelihood of network outputs and automatically pruning most of the redundant hidden neurons during learning phase, which results in an accurate and compact model. The proposed SBELM is evaluated on wide types of benchmark classification problems, which verifies that the accuracy of SBELM model is relatively insensitive to the number of hidden neurons; and hence a much more compact model is always produced as compared with other state-of-the-art neural network classifiers.

  14. Geological applications of machine learning on hyperspectral remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, C. H.; Li, Yi-liang; Lam, Edmund Y.

    2015-02-01

    The CRISM imaging spectrometer orbiting Mars has been producing a vast amount of data in the visible to infrared wavelengths in the form of hyperspectral data cubes. These data, compared with those obtained from previous remote sensing techniques, yield an unprecedented level of detailed spectral resolution in additional to an ever increasing level of spatial information. A major challenge brought about by the data is the burden of processing and interpreting these datasets and extract the relevant information from it. This research aims at approaching the challenge by exploring machine learning methods especially unsupervised learning to achieve cluster density estimation and classification, and ultimately devising an efficient means leading to identification of minerals. A set of software tools have been constructed by Python to access and experiment with CRISM hyperspectral cubes selected from two specific Mars locations. A machine learning pipeline is proposed and unsupervised learning methods were implemented onto pre-processed datasets. The resulting data clusters are compared with the published ASTER spectral library and browse data products from the Planetary Data System (PDS). The result demonstrated that this approach is capable of processing the huge amount of hyperspectral data and potentially providing guidance to scientists for more detailed studies.

  15. Equivalence between learning in noisy perceptrons and tree committee machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copelli, Mauro; Kinouchi, Osame; Caticha, Nestor

    1996-06-01

    We study learning from single presentation of examples (on-line learning) in single-layer perceptrons and tree committee machines (TCMs). Lower bounds for the perceptron generalization error as a function of the noise level ɛ in the teacher output are calculated. We find that local learning in a TCM with K hidden units is simply related to learning in a simple perceptron with a corresponding noise level ɛ(K). For a large number of examples and finite K the generalization error decays as α-1CM, where αCM is the number of examples per adjustable weight in the TCM. We also show that on-line learning is possible even in the K-->∞ limit, but with the generalization error decaying as α-1/2CM. The simple Hebb rule can also be applied to the TCM, but now the error decays as α-1/2CM for finite K and α-1/4CM for K-->∞. Exponential decay of the generalization error in both the noisy perceptron learning and in the TCM is obtained by using the learning by queries strategy.

  16. Big Data and Machine Learning in Plastic Surgery: A New Frontier in Surgical Innovation.

    PubMed

    Kanevsky, Jonathan; Corban, Jason; Gaster, Richard; Kanevsky, Ari; Lin, Samuel; Gilardino, Mirko

    2016-05-01

    Medical decision-making is increasingly based on quantifiable data. From the moment patients come into contact with the health care system, their entire medical history is recorded electronically. Whether a patient is in the operating room or on the hospital ward, technological advancement has facilitated the expedient and reliable measurement of clinically relevant health metrics, all in an effort to guide care and ensure the best possible clinical outcomes. However, as the volume and complexity of biomedical data grow, it becomes challenging to effectively process "big data" using conventional techniques. Physicians and scientists must be prepared to look beyond classic methods of data processing to extract clinically relevant information. The purpose of this article is to introduce the modern plastic surgeon to machine learning and computational interpretation of large data sets. What is machine learning? Machine learning, a subfield of artificial intelligence, can address clinically relevant problems in several domains of plastic surgery, including burn surgery; microsurgery; and craniofacial, peripheral nerve, and aesthetic surgery. This article provides a brief introduction to current research and suggests future projects that will allow plastic surgeons to explore this new frontier of surgical science.

  17. Fall classification by machine learning using mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Albert, Mark V; Kording, Konrad; Herrmann, Megan; Jayaraman, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Fall prevention is a critical component of health care; falls are a common source of injury in the elderly and are associated with significant levels of mortality and morbidity. Automatically detecting falls can allow rapid response to potential emergencies; in addition, knowing the cause or manner of a fall can be beneficial for prevention studies or a more tailored emergency response. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate techniques to not only reliably detect a fall but also to automatically classify the type. We asked 15 subjects to simulate four different types of falls-left and right lateral, forward trips, and backward slips-while wearing mobile phones and previously validated, dedicated accelerometers. Nine subjects also wore the devices for ten days, to provide data for comparison with the simulated falls. We applied five machine learning classifiers to a large time-series feature set to detect falls. Support vector machines and regularized logistic regression were able to identify a fall with 98% accuracy and classify the type of fall with 99% accuracy. This work demonstrates how current machine learning approaches can simplify data collection for prevention in fall-related research as well as improve rapid response to potential injuries due to falls.

  18. Galaxy Image Processing and Morphological Classification Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian

    2012-03-01

    This work uses data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Galaxy Zoo Project for classification of galaxy morphologies via machine learning. SDSS imaging data together with reliable human classifications from Galaxy Zoo provide the training set and test set for the machine learning architectures. Classification is performed with hand-picked, pre-computed features from SDSS as well as with the raw imaging data from SDSS that was available to humans in the Galaxy Zoo project. With the hand-picked features and a logistic regression classifier, 95.21% classification accuracy and an area under the ROC curve of 0.986 are attained. In the case of the raw imaging data, the images are first processed to remove background noise, image artifacts, and celestial objects other than the galaxy of interest. They are then rotated onto their principle axis of variance to guarantee rotational invariance. The processed images are used to compute color information, up to 4^th order central normalized moments, and radial intensity profiles. These features are used to train a support vector machine with a 3^rd degree polynomial kernel, which achieves a classification accuracy of 95.89% with an ROC area of 0.943.

  19. Extreme learning machine for regression and multiclass classification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guang-Bin; Zhou, Hongming; Ding, Xiaojian; Zhang, Rui

    2012-04-01

    Due to the simplicity of their implementations, least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) and proximal support vector machine (PSVM) have been widely used in binary classification applications. The conventional LS-SVM and PSVM cannot be used in regression and multiclass classification applications directly, although variants of LS-SVM and PSVM have been proposed to handle such cases. This paper shows that both LS-SVM and PSVM can be simplified further and a unified learning framework of LS-SVM, PSVM, and other regularization algorithms referred to extreme learning machine (ELM) can be built. ELM works for the "generalized" single-hidden-layer feedforward networks (SLFNs), but the hidden layer (or called feature mapping) in ELM need not be tuned. Such SLFNs include but are not limited to SVM, polynomial network, and the conventional feedforward neural networks. This paper shows the following: 1) ELM provides a unified learning platform with a widespread type of feature mappings and can be applied in regression and multiclass classification applications directly; 2) from the optimization method point of view, ELM has milder optimization constraints compared to LS-SVM and PSVM; 3) in theory, compared to ELM, LS-SVM and PSVM achieve suboptimal solutions and require higher computational complexity; and 4) in theory, ELM can approximate any target continuous function and classify any disjoint regions. As verified by the simulation results, ELM tends to have better scalability and achieve similar (for regression and binary class cases) or much better (for multiclass cases) generalization performance at much faster learning speed (up to thousands times) than traditional SVM and LS-SVM.

  20. An Incremental Type-2 Meta-Cognitive Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Pratama, Mahardhika; Zhang, Guangquan; Er, Meng Joo; Anavatti, Sreenatha

    2017-02-01

    Existing extreme learning algorithm have not taken into account four issues: 1) complexity; 2) uncertainty; 3) concept drift; and 4) high dimensionality. A novel incremental type-2 meta-cognitive extreme learning machine (ELM) called evolving type-2 ELM (eT2ELM) is proposed to cope with the four issues in this paper. The eT2ELM presents three main pillars of human meta-cognition: 1) what-to-learn; 2) how-to-learn; and 3) when-to-learn. The what-to-learn component selects important training samples for model updates by virtue of the online certainty-based active learning method, which renders eT2ELM as a semi-supervised classifier. The how-to-learn element develops a synergy between extreme learning theory and the evolving concept, whereby the hidden nodes can be generated and pruned automatically from data streams with no tuning of hidden nodes. The when-to-learn constituent makes use of the standard sample reserved strategy. A generalized interval type-2 fuzzy neural network is also put forward as a cognitive component, in which a hidden node is built upon the interval type-2 multivariate Gaussian function while exploiting a subset of Chebyshev series in the output node. The efficacy of the proposed eT2ELM is numerically validated in 12 data streams containing various concept drifts. The numerical results are confirmed by thorough statistical tests, where the eT2ELM demonstrates the most encouraging numerical results in delivering reliable prediction, while sustaining low complexity.

  1. A new machine learning classifier for high dimensional healthcare data.

    PubMed

    Padman, Rema; Bai, Xue; Airoldi, Edoardo M

    2007-01-01

    Data sets with many discrete variables and relatively few cases arise in health care, commerce, information security, and many other domains. Learning effective and efficient prediction models from such data sets is a challenging task. In this paper, we propose a new approach that combines Metaheuristic search and Bayesian Networks to learn a graphical Markov Blanket-based classifier from data. The Tabu Search enhanced Markov Blanket (TS/MB) procedure is based on the use of restricted neighborhoods in a general Bayesian Network constrained by the Markov condition, called Markov Blanket Neighborhoods. Computational results from two real world healthcare data sets indicate that the TS/MB procedure converges fast and is able to find a parsimonious model with substantially fewer predictor variables than in the full data set. Furthermore, it has comparable or better prediction performance when compared against several machine learning methods, and provides insight into possible causal relations among the variables.

  2. Machine learning assisted design of highly active peptides for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Sébastien; Laviolette, François; Marchand, Mario; Tremblay, Denise; Moineau, Sylvain; Liang, Xinxia; Biron, Éric; Corbeil, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of peptides possessing high biological activity is very challenging due to the enormous diversity for which only a minority have the desired properties. To lower cost and reduce the time to obtain promising peptides, machine learning approaches can greatly assist in the process and even partly replace expensive laboratory experiments by learning a predictor with existing data or with a smaller amount of data generation. Unfortunately, once the model is learned, selecting peptides having the greatest predicted bioactivity often requires a prohibitive amount of computational time. For this combinatorial problem, heuristics and stochastic optimization methods are not guaranteed to find adequate solutions. We focused on recent advances in kernel methods and machine learning to learn a predictive model with proven success. For this type of model, we propose an efficient algorithm based on graph theory, that is guaranteed to find the peptides for which the model predicts maximal bioactivity. We also present a second algorithm capable of sorting the peptides of maximal bioactivity. Extensive analyses demonstrate how these algorithms can be part of an iterative combinatorial chemistry procedure to speed up the discovery and the validation of peptide leads. Moreover, the proposed approach does not require the use of known ligands for the target protein since it can leverage recent multi-target machine learning predictors where ligands for similar targets can serve as initial training data. Finally, we validated the proposed approach in vitro with the discovery of new cationic antimicrobial peptides. Source code freely available at http://graal.ift.ulaval.ca/peptide-design/.

  3. Machine Learning Assisted Design of Highly Active Peptides for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Giguère, Sébastien; Laviolette, François; Marchand, Mario; Tremblay, Denise; Moineau, Sylvain; Liang, Xinxia; Biron, Éric; Corbeil, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of peptides possessing high biological activity is very challenging due to the enormous diversity for which only a minority have the desired properties. To lower cost and reduce the time to obtain promising peptides, machine learning approaches can greatly assist in the process and even partly replace expensive laboratory experiments by learning a predictor with existing data or with a smaller amount of data generation. Unfortunately, once the model is learned, selecting peptides having the greatest predicted bioactivity often requires a prohibitive amount of computational time. For this combinatorial problem, heuristics and stochastic optimization methods are not guaranteed to find adequate solutions. We focused on recent advances in kernel methods and machine learning to learn a predictive model with proven success. For this type of model, we propose an efficient algorithm based on graph theory, that is guaranteed to find the peptides for which the model predicts maximal bioactivity. We also present a second algorithm capable of sorting the peptides of maximal bioactivity. Extensive analyses demonstrate how these algorithms can be part of an iterative combinatorial chemistry procedure to speed up the discovery and the validation of peptide leads. Moreover, the proposed approach does not require the use of known ligands for the target protein since it can leverage recent multi-target machine learning predictors where ligands for similar targets can serve as initial training data. Finally, we validated the proposed approach in vitro with the discovery of new cationic antimicrobial peptides. Source code freely available at http://graal.ift.ulaval.ca/peptide-design/. PMID:25849257

  4. Intra-and-Inter Species Biomass Prediction in a Plantation Forest: Testing the Utility of High Spatial Resolution Spaceborne Multispectral RapidEye Sensor and Advanced Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Dube, Timothy; Mutanga, Onisimo; Adam, Elhadi; Ismail, Riyad

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of aboveground biomass using remote sensing is critical for better understanding the role of forests in carbon sequestration and for informed sustainable management. Although remote sensing techniques have been proven useful in assessing forest biomass in general, more is required to investigate their capabilities in predicting intra-and-inter species biomass which are mainly characterised by non-linear relationships. In this study, we tested two machine learning algorithms, Stochastic Gradient Boosting (SGB) and Random Forest (RF) regression trees to predict intra-and-inter species biomass using high resolution RapidEye reflectance bands as well as the derived vegetation indices in a commercial plantation. The results showed that the SGB algorithm yielded the best performance for intra-and-inter species biomass prediction; using all the predictor variables as well as based on the most important selected variables. For example using the most important variables the algorithm produced an R2 of 0.80 and RMSE of 16.93 t·ha−1 for E. grandis; R2 of 0.79, RMSE of 17.27 t·ha−1 for P. taeda and R2 of 0.61, RMSE of 43.39 t·ha−1 for the combined species data sets. Comparatively, RF yielded plausible results only for E. dunii (R2 of 0.79; RMSE of 7.18 t·ha−1). We demonstrated that although the two statistical methods were able to predict biomass accurately, RF produced weaker results as compared to SGB when applied to combined species dataset. The result underscores the relevance of stochastic models in predicting biomass drawn from different species and genera using the new generation high resolution RapidEye sensor with strategically positioned bands. PMID:25140631

  5. Ensemble machine learning on gene expression data for cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Tan, Aik Choon; Gilbert, David

    2003-01-01

    Whole genome RNA expression studies permit systematic approaches to understanding the correlation between gene expression profiles to disease states or different developmental stages of a cell. Microarray analysis provides quantitative information about the complete transcription profile of cells that facilitate drug and therapeutics development, disease diagnosis, and understanding in the basic cell biology. One of the challenges in microarray analysis, especially in cancerous gene expression profiles, is to identify genes or groups of genes that are highly expressed in tumour cells but not in normal cells and vice versa. Previously, we have shown that ensemble machine learning consistently performs well in classifying biological data. In this paper, we focus on three different supervised machine learning techniques in cancer classification, namely C4.5 decision tree, and bagged and boosted decision trees. We have performed classification tasks on seven publicly available cancerous microarray data and compared the classification/prediction performance of these methods. We have observed that ensemble learning (bagged and boosted decision trees) often performs better than single decision trees in this classification task.

  6. Machine learning approach for objective inpainting quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantc, V. A.; Voronin, V. V.; Marchuk, V. I.; Sherstobitov, A. I.; Agaian, S.; Egiazarian, K.

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on a machine learning approach for objective inpainting quality assessment. Inpainting has received a lot of attention in recent years and quality assessment is an important task to evaluate different image reconstruction approaches. Quantitative metrics for successful image inpainting currently do not exist; researchers instead are relying upon qualitative human comparisons in order to evaluate their methodologies and techniques. We present an approach for objective inpainting quality assessment based on natural image statistics and machine learning techniques. Our method is based on observation that when images are properly normalized or transferred to a transform domain, local descriptors can be modeled by some parametric distributions. The shapes of these distributions are different for noninpainted and inpainted images. Approach permits to obtain a feature vector strongly correlated with a subjective image perception by a human visual system. Next, we use a support vector regression learned on assessed by human images to predict perceived quality of inpainted images. We demonstrate how our predicted quality value repeatably correlates with a qualitative opinion in a human observer study.

  7. Effective feature selection for image steganalysis using extreme learning machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guorui; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Xinpeng

    2014-11-01

    Image steganography delivers secret data by slight modifications of the cover. To detect these data, steganalysis tries to create some features to embody the discrepancy between the cover and steganographic images. Therefore, the urgent problem is how to design an effective classification architecture for given feature vectors extracted from the images. We propose an approach to automatically select effective features based on the well-known JPEG steganographic methods. This approach, referred to as extreme learning machine revisited feature selection (ELM-RFS), can tune input weights in terms of the importance of input features. This idea is derived from cross-validation learning and one-dimensional (1-D) search. While updating input weights, we seek the energy decreasing direction using the leave-one-out (LOO) selection. Furthermore, we optimize the 1-D energy function instead of directly discarding the least significant feature. Since recent Liu features can gain considerable low detection errors compared to a previous JPEG steganalysis, the experimental results demonstrate that the new approach results in less classification error than other classifiers such as SVM, Kodovsky ensemble classifier, direct ELM-LOO learning, kernel ELM, and conventional ELM in Liu features. Furthermore, ELM-RFS achieves a similar performance with a deep Boltzmann machine using less training time.

  8. Teaching an Old Log New Tricks with Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Krista; Puri, Colin; Mahler, Paul; Dukatz, Carl

    2014-03-01

    To most people, the log file would not be considered an exciting area in technology today. However, these relatively benign, slowly growing data sources can drive large business transformations when combined with modern-day analytics. Accenture Technology Labs has built a new framework that helps to expand existing vendor solutions to create new methods of gaining insights from these benevolent information springs. This framework provides a systematic and effective machine-learning mechanism to understand, analyze, and visualize heterogeneous log files. These techniques enable an automated approach to analyzing log content in real time, learning relevant behaviors, and creating actionable insights applicable in traditionally reactive situations. Using this approach, companies can now tap into a wealth of knowledge residing in log file data that is currently being collected but underutilized because of its overwhelming variety and volume. By using log files as an important data input into the larger enterprise data supply chain, businesses have the opportunity to enhance their current operational log management solution and generate entirely new business insights-no longer limited to the realm of reactive IT management, but extending from proactive product improvement to defense from attacks. As we will discuss, this solution has immediate relevance in the telecommunications and security industries. However, the most forward-looking companies can take it even further. How? By thinking beyond the log file and applying the same machine-learning framework to other log file use cases (including logistics, social media, and consumer behavior) and any other transactional data source.

  9. Machine Learning Principles Can Improve Hip Fracture Prediction.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Christian; Eiken, Pia; Vestergaard, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Apply machine learning principles to predict hip fractures and estimate predictor importance in Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-scanned men and women. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry data from two Danish regions between 1996 and 2006 were combined with national Danish patient data to comprise 4722 women and 717 men with 5 years of follow-up time (original cohort n = 6606 men and women). Twenty-four statistical models were built on 75% of data points through k-5, 5-repeat cross-validation, and then validated on the remaining 25% of data points to calculate area under the curve (AUC) and calibrate probability estimates. The best models were retrained with restricted predictor subsets to estimate the best subsets. For women, bootstrap aggregated flexible discriminant analysis ("bagFDA") performed best with a test AUC of 0.92 [0.89; 0.94] and well-calibrated probabilities following Naïve Bayes adjustments. A "bagFDA" model limited to 11 predictors (among them bone mineral densities (BMD), biochemical glucose measurements, general practitioner and dentist use) achieved a test AUC of 0.91 [0.88; 0.93]. For men, eXtreme Gradient Boosting ("xgbTree") performed best with a test AUC of 0.89 [0.82; 0.95], but with poor calibration in higher probabilities. A ten predictor subset (BMD, biochemical cholesterol and liver function tests, penicillin use and osteoarthritis diagnoses) achieved a test AUC of 0.86 [0.78; 0.94] using an "xgbTree" model. Machine learning can improve hip fracture prediction beyond logistic regression using ensemble models. Compiling data from international cohorts of longer follow-up and performing similar machine learning procedures has the potential to further improve discrimination and calibration.

  10. Kernel-based machine learning techniques for infrasound signal classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, Matthias; Igel, Christian; Mialle, Pierrick

    2014-05-01

    Infrasound monitoring is one of four remote sensing technologies continuously employed by the CTBTO Preparatory Commission. The CTBTO's infrasound network is designed to monitor the Earth for potential evidence of atmospheric or shallow underground nuclear explosions. Upon completion, it will comprise 60 infrasound array stations distributed around the globe, of which 47 were certified in January 2014. Three stages can be identified in CTBTO infrasound data processing: automated processing at the level of single array stations, automated processing at the level of the overall global network, and interactive review by human analysts. At station level, the cross correlation-based PMCC algorithm is used for initial detection of coherent wavefronts. It produces estimates for trace velocity and azimuth of incoming wavefronts, as well as other descriptive features characterizing a signal. Detected arrivals are then categorized into potentially treaty-relevant versus noise-type signals by a rule-based expert system. This corresponds to a binary classification task at the level of station processing. In addition, incoming signals may be grouped according to their travel path in the atmosphere. The present work investigates automatic classification of infrasound arrivals by kernel-based pattern recognition methods. It aims to explore the potential of state-of-the-art machine learning methods vis-a-vis the current rule-based and task-tailored expert system. To this purpose, we first address the compilation of a representative, labeled reference benchmark dataset as a prerequisite for both classifier training and evaluation. Data representation is based on features extracted by the CTBTO's PMCC algorithm. As classifiers, we employ support vector machines (SVMs) in a supervised learning setting. Different SVM kernel functions are used and adapted through different hyperparameter optimization routines. The resulting performance is compared to several baseline classifiers. All

  11. Machine learning for the New York City power grid.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Cynthia; Waltz, David; Anderson, Roger N; Boulanger, Albert; Salleb-Aouissi, Ansaf; Chow, Maggie; Dutta, Haimonti; Gross, Philip N; Huang, Bert; Ierome, Steve; Isaac, Delfina F; Kressner, Arthur; Passonneau, Rebecca J; Radeva, Axinia; Wu, Leon

    2012-02-01

    Power companies can benefit from the use of knowledge discovery methods and statistical machine learning for preventive maintenance. We introduce a general process for transforming historical electrical grid data into models that aim to predict the risk of failures for components and systems. These models can be used directly by power companies to assist with prioritization of maintenance and repair work. Specialized versions of this process are used to produce 1) feeder failure rankings, 2) cable, joint, terminator, and transformer rankings, 3) feeder Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) estimates, and 4) manhole events vulnerability rankings. The process in its most general form can handle diverse, noisy, sources that are historical (static), semi-real-time, or realtime, incorporates state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms for prioritization (supervised ranking or MTBF), and includes an evaluation of results via cross-validation and blind test. Above and beyond the ranked lists and MTBF estimates are business management interfaces that allow the prediction capability to be integrated directly into corporate planning and decision support; such interfaces rely on several important properties of our general modeling approach: that machine learning features are meaningful to domain experts, that the processing of data is transparent, and that prediction results are accurate enough to support sound decision making. We discuss the challenges in working with historical electrical grid data that were not designed for predictive purposes. The “rawness” of these data contrasts with the accuracy of the statistical models that can be obtained from the process; these models are sufficiently accurate to assist in maintaining New York City’s electrical grid.

  12. Machine-z: Rapid machine-learned redshift indicator for Swift gamma-ray bursts

    DOE PAGES

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Wozniak, P. R.; Gehrels, N.

    2016-03-08

    Studies of high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) provide important information about the early Universe such as the rates of stellar collapsars and mergers, the metallicity content, constraints on the re-ionization period, and probes of the Hubble expansion. Rapid selection of high-z candidates from GRB samples reported in real time by dedicated space missions such as Swift is the key to identifying the most distant bursts before the optical afterglow becomes too dim to warrant a good spectrum. Here, we introduce ‘machine-z’, a redshift prediction algorithm and a ‘high-z’ classifier for Swift GRBs based on machine learning. Our method relies exclusively onmore » canonical data commonly available within the first few hours after the GRB trigger. Using a sample of 284 bursts with measured redshifts, we trained a randomized ensemble of decision trees (random forest) to perform both regression and classification. Cross-validated performance studies show that the correlation coefficient between machine-z predictions and the true redshift is nearly 0.6. At the same time, our high-z classifier can achieve 80 per cent recall of true high-redshift bursts, while incurring a false positive rate of 20 per cent. With 40 per cent false positive rate the classifier can achieve ~100 per cent recall. As a result, the most reliable selection of high-redshift GRBs is obtained by combining predictions from both the high-z classifier and the machine-z regressor.« less

  13. Digital imaging biomarkers feed machine learning for melanoma screening.

    PubMed

    Gareau, Daniel S; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Yagerman, Sarah; Carucci, John A; Gulati, Nicholas; Hueto, Ferran; DeFazio, Jennifer L; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Marghoob, Ashfaq; Krueger, James G

    2016-10-26

    We developed an automated approach for generating quantitative image analysis metrics (imaging biomarkers) that are then analysed with a set of 13 machine learning algorithms to generate an overall risk score that is called a Q-score. These methods were applied to a set of 120 "difficult" dermoscopy images of dysplastic nevi and melanomas that were subsequently excised/classified. This approach yielded 98% sensitivity and 36% specificity for melanoma detection, approaching sensitivity/specificity of expert lesion evaluation. Importantly, we found strong spectral dependence of many imaging biomarkers in blue or red colour channels, suggesting the need to optimize spectral evaluation of pigmented lesions.

  14. Machine learning prediction for classification of outcomes in local minimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ritankar; Wales, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning schemes are employed to predict which local minimum will result from local energy minimisation of random starting configurations for a triatomic cluster. The input data consists of structural information at one or more of the configurations in optimisation sequences that converge to one of four distinct local minima. The ability to make reliable predictions, in terms of the energy or other properties of interest, could save significant computational resources in sampling procedures that involve systematic geometry optimisation. Results are compared for two energy minimisation schemes, and for neural network and quadratic functions of the inputs.

  15. Characterizing EMG data using machine-learning tools.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Jamileh; Hamilton-Wright, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Effective electromyographic (EMG) signal characterization is critical in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders. Machine-learning based pattern classification algorithms are commonly used to produce such characterizations. Several classifiers have been investigated to develop accurate and computationally efficient strategies for EMG signal characterization. This paper provides a critical review of some of the classification methodologies used in EMG characterization, and presents the state-of-the-art accomplishments in this field, emphasizing neuromuscular pathology. The techniques studied are grouped by their methodology, and a summary of the salient findings associated with each method is presented.

  16. Orbital-free bond breaking via machine learning.

    PubMed

    Snyder, John C; Rupp, Matthias; Hansen, Katja; Blooston, Leo; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Burke, Kieron

    2013-12-14

    Using a one-dimensional model, we explore the ability of machine learning to approximate the non-interacting kinetic energy density functional of diatomics. This nonlinear interpolation between Kohn-Sham reference calculations can (i) accurately dissociate a diatomic, (ii) be systematically improved with increased reference data and (iii) generate accurate self-consistent densities via a projection method that avoids directions with no data. With relatively few densities, the error due to the interpolation is smaller than typical errors in standard exchange-correlation functionals.

  17. Transferable Atomic Multipole Machine Learning Models for Small Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Bereau, Tristan; Andrienko, Denis; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-07-14

    Accurate representation of the molecular electrostatic potential, which is often expanded in distributed multipole moments, is crucial for an efficient evaluation of intermolecular interactions. Here we introduce a machine learning model for multipole coefficients of atom types H, C, O, N, S, F, and Cl in any molecular conformation. The model is trained on quantum-chemical results for atoms in varying chemical environments drawn from thousands of organic molecules. Multipoles in systems with neutral, cationic, and anionic molecular charge states are treated with individual models. The models' predictive accuracy and applicability are illustrated by evaluating intermolecular interaction energies of nearly 1,000 dimers and the cohesive energy of the benzene crystal.

  18. Machine learning in the rational design of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Rondón-Villarreal, Paola; Sierra, Daniel A; Torres, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important public health issues is the microbial and bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics by pathogen microorganisms. In recent years, many researches have been focused on the development of new antibiotics. Among these, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have raised as a promising alternative to combat antibioticresistant microorganisms. For this reason, many theoretical efforts have been done in the development of new computational tools for the rational design of both better and effective AMPs. In this review, we present an overview of the rational design of AMPs using machine learning techniques and new research fields.

  19. Large-scale machine learning for metagenomics sequence classification

    PubMed Central

    Vervier, Kévin; Mahé, Pierre; Tournoud, Maud; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Vert, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Metagenomics characterizes the taxonomic diversity of microbial communities by sequencing DNA directly from an environmental sample. One of the main challenges in metagenomics data analysis is the binning step, where each sequenced read is assigned to a taxonomic clade. Because of the large volume of metagenomics datasets, binning methods need fast and accurate algorithms that can operate with reasonable computing requirements. While standard alignment-based methods provide state-of-the-art performance, compositional approaches that assign a taxonomic class to a DNA read based on the k-mers it contains have the potential to provide faster solutions. Results: We propose a new rank-flexible machine learning-based compositional approach for taxonomic assignment of metagenomics reads and show that it benefits from increasing the number of fragments sampled from reference genome to tune its parameters, up to a coverage of about 10, and from increasing the k-mer size to about 12. Tuning the method involves training machine learning models on about 108 samples in 107 dimensions, which is out of reach of standard softwares but can be done efficiently with modern implementations for large-scale machine learning. The resulting method is competitive in terms of accuracy with well-established alignment and composition-based tools for problems involving a small to moderate number of candidate species and for reasonable amounts of sequencing errors. We show, however, that machine learning-based compositional approaches are still limited in their ability to deal with problems involving a greater number of species and more sensitive to sequencing errors. We finally show that the new method outperforms the state-of-the-art in its ability to classify reads from species of lineage absent from the reference database and confirm that compositional approaches achieve faster prediction times, with a gain of 2–17 times with respect to the BWA-MEM short read mapper, depending

  20. Astrophysical Parameter Estimation for Gaia using Machine Learning Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiede, C.; Smith, K.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.

    2008-08-01

    Gaia is the next astrometric mission from ESA and will measure objects up to a magnitude of about G=20. Depending on the kind of object (which will be determined automatically because Gaia does not hold an input catalogue), the specific astrophysical parameters will be estimated. The General Stellar Parametrizer (GSP-phot) estimates the astrophysical parameters based on low-dispersion spectra and parallax information for single stars. We show the results of machine learning algorithms trained on simulated data and further developments of the core algorithms which improve the accuracy of the estimated astrophysical parameters.

  1. Coordinated machine learning and decision support for situation awareness.

    SciTech Connect

    Draelos, Timothy John; Zhang, Peng-Chu.; Wunsch, Donald C.; Seiffertt, John; Conrad, Gregory N.; Brannon, Nathan Gregory

    2007-09-01

    For applications such as force protection, an effective decision maker needs to maintain an unambiguous grasp of the environment. Opportunities exist to leverage computational mechanisms for the adaptive fusion of diverse information sources. The current research employs neural networks and Markov chains to process information from sources including sensors, weather data, and law enforcement. Furthermore, the system operator's input is used as a point of reference for the machine learning algorithms. More detailed features of the approach are provided, along with an example force protection scenario.

  2. Extreme learning machine for ranking: generalization analysis and applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Peng, Jiangtao; Zhou, Yicong; Li, Luoqing; Pan, Zhibin

    2014-05-01

    The extreme learning machine (ELM) has attracted increasing attention recently with its successful applications in classification and regression. In this paper, we investigate the generalization performance of ELM-based ranking. A new regularized ranking algorithm is proposed based on the combinations of activation functions in ELM. The generalization analysis is established for the ELM-based ranking (ELMRank) in terms of the covering numbers of hypothesis space. Empirical results on the benchmark datasets show the competitive performance of the ELMRank over the state-of-the-art ranking methods.

  3. Compilation of a Network Security/Machine Learning Toolchain for Android ARM Platforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Compilation of a Network Security/Machine Learning Toolchain for Android ARM Platforms by Ralph P. Ritchey, Garrett S. Payer, and Dr. Richard...of a Network Security/Machine Learning Toolchain for Android ARM Platforms Ralph P. Ritchey, Garrett S. Payer, and Dr. Richard E. Harang...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Compilation of a Network Security/Machine Learning Toolchain for Android ARM Platforms 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911WX-12-F-0052 5b

  4. Development of theories and approaches for machine learning with considerations for mathematics education

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschdorff, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    A study is conducted of the development of machine learning in the context of the field of artificial intelligence. Emphasis is placed upon methodology and developmental factors. The simulation and performance modes are defined and discussed. Selected machine learning programs are presented for each mode. A contrast of the methodologies of machine learning is made, focusing on the dimensions of purpose, task, and mechanism. Methodology is found to be most related to the researcher's purpose. The relationship of methodology and mechanism is found to be varied with overlap present for specific learning strategies. Other findings include an absence of movement or shifts between modes on the part of researchers and limited contributions of one mode's findings to the findings of the other mode. Machine learning is found to have been affected by the perspectives and activities of the parent field, artificial intelligence. Machine learning is described for various time periods with an emphasis on the expectations of artificial intelligence for machine learning and the relation of the learning problem to other artificial intelligence activities. Consideration is given to the possible applications and implications of research work in machine learning for the concerns of mathematics education. The primary contributions of machine learning lie in the explicitness with which the learning activity is described.

  5. Airline Passenger Profiling Based on Fuzzy Deep Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-Jun; Sheng, Wei-Guo; Sun, Xing-Ming; Chen, Sheng-Yong

    2016-09-27

    Passenger profiling plays a vital part of commercial aviation security, but classical methods become very inefficient in handling the rapidly increasing amounts of electronic records. This paper proposes a deep learning approach to passenger profiling. The center of our approach is a Pythagorean fuzzy deep Boltzmann machine (PFDBM), whose parameters are expressed by Pythagorean fuzzy numbers such that each neuron can learn how a feature affects the production of the correct output from both the positive and negative sides. We propose a hybrid algorithm combining a gradient-based method and an evolutionary algorithm for training the PFDBM. Based on the novel learning model, we develop a deep neural network (DNN) for classifying normal passengers and potential attackers, and further develop an integrated DNN for identifying group attackers whose individual features are insufficient to reveal the abnormality. Experiments on data sets from Air China show that our approach provides much higher learning ability and classification accuracy than existing profilers. It is expected that the fuzzy deep learning approach can be adapted for a variety of complex pattern analysis tasks.

  6. A quantum speedup in machine learning: finding an N-bit Boolean function for a classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Seokwon; Bang, Jeongho; Lee, Changhyoup; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2014-10-01

    We compare quantum and classical machines designed for learning an N-bit Boolean function in order to address how a quantum system improves the machine learning behavior. The machines of the two types consist of the same number of operations and control parameters, but only the quantum machines utilize the quantum coherence naturally induced by unitary operators. We show that quantum superposition enables quantum learning that is faster than classical learning by expanding the approximate solution regions, i.e., the acceptable regions. This is also demonstrated by means of numerical simulations with a standard feedback model, namely random search, and a practical model, namely differential evolution.

  7. Extremely Randomized Machine Learning Methods for Compound Activity Prediction.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Wojciech M; Podlewska, Sabina; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2015-11-09

    Speed, a relatively low requirement for computational resources and high effectiveness of the evaluation of the bioactivity of compounds have caused a rapid growth of interest in the application of machine learning methods to virtual screening tasks. However, due to the growth of the amount of data also in cheminformatics and related fields, the aim of research has shifted not only towards the development of algorithms of high predictive power but also towards the simplification of previously existing methods to obtain results more quickly. In the study, we tested two approaches belonging to the group of so-called 'extremely randomized methods'-Extreme Entropy Machine and Extremely Randomized Trees-for their ability to properly identify compounds that have activity towards particular protein targets. These methods were compared with their 'non-extreme' competitors, i.e., Support Vector Machine and Random Forest. The extreme approaches were not only found out to improve the efficiency of the classification of bioactive compounds, but they were also proved to be less computationally complex, requiring fewer steps to perform an optimization procedure.

  8. Imaging patterns predict patient survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma via machine learning techniques

    PubMed Central

    Macyszyn, Luke; Akbari, Hamed; Pisapia, Jared M.; Da, Xiao; Attiah, Mark; Pigrish, Vadim; Bi, Yingtao; Pal, Sharmistha; Davuluri, Ramana V.; Roccograndi, Laura; Dahmane, Nadia; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Biros, George; Wolf, Ronald L.; Bilello, Michel; O'Rourke, Donald M.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background MRI characteristics of brain gliomas have been used to predict clinical outcome and molecular tumor characteristics. However, previously reported imaging biomarkers have not been sufficiently accurate or reproducible to enter routine clinical practice and often rely on relatively simple MRI measures. The current study leverages advanced image analysis and machine learning algorithms to identify complex and reproducible imaging patterns predictive of overall survival and molecular subtype in glioblastoma (GB). Methods One hundred five patients with GB were first used to extract approximately 60 diverse features from preoperative multiparametric MRIs. These imaging features were used by a machine learning algorithm to derive imaging predictors of patient survival and molecular subtype. Cross-validation ensured generalizability of these predictors to new patients. Subsequently, the predictors were evaluated in a prospective cohort of 29 new patients. Results Survival curves yielded a hazard ratio of 10.64 for predicted long versus short survivors. The overall, 3-way (long/medium/short survival) accuracy in the prospective cohort approached 80%. Classification of patients into the 4 molecular subtypes of GB achieved 76% accuracy. Conclusions By employing machine learning techniques, we were able to demonstrate that imaging patterns are highly predictive of patient survival. Additionally, we found that GB subtypes have distinctive imaging phenotypes. These results reveal that when imaging markers related to infiltration, cell density, microvascularity, and blood–brain barrier compromise are integrated via advanced pattern analysis methods, they form very accurate predictive biomarkers. These predictive markers used solely preoperative images, hence they can significantly augment diagnosis and treatment of GB patients. PMID:26188015

  9. GeneRIF indexing: sentence selection based on machine learning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A Gene Reference Into Function (GeneRIF) describes novel functionality of genes. GeneRIFs are available from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene database. GeneRIF indexing is performed manually, and the intention of our work is to provide methods to support creating the GeneRIF entries. The creation of GeneRIF entries involves the identification of the genes mentioned in MEDLINE®; citations and the sentences describing a novel function. Results We have compared several learning algorithms and several features extracted or derived from MEDLINE sentences to determine if a sentence should be selected for GeneRIF indexing. Features are derived from the sentences or using mechanisms to augment the information provided by them: assigning a discourse label using a previously trained model, for example. We show that machine learning approaches with specific feature combinations achieve results close to one of the annotators. We have evaluated different feature sets and learning algorithms. In particular, Naïve Bayes achieves better performance with a selection of features similar to one used in related work, which considers the location of the sentence, the discourse of the sentence and the functional terminology in it. Conclusions The current performance is at a level similar to human annotation and it shows that machine learning can be used to automate the task of sentence selection for GeneRIF annotation. The current experiments are limited to the human species. We would like to see how the methodology can be extended to other species, specifically the normalization of gene mentions in other species. PMID:23725347

  10. Fifty years of computer analysis in chest imaging: rule-based, machine learning, deep learning.

    PubMed

    van Ginneken, Bram

    2017-03-01

    Half a century ago, the term "computer-aided diagnosis" (CAD) was introduced in the scientific literature. Pulmonary imaging, with chest radiography and computed tomography, has always been one of the focus areas in this field. In this study, I describe how machine learning became the dominant technology for tackling CAD in the lungs, generally producing better results than do classical rule-based approaches, and how the field is now rapidly changing: in the last few years, we have seen how even better results can be obtained with deep learning. The key differences among rule-based processing, machine learning, and deep learning are summarized and illustrated for various applications of CAD in the chest.

  11. Learning with incomplete information in the committee machine.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Urs M; Kühn, Reimer; Stamatescu, Ion-Olimpiu

    2009-12-01

    We study the problem of learning with incomplete information in a student-teacher setup for the committee machine. The learning algorithm combines unsupervised Hebbian learning of a series of associations with a delayed reinforcement step, in which the set of previously learnt associations is partly and indiscriminately unlearnt, to an extent that depends on the success rate of the student on these previously learnt associations. The relevant learning parameter lambda represents the strength of Hebbian learning. A coarse-grained analysis of the system yields a set of differential equations for overlaps of student and teacher weight vectors, whose solutions provide a complete description of the learning behavior. It reveals complicated dynamics showing that perfect generalization can be obtained if the learning parameter exceeds a threshold lambda ( c ), and if the initial value of the overlap between student and teacher weights is non-zero. In case of convergence, the generalization error exhibits a power law decay as a function of the number of examples used in training, with an exponent that depends on the parameter lambda. An investigation of the system flow in a subspace with broken permutation symmetry between hidden units reveals a bifurcation point lambda* above which perfect generalization does not depend on initial conditions. Finally, we demonstrate that cases of a complexity mismatch between student and teacher are optimally resolved in the sense that an over-complex student can emulate a less complex teacher rule, while an under-complex student reaches a state which realizes the minimal generalization error compatible with the complexity mismatch.

  12. Machine Learning for Knowledge Extraction from PHR Big Data.

    PubMed

    Poulymenopoulou, Michaela; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing, Internet of things (IOT) and NoSQL database technologies can support a new generation of cloud-based PHR services that contain heterogeneous (unstructured, semi-structured and structured) patient data (health, social and lifestyle) from various sources, including automatically transmitted data from Internet connected devices of patient living space (e.g. medical devices connected to patients at home care). The patient data stored in such PHR systems constitute big data whose analysis with the use of appropriate machine learning algorithms is expected to improve diagnosis and treatment accuracy, to cut healthcare costs and, hence, to improve the overall quality and efficiency of healthcare provided. This paper describes a health data analytics engine which uses machine learning algorithms for analyzing cloud based PHR big health data towards knowledge extraction to support better healthcare delivery as regards disease diagnosis and prognosis. This engine comprises of the data preparation, the model generation and the data analysis modules and runs on the cloud taking advantage from the map/reduce paradigm provided by Apache Hadoop.

  13. Machine learning and docking models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Kéri, György; Orfi, Lászlo; Pato, János; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Verma, Rinkee; Bradley, Erin K; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2017-03-01

    There is a shortage of compounds that are directed towards new targets apart from those targeted by the FDA approved drugs used against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Topoisomerase I (Mttopo I) is an essential mycobacterial enzyme and a promising target in this regard. However, it suffers from a shortage of known inhibitors. We have previously used computational approaches such as homology modeling and docking to propose 38 FDA approved drugs for testing and identified several active molecules. To follow on from this, we now describe the in vitro testing of a library of 639 compounds. These data were used to create machine learning models for Mttopo I which were further validated. The combined Mttopo I Bayesian model had a 5 fold cross validation receiver operator characteristic of 0.74 and sensitivity, specificity and concordance values above 0.76 and was used to select commercially available compounds for testing in vitro. The recently described crystal structure of Mttopo I was also compared with the previously described homology model and then used to dock the Mttopo I actives norclomipramine and imipramine. In summary, we describe our efforts to identify small molecule inhibitors of Mttopo I using a combination of machine learning modeling and docking studies in conjunction with screening of the selected molecules for enzyme inhibition. We demonstrate the experimental inhibition of Mttopo I by small molecule inhibitors and show that the enzyme can be readily targeted for lead molecule development.

  14. Imputation of missing data using machine learning techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Harp, S.A.; Goldman, R.; Samad, T.

    1996-12-31

    A serious problem in mining industrial data bases is that they are often incomplete, and a significant amount of data is missing, or erroneously entered. This paper explores the use of machine-learning based alternatives to standard statistical data completion (data imputation) methods, for dealing with missing data. We have approached the data completion problem using two well-known machine learning techniques. The first is an unsupervised clustering strategy which uses a Bayesian approach to cluster the data into classes. The classes so obtained are then used to predict multiple choices for the attribute of interest. The second technique involves modeling missing variables by supervised induction of a decision tree-based classifier. This predicts the most likely value for the attribute of interest. Empirical tests using extracts from industrial databases maintained by Honeywell customers have been done in order to compare the two techniques. These tests show both approaches are useful and have advantages and disadvantages. We argue that the choice between unsupervised and supervised classification techniques should be influenced by the motivation for solving the missing data problem, and discuss potential applications for the procedures we are developing.

  15. Edge detection in grayscale imagery using machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Glocer, K. A.; Perkins, S. J.

    2004-01-01

    Edge detection can be formulated as a binary classification problem at the pixel level with the goal of identifying individual pixels as either on-edge or off-edge. To solve this classification problem we use both fixed and adaptive feature selection in conjunction with a support vector machine. This approach provides a direct data-driven solution and does not require the intermediate step of learning a distribution to perform a likelihood-based classification. Furthermore, the approach can readily be adapted for other image processing tasks. The algorithm was tested on a data set of 50 object images, each associated with a hand-drawn 'ground truth' image. We computed ROC curves to evaluate the performance of the general feature extraction and machine learning approach, and compared that to the standard Canny edge detector and with recent work on statistical edge detection. Using a direct pixel-by-pixel error metric enabled us to compare to the statistical edge detection approach, and our algorithm compared favorably. Using a more 'natural' metric enabled comparision with work by the authors of the image data set, and our algorithm performed comparably to the suite of state-of-art edge detectors in that study.

  16. Predicting DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Li, Chanjuan; Liu, Zhihong; Du, Jiewen; Ye, Jiming; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2017-02-02

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a promising Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) drug target. DPP-IV inhibitors prolong the action of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), improve glucose homeostasis without weight gain, edema, and hypoglycemia. However, the marketed DPP-IV inhibitors have adverse effects such as nasopharyngitis, headache, nausea, hypersensitivity, skin reactions and pancreatitis. Therefore, it is still expected for novel DPP-IV inhibitors with minimal adverse effects. The scaffolds of existing DPP-IV inhibitors are structurally diversified. This makes it difficult to build virtual screening models based upon the known DPP-IV inhibitor libraries using conventional QSAR approaches. In this paper, we report a new strategy to predict DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches involving naïve Bayesian (NB) and recursive partitioning (RP) methods. We built 247 machine learning models based on 1307 known DPP-IV inhibitors with optimized molecular properties and topological fingerprints as descriptors. The overall predictive accuracies of the optimized models were greater than 80%. An external test set, composed of 65 recently reported compounds, was employed to validate the optimized models. The results demonstrated that both NB and RP models have a good predictive ability based on different combinations of descriptors. Twenty "good" and twenty "bad" structural fragments for DPP-IV inhibitors can also be derived from these models for inspiring the new DPP-IV inhibitor scaffold design.

  17. Calibrating Building Energy Models Using Supercomputer Trained Machine Learning Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, Jibonananda; New, Joshua Ryan; Edwards, Richard; Parker, Lynne Edwards

    2014-01-01

    Building Energy Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrofit purposes. EnergyPlus is the flagship Department of Energy software that performs BEM for different types of buildings. The input to EnergyPlus can often extend in the order of a few thousand parameters which have to be calibrated manually by an expert for realistic energy modeling. This makes it challenging and expensive thereby making building energy modeling unfeasible for smaller projects. In this paper, we describe the Autotune research which employs machine learning algorithms to generate agents for the different kinds of standard reference buildings in the U.S. building stock. The parametric space and the variety of building locations and types make this a challenging computational problem necessitating the use of supercomputers. Millions of EnergyPlus simulations are run on supercomputers which are subsequently used to train machine learning algorithms to generate agents. These agents, once created, can then run in a fraction of the time thereby allowing cost-effective calibration of building models.

  18. Harnessing ontology and machine learning for RSO classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Yao, Li; Han, Dapeng

    2016-01-01

    Classification is an important part of resident space objects (RSOs) identification, which is a main focus of space situational awareness. Owing to the absence of some features caused by the limited and uncertain observations, RSO classification remains a difficult task. In this paper, an ontology for RSO classification named OntoStar is built upon domain knowledge and machine learning rules. Then data describing RSO are represented by OntoStar. A demo shows how an RSO is classified based on OntoStar. It is also shown in the demo that traceable and comprehensible reasons for the classification can be given, hence the classification can be checked and validated. Experiments on WEKA show that ontology-based classification gains a relatively high accuracy and precision for classifying RSOs. When classifying RSOs with imperfect data, ontology-based classification keeps its performances, showing evident advantages over classical machine learning classifiers who either have increases of 5 % at least in FP rate or have decreases of 5 % at least in indexes such as accuracy, precision and recall.

  19. Machine learning of molecular electronic properties in chemical compound space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montavon, Grégoire; Rupp, Matthias; Gobre, Vivekanand; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Hansen, Katja; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O.

    2013-09-01

    The combination of modern scientific computing with electronic structure theory can lead to an unprecedented amount of data amenable to intelligent data analysis for the identification of meaningful, novel and predictive structure-property relationships. Such relationships enable high-throughput screening for relevant properties in an exponentially growing pool of virtual compounds that are synthetically accessible. Here, we present a machine learning model, trained on a database of ab initio calculation results for thousands of organic molecules, that simultaneously predicts multiple electronic ground- and excited-state properties. The properties include atomization energy, polarizability, frontier orbital eigenvalues, ionization potential, electron affinity and excitation energies. The machine learning model is based on a deep multi-task artificial neural network, exploiting the underlying correlations between various molecular properties. The input is identical to ab initio methods, i.e. nuclear charges and Cartesian coordinates of all atoms. For small organic molecules, the accuracy of such a ‘quantum machine’ is similar, and sometimes superior, to modern quantum-chemical methods—at negligible computational cost.

  20. Effective and efficient optics inspection approach using machine learning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulla, G; Kegelmeyer, L; Liao, Z; Carr, W

    2010-11-02

    The Final Optics Damage Inspection (FODI) system automatically acquires and utilizes the Optics Inspection (OI) system to analyze images of the final optics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). During each inspection cycle up to 1000 images acquired by FODI are examined by OI to identify and track damage sites on the optics. The process of tracking growing damage sites on the surface of an optic can be made more effective by identifying and removing signals associated with debris or reflections. The manual process to filter these false sites is daunting and time consuming. In this paper we discuss the use of machine learning tools and data mining techniques to help with this task. We describe the process to prepare a data set that can be used for training and identifying hardware reflections in the image data. In order to collect training data, the images are first automatically acquired and analyzed with existing software and then relevant features such as spatial, physical and luminosity measures are extracted for each site. A subset of these sites is 'truthed' or manually assigned a class to create training data. A supervised classification algorithm is used to test if the features can predict the class membership of new sites. A suite of self-configuring machine learning tools called 'Avatar Tools' is applied to classify all sites. To verify, we used 10-fold cross correlation and found the accuracy was above 99%. This substantially reduces the number of false alarms that would otherwise be sent for more extensive investigation.

  1. Machine Learning Approaches to Rare Events Sampling and Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsheikh, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Given the severe impacts of rare events, we try to quantitatively answer the following two questions: How can we estimate the probability of a rare event? And what are the factors affecting these probabilities? We utilize machine learning classification methods to define the failure boundary (in the stochastic space) corresponding to a specific threshold of a rare event. The training samples for the classification algorithm are obtained using multilevel splitting and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Once the training of the classifier is performed, a full MC simulation can be performed efficiently using the classifier as a reduced order model replacing the full physics simulator.We apply the proposed method on a standard benchmark for CO2 leakage through an abandoned well. In this idealized test case, CO2 is injected into a deep aquifer and then spreads within the aquifer and, upon reaching an abandoned well; it rises to a shallower aquifer. In current study, we try to evaluate the probability of leakage of a pre-defined amount of the injected CO2 given a heavy tailed distribution of the leaky well permeability. We show that machine learning based approaches significantly outperform direct MC and multi-level splitting methods in terms of efficiency and precision. The proposed algorithm's efficiency and reliability enabled us to perform a sensitivity analysis to the different modeling assumptions including the different prior distributions on the probability of CO2 leakage.

  2. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, M.; Trac, H.; Sutherland, D. J.; Fromenteau, S.; Póczos, B.; Schneider, J.

    2016-11-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark’s publicly available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power-law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with a width of {{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 2.13). We employ the support distribution machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.67) for the contaminated case. Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even the scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  3. Machine Learning for Quantum Metrology and Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Barry; Zahedinejad, Ehsan; Palittapongarnpim, Pantita

    Generating quantum metrological procedures and quantum gate designs, subject to constraints such as temporal or particle-number bounds or limits on the number of control parameters, are typically hard computationally. Although greedy machine learning algorithms are ubiquitous for tackling these problems, the severe constraints listed above limit the efficacy of such approaches. Our aim is to devise heuristic machine learning techniques to generate tractable procedures for adaptive quantum metrology and quantum gate design. In particular we have modified differential evolution to generate adaptive interferometric-phase quantum metrology procedures for up to 100 photons including loss and noise, and we have generated policies for designing single-shot high-fidelity three-qubit gates in superconducting circuits by avoided level crossings. Although quantum metrology and quantum control are regarded as disparate, we have developed a unified framework for these two subjects, and this unification enables us to transfer insights and breakthroughs from one of the topics to the other. Thanks to NSERC, AITF and 1000 Talent Plan.

  4. Machine Learning for Detecting Gene-Gene Interactions

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Brett A.; Reif, David M.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Moore, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Complex interactions among genes and environmental factors are known to play a role in common human disease aetiology. There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that complex interactions are ‘the norm’ and, rather than amounting to a small perturbation to classical Mendelian genetics, interactions may be the predominant effect. Traditional statistical methods are not well suited for detecting such interactions, especially when the data are high dimensional (many attributes or independent variables) or when interactions occur between more than two polymorphisms. In this review, we discuss machine-learning models and algorithms for identifying and characterising susceptibility genes in common, complex, multifactorial human diseases. We focus on the following machine-learning methods that have been used to detect gene-gene interactions: neural networks, cellular automata, random forests, and multifactor dimensionality reduction. We conclude with some ideas about how these methods and others can be integrated into a comprehensive and flexible framework for data mining and knowledge discovery in human genetics. PMID:16722772

  5. Steerable Wavelet Machines (SWM): Learning Moving Frames for Texture Classification.

    PubMed

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Puspoki, Zsuzsanna; Ward, John Paul; Unser, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We present texture operators encoding class-specific local organizations of image directions (LOIDs) in a rotation-invariant fashion. The LOIDs are key for visual understanding, and are at the origin of the success of the popular approaches, such as local binary patterns (LBPs) and the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT). Whereas, LBPs and SIFT yield hand-crafted image representations, we propose to learn data-specific representations of the LOIDs in a rotation-invariant fashion. The image operators are based on steerable circular harmonic wavelets (CHWs), offering a rich and yet compact initial representation for characterizing natural textures. The joint location and orientation required to encode the LOIDs is preserved by using moving frames (MFs) texture representations built from locally-steered image gradients that are invariant to rigid motions. In a second step, we use support vector machines to learn a multi-class shaping matrix for the initial CHW representation, yielding data-driven MFs called steerable wavelet machines (SWMs). The SWM forward function is composed of linear operations (i.e., convolution and weighted combinations) interleaved with non-linear steermax operations. We experimentally demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed operators for classifying natural textures. Our scheme outperforms recent approaches on several test suites of the Outex and the CUReT databases.

  6. Machine Learning Based Road Detection from High Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Ye; Wang, Guofeng; Hu, Xiangyun

    2016-06-01

    At present, remote sensing technology is the best weapon to get information from the earth surface, and it is very useful in geo- information updating and related applications. Extracting road from remote sensing images is one of the biggest demand of rapid city development, therefore, it becomes a hot issue. Roads in high-resolution images are more complex, patterns of roads vary a lot, which becomes obstacles for road extraction. In this paper, a machine learning based strategy is presented. The strategy overall uses the geometry features, radiation features, topology features and texture features. In high resolution remote sensing images, the images cover a great scale of landscape, thus, the speed of extracting roads is slow. So, roads' ROIs are firstly detected by using Houghline detection and buffering method to narrow down the detecting area. As roads in high resolution images are normally in ribbon shape, mean-shift and watershed segmentation methods are used to extract road segments. Then, Real Adaboost supervised machine learning algorithm is used to pick out segments that contain roads' pattern. At last, geometric shape analysis and morphology methods are used to prune and restore the whole roads' area and to detect the centerline of roads.

  7. Predicting DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jie; Li, Chanjuan; Liu, Zhihong; Du, Jiewen; Ye, Jiming; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a promising Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) drug target. DPP-IV inhibitors prolong the action of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), improve glucose homeostasis without weight gain, edema, and hypoglycemia. However, the marketed DPP-IV inhibitors have adverse effects such as nasopharyngitis, headache, nausea, hypersensitivity, skin reactions and pancreatitis. Therefore, it is still expected for novel DPP-IV inhibitors with minimal adverse effects. The scaffolds of existing DPP-IV inhibitors are structurally diversified. This makes it difficult to build virtual screening models based upon the known DPP-IV inhibitor libraries using conventional QSAR approaches. In this paper, we report a new strategy to predict DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches involving naïve Bayesian (NB) and recursive partitioning (RP) methods. We built 247 machine learning models based on 1307 known DPP-IV inhibitors with optimized molecular properties and topological fingerprints as descriptors. The overall predictive accuracies of the optimized models were greater than 80%. An external test set, composed of 65 recently reported compounds, was employed to validate the optimized models. The results demonstrated that both NB and RP models have a good predictive ability based on different combinations of descriptors. Twenty "good" and twenty "bad" structural fragments for DPP-IV inhibitors can also be derived from these models for inspiring the new DPP-IV inhibitor scaffold design.

  8. Parsimonious kernel extreme learning machine in primal via Cholesky factorization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Recently, extreme learning machine (ELM) has become a popular topic in machine learning community. By replacing the so-called ELM feature mappings with the nonlinear mappings induced by kernel functions, two kernel ELMs, i.e., P-KELM and D-KELM, are obtained from primal and dual perspectives, respectively. Unfortunately, both P-KELM and D-KELM possess the dense solutions in direct proportion to the number of training data. To this end, a constructive algorithm for P-KELM (CCP-KELM) is first proposed by virtue of Cholesky factorization, in which the training data incurring the largest reductions on the objective function are recruited as significant vectors. To reduce its training cost further, PCCP-KELM is then obtained with the application of a probabilistic speedup scheme into CCP-KELM. Corresponding to CCP-KELM, a destructive P-KELM (CDP-KELM) is presented using a partial Cholesky factorization strategy, where the training data incurring the smallest reductions on the objective function after their removals are pruned from the current set of significant vectors. Finally, to verify the efficacy and feasibility of the proposed algorithms in this paper, experiments on both small and large benchmark data sets are investigated.

  9. Forecasting daily streamflow using online sequential extreme learning machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Aranildo R.; Cannon, Alex J.; Hsieh, William W.

    2016-06-01

    While nonlinear machine methods have been widely used in environmental forecasting, in situations where new data arrive continually, the need to make frequent model updates can become cumbersome and computationally costly. To alleviate this problem, an online sequential learning algorithm for single hidden layer feedforward neural networks - the online sequential extreme learning machine (OSELM) - is automatically updated inexpensively as new data arrive (and the new data can then be discarded). OSELM was applied to forecast daily streamflow at two small watersheds in British Columbia, Canada, at lead times of 1-3 days. Predictors used were weather forecast data generated by the NOAA Global Ensemble Forecasting System (GEFS), and local hydro-meteorological observations. OSELM forecasts were tested with daily, monthly or yearly model updates. More frequent updating gave smaller forecast errors, including errors for data above the 90th percentile. Larger datasets used in the initial training of OSELM helped to find better parameters (number of hidden nodes) for the model, yielding better predictions. With the online sequential multiple linear regression (OSMLR) as benchmark, we concluded that OSELM is an attractive approach as it easily outperformed OSMLR in forecast accuracy.

  10. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, Michelle; Trac, Hy; Sutherland, Dougal; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Poczos, Barnabas; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are a rich source of information for examining fundamental astrophysical processes and cosmological parameters, however, employing clusters as cosmological probes requires accurate mass measurements derived from cluster observables. We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers, and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create a mock catalog from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. The presence of interlopers in the catalog produces a wide, flat fractional mass error distribution, with width = 2.13. We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement (width = 0.67). Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even a scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  11. Estimation of alpine skier posture using machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Bojan; Petrič, Tadej; Babič, Jan; Supej, Matej

    2014-10-13

    High precision Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements are becoming more and more popular in alpine skiing due to the relatively undemanding setup and excellent performance. However, GNSS provides only single-point measurements that are defined with the antenna placed typically behind the skier's neck. A key issue is how to estimate other more relevant parameters of the skier's body, like the center of mass (COM) and ski trajectories. Previously, these parameters were estimated by modeling the skier's body with an inverted-pendulum model that oversimplified the skier's body. In this study, we propose two machine learning methods that overcome this shortcoming and estimate COM and skis trajectories based on a more faithful approximation of the skier's body with nine degrees-of-freedom. The first method utilizes a well-established approach of artificial neural networks, while the second method is based on a state-of-the-art statistical generalization method. Both methods were evaluated using the reference measurements obtained on a typical giant slalom course and compared with the inverted-pendulum method. Our results outperform the results of commonly used inverted-pendulum methods and demonstrate the applicability of machine learning techniques in biomechanical measurements of alpine skiing.

  12. ENZPRED-enzymatic protein class predicting by machine learning.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kirtan; Panchal, Hetalkumar

    2013-01-01

    Recent times have seen flooding of biological data into the scientific community. Due to increase in large amounts of data from genome and other sequencing projects become available, being diverted on to Insilco approach for data collection and prediction has become a priority also progresses in sequencing technologies have found an exponential function rise in the number of newly found enzymes. Commonly, function of such enzymes is determined by experiments that can be time consuming and costly. As new approaches are needed to determine the functions of the proteins these genes encode. The protein parameters that can be used for an enzyme/ non-enzyme classification includes features of sequences like amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, grand Average of hydropathicity (GRAVY), probability of being in alpha helix, probability of being in beta sheet Probability of being in a turn. We show how large-scale computational analysis can help to address this challenge by help of java and support vector machine library. In this paper, a recently developed machine learning algorithm referred to as the svm library Learning Machine is used to classify protein sequences with six main classes of enzyme data downloaded from a public domain database. Comparative studies on different type of kernel methods like 1.radial basis function, 2.polynomial available in SVM library. Results show that RBF method take less time in training and give more accurate result then other kernel methods to also less training time compared to other kernel methods. The classification accuracy of RBF is also higher than various methods in respect of available sequences data.

  13. ALPS: Advanced Learning Packages, 1978-1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Juan Unified School District, Carmichael, CA.

    The document describes the ALPS (Advanced Learning Packages) program for teaching gifted students. Introductory materials provide information on teacher requirements, school requirements, ALPS teacher orientation responsibilities, orientation week, field trip procedures, gifted money available, ALPS costs, ALPS evaluations, the Structure of…

  14. Comparison and optimization of machine learning methods for automated classification of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lannin, Timothy B; Thege, Fredrik I; Kirby, Brian J

    2016-10-01

    Advances in rare cell capture technology have made possible the interrogation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) captured from whole patient blood. However, locating captured cells in the device by manual counting bottlenecks data processing by being tedious (hours per sample) and compromises the results by being inconsistent and prone to user bias. Some recent work has been done to automate the cell location and classification process to address these problems, employing image processing and machine learning (ML) algorithms to locate and classify cells in fluorescent microscope images. However, the type of machine learning method used is a part of the design space that has not been thoroughly explored. Thus, we have trained four ML algorithms on three different datasets. The trained ML algorithms locate and classify thousands of possible cells in a few minutes rather than a few hours, representing an order of magnitude increase in processing speed. Furthermore, some algorithms have a significantly (P < 0.05) higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curve than do other algorithms. Additionally, significant (P < 0.05) losses to performance occur when training on cell lines and testing on CTCs (and vice versa), indicating the need to train on a system that is representative of future unlabeled data. Optimal algorithm selection depends on the peculiarities of the individual dataset, indicating the need of a careful comparison and optimization of algorithms for individual image classification tasks. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. Distributed machine learning: Scaling up with coarse-grained parallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, F.J.; Hennessy, D.N.

    1994-12-31

    Machine teaming methods are becoming accepted as additions to the biologist`s data-analysis tool kit. However, scaling these techniques up to large data sets, such as those in biological and medical domains, is problematic in terms of both the required computational search effort and required memory (and the detrimental effects of excessive swapping). Our approach to tackling the problem of scaling up to large datasets is to take advantage of the ubiquitous workstation networks that are generally available in scientific and engineering environments. This paper introduces the notion of the invariant-partitioning property--that for certain evaluation criteria it is possible to partition a data set across multiple processors such that any rule that is satisfactory over the entire data set will also be satisfactory on at least one subset. In addition, by taking advantage of cooperation through interprocess communication, it is possible to build distributed learning algorithms such that only rules that are satisfactory over the entire data set will be learned. We describe a distributed learning system, CorPRL, that takes advantage of the invariant-partitioning property to learn from very large data sets, and present results demonstrating CorPRL`s effectiveness in analyzing data from two databases.

  16. Blind Domain Adaptation With Augmented Extreme Learning Machine Features.

    PubMed

    Uzair, Muhammad; Mian, Ajmal

    2016-02-11

    In practical applications, the test data often have different distribution from the training data leading to suboptimal visual classification performance. Domain adaptation (DA) addresses this problem by designing classifiers that are robust to mismatched distributions. Existing DA algorithms use the unlabeled test data from target domain during training time in addition to the source domain data. However, target domain data may not always be available for training. We propose a blind DA algorithm that does not require target domain samples for training. For this purpose, we learn a global nonlinear extreme learning machine (ELM) model from the source domain data in an unsupervised fashion. The global ELM model is then used to initialize and learn class specific ELM models from the source domain data. During testing, the target domain features are augmented with the reconstructed features from the global ELM model. The resulting enriched features are then classified using the class specific ELM models based on minimum reconstruction error. Extensive experiments on 16 standard datasets show that despite blind learning, our method outperforms six existing state-of-the-art methods in cross domain visual recognition.

  17. Application of machine learning using support vector machines for crater detection from Martian digital topography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamunićcar, Goran; Lončarić, Sven

    In our previous work, in order to extend the GT-57633 catalogue [PSS, 56 (15), 1992-2008] with still uncatalogued impact-craters, the following has been done [GRS, 48 (5), in press, doi:10.1109/TGRS.2009.2037750]: (1) the crater detection algorithm (CDA) based on digital elevation model (DEM) was developed; (2) using 1/128° MOLA data, this CDA proposed 414631 crater-candidates; (3) each crater-candidate was analyzed manually; and (4) 57592 were confirmed as correct detections. The resulting GT-115225 catalog is the significant result of this effort. However, to check such a large number of crater-candidates manually was a demanding task. This was the main motivation for work on improvement of the CDA in order to provide better classification of craters as true and false detections. To achieve this, we extended the CDA with the machine learning capability, using support vector machines (SVM). In the first step, the CDA (re)calculates numerous terrain morphometric attributes from DEM. For this purpose, already existing modules of the CDA from our previous work were reused in order to be capable to prepare these attributes. In addition, new attributes were introduced such as ellipse eccentricity and tilt. For machine learning purpose, the CDA is additionally extended to provide 2-D topography-profile and 3-D shape for each crater-candidate. The latter two are a performance problem because of the large number of crater-candidates in combination with the large number of attributes. As a solution, we developed a CDA architecture wherein it is possible to combine the SVM with a radial basis function (RBF) or any other kernel (for initial set of attributes), with the SVM with linear kernel (for the cases when 2-D and 3-D data are included as well). Another challenge is that, in addition to diversity of possible crater types, there are numerous morphological differences between the smallest (mostly very circular bowl-shaped craters) and the largest (multi-ring) impact

  18. Holographic implementation of a learning machine based on a multicategory perceptron algorithm.

    PubMed

    Paek, E G; Wullert Ii, J R; Patel, J S

    1989-12-01

    An optical learning machine that has multicategory classification capability is demonstrated. The system exactly implements the single-layer perceptron algorithm and is fully parallel and analog. Experimental results on the learning by examples obtained from the system are described.

  19. Two-Stage Machine Learning model for guideline development.

    PubMed

    Mani, S; Shankle, W R; Dick, M B; Pazzani, M J

    1999-05-01

    We present a Two-Stage Machine Learning (ML) model as a data mining method to develop practice guidelines and apply it to the problem of dementia staging. Dementia staging in clinical settings is at present complex and highly subjective because of the ambiguities and the complicated nature of existing guidelines. Our model abstracts the two-stage process used by physicians to arrive at the global Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDRS) score. The model incorporates learning intermediate concepts (CDRS category scores) in the first stage that then become the feature space for the second stage (global CDRS score). The sample consisted of 678 patients evaluated in the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at the University of California, Irvine. The demographic variables, functional and cognitive test results used by physicians for the task of dementia severity staging were used as input to the machine learning algorithms. Decision tree learners and rule inducers (C4.5, Cart, C4.5 rules) were selected for our study as they give expressive models, and Naive Bayes was used as a baseline algorithm for comparison purposes. We first learned the six CDRS category scores (memory, orientation, judgement and problem solving, personal care, home and hobbies, and community affairs). These learned CDRS category scores were then used to learn the global CDRS scores. The Two-Stage ML model classified as well as or better than the published inter-rater agreements for both the category and global CDRS scoring by dementia experts. Furthermore, for the most critical distinction, normal versus very mildly impaired, the Two-Stage ML model was 28.1 and 6.6% more accurate than published performances by domain experts. Our study of the CDRS examined one of the largest, most diverse samples in the literature, suggesting that our findings are robust. The Two-Stage ML model also identified a CDRS category, Judgment and Problem Solving, which has low classification accuracy similar to published

  20. Bidirectional extreme learning machine for regression problem and its learning effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yimin; Wang, Yaonan; Yuan, Xiaofang

    2012-09-01

    It is clear that the learning effectiveness and learning speed of neural networks are in general far slower than required, which has been a major bottleneck for many applications. Recently, a simple and efficient learning method, referred to as extreme learning machine (ELM), was proposed by Huang , which has shown that, compared to some conventional methods, the training time of neural networks can be reduced by a thousand times. However, one of the open problems in ELM research is whether the number of hidden nodes can be further reduced without affecting learning effectiveness. This brief proposes a new learning algorithm, called bidirectional extreme learning machine (B-ELM), in which some hidden nodes are not randomly selected. In theory, this algorithm tends to reduce network output error to 0 at an extremely early learning stage. Furthermore, we find a relationship between the network output error and the network output weights in the proposed B-ELM. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can be tens to hundreds of times faster than other incremental ELM algorithms.

  1. Of Genes and Machines: Application of a Combination of Machine Learning Tools to Astronomy Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinis, S.; Kumar, S.; Gezari, S.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Waters, C.

    2016-04-01

    We apply a combination of genetic algorithm (GA) and support vector machine (SVM) machine learning algorithms to solve two important problems faced by the astronomical community: star-galaxy separation and photometric redshift estimation of galaxies in survey catalogs. We use the GA to select the relevant features in the first step, followed by optimization of SVM parameters in the second step to obtain an optimal set of parameters to classify or regress, in the process of which we avoid overfitting. We apply our method to star-galaxy separation in Pan-STARRS1 data. We show that our method correctly classifies 98% of objects down to {i}{{P1}}=24.5, with a completeness (or true positive rate) of 99% for galaxies and 88% for stars. By combining colors with morphology, our star-galaxy separation method yields better results than the new SExtractor classifier spread_model, in particular at the faint end ({i}{{P1}}\\gt 22). We also use our method to derive photometric redshifts for galaxies in the COSMOS bright multiwavelength data set down to an error in (1+z) of σ =0.013, which compares well with estimates from spectral energy distribution fitting on the same data (σ =0.007) while making a significantly smaller number of assumptions.

  2. Statistical and Machine-Learning Classifier Framework to Improve Pulse Shape Discrimination System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtz, R.; Kaplan, A.

    2015-10-28

    Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is a variety of statistical classifier. Fully-­realized statistical classifiers rely on a comprehensive set of tools for designing, building, and implementing. PSD advances rely on improvements to the implemented algorithm. PSD advances can be improved by using conventional statistical classifier or machine learning methods. This paper provides the reader with a glossary of classifier-­building elements and their functions in a fully-­designed and operational classifier framework that can be used to discover opportunities for improving PSD classifier projects. This paper recommends reporting the PSD classifier’s receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and its behavior at a gamma rejection rate (GRR) relevant for realistic applications.

  3. Advancement in Productivity of Arabic into English Machine Translation Systems from 2008 to 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Al-Sha'r, Awatif M.; AbuSeileek, Ali F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to compare between the advancements in the productivity of Arabic into English Machine Translation Systems between two years, 2008 and 2013. It also aims to evaluate the progress achieved by various systems of Arabic into English electronic translation between the two years. For tracing such advancement, a comparative analysis…

  4. Advances in precision machining and moulding technology bring design opportunities.

    PubMed

    Glendening, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Machining of materials for medical applications has moved to a new level of precision. In parallel with this, moulding technology has improved through the increased use of sensors in moulds, enhanced design simulation and processes such as micromoulding. This article examines the opportunities offered by these developments and includes examples of mass produced parts that demonstrate the new capabilities useful to product designers.

  5. An impoverished machine: challenges to human learning and instructional technology.

    PubMed

    Taraban, Roman

    2008-08-01

    Many of the limitations to human learning and processing identified by cognitive psychologists over the last 50 years still hold true, including computational constraints, low learning rates, and unreliable processing. Instructional technology can be used in classrooms and in other learning contexts to address these limitations to learning. However, creating technological innovations is not enough. As part of psychological science, the development and assessment of instructional systems should be guided by theories and practices within the discipline. The technology we develop should become an object of research like other phenomena that are studied. In the present article, I present an informal account of my own work in assessing instructional technology for engineering thermodynamics to show not only the benefits, but also the limitations, in studying the technology we create. I conclude by considering several ways of advancing the development of instructional technology within the SCiP community, including interdisciplinary research and envisioning learning contexts that differ radically from traditional learning focused on lectures and testing.

  6. An iterative learning control method with application for CNC machine tools

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.I.; Kim, S.

    1996-01-01

    A proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) type iterative learning controller is proposed for precise tracking control of industrial robots and computer numerical controller (CNC) machine tools performing repetitive tasks. The convergence of the output error by the proposed learning controller is guaranteed under a certain condition even when the system parameters are not known exactly and unknown external disturbances exist. As the proposed learning controller is repeatedly applied to the industrial robot or the CNC machine tool with the path-dependent repetitive task, the distance difference between the desired path and the actual tracked or machined path, which is one of the most significant factors in the evaluation of control performance, is progressively reduced. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed learning controller can improve machining accuracy when the CNC machine tool performs repetitive machining tasks.

  7. A Sustainable Model for Integrating Current Topics in Machine Learning Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiopoulos, M.; DeMara, R. F.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Wu, A. S.; Mollaghasemi, M.; Gelenbe, E.; Kysilka, M.; Secretan, J.; Sharma, C. A.; Alnsour, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated research and teaching model that has resulted from an NSF-funded effort to introduce results of current Machine Learning research into the engineering and computer science curriculum at the University of Central Florida (UCF). While in-depth exposure to current topics in Machine Learning has traditionally occurred…

  8. Visual Tracking Based on Extreme Learning Machine and Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoxian; Tang, Linbo; Yang, Jinglin; Zhao, Baojun; Wang, Shuigen

    2015-01-01

    The existing sparse representation-based visual trackers mostly suffer from both being time consuming and having poor robustness problems. To address these issues, a novel tracking method is presented via combining sparse representation and an emerging learning technique, namely extreme learning machine (ELM). Specifically, visual tracking can be divided into two consecutive processes. Firstly, ELM is utilized to find the optimal separate hyperplane between the target observations and background ones. Thus, the trained ELM classification function is able to remove most of the candidate samples related to background contents efficiently, thereby reducing the total computational cost of the following sparse representation. Secondly, to further combine ELM and sparse representation, the resultant confidence values (i.e., probabilities to be a target) of samples on the ELM classification function are used to construct a new manifold learning constraint term of the sparse representation framework, which tends to achieve robuster results. Moreover, the accelerated proximal gradient method is used for deriving the optimal solution (in matrix form) of the constrained sparse tracking model. Additionally, the matrix form solution allows the candidate samples to be calculated in parallel, thereby leading to a higher efficiency. Experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed tracker. PMID:26506359

  9. Automatic programming of binary morphological machines by PAC learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, Junior; Tomita, Nina S.; Correa da Silva, Flavio S.; Terada, Routo

    1995-08-01

    Binary image analysis problems can be solved by set operators implemented as programs for a binary morphological machine (BMM). This is a very general and powerful approach to solve this type of problem. However, the design of these programs is not a task manageable by nonexperts on mathematical morphology. In order to overcome this difficulty we have worked on tools that help users describe their goals at higher levels of abstraction and to translate them into BMM programs. Some of these tools are based on the representation of the goals of the user as a collection of input-output pairs of images and the estimation of the target operator from these data. PAC learning is a well suited methodology for this task, since in this theory 'concepts' are represented as Boolean functions that are equivalent to set operators. In order to apply this technique in practice we must have efficient learning algorithms. In this paper we introduce two PAC learning algorithms, both are based on the minimal representation of Boolean functions, which has a straightforward translation to the canonical decomposition of set operators. The first algorithm is based on the classical Quine-McCluskey algorithm for the simplification of Boolean functions, and the second one is based on a new idea for the construction of Boolean functions: the incremental splitting of intervals. We also present a comparative complexity analysis of the two algorithms. Finally, we give some application examples.

  10. Fault Modeling of Extreme Scale Applications Using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnu, Abhinav; Dam, Hubertus van; Tallent, Nathan R.; Kerbyson, Darren J.; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2016-05-01

    Faults are commonplace in large scale systems. These systems experience a variety of faults such as transient, permanent and intermittent. Multi-bit faults are typically not corrected by the hardware resulting in an error. Here, this paper attempts to answer an important question: Given a multi-bit fault in main memory, will it result in an application error — and hence a recovery algorithm should be invoked — or can it be safely ignored? We propose an application fault modeling methodology to answer this question. Given a fault signature (a set of attributes comprising of system and application state), we use machine learning to create a model which predicts whether a multibit permanent/transient main memory fault will likely result in error. We present the design elements such as the fault injection methodology for covering important data structures, the application and system attributes which should be used for learning the model, the supervised learning algorithms (and potentially ensembles), and important metrics. Lastly, we use three applications — NWChem, LULESH and SVM — as examples for demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed fault modeling methodology.

  11. Visual tracking based on extreme learning machine and sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoxian; Tang, Linbo; Yang, Jinglin; Zhao, Baojun; Wang, Shuigen

    2015-10-22

    The existing sparse representation-based visual trackers mostly suffer from both being time consuming and having poor robustness problems. To address these issues, a novel tracking method is presented via combining sparse representation and an emerging learning technique, namely extreme learning machine (ELM). Specifically, visual tracking can be divided into two consecutive processes. Firstly, ELM is utilized to find the optimal separate hyperplane between the target observations and background ones. Thus, the trained ELM classification function is able to remove most of the candidate samples related to background contents efficiently, thereby reducing the total computational cost of the following sparse representation. Secondly, to further combine ELM and sparse representation, the resultant confidence values (i.e., probabilities to be a target) of samples on the ELM classification function are used to construct a new manifold learning constraint term of the sparse representation framework, which tends to achieve robuster results. Moreover, the accelerated proximal gradient method is used for deriving the optimal solution (in matrix form) of the constrained sparse tracking model. Additionally, the matrix form solution allows the candidate samples to be calculated in parallel, thereby leading to a higher efficiency. Experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed tracker.

  12. Modeling the Swift BAT Trigger Algorithm with Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, Philip B.; Lien, Amy Y.; Baker, John G.; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2016-02-01

    To draw inferences about gamma-ray burst (GRB) source populations based on Swift observations, it is essential to understand the detection efficiency of the Swift burst alert telescope (BAT). This study considers the problem of modeling the Swift/BAT triggering algorithm for long GRBs, a computationally expensive procedure, and models it using machine learning algorithms. A large sample of simulated GRBs from Lien et al. is used to train various models: random forests, boosted decision trees (with AdaBoost), support vector machines, and artificial neural networks. The best models have accuracies of ≳97% (≲3% error), which is a significant improvement on a cut in GRB flux, which has an accuracy of 89.6% (10.4% error). These models are then used to measure the detection efficiency of Swift as a function of redshift z, which is used to perform Bayesian parameter estimation on the GRB rate distribution. We find a local GRB rate density of {n}0∼ {0.48}-0.23+0.41 {{{Gpc}}}-3 {{{yr}}}-1 with power-law indices of {n}1∼ {1.7}-0.5+0.6 and {n}2∼ -{5.9}-0.1+5.7 for GRBs above and below a break point of {z}1∼ {6.8}-3.2+2.8. This methodology is able to improve upon earlier studies by more accurately modeling Swift detection and using this for fully Bayesian model fitting.

  13. Detecting falls with wearable sensors using machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Ahmet Turan; Barshan, Billur

    2014-06-18

    Falls are a serious public health problem and possibly life threatening for people in fall risk groups. We develop an automated fall detection system with wearable motion sensor units fitted to the subjects' body at six different positions. Each unit comprises three tri-axial devices (accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer/compass). Fourteen volunteers perform a standardized set of movements including 20 voluntary falls and 16 activities of daily living (ADLs), resulting in a large dataset with 2520 trials. To reduce the computational complexity of training and testing the classifiers, we focus on the raw data for each sensor in a 4 s time window around the point of peak total acceleration of the waist sensor, and then perform feature extraction and reduction. Most earlier studies on fall detection employ rule-based approaches that rely on simple thresholding of the sensor outputs. We successfully distinguish falls from ADLs using six machine learning techniques (classifiers): the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classifier, least squares method (LSM), support vector machines (SVM), Bayesian decision making (BDM), dynamic time warping (DTW), and artificial neural networks (ANNs). We compare the performance and the computational complexity of the classifiers and achieve the best results with the k-NN classifier and LSM, with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy all above 99%. These classifiers also have acceptable computational requirements for training and testing. Our approach would be applicable in real-world scenarios where data records of indeterminate length, containing multiple activities in sequence, are recorded.

  14. Application of Machine Learning to the Prediction of Vegetation Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchfield, Emily; Nay, John J.; Gilligan, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    This project applies machine learning techniques to remotely sensed imagery to train and validate predictive models of vegetation health in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. For both locations, we downloaded and processed eleven years of imagery from multiple MODIS datasets which were combined and transformed into two-dimensional matrices. We applied a gradient boosted machines model to the lagged dataset values to forecast future values of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI). The predictive power of raw spectral data MODIS products were compared across time periods and land use categories. Our models have significantly more predictive power on held-out datasets than a baseline. Though the tool was built to increase capacity to monitor vegetation health in data scarce regions like South Asia, users may include ancillary spatiotemporal datasets relevant to their region of interest to increase predictive power and to facilitate interpretation of model results. The tool can automatically update predictions as new MODIS data is made available by NASA. The tool is particularly well-suited for decision makers interested in understanding and predicting vegetation health dynamics in countries in which environmental data is scarce and cloud cover is a significant concern.

  15. Detecting Falls with Wearable Sensors Using Machine Learning Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Ahmet Turan; Barshan, Billur

    2014-01-01

    Falls are a serious public health problem and possibly life threatening for people in fall risk groups. We develop an automated fall detection system with wearable motion sensor units fitted to the subjects' body at six different positions. Each unit comprises three tri-axial devices (accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer/compass). Fourteen volunteers perform a standardized set of movements including 20 voluntary falls and 16 activities of daily living (ADLs), resulting in a large dataset with 2520 trials. To reduce the computational complexity of training and testing the classifiers, we focus on the raw data for each sensor in a 4 s time window around the point of peak total acceleration of the waist sensor, and then perform feature extraction and reduction. Most earlier studies on fall detection employ rule-based approaches that rely on simple thresholding of the sensor outputs. We successfully distinguish falls from ADLs using six machine learning techniques (classifiers): the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classifier, least squares method (LSM), support vector machines (SVM), Bayesian decision making (BDM), dynamic time warping (DTW), and artificial neural networks (ANNs). We compare the performance and the computational complexity of the classifiers and achieve the best results with the k-NN classifier and LSM, with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy all above 99%. These classifiers also have acceptable computational requirements for training and testing. Our approach would be applicable in real-world scenarios where data records of indeterminate length, containing multiple activities in sequence, are recorded. PMID:24945676

  16. Detection of Hypertension Retinopathy Using Deep Learning and Boltzmann Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triwijoyo, B. K.; Pradipto, Y. D.

    2017-01-01

    hypertensive retinopathy (HR) in the retina of the eye is disturbance caused by high blood pressure disease, where there is a systemic change of arterial in the blood vessels of the retina. Most heart attacks occur in patients caused by high blood pressure symptoms of undiagnosed. Hypertensive retinopathy Symptoms such as arteriolar narrowing, retinal haemorrhage and cotton wool spots. Based on this reasons, the early diagnosis of the symptoms of hypertensive retinopathy is very urgent to aim the prevention and treatment more accurate. This research aims to develop a system for early detection of hypertension retinopathy stage. The proposed method is to determine the combined features artery and vein diameter ratio (AVR) as well as changes position with Optic Disk (OD) in retinal images to review the classification of hypertensive retinopathy using Deep Neural Networks (DNN) and Boltzmann Machines approach. We choose this approach of because based on previous research DNN models were more accurate in the image pattern recognition, whereas Boltzmann machines selected because It requires speedy iteration in the process of learning neural network. The expected results from this research are designed a prototype system early detection of hypertensive retinopathy stage and analysed the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed methods.

  17. Machine Learning Methods for Predicting HLA–Peptide Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Shi, Leming; Tong, Weida; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    As major histocompatibility complexes in humans, the human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) have important functions to present antigen peptides onto T-cell receptors for immunological recognition and responses. Interpreting and predicting HLA–peptide binding are important to study T-cell epitopes, immune reactions, and the mechanisms of adverse drug reactions. We review different types of machine learning methods and tools that have been used for HLA–peptide binding prediction. We also summarize the descriptors based on which the HLA–peptide binding prediction models have been constructed and discuss the limitation and challenges of the current methods. Lastly, we give a future perspective on the HLA–peptide binding prediction method based on network analysis. PMID:26512199

  18. Machine-learned approximations to Density Functional Theory Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Ganesh; Bowen, R. Chris

    2017-02-01

    Large scale Density Functional Theory (DFT) based electronic structure calculations are highly time consuming and scale poorly with system size. While semi-empirical approximations to DFT result in a reduction in computational time versus ab initio DFT, creating such approximations involves significant manual intervention and is highly inefficient for high-throughput electronic structure screening calculations. In this letter, we propose the use of machine-learning for prediction of DFT Hamiltonians. Using suitable representations of atomic neighborhoods and Kernel Ridge Regression, we show that an accurate and transferable prediction of DFT Hamiltonians for a variety of material environments can be achieved. Electronic structure properties such as ballistic transmission and band structure computed using predicted Hamiltonians compare accurately with their DFT counterparts. The method is independent of the specifics of the DFT basis or material system used and can easily be automated and scaled for predicting Hamiltonians of any material system of interest.

  19. Stochastic upscaling in solid mechanics: An excercise in machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Koutsourelakis, P.S.

    2007-09-10

    This paper presents a consistent theoretical and computational framework for upscaling in random microstructures. We adopt an information theoretic approach in order to quantify the informational content of the microstructural details and find ways to condense it while assessing quantitatively the approximation introduced. In particular, we substitute the high-dimensional microscale description by a lower-dimensional representation corresponding for example to an equivalent homogeneous medium. The probabilistic characteristics of the latter are determined by minimizing the distortion between actual macroscale predictions and the predictions made using the coarse model. A machine learning framework is essentially adopted in which a vector quantizer is trained using data generated computationally or collected experimentally. Several parallels and differences with similar problems in source coding theory are pointed out and an efficient computational tool is employed. Various applications in linear and non-linear problems in solid mechanics are examined.

  20. Unsteady flow sensing and optimal sensor placement using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaan, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Machine learning is used to estimate the flow state and to determine the optimal sensor placement over a two-dimensional (2D) airfoil equipped with a Coanda actuator. The analysis is based on flow field data obtained from 2D unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (uRANS) simulations with different jet blowing intensities and actuation frequencies, characterizing different flow separation states. This study shows how the "random forests" algorithm is utilized beyond its typical usage in fluid mechanics estimating the flow state to determine the optimal sensor placement. The results are compared against the current de-facto standard of maximum modal amplitude location and against a brute force approach that scans all possible sensor combinations. The results show that it is possible to simultaneously infer the state of flow and to determine the optimal sensor location without the need to perform proper orthogonal decomposition. Collaborative Research Center (CRC) 880, DFG.

  1. Machine Learning for Discriminating Quantum Measurement Trajectories and Improving Readout.

    PubMed

    Magesan, Easwar; Gambetta, Jay M; Córcoles, A D; Chow, Jerry M

    2015-05-22

    Current methods for classifying measurement trajectories in superconducting qubit systems produce fidelities systematically lower than those predicted by experimental parameters. Here, we place current classification methods within the framework of machine learning (ML) algorithms and improve on them by investigating more sophisticated ML approaches. We find that nonlinear algorithms and clustering methods produce significantly higher assignment fidelities that help close the gap to the fidelity possible under ideal noise conditions. Clustering methods group trajectories into natural subsets within the data, which allows for the diagnosis of systematic errors. We find large clusters in the data associated with T1 processes and show these are the main source of discrepancy between our experimental and ideal fidelities. These error diagnosis techniques help provide a path forward to improve qubit measurements.

  2. Applying Machine Learning to GlueX Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    GlueX is a high energy physics experiment with the goal of collecting data necessary for understanding confinement in quantum chromodynamics. Beginning in 2015, GlueX will collect huge amounts of data describing billions of particle collisions. In preparation for data collection, efforts are underway to develop a methodology for analyzing these large data sets. One of the primary challenges in GlueX data analysis is isolating events of interest from a proportionally large background. GlueX has recently begun approaching this selection problem using machine learning algorithms, specifically boosted decision trees. Preliminary studies indicate that these algorithms have the potential to offer vast improvements in both signal selection efficiency and purity over more traditional techniques.

  3. Machine Learning for Discriminating Quantum Measurement Trajectories and Improving Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magesan, Easwar; Gambetta, Jay M.; Córcoles, A. D.; Chow, Jerry M.

    2015-05-01

    Current methods for classifying measurement trajectories in superconducting qubit systems produce fidelities systematically lower than those predicted by experimental parameters. Here, we place current classification methods within the framework of machine learning (ML) algorithms and improve on them by investigating more sophisticated ML approaches. We find that nonlinear algorithms and clustering methods produce significantly higher assignment fidelities that help close the gap to the fidelity possible under ideal noise conditions. Clustering methods group trajectories into natural subsets within the data, which allows for the diagnosis of systematic errors. We find large clusters in the data associated with T1 processes and show these are the main source of discrepancy between our experimental and ideal fidelities. These error diagnosis techniques help provide a path forward to improve qubit measurements.

  4. Synergies Between Quantum Mechanics and Machine Learning in Reaction Prediction.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Peter; Fooshee, David; Subrahmanya, Niranjan; Baldi, Pierre

    2016-11-28

    Machine learning (ML) and quantum mechanical (QM) methods can be used in two-way synergy to build chemical reaction expert systems. The proposed ML approach identifies electron sources and sinks among reactants and then ranks all source-sink pairs. This addresses a bottleneck of QM calculations by providing a prioritized list of mechanistic reaction steps. QM modeling can then be used to compute the transition states and activation energies of the top-ranked reactions, providing additional or improved examples of ranked source-sink pairs. Retraining the ML model closes the loop, producing more accurate predictions from a larger training set. The approach is demonstrated in detail using a small set of organic radical reactions.

  5. Counterfeit Electronics Detection Using Image Processing and Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadizanjani, Navid; Tehranipoor, Mark; Forte, Domenic

    2017-01-01

    Counterfeiting is an increasing concern for businesses and governments as greater numbers of counterfeit integrated circuits (IC) infiltrate the global market. There is an ongoing effort in experimental and national labs inside the United States to detect and prevent such counterfeits in the most efficient time period. However, there is still a missing piece to automatically detect and properly keep record of detected counterfeit ICs. Here, we introduce a web application database that allows users to share previous examples of counterfeits through an online database and to obtain statistics regarding the prevalence of known defects. We also investigate automated techniques based on image processing and machine learning to detect different physical defects and to determine whether or not an IC is counterfeit.

  6. Nonlinear machine learning and design of reconfigurable digital colloids.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew W; Phillips, Carolyn L; Jankowksi, Eric; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2016-09-14

    Digital colloids, a cluster of freely rotating "halo" particles tethered to the surface of a central particle, were recently proposed as ultra-high density memory elements for information storage. Rational design of these digital colloids for memory storage applications requires a quantitative understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the configurational states within which information is stored. We apply nonlinear machine learning to Brownian dynamics simulations of these digital colloids to extract the low-dimensional intrinsic manifold governing digital colloid morphology, thermodynamics, and kinetics. By modulating the relative size ratio between halo particles and central particles, we investigate the size-dependent configurational stability and transition kinetics for the 2-state tetrahedral (N = 4) and 30-state octahedral (N = 6) digital colloids. We demonstrate the use of this framework to guide the rational design of a memory storage element to hold a block of text that trades off the competing design criteria of memory addressability and volatility.

  7. Neural architecture design based on extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Crespo, Andrés; García-Laencina, Pedro J; Sancho-Gómez, José-Luis

    2013-12-01

    Selection of the optimal neural architecture to solve a pattern classification problem entails to choose the relevant input units, the number of hidden neurons and its corresponding interconnection weights. This problem has been widely studied in many research works but their solutions usually involve excessive computational cost in most of the problems and they do not provide a unique solution. This paper proposes a new technique to efficiently design the MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) architecture for classification using the Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) algorithm. The proposed method provides a high generalization capability and a unique solution for the architecture design. Moreover, the selected final network only retains those input connections that are relevant for the classification task. Experimental results show these advantages.

  8. Machine-learned approximations to Density Functional Theory Hamiltonians.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Ganesh; Bowen, R Chris

    2017-02-15

    Large scale Density Functional Theory (DFT) based electronic structure calculations are highly time consuming and scale poorly with system size. While semi-empirical approximations to DFT result in a reduction in computational time versus ab initio DFT, creating such approximations involves significant manual intervention and is highly inefficient for high-throughput electronic structure screening calculations. In this letter, we propose the use of machine-learning for prediction of DFT Hamiltonians. Using suitable representations of atomic neighborhoods and Kernel Ridge Regression, we show that an accurate and transferable prediction of DFT Hamiltonians for a variety of material environments can be achieved. Electronic structure properties such as ballistic transmission and band structure computed using predicted Hamiltonians compare accurately with their DFT counterparts. The method is independent of the specifics of the DFT basis or material system used and can easily be automated and scaled for predicting Hamiltonians of any material system of interest.

  9. FRC Separatrix inference using machine-learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Jesus; Roche, Thomas; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    As Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) devices approach lifetimes exceeding the characteristic time of conductive structures external to the plasma, plasma stabilization cannot be achieved solely by the flux conserving effect of the external structures, and active control systems are then necessary. An essential component of such control systems is a reconstruction method for the plasma separatrix suitable for real time. We report on a method to infer the separatrix in an FRC using the information of magnetic probes located externally to the plasma. The method uses machine learning methods, namely Bayesian inference of Gaussian Processes, to obtain the most likely plasma current density distribution given the measurements of magnetic field external to the plasma. From the current sources, flux function and in particular separatrix are easily computed. The reconstruction method is non iterative and hence suitable for deterministic real time applications. Validation results with numerical simulations and application to separatrix inference of C-2U plasma discharges will be presented.

  10. Monitoring frog communities: An application of machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.; Watson, G.; Grigg, G.; McCallum, H.

    1996-12-31

    Automatic recognition of animal vocalizations would be a valuable tool for a variety of biological research and environmental monitoring applications. We report the development of a software system which can recognize the vocalizations of 22 species of frogs which occur in an area of northern Australia. This software system will be used in unattended operation to monitor the effect on frog populations of the introduced Cane Toad. The system is based around classification of local peaks in the spectrogram of the audio signal using Quinlan`s machine learning system, C4.5. Unreliable identifications of peaks are aggregated together using a hierarchical structure of segments based on the typical temporal vocalization species` patterns. This produces robust system performance.

  11. Machine-learned approximations to Density Functional Theory Hamiltonians

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Ganesh; Bowen, R. Chris

    2017-01-01

    Large scale Density Functional Theory (DFT) based electronic structure calculations are highly time consuming and scale poorly with system size. While semi-empirical approximations to DFT result in a reduction in computational time versus ab initio DFT, creating such approximations involves significant manual intervention and is highly inefficient for high-throughput electronic structure screening calculations. In this letter, we propose the use of machine-learning for prediction of DFT Hamiltonians. Using suitable representations of atomic neighborhoods and Kernel Ridge Regression, we show that an accurate and transferable prediction of DFT Hamiltonians for a variety of material environments can be achieved. Electronic structure properties such as ballistic transmission and band structure computed using predicted Hamiltonians compare accurately with their DFT counterparts. The method is independent of the specifics of the DFT basis or material system used and can easily be automated and scaled for predicting Hamiltonians of any material system of interest. PMID:28198471

  12. Combining satellite imagery and machine learning to predict poverty.

    PubMed

    Jean, Neal; Burke, Marshall; Xie, Michael; Davis, W Matthew; Lobell, David B; Ermon, Stefano

    2016-08-19

    Reliable data on economic livelihoods remain scarce in the developing world, hampering efforts to study these outcomes and to design policies that improve them. Here we demonstrate an accurate, inexpensive, and scalable method for estimating consumption expenditure and asset wealth from high-resolution satellite imagery. Using survey and satellite data from five African countries--Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, Malawi, and Rwanda--we show how a convolutional neural network can be trained to identify image features that can explain up to 75% of the variation in local-level economic outcomes. Our method, which requires only publicly available data, could transform efforts to track and target poverty in developing countries. It also demonstrates how powerful machine learning techniques can be applied in a setting with limited training data, suggesting broad potential application across many scientific domains.

  13. Machine learning, medical diagnosis, and biomedical engineering research - commentary.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kenneth R; Koprowski, Robert; Skufca, Joseph D

    2014-07-05

    A large number of papers are appearing in the biomedical engineering literature that describe the use of machine learning techniques to develop classifiers for detection or diagnosis of disease. However, the usefulness of this approach in developing clinically validated diagnostic techniques so far has been limited and the methods are prone to overfitting and other problems which may not be immediately apparent to the investigators. This commentary is intended to help sensitize investigators as well as readers and reviewers of papers to some potential pitfalls in the development of classifiers, and suggests steps that researchers can take to help avoid these problems. Building classifiers should be viewed not simply as an add-on statistical analysis, but as part and parcel of the experimental process. Validation of classifiers for diagnostic applications should be considered as part of a much larger process of establishing the clinical validity of the diagnostic technique.

  14. Machine learning, medical diagnosis, and biomedical engineering research - commentary

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A large number of papers are appearing in the biomedical engineering literature that describe the use of machine learning techniques to develop classifiers for detection or diagnosis of disease. However, the usefulness of this approach in developing clinically validated diagnostic techniques so far has been limited and the methods are prone to overfitting and other problems which may not be immediately apparent to the investigators. This commentary is intended to help sensitize investigators as well as readers and reviewers of papers to some potential pitfalls in the development of classifiers, and suggests steps that researchers can take to help avoid these problems. Building classifiers should be viewed not simply as an add-on statistical analysis, but as part and parcel of the experimental process. Validation of classifiers for diagnostic applications should be considered as part of a much larger process of establishing the clinical validity of the diagnostic technique. PMID:24998888

  15. Calibration transfer via an extreme learning machine auto-encoder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wo-Ruo; Bin, Jun; Lu, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2016-03-21

    In order to solve the spectra standardization problem in near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, a Transfer via Extreme learning machine Auto-encoder Method (TEAM) has been proposed in this study. A comparative study among TEAM, piecewise direct standardization (PDS), generalized least squares (GLS) and calibration transfer methods based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was conducted, and the performances of these algorithms were benchmarked with three spectral datasets: corn, tobacco and pharmaceutical tablet spectra. The results show that TEAM is a stable method and can significantly reduce prediction errors compared with PDS, GLS and CCA. TEAM can also achieve the best RMSEPs in most cases with a small number of calibration sets. TEAM is implemented in Python language and available as an open source package at https://github.com/zmzhang/TEAM.

  16. Hematocrit estimation using online sequential extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Hieu Trung; Won, Yonggwan; Kim, Jinsul

    2015-01-01

    Hematocrit is a blood test that is defined as the volume percentage of red blood cells in the whole blood. It is one of the important indicators for clinical decision making and the most effective factor in glucose measurement using handheld devices. In this paper, a method for hematocrit estimation that is based upon the transduced current curve and the neural network is presented. The salient points of this method are that (1) the neural network is trained by the online sequential extreme learning machine (OS-ELM) in which the devices can be still trained with new samples during the using process and (2) the extended features are used to reduce the number of current points which can save the battery power of devices and speed up the measurement process.

  17. An Extreme Learning Machine Approach to Density Estimation Problems.

    PubMed

    Cervellera, Cristiano; Maccio, Danilo

    2017-01-17

    In this paper, we discuss how the extreme learning machine (ELM) framework can be effectively employed in the unsupervised context of multivariate density estimation. In particular, two algorithms are introduced, one for the estimation of the cumulative distribution function underlying the observed data, and one for the estimation of the probability density function. The algorithms rely on the concept of $F$-discrepancy, which is closely related to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov criterion for goodness of fit. Both methods retain the key feature of the ELM of providing the solution through random assignment of the hidden feature map and a very light computational burden. A theoretical analysis is provided, discussing convergence under proper hypotheses on the chosen activation functions. Simulation tests show how ELMs can be successfully employed in the density estimation framework, as a possible alternative to other standard methods.

  18. Liver vessel segmentation based on extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye Zhan; Zhao, Yu Qian; Liao, Miao; Zou, Bei Ji; Wang, Xiao Fang; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Liver-vessel segmentation plays an important role in vessel structure analysis for liver surgical planning. This paper presents a liver-vessel segmentation method based on extreme learning machine (ELM). Firstly, an anisotropic filter is used to remove noise while preserving vessel boundaries from the original computer tomography (CT) images. Then, based on the knowledge of prior shapes and geometrical structures, three classical vessel filters including Sato, Frangi and offset medialness filters together with the strain energy filter are used to extract vessel structure features. Finally, the ELM is applied to segment liver vessels from background voxels. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively segment liver vessels from abdominal CT images, and achieves good accuracy, sensitivity and specificity.

  19. L1-Regularized Boltzmann Machine Learning Using Majorizer Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki

    2015-05-01

    We propose an inference method to estimate sparse interactions and biases according to Boltzmann machine learning. The basis of this method is L1 regularization, which is often used in compressed sensing, a technique for reconstructing sparse input signals from undersampled outputs. L1 regularization impedes the simple application of the gradient method, which optimizes the cost function that leads to accurate estimations, owing to the cost function's lack of smoothness. In this study, we utilize the majorizer minimization method, which is a well-known technique implemented in optimization problems, to avoid the non-smoothness of the cost function. By using the majorizer minimization method, we elucidate essentially relevant biases and interactions from given data with seemingly strongly-correlated components.

  20. Active machine learning-driven experimentation to determine compound effects on protein patterns

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Armaghan W; Kangas, Joshua D; Sullivan, Devin P; Murphy, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    High throughput screening determines the effects of many conditions on a given biological target. Currently, to estimate the effects of those conditions on other targets requires either strong modeling assumptions (e.g. similarities among targets) or separate screens. Ideally, data-driven experimentation could be used to learn accurate models for many conditions and targets without doing all possible experiments. We have previously described an active machine learning algorithm that can iteratively choose small sets of experiments to learn models of multiple effects. We now show that, with no prior knowledge and with liquid handling robotics and automated microscopy under its control, this learner accurately learned the effects of 48 chemical compounds on the subcellular localization of 48 proteins while performing only 29% of all possible experiments. The results represent the first practical demonstration of the utility of active learning-driven biological experimentation in which the set of possible phenotypes is unknown in advance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10047.001 PMID:26840049

  1. Identifying Energy-Efficient Concurrency Levels using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis-Maury, M; Singh, K; Blagojevic, F; Nikolopoulos, D S; de Supinski, B R; Schulz, M; McKee, S A

    2007-07-23

    Multicore microprocessors have been largely motivated by the diminishing returns in performance and the increased power consumption of single-threaded ILP microprocessors. With the industry already shifting from multicore to many-core microprocessors, software developers must extract more thread-level parallelism from applications. Unfortunately, low power-efficiency and diminishing returns in performance remain major obstacles with many cores. Poor interaction between software and hardware, and bottlenecks in shared hardware structures often prevent scaling to many cores, even in applications where a high degree of parallelism is potentially available. In some cases, throwing additional cores at a problem may actually harm performance and increase power consumption. Better use of otherwise limitedly beneficial cores by software components such as hypervisors and operating systems can improve system-wide performance and reliability, even in cases where power consumption is not a main concern. In response to these observations, we evaluate an approach to throttle concurrency in parallel programs dynamically. We throttle concurrency to levels with higher predicted efficiency from both performance and energy standpoints, and we do so via machine learning, specifically artificial neural networks (ANNs). One advantage of using ANNs over similar techniques previously explored is that the training phase is greatly simplified, thereby reducing the burden on the end user. Using machine learning in the context of concurrency throttling is novel. We show that ANNs are effective for identifying energy-efficient concurrency levels in multithreaded scientific applications, and we do so using physical experimentation on a state-of-the-art quad-core Xeon platform.

  2. Automatic fitting of Gaussian peaks using abductive machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Aal, R.E.

    1998-02-01

    Analytical techniques have been used for many years for fitting Gaussian peaks in nuclear spectroscopy. However, the complexity of the approach warrants looking for machine-learning alternatives where intensive computations are required only once (during training), while actual analysis on individual spectra is greatly simplified and quickened. This should allow the use of simple portable systems for fast and automated analysis of large numbers of spectra, particularly in situations where accuracy may be traded for speed and simplicity. This paper proposes the use of abductive networks machine learning for this purpose. The Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIM) tool was used to build models for analyzing both single and double Gaussian peaks in the presence of noise depicting statistical uncertainties in collected spectra. AIM networks were synthesized by training on 1,000 representative simulated spectra and evaluated on 500 new spectra. A classifier network determines the multiplicity of single/double peaks with an accuracy of 98%. With statistical uncertainties corresponding to a peak count of 100, average percentage absolute errors for the height, position, and width of single peaks are 4.9, 2.9, and 4.2%, respectively. For double peaks, these average errors are within 7.0, 3.1, and 5.9%, respectively. Models have been developed which account for the effect of a linear background on a single peak. Performance is compared with a neural network application and with an analytical curve-fitting routine, and the new technique is applied to actual data of an alpha spectrum.

  3. Machine Learning Techniques for Arterial Pressure Waveform Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Vânia G.; Vieira, João; Santos, Pedro; Pereira, Tânia; Pereira, H. Catarina; Correia, Carlos; Pego, Mariano; Cardoso, João

    2013-01-01

    The Arterial Pressure Waveform (APW) can provide essential information about arterial wall integrity and arterial stiffness. Most of APW analysis frameworks individually process each hemodynamic parameter and do not evaluate inter-dependencies in the overall pulse morphology. The key contribution of this work is the use of machine learning algorithms to deal with vectorized features extracted from APW. With this purpose, we follow a five-step evaluation methodology: (1) a custom-designed, non-invasive, electromechanical device was used in the data collection from 50 subjects; (2) the acquired position and amplitude of onset, Systolic Peak (SP), Point of Inflection (Pi) and Dicrotic Wave (DW) were used for the computation of some morphological attributes; (3) pre-processing work on the datasets was performed in order to reduce the number of input features and increase the model accuracy by selecting the most relevant ones; (4) classification of the dataset was carried out using four different machine learning algorithms: Random Forest, BayesNet (probabilistic), J48 (decision tree) and RIPPER (rule-based induction); and (5) we evaluate the trained models, using the majority-voting system, comparatively to the respective calculated Augmentation Index (AIx). Classification algorithms have been proved to be efficient, in particular Random Forest has shown good accuracy (96.95%) and high area under the curve (AUC) of a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (0.961). Finally, during validation tests, a correlation between high risk labels, retrieved from the multi-parametric approach, and positive AIx values was verified. This approach gives allowance for designing new hemodynamic morphology vectors and techniques for multiple APW analysis, thus improving the arterial pulse understanding, especially when compared to traditional single-parameter analysis, where the failure in one parameter measurement component, such as Pi, can jeopardize the whole evaluation. PMID

  4. Gravity Spy - Integrating LIGO detector characterization, citizen science, and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevin, Michael; Gravity Spy

    2016-06-01

    On September 14th 2015, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) made the first direct observation of gravitational waves and opened a new field of observational astronomy. However, being the most complicated and sensitve experiment ever undertaken in gravitational physics, aLIGO is susceptible to various sources of environmental and instrumental noise that hinder the search for more gravitational waves.Of particular concern are transient, non-Gaussian noise features known as glitches. Glitches can mimic true astrophysical gravitational waves, occur at a high enough frequency to be coherent between the two detectors, and generally worsen aLIGO's detection capabilities. The proper classification and charaterization of glitches is paramount in optimizing aLIGO's ability to detect gravitational waves. However, teaching computers to identify and morphologically classify these artifacts is exceedingly difficult.Human intuition has proven to be a useful tool in classifcation probelms such as this. Gravity Spy is an innovative, interdisciplinary project hosted by Zooniverse that combines aLIGO detector characterization, citizen science, machine learning, and social science. In this project, citizen scientists and computers will work together in a sybiotic relationship that leverages human pattern recognition and the ability of machine learning to process large amounts of data systematically: volunteers classify triggers from the aLIGO data steam that are constantly updated as aLIGO takes in new data, and these classifications are used to train machine learning algorithms which proceed to classify the bulk of aLIGO data and feed questionable glithces back to the users.In this talk, I will discuss the workflow and initial results of the Gravity Spy project with regard to aLIGO's future observing runs and highlight the potential of such citizen science projects in promoting nascent fields such as gravitational wave astrophysics.

  5. Development of Advanced Carbide for Nickel-Based Alloy Machining for Turbine Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-20

    based alloys such as Inconel 718 with 40% higher machining productivity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS NCDMM; Success Stories; Kennametal, Inc.; Inconel 718 ...Inc. involved developing an advanced coated carbide cutting tool for turning nickel-based alloys such as Inconel 718 with 40% higher machining...nd DOC constant for the ng of six (6) cutting tools t 180 and 250 SFM led to l performance goal. It was r resulting from premature e in Inconel

  6. Is extreme learning machine feasible? A theoretical assessment (part II).

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaobo; Liu, Xia; Fang, Jian; Xu, Zongben

    2015-01-01

    An extreme learning machine (ELM) can be regarded as a two-stage feed-forward neural network (FNN) learning system that randomly assigns the connections with and within hidden neurons in the first stage and tunes the connections with output neurons in the second stage. Therefore, ELM training is essentially a linear learning problem, which significantly reduces the computational burden. Numerous applications show that such a computation burden reduction does not degrade the generalization capability. It has, however, been open that whether this is true in theory. The aim of this paper is to study the theoretical feasibility of ELM by analyzing the pros and cons of ELM. In the previous part of this topic, we pointed out that via appropriately selected activation functions, ELM does not degrade the generalization capability in the sense of expectation. In this paper, we launch the study in a different direction and show that the randomness of ELM also leads to certain negative consequences. On one hand, we find that the randomness causes an additional uncertainty problem of ELM, both in approximation and learning. On the other hand, we theoretically justify that there also exist activation functions such that the corresponding ELM degrades the generalization capability. In particular, we prove that the generalization capability of ELM with Gaussian kernel is essentially worse than that of FNN with Gaussian kernel. To facilitate the use of ELM, we also provide a remedy to such a degradation. We find that the well-developed coefficient regularization technique can essentially improve the generalization capability. The obtained results reveal the essential characteristic of ELM in a certain sense and give theoretical guidance concerning how to use ELM.

  7. Advancing the Relationship between Business School Ranking and Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbeck, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This commentary advances a positive relationship between a business school's ranking in the popular press and student learning by advocating market-oriented measures of student learning. A framework for student learning is based on the Assurance of Learning mandated by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International,…

  8. Skull-Stripping with Machine Learning Deformable Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Joshi, Anand A.; Feng, Albert; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Terzopoulos, Demetri

    2014-01-01

    Background Segmentation methods for medical images may not generalize well to new data sets or new tasks, hampering their utility. We attempt to remedy these issues using deformable organisms to create an easily customizable segmentation plan. We validate our framework by creating a plan to locate the brain in 3D magnetic resonance images of the head (skull-stripping). New Method Our method borrows ideas from artificial life to govern a set of deformable models. We use control processes such as sensing, proactive planning, reactive behavior, and knowledge representation to segment an image. The image may have landmarks and features specific to that dataset; these may be easily incorporated into the plan. In addition, we use a machine learning method to make our segmentation more accurate. Results Our method had the least Hausdorff distance error, but included slightly less brain voxels (false negatives). It also had the lowest false positive error and performed on par to skull-stripping specific method on other metrics. Comparison with Existing Method(s) We tested our method on 838 T1-weighted images, evaluating results using distance and overlap error metrics based on expert gold standard segmentations. We evaluated the results before and after the learning step to quantify its benefit; we also compare our results to three other widely used methods: BSE, BET, and the Hybrid Watershed algorithm. Conclusions Our framework captures diverse categories of information needed for brain segmentation and will provide a foundation for tackling a wealth of segmentation problems. PMID:25124851

  9. Using machine learning techniques to automate sky survey catalog generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fayyad, Usama M.; Roden, J. C.; Doyle, R. J.; Weir, Nicholas; Djorgovski, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the application of machine classification techniques to the development of an automated tool for the reduction of a large scientific data set. The 2nd Palomar Observatory Sky Survey provides comprehensive photographic coverage of the northern celestial hemisphere. The photographic plates are being digitized into images containing on the order of 10(exp 7) galaxies and 10(exp 8) stars. Since the size of this data set precludes manual analysis and classification of objects, our approach is to develop a software system which integrates independently developed techniques for image processing and data classification. Image processing routines are applied to identify and measure features of sky objects. Selected features are used to determine the classification of each object. GID3* and O-BTree, two inductive learning techniques, are used to automatically learn classification decision trees from examples. We describe the techniques used, the details of our specific application, and the initial encouraging results which indicate that our approach is well-suited to the problem. The benefits of the approach are increased data reduction throughput, consistency of classification, and the automated derivation of classification rules that will form an objective, examinable basis for classifying sky objects. Furthermore, astronomers will be freed from the tedium of an intensely visual task to pursue more challenging analysis and interpretation problems given automatically cataloged data.

  10. Gene essentiality prediction based on fractal features and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongming; Yang, Licai; Liu, Zhiping; Zhu, Chuansheng

    2017-02-28

    Essential genes are required for the viability of an organism. Accurate and rapid identification of new essential genes is of substantial theoretical interest to synthetic biology and has practical applications in biomedicine. Fractals provide facilitated access to genetic structure analysis on a different scale. In this study, machine learning-based methods using solely fractal features are presented and the problem of predicting essential genes in bacterial genomes is evaluated. Six fractal features were investigated to learn the parameters of five supervised classification methods for the binary classification task. The optimal parameters of these classifiers are determined via grid-based searching technique. All the currently available identified genes from the database of essential genes were utilized to build the classifiers. The fractal features were proven to be more robust and powerful in the prediction performance. In a statistical sense, the ELM method shows superiority in predicting the essential genes. Non-parameter tests of the average AUC and ACC showed that the fractal feature is much better than other five compared features sets. Our approach is promising and convenient to identify new bacterial essential genes.

  11. Extreme learning machine and adaptive sparse representation for image classification.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiuwen; Zhang, Kai; Luo, Minxia; Yin, Chun; Lai, Xiaoping

    2016-09-01

    Recent research has shown the speed advantage of extreme learning machine (ELM) and the accuracy advantage of sparse representation classification (SRC) in the area of image classification. Those two methods, however, have their respective drawbacks, e.g., in general, ELM is known to be less robust to noise while SRC is known to be time-consuming. Consequently, ELM and SRC complement each other in computational complexity and classification accuracy. In order to unify such mutual complementarity and thus further enhance the classification performance, we propose an efficient hybrid classifier to exploit the advantages of ELM and SRC in this paper. More precisely, the proposed classifier consists of two stages: first, an ELM network is trained by supervised learning. Second, a discriminative criterion about the reliability of the obtained ELM output is adopted to decide whether the query image can be correctly classified or not. If the output is reliable, the classification will be performed by ELM; otherwise the query image will be fed to SRC. Meanwhile, in the stage of SRC, a sub-dictionary that is adaptive to the query image instead of the entire dictionary is extracted via the ELM output. The computational burden of SRC thus can be reduced. Extensive experiments on handwritten digit classification, landmark recognition and face recognition demonstrate that the proposed hybrid classifier outperforms ELM and SRC in classification accuracy with outstanding computational efficiency.

  12. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Computer Resources for Machine Learning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Champion, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Machine learning describes pattern-recognition algorithms - in this case, probabilistic neural networks (PNNs). These can be computationally intensive, in part because of the nonlinear optimizer, a numerical process that calibrates the PNN by minimizing a sum of squared errors. This report suggests efficiencies that are expressed as cost and benefit. The cost is computer time needed to calibrate the PNN, and the benefit is goodness-of-fit, how well the PNN learns the pattern in the data. There may be a point of diminishing returns where a further expenditure of computer resources does not produce additional benefits. Sampling is suggested as a cost-reduction strategy. One consideration is how many points to select for calibration and another is the geometric distribution of the points. The data points may be nonuniformly distributed across space, so that sampling at some locations provides additional benefit while sampling at other locations does not. A stratified sampling strategy can be designed to select more points in regions where they reduce the calibration error and fewer points in regions where they do not. Goodness-of-fit tests ensure that the sampling does not introduce bias. This approach is illustrated by statistical experiments for computing correlations between measures of roadless area and population density for the San Francisco Bay Area. The alternative to training efficiencies is to rely on high-performance computer systems. These may require specialized programming and algorithms that are optimized for parallel performance.

  13. Dynamic adjustment of hidden node parameters for extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guorui; Lan, Yuan; Zhang, Xinpeng; Qian, Zhenxing

    2015-02-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM), proposed by Huang et al., was developed for generalized single hidden layer feedforward networks with a wide variety of hidden nodes. ELMs have been proved very fast and effective especially for solving function approximation problems with a predetermined network structure. However, it may contain insignificant hidden nodes. In this paper, we propose dynamic adjustment ELM (DA-ELM) that can further tune the input parameters of insignificant hidden nodes in order to reduce the residual error. It is proved in this paper that the energy error can be effectively reduced by applying recursive expectation-minimization theorem. In DA-ELM, the input parameters of insignificant hidden node are updated in the decreasing direction of the energy error in each step. The detailed theoretical foundation of DA-ELM is presented in this paper. Experimental results show that the proposed DA-ELM is more efficient than the state-of-art algorithms such as Bayesian ELM, optimally-pruned ELM, two-stage ELM, Levenberg-Marquardt, sensitivity-based linear learning method as well as the preliminary ELM.

  14. Personal Information from Latent Fingerprints Using Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Zare, Richard N

    2017-01-17

    Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) was applied to latent fingerprints to obtain not only spatial patterns but also chemical maps. Samples with similar lipid compositions as those of the fingerprints were collected by swiping a glass slide across the forehead of consenting adults. A machine learning model called gradient boosting tree ensemble (GDBT) was applied to the samples that allowed us to distinguish between different genders, ethnicities, and ages (within 10 years). The results from 194 samples showed accuracies of 89.2%, 82.4%, and 84.3%, respectively. Specific chemical species that were determined by the feature selection of GDBT were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. As a proof-of-concept, the machine learning model trained on the sample data was applied to overlaid latent fingerprints from different individuals, giving accurate gender and ethnicity information from those fingerprints. The results suggest that DESI-MSI imaging of fingerprints with GDBT analysis might offer a significant advance in forensic science.

  15. The identification of cis-regulatory elements: A review from a machine learning perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifeng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Kaye, Alice M; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2015-12-01

    The majority of the human genome consists of non-coding regions that have been called junk DNA. However, recent studies have unveiled that these regions contain cis-regulatory elements, such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, insulators, etc. These regulatory elements can play crucial roles in controlling gene expressions in specific cell types, conditions, and developmental stages. Disruption to these regions could contribute to phenotype changes. Precisely identifying regulatory elements is key to deciphering the mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation. Cis-regulatory events are complex processes that involve chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, DNA methylation, histone modifications, and the interactions between them. The development of next-generation sequencing techniques has allowed us to capture these genomic features in depth. Applied analysis of genome sequences for clinical genetics has increased the urgency for detecting these regions. However, the complexity of cis-regulatory events and the deluge of sequencing data require accurate and efficient computational approaches, in particular, machine learning techniques. In this review, we describe machine learning approaches for predicting transcription factor binding sites, enhancers, and promoters, primarily driven by next-generation sequencing data. Data sources are provided in order to facilitate testing of novel methods. The purpose of this review is to attract computational experts and data scientists to advance this field.

  16. The applications of machine learning algorithms in the modeling of estrogen-like chemicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun; Gramatica, Paola

    2009-06-01

    Increasing concern is being shown by the scientific community, government regulators, and the public about endocrine-disrupting chemicals that, in the environment, are adversely affecting human and wildlife health through a variety of mechanisms, mainly estrogen receptor-mediated mechanisms of toxicity. Because of the large number of such chemicals in the environment, there is a great need for an effective means of rapidly assessing endocrine-disrupting activity in the toxicology assessment process. When faced with the challenging task of screening large libraries of molecules for biological activity, the benefits of computational predictive models based on quantitative structure-activity relationships to identify possible estrogens become immediately obvious. Recently, in order to improve the accuracy of prediction, some machine learning techniques were introduced to build more effective predictive models. In this review we will focus our attention on some recent advances in the use of these methods in modeling estrogen-like chemicals. The advantages and disadvantages of the machine learning algorithms used in solving this problem, the importance of the validation and performance assessment of the built models as well as their applicability domains will be discussed.

  17. Color-texture based extreme learning machines for tissue tumor classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Yeo, S. Y.; Wong, S. T.; Lee, G.; Su, Y.; Hong, J. M.; Choo, A.; Chen, S.

    2016-03-01

    In histopathological classification and diagnosis of cancer cases, pathologists perform visual assessments of immunohistochemistry (IHC)-stained biomarkers in cells to determine tumor versus non-tumor tissues. One of the prerequisites for such assessments is the correct identification of regions-of-interest (ROIs) with relevant histological features. Advances in image processing and machine learning give rise to the possibility of full automation in ROI identification by identifying image features such as colors and textures. Such computer-aided diagnostic systems could enhance research output and efficiency in identifying the pathology (normal, non-tumor or tumor) of a tissue pattern from ROI images. In this paper, a computational method using color-texture based extreme learning machines (ELM) is proposed for automatic tissue tumor classification. Our approach consists of three steps: (1) ROIs are manually identified and annotated from individual cores of tissue microarrays (TMAs); (2) color and texture features are extracted from the ROIs images; (3) ELM is applied to the extracted features to classify the ROIs into non-tumor or tumor categories. The proposed approach is tested on 100 sets of images from a kidney cancer TMA and the results show that ELM is able to achieve classification accuracies of 91.19% and 88.72% with a Gaussian radial basis function (RBF) and linear kernel, respectively, which is superior to using SVM with the same kernels.

  18. Applications of machine learning and high-dimensional visualization in cancer detection, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John F; Marx, Kenneth A; Hoffman, Patrick E; Gee, Alexander G; O'Neil, Philip; Ujwal, M L; Hotchkiss, John

    2004-05-01

    Recent technical advances in combinatorial chemistry, genomics, and proteomics have made available large databases of biological and chemical information that have the potential to dramatically improve our understanding of cancer biology at the molecular level. Such an understanding of cancer biology could have a substantial impact on how we detect, diagnose, and manage cancer cases in the clinical setting. One of the biggest challenges facing clinical oncologists is how to extract clinically useful knowledge from the overwhelming amount of raw molecular data that are currently available. In this paper, we discuss how the exploratory data analysis techniques of machine learning and high-dimensional visualization can be applied to extract clinically useful knowledge from a heterogeneous assortment of molecular data. After an introductory overview of machine learning and visualization techniques, we describe two proprietary algorithms (PURS and RadViz) that we have found to be useful in the exploratory analysis of large biological data sets. We next illustrate, by way of three examples, the applicability of these techniques to cancer detection, diagnosis, and management using three very different types of molecular data. We first discuss the use of our exploratory analysis techniques on proteomic mass spectroscopy data for the detection of ovarian cancer. Next, we discuss the diagnostic use of these techniques on gene expression data to differentiate between squamous and adenocarcinoma of the lung. Finally, we illustrate the use of such techniques in selecting from a database of chemical compounds those most effective in managing patients with melanoma versus leukemia.

  19. Combining machine learning, crowdsourcing and expert knowledge to detect chemical-induced diseases in text

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Àlex; Li, Tong Shu; Su, Andrew I.; Good, Benjamin M.; Furlong, Laura I.

    2016-01-01

    Drug toxicity is a major concern for both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. In this context, text-mining methods for the identification of drug side effects from free text are key for the development of up-to-date knowledge sources on drug adverse reactions. We present a new system for identification of drug side effects from the literature that combines three approaches: machine learning, rule- and knowledge-based approaches. This system has been developed to address the Task 3.B of Biocreative V challenge (BC5) dealing with Chemical-induced Disease (CID) relations. The first two approaches focus on identifying relations at the sentence-level, while the knowledge-based approach is applied both at sentence and abstract levels. The machine learning method is based on the BeFree system using two corpora as training data: the annotated data provided by the CID task organizers and a new CID corpus developed by crowdsourcing. Different combinations of results from the three strategies were selected for each run of the challenge. In the final evaluation setting, the system achieved the highest Recall of the challenge (63%). By performing an error analysis, we identified the main causes of misclassifications and areas for improving of our system, and highlighted the need of consistent gold standard data sets for advancing the state of the art in text mining of drug side effects. Database URL: https://zenodo.org/record/29887?ln¼en#.VsL3yDLWR_V PMID:27307137

  20. Cortical feature analysis and machine learning improves detection of "MRI-negative" focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Bilal; Brodley, Carla E; Blackmon, Karen E; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Barash, Gilad; Carlson, Chad; Quinn, Brian T; Doyle, Werner; French, Jacqueline; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is the most common cause of pediatric epilepsy and the third most common lesion in adults with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Advances in MRI have revolutionized the diagnosis of FCD, resulting in higher success rates for resective epilepsy surgery. However, many patients with histologically confirmed FCD have normal presurgical MRI studies ('MRI-negative'), making presurgical diagnosis difficult. The purpose of this study was to test whether a novel MRI postprocessing method successfully detects histopathologically verified FCD in a sample of patients without visually appreciable lesions. We applied an automated quantitative morphometry approach which computed five surface-based MRI features and combined them in a machine learning model to classify lesional and nonlesional vertices. Accuracy was defined by classifying contiguous vertices as "lesional" when they fell within the surgical resection region. Our multivariate method correctly detected the lesion in 6 of 7 MRI-positive patients, which is comparable with the detection rates that have been reported in univariate vertex-based morphometry studies. More significantly, in patients that were MRI-negative, machine learning correctly identified 14 out of 24 FCD lesions (58%). This was achieved after separating abnormal thickness and thinness into distinct classifiers, as well as separating sulcal and gyral regions. Results demonstrate that MRI-negative images contain sufficient information to aid in the in vivo detection of visually elusive FCD lesions.

  1. Structure classification and melting temperature prediction in octet AB solids via machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, G.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2015-06-01

    resulting model to be 11 % of the mean melting temperature of the data, but we note that if the accuracy of this predicted error is itself measured, our estimated fitting error itself has a root-mean-square error of 50 % . In short, what we illustrate is that classification and regression predictions can vary significantly, depending on the details of how machine learning methods are applied to small data sets. This variation makes it important, if not essential, to average the predictions and compute confidence intervals about these averages to report results meaningfully. However, when properly used, these statistical methods can advance our understanding and improve predictions of material properties even for small data sets.

  2. Machine learning techniques for energy optimization in mobile embedded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoo, Brad Kyoshi

    Mobile smartphones and other portable battery operated embedded systems (PDAs, tablets) are pervasive computing devices that have emerged in recent years as essential instruments for communication, business, and social interactions. While performance, capabilities, and design are all important considerations when purchasing a mobile device, a long battery lifetime is one of the most desirable attributes. Battery technology and capacity has improved over the years, but it still cannot keep pace with the power consumption demands of today's mobile devices. This key limiter has led to a strong research emphasis on extending battery lifetime by minimizing energy consumption, primarily using software optimizations. This thesis presents two strategies that attempt to optimize mobile device energy consumption with negligible impact on user perception and quality of service (QoS). The first strategy proposes an application and user interaction aware middleware framework that takes advantage of user idle time between interaction events of the foreground application to optimize CPU and screen backlight energy consumption. The framework dynamically classifies mobile device applications based on their received interaction patterns, then invokes a number of different power management algorithms to adjust processor frequency and screen backlight levels accordingly. The second strategy proposes the usage of machine learning techniques to learn a user's mobile device usage pattern pertaining to spatiotemporal and device contexts, and then predict energy-optimal data and location interface configurations. By learning where and when a mobile device user uses certain power-hungry interfaces (3G, WiFi, and GPS), the techniques, which include variants of linear discriminant analysis, linear logistic regression, non-linear logistic regression, and k-nearest neighbor, are able to dynamically turn off unnecessary interfaces at runtime in order to save energy.

  3. OpenCL based machine learning labeling of biomedical datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoros, Oscar; Escalera, Sergio; Puig, Anna

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a two-stage labeling method of large biomedical datasets through a parallel approach in a single GPU. Diagnostic methods, structures volume measurements, and visualization systems are of major importance for surgery planning, intra-operative imaging and image-guided surgery. In all cases, to provide an automatic and interactive method to label or to tag different structures contained into input data becomes imperative. Several approaches to label or segment biomedical datasets has been proposed to discriminate different anatomical structures in an output tagged dataset. Among existing methods, supervised learning methods for segmentation have been devised to easily analyze biomedical datasets by a non-expert user. However, they still have some problems concerning practical application, such as slow learning and testing speeds. In addition, recent technological developments have led to widespread availability of multi-core CPUs and GPUs, as well as new software languages, such as NVIDIA's CUDA and OpenCL, allowing to apply parallel programming paradigms in conventional personal computers. Adaboost classifier is one of the most widely applied methods for labeling in the Machine Learning community. In a first stage, Adaboost trains a binary classifier from a set of pre-labeled samples described by a set of features. This binary classifier is defined as a weighted combination of weak classifiers. Each weak classifier is a simple decision function estimated on a single feature value. Then, at the testing stage, each weak classifier is independently applied on the features of a set of unlabeled samples. In this work, we propose an alternative representation of the Adaboost binary classifier. We use this proposed representation to define a new GPU-based parallelized Adaboost testing stage using OpenCL. We provide numerical experiments based on large available data sets and we compare our results to CPU-based strategies in terms of time and

  4. Relational Machine Learning for Electronic Health Record-Driven Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Peissig, Peggy L.; Costa, Vitor Santos; Caldwell, Michael D.; Rottscheit, Carla; Berg, Richard L.; Mendonca, Eneida A.; Page, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electronic health records (EHR) offer medical and pharmacogenomics research unprecedented opportunities to identify and classify patients at risk. EHRs are collections of highly inter-dependent records that include biological, anatomical, physiological, and behavioral observations. They comprise a patient’s clinical phenome, where each patient has thousands of date-stamped records distributed across many relational tables. Development of EHR computer-based phenotyping algorithms require time and medical insight from clinical experts, who most often can only review a small patient subset representative of the total EHR records, to identify phenotype features. In this research we evaluate whether relational machine learning (ML) using Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) can contribute to addressing these issues as a viable approach for EHR-based phenotyping. Methods Two relational learning ILP approaches and three well-known WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis) implementations of non-relational approaches (PART, J48, and JRIP) were used to develop models for nine phenotypes. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) coded EHR data were used to select training cohorts for the development of each phenotypic model. Accuracy, precision, recall, F-Measure, and Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUROC) curve statistics were measured for each phenotypic model based on independent manually verified test cohorts. A two-sided binomial distribution test (sign test) compared the five ML approaches across phenotypes for statistical significance. Results We developed an approach to automatically label training examples using ICD-9 diagnosis codes for the ML approaches being evaluated. Nine phenotypic models for each MLapproach were evaluated, resulting in better overall model performance in AUROC using ILP when compared to PART (p=0.039), J48 (p=0.003) and JRIP (p=0.003). Discussion ILP has the potential to improve

  5. A novel multiple instance learning method based on extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Cai, Liangjian; Peng, Jinzhu; Jia, Yuheng

    2015-01-01

    Since real-world data sets usually contain large instances, it is meaningful to develop efficient and effective multiple instance learning (MIL) algorithm. As a learning paradigm, MIL is different from traditional supervised learning that handles the classification of bags comprising unlabeled instances. In this paper, a novel efficient method based on extreme learning machine (ELM) is proposed to address MIL problem. First, the most qualified instance is selected in each bag through a single hidden layer feedforward network (SLFN) whose input and output weights are both initialed randomly, and the single selected instance is used to represent every bag. Second, the modified ELM model is trained by using the selected instances to update the output weights. Experiments on several benchmark data sets and multiple instance regression data sets show that the ELM-MIL achieves good performance; moreover, it runs several times or even hundreds of times faster than other similar MIL algorithms.

  6. Guidelines for Developing and Reporting Machine Learning Predictive Models in Biomedical Research: A Multidisciplinary View

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background As more and more researchers are turning to big data for new opportunities of biomedical discoveries, machine learning models, as the backbone of big data analysis, are mentioned more often in biomedical journals. However, owing to the inherent complexity of machine learning methods, they are prone to misuse. Because of the flexibility in specifying machine learning models, the results are often insufficiently reported in research articles, hindering reliable assessment of model validity and consistent interpretation of model outputs. Objective To attain a set of guidelines on the use of machine learning predictive models within clinical settings to make sure the models are correctly applied and sufficiently reported so that true discoveries can be distinguished from random coincidence. Methods A multidisciplinary panel of machine learning experts, clinicians, and traditional statisticians were interviewed, using an iterative process in accordance with the Delphi method. Results The process produced a set of guidelines that consists of (1) a list of reporting items to be included in a research article and (2) a set of practical sequential steps for developing predictive models. Conclusions A set of guidelines was generated to enable correct application of machine learning models and consistent reporting of model specifications and results in biomedical research. We believe that such guidelines will accelerate the adoption of big data analysis, particularly with machine learning methods, in the biomedical research community. PMID:27986644

  7. Thermography and machine learning techniques for tomato freshness prediction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen; Wang, Hong-Jin; Tan, Zuojun

    2016-12-01

    The United States and China are the world's leading tomato producers. Tomatoes account for over $2 billion annually in farm sales in the U.S. Tomatoes also rank as the world's 8th most valuable agricultural product, valued at $58 billion dollars annually, and quality is highly prized. Nondestructive technologies, such as optical inspection and near-infrared spectrum analysis, have been developed to estimate tomato freshness (also known as grades in USDA parlance). However, determining the freshness of tomatoes is still an open problem. This research (1) illustrates the principle of theory on why thermography might be able to reveal the internal state of the tomatoes and (2) investigates the application of machine learning techniques-artificial neural networks (ANNs) and support vector machines (SVMs)-in combination with transient step heating, and thermography for freshness prediction, which refers to how soon the tomatoes will decay. Infrared images were captured at a sampling frequency of 1 Hz during 40 s of heating followed by 160 s of cooling. The temperatures of the acquired images were plotted. Regions with higher temperature differences between fresh and less fresh (rotten within three days) tomatoes of approximately uniform size and shape were used as the input nodes for ANN and SVM models. The ANN model built using heating and cooling data was relatively optimal. The overall regression coefficient was 0.99. These results suggest that a combination of infrared thermal imaging and ANN modeling methods can be used to predict tomato freshness with higher accuracy than SVM models.

  8. Modeling the Swift BAT Trigger Algorithm with Machine Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Philip B.; Lien, Amy Y.; Baker, John G.; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    To draw inferences about gamma-ray burst (GRB) source populations based on Swift observations, it is essential to understand the detection efficiency of the Swift burst alert telescope (BAT). This study considers the problem of modeling the Swift BAT triggering algorithm for long GRBs, a computationally expensive procedure, and models it using machine learning algorithms. A large sample of simulated GRBs from Lien et al. (2014) is used to train various models: random forests, boosted decision trees (with AdaBoost), support vector machines, and artificial neural networks. The best models have accuracies of approximately greater than 97% (approximately less than 3% error), which is a significant improvement on a cut in GRB flux which has an accuracy of 89:6% (10:4% error). These models are then used to measure the detection efficiency of Swift as a function of redshift z, which is used to perform Bayesian parameter estimation on the GRB rate distribution. We find a local GRB rate density of eta(sub 0) approximately 0.48(+0.41/-0.23) Gpc(exp -3) yr(exp -1) with power-law indices of eta(sub 1) approximately 1.7(+0.6/-0.5) and eta(sub 2) approximately -5.9(+5.7/-0.1) for GRBs above and below a break point of z(sub 1) approximately 6.8(+2.8/-3.2). This methodology is able to improve upon earlier studies by more accurately modeling Swift detection and using this for fully Bayesian model fitting. The code used in this is analysis is publicly available online.

  9. Machine learning applications in cancer prognosis and prediction.

    PubMed

    Kourou, Konstantina; Exarchos, Themis P; Exarchos, Konstantinos P; Karamouzis, Michalis V; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has been characterized as a heterogeneous disease consisting of many different subtypes. The early diagnosis and prognosis of a cancer type have become a necessity in cancer research, as it can facilitate the subsequent clinical management of patients. The importance of classifying cancer patients into high or low risk groups has led many research teams, from the biomedical and the bioinformatics field, to study the application of machine learning (ML) methods. Therefore, these techniques have been utilized as an aim to model the progression and treatment of cancerous conditions. In addition, the ability of ML tools to detect key features from complex datasets reveals their importance. A variety of these techniques, including Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Bayesian Networks (BNs), Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and Decision Trees (DTs) have been widely applied in cancer research for the development of predictive models, resulting in effective and accurate decision making. Even though it is evident that the use of ML methods can improve our understanding of cancer progression, an appropriate level of validation is needed in order for these methods to be considered in the everyday clinical practice. In this work, we present a review of recent ML approaches employed in the modeling of cancer progression. The predictive models discussed here are based on various supervised ML techniques as well as on different input features and data samples. Given the growing trend on the application of ML methods in cancer research, we present here the most recent publications that employ these techniques as an aim to model cancer risk or patient outcomes.

  10. Machine Learning Approaches for Predicting Protein Complex Similarity.

    PubMed

    Farhoodi, Roshanak; Akbal-Delibas, Bahar; Haspel, Nurit

    2017-01-01

    Discriminating native-like structures from false positives with high accuracy is one of the biggest challenges in protein-protein docking. While there is an agreement on the existence of a relationship between various favorable intermolecular interactions (e.g., Van der Waals, electrostatic, and desolvation forces) and the similarity of a conformation to its native structure, the precise nature of this relationship is not known. Existing protein-protein docking methods typically formulate this relationship as a weighted sum of selected terms and calibrate their weights by using a training set to evaluate and rank candidate complexes. Despite improvements in the predictive power of recent docking methods, producing a large number of false positives by even state-of-the-art methods often leads to failure in predicting the correct binding of many complexes. With the aid of machine learning methods, we tested several approaches that not only rank candidate structures relative to each other but also predict how similar each candidate is to the native conformation. We trained a two-layer neural network, a multilayer neural network, and a network of Restricted Boltzmann Machines against extensive data sets of unbound complexes generated by RosettaDock and PyDock. We validated these methods with a set of refinement candidate structures. We were able to predict the root mean squared deviations (RMSDs) of protein complexes with a very small, often less than 1.5 Å, error margin when trained with structures that have RMSD values of up to 7 Å. In our most recent experiments with the protein samples having RMSD values up to 27 Å, the average prediction error was still relatively small, attesting to the potential of our approach in predicting the correct binding of protein-protein complexes.

  11. Using financial risk measures for analyzing generalization performance of machine learning models.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Akiko; Kanamori, Takafumi

    2014-09-01

    We propose a unified machine learning model (UMLM) for two-class classification, regression and outlier (or novelty) detection via a robust optimization approach. The model embraces various machine learning models such as support vector machine-based and minimax probability machine-based classification and regression models. The unified framework makes it possible to compare and contrast existing learning models and to explain their differences and similarities. In this paper, after relating existing learning models to UMLM, we show some theoretical properties for UMLM. Concretely, we show an interpretation of UMLM as minimizing a well-known financial risk measure (worst-case value-at risk (VaR) or conditional VaR), derive generalization bounds for UMLM using such a risk measure, and prove that solving problems of UMLM leads to estimators with the minimized generalization bounds. Those theoretical properties are applicable to related existing learning models.

  12. Application of machine learning for the evaluation of turfgrass plots using aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ke; Raheja, Amar; Bhandari, Subodh; Green, Robert L.

    2016-05-01

    Historically, investigation of turfgrass characteristics have been limited to visual ratings. Although relevant information may result from such evaluations, final inferences may be questionable because of the subjective nature in which the data is collected. Recent advances in computer vision techniques allow researchers to objectively measure turfgrass characteristics such as percent ground cover, turf color, and turf quality from the digital images. This paper focuses on developing a methodology for automated assessment of turfgrass quality from aerial images. Images of several turfgrass plots of varying quality were gathered using a camera mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle. The quality of these plots were also evaluated based on visual ratings. The goal was to use the aerial images to generate quality evaluations on a regular basis for the optimization of water treatment. Aerial images are used to train a neural network so that appropriate features such as intensity, color, and texture of the turfgrass are extracted from these images. Neural network is a nonlinear classifier commonly used in machine learning. The output of the neural network trained model is the ratings of the grass, which is compared to the visual ratings. Currently, the quality and the color of turfgrass, measured as the greenness of the grass, are evaluated. The textures are calculated using the Gabor filter and co-occurrence matrix. Other classifiers such as support vector machines and simpler linear regression models such as Ridge regression and LARS regression are also used. The performance of each model is compared. The results show encouraging potential for using machine learning techniques for the evaluation of turfgrass quality and color.

  13. Auto-adaptive robot-aided therapy using machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Badesa, Francisco J; Morales, Ricardo; Garcia-Aracil, Nicolas; Sabater, J M; Casals, Alicia; Zollo, Loredana

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents an application of a classification method to adaptively and dynamically modify the therapy and real-time displays of a virtual reality system in accordance with the specific state of each patient using his/her physiological reactions. First, a theoretical background about several machine learning techniques for classification is presented. Then, nine machine learning techniques are compared in order to select the best candidate in terms of accuracy. Finally, first experimental results are presented to show that the therapy can be modulated in function of the patient state using machine learning classification techniques.

  14. Clinical chemistry in higher dimensions: Machine-learning and enhanced prediction from routine clinical chemistry data.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Alice; Signor, Ben M; Lidbury, Brett A; Badrick, Tony

    2016-11-01

    Big Data is having an impact on many areas of research, not the least of which is biomedical science. In this review paper, big data and machine learning are defined in terms accessible to the clinical chemistry community. Seven myths associated with machine learning and big data are then presented, with the aim of managing expectation of machine learning amongst clinical chemists. The myths are illustrated with four examples investigating the relationship between biomarkers in liver function tests, enhanced laboratory prediction of hepatitis virus infection, the relationship between bilirubin and white cell count, and the relationship between red cell distribution width and laboratory prediction of anaemia.

  15. Comparative study of public-domain supervised machine-learning accuracy on the UCI database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eklund, Peter W.

    1999-02-01

    This paper surveys public domain supervised learning algorithms and performs accuracy (error rate) analysis of their classification performance on unseen instances for twenty-nine of the University of California at Irvine machine learning datasets. The learning algorithms represent three types of classifiers: decision trees, neural networks and rule-based classifiers. The study performs data analysis and examines the effect of irrelevant attributes to explain the performance characteristics of the learning algorithms. The survey concludes with some general recommendations about the selection of public domain machine-learning algorithms relative to the properties of the data examined.

  16. Machines that learn to segment images: a crucial technology for connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Viren; Seung, H Sebastian; Turaga, Srinivas C

    2010-01-01

    Connections between neurons can be found by checking whether synapses exist at points of contact, which in turn are determined by neural shapes. Finding these shapes is a special case of image segmentation, which is laborious for humans and would ideally be performed by computers. New metrics properly quantify the performance of a computer algorithm using its disagreement with ‘true’ segmentations of example images. New machine learning methods search for segmentation algorithms that minimize such metrics. These advances have reduced computer errors dramatically. It should now be faster for a human to correct the remaining errors than to segment an image manually. Further reductions in human effort are expected, and crucial for finding connectomes more complex than that of Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:20801638

  17. Machine learning amplifies the effect of parental family history of Alzheimer's disease on list learning strategy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Timothy S; Coen, Michael H; La Rue, Asenath; Jonaitis, Erin; Koscik, Rebecca L; Hermann, Bruce; Sager, Mark A

    2012-05-01

    Identification of preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an essential first step in developing interventions to prevent or delay disease onset. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that deeper analyses of traditional cognitive tests may be useful in identifying subtle but potentially important learning and memory differences in asymptomatic populations that differ in risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. Subjects included 879 asymptomatic higher-risk persons (middle-aged children of parents with AD) and 355 asymptotic lower-risk persons (middle-aged children of parents without AD). All were administered the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test at baseline. Using machine learning approaches, we constructed a new measure that exploited finer differences in memory strategy than previous work focused on serial position and subjective organization. The new measure, based on stochastic gradient descent, provides a greater degree of statistical separation (p = 1.44 × 10-5) than previously observed for asymptomatic family history and non-family history groups, while controlling for apolipoprotein epsilon 4, age, gender, and education level. The results of our machine learning approach support analyzing memory strategy in detail to probe potential disease onset. Such distinct differences may be exploited in asymptomatic middle-aged persons as a potential risk factor for AD.

  18. The Value Simulation-Based Learning Added to Machining Technology in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Linda; Tan, Hock Soon; Thwin, Mya Mya; Tan, Kim Cheng; Koh, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the value simulation-based learning (SBL) added to the learning of Machining Technology in a 15-week core subject course offered to university students. The research questions were: (1) How did SBL enhance classroom learning? (2) How did SBL help participants in their test? (3) How did SBL prepare participants for…

  19. Synthetic tests of passive microwave brightness temperature assimilation over snow covered land using machine learning algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    A novel data assimilation framework is evaluated that assimilates passive microwave (PMW) brightness temperature (Tb) observations into an advanced land surface model for the purpose of improving snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates across regional- and continental-scales. The multifrequency, multipolarization framework employs machine learning algorithms to predict PMW Tb as a function of land surface model state information and subsequently merges the predicted PMW Tb with observed PMW Tb from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E). The merging procedure is predicated on conditional probabilities computed within a Bayesian statistical framework using either an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) or an Ensemble Kalman Smoother (EnKS). The data assimilation routine produces a conditioned (updated) estimate of modeled SWE that is more accurate and contains less uncertainty than the model without assimilation. A synthetic case study is presented for select locations in North America that compares model results with and without assimilation against synthetic observations of snow depth and SWE. It is shown that the data assimilation framework improves modeled estimates of snow depth and SWE during both the accumulation and ablation phases of the snow season. Further, it is demonstrated that the EnKS outperforms the EnKF implementation due to its ability to better modulate high frequency noise into the conditioned estimates. The overarching findings from this study demonstrate the feasibility of machine learning algorithms for use as an observation model operator within a data assimilation framework in order to improve model estimates of snow depth and SWE across regional- and continental-scales.

  20. Rapid Probabilistic Source Inversion Using Machine Learning Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeufl, P.; Valentine, A. P.; Trampert, J.

    2013-12-01

    Determination of earthquake source parameters is an important task in seismology. For many applications, it is also valuable to understand the uncertainties associated with these determinations, and this is particularly true in the context of earthquake early warning and hazard mitigation. We present a framework for probabilistic centroid moment tensor point source inversions in near real-time, applicable to a wide variety of data-types. Our methodology allows us to find an approximation to p(m|d), the conditional probability of source parameters (m) given observations, (d). This approximation is obtained by smoothly interpolating a set of random prior samples, using a machine learning algorithm able to learn the mapping from d to m. The approximation obtained can be evaluated within milliseconds on a standard desktop computer for a new observation (d). This makes the method well suited for use in situations such as earthquake early warning, where inversions must be performed routinely, for a fixed station geometry, and where it is important that results are obtained rapidly. This is a major advantage over traditional sampling based techniques, such as Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo methods, where a re-sampling of the posterior is necessary every time a new observation is made. We demonstrated the method by applying it to a regional static GPS displacement data set for the 2010 MW 7.2 El Mayor Cucapah earthquake in Baja California and obtained estimates of logarithmic magnitude, centroid location and depth, and focal mechanism (Käufl et al., submitted). We will present an extension of this approach to the inversion of full waveforms and explore possibilities for jointly inverting seismic and geodetic data. (1) P. Käufl, A. P. Valentine, T.B. O'Toole, J. Trampert, submitted, Geophysical Journal International

  1. Prediction of preterm deliveries from EHG signals using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Paul; Cheung, Pauline; Hussain, Abir; Al-Jumeily, Dhiya; Dobbins, Chelsea; Iram, Shamaila

    2013-01-01

    There has been some improvement in the treatment of preterm infants, which has helped to increase their chance of survival. However, the rate of premature births is still globally increasing. As a result, this group of infants are most at risk of developing severe medical conditions that can affect the respiratory, gastrointestinal, immune, central nervous, auditory and visual systems. In extreme cases, this can also lead to long-term conditions, such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation, learning difficulties, including poor health and growth. In the US alone, the societal and economic cost of preterm births, in 2005, was estimated to be $26.2 billion, per annum. In the UK, this value was close to £2.95 billion, in 2009. Many believe that a better understanding of why preterm births occur, and a strategic focus on prevention, will help to improve the health of children and reduce healthcare costs. At present, most methods of preterm birth prediction are subjective. However, a strong body of evidence suggests the analysis of uterine electrical signals (Electrohysterography), could provide a viable way of diagnosing true labour and predict preterm deliveries. Most Electrohysterography studies focus on true labour detection during the final seven days, before labour. The challenge is to utilise Electrohysterography techniques to predict preterm delivery earlier in the pregnancy. This paper explores this idea further and presents a supervised machine learning approach that classifies term and preterm records, using an open source dataset containing 300 records (38 preterm and 262 term). The synthetic minority oversampling technique is used to oversample the minority preterm class, and cross validation techniques, are used to evaluate the dataset against other similar studies. Our approach shows an improvement on existing studies with 96% sensitivity, 90% specificity, and a 95% area under the curve value with 8% global error using the polynomial classifier.

  2. Is extreme learning machine feasible? A theoretical assessment (part I).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Lin, Shaobo; Fang, Jian; Xu, Zongben

    2015-01-01

    An extreme learning machine (ELM) is a feedforward neural network (FNN) like learning system whose connections with output neurons are adjustable, while the connections with and within hidden neurons are randomly fixed. Numerous applications have demonstrated the feasibility and high efficiency of ELM-like systems. It has, however, been open if this is true for any general applications. In this two-part paper, we conduct a comprehensive feasibility analysis of ELM. In Part I, we provide an answer to the question by theoretically justifying the following: 1) for some suitable activation functions, such as polynomials, Nadaraya-Watson and sigmoid functions, the ELM-like systems can attain the theoretical generalization bound of the FNNs with all connections adjusted, i.e., they do not degrade the generalization capability of the FNNs even when the connections with and within hidden neurons are randomly fixed; 2) the number of hidden neurons needed for an ELM-like system to achieve the theoretical bound can be estimated; and 3) whenever the activation function is taken as polynomial, the deduced hidden layer output matrix is of full column-rank, therefore the generalized inverse technique can be efficiently applied to yield the solution of an ELM-like system, and, furthermore, for the nonpolynomial case, the Tikhonov regularization can be applied to guarantee the weak regularity while not sacrificing the generalization capability. In Part II, however, we reveal a different aspect of the feasibility of ELM: there also exists some activation functions, which makes the corresponding ELM degrade the generalization capability. The obtained results underlie the feasibility and efficiency of ELM-like systems, and yield various generalizations and improvements of the systems as well.

  3. Crystal structure representations for machine learning models of formation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, Felix; Lindmaa, Alexander; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2015-04-20

    We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit cell repeated over the lattice; (ii) an extended Coulomb-like matrix that takes into account a number of neighboring unit cells; and (iii) an ansatz that mimics the periodicity and the basic features of the elements in the Ewald sum matrix using a sine function of the crystal coordinates of the atoms. The representations are compared for a Laplacian kernel with Manhattan norm, trained to reproduce formation energies using a dataset of 3938 crystal structures obtained from the Materials Project. For training sets consisting of 3000 crystals, the generalization error in predicting formation energies of new structures corresponds to (i) 0.49, (ii) 0.64, and (iii) 0.37eV/atom for the respective representations.

  4. Machine Learning of Parameters for Accurate Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules. PMID:26146493

  5. Protein sequence classification with improved extreme learning machine algorithms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiuwen; Xiong, Lianglin

    2014-01-01

    Precisely classifying a protein sequence from a large biological protein sequences database plays an important role for developing competitive pharmacological products. Comparing the unseen sequence with all the identified protein sequences and returning the category index with the highest similarity scored protein, conventional methods are usually time-consuming. Therefore, it is urgent and necessary to build an efficient protein sequence classification system. In this paper, we study the performance of protein sequence classification using SLFNs. The recent efficient extreme learning machine (ELM) and its invariants are utilized as the training algorithms. The optimal pruned ELM is first employed for protein sequence classification in this paper. To further enhance the performance, the ensemble based SLFNs structure is constructed where multiple SLFNs with the same number of hidden nodes and the same activation function are used as ensembles. For each ensemble, the same training algorithm is adopted. The final category index is derived using the majority voting method. Two approaches, namely, the basic ELM and the OP-ELM, are adopted for the ensemble based SLFNs. The performance is analyzed and compared with several existing methods using datasets obtained from the Protein Information Resource center. The experimental results show the priority of the proposed algorithms.

  6. Machine learning and cosmological simulations - I. Semi-analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdar, Harshil M.; Turk, Matthew J.; Brunner, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new exploratory framework to model galaxy formation and evolution in a hierarchical Universe by using machine learning (ML). Our motivations are two-fold: (1) presenting a new, promising technique to study galaxy formation, and (2) quantitatively analysing the extent of the influence of dark matter halo properties on galaxies in the backdrop of semi-analytical models (SAMs). We use the influential Millennium Simulation and the corresponding Munich SAM to train and test various sophisticated ML algorithms (k-Nearest Neighbors, decision trees, random forests, and extremely randomized trees). By using only essential dark matter halo physical properties for haloes of M > 1012 M⊙ and a partial merger tree, our model predicts the hot gas mass, cold gas mass, bulge mass, total stellar mass, black hole mass and cooling radius at z = 0 for each central galaxy in a dark matter halo for the Millennium run. Our results provide a unique and powerful phenomenological framework to explore the galaxy-halo connection that is built upon SAMs and demonstrably place ML as a promising and a computationally efficient tool to study small-scale structure formation.

  7. Machine learning and cosmological simulations - II. Hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdar, Harshil M.; Turk, Matthew J.; Brunner, Robert J.

    2016-04-01

    We extend a machine learning (ML) framework presented previously to model galaxy formation and evolution in a hierarchical universe using N-body + hydrodynamical simulations. In this work, we show that ML is a promising technique to study galaxy formation in the backdrop of a hydrodynamical simulation. We use the Illustris simulation to train and test various sophisticated ML algorithms. By using only essential dark matter halo physical properties and no merger history, our model predicts the gas mass, stellar mass, black hole mass, star formation rate, g - r colour, and stellar metallicity fairly robustly. Our results provide a unique and powerful phenomenological framework to explore the galaxy-halo connection that is built upon a solid hydrodynamical simulation. The promising reproduction of the listed galaxy properties demonstrably place ML as a promising and a significantly more computationally efficient tool to study small-scale structure formation. We find that ML mimics a full-blown hydrodynamical simulation surprisingly well in a computation time of mere minutes. The population of galaxies simulated by ML, while not numerically identical to Illustris, is statistically robust and physically consistent with Illustris galaxies and follows the same fundamental observational constraints. ML offers an intriguing and promising technique to create quick mock galaxy catalogues in the future.

  8. MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Bias Adjustment Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albayrak, A.; Wei, J. C.; Petrenko, M.; Lary, D. J.; Leptoukh, G. G.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past decade, global aerosol observations have been conducted by space-borne sensors, airborne instruments, and ground-base network measurements. Unfortunately, quite often we encounter the differences of aerosol measurements by different well-calibrated instruments, even with a careful collocation in time and space. The differences might be rather substantial, and need to be better understood and accounted for when merging data from many sensors. The possible causes for these differences come from instrumental bias, different satellite viewing geometries, calibration issues, dynamically changing atmospheric and the surface conditions, and other "regressors", resulting in random and systematic errors in the final aerosol products. In this study, we will concentrate on the subject of removing biases and the systematic errors from MODIS (both Terra and Aqua) aerosol product, using Machine Learning algorithms. While we are assessing our regressors in our system when comparing global aerosol products, the Aerosol Robotic Network of sun-photometers (AERONET) will be used as a baseline for evaluating the MODIS aerosol products (Dark Target for land and ocean, and Deep Blue retrieval algorithms). The results of bias adjustment for MODIS Terra and Aqua are planned to be incorporated into the AeroStat Giovanni as part of the NASA ACCESS funded AeroStat project.

  9. Electronic spectra from TDDFT and machine learning in chemical space

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Hartmann, Mia; Tapavicza, Enrico; Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von

    2015-08-28

    Due to its favorable computational efficiency, time-dependent (TD) density functional theory (DFT) enables the prediction of electronic spectra in a high-throughput manner across chemical space. Its predictions, however, can be quite inaccurate. We resolve this issue with machine learning models trained on deviations of reference second-order approximate coupled-cluster (CC2) singles and doubles spectra from TDDFT counterparts, or even from DFT gap. We applied this approach to low-lying singlet-singlet vertical electronic spectra of over 20 000 synthetically feasible small organic molecules with up to eight CONF atoms. The prediction errors decay monotonously as a function of training set size. For a training set of 10 000 molecules, CC2 excitation energies can be reproduced to within ±0.1 eV for the remaining molecules. Analysis of our spectral database via chromophore counting suggests that even higher accuracies can be achieved. Based on the evidence collected, we discuss open challenges associated with data-driven modeling of high-lying spectra and transition intensities.

  10. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempiricalmore » OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.« less

  11. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  12. Machine Learning of Parameters for Accurate Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Dral, Pavlo O; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-05-12

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  13. Improved Automated Seismic Event Extraction Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, L.; Kleiner, A.; Jordan, M. I.

    2009-12-01

    Like many organizations engaged in seismic monitoring, the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization collects and processes seismic data from a large network of sensors. This data is continuously transmitted to a central data center, and bulletins of seismic events are automatically extracted. However, as for many such automated systems at present, the inaccuracy of this extraction necessitates substantial human analyst review effort. A significant opportunity for improvement thus lies in the fact that these systems currently fail to fully utilize the valuable repository of historical data provided by prior analyst reviews. In this work, we present the results of the application of machine learning approaches to several fundamental sub-tasks in seismic event extraction. These methods share as a common theme the use of historical analyst-reviewed bulletins as ground truth from which they extract relevant patterns to accomplish the desired goals. For instance, we demonstrate the effectiveness of classification and ranking methods for the identification of false events -- that is, those which will be invalidated and discarded by analysts -- in automated bulletins. We also show gains in the accuracy of seismic phase identification via the use of classification techniques to automatically assign seismic phase labels to station detections. Furthermore, we examine the potential of historical association data to inform the direct association of new signal detections with their corresponding seismic events. Empirical results are based upon parametric historical seismic detection and event data received from the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization.

  14. Automated mapping of building facades by machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhle, J.

    2014-08-01

    Facades of buildings contain various types of objects which have to be recorded for information systems. The article describes a solution for this task focussing on automated classification by means of machine learning techniques. Stereo pairs of oblique images are used to derive 3D point clouds of buildings. The planes of the buildings are automatically detected. The derived planes are supplemented with a regular grid of points for which the colour values are found in the images. For each grid point of the façade additional attributes are derived from image and object data. This "intelligent" point cloud is analysed by a decision tree, which is derived from a small training set. The derived decision tree is then used to classify the complete point cloud. To each point of the regular façade grid a class is assigned and a façade plan is mapped by a colour palette representing the different objects. Some image processing methods are applied to improve the appearance of the interpreted façade plot and to extract additional information. The proposed method is tested on facades of a church. Accuracy measures were derived from 140 independent checkpoints, which were randomly selected. When selecting four classes ("window", "stone work", "painted wall", and "vegetation") the overall accuracy is assessed with 80 % (95 % Confidence Interval: 71 %-88 %). The user accuracy of class "stonework" was assessed with 90 % (95 % CI: 80 %-97 %). The proposed methodology has a high potential for automation and fast processing.

  15. Machine-learned pattern identification in olfactory subtest results

    PubMed Central

    Lötsch, Jörn; Hummel, Thomas; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    The human sense of smell is often analyzed as being composed of three main components comprising olfactory threshold, odor discrimination and the ability to identify odors. A relevant distinction of the three components and their differential changes in distinct disorders remains a research focus. The present data-driven analysis aimed at establishing a cluster structure in the pattern of olfactory subtest results. Therefore, unsupervised machine-learning was applied onto olfactory subtest results acquired in 10,714 subjects with nine different olfactory pathologies. Using the U-matrix, Emergent Self-organizing feature maps (ESOM) identified three different clusters characterized by (i) low threshold and good discrimination and identification, (ii) very high threshold associated with absent to poor discrimination and identification ability, or (iii) medium threshold, i.e., in the mid-range of possible thresholds, associated with reduced discrimination and identification ability. Specific etiologies of olfactory (dys)function were unequally represented in the clusters (p < 2.2 · 10−16). Patients with congenital anosmia were overrepresented in the second cluster while subjects with postinfectious olfactory dysfunction belonged frequently to the third cluster. However, the clusters provided no clear separation between etiologies. Hence, the present verification of a distinct cluster structure encourages continued scientific efforts at olfactory test pattern recognition. PMID:27762302

  16. Sparse approximation through boosting for learning large scale kernel machines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Yao, Xin

    2010-06-01

    Recently, sparse approximation has become a preferred method for learning large scale kernel machines. This technique attempts to represent the solution with only a subset of original data points also known as basis vectors, which are usually chosen one by one with a forward selection procedure based on some selection criteria. The computational complexity of several resultant algorithms scales as O(NM(2)) in time and O(NM) in memory, where N is the number of training points and M is the number of basis vectors as well as the steps of forward selection. For some large scale data sets, to obtain a better solution, we are sometimes required to include more basis vectors, which means that M is not trivial in this situation. However, the limited computational resource (e.g., memory) prevents us from including too many vectors. To handle this dilemma, we propose to add an ensemble of basis vectors instead of only one at each forward step. The proposed method, closely related to gradient boosting, could decrease the required number M of forward steps significantly and thus a large fraction of computational cost is saved. Numerical experiments on three large scale regression tasks and a classification problem demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  17. Machine learning based interatomic potential for amorphous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deringer, Volker L.; Csányi, Gábor

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a Gaussian approximation potential (GAP) for atomistic simulations of liquid and amorphous elemental carbon. Based on a machine learning representation of the density-functional theory (DFT) potential-energy surface, such interatomic potentials enable materials simulations with close-to DFT accuracy but at much lower computational cost. We first determine the maximum accuracy that any finite-range potential can achieve in carbon structures; then, using a hierarchical set of two-, three-, and many-body structural descriptors, we construct a GAP model that can indeed reach the target accuracy. The potential yields accurate energetic and structural properties over a wide range of densities; it also correctly captures the structure of the liquid phases, at variance with a state-of-the-art empirical potential. Exemplary applications of the GAP model to surfaces of "diamondlike" tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta -C) are presented, including an estimate of the amorphous material's surface energy and simulations of high-temperature surface reconstructions ("graphitization"). The presented interatomic potential appears to be promising for realistic and accurate simulations of nanoscale amorphous carbon structures.

  18. Resistance gene identification from Larimichthys crocea with machine learning techniques

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yinyin; Liao, Zhijun; Ju, Ying; Liu, Juan; Mao, Yong; Liu, Xiangrong

    2016-01-01

    The research on resistance genes (R-gene) plays a vital role in bioinformatics as it has the capability of coping with adverse changes in the external environment, which can form the corresponding resistance protein by transcription and translation. It is meaningful to identify and predict R-gene of Larimichthys crocea (L.Crocea). It is friendly for breeding and the marine environment as well. Large amounts of L.Crocea’s immune mechanisms have been explored by biological methods. However, much about them is still unclear. In order to break the limited understanding of the L.Crocea’s immune mechanisms and to detect new R-gene and R-gene-like genes, this paper came up with a more useful combination prediction method, which is to extract and classify the feature of available genomic data by machine learning. The effectiveness of feature extraction and classification methods to identify potential novel R-gene was evaluated, and different statistical analyzes were utilized to explore the reliability of prediction method, which can help us further understand the immune mechanisms of L.Crocea against pathogens. In this paper, a webserver called LCRG-Pred is available at http://server.malab.cn/rg_lc/. PMID:27922074

  19. Characterization of decohering quantum systems: Machine learning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenberg, Markku P. V.; Köhn, Oliver; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive data collection and analysis, where data are being fed back to update the measurement settings, can greatly increase speed, precision, and reliability of the characterization of quantum systems. However, decoherence tends to make adaptive characterization difficult. As an example, we consider two coupled discrete quantum systems. When one of the systems can be controlled and measured, the standard method to characterize another, with an unknown frequency ωr, is swap spectroscopy. Here, adapting measurements can provide estimates whose error decreases exponentially in the number of measurement shots rather than as a power law in conventional swap spectroscopy. However, when the decoherence time is so short that an excitation oscillating between the two systems can only undergo less than a few tens of vacuum Rabi oscillations, this approach can be marred by a severe limit on accuracy unless carefully designed. We adopt machine learning techniques to search for efficient policies for the characterization of decohering quantum systems. We find, for instance, that when the system undergoes more than 2 Rabi oscillations during its relaxation time T1, O (103) measurement shots are sufficient to reduce the squared error of the Bayesian initial prior of the unknown frequency ωr by a factor O (104) or larger. We also develop policies optimized for extreme initial parameter uncertainty and for the presence of imperfections in the readout.

  20. Resistance gene identification from Larimichthys crocea with machine learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yinyin; Liao, Zhijun; Ju, Ying; Liu, Juan; Mao, Yong; Liu, Xiangrong

    2016-12-01

    The research on resistance genes (R-gene) plays a vital role in bioinformatics as it has the capability of coping with adverse changes in the external environment, which can form the corresponding resistance protein by transcription and translation. It is meaningful to identify and predict R-gene of Larimichthys crocea (L.Crocea). It is friendly for breeding and the marine environment as well. Large amounts of L.Crocea’s immune mechanisms have been explored by biological methods. However, much about them is still unclear. In order to break the limited understanding of the L.Crocea’s immune mechanisms and to detect new R-gene and R-gene-like genes, this paper came up with a more useful combination prediction method, which is to extract and classify the feature of available genomic data by machine learning. The effectiveness of feature extraction and classification methods to identify potential novel R-gene was evaluated, and different statistical analyzes were utilized to explore the reliability of prediction method, which can help us further understand the immune mechanisms of L.Crocea against pathogens. In this paper, a webserver called LCRG-Pred is available at http://server.malab.cn/rg_lc/.