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Sample records for advanced maillard reaction

  1. Maillard reactions in pharmaceutical formulations and human health.

    PubMed

    Newton, David W

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews pharmaceutical and health implications of the nonenzymatic Maillard reaction, also referred to as browning or N-glycation. The spontaneous Maillard reaction between reducing sugars and amines was first reported by French scientist Louis Maillard in 1912; the Maillard reaction may also occur with other drugs. Hemoglobin A1c and chemically complex colored products that follow initial dextrose and amino acids adducts in parenteral nutrition solutions are the advanced maillard products most familiar to pharmacists.

  2. The Maillard reaction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dyer, D G; Blackledge, J A; Katz, B M; Hull, C J; Adkisson, H D; Thorpe, S R; Lyons, T J; Baynes, J W

    1991-02-01

    The Maillard or browning reaction between reducing sugars and protein contributes to the chemical deterioration and loss of nutritional value of proteins during food processing and storage. This article presents and discusses evidence that the Maillard reaction is also involved in the chemical aging of long-lived proteins in human tissues. While the concentration of the Amadori adduct of glucose to lens protein and skin collagen is relatively constant with age, products of sequential glycation and oxidation of protein, termed glycoxidation products, accumulate in these long-lived proteins with advancing age and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. Among these products are the chemically modified amino acids, N epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), N epsilon-(carboxymethyl)hydroxylysine (CMhL), and the fluorescent crosslink, pentosidine. While these glycoxidation products are present at only trace levels in tissue proteins, there is strong evidence for the presence of other browning products which remain to be characterized. Mechanisms for detoxifying reactive intermediates in the Maillard reaction and catabolism of extensively browned proteins are also discussed, along with recent approaches for therapeutic modulation of advanced stages of the Maillard reaction. PMID:1858426

  3. Microwave-assisted Maillard reactions for the preparation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs).

    PubMed

    Visentin, Sonja; Medana, Claudio; Barge, Alessandro; Giancotti, Valeria; Cravotto, Giancarlo

    2010-05-21

    The application of microwaves as an efficient form of volumetric heating to promote organic reactions was recognized in the mid-1980 s. It has a much longer history in the food research and industry where microwave irradiation was studied in depth to optimize food browning and the development of desirable flavours from Maillard reactions. The microwave-promoted Maillard reaction is a challenging synthetic method to generate molecular diversity in a straightforward way. In this paper we present a new rapid and efficient one-pot procedure for the preparation of pentosidine and other AGEs under microwave irradiation. PMID:20448908

  4. Genotoxicity testing of Maillard reaction products.

    PubMed

    Shibamoto, T

    1989-01-01

    Since the development of short-term genotoxicity tests such as the Ames assay, the mutagenicity of Maillard reaction products has been tested extensively. Some products have exhibited strong activity. For example, one of the earliest studies demonstrated some mutagenic activity in a dichloromethane extract of a D-glucose/ammonia Maillard model system. Many researchers have attempted to pinpoint the principal chemical(s) of mutagenicity of the Maillard products using various sugar-amino acid browning model systems over last two decades. However, no mutagenic individual Maillard product has been isolated and identified. Nitrite has been also used as a reactant in browning reaction model systems, primarily to investigate the formation of potentially mutagenic or carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds. Recently some potent mutagens isolated from pyrolyzed amino acids or proteins have begun to receive attention as Maillard reaction products. PMID:2675034

  5. Historical perspective of the Maillard reaction in food science.

    PubMed

    Finot, Paul-André

    2005-06-01

    Maillard's paper of 1912 describing the reaction between amino acids and sugars is both innovative and visionary. It provides original and still-valuable data on the chemistry of a new reaction and foresees its involvement in many scientific and biological domains, even in human pathology. This paper was ignored by the scientific community until 1941. In 1948 the Maillard reaction was definitely recognized as being responsible for the browning and loss of nutritive value of heated milk powders. There was then a continuous increase in papers on the chemistry of this complex reaction to identify its various pathways: in food science, to evaluate the influence of reaction parameters (pH, T degrees , time, sugar reactivity, concentration of the reagents, water activity, glass transition temperature) on the evolution of the reaction and on changes in food quality; in nutrition, to quantify the loss of bioavailability of essential amino acids; on the metabolism of the reaction products and on the physiological effects of the ingested Maillard reaction products. The significant scientific advances and the key persons and pioneers who contributed much to the understanding of the Maillard reaction are presented. The food industry is directly concerned with the occurrence of this reaction in processed foods and contributed significantly by its own research to understanding the phenomena and to optimizing the processes and conditions of food preparation in order to preserve the nutritional, safety, and organoleptic qualities of foods. PMID:16037216

  6. Historical perspective of the Maillard reaction in food science.

    PubMed

    Finot, Paul-André

    2005-06-01

    Maillard's paper of 1912 describing the reaction between amino acids and sugars is both innovative and visionary. It provides original and still-valuable data on the chemistry of a new reaction and foresees its involvement in many scientific and biological domains, even in human pathology. This paper was ignored by the scientific community until 1941. In 1948 the Maillard reaction was definitely recognized as being responsible for the browning and loss of nutritive value of heated milk powders. There was then a continuous increase in papers on the chemistry of this complex reaction to identify its various pathways: in food science, to evaluate the influence of reaction parameters (pH, T degrees , time, sugar reactivity, concentration of the reagents, water activity, glass transition temperature) on the evolution of the reaction and on changes in food quality; in nutrition, to quantify the loss of bioavailability of essential amino acids; on the metabolism of the reaction products and on the physiological effects of the ingested Maillard reaction products. The significant scientific advances and the key persons and pioneers who contributed much to the understanding of the Maillard reaction are presented. The food industry is directly concerned with the occurrence of this reaction in processed foods and contributed significantly by its own research to understanding the phenomena and to optimizing the processes and conditions of food preparation in order to preserve the nutritional, safety, and organoleptic qualities of foods.

  7. The Maillard reaction in the human body. The main discoveries and factors that affect glycation.

    PubMed

    Tessier, F J

    2010-06-01

    Ever since the discovery of the Maillard reaction in 1912 and the discovery of the interaction between advanced glycation end-products and cellular receptors, impressive progress has been made in the knowledge of nonenzymatic browning of proteins in vivo. This reaction which leads to the accumulation of random damage in extracellular proteins is known to have deleterious effects on biological function, and is associated with aging and complication in chronic diseases. Despite a controlled membrane permeability and a protective regulation of the cells, intracellular proteins are also altered by the Maillard reaction. Two main factors, protein turnover and the concentration of carbonyls, are involved in the rate of formation of the Maillard products. This paper reviews the key milestones of the discovery of the Maillard reaction in vivo, better known as glycation, and the factors which are likely to affect it.

  8. Allergenicity of Maillard reaction products from peanut proteins.

    PubMed

    Chung, S Y; Champagne, E T

    1999-12-01

    It is known that peanut allergy is caused by peanut proteins. However, little is known about the impact of roasting on the allergenicity of peanuts. During roasting, proteins react with sugars to form Maillard reaction products, which could affect allergenicity. To determine if the Maillard reaction could convert a nonallergenic peanut protein into a potentially allergenic product, nonallergenic lectin was reacted with glucose or fructose at 50 degrees C for 28 days. Browning products from heat-treated peanuts were also examined. The products were analyzed in immunoblot and competitive assays, using a pooled serum (i.e., IgE antibodies) from patients with peanut anaphylaxis. Results showed that the products were recognized by IgE and had an inhibitory effect on IgE binding to a peanut allergen. Thus, the findings suggest that these Maillard reaction products are potentially allergenic and indicate the need to verify whether the Maillard reaction products formed in peanuts during roasting increase their allergenicity.

  9. Baking, ageing, diabetes: a short history of the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Michael; Henle, Thomas

    2014-09-22

    The reaction of reducing carbohydrates with amino compounds described in 1912 by Louis-Camille Maillard is responsible for the aroma, taste, and appearance of thermally processed food. The discovery that non-enzymatic conversions also occur in organisms led to intensive investigation of the pathophysiological significance of the Maillard reaction in diabetes and ageing processes. Dietary Maillard products are discussed as "glycotoxins" and thus as a nutritional risk, but also increasingly with regard to positive effects in the human body. In this Review we give an overview of the most important discoveries in Maillard research since it was first described and show that the complex reaction, even after over one hundred years, has lost none of its interdisciplinary actuality. PMID:25044982

  10. Formation of flavour compounds in the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    van Boekel, M A J S

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of the Maillard reaction for food quality and focuses on flavour compound formation. The most important classes of Maillard flavour compounds are indicated and it is shown where they are formed in the Maillard reaction. Some emphasis is given on the kinetics of formation of flavour compounds. It is concluded that the essential elements for predicting the formation of flavour compounds in the Maillard reaction are now established but much more work needs to be done on specific effects such as the amino acid type, the pH, water content and interactions in the food matrix. It is also concluded that most work is done on free amino acids but hardly anything on peptides and proteins, which could generate peptide- or protein-specific flavour compounds. PMID:16386869

  11. Carbonylation of myofibrillar proteins through the maillard pathway: effect of reducing sugars and reaction temperature.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Adriana; Estévez, Mario

    2013-03-27

    Carbonylation is recognized as one of the most remarkable chemical modifications in oxidized proteins and is generally ascribed to the direct attack of free radicals to basic amino acid residues. The purpose of this work was to investigate the formation of specific carbonyls, α-aminoadipic and γ-glutamic semialdehydes (AAS and GGS, respectively), in myofibrillar proteins (MP) through a Maillard-type pathway in the presence of reducing sugars. The present study confirmed the concurrent formation of protein carbonyls and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) during incubation (80 °C/48 h) of MP (4 mg/mL) in the presence of reducing sugars (0.5 M). Copper irons (10 μM) were found to promote the formation of protein carbonyls, and a specific inhibitor of the Maillard reaction (0.02 M pyridoxamine) blocked the carbonylation process which emphasize the occurrence of a Maillard-type pathway. The Maillard-mediated carbonylation occurred in a range of reducing sugars (0.02-0.5 M) and reaction temperatures (4-110 °C) compatible with food systems. Upcoming studies on this topic may contribute further to shed light on the complex interactions between protein oxidation and the Maillard reaction and the impact of the protein damage on food quality and human health.

  12. Contribution of mass spectrometry to the study of the Maillard reaction in food.

    PubMed

    Fay, Laurent B; Brevard, Hugues

    2005-01-01

    The Maillard reaction or non-enzymatic browning corresponds to a set of reactions occurring between amines and carbonyl compounds, especially reducing sugars. The Maillard reaction is known to occur in heated, dried, or stored foods and in vivo in mammalian organisms. In food, the Maillard reaction is responsible for changes in colour, flavor, and nutritive value but also for the formation of stabilizing and mutagenic compounds. Because of the complexity of the Maillard reaction, mass spectrometry, coupled or not to separation techniques, is a key tool in this research area and we will review in this article the contribution of mass spectrometry to the understanding of this reaction. Different steps of Maillard reaction will be described and the importance and the role played by mass spectrometry will be highlighted. In addition, different approaches to investigate the Maillard reaction from the formation of Amadori products (early Maillard reaction product) to the flavor and melanoidin production will also be covered. PMID:15389846

  13. Investigations on the Maillard reaction of dextrins during aging of Pilsner type beer.

    PubMed

    Rakete, Stefan; Klaus, Alexander; Glomb, Marcus A

    2014-10-01

    Although Maillard reaction plays a pivotal role during preparation of food, only few investigations concerning the role of carbohydrate degradation in beer aging have been carried out. The formation of Maillard specific precursor structures and their follow-up products during degradation of low molecular carbohydrate dextrins in the presence of proline and lysine was studied in model incubations and in beer. Twenty-one α-dicarbonyl compounds were identified and quantitated as reactive intermediates. The oxidative formation of 3-deoxypentosone as the precursor of furfural from oligosaccharides was verified. N-Carboxymethylproline and N-formylproline were established as novel proline derived Maillard advanced glycation end products. Formation of N-carboxymethylproline and furfural responded considerably to the presence of oxygen and was positively correlated to aging of Pilsner type beer. The present study delivers an in-depth view on the mechanisms behind the formation of beer relevant aging parameters.

  14. The Maillard reaction and its control during food processing. The potential of emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, H; Janositz, A; Knorr, D

    2010-06-01

    The Maillard reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids is a common reaction in foods which undergo thermal processing. Desired consequences like the formation of flavor and brown color of some cooked foods but also the destruction of essential amino acids and the production of anti-nutritive compounds require the consideration of the Maillard reaction and relevant mechanisms for its control. This paper aims to exemplify the recent advances in food processing with regard to the controllability of heat-induced changes in the food quality. Firstly, improved thermal technologies, such as ohmic heating, which allows direct heating of the product and overcoming the heat transfer limitations of conventional thermal processing are presented in terms of their applicability to reduce the thermal exposure during food preservation. Secondly, non-thermal technologies such as high hydrostatic pressure and pulsed electric fields and their ability to extend the shelf life of food products without the application of heat, thus also preserving the quality attributes of the food, will be discussed. Finally, an innovative method for the removal of Maillard reaction substrates in food raw materials by the application of pulsed electric field cell disintegration and extraction as well as enzymatic conversion is presented in order to demonstrate the potential of the combination of processes to control the occurrence of the Maillard reaction in food processing. PMID:19896291

  15. The Maillard reaction and its control during food processing. The potential of emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, H; Janositz, A; Knorr, D

    2010-06-01

    The Maillard reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids is a common reaction in foods which undergo thermal processing. Desired consequences like the formation of flavor and brown color of some cooked foods but also the destruction of essential amino acids and the production of anti-nutritive compounds require the consideration of the Maillard reaction and relevant mechanisms for its control. This paper aims to exemplify the recent advances in food processing with regard to the controllability of heat-induced changes in the food quality. Firstly, improved thermal technologies, such as ohmic heating, which allows direct heating of the product and overcoming the heat transfer limitations of conventional thermal processing are presented in terms of their applicability to reduce the thermal exposure during food preservation. Secondly, non-thermal technologies such as high hydrostatic pressure and pulsed electric fields and their ability to extend the shelf life of food products without the application of heat, thus also preserving the quality attributes of the food, will be discussed. Finally, an innovative method for the removal of Maillard reaction substrates in food raw materials by the application of pulsed electric field cell disintegration and extraction as well as enzymatic conversion is presented in order to demonstrate the potential of the combination of processes to control the occurrence of the Maillard reaction in food processing.

  16. Functional improvements in dried egg white through the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Handa, A; Kuroda, N

    1999-05-01

    The effects of the Maillard reaction on the functional properties of dried egg white (DEW) were investigated. Maillard-reacted DEW (M-DEW) was prepared by storing sugar-preserved DEW (SP-DEW) at 55 degrees C and 35% relative humidity for 0-12 days. The M-DEW developed an excellent gelling property, and hydrogen sulfide production from heat-induced M-DEW gels decreased. Surface sulfhydryl (SH) group content of M-DEW increased while total SH group and alpha-helix contents decreased with increasing heating time in the dry state. Breaking strength, breaking strain, water-holding capacity, and hydrogen sulfide of heat-induced M-DEW gels significantly correlated with surface and total SH group contents in M-DEW. SDS-PAGE revealed that M-DEW proteins were polymerized in which covalent bonds were involved. The present study demonstrated that the Maillard reaction partially unfolds and polymerizes proteins of SP-DEW and, consequently, improved gelling property of SP-DEW under certain controlled conditions.

  17. Fluorescence from the maillard reaction and its potential applications in food science.

    PubMed

    Matiacevich, Silvia B; Santagapita, Patricio R; Buera, M Pilar

    2005-01-01

    The chemistry of the Maillard reaction involves a complex set of steps, and its interpretation represents a challenge in basic and applied aspects of Food Science. Fluorescent compounds have been recognized as important early markers of the reaction in food products since 1942. However, the recent advances in the characterization of fluorophores' development were observed in biological and biomedical areas. The in vivo non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins produces biological effects, promoting health deterioration. The characteristic fluorescence of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) is similar to that of Maillard food products and represents an indicator of the level of AGE-modified proteins, but the structure of the fluorescent groups is, typically, unknown. Application of fluorescence measurement is considered a potential tool for addressing key problems of food deterioration as an early marker or index of the damage of biomolecules. Fluorophores may be precursors of the brown pigments and/or end products. A general scheme of the Maillard reaction is proposed in this article, incorporating the pool concept. A correct interpretation of the effect of environmental and compositional conditions and their influences on the reaction kinetics may help to define the meaning of fluorescence development for each particular system.

  18. High-Pressure-High-Temperature Processing Reduces Maillard Reaction and Viscosity in Whey Protein-Sugar Solutions.

    PubMed

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Xi, Bingyan; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; van Boekel, Martinus; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Stieger, Markus

    2016-09-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of pressure in high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) processing on Maillard reactions and protein aggregation of whey protein-sugar solutions. Solutions of whey protein isolate containing either glucose or trehalose at pH 6, 7, and 9 were treated by HPHT processing or conventional high-temperature (HT) treatments. Browning was reduced, and early and advanced Maillard reactions were retarded under HPHT processing at all pH values compared to HT treatment. HPHT induced a larger pH drop than HT treatments, especially at pH 9, which was not associated with Maillard reactions. After HPHT processing at pH 7, protein aggregation and viscosity of whey protein isolate-glucose/trehalose solutions remained unchanged. It was concluded that HPHT processing can potentially improve the quality of protein-sugar-containing foods, for which browning and high viscosities are undesired, such as high-protein beverages.

  19. The Maillard reaction of bisoprolol fumarate with various reducing carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Szalka, Mateusz; Lubczak, Jacek; Naróg, Dorota; Laskowski, Marek; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof

    2014-08-01

    HPLC analysis of drug products containing bisoprolol fumarate and lactose revealed the presence of N-formylbisoprolol, which is a final product of the Maillard reaction. Formulations containing secondary amines and reducing carbohydrates are prone to the condensation of amine and carbonyl functional groups and formation of glycosylamines in pharmaceutically relevant conditions. Further rearrangement occurs in the presence of a nucleophile and leads to the formation of 1-deoxy-1-amino-2-ketose also known as the Amadori Rearrangement Product (ARP). The influence of water content, carbohydrate, and lubricant types on the reaction rate was tested. The reaction progress was monitored by HPLC and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The structures of intermediates were confirmed by the LC/MS(2) analysis. N-formylbisoprolol - the final reaction product - was synthesised and characterised by LC/MS(2), H(1) and C(13) NMR.

  20. Maillard reaction products as antimicrobial components for packaging films.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Carolin; Müller, Ulla; Sauer, Tanja; Augner, Kerstin; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2014-02-15

    Active packaging foils with incorporated antimicrobial agents release the active ingredient during food storage. Maillard reaction products (MRPs) show antimicrobial activity that is at least partially mediated by H2O2. De novo generation of H2O2 by an MRP fraction, extracted from a ribose/lysine Maillard reaction mixture by 85% ethanol, was monitored at three concentrations (1.6, 16.1, and 32.3g/L) and three temperatures (4, 25, and 37 °C) between 0 and 96 h, reaching a maximum of 335 μM H2O2 (32.3g/L, 37 °C, 96 h). The active MRP fraction (16.1g/L) completely inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli for 24h and was therefore incorporated in a polyvinyl acetate-based lacquer and dispersed onto a low-density polyethylene film. The coated film generated about 100 μM H2O2 and resulted in a log-reduction of >5 log-cycles against E. coli. Thus, MRPs can be considered as active ingredients for antimicrobial packaging materials.

  1. Maillard reaction, mitochondria and oxidative stress: potential role of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Edeas, M; Attaf, D; Mailfert, A-S; Nasu, M; Joubet, R

    2010-06-01

    Glycation and oxidative stress are two important processes known to play a key role in complications of many disease processes. Oxidative stress, either via increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS), or by depleting the antioxidants may modulate the genesis of early glycated proteins in vivo. Maillard Reactions, occur in vivo as well as in vitro and are associated with the chronic complications of diabetes, aging and age-related diseases. Hyperglycaemia causes the autoxidation of glucose, glycation of proteins, and the activation of polyol metabolism. These changes facilitate the generation of reactive oxygen species and decrease the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, resulting in a remarkable increase of oxidative stress. A large body of evidence indicates that mitochondria alteration is involved and plays a central role in various oxidative stress-related diseases. The damaged mitochondria produce more ROS (increase oxidative stress) and less ATP (cellular energy) than normal mitochondria. As they are damaged, they cannot burn or use glucose or lipid and cannot provide cell with ATP. Further, glucose, amino acids and lipid will not be correctly used and will accumulate outside the mitochondria; they will undergo more glycation (as observed in diabetes, obesity, HIV infection and lipodystrophia). The objective of this paper is to discuss how to stop the vicious circle established between oxidative stress, Maillard Reaction and mitochondria. The potential application of some antioxidants to reduce glycation phenomenon and to increase the antioxidant defence system by targeting mitochondria will be discussed. Food and pharmaceutical companies share the same challenge, they must act now, urgently and energetically. PMID:20031340

  2. The Maillard reaction--illicite (bio)chemistry in tissues and food.

    PubMed

    Robert, L; Robert, A-M; Labat-Robert, J

    2011-12-01

    We present a review of our early work on the Maillard reaction, at the interface of food chemistry and tissue biochemistry, as well as the reinterpretation of our early findings in the light of recent advances in the chemistry of the involved reactions. These concern specifically the role of lower aldehydes, produced during the glycolytic pathways and especially acetaldehyde. We also review some of our recent findings on the cytotoxic and genotoxic aspect of these "illicit" organic reactions, taking place in tissues (and also in food products) besides the genetically "programmed" metabolic pathways. Some recent results in organic-pharmaceutical chemistry confirm the potential importance of the reviewed reactions both in food chemistry and in tissues as well as the pathological importance of reactions taking place in tissues. PMID:21640521

  3. The Maillard reaction--illicite (bio)chemistry in tissues and food.

    PubMed

    Robert, L; Robert, A-M; Labat-Robert, J

    2011-12-01

    We present a review of our early work on the Maillard reaction, at the interface of food chemistry and tissue biochemistry, as well as the reinterpretation of our early findings in the light of recent advances in the chemistry of the involved reactions. These concern specifically the role of lower aldehydes, produced during the glycolytic pathways and especially acetaldehyde. We also review some of our recent findings on the cytotoxic and genotoxic aspect of these "illicit" organic reactions, taking place in tissues (and also in food products) besides the genetically "programmed" metabolic pathways. Some recent results in organic-pharmaceutical chemistry confirm the potential importance of the reviewed reactions both in food chemistry and in tissues as well as the pathological importance of reactions taking place in tissues.

  4. Food Protein-polysaccharide Conjugates Obtained via the Maillard Reaction: A Review.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Fabíola Cristina; Coimbra, Jane Sélia Dos Reis; de Oliveira, Eduardo Basílio; Zuñiga, Abraham Damian Giraldo; Rojas, Edwin E Garcia

    2016-05-18

    The products formed by glycosylation of food proteins with carbohydrates via the Maillard reaction, also known as conjugates, are agents capable of changing and improving techno-functional characteristics of proteins. The Maillard reaction uses the covalent bond between a group of a reducing carbohydrates and an amino group of a protein. This reaction does not require additional chemicals as it occurs naturally under controlled conditions of temperature, time, pH, and moisture. Moreover, there is growing interest in modifying proteins for industrial food applications. This review analyses the current state of art of the Maillard reaction on food protein functionalities. It also discusses the influence of the Maillard reaction on the conditions and formulation of reagents that improve desirable techno-functional characteristics of food protein.

  5. Coordinate contribution of lipid oxidation and Maillard reaction to the nonenzymatic food browning.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Rosario; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2005-01-01

    Lipid oxidation and the Maillard reaction are probably the two most important reactions in Food Science. Both include a whole network of different reactions in which an extraordinary complex mixture of compounds are obtained in very different amounts and produce important changes in food flavor, color, texture, and nutritional value, with positive and negative consequences. This article analyzes the interactions between both reactions, with special emphasis in nonenzymatic browning development, by discussing the influence of lipid oxidation products in the Maillard pathway and vice versa, as well as the existence of common intermediates and polymerization mechanisms in both reactions. The existing data suggest that both reactions are so interrelated that they should be considered simultaneously to understand the products of the Maillard reaction in the presence of lipids and vice versa, and should be included in one general pathway that can be initiated by both lipids and carbohydrates. PMID:15730188

  6. Contribution of crosslinking products in the flavour enhancer processing: the new concept of Maillard peptide in sensory characteristics of Maillard reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Karangwa, Eric; Murekatete, Nicole; Habimana, Jean de Dieu; Masamba, Kingsley; Duhoranimana, Emmanuel; Muhoza, Bertrand; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the flavour-enhancing properties of the Maillard reaction products (MRPs) for different systems consisted of different peptides (sunflower, SFP; corn, CP and soyabean SP) with, xylose and cysteine were investigated. Maillard systems from peptides of sunflower, corn and soyabean with xylose and cysteine were designated as PXC, MCP and MSP, respectively. The Maillard systems were prepared at pH of 7.4 using temperature of 120C for 2 h. Results showed that all systems were significantly different in all sensory attributes. The highest scores for mouthfulness and continuity were observed for MCP with the lowest peptides distribution between 1000 and 5000 Da, known as Maillard peptide. This revealed that the MCP with the lowest Maillard peptide content had the strongest "Kokumi" effect compared to the other MRPsand demonstrated that "kokumi effect" of MRPs was contributed by not only the "Maillard peptide" defined by the molecular weight (1000-5000 Da). Results on sensory evaluation after fractionation of PXC followed by enzymatic hydrolysis showed no significant differences between PXC, P-PXC and their hydrolysates. This observation therefore confirmed that the presence of other contributors attributed to the "Kokumi" effect rather than the Maillard peptide. It can be deduced that the unhydrolyzed crosslinking products might have contributed to the "Kokumi" effect of MRPs. The structures of four probable crosslinking compounds were proposed and the findings have provided new insights in the sensory characteristics of xylose, cysteine and sunflower peptide MRPs. PMID:27478243

  7. A quantitative model of the generation of N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine in the Maillard reaction between collagen and glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, António E N; Ponces Freire, Ana M J; Voit, Eberhard O

    2003-01-01

    The Maillard reaction between reducing sugars and amino groups of biomolecules generates complex structures known as AGEs (advanced glycation endproducts). These have been linked to protein modifications found during aging, diabetes and various amyloidoses. To investigate the contribution of alternative routes to the formation of AGEs, we developed a mathematical model that describes the generation of CML [ N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine] in the Maillard reaction between glucose and collagen. Parameter values were obtained by fitting published data from kinetic experiments of Amadori compound decomposition and glycoxidation of collagen by glucose. These raw parameter values were subsequently fine-tuned with adjustment factors that were deduced from dynamic experiments taking into account the glucose and phosphate buffer concentrations. The fine-tuned model was used to assess the relative contributions of the reaction between glyoxal and lysine, the Namiki pathway, and Amadori compound degradation to the generation of CML. The model suggests that the glyoxal route dominates, except at low phosphate and high glucose concentrations. The contribution of Amadori oxidation is generally the least significant at low glucose concentrations. Simulations of the inhibition of CML generation by aminoguanidine show that this compound effectively blocks the glyoxal route at low glucose concentrations (5 mM). Model results are compared with literature estimates of the contributions to CML generation by the three pathways. The significance of the dominance of the glyoxal route is discussed in the context of possible natural defensive mechanisms and pharmacological interventions with the goal of inhibiting the Maillard reaction in vivo. PMID:12911334

  8. A Perspective on the Maillard Reaction and the Analysis of Protein Glycation by Mass Spectrometry: Probing the Pathogenesis of Chronic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Ames, Jennifer M.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-12-18

    The Maillard reaction, starting from the glycation of protein and progressing to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), is implicated in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, renal, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this perspective review, we provide on overview on the relevance of the Maillard reaction in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and discuss traditional approaches and recent developments in the analysis of glycated proteins by mass spectrometry. We propose that proteomics approaches, particularly bottom-up proteomics, will play a significant role in analyses of clinical samples leading to the identification of new markers of disease development and progression.

  9. High-Pressure-High-Temperature Processing Reduces Maillard Reaction and Viscosity in Whey Protein-Sugar Solutions.

    PubMed

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Xi, Bingyan; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; van Boekel, Martinus; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Stieger, Markus

    2016-09-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of pressure in high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) processing on Maillard reactions and protein aggregation of whey protein-sugar solutions. Solutions of whey protein isolate containing either glucose or trehalose at pH 6, 7, and 9 were treated by HPHT processing or conventional high-temperature (HT) treatments. Browning was reduced, and early and advanced Maillard reactions were retarded under HPHT processing at all pH values compared to HT treatment. HPHT induced a larger pH drop than HT treatments, especially at pH 9, which was not associated with Maillard reactions. After HPHT processing at pH 7, protein aggregation and viscosity of whey protein isolate-glucose/trehalose solutions remained unchanged. It was concluded that HPHT processing can potentially improve the quality of protein-sugar-containing foods, for which browning and high viscosities are undesired, such as high-protein beverages. PMID:27588940

  10. The influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction of ghee.

    PubMed

    Newton, Angela E; Fairbanks, Antony J; Golding, Matt; Andrewes, Paul; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2015-04-15

    Food systems, such as cream and butter, have an emulsion or emulsion-like structure. When these food emulsions are heated to high temperatures to make products such as ghee, the Maillard reaction forms a range of volatile flavour compounds. The objective of this paper was to unravel the specific influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction pathways that occur during the cooking of ghee using model systems. Switching the dispersed phase from oil to water provided a means of altering the ratios of volatile compounds produced in the cooked samples. The oil-in-water emulsion generated a volatile compound profile similar to that of the fat containing two phase model matrix, whereas the water-in-oil emulsion produced a different ratio of these compounds. The ability to generate different volatile compound profiles through the use of inverted emulsion structures could point to a new avenue for control of the Maillard reaction in high temperature food systems. PMID:25466150

  11. The influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction of ghee.

    PubMed

    Newton, Angela E; Fairbanks, Antony J; Golding, Matt; Andrewes, Paul; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2015-04-15

    Food systems, such as cream and butter, have an emulsion or emulsion-like structure. When these food emulsions are heated to high temperatures to make products such as ghee, the Maillard reaction forms a range of volatile flavour compounds. The objective of this paper was to unravel the specific influence of emulsion structure on the Maillard reaction pathways that occur during the cooking of ghee using model systems. Switching the dispersed phase from oil to water provided a means of altering the ratios of volatile compounds produced in the cooked samples. The oil-in-water emulsion generated a volatile compound profile similar to that of the fat containing two phase model matrix, whereas the water-in-oil emulsion produced a different ratio of these compounds. The ability to generate different volatile compound profiles through the use of inverted emulsion structures could point to a new avenue for control of the Maillard reaction in high temperature food systems.

  12. Ovalbumin Modified with Pyrraline, a Maillard Reaction Product, shows Enhanced T-cell Immunogenicity*

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, Monika; Wellner, Anne; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Ilchmann, Anne; Briza, Peter; Krause, Maren; Nagai, Ryoji; Burgdorf, Sven; Scheurer, Stephan; Vieths, Stefan; Henle, Thomas; Toda, Masako

    2014-01-01

    The Maillard reaction (also referred to as “glycation”) takes place between reducing sugars and compounds with free amino groups during thermal processing of foods. In the final stage of the complex reaction cascade, the so-called advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed, including proteins with various glycation structures. It has been suggested that some AGEs could have immunostimulatory effects. Here, we aimed to identify specific glycation structure(s) that could influence the T-cell immunogenicity and potential allergenicity of food allergens, using ovalbumin (OVA, an egg white allergen) as a model allergen. OVA was specifically modified with representative glycation structures: Nϵ-carboxymethyl lysine (CM-OVA), Nϵ-carboxyethyl lysine (CE-OVA), pyrraline (Pyr-OVA), or methylglyoxal-derived arginine derivatives (MGO-OVA). As well as AGE-OVA, a crude glycation product in thermal incubation of OVA with glucose, only Pyr-OVA, and not other modified OVAs, was efficiently taken up by bone marrow-derived murine dendritic cells (BMDCs). The uptake of Pyr-OVA was reduced in scavenger receptor class A (SR-A)-deficient BMDCs, but not in cells treated with inhibitors of scavenger receptor class B, galectin-3, or blocking antibodies against CD36, suggesting that pyrraline binds to SR-A. Compared with other modified OVAs, Pyr-OVA induced higher activation of OVA-specific CD4+ T-cells in co-culture with BMDCs. Furthermore, compared with native OVA, AGE-OVA and Pyr-OVA induced higher IgE production in mice. Pyrraline could induce better allergen uptake by DCs via association with SR-A and subsequently enhance CD4+ T-cell activation and IgE production. Our findings help us to understand how Maillard reaction enhances the potential allergenicity of food allergens. PMID:24505139

  13. Identification of Maillard reaction induced chemical modifications on Ara h 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Maillard reaction is a non-enzymatic glycation reaction between proteins and reducing sugars that can modify nut allergens during thermal processing. These modifications can alter the structural and immunological properties of these allergens, and may result in increased IgE binding. Here, we ...

  14. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  15. The multiple Maillard reactions of ribose and deoxyribose sugars and sugar phosphates.

    PubMed

    Munanairi, Admire; O'Banion, Steven K; Gamble, Ryan; Breuer, Elizabeth; Harris, Andrew W; Sandwick, Roger K

    2007-12-10

    Ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) undergoes the Maillard reaction with amines at significantly higher rates than most other sugars and sugar phosphates. The presence of an intramolecular phosphate group, which catalyzes the early stages of the Maillard reaction, provides the opportunity for the R5P molecule to undergo novel reaction paths creating unique Maillard products. The initial set of reactions leading to an Amadori product (phosphorylated) and to an alpha-dicarbonyl phosphate compound follows a typical Maillard reaction sequence, but an observed phosphate hydrolysis accompanying the reaction adds to the complexity of the products formed. The reaction rate for the loss of R5P is partially dependent on the pK(a) of the amine but also is correlated to the protonation of an early intermediate of the reaction sequence. In the presence of oxygen, a carboxymethyl group conjugated to the amine is a major product of the reaction of R5P with N-acetyllysine while little of this product is generated in the absence of oxygen. Despite lacking a critical hydroxyl group necessary for the Maillard reaction, 2-deoxyribose 5-phosphate (dR5P) still generates an Amadori-like product (with a carbonyl on the C-3 carbon) and undergoes phosphate cleavage. Two highly UV-absorbing products of dR5P were amine derivatives of 5-methylene-2-pyrrolone and 2-formylpyrrole. The reaction of dR5P with certain amines generates a set of products that exhibit an interesting absorbance at 340nm and a high fluorescence. PMID:17850774

  16. A Laboratory Experiment, Based on the Maillard Reaction, Conducted as a Project in Introductory Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravchuk, Olena; Elliott, Antony; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2005-01-01

    A simple laboratory experiment, based on the Maillard reaction, served as a project in Introductory Statistics for undergraduates in Food Science and Technology. By using the principles of randomization and replication and reflecting on the sources of variation in the experimental data, students reinforced the statistical concepts and techniques…

  17. Maillard reaction products of rice protein hydrolysates with mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice protein, a byproduct of rice syrup production, is abundant but, its lack of functionality prevents its wide use as a food ingredient. Maillard reaction products of (MRPs) hydrolysates from the limited hydrolysis of rice protein (LHRP) and various mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides were evaluat...

  18. The Maillard reaction. From nutritional problems to preventive medicine.

    PubMed

    Robert, L; Labat-Robert, J; Robert, A-M

    2010-06-01

    The questions we were asked by Dr Edeas, president of the French Society of Antioxidants to discuss in this introductory lecture are the following: (a) the metabolism of glycation; (b) what are its consequences at the cellular level, and (c) their effect on health. As a recent and vast literature is available on these subjects, in the following we present a short survey of some basic data on the proposed subjects, insisting on our own experiments on the cytotoxicity of Maillard products and on a new approach to prevent the aggravation and acceleration of age-related diseases, essentially diabetes type II and its consequences on the cardiovascular system. PMID:19896300

  19. Preventive effect of fermented Maillard reaction products from milk proteins in cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Oh, N S; Kwon, H S; Lee, H A; Joung, J Y; Lee, J Y; Lee, K B; Shin, Y K; Baick, S C; Park, M R; Kim, Y; Lee, K W; Kim, S H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dual effect of Maillard reaction and fermentation on the preventive cardiovascular effects of milk proteins. Maillard reaction products (MRP) were prepared from the reaction between milk proteins, such as whey protein concentrates (WPC) and sodium caseinate (SC), and lactose. The hydrolysates of MRP were obtained from fermentation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB; i.e., Lactobacillus gasseri H10, L. gasseri H11, Lactobacillus fermentum H4, and L. fermentum H9, where human-isolated strains were designated H1 to H15), which had excellent proteolytic and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities (>20%). The antioxidant activity of MRP was greater than that of intact proteins in assays of the reaction with 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt and trivalent ferric ions; moreover, the effect of MRP was synergistically improved by fermentation. The Maillard reaction dramatically increased the level of antithrombotic activity and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) inhibitory effect of milk proteins, but did not change the level of activity for micellar cholesterol solubility. Furthermore, specific biological properties were enhanced by fermentation. Lactobacillus gasseri H11 demonstrated the greatest activity for thrombin and HMGR inhibition in Maillard-reacted WPC, by 42 and 33%, respectively, whereas hydrolysates of Maillard-reacted SC fermented by L. fermentum H9 demonstrated the highest reduction rate for micellar cholesterol solubility, at 52%. In addition, the small compounds that were likely released by fermentation of MRP were identified by size-exclusion chromatography. Therefore, MRP and hydrolysates of fermented MRP could be used to reduce cardiovascular risks.

  20. Identification of hydroxycinnamic acid-maillard reaction products in low-moisture baking model systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Deshou; Chiaro, Christopher; Maddali, Pranav; Prabhu, K Sandeep; Peterson, Devin G

    2009-11-11

    The chemistry and fate of hydroxycinnamic acids (ferulic, p-coumeric, caffeic, sinapic, and cinnamic acid) in a glucose/glycine simulated baking model (10% moisture at 200 degrees C for 15 min) were investigated. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of glucose/glycine and glucose/glycine/hydroxycinnamic acid model systems confirmed the phenolics reacted with Maillard intermediates; two main reaction product adducts were reported. On the basis of isotopomeric analysis, LC-MS, and NMR spectroscopy, structures of two ferulic acid-Maillard reaction products were identified as 6-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5-(hydroxymethyl)-8-oxabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one (adduct I) and 2-(6-(furan-2-yl)-7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1-methyl-3-oxo-2,5-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-5-en-2-yl)acetic acid (adduct II). In addition, a pyrazinone-type Maillard product, 2-(5-(furan-2-yl)-6-methyl-2-oxopyrazin-1(2H)-yl) acetic acid (IIa), was identified as an intermediate for reaction product adduct II, whereas 3-deoxy-2-hexosulose was identified as an intermediate of adduct I. Both adducts I and II were suggested to be generated by pericyclic reaction mechanisms. Quantitative gas chromatography (GC) analysis and liquid chromatography (LC) also indicated that the addition of ferulic acid to a glucose/glycine model significantly reduced the generation of select Maillard-type aroma compounds, such as furfurals, methylpyrazines, 2-acetylfuran, 2-acetylpyridine, 2-acetylpyrrole, and cyclotene as well as inhibited color development in these Maillard models. In addition, adducts I and II suppressed the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated expression of two prototypical pro-inflammatory genes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, in an in vitro murine macrophage model; ferulic acid reported negligible activity.

  1. Food Processing and Maillard Reaction Products: Effect on Human Health and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Tamanna, Nahid; Mahmood, Niaz

    2015-01-01

    Maillard reaction produces flavour and aroma during cooking process; and it is used almost everywhere from the baking industry to our day to day life to make food tasty. It is often called nonenzymatic browning reaction since it takes place in the absence of enzyme. When foods are being processed or cooked at high temperature, chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars leads to the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs). Depending on the way the food is being processed, both beneficial and toxic MRPs can be produced. Therefore, there is a need to understand the different types of MRPs and their positive or negative health effects. In this review we have summarized how food processing effects MRP formation in some of the very common foods. PMID:26904661

  2. Food Processing and Maillard Reaction Products: Effect on Human Health and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Tamanna, Nahid; Mahmood, Niaz

    2015-01-01

    Maillard reaction produces flavour and aroma during cooking process; and it is used almost everywhere from the baking industry to our day to day life to make food tasty. It is often called nonenzymatic browning reaction since it takes place in the absence of enzyme. When foods are being processed or cooked at high temperature, chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars leads to the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs). Depending on the way the food is being processed, both beneficial and toxic MRPs can be produced. Therefore, there is a need to understand the different types of MRPs and their positive or negative health effects. In this review we have summarized how food processing effects MRP formation in some of the very common foods.

  3. Food Processing and Maillard Reaction Products: Effect on Human Health and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Tamanna, Nahid; Mahmood, Niaz

    2015-01-01

    Maillard reaction produces flavour and aroma during cooking process; and it is used almost everywhere from the baking industry to our day to day life to make food tasty. It is often called nonenzymatic browning reaction since it takes place in the absence of enzyme. When foods are being processed or cooked at high temperature, chemical reaction between amino acids and reducing sugars leads to the formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs). Depending on the way the food is being processed, both beneficial and toxic MRPs can be produced. Therefore, there is a need to understand the different types of MRPs and their positive or negative health effects. In this review we have summarized how food processing effects MRP formation in some of the very common foods. PMID:26904661

  4. Thermal luminescence spectra of polyamides and their Maillard reaction with reducing sugars.

    PubMed

    Karakisawa, Taketo; Yamada, Taishi; Sekine, Masahiko; Ishii, Hiroshi; Satoh, Chikahiro; Millington, Keith R; Nakata, Munetaka

    2012-01-01

    Thermal luminescence (TL) spectra of polyamides were measured with a Fourier-transform chemiluminescence spectrometer to elucidate the emission mechanism. A TL band of ε-polylysine with a peak at 542 nm observed at 403 K was assigned to the emission due to the interaction of the -CO-NH- group with oxygen molecules by comparison with nylon-6, polyglycine, and polyalanine. When the sample was kept at 453 K, the intensity of the TL band decreased and the wavelength of the peak shifted to 602 nm, which was assigned to the emission due to the interaction of the NH2 group on the side chain with oxygen molecules by comparison with monomeric lysine. A weak emission with a peak at 668 nm was assigned to the advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) yielded by the Maillard reaction with a catalytic amount of water. To understand this reaction and to examine the TL emission of AGEs, we measured TL spectra of mixtures of polylysine and reducing sugars such as glucose, maltose, lactose, and dextrin. The minimum temperature for TL emission, wavelength of the peak and the relative intensities of the TL emission were found to depend on the size of the sugars. PMID:23044771

  5. Characteristics and antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products from psicose-lysine and fructose-lysine model systems.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Guan, Yuping; Sun, Yuanxia

    2011-04-01

    D-Psicose, an epimer of D-fructose isomerized at C-3 position, is a rare ketohexose that is thought to be beneficial for obese people and diabetic patients as a noncaloric sweetener. In the present study, model Maillard reaction products were obtained from D-psicose (or D-fructose) and L-lysine heating at 120 °C up to 8 h with the initial pH 9.0. The changes in pH, UV-vis absorbance, and free amino groups during the reaction were detected. Moreover, the antioxidant potential of the Maillard reaction products at different intervals was investigated. Although there was almost no difference in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity, the Maillard reaction products from psicose performed better than that from fructose in the radical-scavenging activity of 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt and 1, 1,-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl. The reducing power of the Maillard reaction products from psicose was also stronger than that from fructose. These results indicated that psicose played an effective role in the Maillard reaction and its Maillard reaction products could act as potential antioxidants in food industry. PMID:21535806

  6. Characteristics and antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products from psicose-lysine and fructose-lysine model systems.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoxi; Guan, Yuping; Sun, Yuanxia

    2011-04-01

    D-Psicose, an epimer of D-fructose isomerized at C-3 position, is a rare ketohexose that is thought to be beneficial for obese people and diabetic patients as a noncaloric sweetener. In the present study, model Maillard reaction products were obtained from D-psicose (or D-fructose) and L-lysine heating at 120 °C up to 8 h with the initial pH 9.0. The changes in pH, UV-vis absorbance, and free amino groups during the reaction were detected. Moreover, the antioxidant potential of the Maillard reaction products at different intervals was investigated. Although there was almost no difference in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity, the Maillard reaction products from psicose performed better than that from fructose in the radical-scavenging activity of 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt and 1, 1,-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl. The reducing power of the Maillard reaction products from psicose was also stronger than that from fructose. These results indicated that psicose played an effective role in the Maillard reaction and its Maillard reaction products could act as potential antioxidants in food industry.

  7. Urinary excretion of dietary Maillard reaction products in healthy adult female cats.

    PubMed

    van Rooijen, C; Bosch, G; Butré, C I; van der Poel, A F B; Wierenga, P A; Alexander, L; Hendriks, W H

    2016-01-01

    During processing of foods, the Maillard reaction occurs, resulting in the formation of advanced Maillard reaction products (MRP). Varying amounts of MRP have been found in commercially processed pet foods. Dietary MRP can be absorbed and contribute to the endogenous pool of MRP and possibly the etiology of age-related diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine urinary excretion of dietary MRP in cats fed commercial moist and dry foods. A pilot study with 10 cats, conducted to determine the adaptation time required for stable urinary excretion of MRP when changing to a diet with contrasting MRP content, showed an adaptation time of 1 d for all components. In the main study, 6 commercially processed dry and 6 moist diets were fed to 12 adult female cats in 2 parallel randomized, 36-d Latin square designs. The 24-h urine was collected quantitatively using modified litter boxes, and fructoselysine (FL), carboxymethyllysine (CML), and lysinoalanine (LAL) were analyzed using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) - mass spectrometer. Daily urinary excretion of FL and CML showed a positive relationship with daily intake in the dry ( = 0.03 and < 0.01, respectively) and moist ( < 0.01) foods. For LAL, no significant relationship was observed. Urinary recovery (% ingested) showed a negative relationship with daily intake for FL, CML, and LAL in the dry foods ( < 0.01, < 0.01, and = 0.08, respectively) and for CML and LAL in the moist foods ( < 0.01). The observed increase in urinary excretion with increasing dietary intake indicates that dietary MRP were absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract of cats and excreted in the urine. The adaptation time with change in diet indicates a likely effective excretion of MRP. Minimum apparent absorption of FL, CML, and LAL was found to range between 8% and 23%, 25% and 73%, and 6% and 19%, respectively. The observed decrease in urinary recovery suggests a limiting factor in digestion, absorption, metabolism

  8. Maillard reaction products modulating the growth of human tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Marko, Doris; Habermeyer, Michael; Kemény, Monika; Weyand, Ulrike; Niederberger, Ellen; Frank, Oliver; Hofmann, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a series of Maillard reaction products formed from carbohydrates under household heating conditions on the growth of human tumor cells in vitro. 4-Hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2H)-furanone (1) was found to potently enhance the proliferation of human tumor cells. In contrast, the Maillard-type chromophores 2-(2-furyl)methylidene-4-hydroxy-5-methyl-2H-furan-3-one (2), 4-(2-furyl)-7-[(2-furyl)methylidene]-2-hydroxy-2H,7H,8aH-pyrano[2,3-b]- pyran-3-one (6), and 3-hydroxy-4[(E)-(2-furyl)methylidene]methyl-3-cyclopentene-1,2 dione (13) inhibited the growth of human tumor cells in vitro in the low micromolar range. GXF251L cells (gastric carcinoma), synchronized by serum deprivation, were retained in the G1-phase of the cell cycle after treatment with 2, 6, or 13 for 24 h. Concomitantly, a distinct sub-G1 peak was observed, indicative for apoptosis induction. DNA fragmentation was further investigated by ELISA using antibodies raised against histones and DNA. 2 induced a significant increase of fragmented DNA at concentrations > or = 30 microM. After treatment with compound 6, DNA fragmentation was observed at a higher concentration range (> or = 50 microM), whereas incubation with 13 resulted in a marked DNA fragmentation already at 20 microM. On the protein level, the activation of caspase 3, as an early marker for apoptosis induction, was determined. The results were almost identical to those obtained in the DNA fragmentation ELISA. In summary, Maillard reaction products potently modulating the growth of human tumor cells were identified. The Maillard-type chromophores 2, 6, and 13 were found to interfere with the proliferation of gastric carcinoma cells, causing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction.

  9. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions.

  10. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions. PMID:27542493

  11. Possibility of the nonenzymatic browning (Maillard) reaction in the ISM.

    PubMed

    Jalbout, Abraham F; Shipar, M Abul Haider

    2008-04-01

    The possibility of the occurrence of the nonenzymatic browning reaction in the gaseous phase in the interstellar medium has been investigated by using Density Functional Theory computations. Mechanisms for the reactions between formaldehyde (Fald) + glycine (Gly), Fald + NH(3) and Fald + methylamine (MeAm) have been proposed, and the possibility of the formation of different compounds in the proposed mechanisms has been evaluated through calculating the Gibb's free energy changes for different steps of the reaction, by following the total mass balance. The Fald + Gly reaction under basic conditions is found as the most favorable for producing 1-methyl-amino methene or 1-methyl-amino methelene (MAM). The reaction under acidic conditions is found to be the least favorable for producing MAM. The Fald + NH(3) reaction is found to be plausible for the production of MeAm, which can participate by reaction with Fald, resulting in the formation of MAM. PMID:18188676

  12. Possibility of the Nonenzymatic Browning (Maillard) Reaction in the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Shipar, M. Abul Haider

    2008-04-01

    The possibility of the occurrence of the nonenzymatic browning reaction in the gaseous phase in the interstellar medium has been investigated by using Density Functional Theory computations. Mechanisms for the reactions between formaldehyde ( Fald) + glycine ( Gly), Fald + NH 3 and Fald + methylamine ( MeAm) have been proposed, and the possibility of the formation of different compounds in the proposed mechanisms has been evaluated through calculating the Gibb's free energy changes for different steps of the reaction, by following the total mass balance. The Fald + Gly reaction under basic conditions is found as the most favorable for producing 1-methyl-amino methene or 1-methyl-amino methelene ( MAM). The reaction under acidic conditions is found to be the least favorable for producing MAM. The Fald + NH 3 reaction is found to be plausible for the production of MeAm, which can participate by reaction with Fald, resulting in the formation of MAM.

  13. The effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Zhou, Yamin; Ma, Jimei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Phytic acid, myo-inositol hexaphosphoric acid, exists in substantial (1-5%) amounts in edible plant seeds. In this study the effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide were investigated. Both phytic acid and phosphate enhanced browning in glucose/β-alanine system, but phytic acid was less effective than phosphate. Higher pH favoured the catalytic activities for both of them. The influence of the types of sugar and amino acid on the reaction was also examined. Browning was suppressed by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions, but an additive effect was observed for ferrous ions and phytic acid in glucose/β-alanine solution at pH 8.0. Both phytic acid and phosphate promoted the polymerisation of the reaction intermediates. The kinetics of Maillard reaction was first-ordered reaction in the presence of phytic acid. Phytic acid was less effective than phosphate in the formation of acrylamide. When potato slices were treated with sodium phytate and calcium chloride successively, the formation of acrylamide was greatly suppressed. PMID:23768320

  14. Impacts of glutathione Maillard reaction products on sensory characteristics and consumer acceptability of beef soup.

    PubMed

    Hong, J H; Jung, D W; Kim, Y S; Lee, S M; Kim, K O

    2010-10-01

    The sensory characteristics and consumer acceptability of beef soup with added glutathione Maillard reaction products (GMRPs) were investigated to examine the effects of the GMRPs on beef-soup flavor compared to soups made with glutathione (GSH) and monosodium glutamate (MSG), a control (CON), or a control soup made with 150% beef content (CON150). The sensory characteristics of the beef soups were examined by descriptive analysis. The overall acceptabilities of the beef soups were rated by consumers. Principal component analysis was performed on descriptive data as explanatory variables with overall acceptability as a supplementary variable to observe the relationships between the descriptive data and consumer acceptability, as well as the relationships between the beef-soup samples and their sensory attributes. The samples containing GMRPs had "beef flavor" that was stronger than the CON and MSG samples, and comparable to that of the GSH sample and CON150. The GMRP samples had stronger "green onion flavor,"garlic flavor," and "boiled egg white flavor" than the other samples. The beef soup containing MSG was preferred to CON, CON150, and GSH. The samples with GMRPs were least favored because of their pronounced metallic and astringent notes. The results of this study imply the feasibility of GMRPs as a flavor enhancer since the soups containing these compounds showed more complex flavor profiles than GSH. However, future studies are required to optimize the MR conditions that produce GMRPs without undesirable characteristics. Practical Application: This study examined the practicability of the Maillard reaction products between glutathione (GSH) and glucose (GP) or fructose (FP) as a flavor enhancer by investigating the sensory characteristics and consumer acceptability evoked by them in a beef-soup system. This study helps flavor and food industry to develop a new flavor enhancer by providing practical information, such as beef flavor-enhancing effect of FP and

  15. Evaluation of maillard reaction variables and their effect on heterocyclic amine formation in chemical model systems.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Cara; Karim, Faris; Smith, J Scott

    2015-02-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs), highly mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic by-products, form during Maillard browning reactions, specifically in muscle-rich foods. Chemical model systems allow examination of in vitro formation of HCAs while eliminating complex matrices of meat. Limited research has evaluated the effects of Maillard reaction parameters on HCA formation. Therefore, 4 essential Maillard variables (precursors molar concentrations, water amount, sugar type, and sugar amounts) were evaluated to optimize a model system for the study of 4 HCAs: 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline. Model systems were dissolved in diethylene glycol, heated at 175 °C for 40 min, and separated using reversed-phase liquid chromatography. To define the model system, precursor amounts (threonine and creatinine) were adjusted in molar increments (0.2/0.2, 0.4/0.4, 0.6/0.6, and 0.8/0.8 mmol) and water amounts by percentage (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%). Sugars (lactose, glucose, galactose, and fructose) were evaluated in several molar amounts proportional to threonine and creatinine (quarter, half, equi, and double). The precursor levels and amounts of sugar were significantly different (P < 0.05) in regards to total HCA formation, with 0.6/0.6/1.2 mmol producing higher levels. Water concentration and sugar type also had a significant effect (P < 0.05), with 5% water and lactose producing higher total HCA amounts. A model system containing threonine (0.6 mmol), creatinine (0.6 mmol), and glucose (1.2 mmol), with 15% water was determined to be the optimal model system with glucose and 15% water being a better representation of meat systems. PMID:25597341

  16. Evaluation of maillard reaction variables and their effect on heterocyclic amine formation in chemical model systems.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Cara; Karim, Faris; Smith, J Scott

    2015-02-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs), highly mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic by-products, form during Maillard browning reactions, specifically in muscle-rich foods. Chemical model systems allow examination of in vitro formation of HCAs while eliminating complex matrices of meat. Limited research has evaluated the effects of Maillard reaction parameters on HCA formation. Therefore, 4 essential Maillard variables (precursors molar concentrations, water amount, sugar type, and sugar amounts) were evaluated to optimize a model system for the study of 4 HCAs: 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline. Model systems were dissolved in diethylene glycol, heated at 175 °C for 40 min, and separated using reversed-phase liquid chromatography. To define the model system, precursor amounts (threonine and creatinine) were adjusted in molar increments (0.2/0.2, 0.4/0.4, 0.6/0.6, and 0.8/0.8 mmol) and water amounts by percentage (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%). Sugars (lactose, glucose, galactose, and fructose) were evaluated in several molar amounts proportional to threonine and creatinine (quarter, half, equi, and double). The precursor levels and amounts of sugar were significantly different (P < 0.05) in regards to total HCA formation, with 0.6/0.6/1.2 mmol producing higher levels. Water concentration and sugar type also had a significant effect (P < 0.05), with 5% water and lactose producing higher total HCA amounts. A model system containing threonine (0.6 mmol), creatinine (0.6 mmol), and glucose (1.2 mmol), with 15% water was determined to be the optimal model system with glucose and 15% water being a better representation of meat systems.

  17. Antioxidant activity of Maillard type reaction products between phosphatidylethanolamine and glucose.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Kshitij; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2014-10-15

    Phosphatidylethanolamine and glucose were added to the degummed mustard seed oil (20.16μmol/g oil) to prepare blank oil (O), glucose added oil (OG), phosphatidylethanolamine added oil (OP), and both phosphatidylethanolamine and glucose added oil (OPG). These oils were heated at 160°C for 10min. Absorbance and fluorescence measurement confirmed the occurrence of Maillard type reactions. During oil incubation (both at 40 and 104°C), the heated OP and OPG oils showed the highest oxidative stability. Moreover, the degradations of tocols in these oils were 16-17% (72h at 104°C) and 7-20% (53days at 40°C), while that in other oils (O and OG) were 56-65% (24h at 104°C) and 20-57% (19days at 40°C), respectively. Maillard type reaction products of phosphatidylethanolamine showed potent antioxidant activity. Some of the reaction products such as Amadori product, phosphatidylethanolamine-linked pyrrolecarbaldehyde and 2,3-dihydro-1H-imidazo[1,2-α]pyridine-4-ylium derivatives were identified using LC-TOF MS analysis. PMID:24837915

  18. Controlling the Maillard reaction by reactant encapsulation: sodium chloride in cookies.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Alberto; Troise, Antonio Dario; Ataç Mogol, Burçe; Roullier, Victor; Gourdon, Anthony; El Mafadi Jian, Samira; Hamzalioğlu, Berat Aytül; Gökmen, Vural; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2012-10-31

    Formation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) including 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and acrylamide has been an intensive area of research in recent decades. The presence of reactants such as sodium chloride may influence the Maillard reaction (MR) pathways through the dehydration of various key intermediates. The aim of this work was to test the potential of ingredient encapsulation to mitigate the MR by investigating the case of sodium chloride encapsulation on the HMF formation in cookies. Thirteen cookies were prepared with recipes containing free or encapsulated NaCl. Increasing NaCl concentration from 0 to 0.65% increases HMF concentration up to 75%, whereas in the presence of encapsulated NaCl the reduction of HMF varied from 18 to 61% due to the inhibition of sucrose pyrolytic decomposition and the fructofuranosyl cation formation. Data demonstrated that the more heat-resistant the lipid-based coating was, the more pronounced the reduction of HMF formation. The results showed that encapsulation represents a useful approach to prevent the formation of potentially harmful compounds in thermally processed foods.

  19. Origin and yields of acetic acid in pentose-based Maillard reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Davidek, Tomas; Gouézec, Elisabeth; Devaud, Stéphanie; Blank, Imre

    2008-04-01

    The formation of acetic acid from pentoses was studied in aqueous buffered systems (90-120 degrees C, pH 6.0-8.0) containing equimolar concentrations of 13C-labeled xylose and glycine. Acetic acid was quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy using an isotope dilution assay. Acetic acid was mainly formed from the C-1/C-2 carbon atoms of xylose (77-87%), while small amounts were also formed from the C-4/C-5 atoms of the pentose sugar (9-15%). Temperature and pH had only a small effect on the relative contribution of the sugar carbon atoms to acetic acid. These results support beta-dicarbonyl cleavage of 1-deoxypento-2,4-diulose as a major pathway leading to acetic acid in pentose-based Maillard reaction systems under food processing conditions. Acetic acid was confirmed as a major degradation product of pentoses at the early stage of the Maillard reaction, yielding 16 mol% and 28 mol% at pH 6.0 and pH 8.0, respectively. PMID:18448822

  20. A Maillard reaction product enhances eNOS activity in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christoph A; Heiss, Elke H; Schachner, Daniel; Aristei, Yasmin; Severin, Theodor; Dirsch, Verena M

    2010-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. Although dietary factors can modulate eNOS activity, putative effects of processed food are barely investigated. We aimed to examine whether the model Maillard reaction product 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-1-propyl-4(1H)-pyridone (HMPP), formed from maltol or starch and propylamine, affects the eNOS system. Incubation of EA.hy926 endothelial cells with 30-300 microM HMPP for 18 h enhanced endothelial NO release measured with the fluorescent probe diaminofluorescein-2 and eNOS activity determined by the [14C]L-arginine-[14C]L-citrulline conversion assay. HMPP increased NO production also in two different types of primary human endothelial cells. Protein levels of eNOS and inducible NO synthase remained unaltered by HMPP. HMPP inhibited eNOS activity within the first 2-4 h, whereas it potently increased eNOS activity after 12-24 h. Levels of eNOS phosphorylation, expression of heat-shock protein 90, caveolin-1 and various antioxidant enzymes were not affected. Intracellular reactive oxygen species remained unchanged by HMPP. This is the first study to demonstrate positive effects of a Maillard reaction product on eNOS activity and endothelial NO production, which is considered favourable for cardiovascular protection. PMID:20112298

  1. Microencapsulation of stearidonic acid soybean oil in Maillard reaction-modified complex coacervates.

    PubMed

    Ifeduba, Ebenezer A; Akoh, Casimir C

    2016-05-15

    The antioxidant capacity of Maillard reaction (MR)-modified gelatin (GE)-gum arabic (GA) coacervates was optimized to produce microcapsules with superior oxidative stability compared to the unmodified control. MR was used to crosslink GE and GA, with or without maltodextrin (MD), to produce anti-oxidative Maillard reaction products (MRP) which was used to encapsulate stearidonic acid soybean oil (SDASO) by complex coacervation. Biopolymer blends (GE-GA [1:1, w/w] or GE-GA-MD [2:2:1, w/w/w]) were crosslinked by dry-heating at 80°C for 4, 8, or 16h. Relationships between the extent of browning, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and the total oxidation (TOTOX) of encapsulated SDASO were fitted to quadratic models. The [GE-GA-MD] blends exhibited higher browning rates and TEAC values than corresponding [GE-GA] blends. Depending on the type of biopolymer blend and dry-heating time, TOTOX values of SDASO in MRP-derived microcapsules were 29-87% lower than that of the non-crosslinked control after 30 days of storage.

  2. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively.

  3. Safety assessment of Maillard reaction products of chicken bone hydrolysate using Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-Zhi; Sun, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Hu, Li; Li, Xia; Wu, Xiao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background The Maillard reaction products of chicken bone hydrolysate (MRPB) containing 38% protein, which is a derived product from chicken bone, is usually used as a flavor enhancer or food ingredient. In the face of a paucity of reported data regarding the safety profile of controversial Maillard reaction products, the potential health effects of MRPB were evaluated in a subchronic rodent feeding study. Methods Sprague–Dawley rats (SD, 5/sex/group) were administered diets containing 9, 3, 1, or 0% of MRPB derived from chicken bone for 13 weeks. Results During the 13-week treatment period, no mortality occurred, and no remarkable changes in general condition and behavior were observed. The consumption of MRPB did not have any effect on body weight or feed and water consumption. At the same time, there was no significant increase in the weights of the heart, liver, lung, kidney, spleen, small intestine, and thymus in groups for both sexes. Serological examination showed serum alanine aminotransferase in both sexes was decreased significantly, indicating liver cell protection. No treatment-related histopathological differences were observed between the control and test groups. Conclusion Based on the results of this study, the addition of 9% MRPB in the diet had no adverse effect on both male and female SD rats during the 90-day observation. Those results would provide useful information on the safety of a meaty flavor enhancer from bone residue as a byproduct of meat industry. PMID:27016175

  4. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively. PMID:23790889

  5. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation.

  6. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation. PMID:25660883

  7. Multiresponse kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation in a heated glucose/wheat flour system.

    PubMed

    Kocadağlı, Tolgahan; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-11-15

    The study describes the kinetics of the formation and degradation of α-dicarbonyl compounds in glucose/wheat flour system heated under low moisture conditions. Changes in the concentrations of glucose, fructose, individual free amino acids, lysine and arginine residues, glucosone, 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, 3,4-dideoxyglucosone, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and diacetyl concentrations were determined to form a multiresponse kinetic model for isomerisation and degradation reactions of glucose. Degradation of Amadori product mainly produced 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 3-deoxyglucosone proceeded directly from glucose and also Amadori product degradation. Glyoxal formation was predominant from glucosone while methylglyoxal and diacetyl originated from 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural from fructose was found to be a key step. Multi-response kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation simultaneously indicated quantitatively predominant parallel and consecutive pathways and rate limiting steps by estimating the reaction rate constants. PMID:27283710

  8. Functional properties of nisin-carbohydrate conjugates formed by radiation induced Maillard reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muppalla, Shobita R.; Sonavale, Rahul; Chawla, Surinder P.; Sharma, Arun

    2012-12-01

    Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates were prepared by irradiating nisin either with glucose or dextran. Increase in browning and formation of intermediate products was observed with a concomitant decrease in free amino and reducing sugar groups indicating occurrence of the Maillard reaction catalyzed by irradiation. Nisin-carbohydrate conjugates showed a broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescence) as well as Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus). Results of antioxidant assays, including that of DPPH radical-scavenging activity and reducing power, showed that the nisin-dextran conjugates possessed better antioxidant potential than nisin-glucose conjugate. These results suggested that it was possible to enhance the functional properties of nisin by preparing radiation induced conjugates suitable for application in food industry.

  9. Influence of home cooking conditions on Maillard reaction products in beef.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Aurea Juliana Bombo; de Almeida Lima, Daniele; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Markowicz Bastos, Deborah Helena

    2016-04-01

    The influence of home cooking methods on the generation of Maillard reaction products (MRP) in beef was investigated. Grilling and frying hamburgers to an internal temperature below 90 °C mainly generated furosine. When the temperature reached 90 °C and 100 °C, furosine content decreased by 36% and fluorescent compounds increased by up to 98%. Baking meat at 300 °C, the most severe heat treatment studied, resulted in the formation of carboxymethyllysine. Boiling in water caused very low MRP formation. Acrylamide concentrations in grilled, fried or baked meat were extremely low. Home cooking conditions leading to low MRP generation and pleasant colours were obtained and could be used to guide diabetic and chronic renal patients on how to reduce their carboxymethyllysine intake.

  10. Investigation of the use of Maillard reaction inhibitors for the production of patatin-carbohydrate conjugates.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sooyoun; Karboune, Salwa

    2014-12-17

    Selected Maillard reaction inhibitors, including aminoguanidine, cysteine, pyridoxamine, and sodium bisulfite, were evaluated for their effect on the production of carbohydrate conjugated proteins with less cross-linking/browning. Patatin (PTT), a major potato protein, was glycated with galactose, xylose, galactooligosaccharides, xylooligosaccharides, galactan, and xylan under controlled conditions. The effectiveness of the inhibitors to control the glycation reaction was assessed by monitoring the glycation extent, the protein cross-linking, and the formation of dicarbonyl compounds. Sodium bisulfite was the most effective inhibitor for PTT-galactose and PTT-xylan reaction systems (reaction control ratios of 210.0 and 12.8). On the other hand, aminoguanidine and cysteine led to the highest reaction control ratios for the PTT-xylose/xylooligosaccharide (160.0 and 143.0) and PTT-galactooligosaccharides/galactan (663.0 and 71.0) reaction systems, respectively. The use of cysteine and aminoguanidine as inhibitors led to 1.7-99.4% decreases in the particle size distribution of the PTT conjugates and to 0.4-9.3% increases in their relative digestibility, per 5% blocked lysine.

  11. Investigation of the use of Maillard reaction inhibitors for the production of patatin-carbohydrate conjugates.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sooyoun; Karboune, Salwa

    2014-12-17

    Selected Maillard reaction inhibitors, including aminoguanidine, cysteine, pyridoxamine, and sodium bisulfite, were evaluated for their effect on the production of carbohydrate conjugated proteins with less cross-linking/browning. Patatin (PTT), a major potato protein, was glycated with galactose, xylose, galactooligosaccharides, xylooligosaccharides, galactan, and xylan under controlled conditions. The effectiveness of the inhibitors to control the glycation reaction was assessed by monitoring the glycation extent, the protein cross-linking, and the formation of dicarbonyl compounds. Sodium bisulfite was the most effective inhibitor for PTT-galactose and PTT-xylan reaction systems (reaction control ratios of 210.0 and 12.8). On the other hand, aminoguanidine and cysteine led to the highest reaction control ratios for the PTT-xylose/xylooligosaccharide (160.0 and 143.0) and PTT-galactooligosaccharides/galactan (663.0 and 71.0) reaction systems, respectively. The use of cysteine and aminoguanidine as inhibitors led to 1.7-99.4% decreases in the particle size distribution of the PTT conjugates and to 0.4-9.3% increases in their relative digestibility, per 5% blocked lysine. PMID:25400165

  12. Dietary Maillard reaction products and their fermented products reduce cardiovascular risk in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Oh, N S; Park, M R; Lee, K W; Kim, S H; Kim, Y

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the effects of Maillard reaction products (MRP) and MRP fermented by lactic acid bacteria on antioxidants and their enhancement of cardiovascular health in ICR mouse and rat models. In previous in vitro studies, the selected lactic acid bacteria were shown to significantly affect the activity of MRP. The expression of genes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) related to antioxidant activity was upregulated by Maillard-reacted sodium caseinate (cMRP), and cMRP fermented by Lactobacillus fermentum H9 (F-cMRP) synergistically increased the expression of catalase and superoxide dismutase when compared with the high-cholesterol-diet group. Bleeding time, the assay for determination of antithrombotic activity, was significantly prolonged by Maillard-reacted whey protein concentration (wMRP) and wMRP fermented by Lactobacillus gasseri H10 (F-wMRP), similar to the bleeding time of the aspirin group (positive control). In addition, the acute pulmonary thromboembolism-induced mice overcame severe body paralysis or death in both the wMRP and the F-wMRP groups. In the serum-level experiment, cMRP and F-cMRP significantly reduced the serum total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and triglycerides but had only a slight effect on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase also declined in the cMRP and F-cMRP intake groups compared with the high-cholesterol-diet group. In particular, F-cMRP showed the highest reducing effects on triglycerides, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. Moreover, the expression of cholesterol-related genes in the F-cMRP group demonstrated greater effects than for the cMRP group in the level of cholesterol 7 α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), and low-density lipoprotein receptors compared with the high-cholesterol-diet group. The protective role of cMRP and F-cMRP in the high

  13. Synthesis, optimization and structural characterization of a chitosan-glucose derivative obtained by the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Gullón, Beatriz; Montenegro, María I; Ruiz-Matute, Ana I; Cardelle-Cobas, Alejandra; Corzo, Nieves; Pintado, Manuela E

    2016-02-10

    Chitosan (Chit) was submitted to the Maillard reaction (MR) by co-heating a solution with glucose (Glc). Different reaction conditions as temperature (40, 60 and 80 °C), Glc concentration (0.5%, 1%, and 2%, w/v), and reaction time (72, 52 and 24h) were evaluated. Assessment of the reaction extent was monitored by measuring changes in UV absorbance, browning and fluorescence. Under the best conditions, 2% (w/v) of Chit, 2% (w/v) of Glc at 60°C and 32 h of reaction time, a chitosan-glucose (Chit-Glc) derivative was purified and submitted to structural characterization to confirm its formation. Analysis of its molecular weight (MW) and the degree of substitution (DS) was carried out by HPLC-Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) and a colloid titration method, respectively. FT-IR and (1)H NMR were also used to analyze the functional groups and evaluate the introduction of Glc into the Chit molecule. According to our objectives, the results obtained in this work allowed to better understand the key parameters influencing the MR with Chit as well as to confirm the successful introduction of Glc into the Chit molecule obtaining a Chit-Glc derivative with a DS of 64.76 ± 4.40% and a MW of 210.37 kDa.

  14. Effects of o-phenylenediamine on methylglyoxal generation from monosaccharide: Comment on "correlation of methylglyoxal with acrylamide formation in fructose/asparagine Maillard reaction model system".

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2008-07-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG), a reactive carbonyl compound, has recently garnered much attention because of its ability to modify proteins over time and yield advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that are thought to contribute to the development of diabetes mellitus and its complications. In a recent paper published in Food Chemistry by Yuan et al. [Yuan, Y., Zhao, G. H., Hu, X. S., Wu, J. H., Liu, J., & Chen, F. (2007a). Correlation of methylglyoxal with acrylamide formation in fructose/asparagines Maillard reaction model system. Food Chemistry, 108(3), 885-890] authors showed a high correlation between methylglyoxal formation and acrylamide formation. However, in their study, model systems of aqueous fructose/asparagines (Fru/Asn) and fructose/asparagines/o-phenylenediamine (Fru/Asn/OPD) heating at 150°C were used. The validity of these models relies on the assumption that OPD will only serve the role of a trapping agent for MG. In this short communication, we would like to call to attention that MG can also have a strong catalytic effect in the generation of MG from fructose. Therefore, it is concluded that the concentration of MG obtained in Fru/Asn/OPD model system cannot correspond to the total amount of MG formed by Maillard reaction of Fru and Asn as claimed by Yuan et al. [Yuan, Y., Zhao, G. H., Hu, X. S., Wu, J. H., Liu, J., & Chen, F. (2007a). Correlation of methylglyoxal with acrylamide formation in fructose/asparagines Maillard reaction model system. Food Chemistry, 108(3), 885-890, Yuan, Y., Zhao, G. H., Hu X. S., Wu, J. H., Liu, J., & Chen. F. (2007b). High correlation of methylglyoxal with acrylamide formation in glucose/asparagine Maillardreaction model. European Food Research and Technology. doi:10.1007/s00217-007-0658-0].

  15. Assessment of the ribose-induced Maillard reaction as a means of gelatine powder identification and quality control.

    PubMed

    Tan, Thuan-Chew; AlKarkhi, Abbas F M; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2012-10-15

    The addition of ribose to bovine or porcine gelatine solutions followed by heating at 95 °C yielded brown solutions with different pH, colour (CIE L(*) and b(*)) and absorbance (A(420*) values. These differences were used for gelatine powder identification, differentiation and quality control. Differentiation analysis of the Maillard reaction parameters was conducted using cluster analysis (CA) and confidence intervals (CI). The potential use of the method as a quality control procedure was evaluated by using statistical process control (SPC). CA revealed that the two types of gelatine could be classified into two different groups. CI (95% confidence) revealed that the absorbance and colour values could be used as indicators for differentiation between the two types of gelatine because the intervals between the Maillard reaction parameters of the samples were far apart. The methodology demonstrated good reproducibility because it behaved predictably based on the X¯-S charts generated from the SPC charts. PMID:23442706

  16. Taste-Active Maillard Reaction Products in Roasted Garlic (Allium sativum).

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Junichiro; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-07-27

    In order to gain first insight into candidate Maillard reaction products formed upon thermal processing of garlic, mixtures of glucose and S-allyl-l-cysteine, the major sulfur-containing amino acid in garlic, were low-moisture heated, and nine major reaction products were isolated. LC-TOF-MS, 1D/2D NMR, and CD spectroscopy led to their identification as acortatarin A (1), pollenopyrroside A (2), epi-acortatarin A (3), xylapyrroside A (4), 5-hydroxymethyl-1-[(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furanyl)methyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carbalde-hyde (5), 3-(allylthio)-2-(2-formyl-5-hydroxymethyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)propanoic acid (6), (4S)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-3,4-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]oxazine-6-carbaldehyde (7), (2R)-3-(allylthio)-2-[(4R)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-6-formyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrrolo-[1,2-a]pyrazin-2(1H)-yl]propanoic acid (8), and (2R)-3-(allylthio)-2-((4S)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-6-formyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrrolo-[1,2-a]pyrazin-2(1H)-yl)propanoic acid (9). Among the Maillard reaction products identified, compounds 5-9 have not previously been published. The thermal generation of the literature known spiroalkaloids 1-4 is reported for the first time. Sensory analysis revealed a bitter taste with thresholds between 0.5 and 785 μmol/kg for 1-5 and 7-9. Compound 6 did not show any intrinsic taste (water) but exhibited a strong mouthfullness (kokumi) enhancing activity above 186 μmol/kg. LC-MS/MS analysis showed 1-9 to be generated upon pan-frying of garlic with the highest concentration of 793.7 μmol/kg found for 6, thus exceeding its kokumi threshold by a factor of 4 and giving evidence for its potential taste modulation activity in processed garlic preparations.

  17. Taste-Active Maillard Reaction Products in Roasted Garlic (Allium sativum).

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Junichiro; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-07-27

    In order to gain first insight into candidate Maillard reaction products formed upon thermal processing of garlic, mixtures of glucose and S-allyl-l-cysteine, the major sulfur-containing amino acid in garlic, were low-moisture heated, and nine major reaction products were isolated. LC-TOF-MS, 1D/2D NMR, and CD spectroscopy led to their identification as acortatarin A (1), pollenopyrroside A (2), epi-acortatarin A (3), xylapyrroside A (4), 5-hydroxymethyl-1-[(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furanyl)methyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carbalde-hyde (5), 3-(allylthio)-2-(2-formyl-5-hydroxymethyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)propanoic acid (6), (4S)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-3,4-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]oxazine-6-carbaldehyde (7), (2R)-3-(allylthio)-2-[(4R)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-6-formyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrrolo-[1,2-a]pyrazin-2(1H)-yl]propanoic acid (8), and (2R)-3-(allylthio)-2-((4S)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-6-formyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrrolo-[1,2-a]pyrazin-2(1H)-yl)propanoic acid (9). Among the Maillard reaction products identified, compounds 5-9 have not previously been published. The thermal generation of the literature known spiroalkaloids 1-4 is reported for the first time. Sensory analysis revealed a bitter taste with thresholds between 0.5 and 785 μmol/kg for 1-5 and 7-9. Compound 6 did not show any intrinsic taste (water) but exhibited a strong mouthfullness (kokumi) enhancing activity above 186 μmol/kg. LC-MS/MS analysis showed 1-9 to be generated upon pan-frying of garlic with the highest concentration of 793.7 μmol/kg found for 6, thus exceeding its kokumi threshold by a factor of 4 and giving evidence for its potential taste modulation activity in processed garlic preparations. PMID:27381763

  18. Inhibitory mechanism of naringenin against carcinogenic acrylamide formation and nonenzymatic browning in Maillard model reactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ka-Wing; Zeng, Xiaohui; Tang, Yun Sang; Wu, Jia-Jun; Liu, Zhiwei; Sze, Kong-Hung; Chu, Ivan K; Chen, Feng; Wang, Mingfu

    2009-08-01

    Chemical model reactions were carried out to investigate the effect of a citrus flavonoid, naringenin, on the formation of acrylamide under mild heating conditions. Results showed that naringenin significantly and dose dependently inhibited the formation of acrylamide (20-50% relative to the control), although not in a linear manner. Moreover, the presence of naringenin in acrylamide-producing models effectively reduced the extent of browning. Careful comparison of the HPLC chromatograms of samples from the chemical model reactions revealed that naringenin likely reacted with Maillard intermediates, giving rise to new derivatives. Subsequent LC-MS analyses suggested that the proposed derivatives have a predicted molecular mass of 341 Da. Eventually, two derivatives were purified and characterized with LC-MS/MS and NMR spectroscopy as 8-C-(E-propenamide)naringenin and 6-C-(E-propenamide)naringenin, respectively. In other words, naringenin, a rather weak antioxidant, strongly inhibited acrylamide formation probably by directly reacting with acrylamide precursors, thus diverting them from the pathways that lead to acrylamide formation. PMID:19639978

  19. Effect of physical state of gelatin-plasticizer based films on to the occurrence of Maillard reactions.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, N; Díaz-Calderón, P; Enrione, J; Matiacevich, S

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of the Maillard reaction on gelatin-based films (bovine and salmon) in the glassy state, in mixtures with low molecular weight plasticizers (e.g. glycerol, glucose and trehalose) at different storage times. For testing, the gelatin-plasticizer films were stored under glassy conditions (Tg-10°C), previously determined by calorimetric tests. Studies under accelerated conditions (T ≫ Tg) were also developed. Color, opacity and browning index (Br) were evaluated by computer vision at all storage times. Results showed in samples stored under glassy conditions that the Maillard reaction did not occur, independent of gelatin origin and type of plasticizer. Changes in color stated by opacity and Br were only significant (p < 0.05) in gelatin-glucose systems under accelerated storage conditions. The inhibition of reaction in gelatin films in the glassy state was related to the well-known conditions of low molecular mobility of glassy matrices, but also with the non-Maillard reactive characteristics of glycerol and trehalose.

  20. Effect of physical state of gelatin-plasticizer based films on to the occurrence of Maillard reactions.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, N; Díaz-Calderón, P; Enrione, J; Matiacevich, S

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of the Maillard reaction on gelatin-based films (bovine and salmon) in the glassy state, in mixtures with low molecular weight plasticizers (e.g. glycerol, glucose and trehalose) at different storage times. For testing, the gelatin-plasticizer films were stored under glassy conditions (Tg-10°C), previously determined by calorimetric tests. Studies under accelerated conditions (T ≫ Tg) were also developed. Color, opacity and browning index (Br) were evaluated by computer vision at all storage times. Results showed in samples stored under glassy conditions that the Maillard reaction did not occur, independent of gelatin origin and type of plasticizer. Changes in color stated by opacity and Br were only significant (p < 0.05) in gelatin-glucose systems under accelerated storage conditions. The inhibition of reaction in gelatin films in the glassy state was related to the well-known conditions of low molecular mobility of glassy matrices, but also with the non-Maillard reactive characteristics of glycerol and trehalose. PMID:25577109

  1. High-intensity ultrasound production of Maillard reaction flavor compounds in a cysteine-xylose model system.

    PubMed

    Ong, Olivia X H; Seow, Yi-Xin; Ong, Peter K C; Zhou, Weibiao

    2015-09-01

    Application of high intensity ultrasound has shown potential in the production of Maillard reaction odor-active flavor compounds in model systems. The impact of initial pH, sonication duration, and ultrasound intensity on the production of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) by ultrasound processing in a cysteine-xylose model system were evaluated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) with a modified mathematical model. Generation of selected MRPs, 2-methylthiophene and tetramethyl pyrazine, was optimal at an initial pH of 6.00, accompanied with 78.1 min of processing at an ultrasound intensity of 19.8 W cm(-2). However, identification of volatiles using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) revealed that ultrasound-assisted Maillard reactions generated fewer sulfur-containing volatile flavor compounds as compared to conventional heat treatment of the model system. Likely reasons for this difference in flavor profile include the expulsion of H2S due to ultrasonic degassing and inefficient transmission of ultrasonic energy. PMID:25640682

  2. Effects of cationic species on visual color formation in model Maillard reactions of pentose sugars and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, George P

    2008-08-27

    Effects of cationic species on Maillard browning were examined after heating (ca. 100 degrees C) aqueous pH 7.2 buffered solutions of amino acids and pentose sugars. Metallic ions of Group I metals (Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs) produced a small increase in browning (A420), but somewhat greater effects were observed with ions of Group II metals Ca and Mg. Browning was suppressed by triethylammonium ion, but unaffected by a salt of the stronger base, guanidine. The quaternary amine salt choline chloride produced enhanced browning and served as a model for phospholipid involvement in Maillard reactions. With alpha,omega-diamino acids increases in browning were observed which related to lowered pK2 values resulting from positively charged omega-substituents in these molecules. PMID:18611025

  3. Transglutaminase cross-linking effect on sensory characteristics and antioxidant activities of Maillard reaction products from soybean protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Song, Na; Tan, Chen; Huang, Meigui; Liu, Ping; Eric, Karangwa; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xia, Shuqin; Jia, Chengsheng

    2013-01-01

    To improve the yield of Maillard peptides, a microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) was used to increase the content of 1000-5000Da peptides in soybean protein hydrolysates by using a cross-linking reaction. The sensory characteristics and antioxidant activities of corresponding Maillard Reaction Products (MSPC) was then evaluated. After cross-linking treatment the content of 1000-5000Da peptides in protein hydrolysates and the yield of Maillard peptides increased by 21.19% and 8.71%, respectively, which contributed to the improved mouthfulness of MSPC. The bitter amino acids were significantly decreased and the umami acids were markedly increased in MSPC. Volatile compounds identified by GC-MS analysis showed that the content of the important meaty flavour compounds (such as 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, bis(2-methyl-3-furyl)disulfide) of MSPC were dramatically higher than that of MRPs from uncross-linking peptides. Combined with sensory evaluation, it was confirmed that MTGase cross-linking improved the flavour Characteristics and did not affect the antioxidant activity of MSPC.

  4. Stability of Individual Maillard Reaction Products in the Presence of the Human Colonic Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Michael; Bunzel, Diana; Huch, Melanie; Franz, Charles M A P; Kulling, Sabine E; Henle, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Maillard reaction products (MRPs) are taken up in substantial amounts with the daily diet, but the majority are not transported across the intestinal epithelium. The aim of this study was to obtain first insights into the stability of dietary MRPs in the presence of the intestinal microbiota. Four individual MRPs, namely, N-ε-fructosyllysine (FL), N-ε-carboxymethyllysine (CML), pyrraline (PYR), and maltosine (MAL), were anaerobically incubated with fecal suspensions from eight human volunteers at 37 °C for up to 72 h. The stability of the MRPs was measured by HPLC with UV and MS/MS detections. The Amadori product FL could no longer be detected after 4 h of incubation. Marked interindividual differences were observed for CML metabolism: Depending on the individual, at least 40.7 ± 1.5% of CML was degraded after 24 h of incubation, and the subjects could thus be tentatively grouped into fast and slow metabolizers of this compound. PYR was degraded by 20.3 ± 4.4% during 24 h by all subjects. The concentration of MAL was not significantly lowered in the presence of fecal suspensions. In no case could metabolites be identified and quantified by different mass spectrometric techniques. This is the first study showing that the human colonic microbiota is able to degrade selected glycated amino acids and possibly use them as a source of energy, carbon, and/or nitrogen. PMID:26186075

  5. Maillard reaction products and potatoes: have the benefits been clearly assessed?

    PubMed

    Liska, DeAnn J; Cook, Chad M; Wang, Ding Ding; Szpylka, John

    2016-03-01

    Cooking foods affords numerous food safety benefits. During heating, Maillard reaction products (MRPs) are formed. MRPs contribute sensory aspects to food, including color, taste, and texture. One MRP, acrylamide, has been implicated in negative health outcomes; however, emerging data suggests MRPs may also deliver certain health benefits. The food industry has taken steps to decrease acrylamide formation, but the perception that high levels of acrylamide compromise the nutritional benefit of certain foods has continued. Potatoes are susceptible to MRP formation during cooking but also are considered an affordable, high nutrient content food. In particular, potatoes contribute significantly to fiber and potassium intakes in the U.S. population, two nutrients of need. How, then, should potatoes be judged for effects on health? A structured evidence assessment was conducted to identify literature, specifically clinical trials, on MRPs from potatoes and health, as well as nutritional contribution of potatoes. The results indicate limited human clinical data are available on negative health outcomes of potato-based MRPs, whereas potatoes are important contributors of key nutrients, such as fiber and potassium. Therefore, a balanced benefit-risk approach is warranted in order to assure that decreasing consumption of certain foods, like potatoes, does not lead to unintended consequences of nutrition inadequacies. PMID:27004113

  6. Characterisation of bovine serum albumin-fucoidan conjugates prepared via the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Yeong; Shin, Weon-Sun

    2015-04-15

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-fucoidan conjugates were prepared by the Maillard reaction (60 °C and 79% relative humidity for 96 h), and were then identified by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Molecular characteristics of the BSA-fucoidan conjugates were investigated, using atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. SDS-PAGE patterns provided evidence for the covalent bonding between BSA and fucoidan. SEC profiles showed that about 1.5-2.0 mol of fucoidan were covalently linked to 1 mol of BSA, resulting in high-molecular-weight compositions (conjugates). AFM images and DLS results indicated that most particles in the conjugates were nano-structured and more spherical than those of a regular BSA-fucoidan mixture. The fluorescence intensity and maximum emission wavelength of the conjugates together revealed that the BSA molecules had converted from an ordered conformation into a partially folded molten globule state.

  7. Temperature effect on lactose crystallization, maillard reactions, and lipid oxidation in whole milk powder.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Marianne K; Lauridsen, Lene; Skibsted, Leif H; Risbo, Jens

    2005-09-01

    Whole milk powder with an initial water content of 4.4% (w/w) and a water activity of 0.23 stored in hermetically sealed vials for up to 147 days below (37 and 45 degrees C) and above (55 degrees C) the glass transition temperature (T(g) determined to have the value 48 degrees C) showed a strong temperature dependence for quality deterioration corresponding to energies of activation close to 200 kJ/mol for most deteriorative processes. The glass transition was found not to cause any deviation from Arrhenius temperature dependence. Lactose crystallization, which occurred as a gradual process as monitored by isothermal calorimetry, is concluded to liberate bound water (a(w) increase to 0.46) with a modest time delay (approximately 2 days at 55 degrees C) and with concomitant surface browning as evidenced by an increasing Hunter b-value. Browning and formation of bound hydroxymethyl-furfural determined by HPLC seem to be coupled, while formation of another Maillard reaction product, furosine, occurred gradually and was initiated prior to crystallization. Initiation of lipid oxidation, as detected by lipid-derived radicals (high g-value ESR spectra), and progression of lipid oxidation, as detected by headspace GC, seem not to be affected by lactose crystallization and browning, and no indication of browning products acting as antioxidants could be determined. PMID:16131114

  8. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglycosylamines: Maillard reaction of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose with biological amines.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Aparna; Patel, Himika H; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2014-02-01

    The Maillard reaction of sugars and amines resulting in the formation of glycosylamines and Amadori products is of biological significance, for drug delivery, role in central nervous system, and other potential applications. We have examined the interaction of (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG) with biological amines to study the formation of (18) F-fluorodeoxyglycosylamines ((18) F-FDGly). Respective amines N-allyl-2-aminomethylpyrrolidine (NAP) and 2-(4'-aminophenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (PIB precursor) were mixed with FDG to provide glycosylamines, FDGNAP and FDGBTA. Radiosynthesis using (18) F-FDG (2-5 mCi) was carried out to provide (18) F-FDGNAP and (18) F-FDGBTA. Binding of FDGBTA and (18) F-FDGBTA was evaluated in human brain sections of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and control subjects using autoradiography. Both FDGNAP and FDGBTA were isolated as stable products. Kinetics of (18) F-FDGNAP reaction indicated a significant product at 4 h (63% radiochemical yield). (18) F-FDGBTA was prepared in 57% yield. Preliminary studies of FDGBTA showed displacement of (3) H-PIB (reduced by 80%), and (18) F-FDGBTA indicated selective binding to Aβ-amyloid plaques present in postmortem AD human brain, with a gray matter ratio of 3 between the AD patients and control subjects. We have demonstrated that (18) F-FDG couples with amines under mild conditions to form (18) F-FDGly in a manner similar to click chemistry. Although these amine derivatives are stable in vitro, stability in vivo and selective binding is under investigation. PMID:24327460

  9. Sensory characteristics and consumer acceptability of beef stock containing glutathione Maillard reaction products prepared at various conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, G Y; Hong, J H; Kim, Y S; Lee, S M; Kim, K O

    2011-01-01

    The sensory characteristics and consumer acceptability of beef soup samples containing 9 types of glutathione Maillard reaction products (GMRPs) were investigated to examine the effects of the GMRPs produced under different reaction conditions on the flavor of the beef soup. The sensory characteristics of the beef stocks were examined using descriptive analysis. In consumer testing, 50 consumers evaluated the overall acceptability and flavor intensities of beef odor, salty taste, beef flavor, and seasoning flavor in the beef soup samples. It was found that the reaction conditions, including sugar type and pH, affected the sensory characteristics of the beef stock containing the GMRPs. The samples containing the GMRPs reacted at pH 7 were characterized with strong beef flavor, chestnut flavor, and cooked rice flavor. However, the GMRP reacted with xylose at pH 7 (XM7) was significantly stronger in beef-related sensory characteristics than the GMRPs reacted with glucose or fructose at pH 7 (GM7 and FM7). The samples containing the GMRPs reacted at pH 3 had strong acid-related attributes whereas the GMRPs reacted at pH 11 exhibited strong sulfur-related attributes and a bitter taste. Overall, the beef soup containing XM7, which was perceived as having a strong beef odor and flavor, was rated the highest consumer acceptability score. This suggests that XM7 has feasibility as a flavor enhancer. To elucidate its effectiveness further, it is required to apply XM7 in various food systems at varying levels and to compare its flavor enhancing effects with other flavor enhancers such as monosodium L-glutamate in future studies. Practical Application: This study characterized sensory attributes of glutathione Maillard reaction products (GMRPs) reacted under various conditions and evaluated their potential as a flavor enhancer by examining consumer acceptability of beef stock containing the GMRPs. This study showed that the GMRP reacted with xylose at pH 7 had strong 71 beef

  10. De novo synthesis of amino acids during the maillard reaction: qTOF/ESI mass spectrometric evidence for the mechanism of Akabori transformation.

    PubMed

    Nashalian, Ossanna; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2015-01-14

    The transformation of α-amino acids into their hydroxymethyl derivatives during the Maillard reaction is an intriguing possibility for catalysis by metal salts in the presence of Strecker aldehydes; the process is commonly known as the Akabori reaction. The mechanism of this reaction was studied in the presence of glucose, using glycine copper complex and paraformaldehyde as Akabori model system in aqueous mixtures heated at 110 °C for 2 h and subsequently analyzed by qTOF/ESI/MS. Isotope-labeling studies of the various products identified have provided for the first time mass spectrometric evidence for the detailed mechanism of Akabori transformation, particularly the formation of Schiff base adducts prior to the final conversion into serine and hydroxymethyl-serine. Furthermore, the results have indicated that sugars do not interfere with such transformations and, on the contrary, the presence of glycine–copper complexes in the Maillard model systems can enhance the production of Maillard reaction intermediates.

  11. Biological and chemical assessment of antioxidant activity of sugar-lysine model maillard reaction products.

    PubMed

    Kitts, David D; Hu, Chun

    2005-06-01

    The antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) is often associated with increased stability and shelf life of food systems vulnerable to oxidation reactions. In this study, nondialyzed, high-molecular weight (HMW = >3500 Da) MRPs were recovered from three model sugar-lysine (glucose-lysine, Glc-Lys; fructose-lysine, Fru-Lys; and ribose-lysine, Rib-Lys) reactions, heated at 121 degrees C for one hour. Samples were characterized by UV and fluorescence spectra and assessed for antioxidant activity using both standard chemical methods (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl [DPPH] and oxygen radical absorbing capacity [ORAC]). In addition, biochemical (e.g., cell culture for intracellular oxidation in RAW264.7 cells and protection against metal ion-induced cytotoxicity in C3H/10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblast cells) assays were used. Patterns of change for fluorescence and multiple colorimetric parameters corresponded to the recovery yield of HMW MRPs and indicated that Rib was more (P < 0.05) reactive than Glc, which in turn was greater (P < 0.05) than Fru. These characteristics of rate of browning did not parallel the significant (P < 0.05) antioxidant activity noted for different sugar-derived HMW MRPs to scavenge DPPH radical, or exhibit total antioxidant activity using the ORAC (e.g., 800-1000 micromol Trolox/gm MRP) method. Antioxidant activity of Glc-, Fru-, and Rib-Lys HMW-MRPs (50 microg/mL) produced protection (P < 0.05) against both H2O2- and AAPH-induced intracellular oxidation reactions in cultured RAW 264.7 cells. Metal chelating activity of all three sugar-derived HMW MRPs (0.01% w/v) was attributed to similar protection (P < 0.05) against Fe2+ and Cu2+-induced cytotoxicity in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The reducing activity of all three HMW-MRPs indicated the potential for prooxidant activity that could explain enhanced cytotoxicity of Fe3+ in cultured cells. PMID:16037272

  12. Ascorbic acid-induced crosslinking of lens proteins: evidence supporting a Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Ortwerth, B J; Olesen, P R

    1988-08-31

    a Maillard-type reaction. PMID:3408736

  13. Short communication: Amino trap column improves the separation of methylimidazoles, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, and sugars in Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian-Bing; Liu, Ding-Bo; Yu, Shu-Juan; Zhao, Zhen-Gang; Yu, Pei

    2014-11-01

    A simultaneous analysis of methylimidazoles, reducing sugars, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde in the Maillard reaction was improved by use of an amino trap column. Analysis was carried out by using high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) coupled with an amino trap column. The amino trap column was a useful tool to improve the separation of methylimidazoles, reducing sugars, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde. This technique is useful for simultaneous analysis of methylimidazoles, reducing sugars, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde in risk assessment for dairy products.

  14. Analysis of the Maillard reaction in human hair using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging and a focal-plane array detector.

    PubMed

    Jung, In-Keun; Park, Sang-Chul; Bin, Sung-Ah; Roh, Young Sup; Lee, John Hwan; Kim, Boo-Min

    2016-03-01

    The Maillard reaction has been well researched and used in the food industry and the fields of environmental science and organic chemistry. Here, we induced the Maillard reaction inside human hair and analyzed its effects by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with a focal-plane array (FTIR-FPA) detector. We used arginine (A), glycine (G), and D-xylose (X) to generate the Maillard reaction by dissolving them in purified water and heating it to 150 °C. This label-free process generated a complex compound (named AGX after its ingredients) with a monomer structure, which was determined by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and FTIR-FPA. This compound was stable in hair and substantially increased its tensile strength. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the formation of this monomer in human hair, and our study provides insights into a new method that could be used to improve the condition of damaged or aging hair.

  15. Optimization of Maillard reaction with ribose for enhancing anti-allergy effect of fish protein hydrolysates using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Yong; Kim, Se-Wook; Kim, Yoonsook; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Jeon, Hyeonjin; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2015-06-01

    Halibut is served on sushi and as sliced raw fish fillets. We investigated the optimal conditions of the Maillard reaction (MR) with ribose using response surface methodology to reduce the allergenicity of its protein. A 3-factored and 5-leveled central composite design was used, where the independent variables were substrate (ribose) concentration (X1, %), reaction time (X2, min), and pH (X3), while the dependent variables were browning index (Y1, absorbance at 420nm), DPPH scavenging (Y2, EC50 mg/mL), FRAP (Y3, mM FeSO4/mg extract) and β-hexosaminidase release (Y4, %). The optimal conditions were obtained as follows: X1, 28.36%; X2, 38.09min; X3, 8.26. Maillard reaction products of fish protein hydrolysate (MFPH) reduced the amount of nitric oxide synthesis compared to the untreated FPH, and had a significant anti-allergy effect on β-hexosaminidase and histamine release, compared with that of the FPH control. We concluded that MFPH, which had better antioxidant and anti-allergy activities than untreated FPH, can be used as an improved dietary source. PMID:25624251

  16. Effect of Maillard browning reaction on protein utilization and plasma amino acid response by rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Plakas, S M; Lee, T C; Wolke, R E; Meade, T L

    1985-12-01

    The effect of the Maillard browning reaction in the diet of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) on growth and amino acid availability was investigated. Chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis methods were applied for the detection of the losses of amino acids in a model protein browning system. Arginine and lysine exhibited the greatest losses in the mixture of fish protein isolate and glucose stored for 40 d at 37 degrees C. The apparent digestibility and absorption of individual amino acids, particularly lysine, was lower in trout fed browned protein than in those fed the control protein. Plasma lysine levels were significantly depressed, while the plasma levels of glucose and most other amino acids were elevated in relation to the loss in nutritive value of dietary protein after browning. The early Maillard reaction derivative of lysine, epsilon-deoxy-fructosyl-lysine, was recovered from browned protein (by using the in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis procedure) and from the plasma of trout fed browned protein. Analysis of plasma free amino acids provided an indication of lysine bioavailability and identified lysine as the first-limiting amino acid in the diets containing browned protein. PMID:3934350

  17. Chemical characteristics and enhanced hepatoprotective activities of Maillard reaction products derived from milk protein-sugar system.

    PubMed

    Oh, Nam Su; Young Lee, Ji; Lee, Hyun Ah; Joung, Jae Yeon; Shin, Yong Kook; Kim, Sae Hun; Kim, Younghoon; Lee, Kwang Won

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics, antioxidative properties, and hepatoprotective effects of Maillard reaction products (MRP) from milk protein reacted with sugars. The MRP were obtained from milk protein, whey protein concentrates and sodium caseinate, using 2 types of sugars, lactose and glucose, by heating the mixture at 55°C for 7d in a sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Changes in the chemical modification of the milk protein were monitored by measuring the protein-bound carbonyls and PAGE protein profiles. The results showed that the amount of protein-bound carbonyls increased after Maillard reaction (MR). In addition, sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis indicated a formation of high-molecular weight complexes through MR. The modification sites induced by MR of milk protein were monitored by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of tryptic-digested gel spots of MRP. As a result, modification and their localization in AA sequence of MRP was identified. Also, the MRP showed higher antioxidant activities than the intact milk protein, and they reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species production and inhibited the depletion of the reduced glutathione concentrations in the HepG2 cells. In particular, glucose-sodium caseinate MRP showed the highest biological activities among all MRP. Therefore, these results suggest that the MRP from milk protein reacting with sugars possess effective antioxidant activity and have a protective ability against oxidative damage.

  18. Maillard Reaction of Pidan White as Inhibited by Chinese Black Tea Extract (Camellia sinensis) in the Pickling Solution

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Palanivel; Benjakul, Soottawat; Baharin, Badlishah Sham

    2014-01-01

    Changes in Maillard reaction of pidan white were monitored with A294, fluorescence intensity, and browning intensity during pickling in the absence and presence of Chinese black tea extract (Camellia sinensis) at levels of 2% and 5% together with 0.2% ZnCl2 or 0.2% CaCl2 up to 3 wk, followed by ageing for another 3 wk. Browning intensity and A294 of pidan white increased with increasing pickling/ageing, while fluorescence intensity decreased during ageing (p<0.05), irrespective of treatments. At wk 6, pidan white treated with 0.2% ZnCl2 and 0.2% CaCl2 showed slightly higher browning intensity, fluorescence intensity and A294 than those treated with divalents together with Chinese black tea (p<0.05). Free amino group and sugar contents showed continuous decrease during pickling and ageing irrespective of tea and cations used. However, pidan treated without Chinese black tea extract showed significantly lower free amino group and sugar during the ageing of 6 wk (p<0.05). Thus, Chinese black tea extract had an inhibitory effect on the Maillard reaction during ageing of pidan white. PMID:26761277

  19. Maillard Reaction of Pidan White as Inhibited by Chinese Black Tea Extract (Camellia sinensis) in the Pickling Solution.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Palanivel; Benjakul, Soottawat; Baharin, Badlishah Sham

    2014-01-01

    Changes in Maillard reaction of pidan white were monitored with A294, fluorescence intensity, and browning intensity during pickling in the absence and presence of Chinese black tea extract (Camellia sinensis) at levels of 2% and 5% together with 0.2% ZnCl2 or 0.2% CaCl2 up to 3 wk, followed by ageing for another 3 wk. Browning intensity and A294 of pidan white increased with increasing pickling/ageing, while fluorescence intensity decreased during ageing (p<0.05), irrespective of treatments. At wk 6, pidan white treated with 0.2% ZnCl2 and 0.2% CaCl2 showed slightly higher browning intensity, fluorescence intensity and A294 than those treated with divalents together with Chinese black tea (p<0.05). Free amino group and sugar contents showed continuous decrease during pickling and ageing irrespective of tea and cations used. However, pidan treated without Chinese black tea extract showed significantly lower free amino group and sugar during the ageing of 6 wk (p<0.05). Thus, Chinese black tea extract had an inhibitory effect on the Maillard reaction during ageing of pidan white. PMID:26761277

  20. The kinetics of Maillard reaction in lactose-hydrolysed milk powder and related systems containing carbohydrate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Gabriela B; Pereyra Gonzales, Adriana S; Leiva, Graciela E; Malec, Laura S

    2013-12-15

    The kinetics of Maillard reaction in lactose-hydrolysed skim milk powder and related systems containing carbohydrate mixtures were analysed. The effect of the increase of water activity and temperature during storage of the commercial product was also evaluated. In systems with two and three carbohydrates, a marked decrease of the reaction rate was observed when monosaccharides were partially replaced by lactose, notwithstanding the fact that the former still remained in a higher proportion than lysine. The rate of available lysine loss in lactose-hydrolysed milk was mostly affected by the presence of galactose. The reaction rate constants at aw 0.52 and at 37 and 50 °C were higher than at aw 0.33. However, no significant differences were observed at 60 °C. Temperature is the most important factor to be controlled in order to minimise nutritional deterioration during storage.

  1. The kinetics of Maillard reaction in lactose-hydrolysed milk powder and related systems containing carbohydrate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Gabriela B; Pereyra Gonzales, Adriana S; Leiva, Graciela E; Malec, Laura S

    2013-12-15

    The kinetics of Maillard reaction in lactose-hydrolysed skim milk powder and related systems containing carbohydrate mixtures were analysed. The effect of the increase of water activity and temperature during storage of the commercial product was also evaluated. In systems with two and three carbohydrates, a marked decrease of the reaction rate was observed when monosaccharides were partially replaced by lactose, notwithstanding the fact that the former still remained in a higher proportion than lysine. The rate of available lysine loss in lactose-hydrolysed milk was mostly affected by the presence of galactose. The reaction rate constants at aw 0.52 and at 37 and 50 °C were higher than at aw 0.33. However, no significant differences were observed at 60 °C. Temperature is the most important factor to be controlled in order to minimise nutritional deterioration during storage. PMID:23993550

  2. Maillard reaction of ribose 5-phosphate generates superoxide and glycation products for bovine heart cytochrome c reduction.

    PubMed

    Gersten, Rebecca A; Gretebeck, Lisa M; Hildick-Smith, Gordon; Sandwick, Roger K

    2010-11-22

    Ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) is a sugar known to undergo the Maillard reaction (glycation) at a rapid rate. In a reaction with the lysines of bovine heart cytochrome c, R5P generates superoxide (O2-) that subsequently reduces ferri-cytochrome c to ferro-cytochrome c. The rate equation for the observed cytochrome c reduction is first order in respect to cytochrome c and half order in respect to R5P. The addition of amines to the cytochrome c-R5P system greatly increases the O2- generation with rates of approximately 1.0 μMmin(-1) being observed with millimolar levels of R5P and amine at 37°C. Pre-incubation of R5P with the amine prior to cytochrome c addition further enhances the rate of cytochrome c reduction approximately twofold for every 30 min of incubation. While clearly accounting for a portion of the reduction of cytochrome c, O2- is not the sole reductant of the system as the use of superoxide dismutase only partially limits cytochrome c reduction, and the contribution of O2- proportionally decreases with longer amine-R5P incubation times. The remainder of the cytochrome c reduction is attributed to either the Amadori product or a cross-linked Schiff base created when a Maillard reaction-derived dicarbonyl compound(s) reacts with the amine. It is believed that these compounds directly transfer electrons to ferri-cytochrome c and subsequently become stable free-radical cations. ATP, a putative regulator of cytochrome c activity, does not inhibit electron transport from O2- or the cross-linked Schiff base but does prevent R5P from reacting with surface lysines to generate superoxide. The spontaneous reaction between R5P and amines could serve as an alternative system for generating O2- in solution. PMID:20933223

  3. Ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous analysis of asparagine, sugars, and acrylamide in Maillard reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ren, Yiping; Jiao, Jingjing; Li, Dong; Zhang, Ying

    2011-05-01

    We developed an automated microwave digestion labstation (MDL) combined with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method under the control of positive-negative ion switching as a robust kinetic study tool for rapid and simultaneous quantification of asparagine, glucose, fructose, and acrylamide in Maillard reaction products. Maillard reactions were conducted in a potato model via MDL. The two-step simple pretreatment procedures included the addition of isotope internal standards (15)N(2)-asparagine, (13)C(6)-glucose, and D(3)-acrylamide, followed by appropriate dilution with the mobile phase and filtration. Analytes were separated on a Hypercarb column and monitored by MS/MS. Study of matrix effects indicated Maillard reaction products induce an ionization suppression of both positive and negative precursor ions, but quantitative results are corrected through the use of isotopically labeled internal standards. Using this method, the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) ranges of all analytes were calculated as 0.04-0.6 and 0.1-1.1 μM, respectively. Excellent repeatability (RSD < 9.6%) and acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD < 9.2%) substantially supported the use of this method for sample analysis. The present kinetic tools, with 10-50 min mimic of Maillard reactions and short instrumental run time (5.5 min per sample), were successfully validated and applied to simultaneous determination of acrylamide and its precursors and intermediates during Maillard reactions and kinetic elucidation. Furthermore, current tools of MDL combined with simple sample treatment procedures and UHPLC-MS/MS analysis reduce sample analysis time and labor in the kinetic study. PMID:21462916

  4. Free and Protein-Bound Maillard Reaction Products in Beer: Method Development and a Survey of Different Beer Types.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Michael; Witte, Sophia; Henle, Thomas

    2016-09-28

    The Maillard reaction is important for beer color and flavor, but little is known about the occurrence of individual glycated amino acids in beer. Therefore, seven Maillard reaction products (MRPs), namely, fructosyllysine, maltulosyllysine, pyrraline, formyline, maltosine, MG-H1, and argpyrimidine, were synthesized and quantitated in different types of beer (Pilsner, dark, bock, wheat, and nonalcoholic beers) by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode through application of the standard addition method. Free MRPs were analyzed directly. A high molecular weight fraction was isolated by dialysis and hydrolyzed enzymatically prior to analysis. Maltulosyllysine was quantitated for the first time in food. The most important free MRPs in beer are fructosyllysine (6.8-27.0 mg/L) and maltulosyllysine (3.7-21.8 mg/L). Beer contains comparatively high amounts of late-stage free MRPs such as pyrraline (0.2-1.6 mg/L) and MG-H1 (0.3-2.5 mg/L). Minor amounts of formyline (4-230 μg/L), maltosine (6-56 μg/L), and argpyrimidine (0.1-4.1 μg/L) were quantitated. Maltulosyllysine was the most significant protein-bound MRP, but both maltulosyllysine and fructosyllysine represent only 15-60% of the total protein-bound lysine-derived Amadori products. Differences in the patterns of protein-bound and free individual MRPs and the ratios between them were identified, which indicate differences in their chemical, biochemical, and microbiological stabilities during the brewing process.

  5. Effect of roasting time of buckwheat groats on the formation of Maillard reaction products and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Małgorzata, Wronkowska; Konrad, Piskuła Mariusz; Zieliński, Henryk

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the formation of Maillard reaction products and antioxidant capacity of buckwheat, induced by roasting at 160 °C for 30, 40 and 50 min, were evaluated in the study. Furozine, was detected after roasting, in all buckwheat samples. Increase of FIC, the presence of significant amounts of CML and enhanced browning were observed, along with increasing times of roasting. The formation of acrylamide in the obtained buckwheat products was also significantly connected with the time of roasting. A significant degradation was observed in natural antioxidants, as affected by heat treatment time. The colour parameter changed significantly with the increasing of roasting time. Overall, 30min of roasting was beneficial from a nutritional point of view for the obtained buckwheat product.

  6. Antioxidative, Antibacterial, and Food Functional Properties of the Half-Fin Anchovy Hydrolysates-Glucose Conjugates Formed via Maillard Reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Ru; Yang, Peiyu; Wei, Rongbian; Ruan, Guanqiang

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidative, antibacterial, and food functional properties of the half-fin anchovy hydrolysates (HAHp)-glucose conjugates formed by Maillard reaction (MR) were investigated, respectively. Results of sugar and amino acid contents loss rates, browning index, and molecular weight distribution indicated that the initial pH of HAHp played an important role in the process of MR between HAHp and glucose. HAHp-glucose Maillard reaction products (HAHp-G MRPs) demonstrated enhanced antioxidative activities of reducing power and scavenging DPPH radicals compared to control groups. HAHp-G MRPs produced from the condition of pH 9.6 displayed the strongest reducing power. The excellent scavenging activity on DPPH radicals was found for HAHp(5.6)-G MRPs which was produced at pH 5.6. Additionally, HAHp(5.6)-G MRPs showed variable antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, and Sarcina lutea, with the MIC values ranging from 8.3 to 16.7 μg/mL. Result of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on E. coli suggested that HAHp(5.6)-G MRPs exhibited antibacterial activity by destroying the cell integrity through membrane permeabilization. Moreover, HAHp(5.6)-G MRPs had excellent foaming ability and stability at alkaline conditions of pH 8.0, and showed emulsion properties at acidic pH 4.0. These results suggested that specific HAHp-G MRPs should be promising functional ingredients used in foods. PMID:27331806

  7. Kinetics of formation of three indicators of the maillard reaction in model cookies: influence of baking temperature and type of sugar.

    PubMed

    Charissou, Amèlie; Ait-Ameur, Lamia; Birlouez-Aragon, Inès

    2007-05-30

    The Maillard reaction (MR), despite its impact on flavor, color, and texture of cereal products, must be controlled for possible deleterious effects on protein nutritional quality. The present study aims to simultaneously monitor three indicators of the MR reaction (acid-released lysine, furosine, and carboxymethyllysine (CML)) by GC/MS in model cookies and evaluate the effect of formulation and baking temperature. Whereas furosine followed a bell-shape kinetic, indicative of an intermediary compound, CML linearly accumulated, proving to be a good indicator of the advanced MR. Acid-released lysine continuously decreased during baking. A reference baking level was defined to compare differently processed cookies using fluorescence synchronous spectra, highly sensitive to the dough physicochemical properties. Furosine was maximal in glucose-containing cookies, but only accounted for 5-50% lysine blockage, depending on the sugar and baking temperature. High oven temperatures and the use of fructose as the sugar source were associated with lowest the lysine damage and CML formation.

  8. Kinetics of formation of three indicators of the maillard reaction in model cookies: influence of baking temperature and type of sugar.

    PubMed

    Charissou, Amèlie; Ait-Ameur, Lamia; Birlouez-Aragon, Inès

    2007-05-30

    The Maillard reaction (MR), despite its impact on flavor, color, and texture of cereal products, must be controlled for possible deleterious effects on protein nutritional quality. The present study aims to simultaneously monitor three indicators of the MR reaction (acid-released lysine, furosine, and carboxymethyllysine (CML)) by GC/MS in model cookies and evaluate the effect of formulation and baking temperature. Whereas furosine followed a bell-shape kinetic, indicative of an intermediary compound, CML linearly accumulated, proving to be a good indicator of the advanced MR. Acid-released lysine continuously decreased during baking. A reference baking level was defined to compare differently processed cookies using fluorescence synchronous spectra, highly sensitive to the dough physicochemical properties. Furosine was maximal in glucose-containing cookies, but only accounted for 5-50% lysine blockage, depending on the sugar and baking temperature. High oven temperatures and the use of fructose as the sugar source were associated with lowest the lysine damage and CML formation. PMID:17469839

  9. The decrease in the IgG-binding capacity of intensively dry heated whey proteins is associated with intense Maillard reaction, structural changes of the proteins and formation of RAGE-ligands.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fahui; Teodorowicz, Małgorzata; van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Wichers, Harry J; Hettinga, Kasper A

    2016-01-01

    Heat treatment is the most common way of milk processing, inducing structural changes as well as chemical modifications in milk proteins. These modifications influence the immune-reactivity and allergenicity of milk proteins. This study shows the influence of dry heating on the solubility, particle size, loss of accessible thiol and amino groups, degree of Maillard reaction, IgG-binding capacity and binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) of thermally treated and glycated whey proteins. A mixture of whey proteins and lactose was dry heated at 130 °C up to 20 min to mimic the baking process in two different water activities, 0.23 to mimic the heating in the dry state and 0.59 for the semi-dry state. The dry heating was accompanied by a loss of soluble proteins and an increase in the size of dissolved aggregates. Most of the Maillard reaction sites were found to be located in the reported conformational epitope area on whey proteins. Therefore the structural changes, including exposure of the SH group, SH-SS exchange, covalent cross-links and the loss of available lysine, subsequently resulted in a decreased IgG-binding capacity (up to 33%). The binding of glycation products to RAGE increased with the heating time, which was correlated with the stage of the Maillard reaction and the decrease in the IgG-binding capacity. The RAGE-binding capacity was higher in samples with a lower water activity (0.23). These results indicate that the intensive dry heating of whey proteins as it occurs during baking may be of importance to the immunological properties of allergens in cow's milk, both due to chemical modifications of the allergens and formation of AGEs.

  10. Sugar-Conjugated Bis(glycinato)copper(II) Complexes and Their Modulating Influence on the Maillard Reaction.

    PubMed

    Nashalian, Ossanna; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2015-05-01

    Transition metal ions are known to play an important role in the Maillard reaction in catalyzing redox reactions. They can also form strong binary complexes with amino acids with increased reactivity toward smaller aldehydes. To take advantage of this enhanced reactivity and to demonstrate the ability of glucose to conjugate with glycine copper complexes, model systems containing (Gly)2Cu and glucose or their isotopically enriched counterparts were heated in aqueous solutions in the presence and absence of paraformaldehyde at 110 °C for 2 h and the residues were analyzed by electrospray ionization/quadrupole time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (ESI/qTOF/MS). Isotope-labeling studies have indicated the ability of (Gly)2Cu complexes to act as molecular scaffolds and undergo multiple reactions with glucose to generate various complexes of sugar conjugates. These relatively stable intermediates allowed for the slower release of aroma and browning precursors, such as Amadori products, during heating, as assessed by the extent of browning and total volatile release. PMID:25891171

  11. Role of choline and glycine betaine in the formation of N,N-dimethylpiperidinium (mepiquat) under Maillard reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Bessaire, Thomas; Tarres, Adrienne; Stadler, Richard H; Delatour, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    This study is the first to examine the role of choline and glycine betaine, naturally present in some foods, in particular in cereal grains, to generate N,N-dimethylpiperidinium (mepiquat) under Maillard conditions via transmethylation reactions involving the nucleophile piperidine. The formation of mepiquat and its intermediates piperidine - formed by cyclisation of free lysine in the presence of reducing sugars - and N-methylpiperidine were monitored over time (240°C, up to 180 min) using high-resolution mass spectrometry in a model system comprised of a ternary mixture of lysine/fructose/alkylating agent (choline or betaine). The reaction yield was compared with data recently determined for trigonelline, a known methylation agent present naturally in coffee beans. The role of choline and glycine betaine in nucleophilic displacement reactions was further supported by experiments carried out with stable isotope-labelled precursors (¹³C- and deuterium-labelled). The results unequivocally demonstrated that the piperidine ring of mepiquat originates from the carbon chain of lysine, and that either choline or glycine betaine furnishes the N-methyl groups. The kinetics of formation of the corresponding demethylated products of both choline and glycine betaine, N,N-demethyl-2-aminoethanol and N,N-dimethylglycine, respectively, were also determined using high-resolution mass spectrometry. PMID:25333319

  12. The Maillard reaction of a shrimp by-product protein hydrolysate: chemical changes and inhibiting effects of reactive oxygen species in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zha, Fengchao; Wei, Binbin; Chen, Shengjun; Dong, Shiyuan; Zeng, Mingyong; Liu, Zunying

    2015-06-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to improving the antioxidant activity of protein hydrolysates via the Maillard reaction, but little is known about the cellular antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) from protein hydrolysates. We first investigated chemical characterization and the cellular antioxidant activity of MRPs in a shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) by-product protein hydrolysate (SBH)-glucose system at 110 °C for up to 10 h of heating. Solutions of SBH and glucose were also heated alone as controls. The Maillard reaction greatly resulted in the increase of hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and browning intensity, high molecular weight fraction, and reduction of the total amino acid in SBH with the heating time, which correlated well with the free radical scavenging activity of MRPs. MRPs had stronger inhibiting effects on oxidative stress of human HepG2 cells than the original SBH, and its cellular antioxidant activity strongly correlated with free radical scavenging activity, but less affected by the browning intensity and HMF level. The caramelization of glucose partially affected the HMF level and free radical scavenging activity of MRPs, but it was not related to the cellular antioxidant activity. The cellular antioxidant activity of MRPs for 5 h of heating time appeared to reach a maximum level, which was mainly due to carbonyl ammonia condensation reaction. In conclusion, the Maillard reaction is a potential method to increase the cellular antioxidant activity of a shrimp by-product protein hydrolysate, but the higher HMF levels and the lower amino acid content in MRPs should also be considered.

  13. A potential fluorescent probe: Maillard reaction product from glutathione and ascorbic acid for rapid and label-free dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiang Xue; Song, Xiao Fang; Shi, Yan; Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Bang Lin; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-07-15

    Maillard reactions and their fluorescent products have drawn much attention in the fields of food and life science, however, the application of fluorescent products separated from the reaction as an indicator for detection of certain substances in sensor field has not been mentioned. In this article, we report on an easy-to-synthesize and water-soluble fluorescent probe separated from the typical Maillard reaction products of glutathione and ascorbic acid, with excellent stability and high quantum yield (18.2%). The further application of the probe has been explored for dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols including cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione, which is based on Hg(2+)-induced fluorescence quenching of the Maillard reaction fluorescent products (MRFPs) and the fluorescence recovery as the introduction of biothiols. This sensing system exhibits a good selectivity and sensitivity, and the linear ranges for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 0.05-12, 0.5-10, 0.3-20, and 0.3-20μM, respectively. The detection limits for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 22, 47, 96, and 30nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. Furthermore, the practical applications of this sensor for Hg(2+) and biothiols determination in water samples and human plasma sample have been demonstrated with satisfactory results. PMID:27015151

  14. A potential fluorescent probe: Maillard reaction product from glutathione and ascorbic acid for rapid and label-free dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiang Xue; Song, Xiao Fang; Shi, Yan; Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Bang Lin; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-07-15

    Maillard reactions and their fluorescent products have drawn much attention in the fields of food and life science, however, the application of fluorescent products separated from the reaction as an indicator for detection of certain substances in sensor field has not been mentioned. In this article, we report on an easy-to-synthesize and water-soluble fluorescent probe separated from the typical Maillard reaction products of glutathione and ascorbic acid, with excellent stability and high quantum yield (18.2%). The further application of the probe has been explored for dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols including cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione, which is based on Hg(2+)-induced fluorescence quenching of the Maillard reaction fluorescent products (MRFPs) and the fluorescence recovery as the introduction of biothiols. This sensing system exhibits a good selectivity and sensitivity, and the linear ranges for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 0.05-12, 0.5-10, 0.3-20, and 0.3-20μM, respectively. The detection limits for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 22, 47, 96, and 30nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. Furthermore, the practical applications of this sensor for Hg(2+) and biothiols determination in water samples and human plasma sample have been demonstrated with satisfactory results.

  15. Structural Modification and Bioavailability of Starch Components As Related to the Extent of Maillard Reaction: An Enzymatic Degradation and a Solid-State (13)C CPMAS NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Pizzoferrato; Paci; Rotilio

    1998-02-16

    Starch and starch components, amylose and amylopectin, from potato, have been studied in order to understand the modifications, induced by different levels of the Maillard reaction occurring in the presence of amino acids (L-lysine in this study), in the macromolecular structure and digestibility. Structural characterization was performed by (13)C CPMAS NMR, and differences in the bioavailability of these polymers were studied by enzymatic degradation kinetics. Results obtained reveal that changes are induced by the Maillard reaction, whose occurrence has been verified and measured by the furosine (epsilon-N-2-furoylmethyl-L-lysine) evaluation, on the macromolecular structure of starchy materials and on their enzymatic susceptibility. Lysine seems to act as a disordering agent; a loss of crystallinity is evident for starch and amylopectin and, in particular, for amylose. Finally, within the same sample, as the lysine concentration increases, the polymer digestibility decreases, confirming that structural organization is not the only determinant of starch digestibility. PMID:10554259

  16. Evolution of protein bound Maillard reaction end-products and free Amadori compounds in low lactose milk in presence of fructosamine oxidase I.

    PubMed

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Buonanno, Martina; Fiore, Alberto; Monti, Simona Maria; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Thermal treatments and storage influence milk quality, particularly in low lactose milk as the higher concentration of reducing sugars can lead to the increased formation of the Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The control of the Amadori products (APs) formation is the key step to mitigate the Maillard reaction (MR) in milk. The use of fructosamine oxidases, (Faox) provided promising results. In this paper, the effects of Faox I were evaluated by monitoring the concentration of free and bound MRPs in low lactose milk during shelf life. Results showed that the enzyme reduced the formation of protein-bound MRPs down to 79% after six days at 37°C. Faox I lowered the glycation of almost all the free amino acids resulting effective on basic and polar amino acids. Data here reported corroborate previous findings on the potentiality of Faox enzymes in controlling the early stage of the MR in foods.

  17. Antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) in a lipid-rich model system.

    PubMed

    Vhangani, Lusani Norah; Van Wyk, Jessy

    2016-10-01

    Ribose-lysine (RL), ribose-glycine (RG), fructose-lysine (FL) and fructose-glycine (FG) Maillard models (whole mixture (WM) pH 4 and 9) were heated at 60, 80, 121°C for 30, 60, 120min, and dialysed into low (LMW) and high molecular weight (HMW) fractions. Reducing power (RP), DPPH and peroxyl radical scavenging (PRS) evaluated indirect antioxidant activity (AA). Direct AA in a water-in-oil emulsion was evaluated through peroxide value (PV), p-anisidine, TBARs inhibition and oxidative stability (OS). PRS and RP increased significantly with temperature and time from FLWM>HMW. With DPPH, only MRPs at 121°C exhibited higher AA than BHA. MRPs exhibited low PV, p-anisidine and inhibited the formation of TBARs. BHA showed the highest OS, with p-anisidine, PV and inhibition of TBARS similar to that of MRPs. PMID:27132854

  18. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity of glucose-cysteine Maillard reaction products in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixing; Su, Linliang; Li, Fenfang; Wang, Chaozheng; Yuan, Debao; Chen, Jiao; Tan, Lin; Jin, Zhiqiang; Ma, Weihong

    2015-06-01

    Maillard reaction products (MRPs) derived from glucose-cysteine reactions have excellent anti-browning ability. However, there is a lack of information about their acute and sub-chronic toxicities. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate the acute and sub-chronic toxicities of MRPs in experimental animals. Acute toxicity testing and analysis by Horn's method showed that the median lethal oral dose (LD50) of MRPs in rats was 6.81 g/kg body weight. The sub-chronic toxicity test involved feeding rats with diet containing 0, 0.43, 0.85, or 1.70% (w/w) MRPs for 90 days. These treatments did not affect mortality, gross pathology, histology, hematology, or blood chemistry, and there were no dose-dependent changes in feed consumption. Based on these results, the dietary no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for 90-day exposure was 1.29 and 1.51 g MRPs/kg body weight/day for male and female rats, respectively. PMID:25817020

  19. Characterization and emulsifying properties of β-lactoglobulin-gum Acacia Seyal conjugates prepared via the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Bi, Binwei; Yang, Hao; Fang, Yapeng; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Phillips, Glyn O

    2017-01-01

    Gum Acacia Seyal (ASY) is less valued than is gum Acacia Senegal, due to its poor emulsifying ability. The present study investigated the Maillard reaction between ASY and β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and its impact on the emulsifying properties of ASY. The reaction products of BLG/ASY mixture (r=1/4), prepared by dry-heating at 60°C and a relative humidity of 79%, as a function of incubation time, were characterized by SDS-PAGE, GPC-MALLS and DSC. The results showed that 12-24h of dry-heating under the given conditions was sufficient for conjugation, meanwhile avoiding the formation of deeply coloured and insoluble melanoidins. More than 64% of the protein was incorporated into ASY, resulting in a two-fold increase in arabinogalactan-protein (AGP) content and 3.5 times increase in weight-average molecular mass of ASY. The conjugation with BLG markedly improved the stability of ASY-stabilized emulsions and their resistance against severe conditions, such as low pH and high saline conditions. PMID:27507517

  20. Changes in the physicochemical characteristics, including flavour components and Maillard reaction products, of non-centrifugal cane brown sugar during storage.

    PubMed

    Asikin, Yonathan; Kamiya, Asahiro; Mizu, Masami; Takara, Kensaku; Tamaki, Hajime; Wada, Koji

    2014-04-15

    Changes in the quality attributes of non-centrifugal cane brown sugar represented by physicochemical characteristics as well as flavour components and Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were monitored every 3 months over 1 year of storage. Stored cane brown sugar became darker, and its moisture content and water activity (a(w)) increased during storage. Fructose and glucose levels decreased as non-enzymatic browning via the Maillard reaction occurred in the stored sample, and a similar trend was also discovered in aconitic and acetic acids. Stored cane brown sugar lost its acidic and sulfuric odours (58.70-39.35% and 1.85-0.08%, respectively); subsequently, the nutty and roasted aroma increased from 26.52% to 38.59% due to the volatile MRPs. The browning rate of stored cane brown sugar was positively associated with the development of volatile MRPs (Pearson's coefficient = 0.860), whereas the amount of 3-deoxyglucosone, an intermediate product of the Maillard reaction, had a lower association with the brown colour due to its relatively slow degradation rate.

  1. Response surface methodology for meat-like odorants from the Maillard reaction with glutathione II: the tendencies analysis of meat-like donors.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Song, H L; Chen, F; Zou, T T

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the flavor effect of molecules on food products is fundamental for the food technologist. In this study, the formation of different meat-like compounds was controlled by various influence factors. Furthermore, the concept of interrelationships between Maillard reaction products (MRPs) was demonstrated by statistical analysis for the first time, which provides data and hence production system parameters by which to generate and optimize meat-like flavors through Maillard reactions. We report here the analysis and synthesis trend of the 13 meat-like donors which are regarded as forming the major flavor compounds of cooked meat. Response surface methodology (RSM) has not previously been reported in the literature as a technique to identify which parameters have the greatest influence on the synthesis of these flavor compounds. RSM has been used here to identify the influence of initial pH and ΔpH on flavor compound generation. As all ΔpH had positive RSM values between 0.5 and 1.5 it can be concluded that MRPs of this meat flavor-adapted system would be mostly acidic. These positive values also indicate that under this condition the Maillard reaction is stable and will therefore promote more meat-like flavor compounds to be generated. In addition to ΔpH, varied concentrations of glutathione, cysteine, thiamine, and xylose were investigated for their ability to influence the generation of meat-like flavors. PMID:22416688

  2. Changes in the physicochemical characteristics, including flavour components and Maillard reaction products, of non-centrifugal cane brown sugar during storage.

    PubMed

    Asikin, Yonathan; Kamiya, Asahiro; Mizu, Masami; Takara, Kensaku; Tamaki, Hajime; Wada, Koji

    2014-04-15

    Changes in the quality attributes of non-centrifugal cane brown sugar represented by physicochemical characteristics as well as flavour components and Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were monitored every 3 months over 1 year of storage. Stored cane brown sugar became darker, and its moisture content and water activity (a(w)) increased during storage. Fructose and glucose levels decreased as non-enzymatic browning via the Maillard reaction occurred in the stored sample, and a similar trend was also discovered in aconitic and acetic acids. Stored cane brown sugar lost its acidic and sulfuric odours (58.70-39.35% and 1.85-0.08%, respectively); subsequently, the nutty and roasted aroma increased from 26.52% to 38.59% due to the volatile MRPs. The browning rate of stored cane brown sugar was positively associated with the development of volatile MRPs (Pearson's coefficient = 0.860), whereas the amount of 3-deoxyglucosone, an intermediate product of the Maillard reaction, had a lower association with the brown colour due to its relatively slow degradation rate. PMID:24295691

  3. A novel method for beef bone protein extraction by lipase-pretreatment and its application in the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiqing; Li, Sisi; Fan, Li; Hayat, Khizar; Xiao, Zuobing; Chen, Lihua; Tang, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Five beef bone hydrolysates were obtained by different enzyme treatment schemes, including papain (M), combination of porcine pancreatic lipase and papain (Z+M, combination of lipase and papain (Y+M), Protamex (F), combination of porcine pancreatic lipase and Protamex (Z+F). The degree of hydrolysis (DH), free amino acids and molecular weight distribution of these hydrolysates were evaluated. To further explore the differences between these five hydrolysates, Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were prepared using a xylose/cysteine/hydrolysate model. It was found that the DH, content of low molecular weight peptides and amino acids of hydrolysates increased significantly after lipase pre-treatment. GC-MS showed that the total content of furans, pyrroles and thioethers in MRPs Y+M increased by 78.0% compared with MRPs M, while in MRPs Z+F, pyrazines increased by 44.1% compared with MRPs F. Examining the sensory characteristics of the MRPs, the MRP from the hydrolysate of Y+M had the best mouthful, umami and meaty characteristics. The correlation analysis further confirmed that an appropriate lipase pre-treatment could improve the flavour of MRPs. PMID:27132826

  4. A novel method for beef bone protein extraction by lipase-pretreatment and its application in the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiqing; Li, Sisi; Fan, Li; Hayat, Khizar; Xiao, Zuobing; Chen, Lihua; Tang, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Five beef bone hydrolysates were obtained by different enzyme treatment schemes, including papain (M), combination of porcine pancreatic lipase and papain (Z+M, combination of lipase and papain (Y+M), Protamex (F), combination of porcine pancreatic lipase and Protamex (Z+F). The degree of hydrolysis (DH), free amino acids and molecular weight distribution of these hydrolysates were evaluated. To further explore the differences between these five hydrolysates, Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were prepared using a xylose/cysteine/hydrolysate model. It was found that the DH, content of low molecular weight peptides and amino acids of hydrolysates increased significantly after lipase pre-treatment. GC-MS showed that the total content of furans, pyrroles and thioethers in MRPs Y+M increased by 78.0% compared with MRPs M, while in MRPs Z+F, pyrazines increased by 44.1% compared with MRPs F. Examining the sensory characteristics of the MRPs, the MRP from the hydrolysate of Y+M had the best mouthful, umami and meaty characteristics. The correlation analysis further confirmed that an appropriate lipase pre-treatment could improve the flavour of MRPs.

  5. Modification of soy protein hydrolysates by Maillard reaction: Effects of carbohydrate chain length on structural and interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Haibo; He, Zhiyong; Zeng, Maomao; Qin, Fang; Chen, Jie

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of carbohydrate chain length on the structural and interfacial properties of the Maillard reaction conjugates of soy protein hydrolysates (Mw>30 kDa). The covalent attachment of sugars to soy peptides was confirmed by amino acid analysis and examination of the Fourier-transform infrared spectra. The results suggested that the emulsion stability of the conjugates increased as the length of the carbohydrate chains increased. The surface activity measurement revealed that the soy peptide-dextran conjugates were closely packed and that each molecule occupied a small area of the interface. It was further confirmed that the soy peptide-dextran conjugates formed a thick adsorbed layer at the oil-water interface, as observed in the confocal laser scanning micrographs. The interfacial layer of soy peptides was rheologically complex with broad linear viscoelastic region and strong elastic modulus, and the soy peptide-dextran conjugates might form multilayer adsorption at the interface. This study suggested that the improved surface properties of the soy peptide-dextran conjugates were a result of the strong membrane formed by the closely packed molecular and multilayer adsorption at the interface, which provided steric hindrance to flocculation. PMID:26655794

  6. Protective Effects of Maillard Reaction Products of Whey Protein Concentrate against Oxidative Stress through an Nrf2-Dependent Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Min Cheol; Yang, Sung-Yong; Chun, Su-Hyun; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-09-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC), which contains α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, is utilized widely in the food industry. The Maillard reaction is a complex reaction that produces Maillard reaction products (MRPs), which are associated with the formation of antioxidant compounds. In this study, the hepatoprotection activity of MRPs of WPC against oxidative stress through the nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent antioxidant pathway in HepG2 cells was examined. Glucose-whey protein concentrate conjugate (Glc-WPC) was obtained from Maillard reaction between WPC and glucose. The fluorescence intensity of Glc-WPC increased after 7 d compared to native WPC, and resulted in loss of 48% of the free amino groups of WPC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns of Glc-WPC showed the presence of a high-molecular-weight portion. Treatment of HepG2 cells with Glc-WPC increased cell viability in the presence of oxidative stress, inhibited the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), and increased the glutathione level. Nrf2 translocation and Nrf2, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H)-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NOQ1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutamate-L-cysteine ligase (GCL)M and GCLC mRNA levels were increased by Glc-WPC. Also, Glc-WPC increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The results of this study demonstrate that Glc-WPC activates the Nrf2-dependent pathway through the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK in HepG2 cells, and induces production of antioxidant enzymes and phase II enzymes. PMID:27320783

  7. Fragmentation pathways during Maillard-induced carbohydrate degradation.

    PubMed

    Smuda, Mareen; Glomb, Marcus A

    2013-10-30

    The Maillard reaction network with focus on the chemistry of dicarbonyl structures causes considerable interest of research groups in food chemistry and medical science, respectively. Dicarbonyl compounds are well established as the central intermediates in the nonenzymatic browning reaction and have been verified to be responsible for advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) formation. A multitude of Maillard dicarbonyls covering the range of the intact carbon backbone down to C3 and C2 fragments were detected in several carbohydrate systems, for example, in glucose, maltose, or ascorbic acid reactions. By definition, dicarbonyls with a C2-C5 carbon backbone must originate by fission of the original carbon skeleton. The present review deals with the five major mechanisms reported in the literature for dicarbonyl decomposition: (i) retro-aldol fragmentation, (ii) hydrolytic α-dicarbonyl cleavage, (iii) oxidative α-dicarbonyl cleavage, (iv) hydrolytic β-dicarbonyl cleavage, and (v) amine-induced β-dicarbonyl cleavage.

  8. Fragmentation pathways during Maillard-induced carbohydrate degradation.

    PubMed

    Smuda, Mareen; Glomb, Marcus A

    2013-10-30

    The Maillard reaction network with focus on the chemistry of dicarbonyl structures causes considerable interest of research groups in food chemistry and medical science, respectively. Dicarbonyl compounds are well established as the central intermediates in the nonenzymatic browning reaction and have been verified to be responsible for advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) formation. A multitude of Maillard dicarbonyls covering the range of the intact carbon backbone down to C3 and C2 fragments were detected in several carbohydrate systems, for example, in glucose, maltose, or ascorbic acid reactions. By definition, dicarbonyls with a C2-C5 carbon backbone must originate by fission of the original carbon skeleton. The present review deals with the five major mechanisms reported in the literature for dicarbonyl decomposition: (i) retro-aldol fragmentation, (ii) hydrolytic α-dicarbonyl cleavage, (iii) oxidative α-dicarbonyl cleavage, (iv) hydrolytic β-dicarbonyl cleavage, and (v) amine-induced β-dicarbonyl cleavage. PMID:23425499

  9. Modelling the Maillard reaction during the cooking of a model cheese.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Emmanuel; Meyer, Xuân-Mi; Machado-Maturana, Elizabeth; Berdagué, Jean-Louis; Kondjoyan, Alain

    2015-10-01

    During processing and storage of industrial processed cheese, odorous compounds are formed. Some of them are potentially unwanted for the flavour of the product. To reduce the appearance of these compounds, a methodological approach was employed. It consists of: (i) the identification of the key compounds or precursors responsible for the off-flavour observed, (ii) the monitoring of these markers during the heat treatments applied to the cheese medium, (iii) the establishment of an observable reaction scheme adapted from a literature survey to the compounds identified in the heated cheese medium (iv) the multi-responses stoichiokinetic modelling of these reaction markers. Systematic two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for the semi-quantitation of trace compounds. Precursors were quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography. The experimental data obtained were fitted to the model with 14 elementary linked reactions forming a multi-response observable reaction scheme.

  10. Prenatal dietary load of Maillard reaction products combined with postnatal Coca-Cola drinking affects metabolic status of female Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Gurecká, Radana; Koborová, Ivana; Janšáková, Katarína; Tábi, Tamás; Szökő, Éva; Somoza, Veronika; Šebeková, Katarína; Celec, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess the impact of prenatal exposure to Maillard reaction products (MRPs) -rich diet and postnatal Coca-Cola consumption on metabolic status of female rats. Diet rich in MRPs and consumption of saccharose/fructose sweetened soft drinks is presumed to impose increased risk of development of cardiometabolic afflictions, such as obesity or insulin resistance. Methods At the first day of pregnancy, 9 female Wistar rats were randomized into two groups, pair-fed either with standard rat chow (MRP-) or MRPs-rich diet (MRP+). Offspring from each group of mothers was divided into two groups and given either water (Cola-) or Coca-Cola (Cola+) for drinking ad libitum for 18 days. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed, and circulating markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, glucose and lipid metabolism were assessed. Results MRP+ groups had higher weight gain, significantly so in the MRP+/Cola- vs MRP-/Cola-. Both prenatal and postnatal intervention increased carboxymethyllysine levels and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity, both significantly higher in MRP+/Cola + than in MRP-/Cola-. Total antioxidant capacity was lower in MRP+ groups, with significant decrease in MRP+/Cola + vs MRP-/Cola+. Rats drinking Coca-Cola had higher insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, heart rate, advanced oxidation of protein products, triacylglycerols, and oxidative stress markers measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances compared to rats drinking water, with no visible effect of MRPs-rich diet. Conclusion Metabolic status of rats was affected both by prenatal and postnatal dietary intervention. Our results suggest that combined effect of prenatal MRPs load and postnatal Coca-Cola drinking may play a role in development of metabolic disorders in later life. PMID:25891868

  11. Conversion of Amadori products of the Maillard reaction to N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine by short-term heating: possible detection of artifacts by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Miki Hayashi, Cristina; Nagai, Ryoji; Miyazaki, Kiminori; Hayase, Fumitaka; Araki, Tomohiro; Ono, Tomomichi; Horiuchi, Seikoh

    2002-06-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) of the Maillard reaction increases by aging and in age-enhanced diseases such as atherosclerosis and diabetic complications. Immunohistochemical analysis has been used to demonstrate AGE in vivo. In immunochemistry, the heat-induced epitope retrieval technique is extensively used with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Here we examined whether AGE could be formed artificially through the heating process. Normal rat skin and liver samples were divided into two groups, one rapidly frozen, the other formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and submitted to heat-induced epitope retrieval treatment. In heat-treated sections, the cytoplasm of rat epidermal cells and hepatocytes were strongly stained by monoclonal antibody against N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), while the staining was negligible in either frozen sections or in paraffin-embedded but heat-untreated sections. To clarify the mechanism, we conducted heat treatment to glycated human serum albumin (HSA), a model Amadori protein, and generation of CML was determined by immunochemical and HPLC analysis. CML was generated from glycated HSA by heat treatment (above 80 degrees C) and increased in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, generation of CML from glycated HSA was significantly inhibited in the presence of NaBH4, a reducing agent, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, a chelator of transition metal ion, or aminoguanidine, a trapping reagent for alpha-oxoaldehydes. Furthermore, heat-induced CML formation in rat liver samples determined by HPLC was markedly reduced by pretreatment with NaBH4. Reactive intermediates such as glucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, methylglyoxal, and glyoxal were formed upon heat treatment of glycated HSA at 100 degrees C, indicating that these aldehydes generated from Amadori products by oxidative cleavage can contribute to further CML formation. CML generated by heating, directly from Amadori products or via these

  12. Effect of seed roasting on canolol, tocopherol, and phospholipid contents, Maillard type reactions, and oxidative stability of mustard and rapeseed oils.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Kshitij; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2014-06-18

    This work was carried out to study the effect of roasting on different compositional parameters and oil oxidative stability of three Brassica species (Brassica juncea (BJ), B. juncea var. oriental (BJO), and Brassica napus (rapeseed, RS)). After 10 min of roasting at 165 °C, canolol contents of BJ, BJO, and RS oil reached 297.8, 171.6, and 808.5 μg/g, and the phospholipid phosphorus contents reached 453.6, 342.6, and 224.2 μg/g oil, respectively. The BJ and BJO seeds showed more prominent browning reactions than RS, due to the presence of higher amounts of reducing sugars, lysine, arginine and the occurrence of Maillard type browning reactions of phospholipids. The UV-visible spectra, fluorescence, and pyrrole content showed the presence of browning reaction products in the roasted seed oils. Roasting increased the oxidative stability of all varieties. Canolol formation could only partially explain such observations. Other roasting effects such as phospholipid extraction and Maillard type browning reaction products were also responsible for the increased stability. PMID:24884309

  13. Aldimine Formation Reaction, the First Step of the Maillard Early-phase Reaction, Might be Enhanced in Variant Hemoglobin, Hb Himeji.

    PubMed

    Koga, Masafumi; Inada, Shinya; Shimizu, Sayoko; Hatazaki, Masahiro; Umayahara, Yutaka; Nishihara, Eijun

    2015-01-01

    Hb Himeji (β140Ala→Asp) is known as a variant hemoglobin in which glycation is enhanced and HbA1c measured by immunoassay shows a high value. The phenomenon of enhanced glycation in Hb Himeji is based on the fact that the glycation product of variant hemoglobin (HbX1c) shows a higher value than HbA1c. In this study, we investigated whether aldimine formation reaction, the first step of the Maillard early-phase reaction, is enhanced in Hb Himeji in vitro. Three non-diabetic subjects with Hb Himeji and four non-diabetic subjects without variant hemoglobin were enrolled. In order to examine aldimine formation reaction, whole blood cells were incubated with 500 mg/dl of glucose at 37°C for 1 hour and were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Both HbA1c and HbX1c were not increased in this condition. After incubation with glucose, labile HbA1c (LA1c) fraction increased in the controls (1.1±0.3%). In subjects with Hb Himeji increases in the labile HbX1c (LX1c) fraction as well as the LA1c fraction were observed, and the degree of increase in the LX1c fraction was significantly higher than that of the LA1c fraction (1.8±0.1% vs. 0.5±0.2%, P<0.01). We have shown for the first time that aldimine (LX1c) formation reaction might be enhanced in Hb Himeji in vitro. The 140th amino acid in β chain of hemoglobin is suggested to be involved in aldimine formation reaction.

  14. Characteristics and antioxidant activity of water-soluble Maillard reaction products from interactions in a whey protein isolate and sugars system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-qiong; Bao, Yi-hong; Chen, Ying

    2013-08-15

    The objective of this study was to determine antioxidant activities of water-soluble MRPs (Maillard reaction products) from the reactions between whey protein isolate (WPI) and xylose (X), glucose (G), fructose (F), lactose (L), maltose (M) and sucrose (S) at different initial pH values (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9). MRPs derived from the WPI-X system with increasing of pH rendered the highest browning, reducing power and DPPH radical-scavenging activity. SDS-PAGE analyses indicated formation of cross-linked proteins of large molecular mass produced from WPI-X systems. Results of FT-IR analysis indicated that the amide I, II and III bands of WPI from the WPI-X and WPI-G systems were changed by the Maillard reaction. CD spectroscopy showed that β-sheet, β-turns and random coil were increased while the α-helix was decreased after the WPI-G and WPI-X system aqueous solutions were heated. In conclusion, MRPs obtained from the WPI-X system had high antioxidant activity. PMID:23561117

  15. Mutagenicity of Maillard reaction products from D-glucose-amino acid mixtures and possible roles of active oxygens in the mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Kim, I S; Yeum, D M; Park, Y H

    1991-01-01

    The mutagenicity for Salmonella typhimurium TA100 without S9 mix of Maillard reaction products (MRP) obtained from equimolar amounts of glucose and amino acids under different pHs was investigated. MRP derived from arginine and lysine exhibited the strongest mutagenicity, and weaker mutagenicity was shown by the mixtures with alanine, serine, threonine and monosodium glutamate. MRP from proline and cysteine had no detectable mutagenicity. Furthermore, glucose-arginine and glucose-lysine reaction mixtures, which presented a marked mutagenicity, showed pH- and browning intensity-dependent expression of their mutagenic activities. The mutagenicity of MRP, especially glucose-arginine and glucose-lysine mixtures, was significantly suppressed by active oxygen scavengers such as cysteine, mannitol, alpha-tocopherol, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and reducing agents such as sodium bisulfite and glutathione. Among these desmutagenic factors tested, cysteine, catalase, sodium bisulfite and glutathione had higher desmutagenic activities than the others. Accordingly, it is assumed that the mutagenicity of MRP is due to the direct action of low-molecular-weight compounds such as carbonyls and heterocyclics produced by the Maillard reaction and is enhanced by active oxygens, especially singlet oxygen and hydrogen peroxide derived from their autoxidation. PMID:1986274

  16. Chemiluminescence development after initiation of Maillard reaction in aqueous solutions of glycine and glucose: nonlinearity of the process and cooperative properties of the reaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voeikov, Vladimir L.; Naletov, Vladimir I.

    1998-06-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of free or peptide bound amino acids (Maillard reaction, MR) plays an important role in aging, diabetic complications and atherosclerosis. MR taking place at high temperatures is accompanied by chemiluminescence (CL). Here kinetics of CL development in MR proceeding in model systems at room temperature has been analyzed for the first time. Brief heating of glycine and D-glucose solutions to t greater than 93 degrees Celsius results in their browning and appearance of fluorescencent properties. Developed In solutions rapidly cooled down to 20 degrees Celsius a wave of CL. It reached maximum intensity around 40 min after the reaction mixture heating and cooling it down. CL intensity elevation was accompanied by certain decoloration of the solution. Appearance of light absorbing substances and development of CL depended critically upon the temperature of preincubation (greater than or equal to 93 degrees Celsius), initial pH (greater than or equal to 11,2), sample volume (greater than or equal to 0.5 ml) and reagents concentrations. Dependence of total counts accumulation on a system volume over the critical volume was non-monotonous. After reaching maximum values CL began to decline, though only small part of glucose and glycin had been consumed. Brief heating of such solutions to the critical temperature resulted in emergence of a new CL wave. This procedure could be repeated in one and the same reaction system for several times. Whole CL kinetic curve best fitted to lognormal distribution. Macrokinetic properties of the process are characteristic of chain reactions with delayed branching. Results imply also, that self-organization occurs in this system, and that the course of the process strongly depends upon boundary conditions and periodic interference in its course.

  17. Impact of thermal processing and the Maillard reaction on the basophil activation of hazelnut allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Cucu, Tatiana; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Bridts, Chris; Devreese, Bart; Ebo, Didier

    2012-05-01

    Food allergy, an abnormal immunological response due to sensitization to a food component, has become an important health problem, especially in industrialized countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of thermal processing and glycation on the basophil activation by hazelnut proteins using a basophil activation test. Patients with systemic allergic reactions (SR; n=6) to hazelnut as well as patients with an isolated oral allergy syndrome (OAS; n=4) were investigated. Thermal processing of hazelnut proteins either in the presence or absence of wheat proteins did not result in major changes in the stimulatory activity of the basophils for patients with SR or OAS. For the patients with OAS, incubation of hazelnut proteins with glucose led to complete depletion of the stimulatory activity of the basophils. An increase in stimulatory activity of the basophils for two out of six patients with SR was observed. For the other four patients slight or complete abolition of the stimulatory activity was observed. These results indicate that some patients with SR to hazelnut are at risk when exposed to hazelnut proteins, even in processed foods.

  18. Chemical and Free Radical-scavenging Activity Changes of Ginsenoside Re by Maillard Reaction and Its Possible Use as a Renoprotective Agent

    PubMed Central

    Yamabe, Noriko; Song, Kyung Il; Lee, Woojung; Han, Im-Ho; Lee, Ji Hwan; Ham, Jungyeob; Kim, Su-Nam; Park, Jeong Hill; Kang, Ki Sung

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species play critical role in kidney damage. Free radical-scavenging activities of Panax ginseng are known to be increased by heat-processing. The structural change of ginsenoside and the generation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) are closely related to the increased free radical-scavenging activities. In the present study, we have demonstrated the Maillard reaction model experiment using ginsenoside Re and glycine mixture to identify the renoprotective effect of MRPs from ginseng or ginsenosides. Ginsenoside Re was transformed into less-polar ginsenosides, namely Rg2, Rg6 and F4 by heat-processing. The free radical-scavenging activity of ginsenoside Re-glycine mixture was increased in a temperature-dependant manner by heatprocessing. The improved free radical-scavenging activity by heat-processing was mediated by the generation of antioxidant MRPs which led to the protection of LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells from oxidative stress. Although the free radical scavenging activities of less-polar ginsenosides were weak, they could protect LLC-PK1 cells from oxidative stress. Therefore, MRPs and less-polar ginsenosides contributed to the combined renoprotective effects against oxidative renal damage. PMID:23717126

  19. Inhibiting the color formation by gradient temperature-elevating Maillard reaction of soybean peptide-xylose system based on interaction of l-cysteine and Amadori compounds.

    PubMed

    Huang, M G; Zhang, X M; Eric, K; Abbas, S; Hayat, K; Liu, P; Xia, S Q; Jia, C S

    2012-05-01

    Light color and savory flavor enhancer are attractive for consumers and food producers. The effect of addition time of l-cysteine on inhibiting color formation was investigated in soybean peptide-xylose system, and the possible pathway was explored. Once dicarbonyl compounds were formed during the Maillard reaction, the addition of l-cysteine had no color-inhibiting effect; if l-cysteine was added immediately after the Amadori compound was formed, the extraordinary color-inhibiting effect was observed. Therefore, an improved way to inhibit color formation was proposed on the basis of the interaction of l-cysteine and Amadori compounds by controlling the addition time of l-cysteine through gradient temperature-elevating Maillard reaction. The system was heated at 80 °C for 60 min to form Amadori compounds, followed by the addition of L-cysteine, and the temperature was raised to 120 °C and held for 110 min. Compared with traditional products, the lightest color product was found desirable by GC/MS analysis and sensory evaluation. The novel method proposed can be a guide for the industrial preparation of light-colored products.

  20. The Maillard hypothesis on aging: time to focus on DNA.

    PubMed

    Baynes, John W

    2002-04-01

    Aging is the outcome of the contest between chemistry and biology in living systems. Chronic, cumulative chemical modifications compromise the structure and function of biomolecules throughout the body. Proteins with long life spans serve as cumulators of exposure to chemical damage, which is detectable in the form of advanced glycation and lipoxidation end products (AGEs, ALEs); amino acids modified by reactive oxygen, chlorine, and nitrogen species; and deamidated and racemized amino acids. Not all of these modifications are oxidative in nature, although oxidative reactions are an important source of age-related damage. Measurements of AGEs and ALEs in proteins are useful for assessing the rate and extent of Maillard reaction damage, but it is the damage to the genome that undoubtedly has the greatest effect on the viability of the organism. The extent of genomic damage represents a balance between the rate of modification and the rate and fidelity of repair. Damage to DNA accumulates not in the form of modified nucleic acids, but as chemically "silent" errors in repair-insertions, deletions, substitutions, transpositions, and inversions in DNA sequences-that affect the expression and structure of proteins. These mutations are random, vary from cell to cell, and are passed forward from one cell generation to another. Although they are not detectable in DNA by conventional analytical techniques, purines and pyrimidines modified by Maillard reaction intermediates may be detectable in urine, and studies on these compounds should provide insight into the role of Maillard reactions of DNA in aging and disease.

  1. Influence of the maillard reaction on the allergenicity of rAra h 2, a recombinant major allergen from peanut (Arachis hypogaea), its major epitopes, and peanut agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Patrick; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Hofmann, Thomas

    2005-03-23

    The influence of thermal processing and nonenzymatic browning reactions on the IgE-binding activity of rAra h 2 was studied and compared to findings recently reported for the allergen's natural counterpart. ELISA experiments as well as inhibition assays revealed that thermal treatment of rAra h 2 in the presence of reactive carbohydrates and carbohydrate breakdown products induces a strong increase of the IgE-binding activity, thus collaborating with the data reported for the natural protein isolated from peanuts. To localize the Ara h 2 sequences responsible for the formation of highly IgE-affine glycation sites, model peptides have been synthesized mimicking sequences which contain possible targets for glycation as well as the immunodominant epitopes. Immunological evaluation of these peptides heated in the absence or presence of reducing sugars and carbonyls, respectively, revealed that neither the two lysine residues of Ara h 2 nor its N-terminus are involved in the formation of IgE-affine structures by Maillard reaction. Also, the cysteine-containing major epitope 3 (aa 27-36) was found to lose its IgE-binding capacity upon heating. By contrast, the overlapping major epitopes 6 and 7, which do not contain any lysine or arginine moieties, showed a distinct higher level of IgE binding when subjected to Maillard reaction, thus giving the first evidence that nonbasic amino acids might be accessible for nonenzymatic glycation reactions and that these posttranslational modifications might induce increased IgE binding of the glycated Ara h 2. Analogous experiments were performed with peanut agglutinin, considered in the literature as a minor allergen. ELISA experiments revealed that the majority of tested sera samples from peanut-sensitive patients showed a high level of IgE binding to the lectin even after heat treatment. In contradiction to published data, nonenzymatic browning reactions seem to deteriorate the IgE affinity of the lectin. PMID:15769170

  2. Low intramuscular fat (but high in PUFA) content in cooked cured pork ham decreased Maillard reaction volatiles and pleasing aroma attributes.

    PubMed

    Benet, Iu; Guàrdia, Maria Dolors; Ibañez, Carles; Solà, Josep; Arnau, Jacint; Roura, Eugeni

    2016-04-01

    The influence of intramuscular fat content (high - HI versus low - LI) and fatty acid composition on pork cooked cured ham flavour was analysed by gas chromatography-olfactometry using nasal impact frequency (GC-O/NIF) and quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA). Potential relationships were studied by principal component analysis (PCA). Sixteen and fourteen odourants were identified by GC-O/NIF in LI and HI cooked hams, respectively. The two ham types differed in lipid oxidation odourants: polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) derivatives hexanal, 1-octen-3-one and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal were higher in LI ham; while monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) derivative decanal was higher in HI. HI samples resulted in higher values for odour-active aroma compounds from Maillard reaction, which are related to roast flavour and a higher overall flavour liking. In summary, our results suggest that Maillard derived odour-active aroma compounds were partially inhibited in LI samples (high in PUFA), resulting in lower positive sensory ratings.

  3. Low intramuscular fat (but high in PUFA) content in cooked cured pork ham decreased Maillard reaction volatiles and pleasing aroma attributes.

    PubMed

    Benet, Iu; Guàrdia, Maria Dolors; Ibañez, Carles; Solà, Josep; Arnau, Jacint; Roura, Eugeni

    2016-04-01

    The influence of intramuscular fat content (high - HI versus low - LI) and fatty acid composition on pork cooked cured ham flavour was analysed by gas chromatography-olfactometry using nasal impact frequency (GC-O/NIF) and quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA). Potential relationships were studied by principal component analysis (PCA). Sixteen and fourteen odourants were identified by GC-O/NIF in LI and HI cooked hams, respectively. The two ham types differed in lipid oxidation odourants: polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) derivatives hexanal, 1-octen-3-one and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal were higher in LI ham; while monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) derivative decanal was higher in HI. HI samples resulted in higher values for odour-active aroma compounds from Maillard reaction, which are related to roast flavour and a higher overall flavour liking. In summary, our results suggest that Maillard derived odour-active aroma compounds were partially inhibited in LI samples (high in PUFA), resulting in lower positive sensory ratings. PMID:26593467

  4. Effect of olive mill wastewater phenol compounds on reactive carbonyl species and Maillard reaction end-products in ultrahigh-temperature-treated milk.

    PubMed

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Fiore, Alberto; Colantuono, Antonio; Kokkinidou, Smaro; Peterson, Devin G; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2014-10-15

    Thermal processing and Maillard reaction (MR) affect the nutritional and sensorial qualities of milk. In this paper an olive mill wastewater phenolic powder (OMW) was tested as a functional ingredient for inhibiting MR development in ultrahigh-temperature (UHT)-treated milk. OMW was added to milk at 0.1 and 0.05% w/v before UHT treatment, and the concentration of MR products was monitored to verify the effect of OMW phenols in controlling the MR. Results revealed that OMW is able to trap the reactive carbonyl species such as hydroxycarbonyls and dicarbonyls, which in turn led to the increase of Maillard-derived off-flavor development. The effect of OMW on the formation of Amadori products and N-ε-(carboxymethyl)-lysine (CML) showed that oxidative cleavage, C2-C6 cyclization, and the consequent reactive carbonyl species formation were also inhibited by OMW. Data indicated that OMW is a functional ingredient able to control the MR and to improve the nutritional and sensorial attributes of milk.

  5. Kinetics of color development, pH decreasing, and anti-oxidative activity reduction of Maillard reaction in galactose/glycine model systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shih-Chuan; Yang, Deng-Jye; Jin, Shu-Yi; Hsu, Chia-Hung; Chen, Su-Lin

    2008-05-15

    Galactose/glycine model systems of sugar concentration 0.035, 0.069, 0.139, and 0.278M were incubated at 60, 75, and 90°C separately for studying the reaction kinetics of color development, pH change, and system anti-oxidative activity change in Maillard reaction. The results indicated that system color development followed first-ordered kinetics on galactose concentration; system pH went linearly down with a logarithm-ordered kinetics on galactose concentration; and anti-oxidative activity reduced linearly with a first-ordered kinetics on galactose concentration. The values of Q10 and activation energy ranged from 1.98 to 2.00 and from 68.8 to 69.5kJ/mol, respectively, for these three properties. PMID:26059131

  6. Effects of roasting temperature and duration on fatty acid composition, phenolic composition, Maillard reaction degree and antioxidant attribute of almond (Prunus dulcis) kernel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jau-Tien; Liu, Shih-Chun; Hu, Chao-Chin; Shyu, Yung-Shin; Hsu, Chia-Ying; Yang, Deng-Jye

    2016-01-01

    Roasting treatment increased levels of unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic, oleic and elaidic acids) as well as saturated fatty acids (palmitic and stearic acids) in almond (Prunus dulcis) kernel oils with temperature (150 or 180 °C) and duration (5, 10 or 20 min). Nonetheless, higher temperature (200 °C) and longer duration (10 or 20 min) roasting might result in breakdown of fatty acids especially for unsaturated fatty acids. Phenolic components (total phenols, flavonoids, condensed tannins and phenolic acids) of almond kernels substantially lost in the initial phase; afterward these components gradually increased with roasting temperature and duration. Similar results also observed for their antioxidant activities (scavenging DPPH and ABTS(+) radicals and ferric reducing power). The changes of phenolic acid and flavonoid compositions were also determined by HPLC. Maillard reaction products (estimated with non-enzymatic browning index) also increased with roasting temperature and duration; they might also contribute to enhancing the antioxidant attributes.

  7. Effects of roasting temperature and duration on fatty acid composition, phenolic composition, Maillard reaction degree and antioxidant attribute of almond (Prunus dulcis) kernel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jau-Tien; Liu, Shih-Chun; Hu, Chao-Chin; Shyu, Yung-Shin; Hsu, Chia-Ying; Yang, Deng-Jye

    2016-01-01

    Roasting treatment increased levels of unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic, oleic and elaidic acids) as well as saturated fatty acids (palmitic and stearic acids) in almond (Prunus dulcis) kernel oils with temperature (150 or 180 °C) and duration (5, 10 or 20 min). Nonetheless, higher temperature (200 °C) and longer duration (10 or 20 min) roasting might result in breakdown of fatty acids especially for unsaturated fatty acids. Phenolic components (total phenols, flavonoids, condensed tannins and phenolic acids) of almond kernels substantially lost in the initial phase; afterward these components gradually increased with roasting temperature and duration. Similar results also observed for their antioxidant activities (scavenging DPPH and ABTS(+) radicals and ferric reducing power). The changes of phenolic acid and flavonoid compositions were also determined by HPLC. Maillard reaction products (estimated with non-enzymatic browning index) also increased with roasting temperature and duration; they might also contribute to enhancing the antioxidant attributes. PMID:26213005

  8. Investigations on the effect of antioxidant type and concentration and model system matrix on acrylamide formation in model Maillard reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Costas; Koutsidis, Georgios

    2016-04-15

    The formation of acrylamide in model Maillard reaction systems containing phenolic compounds was examined, with regards to phenolic type, concentration, and model system matrix. In dry glyoxal/asparagine waxy maize starch (WMS) systems, 9 out of 10 examined phenolics demonstrated an inhibiting effect, with the most significant reductions (55-60%) observed for caffeoylquinic acids. In WMS glucose/asparagine systems, examination of three different concentrations (0.1, 0.5 and 1 μmol/g WMS) suggested a 'minimum effective concentration' for epicatechin and caffeic acid, whilst addition of caffeoylquinic acids resulted in dose-dependent acrylamide reduction (25-75%). The discordant results of further studies utilising different matrices (dry and wet-to-dry) indicated that, apart from the nature and chemical reactivity, the matrix and the physical state of the reactants might be important for acrylamide formation.

  9. Mineral composition of seawater bittern nigari products and their effects on changing of browning and antioxidant activity in the glucose/lysine maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Takashi; Yano, Toshihiro

    2014-03-01

    Seawater bittern (nigari) is a concentrated solution remaining after the crystallization process of salt that has been used as a coagulant for tofu. Recently, various nigari products are distributed in the East Asia. To clarify the properties of nigari products, major mineral composition of six nigari products was determined. Then, effects of the nigari on the browning and antioxidant activity during the glucose/lysine Maillard reaction were investigated. Though the predominant cation was Mg(2+), the content was varied by each product (0.88-6.49 mol/L). The other major ion contents were also varied. Each 0.5 mol/L of D-glucose and L-lysine were incubated with the nigari (5-50% (v/v)) or nigari-related salts (1 or 2 mol/L). The browning (OD at 465 nm) and antioxidant activity (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging capacity and ferrous-reducing power) were increased remarkably by the nigari containing high Mg(2+) content. The browning tended to be high with sulfates (Na2SO4, (NH4)2SO4). On the other hand, high content of MgCl2 decreased slightly the browning and antioxidant activity. These results suggest that the reaction and antioxidant activities were affected not only by salinity and cations but also by anions and other elements in the nigari.

  10. Assessment of protein quality of soybean meal and 00-rapeseed meal toasted in the presence of lignosulfonate by amino acid digestibility in growing pigs and Maillard reaction products.

    PubMed

    Hulshof, T G; Bikker, P; van der Poel, A F B; Hendriks, W H

    2016-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine protein quality in processed protein sources using the content of AA, -methylisourea (OMIU)-reactive Lys, Maillard reaction products (MRP), and cross-link products; the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of CP and AA; and growth performance in growing pigs as criteria. Differences in protein quality were created by secondary toasting (at 95°C for 30 min) of soybean meal (SBM) and rapeseed meal (RSM) in the presence of lignosulfonate resulting in processed SBM (pSBM) and processed RSM (pRSM). The processing treatment was used as a model for overprocessed protein sources. Ten growing pigs were each fed 1 of the 4 diets containing SBM, pSBM, RSM, or pRSM in each of 3 periods. Ileal chyme was collected at the end of each period and analyzed for CP, AA, and OMIU-reactive Lys. Diets were analyzed for furosine and carboxymethyllysine (CML) as an indicator for MRP and lysinoalanine (LAL), which is a cross-link product. The SBM and RSM diets contained furosine, CML, and LAL, indicating that the Maillard reaction and cross-linking had taken place in SBM and RSM, presumably during the oil extraction/desolventizing process. The amounts of furosine, CML, and LAL were elevated in pSBM and pRSM due to further processing. Processing resulted in a reduction in total and OMIU-reactive Lys contents and a decrease in G:F from 0.52 to 0.42 for SBM and 0.46 to 0.39 for RSM ( = 0.006), SID of CP from 83.9 to 71.6% for SBM and 74.9 to 64.6% for RSM ( < 0.001), and SID of AA ( < 0.001), with the largest effects for total and OMIU-reactive Lys. The effects of processing could be substantial and should be taken into account when using processed protein sources in diets for growing pigs. The extent of protein damage may be assessed by additional analyses of MRP and cross-link products. PMID:27065264

  11. DJ-1 family Maillard deglycases prevent acrylamide formation.

    PubMed

    Richarme, Gilbert; Marguet, Evelyne; Forterre, Patrick; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-09-23

    The presence of acrylamide in food is a worldwide concern because it is carcinogenic, reprotoxic and neurotoxic. Acrylamide is generated in the Maillard reaction via condensation of reducing sugars and glyoxals arising from their decomposition, with asparagine, the amino acid forming the backbone of the acrylamide molecule. We reported recently the discovery of the Maillard deglycases (DJ-1/Park7 and its prokaryotic homologs) which degrade Maillard adducts formed between glyoxals and lysine or arginine amino groups, and prevent glycation damage in proteins. Here, we show that these deglycases prevent acrylamide formation, likely by degrading asparagine/glyoxal Maillard adducts. We also report the discovery of a deglycase from the hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus furiosus, which prevents acrylamide formation at 100 °C. Thus, Maillard deglycases constitute a unique enzymatic method to prevent acrylamide formation in food without depleting the components (asparagine and sugars) responsible for its formation. PMID:27530919

  12. The impact of raw materials and baking conditions on Maillard reaction products, thiamine, folate, phytic acid and minerals in white bread.

    PubMed

    Helou, Cynthia; Gadonna-Widehem, Pascale; Robert, Nathalie; Branlard, Gérard; Thebault, Jacques; Librere, Sarah; Jacquot, Sylvain; Mardon, Julie; Piquet-Pissaloux, Agnès; Chapron, Sophie; Chatillon, Antoine; Niquet-Léridon, Céline; Tessier, Frédéric J

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a white bread with improved nutrient contents and reduced levels of potentially harmful Maillard reaction products such as N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). Assays were carried out through a full factorial experimental design allowing the simultaneous analysis of four factors at two levels: (1) wheat flour extraction rates (ash content: 0.60%-0.72%), (2) leavening agents (bakers' yeast - bakers' yeast and sourdough), (3) prebaking and (4) baking conditions (different sets of time and temperature). The baking conditions affected HMF and CML as well as certain mineral contents. A reduced baking temperature along with a prolonged heat treatment was found to be favourable for reducing both the CML (up to 20%) and HMF concentrations (up to 96%). The presence of sourdough decreased the formation of CML (up to 28%), and increased the apparent amounts of calcium (up to 8%) and manganese (up to 17.5%) probably through acidification of the dough. The extraction rate of flours as well as interactions between multiple factors also affected certain mineral content. However, compounds like folate, thiamine, copper, zinc, iron and phytic acid were not affected by any of the factors studied.

  13. Free Maillard Reaction Products in Milk Reflect Nutritional Intake of Glycated Proteins and Can Be Used to Distinguish "Organic" and "Conventionally" Produced Milk.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbolz, Uwe; Hofmann, Thomas; Sparmann, Nina; Henle, Thomas

    2016-06-22

    Using LC-MS/MS and isotopically labeled standard substances, quantitation of free Maillard reaction products (MRPs), namely, N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), 5-(hydroxymethyl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (pyrraline, PYR), N(δ)-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)-ornithine (MG-H), and N(ε)-fructosyllysine (FL), in bovine milk was achieved. Considerable variations in the amounts of the individual MRPs were found, most likely as a consequence of the nutritional uptake of glycated proteins. When comparing commercial milk samples labeled as originating from "organic" or "conventional" farming, respectively, significant differences in the content of free PYR (organic milk, 20-300 pmol/mL; conventional milk, 400-1000 pmol/mL) were observed. An analysis of feed samples indicated that rapeseed and sugar beet are the main sources for MRPs in conventional farming. Furthermore, milk of different dairy animals (cow, buffalo, donkey, goat, ewe, mare, camel) as well as for the first time human milk was analyzed for free MRPs. The distribution of their concentrations, with FL and PYR as the most abundant in human milk and with a high individual variability, also points to a nutritional influence. As the components of concentrated feed do not belong to the natural food sources of ruminants and equidae, free MRPs in milk might serve as indicators for an adequate animal feeding in near-natural farming and can be suitable parameters to distinguish between an "organic" and "conventional" production method of milk. PMID:27213835

  14. Effect of different molecular weight chitosans on the mitigation of acrylamide formation and the functional properties of the resultant Maillard reaction products.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Wei; Sung, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Jing-Yi

    2016-05-15

    Mitigation of acrylamide formation and the functional properties of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were investigated in a food model system. The system was composed of elements of mixtures and their combination including fructose, asparagine and different molecular weight chitosans. All solutions were heated, and then analyzed for acrylamide content, MRPs absorbance, pH, color, antioxidant capacity, antibacterial activity and kinematic viscosity. The fructose, asparagine and chitosan mixture had more MRPs compared to other mixtures. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-pricrylhydrazy (DPPH) radical scavenging activities, ferrous ion chelating abilities and reducing power results showed that all solutions containing a combination of two or three reactants had antioxidant capacities. Acrylamide content has a positive correlation with absorbance values at OD294 and OD420 but a negative correlation with the CIB L(∗) value of a solution (p<0.01). Experimental results evidenced that low molecular weight (50-190 kDa) chitosan can be used to mitigate the formation of acrylamide. PMID:26776011

  15. Implications of partial conjugation of whey protein isolate to durian seed gum through Maillard reactions: foaming properties, water holding capacity and interfacial activity.

    PubMed

    Amid, Bahareh Tabatabaee; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Poorazarang, Hashem; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the conjugation of durian seed gum (DSG) with whey protein isolate (WPI) through Maillard reactions. Subsequently, the functional properties of durian seed gum in the non-conjugated (control sample) and conjugated forms were compared with several commercial gums (i.e., Arabic gum, sodium alginate, kappa carrageenan, guar gum, and pectin). The current study revealed that the conjugation of durian seed gum with whey protein isolate significantly (p < 0.05) improved its foaming properties. In this study, the conjugated durian seed gum produced the most stable foam among all samples. On the other hand, the emulsion stabilized with the conjugated durian seed gum also showed more uniform particles with a larger specific surface area than the emulsion containing the non-conjugated durian seed gum. The conjugated durian seed gum showed significant different foaming properties, specific surface area, particle uniformity and water holding capacity (WHC) as compared to the target polysaccharide gums. The conjugated durian seed gum showed more similar functional properties to Arabic gum rather than other studied gums.

  16. Volatile fingerprints of seeds of four species indicate the involvement of alcoholic fermentation, lipid peroxidation, and Maillard reactions in seed deterioration during ageing and desiccation stress

    PubMed Central

    Colville, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The volatile compounds released by orthodox (desiccation-tolerant) seeds during ageing can be analysed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Comparison of three legume species (Pisum sativum, Lathyrus pratensis, and Cytisus scoparius) during artificial ageing at 60% relative humidity and 50 °C revealed variation in the seed volatile fingerprint between species, although in all species the overall volatile concentration increased with storage period, and changes could be detected prior to the onset of viability loss. The volatile compounds are proposed to derive from three main sources: alcoholic fermentation, lipid peroxidation, and Maillard reactions. Lipid peroxidation was confirmed in P. sativum seeds through analysis of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. Volatile production by ageing orthodox seeds was compared with that of recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) seeds of Quercus robur during desiccation. Many of the volatiles were common to both ageing orthodox seeds and desiccating recalcitrant seeds, with alcoholic fermentation forming the major source of volatiles. Finally, comparison was made between two methods of analysis; the first used a Tenax adsorbent to trap volatiles, whilst the second used solid phase microextraction to extract volatiles from the headspace of vials containing powdered seeds. Solid phase microextraction was found to be more sensitive, detecting a far greater number of compounds. Seed volatile analysis provides a non-invasive means of characterizing the processes involved in seed deterioration, and potentially identifying volatile marker compounds for the diagnosis of seed viability loss. PMID:23175670

  17. Use of experimental design methodology to prepare Maillard reaction products from glucose and cysteine inhibitors of polyphenol oxidase from eggplant (Solanum melongena).

    PubMed

    Cheriot, Sophie C; Billaud, Catherine; Nicolas, Jacques

    2006-07-12

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) from eggplant was extracted and partially purified by a two-step fractionation-precipitation using ammonium sulfate and phenylsepharose hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The eggplant PPO extract was characterized concerning its kinetic properties. Optimal conditions to obtain Maillard reaction products (MRPs) with a maximal inhibitory potency (IP) toward PPO activity were determined using the surface response methodology and a four-factor and five-level experimental design. The MRPs were prepared from cysteine (0.25 M) and glucose (0-1 M), at several initial pH values (2-6) and at differing heating times (3-19 h) and temperatures (95-115 degrees C). The maximal IP was obtained after heating a model system of glucose/cysteine (1/0.25 M) at pH 2 for 3 h 20 min at 115 degrees C. The soluble part of this MRP, called MRP(IPmax), was a noncompetitive inhibitor toward eggplant PPO. The IP of MRP(IPmax) on PPO activity was very potent as compared to that displayed by benzoic, p-coumaric, and t-cinnamic acids, as well as sorbic acid and 4-hexylresorcinol. The activity of preincubated PPO at 0 degrees C with MRP(IPmax) was only slightly restored after dialysis or gel filtration.

  18. The impact of raw materials and baking conditions on Maillard reaction products, thiamine, folate, phytic acid and minerals in white bread.

    PubMed

    Helou, Cynthia; Gadonna-Widehem, Pascale; Robert, Nathalie; Branlard, Gérard; Thebault, Jacques; Librere, Sarah; Jacquot, Sylvain; Mardon, Julie; Piquet-Pissaloux, Agnès; Chapron, Sophie; Chatillon, Antoine; Niquet-Léridon, Céline; Tessier, Frédéric J

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a white bread with improved nutrient contents and reduced levels of potentially harmful Maillard reaction products such as N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). Assays were carried out through a full factorial experimental design allowing the simultaneous analysis of four factors at two levels: (1) wheat flour extraction rates (ash content: 0.60%-0.72%), (2) leavening agents (bakers' yeast - bakers' yeast and sourdough), (3) prebaking and (4) baking conditions (different sets of time and temperature). The baking conditions affected HMF and CML as well as certain mineral contents. A reduced baking temperature along with a prolonged heat treatment was found to be favourable for reducing both the CML (up to 20%) and HMF concentrations (up to 96%). The presence of sourdough decreased the formation of CML (up to 28%), and increased the apparent amounts of calcium (up to 8%) and manganese (up to 17.5%) probably through acidification of the dough. The extraction rate of flours as well as interactions between multiple factors also affected certain mineral content. However, compounds like folate, thiamine, copper, zinc, iron and phytic acid were not affected by any of the factors studied. PMID:26974195

  19. Effect of different molecular weight chitosans on the mitigation of acrylamide formation and the functional properties of the resultant Maillard reaction products.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Wei; Sung, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Jing-Yi

    2016-05-15

    Mitigation of acrylamide formation and the functional properties of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were investigated in a food model system. The system was composed of elements of mixtures and their combination including fructose, asparagine and different molecular weight chitosans. All solutions were heated, and then analyzed for acrylamide content, MRPs absorbance, pH, color, antioxidant capacity, antibacterial activity and kinematic viscosity. The fructose, asparagine and chitosan mixture had more MRPs compared to other mixtures. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-pricrylhydrazy (DPPH) radical scavenging activities, ferrous ion chelating abilities and reducing power results showed that all solutions containing a combination of two or three reactants had antioxidant capacities. Acrylamide content has a positive correlation with absorbance values at OD294 and OD420 but a negative correlation with the CIB L(∗) value of a solution (p<0.01). Experimental results evidenced that low molecular weight (50-190 kDa) chitosan can be used to mitigate the formation of acrylamide.

  20. Scavenging of free radicals, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic activities of the Maillard reaction products of beta-lactoglobulin glycated with several sugars.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, F; Chobert, J M; Genot, C; Haertlé, T

    2001-10-01

    The Maillard reaction occurs during many industrial and domestic thermal treatments of foods. It is widely used because of its role in creating colors, flavors, textures, and other functional properties in foodstuffs. Proteins glycated without the use of conventional chemical reagents have improved technofunctional properties such as heat stability, emulsifying, and foaming properties. The present study was carried out to determine the extent to which this reaction can convey antioxidant, antimicrobial, or cytotoxic activities to beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) and to its tryptic and peptic hydrolysates. BLG was modified with six different sugars in solution at 60 degrees C. Antiradical properties were estimated using a radical scavenging activity test. Antimicrobial activities against different bacterial strains were studied with a diffusion disk method. Cytotoxic tests were performed using two cell lines and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazoyl-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) rapid colorimetric assay. Glycation induced a radical scavenging activity to BLG, the intensity of which depended on the sugar used for modification. Proteins modified with ribose and arabinose showed the highest radical scavenging activities depicted by about 80 and 60% of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) absorption decrease at 515 nm. No antimicrobial effect of any glycated form of BLG against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Listeria innocua, and Streptococcus mutans was observed. The MTT test showed no enhancement of cytotoxicity by modified proteins and peptides against COS-7 and HL-60 cells. Thus, glycated proteins could be used in formulated food as functional ingredients with a radical scavenging activity able to delay deterioration due to oxidation. This use could be even more advisable considering the lack of toxicity to eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell cultures demonstrated in this work.

  1. The effect of sugar, amino acid, metal ion, and NaCl on model Maillard reaction under pH control.

    PubMed

    Kwak, E-J; Lim, S-I

    2004-08-01

    The color intensities was determined of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) prepared by heating each of five sugars (maltose, fructose, glucose, arabinose, and xylose) with each of 12 amino acids (aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, proline, serine, cysteine, phenylalanine, arginine, and lysine). The remaining percentages of glucose and rate of change of color intensity due to the addition of a metal ion and NaCl were monitored for nine MRPs that had been formed between glucose and each of nine amino acids (aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, valine, serine, cysteine, phenylalanine, arginine, and lysine). Model MRPs were prepared in a block heater at 100 degrees C for 1-12 h with the pH value controlled at 6.5. The resulting color intensity of each MRPs formed from the basic amino acids was greater due to the higher reactivity than those from the acidic amino acids. The remaining percentage of glucose in each MRPs from the basic amino acids was lower than those from the acidic amino acids. The MRPs from the nonpolar amino acids showed an intermediate color intensity and remaining percentages of glucose between those formed from the basic and acidic amino acids. Browning tended to be accelerated in the presence of metal ions, especially Fe2+ and Cu2+, although it was affected by the property of the amino acid and heating time as well as by the type of metal ion. On the other hand, browning was greatly inhibited by a high concentration of NaCl.

  2. In situ formation of the amino sugars 1-amino-1-deoxy-fructose and 2-amino-2-deoxy-glucose under Maillard reaction conditions in the absence of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Nashalian, Ossanna; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2016-04-15

    Replacing amino acids with their binary metal complexes during the Maillard reaction can initiate various processes, including the oxidative degradation of their glucose conjugates, generating 1-amino-1-deoxy-fructose and its derivatives. These reactive amino sugars are not easily accessible under Maillard reaction conditions and are only formed in the presence of ammonia. To explore the generality of this observation and to study in particular the ability of fructose to generate glucosamine, the amino acid-metal complexes were heated in aqueous solutions with three aldohexoses and two ketohexoses at 110°C for 2 h and the dry residues were analysed by ESI/qTOF/MS/MS. All the sugars generated relatively intense ions at [M+H](+) 180 (C6H14NO5); those ions originating from ketohexoses exhibited MS/MS fragmentations identical to glucosamine and those originating form aldohexoses showed ions identical to fructosamine. Furthermore, the amino sugars were found to form fructosazine, react with other sugars and undergo dehydration reactions.

  3. Maillard reaction and enzymatic browning affect the allergenicity of Pru av 1, the major allergen from cherry (Prunus avium).

    PubMed

    Gruber, Patrick; Vieths, Stefan; Wangorsch, Andrea; Nerkamp, Jörg; Hofmann, Thomas

    2004-06-16

    The influence of thermal processing and nonenymatic as well as polyphenoloxidase-catalyzed browning reaction on the allergenicity of the major cherry allergen Pru av 1 was investigated. After thermal treatment of the recombinant protein rPru av 1 in the absence or presence of carbohydrates, SDS-PAGE, enzyme allergosorbent tests, and inhibition assays revealed that thermal treatment of rPru av 1 alone did not show any influence on the IgE-binding activity of the protein at least for 30 min, thus correlating well with the refolding of the allergen in buffer solution as demonstrated by CD spectroscopic experiments. Incubation of the protein with starch and maltose also showed no effect on IgE-binding activity, whereas reaction with glucose and ribose and, even more pronounced, with the carbohydrate breakdown products glyceraldehyde and glyoxal induced a strong decrease of the IgE-binding capacity of rPru av 1. In the second part of the study, the effect of polyphenoloxidase-catalyzed oxidation of polyphenols on food allergen activity was investigated. Incubation of rPru av 1 with epicatechin in the presence of tyrosinase led to a drastic decrease in IgE-binding activity of the protein. Variations of the phenolic compound revealed caffeic acid and epicatechin as the most active inhibitors of the IgE-binding activity of rPru av 1, followed by catechin and gallic acid, and, finally, by quercetin and rutin, showing significantly lower activity. On the basis of these data, reactive intermediates formed during thermal carbohydrate degradation as well as during enzymatic polyphenol oxidation are suggested as the active chemical species responsible for modifying nucleophilic amino acid side chains of proteins, thus inducing an irreversible change in the tertiary structure of the protein and resulting in a loss of conformational epitopes of the allergen.

  4. Maillard reaction and enzymatic browning affect the allergenicity of Pru av 1, the major allergen from cherry (Prunus avium).

    PubMed

    Gruber, Patrick; Vieths, Stefan; Wangorsch, Andrea; Nerkamp, Jörg; Hofmann, Thomas

    2004-06-16

    The influence of thermal processing and nonenymatic as well as polyphenoloxidase-catalyzed browning reaction on the allergenicity of the major cherry allergen Pru av 1 was investigated. After thermal treatment of the recombinant protein rPru av 1 in the absence or presence of carbohydrates, SDS-PAGE, enzyme allergosorbent tests, and inhibition assays revealed that thermal treatment of rPru av 1 alone did not show any influence on the IgE-binding activity of the protein at least for 30 min, thus correlating well with the refolding of the allergen in buffer solution as demonstrated by CD spectroscopic experiments. Incubation of the protein with starch and maltose also showed no effect on IgE-binding activity, whereas reaction with glucose and ribose and, even more pronounced, with the carbohydrate breakdown products glyceraldehyde and glyoxal induced a strong decrease of the IgE-binding capacity of rPru av 1. In the second part of the study, the effect of polyphenoloxidase-catalyzed oxidation of polyphenols on food allergen activity was investigated. Incubation of rPru av 1 with epicatechin in the presence of tyrosinase led to a drastic decrease in IgE-binding activity of the protein. Variations of the phenolic compound revealed caffeic acid and epicatechin as the most active inhibitors of the IgE-binding activity of rPru av 1, followed by catechin and gallic acid, and, finally, by quercetin and rutin, showing significantly lower activity. On the basis of these data, reactive intermediates formed during thermal carbohydrate degradation as well as during enzymatic polyphenol oxidation are suggested as the active chemical species responsible for modifying nucleophilic amino acid side chains of proteins, thus inducing an irreversible change in the tertiary structure of the protein and resulting in a loss of conformational epitopes of the allergen. PMID:15186129

  5. Glycation of human cortical and cancellous bone captures differences in the formation of Maillard reaction products between glucose and ribose.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Siddula, Alankrita; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    To better understand some aspects of bone matrix glycation, we used an in vitro glycation approach. Within two weeks, our glycation procedures led to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) at the levels that corresponded to approx. 25-30 years of the natural in vivo glycation. Cortical and cancellous bones from human tibias were glycated in vitro using either glucose (glucosylation) or ribose (ribosylation). Both glucosylation and ribosylation led to the formation of higher levels of AGEs and pentosidine (PEN) in cancellous than cortical bone dissected from all tested donors (young, middle-age and elderly men and women). More efficient glycation of bone matrix proteins in cancellous bone most likely depended on the higher porosity of this tissue, which facilitated better accessibility of the sugars to the matrix proteins. Notably, glycation of cortical bone from older donors led to much higher AGEs levels as compared to young donors. Such efficient in vitro glycation of older cortical bone could result from aging-related increase in porosity caused by the loss of mineral content. In addition, more pronounced glycation in vivo would be driven by elevated oxidation processes. Interestingly, the levels of PEN formation differed pronouncedly between glucosylation and ribosylation. Ribosylation generated very high levels of PEN (approx. 6- vs. 2.5-fold higher PEN level than in glucosylated samples). Kinetic studies of AGEs and PEN formation in human cortical and cancellous bone matrix confirmed higher accumulation of fluorescent crosslinks for ribosylation. Our results suggest that in vitro glycation of bone using glucose leads to the formation of lower levels of AGEs including PEN, whereas ribosylation appears to support a pathway toward PEN formation. Our studies may help to understand differences in the progression of bone pathologies related to protein glycation by different sugars, and raise awareness for excessive sugar supplementation in food and

  6. The importance of the Maillard-metal complexes and their silicates in astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesch, Patrick J.; Kolb, Vera M.

    2007-09-01

    The Maillard reaction occurs when sugars and amino acids are mixed together in the solid state or in the aqueous solution. Since both amino acids and sugar-like compounds are found on meteorites, we hypothesized that they would also undergo the Maillard reaction. Our recent work supports this idea. We have shown previously that the water-insoluble Maillard products have substantial similarities with the insoluble organic materials from the meteorites. The Maillard organic materials are also part of the desert varnish on Earth, which is a dark, shiny, hard rock coating that contains iron and manganese and is glazed in silicate. Rocks that are similar in appearance to the desert varnish have been observed on the Martian surface. They may also contain the organic materials. We have undertaken study of the interactions between the Maillard products, iron and other metals, and silicates, to elucidate the role of the Maillard products in the chemistry of desert varnish and meteorites. Specifically, we have synthesized a series of the Maillard-metal complexes, and have tested their reactivity towards silicates. We have studied the properties of these Maillard-metal-silicate products by the IR spectroscopy. The astrobiological potential of the Maillard-metal complexes is assessed.

  7. Effect of theanine and polyphenols enriched fractions from decaffeinated tea dust on the formation of Maillard reaction products and sensory attributes of breads.

    PubMed

    Culetu, Alina; Fernandez-Gomez, Beatriz; Ullate, Monica; del Castillo, Maria Dolores; Andlauer, Wilfried

    2016-04-15

    The antiglycoxidative properties of theanine (TEF) and polyphenols enriched fractions (PEF) prepared from tea dust were tested in a model system composed of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and methylglyoxal (MGO). PEF caused a decrease in available free amino groups of BSA in presence and absence of MGO, suggesting the simultaneous occurrence of glycoxidation reaction and phenols-protein interaction. The presence of PEF and TEF inhibited formation of fluorescent advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Moreover, theanine (TB) and polyphenol-enriched bread (PB) were formulated. A significant increase in free amino groups was observed in TBs with a dose-response effect, while addition of PEF in bread produced a significant decrease (p<0.05). PEF efficiently reduced fluorescent AGE formation in breads compared with TEF. The results are in line with the simplified model systems. PEF used as food ingredient allows obtaining a tasty food possessing health promoting properties and lower content of potential harmful compounds (AGEs).

  8. Effect of theanine and polyphenols enriched fractions from decaffeinated tea dust on the formation of Maillard reaction products and sensory attributes of breads.

    PubMed

    Culetu, Alina; Fernandez-Gomez, Beatriz; Ullate, Monica; del Castillo, Maria Dolores; Andlauer, Wilfried

    2016-04-15

    The antiglycoxidative properties of theanine (TEF) and polyphenols enriched fractions (PEF) prepared from tea dust were tested in a model system composed of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and methylglyoxal (MGO). PEF caused a decrease in available free amino groups of BSA in presence and absence of MGO, suggesting the simultaneous occurrence of glycoxidation reaction and phenols-protein interaction. The presence of PEF and TEF inhibited formation of fluorescent advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Moreover, theanine (TB) and polyphenol-enriched bread (PB) were formulated. A significant increase in free amino groups was observed in TBs with a dose-response effect, while addition of PEF in bread produced a significant decrease (p<0.05). PEF efficiently reduced fluorescent AGE formation in breads compared with TEF. The results are in line with the simplified model systems. PEF used as food ingredient allows obtaining a tasty food possessing health promoting properties and lower content of potential harmful compounds (AGEs). PMID:26616919

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Maillard Reaction Products of Salbutamol and Terbutaline with Lactose and Development and Validation of an LC Method for the Determination of Salbutamol and Terbutaline in the Presence of These Impurities

    PubMed Central

    El-Zaher, Asmaa A.; Fouad, Marwa A.; Elkady, Ehab F.

    2014-01-01

    Being secondary amines, both salbutamol (SLB) and terbutaline (TRB) react by Maillard reaction (MR) with lactose, which is added as an inactive ingredient in tablets. The Amadori rearrangement products were synthesized, isolated, and characterized by mass spectrometry. In addition, a simple, selective, and precise reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) method was developed and validated for the determination of SLB and TRB in tablets, each in the presence of its MR impurity. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Symmetry® Waters C18 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) using a mobile phase consisting of 0.5% aqueous phosphoric acid to acetonitrile (90:10, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.7 mL minute−1. Quantitation was achieved using UV detection at 230 nm. Linearity, accuracy, and precision were found to be acceptable for the determination of SLB and TRB in the concentration range of 0.2–60 and 0.5–80 μg mL−1, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of SLB and TRB in bulk and in their tablets. PMID:24634579

  10. Use of sacrificial anode technology to mitigate non-enzymic Maillard browning.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, George P

    2017-02-15

    Experiments were performed to examine the effects of Maillard browning induced in the presence of metallic elements. The rate of brown pigment formation was shown to be reduced in model Maillard reactions performed in the presence of electropositive metals. Experiments involved reactions of d-xylose, d-arabinose and d-ribose with glycine, α-l- or β-alanine and l-valine in pH 7.0 phosphate buffer at ca. 100°C. "Browning" measured spectrophotometrically at 420nm was significantly lower (compared with controls) in selected reactions containing elemental Mg, Al, Mn and Sn particles. It was hypothesized that the metals acted in sacrificial anode redox fashion to reduce or eliminate dehydroreductones believed to be key Maillard intermediates ultimately leading to less browning. PMID:27664627

  11. Use of sacrificial anode technology to mitigate non-enzymic Maillard browning.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, George P

    2017-02-15

    Experiments were performed to examine the effects of Maillard browning induced in the presence of metallic elements. The rate of brown pigment formation was shown to be reduced in model Maillard reactions performed in the presence of electropositive metals. Experiments involved reactions of d-xylose, d-arabinose and d-ribose with glycine, α-l- or β-alanine and l-valine in pH 7.0 phosphate buffer at ca. 100°C. "Browning" measured spectrophotometrically at 420nm was significantly lower (compared with controls) in selected reactions containing elemental Mg, Al, Mn and Sn particles. It was hypothesized that the metals acted in sacrificial anode redox fashion to reduce or eliminate dehydroreductones believed to be key Maillard intermediates ultimately leading to less browning.

  12. Evidence for inhibition of nitric oxide and inducible nitric oxide synthase in Caco-2 and RAW 264.7 cells by a Maillard reaction product [5-(5,6-dihydro-4H-pyridin-3-ylidenemethyl)furan-2-yl]-methanol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu-Min; Kitts, David D

    2015-08-01

    We have recently isolated and characterized the chemical structure of a bioactive Maillard reaction product, [5-(5,6-dihydro-4H-pyridin-3-ylidenemethyl)furan-2-yl]-methanol (F3-A), from an aqueous glucose (Glc) and lysine (Lys) Maillard reaction (MR) model system. Here, we investigate further the mechanisms for anti-inflammatory effects of this product in Caco-2 and RAW 264.7 cells. The anti-inflammatory capacity of F3-A recovered from Glc-Lys MR mixture and a synthesized product were compared with those of the specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG), and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). F3-A produced a dose-dependent inhibition of extracellular nitric oxide (NO) production and iNOS translation in Caco-2 cells induced with interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and these effects were more potent than those obtained with AG. Moreover, a combination of F3-A and AG to attenuate intestinal inflammation was additive. However, F3-A inhibited only intracellular NO production in RAW 264.7 cells and did not inhibit COX-2 or NF-κB in either cell line. We conclude that the anti-inflammatory properties of F3-A are cell specific, working through different mechanism between macrophages and intestinal cells.

  13. Comprehensive Analysis of Maillard Protein Modifications in Human Lenses: Effect of Age and Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Smuda, Mareen; Henning, Christian; Raghavan, Cibin T.; Johar, Kaid; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Nagaraj, Ram H.; Glomb, Marcus A.

    2015-01-01

    In human lens proteins, advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) originate from the reaction of glycating agents, e.g., vitamin C and glucose. AGEs have been considered to play a significant role in lens aging and cataract formation. Although several AGEs have been detected in the human lens, the contribution of individual glycating agents to their formation remains unclear. A highly sensitive liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry multimethod was developed that allowed us to quantitate 21 protein modifications in normal and cataractous lenses, respectively. N6-Carboxymethyl lysine, N6-carboxyethyl lysine, N7-carboxyethyl arginine, methylglyoxal hydroimidazolone 1, and N6-lactoyl lysine were found to be the major Maillard protein modifications among these AGEs. The novel vitamin C specific amide AGEs, N6-xylonyl and N6-lyxonyl lysine, but also AGEs from glyoxal were detected, albeit in minor quantities. Among the 21 modifications, AGEs from the Amadori product (derived from the reaction of glucose and lysine) and methylglyoxal were dominant. PMID:25849437

  14. Maillard glycation of beta-lactoglobulin induces conformation changes.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, F; Chobert, J M; Dalgalarrondo, M; Choiset, Y; Haertlé, T

    2002-04-01

    Glycation by the Maillard reaction is an ubiquitous reaction of condensation of a reducing sugar with amino groups of proteins, which products could improve the functional and/or biological properties for food and non-food uses. It can induce structural modifications in proteins, modifying their properties. The aim of this work was to investigate the association behavior and the conformational changes of beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) after its glycation by the Maillard reaction with several alimentary sugars (arabinose, galactose, glucose, lactose, rhamnose and ribose). Protein samples were heated in the presence or in the absence (heated control) of different sugars during 3 days at 60 degrees C. Glycation induced oligomerization of BLG monomers. Depending on the reactivity of the sugar, the population of produced oligomers showed smaller or greater heterogeneity in molecular masses. Analysis of modified BLG by circular dichroism and by its susceptibility to pepsinolysis showed that the conditions of heating used did not significantly alter the conformation of BLG. Heating of BLG in presence of sugars induced only minor structural modification, when using the less reactive sugars such as lactose and rhamnose. It was, however, at the origin of major three-dimensional destructuring in the case of the more reactive sugars such as arabinose and ribose. Pepsinolysis of glycated BLG did not affect about 62 and 35% of the protein molecules modified with lactose or rhamnose, and arabinose or ribose, respectively. The increase of susceptibility of glycated BLG to pepsinolysis could be related to the alteration of the conformation of the protein when glycation was performed with highly reactive sugars, as observed by circular dichroism and calorimetry analysis.

  15. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of a low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with a relatively low intensity (3  ×  1016 W cm-2) allowed the enhancing of the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the ‘ultraclean’ proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as a target. A combination of the specific target composition and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed the enhancing of the yield of alpha particles up to 109 per steradian. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long-laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  16. Elucidation of the chemical structure and determination of the production conditions for a bioactive Maillard reaction product, [5-(5,6-dihydro-4H-pyridin-3-ylidenemethyl)furan-2-yl]methanol, isolated from a glucose-lysine heated mixture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu-Min; Chen, Gang; Chen, Hongwen; Zhang, Yilin; Kitts, David D

    2015-02-18

    We previously isolated a bioactive molecule, named F3-A, from an aqueous glucose (Glc) and lysine (Lys) Maillard reaction (MR) model system. Herein, F3-A was verified as [5-(5,6-dihydro-4H-pyridin-3-ylidenemethyl)furan-2-yl]methanol (5) and was subsequently synthesized for confirmation of bioactivity. Using Taguchi and factorial designs, we determined that the conditions which best increased the yield of F3-A were at pH 6 with a sugar:amino acid ratio of 2:1 and heating time of 12 h at 100 °C. The MR mixtures containing glucose produced highest yield, compared to fructose, lactose, and sucrose. Both the F3-A recovered from Glc-Lys MR mixture and the synthesized product exhibited significant (P < 0.05), dose dependent, nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity in Caco-2 cells that was comparable to aminoguanidine (AG) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), respectively. Finally, an additional inhibitory effect of F3-A was determined when coincubated with AG in cytokine-induced Caco-2 cells. This bioactivity points to a potential role in preventing intestinal inflammation.

  17. Maillard Chemistry in Clouds and Aqueous Aerosol As a Source of Atmospheric Humic-Like Substances.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Lelia N; Lemire, Amanda N; Galloway, Melissa M; Corrigan, Ashley L; Turley, Jacob J; Espelien, Brenna M; De Haan, David O

    2016-07-19

    The reported optical, physical, and chemical properties of aqueous Maillard reaction mixtures of small aldehydes (glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde) with ammonium sulfate and amines are compared with those of aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol (water-soluble organic carbon, WSOC) and the humic-like substances (HULIS) fraction of WSOC. Using a combination of new and previously published measurements, we examine fluorescence, X-ray absorbance, UV/vis, and IR spectra, complex refractive indices, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, thermograms, aerosol and electrospray ionization mass spectra, surface activity, and hygroscopicity. Atmospheric WSOC and HULIS encompass a range of properties, but in almost every case aqueous aldehyde-amine reaction mixtures are squarely within this range. Notable exceptions are the higher UV/visible absorbance wavelength dependence (Angström coefficients) observed for methylglyoxal reaction mixtures, the lack of surface activity of glyoxal reaction mixtures, and the higher N/C ratios of aldehyde-amine reaction products relative to atmospheric WSOC and HULIS extracts. The overall optical, physical, and chemical similarities are consistent with, but not demonstrative of, Maillard chemistry being a significant secondary source of atmospheric HULIS. However, the higher N/C ratios of aldehyde-amine reaction products limits the source strength to ≤50% of atmospheric HULIS, assuming that other sources of HULIS incorporate only negligible quantities of nitrogen.

  18. Maillard Chemistry in Clouds and Aqueous Aerosol As a Source of Atmospheric Humic-Like Substances.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Lelia N; Lemire, Amanda N; Galloway, Melissa M; Corrigan, Ashley L; Turley, Jacob J; Espelien, Brenna M; De Haan, David O

    2016-07-19

    The reported optical, physical, and chemical properties of aqueous Maillard reaction mixtures of small aldehydes (glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde) with ammonium sulfate and amines are compared with those of aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol (water-soluble organic carbon, WSOC) and the humic-like substances (HULIS) fraction of WSOC. Using a combination of new and previously published measurements, we examine fluorescence, X-ray absorbance, UV/vis, and IR spectra, complex refractive indices, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, thermograms, aerosol and electrospray ionization mass spectra, surface activity, and hygroscopicity. Atmospheric WSOC and HULIS encompass a range of properties, but in almost every case aqueous aldehyde-amine reaction mixtures are squarely within this range. Notable exceptions are the higher UV/visible absorbance wavelength dependence (Angström coefficients) observed for methylglyoxal reaction mixtures, the lack of surface activity of glyoxal reaction mixtures, and the higher N/C ratios of aldehyde-amine reaction products relative to atmospheric WSOC and HULIS extracts. The overall optical, physical, and chemical similarities are consistent with, but not demonstrative of, Maillard chemistry being a significant secondary source of atmospheric HULIS. However, the higher N/C ratios of aldehyde-amine reaction products limits the source strength to ≤50% of atmospheric HULIS, assuming that other sources of HULIS incorporate only negligible quantities of nitrogen. PMID:27227348

  19. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Copper-catalyzed (or -mediated) asymmetric coupling reactions have received significant attention over the past few years. Especially the coupling reactions of aryl or alkyl halides with nucleophiles became a very powerful tool for the formation of C–C, C–N, C–O and other carbon–heteroatom bonds as well as for the construction of heteroatom-containing ring systems. This review summarizes the recent progress in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions for the formation of C–C and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:26734106

  20. Recent advances in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fengtao; Cai, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Copper-catalyzed (or -mediated) asymmetric coupling reactions have received significant attention over the past few years. Especially the coupling reactions of aryl or alkyl halides with nucleophiles became a very powerful tool for the formation of C-C, C-N, C-O and other carbon-heteroatom bonds as well as for the construction of heteroatom-containing ring systems. This review summarizes the recent progress in copper-catalyzed asymmetric coupling reactions for the formation of C-C and carbon-heteroatom bonds. PMID:26734106

  1. Bioavailability of lysine in Maillard browned protein as determined by plasma lysine response in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Plakas, S M; Lee, T C; Wolke, R E

    1988-01-01

    The bioavailability of lysine in Maillard browned protein was investigated by plasma lysine response in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri). The concentrations of free lysine in the plasma were measured after feeding control and browned protein diets supplemented with graded levels of lysine. Bioavailability of lysine was estimated based on the amounts of supplemental lysine in the diets that resulted in rapid increases in plasma lysine. An approximately 80% loss in bioavailable lysine content was determined by this method in a fish protein isolate subjected to the Maillard browning reaction under mild conditions (40 d incubation at 37 degrees C). The nutritional damage to lysine determined by plasma lysine response was similar to that estimated in vitro by enzymatic hydrolysis and fluorodinitrobenzene reagent, but was underestimated by acid hydrolysis and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid reagent. Rainbow trout are similar to other animals in their inability to utilize the deoxyketosyl (Amadori) compound of lysine formed in early Maillard reaction, and in their plasma response to dietary levels of essential amino acids. PMID:3121813

  2. Recent advances in crossed-beam studies of bimolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kopin

    2006-10-01

    A critical overview of the recent progress in crossed-beam reactive scattering is presented. This review is not intended to be an exhaustive nor a comprehensive one, but rather a critical assessment of what we have been learning about bimolecular reaction dynamics using crossed molecular beams since year 2000. Particular emphasis is placed on the information content encoded in the product angular distribution-the trait of a typical molecular beam scattering experiment-and how the information can help in answering fundamental questions about chemical reactivity. We will start with simple reactions by highlighting a few benchmark three-atom reactions, and then move on progressively to the more complex chemical systems and with more sophisticated types of measurements. Understanding what cause the experimental observations is more than computationally simulating the results. The give and take between experiment and theory in unraveling the physical picture of the underlying dynamics is illustrated throughout this review.

  3. Entering the Conversation: Reaction Papers in Advanced Academic Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Jennifer Davida; Granville, S.

    2009-01-01

    Amongst academics working with postgraduate students, there has recently been increasing interest in ways of supporting advanced academic literacy (AAL). This is a concern for us at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, where we teach a diverse group of postgraduate students, most of whom are subject practitioners in…

  4. Protein-bound advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) as bioactive amino acid derivatives in foods.

    PubMed

    Henle, T

    2005-12-01

    The Maillard reaction or nonenzymatic browning is of outstanding importance for the formation of flavour and colour of heated foods. Corresponding reactions, also referred to as "glycation", are known from biological systems, where the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) shall play an important pathophysiological role in diabetes and uremia. In this review, pathways leading to the formation of individual protein-bound lysine and arginine derivatives in foods are described and nutritional consequences resulting from this posttranslational modifications of food proteins are discussed. PMID:15997413

  5. Recent advances in osmium-catalyzed hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Chelucci, Giorgio; Baldino, Salvatore; Baratta, Walter

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: A current issue in metal-catalyzed reactions is the search for highly efficient transition-metal complexes affording high productivity and selectivity in a variety of processes. Moreover, there is also a great interest in multitasking catalysts that are able to efficiently promote different organic transformations by careful switching of the reaction parameters, such as temperature, solvent, and cocatalyst. In this context, osmium complexes have shown the ability to catalyze efficiently different types of reactions involving hydrogen, proving at the same time high thermal stability and simple synthesis. In the catalytic reduction of C═X (X = O, N) bonds by both hydrogenation (HY) and transfer hydrogenation (TH) reactions, the most interest has been focused on homogeneous systems based on rhodium, iridium, and in particular ruthenium catalysts, which have proved to catalyze chemo- and stereoselective hydrogenations with remarkable efficiency. By contrast, osmium catalysts have received much less attention because they are considered less active on account of their slower ligand exchange kinetics. Thus, this area remained almost neglected until recent studies refuted these prejudices. The aim of this Account is to highlight the impressive developments achieved over the past few years by our and other groups on the design of new classes of osmium complexes and their applications in homogeneous catalytic reactions involving the hydrogenation of carbon-oxygen and carbon-nitrogen bonds by both HY and TH reactions as well as in alcohol deydrogenation (DHY) reactions. The work described in this Account demonstrates that osmium complexes are emerging as powerful catalysts for asymmetric and non-asymmetric syntheses, showing a remarkably high catalytic activity in HY and TH reactions of ketones, aldehydes, imines, and esters as well in DHY reactions of alcohols. Thus, for instance, the introduction of ligands with an NH function, possibly in combination with a

  6. Advanced modeling of reaction cross sections for light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Resler, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The shell model/R-matrix technique of calculating nuclear reaction cross sections for light projectiles incident on light nuclei is discussed, particularly in the application of the technique to thermonuclear reactions. Details are presented on the computational methods for the shell model which display how easily the calculations can be performed. Results of the shell model/R-matrix technique are discussed as are some of the problems encountered in picking an appropriate nucleon-nucleon interaction for the large model spaces which must be used for current problems. The status of our work on developing an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction for use in large-basis shell model calculations is presented. This new interaction is based on a combination of global constraints and microscopic nuclear data. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Covalently Immobilized Laccase for Decolourization of Glucose-Glycine Maillard Products as Colourant of Distillery Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nimisha; Basu, Subhankar; Vankelecom, Ivo F J; Balakrishnan, Malini

    2015-09-01

    Maillard reaction products like melanoidins are recalcitrant, high-molecular-weight compounds responsible for colour in sugarcane molasses distillery wastewater. Conventional biological treatment is unable to break down melanoidins, but extracellular laccase and manganese peroxidase of microbial origin can degrade these complex molecules. In this work, laccase was covalently immobilized on alumina pellets activated with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). The immobilization yield was 50-60 %, and the enzyme activity (886 U/L) was 5-fold higher compared to the soluble enzyme (176 U/L). The immobilized enzyme also showed higher tolerance to pH (4-6) and temperature (35-60 °C), as well as improved storage stability (49 days) and operational stability (10 cycles). Degradation of glucose-glycine Maillard products using immobilized laccase led to 47 % decolourization in 6 h at pH 4.5 and 28 °C. A comprehensive treatment scheme integrating enzymatic, microbial and membrane filtration steps resulted in 90 % decolourization. PMID:26164854

  8. Effect of Maillard Conjugates on the Physical Stability of Zein Nanoparticles Prepared by Liquid Antisolvent Coprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Joye, Iris J; Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; McClements, David Julian

    2015-09-30

    Protein nanoparticles are often not very stable in a complex food matrix because they are primarily stabilized by electrostatic repulsion. In this study, we envisaged the stabilization of zein nanoparticles through Maillard conjugation reactions with polysaccharides of different molecular mass. Zein nanoparticles (0.5% w/v) containing resveratrol (0.025% w/v grape skin extract) were produced by liquid antisolvent precipitation and coated with Maillard conjugates (MC) of sodium caseinate and different molecular mass carbohydrates during particle production. Zein nanoparticles coated with conjugated polysaccharides of 2.8, 37, and 150 kDa had diameters of 198 ± 5, 176 ± 6, and 180 ± 3 nm, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency (∼83%) was not affected by conjugation, but the conjugates significantly improved particle stability against changes in pH (2.0-9.0), CaCl2 addition (up to 100 mM), and heat treatment (30-90 °C, 30 min). Zein nanoparticles coated by MC may therefore be suitable delivery systems for hydrophobic bioactive molecules in a wide range of commercial products.

  9. Effect of Maillard Conjugates on the Physical Stability of Zein Nanoparticles Prepared by Liquid Antisolvent Coprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Joye, Iris J; Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; McClements, David Julian

    2015-09-30

    Protein nanoparticles are often not very stable in a complex food matrix because they are primarily stabilized by electrostatic repulsion. In this study, we envisaged the stabilization of zein nanoparticles through Maillard conjugation reactions with polysaccharides of different molecular mass. Zein nanoparticles (0.5% w/v) containing resveratrol (0.025% w/v grape skin extract) were produced by liquid antisolvent precipitation and coated with Maillard conjugates (MC) of sodium caseinate and different molecular mass carbohydrates during particle production. Zein nanoparticles coated with conjugated polysaccharides of 2.8, 37, and 150 kDa had diameters of 198 ± 5, 176 ± 6, and 180 ± 3 nm, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency (∼83%) was not affected by conjugation, but the conjugates significantly improved particle stability against changes in pH (2.0-9.0), CaCl2 addition (up to 100 mM), and heat treatment (30-90 °C, 30 min). Zein nanoparticles coated by MC may therefore be suitable delivery systems for hydrophobic bioactive molecules in a wide range of commercial products. PMID:26335612

  10. Targeting advanced glycation with pharmaceutical agents: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Borg, Danielle J; Forbes, Josephine M

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are the final products of the Maillard reaction, a complex process that has been studied by food chemists for a century. Over the past 30 years, the biological significance of advanced glycation has also been discovered. There is mounting evidence that advanced glycation plays a homeostatic role within the body and that food-related Maillard products, intermediates such as reactive α-dicarbonyl compounds and AGEs, may influence this process. It remains to be understood, at what point AGEs and their intermediates become pathogenic and contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases that inflict current society. Diabetes and its complications have been a major focus of AGE biology due to the abundance of excess sugar and α-dicarbonyls in this family of diseases. While further temporal information is required, a number of pharmacological agents that inhibit components of the advanced glycation pathway have already showed promising results in preclinical models. These therapies appear to have a wide range of mechanistic actions to reduce AGE load. Some of these agents including Alagebrium, have translated successfully to clinical trials, while others such as aminoguanidine, have had undesirable side-effect profiles. This review will discuss different pharmacological agents that have been used to reduce AGE burden in preclinical models of disease with a focus on diabetes and its complications, compare outcomes of those therapies that have reached clinical trials, and provide further rationale for the use of inhibitors of the glycation pathway in chronic diseases. PMID:27392438

  11. Impact of Maillard type glycation on properties of beta-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Chobert, Jean-Marc; Gaudin, Jean-Charles; Dalgalarrondo, Michèle; Haertlé, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The Maillard reaction occurs during many thermal treatments of foods. It is used because of its role in creating colors, flavors, textures and other functional properties in foods. Glycated beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) can improve techno-functional properties as heat stability, emulsifying and foaming properties. Among the six common sugars used, arabinose and ribose induce the highest degree of modification of proteins. Glycation induced also the oligomerization of BLG monomers. Depending on the reactivity of the sugar, the population of oligomers produced showed smaller or larger heterogeneity in molecular masses. Antiradical properties of glycated BLG were estimated using a radical scavenging activity test. Glycation induced a radical scavenging activity; the intensity depended on the sugar used for modification.

  12. Improving resveratrol bioaccessibility using biopolymer nanoparticles and complexes: impact of protein-carbohydrate maillard conjugation.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Pérez-Ciordia, Sonia; Marín-Arroyo, María R; McClements, David Julian

    2015-04-22

    The impact of encapsulating resveratrol in biopolymer nanoparticles or biopolymer complexes on its physicochemical stability and bioaccessibility was determined. The biopolymer nanoparticles consisted of a zein core surrounded by a caseinate or caseinate-dextran shell. The biopolymer complexes consisted of resveratrol bound to caseinate or caseinate-dextran. The caseinate-dextran conjugates were formed using the Maillard reaction. Both the biopolymer nanoparticles and complexes protected trans-resveratrol from isomerization when exposed to UV light, with the nanoparticles being more effective. Nanoparticles coated by caseinate-dextran were more stable to aggregation under simulated gastrointestinal conditions than those coated by caseinate, presumably due to greater steric repulsion. The bioaccessibility of resveratrol was enhanced when it was encapsulated in both biopolymer nanoparticles and biopolymer complexes. These results have important implications for the development of effective delivery systems for incorporating lipophilic nutraceuticals into functional foods and beverages. PMID:25843145

  13. Review of photochemical reaction constants of organic micropollutants required for UV advanced oxidation processes in water.

    PubMed

    Wols, B A; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2012-06-01

    Emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceutical compounds, personal care products, pesticides, hormones, surfactants, fire retardants, fuel additives etc.) are increasingly found in water sources and therefore need to be controlled by water treatment technology. UV advanced oxidation technologies are often used as an effective barrier against organic contaminants. The combined operation of direct photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radicals ensures good results for a wide range of contaminants. In this review, an overview is provided of the photochemical reaction parameters (quantum yield, molar absorption, OH radical reaction rate constant) of more than 100 organic micropollutants. These parameters allow for a prediction of organic contaminant removal by UV advanced oxidation systems. An example of contaminant degradation is elaborated for a simplified UV/H(2)O(2) system. PMID:22483836

  14. Review of photochemical reaction constants of organic micropollutants required for UV advanced oxidation processes in water.

    PubMed

    Wols, B A; Hofman-Caris, C H M

    2012-06-01

    Emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceutical compounds, personal care products, pesticides, hormones, surfactants, fire retardants, fuel additives etc.) are increasingly found in water sources and therefore need to be controlled by water treatment technology. UV advanced oxidation technologies are often used as an effective barrier against organic contaminants. The combined operation of direct photolysis and reaction with hydroxyl radicals ensures good results for a wide range of contaminants. In this review, an overview is provided of the photochemical reaction parameters (quantum yield, molar absorption, OH radical reaction rate constant) of more than 100 organic micropollutants. These parameters allow for a prediction of organic contaminant removal by UV advanced oxidation systems. An example of contaminant degradation is elaborated for a simplified UV/H(2)O(2) system.

  15. Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-10-12

    This project “Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells”, completed by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) at the University of Delaware in collaboration with the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Florida, developed the fundamental understanding and technology to increase module efficiency and improve the manufacturability of Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 films using the precursor reaction approach currently being developed by a number of companies. Key results included: (1) development of a three-step H2Se/Ar/H2S reaction process to control Ga distribution through the film and minimizes back contact MoSe2 formation; (2) Ag-alloying to improve precursor homogeneity by avoiding In phase agglomeration, faster reaction and improved adhesion to allow wider reaction process window; (3) addition of Sb, Bi, and Te interlayers at the Mo/precursor junction to produce more uniform precursor morphology and improve adhesion with reduced void formation in reacted films; (4) a precursor structure containing Se and a reaction process to reduce processing time to 5 minutes and eliminate H2Se usage, thereby increasing throughput and reducing costs. All these results were supported by detailed characterization of the film growth, reaction pathways, thermodynamic assessment and device behavior.

  16. Workshop on Critical Issues in Microgravity Fluids, Transport, and Reaction Processes in Advanced Human Support Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Joshi, Jitendra A.

    2004-01-01

    This workshop was designed to bring the experts from the Advanced Human Support Technologies communities together to identify the most pressing and fruitful areas of research where success hinges on collaborative research between the two communities. Thus an effort was made to bring together experts in both advanced human support technologies and microgravity fluids, transport and reaction processes. Expertise was drawn from academia, national laboratories, and the federal government. The intent was to bring about a thorough exchange of ideas and develop recommendations to address the significant open design and operation issues for human support systems that are affected by fluid physics, transport and reaction processes. This report provides a summary of key discussions, findings, and recommendations.

  17. Advancing the Theory of Nuclear Reactions with Rare Isotopes: From the Laboratory to the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration is to develop new methods that will advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct-reaction calculations, and, by using a new partial-fusion theory, to integrate descriptions of direct and compound-nucleus reactions. Ohio University concentrates its efforts on the first part of the mission. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g. (d,p) reactions, should be used. Those (d,p) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. While there exist several separable representations for the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the optical potential between a neutron (proton) and a nucleus is not readily available in separable form. For this reason we first embarked in introducing a separable representation for complex phenomenological optical potentials of Woods-Saxon type.

  18. Advancing the Theory of Nuclear Reactions with Rare Isotopes. From the Laboratory to the Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, Filomena

    2015-06-01

    The mission of the Topical Collaboration on the Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes (TORUS) was to develop new methods to advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes—particularly the (d,p) reaction in which a deuteron, composed of a proton and a neutron, transfers its neutron to an unstable nucleus. After benchmarking the state-of-the-art theories, the TORUS collaboration found that there were no exact methods to study (d,p) reactions involving heavy targets; the difficulty arising from the long-range nature of the well known, yet subtle, Coulomb force. To overcome this challenge, the TORUS collaboration developed a new theory where the complexity of treating the long-range Coulomb interaction is shifted to the calculation of so-called form-factors. An efficient implementation for the computation of these form factors was a major achievement of the TORUS collaboration. All the new machinery developed are essential ingredients to analyse (d,p) reactions involving heavy nuclei relevant for astrophysics, energy production, and stockpile stewardship.

  19. Control of Maillard-type off-flavor development in ultrahigh-temperature-processed bovine milk by phenolic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kokkinidou, Smaro; Peterson, Devin G

    2014-08-13

    The application of phenolic compounds to suppress Maillard chemistry and off-flavor development in ultrahigh-termperature (UHT)-processed milk during processing and storage was investigated. Five phenolic compounds were examined for structure-reactivity relationships (catechin, genistein, daidzein, 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene, and 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene). The levels of key transient Maillard reaction (MR) intermediates (reactive carbonyl species) and select off-flavor markers (methional, 2-acetyl-2-thiazoline, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline) were quantified by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS/ToF, respectively. The addition of phenolic compounds prior to UHT processing significantly reduced the concentration of MR intermediates and related off-flavor compounds compared to a control sample (p < 0.05). All phenolic compounds demonstrated unique structure reactivity and, notably, those with a more activated A-ring for aromatic electrophilic substitution (catechin, genistein, and 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene) showed the strongest suppression effect on the off-flavor markers and reactive carbonyl species. Sensory studies were in agreement with the analytical data. The cooked flavor intensity was rated lower for the recombination model samples of the catechin-treated UHT milk compared to the control UHT milk. Additionally, consumer acceptability studies showed catechin-treated UHT milk to have significantly higher liking scores when compared the control sample (Fisher's LSD = 0.728).

  20. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insect stings.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2004-07-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insect venom that were reported primarily in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology from 2002 through 2003. Among the topics highlighted are new insights into the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and potential strategies for more effective treatment of the atopic march. Patients should remain supine with raised legs during anaphylactic shock because upper body elevation could result in sudden death from loss of venous return to the heart. A major advance in food allergy was that humanized, monoclonal anti-IgE antibody showed protection against peanut-induced anaphylaxis. In addition to studies elucidating mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity, a clinical study showed patients with a history of prior penicillin allergy with negative penicillin allergy test results are unlikely to experience reactions or resensitization on subsequent oral courses of penicillin. Lastly, there are new recommendations for patients with convincing insect sting reaction histories but negative skin test responses to venom.

  1. Advanced scheme for high-yield laser driven proton-boron fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Picciotto, A.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Kucharik, M.; Morrissey, M.; Mangione, A.; Szydlowsky, A.; Malinowska, A.; Bertuccio, G.; Shi, Y.; Crivellari, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Bellutti, P.; Korn, G.

    2015-02-01

    A low contrast nanosecond laser pulse with relatively low intensity (3 × 1016 W cm-2) was used to enhance the yield of induced nuclear reactions in advanced solid targets. In particular the "ultraclean" proton-boron fusion reaction, producing energetic alpha-particles without neutron generation, was chosen. A spatially well-defined layer of boron dopants in a hydrogen-enriched silicon substrate was used as target. The combination of the specific target geometry and the laser pulse temporal shape allowed enhancing the yield of alpha-particles up to 109 per steradian, i.e 100 times higher than previous experimental achievements. Moreover the alpha particle stream presented a clearly peaked angular and energy distribution, which make this secondary source attractive for potential applications. This result can be ascribed to the interaction of the long laser pre-pulse with the target and to the optimal target geometry and composition.

  2. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    DOE PAGES

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed tomore » improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations [i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer (GRAAL) simulations], Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Finally, in this manuscript, we discuss the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers.« less

  3. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, K. D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products)represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries - pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most. The physico-chemical processes that control the development of this region have a significant impact on the long-term glass-water reaction. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include Geochemical Reaction Path simulations, Glass Reactivity in Allowance for Alteration Layer simulations, Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Discussed in this manuscript are the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers; thus providing the fundamental data needed to develop pore-scale equations that enable more accurate predictions of nuclear waste glass corrosion in a geologic repository.

  4. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  5. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-07-12

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and time-scales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the pore-scale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations [i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer (GRAAL) simulations], Monte Carlo simulations, and Molecular Dynamics methods. Finally, in this manuscript, we discuss the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers.

  6. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2015-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2014. Studies on food allergy suggest worrisomely high rates of peanut allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis-related hospitalizations. Evidence is mounting to support the theory that environmental exposure to peanut, such as in house dust, especially with an impaired skin barrier attributed to atopic dermatitis (AD) and loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene, is a risk factor for sensitization and allergy. Diagnostic tests are improving, with early studies suggesting the possibility of developing novel cellular tests with increased diagnostic utility. Treatment trials continue to show the promise and limitations of oral immunotherapy, and mechanistic studies are elucidating pathways that might define the degree of efficacy of this treatment. Studies have also provided insights into the prevalence and characteristics of anaphylaxis and insect venom allergy, such as suggesting that baseline platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase activity levels are related to the severity of reactions. Advances in drug allergy include identification of HLA associations for penicillin allergy and a microRNA biomarker/mechanism for toxic epidermal necrolysis. Research identifying critical events leading to skin barrier dysfunction and the polarized immune pathways that drive AD have led to new therapeutic approaches in the prevention and management of AD.

  7. Advancing the sensitivity of selected reaction monitoring-based targeted quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Su, Dian; Liu, Tao; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-04-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)—also known as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)—has emerged as a promising high-throughput targeted protein quantification technology for candidate biomarker verification and systems biology applications. A major bottleneck for current SRM technology, however, is insufficient sensitivity for e.g., detecting low-abundance biomarkers likely present at the pg/mL to low ng/mL range in human blood plasma or serum, or extremely low-abundance signaling proteins in the cells or tissues. Herein we review recent advances in methods and technologies, including front-end immunoaffinity depletion, fractionation, selective enrichment of target proteins/peptides or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs), as well as advances in MS instrumentation, which have significantly enhanced the overall sensitivity of SRM assays and enabled the detection of low-abundance proteins at low to sub- ng/mL level in human blood plasma or serum. General perspectives on the potential of achieving sufficient sensitivity for detection of pg/mL level proteins in plasma are also discussed.

  8. Reaction kinetics of selected micropollutants in ozonation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M

    2012-12-01

    Second-order reaction rate constants of micropollutants with ozone (k(O3)) and hydroxyl radicals (k(OH)) are essential for evaluating their removal efficiencies from water during ozonation and advanced oxidation processes. Kinetic data are unavailable for many of the emerging micropollutants. Twenty-four micropollutants with very diverse structures and applications including endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products were selected, and their k(O3) and k(OH) values were determined using bench-scale reactors (at pH 7 and T = 20 °C). Reactions with molecular ozone are highly selective as indicated by their k(O3) values ranging from 10(-2)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The general trend of ozone reactivity can be explained by micropollutant structures in conjunction with the electrophilic nature of ozone reactions. All of the studied compounds are highly reactive with hydroxyl radicals as shown by their high k(OH) values (10(8)-10(10) M(-1) s(-1)) even though they are structurally very diverse. For compounds with a low reactivity toward ozone, hydroxyl radical based treatment such as O(3)/H(2)O(2) or UV/H(2)O(2) is a viable alternative. This study contributed to filling the data gap pertaining kinetic data of organic micropollutants while confirming results reported in the literature where available. PMID:23079129

  9. Advances in the development of catalytic tethering directing groups for C-H functionalization reactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huan; Guimond, Nicolas; Huang, Yong

    2016-09-28

    Transition metal-catalyzed C-H bond insertion is one of the most straightforward strategies to introduce functionalities within a hydrocarbon microenvironment. For the past two decades, selective activation and functionalization of certain inert C-H bonds have been made possible with the help of directing groups (DGs). Despite the enormous advances in the field, an overwhelming majority of systems require two extra steps from their simple precursors: installation and removal of the DGs. Recently, traceless and multitasking groups were invented as a partial solution to DG release. However, installation remains largely unsolved. Ideally, a transient, catalytic DG would circumvent this problem and increase the step- and atom-economy of C-H functionalization processes. In this review, we summarize the recent development of the transient tethering strategy for C-H activation reactions. PMID:27506568

  10. Advancing the electrochemistry of the hydrogen-evolution reaction through combining experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yao; Jiao, Yan; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The electrocatalytic hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER), as the main step of water splitting and the cornerstone of exploring the mechanism of other multi-electron transfer electrochemical processes, is the subject of extensive studies. A large number of high-performance electrocatalysts have been developed for HER accompanied by recent significant advances in exploring its electrochemical nature. Herein we present a critical appraisal of both theoretical and experimental studies of HER electrocatalysts with special emphasis on the electronic structure, surface (electro)chemistry, and molecular design. It addresses the importance of correlating theoretical calculations and electrochemical measurements toward better understanding of HER electrocatalysis at the atomic level. Fundamental concepts in the computational quantum chemistry and its relation to experimental electrochemistry are also presented along with some featured examples. PMID:25384712

  11. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2008.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2009-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects and in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2008. Key epidemiologic observations include a rise in anaphylaxis in a population-based study and lower rates of peanut allergy in Israel, where infants consume peanut early compared with the United Kingdom, where dietary introduction is generally delayed. Advances in food allergy diagnosis include IgE epitope mapping that discloses the likelihood and severity of allergy; studies correlating likelihood of clinical reactivity on the basis of food-specific IgE to sesame, peanut, milk, and tree nuts; and an observation that a low baseline angiotensin-converting enzyme level may be associated with having pharyngeal edema during a reaction. Molecular, immunologic, and genetic studies are discerning pathways that are key in development of food allergy, identifying new modalities to interrupt mast cell degranulation, and elucidating risks associated with penicillin allergy. Regarding treatment, clinical studies show a majority of children with milk and egg allergy tolerate these proteins in modest amounts when they are extensively heated in baked goods, and studies show promise for oral immunotherapy to treat milk allergy and sublingual immunotherapy for honey bee venom hypersensitivity. The importance of skin barrier dysfunction has continued to be highlighted in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis (AD). Research has also continued to identify immunologic defects that contribute to the propensity of patients with AD to develop viral and bacterial infection. New therapeutic approaches to AD, urticaria, and angioedema have been reported including use of probiotics, biologics, vitamin D, and skin barrier creams.

  12. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2010.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2011-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2010. Key epidemiologic observations include an apparent increase in peanut allergy, with more than 1% of children affected, and increasing evidence that early food allergen exposure, rather than avoidance, might improve allergy outcomes. Advances in food allergy diagnosis include improved insights into prognosis and estimation of severity through component-resolved diagnostics and characterization of IgE binding to specific epitopes. Regarding treatment, oral and epicutaneous immunotherapy show promise. Studies of drug allergies show insights into pathophysiology, and studies on insect hypersensitivity reveal improved diagnostic methods. Genetic and functional studies have revealed the important role of epidermal differentiation products in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Cross-talk between the atopic immune response with the innate immune response have also been found to predispose to infection in patients with atopic dermatitis. New therapeutic approaches to control chronic urticaria have also been identified during the past year.

  13. Advanced methods comparisons of reaction rates in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.N.; Ott, K.O.

    1988-01-01

    A review of worldwide results revealed that reaction rates in the blanket region are generally underpredicted with the discrepancy increasing with penetration; however, these results vary widely. Experiments in the large uniform Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF) blanket yield an accurate quantification of this discrepancy. Using standard production code methods (diffusion theory with 50 group cross sections), a consistent Calculated/Experimental (C/E) drop-off was observed for various reaction rates. A 50% increase in the calculated results at the outer edge of the blanket is necessary for agreement with experiments. The usefulness of refined group constant generation utilizing specialized weighting spectra and transport theory methods in correcting this discrepancy was analyzed. Refined group constants reduce the discrepancy to half that observed using the standard method. The surprising result was that transport methods had no effect on the blanket deviations; thus, transport theory considerations do not constitute or even contribute to an explanation of the blanket discrepancies. The residual blanket C/E drop-off (about half the standard drop-off) using advanced methods must be caused by some approximations which are applied in all current methods. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Discovery and structure determination of a novel Maillard-derived sweetness enhancer by application of the comparative taste dilution analysis (cTDA).

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Harald; Soldo, Tomislav; Hofmann, Thomas

    2003-02-12

    Application of a novel screening procedure, the comparative taste dilution analysis (cTDA), on the non-solvent-extractable reaction products formed in a thermally processed aqueous solution of glucose and l-alanine led to the discovery of the presence of a sweetness-enhancing Maillard reaction product. Isolation, followed by LC-MS and 1D- and 2D-NMR measurements, and synthesis led to its unequivocal identification as N-(1-carboxyethyl)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pyridinium-3-ol inner salt. This so-called alapyridaine, although being tasteless itself, is the first nonvolatile, sweetness-enhancing Maillard reaction product reported in the literature. Depending on the pH value, the detection thresholds of sweet sugars, amino acids, and aspartame, respectively, were found to be significantly decreased when alapyridaine was present; for example, the threshold of glucose decreased by a factor of 16 in an equimolar mixture of glucose and alapyridaine. Studies on the influence of the stereochemistry on taste-enhancing activity revealed that the (+)-(S)-alapyridaine is the physiologically active enantiomer, whereas the (-)-(R)-enantiomer did not affect sweetness perception at all. Thermal processing of aqueous solutions of alapyridaine at 80 degrees C demonstrated a high thermal and hydrolytic stability of that sweetness enhancer; for example, more than 90 or 80% of alapyridaine was recovered when heated for 5 h at pH 7.0, 5.0, or 3.0, respectively. PMID:12568569

  15. Discovery and structure determination of a novel Maillard-derived sweetness enhancer by application of the comparative taste dilution analysis (cTDA).

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Harald; Soldo, Tomislav; Hofmann, Thomas

    2003-02-12

    Application of a novel screening procedure, the comparative taste dilution analysis (cTDA), on the non-solvent-extractable reaction products formed in a thermally processed aqueous solution of glucose and l-alanine led to the discovery of the presence of a sweetness-enhancing Maillard reaction product. Isolation, followed by LC-MS and 1D- and 2D-NMR measurements, and synthesis led to its unequivocal identification as N-(1-carboxyethyl)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pyridinium-3-ol inner salt. This so-called alapyridaine, although being tasteless itself, is the first nonvolatile, sweetness-enhancing Maillard reaction product reported in the literature. Depending on the pH value, the detection thresholds of sweet sugars, amino acids, and aspartame, respectively, were found to be significantly decreased when alapyridaine was present; for example, the threshold of glucose decreased by a factor of 16 in an equimolar mixture of glucose and alapyridaine. Studies on the influence of the stereochemistry on taste-enhancing activity revealed that the (+)-(S)-alapyridaine is the physiologically active enantiomer, whereas the (-)-(R)-enantiomer did not affect sweetness perception at all. Thermal processing of aqueous solutions of alapyridaine at 80 degrees C demonstrated a high thermal and hydrolytic stability of that sweetness enhancer; for example, more than 90 or 80% of alapyridaine was recovered when heated for 5 h at pH 7.0, 5.0, or 3.0, respectively.

  16. Nonvolatile oxidation products of glucose in Maillard model systems: formation of saccharinic and aldonic acids and their corresponding lactones.

    PubMed

    Haffenden, Luke J W; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2008-03-12

    By using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based methodologies, nonvolatile oxidation products of isotopically labeled glucose/glycine model systems were studied through a postpyrolytic in situ derivatization technique by using trimethylsilyldiethylamine. Analysis of the data indicated that the known reactive sugar intermediates such as glucosone and its deoxy derivatives can undergo in Maillard model systems three types of transformations: oxidation of the aldehydic groups into carboxylic acids, oxidative cleavage of alpha-dicarbonyl moieties into aldonic acids, and benzylic acid rearrangement of 1-deoxy-glucosone into saccharinic acids. The aldonic and saccharinic acids were identified through silylation of their lactone derivatives, and their origin was verified through (13)C-labeling studies. The following lactones were identified in glucose and glucose/glycine model systems: trans-dihydro-3,4-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]-2(3 H)-furanone, cis-dihydro-3,4-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]-2(3H)-furanone, 2-C-methyl-2,3,5-tris-O-(trimethylsilyl)-D-ribonic acid gamma-lactone, 3-deoxy-2,5,6-tris-O-(trimethylsilyl)-D-ribo-hexonic acid gamma-lactone, 2-deoxy-3,5-bis-O-(trimethylsilyl)-pentonic acid gamma-lactone, and 2,3,5-tris-O-(trimethylsilyl)-D-arabinonic acid gamma-lactone. The observed reduction in color and aroma in Maillard reactions performed under oxidative conditions may be attributed to the oxidation of reactive dicarbonyls into the corresponding carboxylic acids or their corresponding lactones. PMID:18251497

  17. Nonvolatile oxidation products of glucose in Maillard model systems: formation of saccharinic and aldonic acids and their corresponding lactones.

    PubMed

    Haffenden, Luke J W; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2008-03-12

    By using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based methodologies, nonvolatile oxidation products of isotopically labeled glucose/glycine model systems were studied through a postpyrolytic in situ derivatization technique by using trimethylsilyldiethylamine. Analysis of the data indicated that the known reactive sugar intermediates such as glucosone and its deoxy derivatives can undergo in Maillard model systems three types of transformations: oxidation of the aldehydic groups into carboxylic acids, oxidative cleavage of alpha-dicarbonyl moieties into aldonic acids, and benzylic acid rearrangement of 1-deoxy-glucosone into saccharinic acids. The aldonic and saccharinic acids were identified through silylation of their lactone derivatives, and their origin was verified through (13)C-labeling studies. The following lactones were identified in glucose and glucose/glycine model systems: trans-dihydro-3,4-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]-2(3 H)-furanone, cis-dihydro-3,4-bis[(trimethylsilyl)oxy]-2(3H)-furanone, 2-C-methyl-2,3,5-tris-O-(trimethylsilyl)-D-ribonic acid gamma-lactone, 3-deoxy-2,5,6-tris-O-(trimethylsilyl)-D-ribo-hexonic acid gamma-lactone, 2-deoxy-3,5-bis-O-(trimethylsilyl)-pentonic acid gamma-lactone, and 2,3,5-tris-O-(trimethylsilyl)-D-arabinonic acid gamma-lactone. The observed reduction in color and aroma in Maillard reactions performed under oxidative conditions may be attributed to the oxidation of reactive dicarbonyls into the corresponding carboxylic acids or their corresponding lactones.

  18. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2012.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2012. Studies support an increase in peanut allergy prevalence in children and exposure to the antibacterial agent triclosan and having filaggrin (FLG) loss-of-function mutations as risk factors for food sensitization. The role of specific foods in causing eosinophilic esophagitis is elucidated by several studies, and microRNA analysis is identified as a possible noninvasive disease biomarker. Studies on food allergy diagnosis emphasize the utility of component testing and the possibility of improved diagnosis through stepped approaches, epitope-binding analysis, and bioinformatics. Treatment studies of food allergy show promise for oral immunotherapy, but tolerance induction remains elusive, and additional therapies are under study. Studies on anaphylaxis suggest an important role for platelet-activating factor and its relationship to the need for prompt treatment with epinephrine. Insights on the pathophysiology and diagnosis of non-IgE-mediated drug allergy are offered, with novel data regarding the interaction of drugs with HLA molecules. Numerous studies support influenza vaccination of persons with egg allergy using modest precautions. Evidence continues to mount that there is cross-talk between skin barrier defects and immune responses in patients with atopic dermatitis. Augmentation of the skin barrier with reduction in skin inflammatory responses will likely lead to the most effective intervention in patients with this common skin disease.

  19. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified.

  20. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2011.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2011. Food allergy appears to be increasing in prevalence and carries a strong economic burden. Risk factors can include dietary ones, such as deficiency of vitamin D and timing of complementary foods, and genetic factors, such as filaggrin loss-of-function mutations. Novel mechanisms underlying food allergy include the role of invariant natural killer T cells and influences of dietary components, such as isoflavones. Among numerous preclinical and clinical treatment studies, promising observations include the efficacy of sublingual and oral immunotherapy, a Chinese herbal remedy showing promising in vitro results, the potential immunotherapeutic effects of having children ingest foods with baked-in milk if they tolerate it, and the use of anti-IgE with or without concomitant immunotherapy. Studies of allergic skin diseases, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity to drugs and insect venom are elucidating cellular mechanisms, improved diagnostics, and potential targets for future treatment. The role of skin barrier abnormalities, as well as the modulatory effects of the innate and adaptive immune responses, are major areas of investigation.

  1. Recent advances in reaction bonded silicon carbide optics and optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Joseph; Schwartz, Jay; Landry, David; Glenn, William; Rider, Brian; Chung, Michael

    2005-08-01

    SSG Precision Optronics, Inc. (SSG) has recently developed a number of Reaction Bonded (RB) Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical systems for space-based remote sensing and astronomical observing applications. RB SiC's superior material properties make it uniquely well suited to meet the image quality and long term dimensional stability requirements associated with these applications. An overview of the RB SiC manufacturing process is presented, along with a summary description of recently delivered RB SiC flight hardware. This hardware includes an RB SiC telescope and Pointing Mirror Assembly (PMA) for the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) mission and an imaging telescope for the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) mission. SSG continues to advance the state-of-the-technology with SiC materials and systems. A summary of development activities related to a low-cost, fracture tough, fiber reinforced RB SiC material formulation, novel tooling to produce monolithic, partially closed back mirror geometries, and extension of the technology to large aspheric mirrors is also provided.

  2. Immunological evidence that non-carboxymethyllysine advanced glycation end-products are produced from short chain sugars and dicarbonyl compounds in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, M.; Makita, Z.; Bucala, R.; Suzuki, T.; Koike, T.; Kameda, Y.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Maillard reaction that leads to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of angiopathy in diabetic patients and in the aging process. Recently, it was proposed that AGE were not only created by glucose, but also by dicarbonyl compounds derived from the Maillard reaction, autoxidation of sugars and other metabolic pathways of glucose. In this study, we developed four types of non-carboxymethyllysine (CML) anti-AGE antibodies that recognized proteins modified by incubation with short chain sugars and dicarbonyl compounds. MATERIALS AND METHODS: AGE-modified serum albumins were prepared by incubation of rabbit serum albumin with glyceraldehyde, glycolaldehyde, methylglyoxal or glyoxal. After immunization of rabbits, four types of AGE-specific antisera were obtained that were specific for the AGE modification. To separate non-CML AGE antibodies (Ab) (non-CML AGE-Ab-2, -3, -4, and -5), these anti-AGE antisera were subjected to affinity chromatography on a matrix coupled with four kinds of AGE bovine serum albumin (BSA) or CML-BSA. These non-CML AGE antibodies were used to investigate the AGE content of serum obtained from diabetic patients on hemodialysis. RESULTS: Characterization of the four types of non-CML AGE antibodies obtained by immunoaffinity chromatography was performed by competitive ELISA and immunoblot analysis. Non-CML AGE-Ab-2 crossreacted with the protein modified by glyceraldehyde or glycolaldehyde. Non-CML AGE-Ab-3 and -Ab-4 specifically cross-reacted with protein modified by glycolaldehyde and methylglyoxal, respectively. NonCML AGE-Ab-5 cross-reacted with protein modified with glyoxal as well as methylglyoxal and glycolaldehyde. Three kinds of non-CML AGE (AGE-2, -4, and -5) were detected in diabetic serum as three peaks with apparent molecular weights of 200, 1.15, and 0.85 kD; whereas, AGE-3 was detected as two peaks with apparent molecular weights of 200 and 0.85 k

  3. Physicochemical Changes and Glycation Reaction in Intermediate-Moisture Protein-Sugar Foods with and without Addition of Resveratrol during Storage.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhanwu; Gu, Mantun; Hao, Wangjun; Shen, Yixiao; Zhang, Weimin; Zheng, Lili; Ai, Binling; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Xu, Zhimin

    2016-06-22

    An intermediate-moisture food (IMF) model consisting of whey protein isolate and glucose and an IMF model fortified with resveratrol were used to study the effect of resveratrol on physicochemical changes and glycation of protein-sugar-rich foods during storage. The water activity (aw) of the storage was controlled at 0.75 or 0.56. The browning rate or hardness of fortified IMFs was significantly lower than that of IMFs after 45-day storage. The rate of Maillard reaction in the samples stored at aw 0.56 was higher than that of samples stored at aw 0.75. The fortified IMFs had lower levels of AGEs (advanced glycation end products), CML (N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine), and insoluble protein during storage. The inhibition capability of resveratrol against glycation was also confirmed by using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis to monitor glycated proteins and protein aggregation in the samples. The results of this study suggested that resveratrol could be used as an inhibitor to reduce the formation of undesirable AGEs and other Maillard reaction products in foods during storage. PMID:27218138

  4. Transition-metal-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions: a remarkable advance from palladium to nickel catalysts.

    PubMed

    Han, Fu-She

    2013-06-21

    In the transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, the use of the first row transition metals as catalysts is much more appealing than the precious metals owing to the apparent advantages such as cheapness and earth abundance. Within the last two decades, particularly the last five years, explosive interests have been focused on the nickel-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura reactions. This has greatly advanced the chemistry of transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. Most notably, a broad range of aryl electrophiles such as phenols, aryl ethers, esters, carbonates, carbamates, sulfamates, phosphates, phosphoramides, phosphonium salts, and fluorides, as well as various alkyl electrophiles, which are conventionally challenging, by applying palladium catalysts can now be coupled efficiently with boron reagents in the presence of nickel catalysts. In this review, we would like to summarize the progress in this reaction.

  5. Advances in turbulent mixing techniques to study microsecond protein folding reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Sagar V.; Chan, Alexander; Graceffa, Rita; Nobrega, R. Paul; Matthews, C. Robert; Irving, Thomas C.; Perot, Blair; Bilsel, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational advances in the protein folding arena have shown that the readout of the one-dimensional sequence information into three-dimensional structure begins within the first few microseconds of folding. The initiation of refolding reactions has been achieved by several means, including temperature jumps, flash photolysis, pressure jumps and rapid mixing methods. One of the most commonly used means of initiating refolding of chemically-denatured proteins is by turbulent flow mixing with refolding dilution buffer, where greater than 99% mixing efficiency has been achieved within 10’s of microseconds. Successful interfacing of turbulent flow mixers with complementary detection methods, including time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy (trFL), Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), Circular Dichroism (CD), Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), Hydrogen Exchange (HX) followed by Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR), Infrared Spectroscopy (IR), and Fourier Transform IR Spectroscopy (FTIR), has made this technique very attractive for monitoring various aspects of structure formation during folding. Although continuous-flow (CF) mixing devices interfaced with trFL detection have a dead time of only 30 µs, burst-phases have been detected in this time scale during folding of peptides and of large proteins (e.g., CheY and TIM barrels). Furthermore, a major limitation of CF mixing technique has been the requirement of large quantities of sample. In this brief communication, we will discuss the recent flurry of activity in micromachining and microfluidics, guided by computational simulations, that are likely to lead to dramatic improvements in time resolution and sample consumption for CF mixers over the next few years. PMID:23868289

  6. Recent advances in N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalysed benzoin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rajeev S; Biju, Akkattu T

    2016-01-01

    Summary N-Heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) have emerged as a powerful class of organocatalysts that mediate a variety of organic transformations. The Benzoin reaction constitutes one of the earliest known carbon–carbon bond-forming reactions catalysed by NHCs. The rapid growth of NHC catalysis in general has resulted in the development of a variety of benzoin and benzoin-type reactions. An overview of such NHC-catalysed benzoin reactions is presented. PMID:27340440

  7. Drugs of abuse that mediate advanced glycation end product formation: a chemical link to disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Treweek, Jennifer B; Dickerson, Tobin J; Janda, Kim D

    2009-05-19

    Nicotine and methamphetamine are frequently abused in modern society, despite the increasing evidence of their addictive, neuropharmacological, and toxic effects. Tobacco, the most widely abused substance, is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, killing nearly half a million Americans annually. A methamphetamine epidemic has also spread during the past decade; severe neurotoxicity and addictiveness contribute to the drug's notoriety. Although the majority of research on these two drugs is of pharmacological and neurobiological motivation, further study of these molecules from a chemical perspective may provide novel mechanistic insight into either their addictive potential or their pathological effects. For example, nicotine and methamphetamine share a common structural feature, a secondary amine, suggesting that these molecules could possess similar (or analogous) in vivo reactivity. Discoveries concerning the synthetic requirements for aqueous aldol catalysis and the feasibility of the enamine mechanism under physiological conditions have given rise to the hypothesis that ingested molecules, such as abused drugs, could participate in reactions utilizing an enamine intermediate in vivo. The chemical reactivity of exogenous drugs with amine functionalities was initially examined in the context of the Maillard reaction, or nonenzymatic browning. The heating of reducing sugars with amino acids yields a brown solution; studies of this reaction were originally applied to food chemistry for the production of distinct flavors and aromas. Further research has since revealed numerous instances in which the in vivo production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) through the Maillard reaction contribute to the pathology of disease states. Specifically, the modification of long-lived proteins by glycation and glycoxidation and the accumulation of these AGEs compromise the original function of such proteins and change the mechanical properties of

  8. Recent Advances in Recoverable Systems for the Copper-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Reaction (CuAAC).

    PubMed

    Mandoli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The explosively-growing applications of the Cu-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between organic azides and alkynes (CuAAC) have stimulated an impressive number of reports, in the last years, focusing on recoverable variants of the homogeneous or quasi-homogeneous catalysts. Recent advances in the field are reviewed, with particular emphasis on systems immobilized onto polymeric organic or inorganic supports. PMID:27607998

  9. Recent Advances in the Reactions of 1,2-Allenic Ketones and α-Allenic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuesen; He, Yan; Zhang, Xinying

    2016-06-01

    This Personal Account summarizes our recent efforts in searching for novel synthetic strategies for a number of organic molecules by using allene derivatives as valuable substrates. It starts with a concise description of the background of allene-related synthetic chemistry. The second part deals with the reactions of 1,2-allenic ketones, including the reactions of 1,2-allenic ketones with various nucleophiles to afford functionalized benzenes, heterocycles, and fluoroenones, and those of allenic ketones as nucleophiles under the promotion of bases to provide 1,3,4'-triones or functionalized furans. The third part of this account focuses on the reactions of α-allenic alcohols. In this section, multicomponent reactions involving α-allenic alcohols, and cascade reactions of α-allenic alcohols promoted by Brønsted acid or iodine, are presented. PMID:27230525

  10. Recent advances in transition metal-catalyzed N -atom transfer reactions of azides

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Tom G.

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer reactions of azides provide efficient ways to construct new carbon–nitrogen and sulfur–nitrogen bonds. These reactions are inherently green: no additive besides catalyst is needed to form the nitrenoid reactive intermediate, and the by-product of the reaction is environmentally benign N2 gas. As such, azides can be useful precursors for transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer to sulfides, olefins and C–H bonds. These methods offer competitive selectivities and comparable substrate scope as alternative processes to generate metal nitrenoids. PMID:20617243

  11. Stereospecificity of NAD+/NADH Reactions: A Project Experiment for Advanced Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrey, Jonathan S.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Presents background information, materials needed, and experimental procedures to study enzymes dependent on pyridine nucleotide coenzymes (NAD/NADH). The experiments, suitable for advanced organic or biochemistry courses, require approximately 10-15 hours to complete. (SK)

  12. Advances in the electrochemical simulation of oxidation reactions mediated by cytochrome p450.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Ugo; Boujtita, Mohammed

    2014-10-20

    Combining electrochemistry with mass spectrometry constitutes an increasingly useful approach for simulating reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP450). In this review, we discuss the ability of the electrochemical cell to act as a reliable tool to mimic CYP450. The electrochemical oxidation process and CYP450-catalyzed reactions are compared in terms of mechanistic pathways, chemical structures of reactive intermediate metabolites, and final chemical structures of oxidation products. The oxidation reactions mediated by CYP450 are known to occur by either a single electron transfer (SET) or a hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanism. The similarities between the reactions mediated electrochemically or by CYP450 are discussed in terms of SET and HAT mechanisms.

  13. A DFT Study Toward the Reaction Mechanisms of TNT With Hydroxyl Radicals for Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Zeng, Qun; Zhou, Yang; Zeng, Qingxuan; Wei, Xianfeng; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2016-05-26

    The degradation pathway of environmental contaminant 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was investigated computationally at the SMD(Pauling)/M06-2X/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. The dominant decomposition pathway of TNT → 4,6-dinitro-o-cresol → 4,6-dinitro-2-hydroxybenzylalcohol → 4,6-dinitro-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde was provided, and the corresponding predicted products and their distributions are in a good agreement with available experimental data on TNT degradation by Fenton reaction. It was shown that the mechanism of addition-elimination is crucial for this stage of the reaction. The reaction of H atom abstraction is a minor competing pathway. The details on transition states, intermediate radicals, and free energy surfaces for all proposed reactions are given and make up for a lack of experimental knowledge. PMID:27135259

  14. Advances in metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of halogenated quinazolinones and their quinazoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mphahlele, Malose Jack; Maluleka, Marole Maria

    2014-10-29

    Halogenated quinazolinones and quinazolines are versatile synthetic intermediates for the metal-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions such as the Kumada, Stille, Negishi, Sonogashira, Suzuki-Miyaura and Heck cross-coupling reactions or carbon-heteroatom bond formation via the Buchwald-Hartwig cross-coupling to yield novel polysubstituted derivatives. This review presents an overview of the application of these methods on halogenated quinazolin-4-ones and their quinazolines to generate novel polysubstituted derivatives.

  15. Advances in nickel-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions to construct carbocycles and heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Ashish; Louie, Janis

    2015-08-18

    Transition-metal catalysis has revolutionized the field of organic synthesis by facilitating the construction of complex organic molecules in a highly efficient manner. Although these catalysts are typically based on precious metals, researchers have made great strides in discovering new base metal catalysts over the past decade. This Account describes our efforts in this area and details the development of versatile Ni complexes that catalyze a variety of cycloaddition reactions to afford interesting carbocycles and heterocycles. First, we describe our early work in investigating the efficacy of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands in Ni-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions with carbon dioxide and isocyanate. The use of sterically hindered, electron donating NHC ligands in these reactions significantly improved the substrate scope as well as reaction conditions in the syntheses of a variety of pyrones and pyridones. The high reactivity and versatility of these unique Ni(NHC) catalytic systems allowed us to develop unprecedented Ni-catalyzed cycloadditions that were unexplored due to the inefficacy of early Ni catalysts to promote hetero-oxidative coupling steps. We describe the development and mechanistic analysis of Ni/NHC catalysts that couple diynes and nitriles to form pyridines. Kinetic studies and stoichiometric reactions confirmed a hetero-oxidative coupling pathway associated with this Ni-catalyzed cycloaddition. We then describe a series of new substrates for Ni-catalyzed cycloaddition reactions such as vinylcyclopropanes, aldehydes, ketones, tropones, 3-azetidinones, and 3-oxetanones. In reactions with vinycyclopropanes and tropones, DFT calculations reveal noteworthy mechanistic steps such as a C-C σ-bond activation and an 8π-insertion of vinylcyclopropane and tropone, respectively. Similarly, the cycloaddition of 3-azetidinones and 3-oxetanones also requires Ni-catalyzed C-C σ-bond activation to form N- and O-containing heterocycles. PMID:26200651

  16. Kinetic modeling of reactions in heated monosaccharide-casein systems.

    PubMed

    Brands, Carline M J; van Boekel, Martinus A J S

    2002-11-01

    In the present study, a kinetic model of the Maillard reaction occurring in heated monosaccharide-casein systems was proposed. Its parameters, the reaction rate constants, were estimated via multiresponse modeling. The determinant criterion was used as the statistical fit criterion instead of the familiar least squares to avoid statistical problems. The kinetic model was extensively tested by varying the reaction conditions. Different sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, and tagatose) were studied regarding their effect on the reaction kinetics. This study has shown the power of multiresponse modeling for the unraveling of complicated reaction routes as occur in the Maillard reaction. The iterative process of proposing a model, confronting it with experiments, and criticizing the model was passed through four times to arrive at a model that was largely consistent with all results obtained. A striking difference was found between aldose and ketose sugars as suggested by the modeling results: not the ketoses themselves but only their reaction products were found to be reactive in the Maillard reaction.

  17. Advanced Solution Methods for Microkinetic Models of Catalytic Reactions: A Methanol Synthesis Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rubert-Nason, Patricia; Mavrikakis, Manos; Maravelias, Christos T.; Grabow, Lars C.; Biegler, Lorenz T.

    2014-04-01

    Microkinetic models, combined with experimentally measured reaction rates and orders, play a key role in elucidating detailed reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysis and have typically been solved as systems of ordinary differential equations. In this work, we demonstrate a new approach to fitting those models to experimental data. For the specific example treated here, by reformulating a typical microkinetic model for a continuous stirred tank reactor to a system of nonlinear equations, we achieved a 1000-fold increase in solution speed. The reduced computational cost allows a more systematic search of the parameter space, leading to better fits to the available experimental data. We applied this approach to the problem of methanol synthesis by CO/CO2 hydrogenation over a supported-Cu catalyst, an important catalytic reaction with a large industrial interest and potential for large-scale CO2 chemical fixation.

  18. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Cyclobutanes by Olefin [2 + 2] Photocycloaddition Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The [2 + 2] photocycloaddition is undisputedly the most important and most frequently used photochemical reaction. In this review, it is attempted to cover all recent aspects of [2 + 2] photocycloaddition chemistry with an emphasis on synthetically relevant, regio-, and stereoselective reactions. The review aims to comprehensively discuss relevant work, which was done in the field in the last 20 years (i.e., from 1995 to 2015). Organization of the data follows a subdivision according to mechanism and substrate classes. Cu(I) and PET (photoinduced electron transfer) catalysis are treated separately in sections 2 and 4, whereas the vast majority of photocycloaddition reactions which occur by direct excitation or sensitization are divided within section 3 into individual subsections according to the photochemically excited olefin. PMID:27018601

  19. Recent Advances in Developing Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for the O2 Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic,M.B.; Sasaki, K.; Zhou, W.-P.; Li, M.; Liu, P.; Wang, J.X.; Adzic, R.R.

    2008-09-15

    For Pt, the best single-element catalyst for many reactions, the question of content and loading is exceedingly important because of its price and availability. Using platinum as a fuel-cell catalyst in automotive applications will cause an unquantifiable increase in the demand for this metal. This big obstacle for using fuel cells in electric cars must be solved by decreasing the content of Pt, which is a great challenge of electrocatalysis Over the last several years we inaugurated a new class of electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) based on a monolayer of Pt deposited on metal or alloy carbon-supported nanoparticles. The possibility of decreasing the Pt content in the ORR catalysts down to a monolayer level has a considerable importance because this reaction requires high loadings due to its slow kinetics. The Pt-monolayer approach has several unique features and some of them are: high Pt utilization, enhanced (or decreased) activity, enhanced stability, and direct activity correlations. The synthesis of Pt monolayer (ML) electrocatalysts was facilitated by our new synthesis method which allowed us to deposit a monolayer of Pt on various metals, or alloy nanoparticles [1, 2] for the cathode electrocatalyst. In this synthesis approach Pt is laid down by the galvanically displacing a Cu monolayer, which was deposited at underpotentials in a monolayer-limited reaction on appropriate metal substrate, with Pt after immersing the electrode in a K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} solution.

  20. Advancing the molecular movie: Femtosecond X-ray scattering of an electrocyclic chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minitti, Michael

    Since it began operation in 2009, SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has allowed scientists to make new types of X-ray measurements that were once thought unattainable by delivering one trillion X-ray photons in incredibly short bursts of less than a few femtoseconds. It was promised that this astonishing quantity of photons, delivered in such a small slice of time, could capture the motions of atoms in chemical reactions. Now we have used this capability to make a ``molecular movie'' of a molecule undergoing a chemical reaction from start to finish, with frames just a few femtoseconds long. We assembled the movie by taking individual X-ray snapshots of the molecules that show the positions of their atoms at each moment in time. Comparing these results to computer simulations of the reaction, we determined the routes the individual molecules followed as it's structure rearranged. This is the first step in developing robust methods for visualizing molecular motions in chemistry, biology, and materials science at the atomic scale. Please enjoy the movie! SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  1. Chemical morphogenesis: recent experimental advances in reaction-diffusion system design and control.

    PubMed

    Szalai, István; Cuiñas, Daniel; Takács, Nándor; Horváth, Judit; De Kepper, Patrick

    2012-08-01

    In his seminal 1952 paper, Alan Turing predicted that diffusion could spontaneously drive an initially uniform solution of reacting chemicals to develop stable spatially periodic concentration patterns. It took nearly 40 years before the first two unquestionable experimental demonstrations of such reaction-diffusion patterns could be made in isothermal single phase reaction systems. The number of these examples stagnated for nearly 20 years. We recently proposed a design method that made their number increase to six in less than 3 years. In this report, we formally justify our original semi-empirical method and support the approach with numerical simulations based on a simple but realistic kinetic model. To retain a number of basic properties of real spatial reactors but keep calculations to a minimal complexity, we introduce a new way to collapse the confined spatial direction of these reactors. Contrary to similar reduced descriptions, we take into account the effect of the geometric size in the confinement direction and the influence of the differences in the diffusion coefficient on exchange rates of species with their feed environment. We experimentally support the method by the observation of stationary patterns in red-ox reactions not based on oxihalogen chemistry. Emphasis is also brought on how one of these new systems can process different initial conditions and memorize them in the form of localized patterns of different geometries.

  2. Chemical morphogenesis: recent experimental advances in reaction-diffusion system design and control.

    PubMed

    Szalai, István; Cuiñas, Daniel; Takács, Nándor; Horváth, Judit; De Kepper, Patrick

    2012-08-01

    In his seminal 1952 paper, Alan Turing predicted that diffusion could spontaneously drive an initially uniform solution of reacting chemicals to develop stable spatially periodic concentration patterns. It took nearly 40 years before the first two unquestionable experimental demonstrations of such reaction-diffusion patterns could be made in isothermal single phase reaction systems. The number of these examples stagnated for nearly 20 years. We recently proposed a design method that made their number increase to six in less than 3 years. In this report, we formally justify our original semi-empirical method and support the approach with numerical simulations based on a simple but realistic kinetic model. To retain a number of basic properties of real spatial reactors but keep calculations to a minimal complexity, we introduce a new way to collapse the confined spatial direction of these reactors. Contrary to similar reduced descriptions, we take into account the effect of the geometric size in the confinement direction and the influence of the differences in the diffusion coefficient on exchange rates of species with their feed environment. We experimentally support the method by the observation of stationary patterns in red-ox reactions not based on oxihalogen chemistry. Emphasis is also brought on how one of these new systems can process different initial conditions and memorize them in the form of localized patterns of different geometries. PMID:23919126

  3. Transformation products and reaction kinetics of fragrances in advanced wastewater treatment with ozone.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Niklas; Dopp, Elke; Hesse, Julia; Richards, Jessica; Türk, Jochen; Bester, Kai

    2011-11-01

    The reaction of the fragrance compounds 4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethyl-1,3,4,7-tetrahydrocyclopenta[g]isochromene (HHCB), 1-(3,5,5,6,8,8-hexamethyl-6,7-dihydronaphthalen-2-yl)ethanone (AHTN), 1-tert-butyl-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (musk xylene/MX), 1-(4-tert-butyl-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-dinitrophenyl)ethanone (musk ketone/MK), and 1-(2,3,8,8-tetramethyl-1,3,4,5,6,7-hexahydronaphthalen-2-yl)ethanone (OTNE) with ozone in tap water as well as waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluents is described. Several transformation products are characterized by means of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. One transformation product (HHCB-Lactone) was confirmed by means of a true standard. Musk xylene and musk ketone do not react with ozone under the conditions used in this study. AHTN and HHCB reacted slowly to a multitude of transformation products, while OTNE reacted quickly to several stable transformation products. The reaction constants and half lives are used to predict removal efficiencies for full scale reactors.

  4. Advanced functionalization of polyhydroxyalkanoate via the UV-initiated thiol-ene click reaction.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Kenji; Iwamoto, Kosuke; Satoh, Yasuharu; Sakai, Ryosuke; Satoh, Toshifumi; Dairi, Tohru

    2016-05-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) incorporating vinyl-bearing 3-hydroxyalkanoates were prepared in 8.5-12.9 g L(-1) yield. The molar ratios (0-16 mol%) of the vinyl-bearing 3-hydroxyalkanoate derivatives were controlled by the continuous feeding of undecylenate at various concentrations. Subsequently, the PHAs were functionalized by UV-initiated thiol-ene click reaction and chemical modification. (1)H NMR spectra suggested that 3-mercaptopropionic acid and 2-aminoethanethiol were successfully introduced into the vinyl-bearing PHA. Subsequently, chemical modification using fluorescein or a fibronectin active fragment (GRGDS) was attempted. The former yielded a PHA derivative capable of emitting fluorescence under UV irradiation, which was useful for determining the miscibility of PHA in a composite film comprising poly-ʟ-lactic acid (PLLA) and PHA. In the latter case, PHA bearing GRGDS peptides exhibited cell adhesiveness, suggesting that its biocompatibility was improved upon peptide introduction. Taken together, the UV-initiated thiol-ene click reaction was demonstrated to be useful in PHA modification. PMID:26743654

  5. Cobalt diselenide nanoparticles embedded within porous carbon polyhedra as advanced electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Renbing; Xue, Yanhong; Liu, Bo; Zhou, Kun; Wei, Jun; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2016-10-01

    Highly efficient and cost-effective electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is crucial for a variety of renewable energy applications. Herein, strongly coupled hybrid composites composed of cobalt diselenide (CoSe2) nanoparticles embedded within graphitic carbon polyhedra (GCP) as high-performance ORR catalyst have been rationally designed and synthesized. The catalyst is fabricated by a convenient method, which involves the simultaneous pyrolysis and selenization of preformed Co-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67). Benefiting from the unique structural features, the resulting CoSe2/GCP hybrid catalyst shows high stability and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ORR (the onset and half-wave potentials are 0.935 and 0.806 V vs. RHE, respectively), which is superior to the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.912 and 0.781 V vs. RHE, respectively).

  6. Functional improvements in bovine serum albumin-fucoidan conjugate through the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Yeong; Shin, Weon-Sun

    2016-01-01

    The solubility, thermal stability, surface activity and emulsifying properties of native bovine serum albumin (BSA), heat-treated BSA, a BSA-fucoidan mixture, and a BSA-fucoidan conjugate were assessed. Covalent linkage of BSA with fucoidan resulted in significantly (p < 0.05) high solubility after heating at 90 °C for 15 min, particularly at pH 5. The BSA-fucoidan conjugate had a high melting temperature (97.09 ± 1.45 °C), as found by differential scanning calorimetry, indicating strong heat stability and high resistance to denaturation. Although the attachment of fucoidan, a non-surface-active hydrophilic polysaccharide, gave no change in the surface activity, the emulsifying activity and the emulsion stability of the conjugate at pH 5 were superior to those of native BSA, heat-treated BSA, and the BSA-fucoidan mixture. Conclusively, fucoidan attachment enhanced the solubility, thermal stability and emulsifying properties of the protein molecules with negative charge distribution and steric stabilization.

  7. Advanced unidirectional photocurrent generation via cytochrome c as reaction partner for directed assembly of photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Kai R; Feifel, Sven C; Lokstein, Heiko; Lisdat, Fred

    2014-08-01

    Conversion of light into an electrical current based on biohybrid systems mimicking natural photosynthesis is becoming increasingly popular. Photosystem I (PSI) is particularly useful in such photo-bioelectrochemical devices. Herein, we report on a novel biomimetic approach for an effective assembly of photosystem I with the electron transfer carrier cytochrome c (cyt c), deposited on a thiol-modified gold-surface. Atomic force microscopy and surface plasmon resonance measurements have been used for characterization of the assembly process. Photoelectrochemical experiments demonstrate a cyt c mediated generation of an enhanced unidirectional cathodic photocurrent. Here, cyt c can act as a template for the assembly of an oriented and dense layer of PSI and as wiring agent to direct the electrons from the electrode towards the photosynthetic reaction center of PSI. Furthermore, three-dimensional protein architectures have been formed via the layer-by-layer deposition technique resulting in a successive increase in photocurrent densities. An intermittent cyt c layer is essential for an efficient connection of PSI layers with the electrode and for an improvement of photocurrent densities. PMID:24957935

  8. [Advances and applications of selective reaction monitoring technology in proteomics study ].

    PubMed

    Shan, Yichu; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-04-01

    As an important technology for targeted protein analysis, selective reaction monitoring technology (SRM) improves the detection sensitivity and quantification accuracy by eliminating the interference of impurities and co-eluting peptides by selective detection of specific mother ions and daughter ions. It has been widely applied to the quantitative proteomics study due to the advantages of high selectivity, excellent reproducibility, high sensitivity and wide dynamic range and plays an important role in the area of life science. For the quantitative analysis of the complex samples with wide dynamic range, the throughput of analysis and detection sensitivity still need to be improved. Moreover, van quantification strategies have been proposed to improve the accuracy and precision of quantification. Furthermore, data processing becomes more and more important with the application of SRM technology to the analysis of complex samples. In this work, the recent development of SRM technology is reviewed from the above mentioned aspects. Since SRM technology gains wider applications along with the technological development, its applications in the area of proteomics quantitative study including biomarker validation, post-translational proteomics study (phosphorylation, glycosation, acetylation and so on), biotechnology and signaling pathway analysis are briefly described. Finally, the future developments, applications and outlook of SRM technology are described.

  9. Trends and advances in food analysis by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Salihah, Nur Thaqifah; Hossain, Mohammad Mosharraf; Lubis, Hamadah; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2016-05-01

    Analyses to ensure food safety and quality are more relevant now because of rapid changes in the quantity, diversity and mobility of food. Food-contamination must be determined to maintain health and up-hold laws, as well as for ethical and cultural concerns. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), a rapid and inexpensive quantitative method to detect the presence of targeted DNA-segments in samples, helps in determining both accidental and intentional adulterations of foods by biological contaminants. This review presents recent developments in theory, techniques, and applications of RT-PCR in food analyses, RT-PCR addresses the limitations of traditional food analyses in terms of sensitivity, range of analytes, multiplexing ability, cost, time, and point-of-care applications. A range of targets, including species of plants or animals which are used as food ingredients, food-borne bacteria or viruses, genetically modified organisms, and allergens, even in highly processed foods can be identified by RT-PCR, even at very low concentrations. Microfluidic RT-PCR eliminates the separate sample-processing step to create opportunities for point-of-care analyses. We also cover the challenges related to using RT-PCR for food analyses, such as the need to further improve sample handling.

  10. Trends and advances in food analysis by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Salihah, Nur Thaqifah; Hossain, Mohammad Mosharraf; Lubis, Hamadah; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2016-05-01

    Analyses to ensure food safety and quality are more relevant now because of rapid changes in the quantity, diversity and mobility of food. Food-contamination must be determined to maintain health and up-hold laws, as well as for ethical and cultural concerns. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), a rapid and inexpensive quantitative method to detect the presence of targeted DNA-segments in samples, helps in determining both accidental and intentional adulterations of foods by biological contaminants. This review presents recent developments in theory, techniques, and applications of RT-PCR in food analyses, RT-PCR addresses the limitations of traditional food analyses in terms of sensitivity, range of analytes, multiplexing ability, cost, time, and point-of-care applications. A range of targets, including species of plants or animals which are used as food ingredients, food-borne bacteria or viruses, genetically modified organisms, and allergens, even in highly processed foods can be identified by RT-PCR, even at very low concentrations. Microfluidic RT-PCR eliminates the separate sample-processing step to create opportunities for point-of-care analyses. We also cover the challenges related to using RT-PCR for food analyses, such as the need to further improve sample handling. PMID:27407185

  11. Assessing the effects of model Maillard compound intake on iron, copper and zinc retention and tissue delivery in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Roncero-Ramos, Irene; Pastoriza, Silvia; Navarro, M Pilar; Delgado-Andrade, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of dietary Maillard reaction compounds (MRP) as metal chelating polymers can alter mineral absorption and/or retention. Our aim in this study was to analyse the long-term effects of the consumption of model MRP from glucose-lysine heated for 90 min at 150 °C (GL) on iron, copper and zinc whole-body retention and tissue delivery. For 88 days, weaning rats were fed a Control diet or one containing 3% GL, until reaching the adult stage. During the experimental period a mineral balance was conducted to investigate the mineral retention. At day 88, the animals were sacrificed, blood was drawn for haemoglobin determination and some organs were removed. Copper and zinc balances were unaffected (Cu: 450 vs. 375 μg; Zn: 6.7 vs. 6.2 mg for Control and GL groups, respectively) and no change was observed in whole-body delivery. Iron retention, too, was unaltered (11.2 mg for Control and GL groups) but due to the tendency toward decreased body weight in the GL group (248 vs. 233 g for the Control and GL groups), whole-body iron concentration was 13% higher in the GL group than in the Control group. Absorbed iron accumulated particularly in the liver (144 vs. 190 μg g(-1) for the Control and GL groups), thus reducing haemoglobin levels. The long-term intake of MRP induced iron accumulation in the body but this did not result in enhanced iron functionality, since the haemoglobin concentration declined. Taking into account the findings of our research group's studies of young and adult rats, we now corroborate the hypothesis that the negative effect of GL MRP consumption on iron functionality takes place regardless of the animals' stage of life.

  12. Atomic layer deposition-Sequential self-limiting surface reactions for advanced catalyst "bottom-up" synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junling; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Stair, Peter C.

    2016-06-01

    Catalyst synthesis with precise control over the structure of catalytic active sites at the atomic level is of essential importance for the scientific understanding of reaction mechanisms and for rational design of advanced catalysts with high performance. Such precise control is achievable using atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is similar to chemical vapor deposition (CVD), except that the deposition is split into a sequence of two self-limiting surface reactions between gaseous precursor molecules and a substrate. The unique self-limiting feature of ALD allows conformal deposition of catalytic materials on a high surface area catalyst support at the atomic level. The deposited catalytic materials can be precisely constructed on the support by varying the number and type of ALD cycles. As an alternative to the wet-chemistry based conventional methods, ALD provides a cycle-by-cycle "bottom-up" approach for nanostructuring supported catalysts with near atomic precision. In this review, we summarize recent attempts to synthesize supported catalysts with ALD. Nucleation and growth of metals by ALD on oxides and carbon materials for precise synthesis of supported monometallic catalyst are reviewed. The capability of achieving precise control over the particle size of monometallic nanoparticles by ALD is emphasized. The resulting metal catalysts with high dispersions and uniformity often show comparable or remarkably higher activity than those prepared by conventional methods. For supported bimetallic catalyst synthesis, we summarize the strategies for controlling the deposition of the secondary metal selectively on the primary metal nanoparticle but not on the support to exclude monometallic formation. As a review of the surface chemistry and growth behavior of metal ALD on metal surfaces, we demonstrate the ways to precisely tune size, composition and structure of bimetallic metal nanoparticles. The cycle-by-cycle "bottom up" construction of bimetallic (or multiple

  13. Arginine-derived advanced glycation end products generated in peptide-glucose mixtures during boiling.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Andrej; Schmidt, Rico; Spiller, Sandro; Greifenhagen, Uta; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2014-04-23

    Glycation refers to the reaction of amino groups, for example in proteins, with reducing sugars. Intermediately formed Amadori products can be degraded by oxidation (Maillard reactions) leading to a heterogeneous class of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), especially during exposure to heat. AGEs are considered to be toxic in vivo due to their pronounced local and systemic inflammatory effects. At high temperatures, these reactions have been mostly investigated at the amino acid level. Here, we studied the formation of arginine-related AGEs in peptides under conditions simulating household cooking at physiological d-glucose concentrations. High quantities of AGE-modified peptides were produced within 15 min, especially glyoxal-derived products. The intermediately formed dihydroxy-imidazolidine yielded glyoxal- (Glarg) and methylglyoxal-derived hydro-imidazolinones (MG-H), with Glarg being further degraded to carboxymethyl-l-arginine (CMA). Carboxyethyl-l-arginine was not detected. The formation rates and yields were strongly increased in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of Fe(II)-ions and ascorbate. A nearby histidine residue increased the content of AGEs, whereas glutamic acid significantly reduced the CMA levels.

  14. Impact of browning reactions and bran pigments on color of parboiled rice.

    PubMed

    Lamberts, Lieve; Brijs, Kristof; Mohamed, Rasty; Verhelst, Neelke; Delcour, Jan A

    2006-12-27

    Rice color changes from white to amber during parboiling (soaking and steaming). Color parameters indicated that, during soaking, yellow bran pigments leached out in the water. The levels of the Maillard precursors (i.e., reducing sugars (RS) and free alpha-amino nitrogen (FAN)) depended on soaking temperature and time: leaching of RS was compensated by enzymic formation for long soaking times (>60 min), while proteolytic activity was too low to compensate for FAN leaching. Rice soaking under nitrogen, oxygen, or ambient conditions and determination of polyphenol oxidase activity allowed us to conclude that the effect of enzymic color changes on the soaked rice color was rather small. Color measurements of brown and milled mildly, intermediately, and severely parboiled rice samples showed that both brown and milled rice samples were darker and more red and yellow after parboiling and that the effect depended on the severity of parboiling conditions. Furthermore, steaming affected the rice color more and in a way opposite to that observed in soaking. The changes in RS and the loss of FAN during parboiling suggested that Maillard type reactions occur during brown rice steaming. Analyses of furosine levels confirmed Maillard browning of outer bran layers and endosperm during steaming. The level of this Maillard indicator increased with the severity of parboiling conditions in both brown and milled parboiled rice. Measurements of the levels of bran pigments indicated that bran pigments diffuse into the endosperm during parboiling and contribute to the parboiled rice color. PMID:17177522

  15. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products in human dentine.

    PubMed

    Miura, Jiro; Nishikawa, Kantaro; Kubo, Mizuho; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Takeshige, Fumio; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Cross-linking of collagen by Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) occurs by non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction). The purpose of this study was to examine whether AGEs are formed in human dentinal collagen, and to consider any possible influence of AGEs on dentinal physiology. Mechanical characteristics, fluorescence spectra and immunohistochemical analyses of demineralized dentine sections from young subjects were compared with those of aged ones. The same investigations were performed with young dentine artificially glycated by incubation in 0.1M ribose solution. Indentation measurement indicated that the sections from aged dentine were mechanically harder than those from young dentine. The hardness of young dentine increased after incubation in ribose solution. Fluorescence peak wavelength of the young dentine was shorter than that of the aged one, but shifted towards the peak wavelength of the aged one after incubation in ribose solution. These changes were considered to be due to accumulation of AGEs. Existence of AGEs in dentinal collagen was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. The obtained results suggest that AGEs accumulation occurs in dentinal collagen and is affected by both human age and physiological conditions such as glucose level in blood because dentinal collagen receives nourishment via dental pulp and tubules. PMID:24370182

  16. Advanced reactors and novel reactions for the conversion of triglyceride based oils into high quality renewable transportation fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnen, Michael James

    Sustainable energy continues to grow more important to all societies, leading to the research and development of a variety of alternative and renewable energy technologies. Of these, renewable liquid transportation fuels may be the most visible to consumers, and this visibility is further magnified by the long-term trend of increasingly expensive petroleum fuels that the public consumes. While first-generation biofuels such as biodiesel and fuel ethanol have been integrated into the existing fuel infrastructures of several countries, the chemical differences between them and their petroleum counterparts reduce their effectiveness. This gives rise to the development and commercialization of second generation biofuels, many of which are intended to have equivalent properties to those of their petroleum counterparts. In this dissertation, the primary reactions for a second-generation biofuel process, known herein as the University of North Dakota noncatalytic cracking process (NCP), have been studied at the fundamental level and improved. The NCP is capable of producing renewable fuels and chemicals that are virtually the same as their petroleum counterparts in performance and quality (i.e., petroleum-equivalent). In addition, a novel analytical method, FIMSDIST was developed which, within certain limitations, can increase the elution capabilities of GC analysis and decrease sample processing times compared to other high resolution methods. These advances are particularly useful for studies of highly heterogeneous fuel and/or organic chemical intermediates, such as those studied for the NCP. However the data from FIMSDIST must be supplemented with data from other methods such as for certain carboxylic acid, to provide accurate, comprehensive results, From a series of TAG cracking experiments that were performed, it was found that coke formation during cracking is most likely the result of excessive temperature and/or residence time in a cracking reactor. Based on this

  17. Recent Advances in Inverse-Electron-Demand Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of 1-Oxa-1,3-Butadienes.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    This review is an endeavor to highlight the progress in the inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxa-1,3-butadienes in recent years. The huge number of examples of 1-oxadienes cycloadditions found in the literature clearly demonstrates the incessant importance of this transformation in pyran ring synthesis. This type of reaction is today one of the most important methods for the synthesis of dihydropyrans which are the key building blocks in structuring of carbohydrate and other natural products. Two different modes, inter- and intramolecular, of inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxadienes are discussed. The domino Knoevenagel hetero-Diels-Alder reactions are also described. In recent years the use of chiral Lewis acids, chiral organocatalysts, new optically active heterodienes or dienophiles have provided enormous progress in asymmetric synthesis. Solvent-free and aqueous hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxabutadienes were also investigated. The reactivity of reactants, selectivity of cycloadditions, and chemical stability in aqueous solutions and under physiological conditions were taken into account to show the potential application of the described reactions in bioorthogonal chemistry. New bioorthogonal ligation by click inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition of in situ-generated 1-oxa-1,3-butadienes and vinyl ethers was developed. It seems that some of the hetero-Diels-Alder reactions described in this review can be applied in bioorthogonal chemistry because they are selective, non-toxic, and can function in biological conditions taking into account pH, an aqueous environment, and temperature. PMID:27573264

  18. Recent Advances in Inverse-Electron-Demand Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of 1-Oxa-1,3-Butadienes.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    This review is an endeavor to highlight the progress in the inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxa-1,3-butadienes in recent years. The huge number of examples of 1-oxadienes cycloadditions found in the literature clearly demonstrates the incessant importance of this transformation in pyran ring synthesis. This type of reaction is today one of the most important methods for the synthesis of dihydropyrans which are the key building blocks in structuring of carbohydrate and other natural products. Two different modes, inter- and intramolecular, of inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxadienes are discussed. The domino Knoevenagel hetero-Diels-Alder reactions are also described. In recent years the use of chiral Lewis acids, chiral organocatalysts, new optically active heterodienes or dienophiles have provided enormous progress in asymmetric synthesis. Solvent-free and aqueous hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxabutadienes were also investigated. The reactivity of reactants, selectivity of cycloadditions, and chemical stability in aqueous solutions and under physiological conditions were taken into account to show the potential application of the described reactions in bioorthogonal chemistry. New bioorthogonal ligation by click inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition of in situ-generated 1-oxa-1,3-butadienes and vinyl ethers was developed. It seems that some of the hetero-Diels-Alder reactions described in this review can be applied in bioorthogonal chemistry because they are selective, non-toxic, and can function in biological conditions taking into account pH, an aqueous environment, and temperature.

  19. Generic HPLC platform for automated enzyme reaction monitoring: Advancing the assay toolbox for transaminases and other PLP-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Börner, Tim; Grey, Carl; Adlercreutz, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Methods for rapid and direct quantification of enzyme kinetics independent of the substrate stand in high demand for both fundamental research and bioprocess development. This study addresses the need for a generic method by developing an automated, standardizable HPLC platform monitoring reaction progress in near real-time. The method was applied to amine transaminase (ATA) catalyzed reactions intensifying process development for chiral amine synthesis. Autosampler-assisted pipetting facilitates integrated mixing and sampling under controlled temperature. Crude enzyme formulations in high and low substrate concentrations can be employed. Sequential, small (1 µL) sample injections and immediate detection after separation permits fast reaction monitoring with excellent sensitivity, accuracy and reproducibility. Due to its modular design, different chromatographic techniques, e.g. reverse phase and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) can be employed. A novel assay for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes is presented using SEC for direct monitoring of enzyme-bound and free reaction intermediates. Time-resolved changes of the different cofactor states, e.g. pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate and the internal aldimine were traced in both half reactions. The combination of the automated HPLC platform with SEC offers a method for substrate-independent screening, which renders a missing piece in the assay and screening toolbox for ATAs and other PLP-dependent enzymes.

  20. A One-Pot Synthesis of m-Terphenyls: A Guided Exploration of Reaction Chemistry, Chromatography, and Spectroscopy. A Miniproject for the Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anam, Kishorekumar T.; Curtis, Michael P.; Irfan, Muhammad J.; Johnson, Michael P.; Royer, Andrew P.; Shahmohammadi, Kianor; Vinod, Thottumkara K.

    2002-05-01

    This four-week project-based laboratory exercise, developed for advanced organic chemistry students, involves a one-pot synthesis of m-terphenyls. Chemistry of aryl diazonium salts and Grignard reagents and reactivity of aryne intermediates toward nucleophilic reagents form the reaction chemistry basis for the project. The project exposes students to a number of important laboratory techniques (thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and column chromatography) for monitoring reaction progress and product isolation. A variety of spectroscopic techniques, including IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and attached proton test are used for product characterization. Students are also introduced to a useful empirical relationship to help predict (with considerable accuracy) the 13C chemical shift values of carbon atoms of substituted benzenes.

  1. Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction with Aqueous Glyoxylic Acid: An Experiment in Organic Synthesis and 2-D NMR Analysis for Advanced Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augé, Jacques; Lubin-Germain, Nadège

    1998-10-01

    As an application of the use of water as solvent in organic synthesis, a convenient synthesis of a-hydroxy-g-lactones from an aqueous solution of glyoxylic acid is described. The mechanism of the reaction leading to the lactones goes through cycloadducts which rearrange in situ. The NMR analysis of the diastereomeric lactones is particularly interesting; such an analysis illustrates the importance of modern techniques including 2-D NMR spectroscopy. Complete assignments of the signals are mentioned and NOESY spectra are enclosed. The full experiment is addressed to advanced undergraduate students who are trained in organic synthesis and NMR spectroscopy.

  2. Examining of athermal effects in microwave-induced glucose/glycine reaction and degradation of polysaccharide from Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cunshan; Yu, Xiaojie; Ma, Haile; Liu, Shulan; Qin, Xiaopei; Yagoub, Abu El-Gasim A; Owusu, John

    2013-08-14

    Many reports claim the existence of athermal effects in microwave-induced reactions, and this challenge the assumption that the thermal effect (heating) is the sole factor in microwave heating. Therefore, microwave-induced Maillard reaction of d-glucose/glycine and degradation of polysaccharide from Porphyra yezoensis (PSPY) were investigated. Browning reactions were monitored by measuring heating rate, UV-absorbance and brown color, UV-vis and synchronous fluorescence spectra, GC/MS analysis and intrinsic viscosity of degradation. Heating of d-glucose/glycine solution produced brown compounds which were detected at A420, and the intermediate products, 2-acetylfuran and 5-methylfurfural, whose fluorescence intensity evidenced their formation. Maximum emission of synchronous fluorescence spectra of samples were at 430-440 nm and 370-390 nm. Both microwave and water bath heating did not cause any compositional changes in the Maillard reaction products. All data failed to show any significant athermal effects of compositional changes in the Maillard reaction products. It can be inferred that some of the reports suggesting the existence of athermal effects, which could ascribe to the different set-up obtained in not well temperature controlled microwave heating systems. PMID:23769514

  3. Examining of athermal effects in microwave-induced glucose/glycine reaction and degradation of polysaccharide from Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cunshan; Yu, Xiaojie; Ma, Haile; Liu, Shulan; Qin, Xiaopei; Yagoub, Abu El-Gasim A; Owusu, John

    2013-08-14

    Many reports claim the existence of athermal effects in microwave-induced reactions, and this challenge the assumption that the thermal effect (heating) is the sole factor in microwave heating. Therefore, microwave-induced Maillard reaction of d-glucose/glycine and degradation of polysaccharide from Porphyra yezoensis (PSPY) were investigated. Browning reactions were monitored by measuring heating rate, UV-absorbance and brown color, UV-vis and synchronous fluorescence spectra, GC/MS analysis and intrinsic viscosity of degradation. Heating of d-glucose/glycine solution produced brown compounds which were detected at A420, and the intermediate products, 2-acetylfuran and 5-methylfurfural, whose fluorescence intensity evidenced their formation. Maximum emission of synchronous fluorescence spectra of samples were at 430-440 nm and 370-390 nm. Both microwave and water bath heating did not cause any compositional changes in the Maillard reaction products. All data failed to show any significant athermal effects of compositional changes in the Maillard reaction products. It can be inferred that some of the reports suggesting the existence of athermal effects, which could ascribe to the different set-up obtained in not well temperature controlled microwave heating systems.

  4. A Mesoporous Indium Metal-Organic Framework: Remarkable Advances in Catalytic Activity for Strecker Reaction of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Reinares-Fisac, Daniel; Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles; Gándara, Felipe

    2016-07-27

    With the aim of developing new highly porous, heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts for multicomponent reactions, a new mesoporous metal-organic framework, InPF-110 ([In3O(btb)2(HCOO)(L)], (H3btb = 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene acid, L = methanol, water, or ethanol), has been prepared with indium as the metal center. It exhibits a Langmuir surface area of 1470 m(2) g(-1), and its structure consists of hexagonal pores with a 2.8 nm aperture, which allows the diffusion of multiple substrates. This material presents a large density of active metal sites resulting in outstanding catalytic activity in the formation of substituted α-aminonitriles through the one-pot Strecker reaction of ketones. In this respect, InPF-110 stands out compared to other catalysts for this reaction due to the small catalyst loadings required, and without the need for heat or solvents. Furthermore, X-ray single crystal diffraction studies clearly show the framework-substrate interaction through coordination to the accessible indium sites. PMID:27420904

  5. A Mesoporous Indium Metal-Organic Framework: Remarkable Advances in Catalytic Activity for Strecker Reaction of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Reinares-Fisac, Daniel; Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles; Gándara, Felipe

    2016-07-27

    With the aim of developing new highly porous, heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts for multicomponent reactions, a new mesoporous metal-organic framework, InPF-110 ([In3O(btb)2(HCOO)(L)], (H3btb = 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene acid, L = methanol, water, or ethanol), has been prepared with indium as the metal center. It exhibits a Langmuir surface area of 1470 m(2) g(-1), and its structure consists of hexagonal pores with a 2.8 nm aperture, which allows the diffusion of multiple substrates. This material presents a large density of active metal sites resulting in outstanding catalytic activity in the formation of substituted α-aminonitriles through the one-pot Strecker reaction of ketones. In this respect, InPF-110 stands out compared to other catalysts for this reaction due to the small catalyst loadings required, and without the need for heat or solvents. Furthermore, X-ray single crystal diffraction studies clearly show the framework-substrate interaction through coordination to the accessible indium sites.

  6. Atypical skin reaction in a patient treated with gefitinib for advanced lung cancer: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    FERRAZZI, ANNA; RUSSO, IRENE; PASELLO, GIULIA; ALAIBAC, MAURO

    2016-01-01

    Gefitinib is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor utilized for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma. The most commonly reported adverse event during gefitinib therapy is skin rash, particularly a papulopustular acne-like eruption. Cutaneous toxicities can affect treatment compliance and the quality of life of the patient. The present study reports a case of gefitinib-induced atypical skin reaction in a 73-year-old woman with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, who developed a squamous-crusted eruption on her face after 4 weeks of oral treatment with gefitinib at a dose of 250 mg/day. The patient was treated with 100 mg minocyclin (2 tablets/day, orally) and with ryfamicin topically. A complete resolution of the lesions was observed 2 weeks later. The present case report explored the pathogenesis of this skin manifestation, focusing on the underlying immunological mechanisms. A review of the literature concerning skin reactions to gefitinib was also conducted. PMID:26889239

  7. Use of a Passive Reaction Wheel Jitter Isolation System to Meet the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility Imaging Performance Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, Karl J.; Schauwecker, Christopher J.

    1998-01-01

    Third in the series of NASA great observatories, the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in November of 1998. Following in the path of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, this observatory will image light at X-ray wavelengths, facilitating the detailed study of such phenomena as supernovae and quasars. The AXAF project is sponsored by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Because of exacting requirements on the performance of the AXAF optical system, it was necessary to reduce the transmission of reaction wheel jitter disturbances to the observatory. This reduction was accomplished via use of a passive mechanical isolation system to interface the reaction wheels with the spacecraft central structure. In addition to presenting a description of the spacecraft, the isolation system, and the key image quality requirement flowdown, this paper details the analyses performed in support of system-level imaging performance requirement verification. These analyses include the identification of system-level requirement suballocations, quantification of imaging and pointing performance, and formulation of unit-level isolation system transmissibility requirements. Given in comparison to the non-isolated system imaging performance, the results of these analyses clearly illustrate the effectiveness of an innovative reaction wheel passive isolation system.

  8. Production of sulfate radical and hydroxyl radical by reaction of ozone with peroxymonosulfate: a novel advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Jiang, Jin; Lu, Xinglin; Ma, Jun; Liu, Yongze

    2015-06-16

    In this work, simultaneous generation of hydroxyl radical (•OH) and sulfate radical (SO4•−) by the reaction of ozone (O3) with peroxymonosulfate (PMS; HSO5−) has been proposed and experimentally verified. We demonstrate that the reaction between the anion of PMS (i.e.,SO52−) and O3 is primarily responsible for driving O3 consumption with a measured second order rate constant of (2.12 ± 0.03) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). The formation of both •OH and SO4•− from the reaction between SO52− and O3 is confirmed by chemical probes (i.e., nitrobenzene for •OH and atrazine forb oth •OH and SO4•−). The yields of •OH and SO4•− are determined to be 0.43 ± 0.1 and 0.45 ± 0.1 per mol of O3 consumption, respectively. An adduct,−O3SOO− + O3 → −O3SO5−, is assumed as the first step, which further decomposes into SO5•− and O3•−. The subsequent reaction of SO5•− with O3is proposed to generate SO4•−, while O3•− converts to •OH. A definition of R(ct,•OH) and R(ct,SO4•−) (i.e., respective ratios of •OH and SO4•− exposures to O3 exposure) is adopted to quantify relative contributions of •OH and SO4•−. Increasing pH leads to increases in both values of R(ct,•OH) and R(ct,SO4•−) but does not significantly affect the ratio of R(ct,SO4•−) to R(ct,•OH) (i.e., R(ct,SO4•−)/R(ct,•OH)), which represents the relative formation of SO4•− to •OH. The presence of bicarbonate appreciably inhibits the degradation of probes and fairly decreases the relative contribution of •OH for their degradation, which may be attributed to the conversion of both •OH and SO4•− to the more selective carbonate radical (CO3•−).Humic acid promotes O3 consumption to generate •OH and thus leads to an increase in the R(ct,•OH) value in the O3/PMS process,w hile humic acid has negligible influence on the R(ct,SO4•−) value. This discrepancy is reasonably explained by the negligible effect of humic acid on SO

  9. Global proteomic screening of protein allergens and advanced glycation endproducts in thermally processed peanuts.

    PubMed

    Hebling, Christine M; McFarland, Melinda A; Callahan, John H; Ross, Mark M

    2013-06-19

    Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) are the cause of one of the most prevalent food allergies worldwide. Thermal processing (e.g., roasting) of peanuts and peanut-containing foods results in complex chemical reactions that alter structural conformations of peanut proteins, preventing accurate detection of allergens by most immunochemical and targeted screening methodologies. To improve food allergen detection and support more accurate food labeling, traditional methods for peanut protein extraction were modified to include protein denaturants and solubilization agents. Qualitative characterization by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses of raw and variably roasted peanut extracts confirmed improvements in total protein recovery and provided evidence for the incorporation of Ara h 1, Ara h 3, and, to a lesser extent, Ara h 2 into high molecular weight protein complexes upon roasting. Relative quantification of allergens in peanut lysates was accomplished by label-free spectral feature (MS1) LC-MS/MS methodologies, by which peanut allergen peptides exhibiting a differential MS response in raw versus roasted peanuts were considered to be candidate targets of thermal modification. Identification of lysine-modified Maillard advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) by LC-MS/MS confirmed the formation of (carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), (carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), and pyrraline (Pyr) protein modifications on Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 tryptic peptides in roasted peanut varieties. These results suggest that complex processed food matrices require initial analysis by an untargeted LC-MS/MS approach to determine optimum analytes for subsequent targeted allergen analyses. PMID:23039025

  10. Global proteomic screening of protein allergens and advanced glycation endproducts in thermally processed peanuts.

    PubMed

    Hebling, Christine M; McFarland, Melinda A; Callahan, John H; Ross, Mark M

    2013-06-19

    Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) are the cause of one of the most prevalent food allergies worldwide. Thermal processing (e.g., roasting) of peanuts and peanut-containing foods results in complex chemical reactions that alter structural conformations of peanut proteins, preventing accurate detection of allergens by most immunochemical and targeted screening methodologies. To improve food allergen detection and support more accurate food labeling, traditional methods for peanut protein extraction were modified to include protein denaturants and solubilization agents. Qualitative characterization by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses of raw and variably roasted peanut extracts confirmed improvements in total protein recovery and provided evidence for the incorporation of Ara h 1, Ara h 3, and, to a lesser extent, Ara h 2 into high molecular weight protein complexes upon roasting. Relative quantification of allergens in peanut lysates was accomplished by label-free spectral feature (MS1) LC-MS/MS methodologies, by which peanut allergen peptides exhibiting a differential MS response in raw versus roasted peanuts were considered to be candidate targets of thermal modification. Identification of lysine-modified Maillard advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) by LC-MS/MS confirmed the formation of (carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), (carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), and pyrraline (Pyr) protein modifications on Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 tryptic peptides in roasted peanut varieties. These results suggest that complex processed food matrices require initial analysis by an untargeted LC-MS/MS approach to determine optimum analytes for subsequent targeted allergen analyses.

  11. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Advanced Glycation End Products in the Malfunctioning of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Guo, M; Liu, L; Zhang, J; Liu, M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: In the last decade, dental implants have emerged as a crucial modality and serve as an individual form of therapy for dental failure. However, disparities in host responses have led to peri-implantitis and implant failure. The pathological mechanisms driving peri-implantitis remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the role of oxidative stress and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the progression of peri-implantitis and dental implants failure, compared with chronic periodontal disease. Subjects and Methods: Three patient groups (peri-implantitis, chronic periodontal disease and control), each with 10 subjects (7M/3F) and average age ranging from 40–60 years were selected for analysis. Salivary oxidative stress and tissue AGE levels were analysed by probing for reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Maillard reaction-related fluorescence, respectively. Results: We observed significant increase (> 2-fold) in oxidative stress and AGE levels in patients with peri-implantitis and chronic periodontal disease compared to controls, with chronic periodontal disease having the highest levels. In addition, we observed a strong positive correlation (r = 0.94) between oxidative stress and AGE levels in the patients. Conclusion: We propose that increased AGE levels and oxidative stress, although not the only pathway, are significant mediators in the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Altering them may potentially be used in combination with other modalities to manage peri-implantitis. PMID:26624598

  12. Microwave-assisted isomerisation of lactose to lactulose and Maillard conjugation of lactulose and lactose with whey proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Nooshkam, Majid; Madadlou, Ashkan

    2016-06-01

    Lactose was isomerised to lactulose by microwave heating and purified by a methanolic procedure to a product with approximately 72% lactulose content. Afterwards, lactose and the lactulose-rich product (PLu) were conjugated with either whey protein isolate (WPI) or its antioxidant hydrolysate (WPH) through microwaving. Lactose had a higher Maillard reactivity than PLu, and WPH was more reactive than WPI. The browning intensity of WPI-sugar systems was however higher than that of WPH-sugar pairs. Atomic force microscopy showed larger (up to ≈103 nm) particles for WPI-PLu conjugates compared to WPH-PLu counterparts (up to ≈39 nm). The Maillard conjugation progressively increased the radical-scavenging activity of WPI/WPH-sugar pairs with increasing conjugation time and improved the foaming properties of WPI and WPH. The WPI/WPH-sugar conjugates showed higher solubility and emulsification index than unreacted counterpart pairs. For native WPI, β-lactoglobulin was not degraded by in vitro gastric digestion, whereas for WPH-PLu conjugates degraded completely.

  13. A vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheet sensitized by graphene: an advanced electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Wang, Fengmei; Cheng, Zhongzhou; Zhan, Xueying; Wang, Zhenxing; Liu, Kaili; Safdar, Muhammad; Sun, Lianfeng; He, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Electrocatalytic hydrogen production at low overpotential is a promising route towards a clean and sustainable energy. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDs) have attracted copious attention for their outstanding activities in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the horizontally laid nanosheets suffer from a paucity of active edge sites. Herein, we report the successful synthesis of vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheets through a hydrothermal method followed by a facile sulfurization process. Furthermore, the surface of synthesized WS2 nanosheets was decorated by ultrathin reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoplates. This is achieved for the first time by bringing the rGO on the surface of vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheets, which is conducive to rapid electron transport during the HER process. Significantly, the as-synthesized rGO/WS2 nanosheets exhibit improved HER activity as compared to the undecorated ones. It needs a low overpotential of only 229 mV vs. RHE to afford a current density of 10 mA cm-2. We believe that this hybrid structure demonstrated remarkable HER activity brought about by a compatible synergism between rGO and WS2.Electrocatalytic hydrogen production at low overpotential is a promising route towards a clean and sustainable energy. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDs) have attracted copious attention for their outstanding activities in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the horizontally laid nanosheets suffer from a paucity of active edge sites. Herein, we report the successful synthesis of vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheets through a hydrothermal method followed by a facile sulfurization process. Furthermore, the surface of synthesized WS2 nanosheets was decorated by ultrathin reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoplates. This is achieved for the first time by bringing the rGO on the surface of vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheets, which is conducive to rapid electron transport during the HER process. Significantly, the as

  14. Non-enzymatic-browning-reaction: a versatile route for production of nitrogen-doped carbon dots with tunable multicolor luminescent display.

    PubMed

    Wei, Weili; Xu, Can; Wu, Li; Wang, Jiasi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-06

    The non-enzymatic browning, namely Maillard reaction is commonly invoked to account for abiotic chemical transformations of organic matter. Here we report a new reaction pathway via the Maillard reaction to systematically synthesize a series of nitrogen-doped carbon dots (C-dots) with superhigh quantum yield (QY) and tunable multicolor luminescent displayment. The starting materials are glucose and the serial amino acid analogues which allow systemically controlling luminescent and physicochemical properties of C-dots at will. Unexpectedly, the as-prepared C-dots possess bright photoluminescence with QY up to 69.1% which is almost the highest ever reported, favorable biocompatibility, excellent aqueous and nonaqueous dispersibility, ultrahigh photostability, and readily functionalization. We have demonstrated that they are particularly suitable for multicolor luminescent display and long-term and real-time cellular imaging. Furthermore, the methodology is readily scalable to large yield, and can provide sufficient amount of C-dots for practical demands.

  15. Non-Enzymatic-Browning-Reaction: A Versatile Route for Production of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots with Tunable Multicolor Luminescent Display

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Weili; Xu, Can; Wu, Li; Wang, Jiasi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    The non-enzymatic browning, namely Maillard reaction is commonly invoked to account for abiotic chemical transformations of organic matter. Here we report a new reaction pathway via the Maillard reaction to systematically synthesize a series of nitrogen-doped carbon dots (C-dots) with superhigh quantum yield (QY) and tunable multicolor luminescent displayment. The starting materials are glucose and the serial amino acid analogues which allow systemically controlling luminescent and physicochemical properties of C-dots at will. Unexpectedly, the as-prepared C-dots possess bright photoluminescence with QY up to 69.1% which is almost the highest ever reported, favorable biocompatibility, excellent aqueous and nonaqueous dispersibility, ultrahigh photostability, and readily functionalization. We have demonstrated that they are particularly suitable for multicolor luminescent display and long-term and real-time cellular imaging. Furthermore, the methodology is readily scalable to large yield, and can provide sufficient amount of C-dots for practical demands. PMID:24389590

  16. Non-Enzymatic-Browning-Reaction: A Versatile Route for Production of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots with Tunable Multicolor Luminescent Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Weili; Xu, Can; Wu, Li; Wang, Jiasi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    The non-enzymatic browning, namely Maillard reaction is commonly invoked to account for abiotic chemical transformations of organic matter. Here we report a new reaction pathway via the Maillard reaction to systematically synthesize a series of nitrogen-doped carbon dots (C-dots) with superhigh quantum yield (QY) and tunable multicolor luminescent displayment. The starting materials are glucose and the serial amino acid analogues which allow systemically controlling luminescent and physicochemical properties of C-dots at will. Unexpectedly, the as-prepared C-dots possess bright photoluminescence with QY up to 69.1% which is almost the highest ever reported, favorable biocompatibility, excellent aqueous and nonaqueous dispersibility, ultrahigh photostability, and readily functionalization. We have demonstrated that they are particularly suitable for multicolor luminescent display and long-term and real-time cellular imaging. Furthermore, the methodology is readily scalable to large yield, and can provide sufficient amount of C-dots for practical demands.

  17. Non-enzymatic-browning-reaction: a versatile route for production of nitrogen-doped carbon dots with tunable multicolor luminescent display.

    PubMed

    Wei, Weili; Xu, Can; Wu, Li; Wang, Jiasi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    The non-enzymatic browning, namely Maillard reaction is commonly invoked to account for abiotic chemical transformations of organic matter. Here we report a new reaction pathway via the Maillard reaction to systematically synthesize a series of nitrogen-doped carbon dots (C-dots) with superhigh quantum yield (QY) and tunable multicolor luminescent displayment. The starting materials are glucose and the serial amino acid analogues which allow systemically controlling luminescent and physicochemical properties of C-dots at will. Unexpectedly, the as-prepared C-dots possess bright photoluminescence with QY up to 69.1% which is almost the highest ever reported, favorable biocompatibility, excellent aqueous and nonaqueous dispersibility, ultrahigh photostability, and readily functionalization. We have demonstrated that they are particularly suitable for multicolor luminescent display and long-term and real-time cellular imaging. Furthermore, the methodology is readily scalable to large yield, and can provide sufficient amount of C-dots for practical demands. PMID:24389590

  18. The Relationship Between Maillard Reaction Product Formation and the Strength of Griege Yarns Subjected to Accelerated Ageing Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work examining the effect of ageing on cotton fiber surface chemical and HVI properties, yarn processing performance, and yarn quality showed that cotton bales stored for extended periods exhibit significant changes in a number of these variables including primarily surface sugar content, H...

  19. [Formation of pyridone derivates from maltose and lactose. XII. Investigations on the Maillard-reaction (authors transl)].

    PubMed

    Severine, T; Loidl, A

    1976-01-01

    Maltose and lactose react with methylammoniumacetate in a hot aqueous solution giving a dark brown mixture of products. 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyridone (5) can be isolated from the volatile compounds. Maltol and Isomaltol can be converted into the pyridone 5 with methylammoniumacetate. 1-Carboxymethyl-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4-pyridone is obtained from isomaltol and glycine. PMID:973453

  20. Reaction phenotyping: advances in the experimental strategies used to characterize the contribution of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Michael A; Youdim, Kuresh

    2015-01-01

    During the process of drug discovery, the pharmaceutical industry is faced with numerous challenges. One challenge is the successful prediction of the major routes of human clearance of new medications. For compounds cleared by metabolism, accurate predictions help provide an early risk assessment of their potential to exhibit significant interpatient differences in pharmacokinetics via routes of metabolism catalyzed by functionally polymorphic enzymes and/or clinically significant metabolic drug-drug interactions. This review details the most recent and emerging in vitro strategies used by drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic scientists to better determine rates and routes of metabolic clearance and how to translate these parameters to estimate the amount these routes contribute to overall clearance, commonly referred to as fraction metabolized. The enzymes covered in this review include cytochrome P450s together with other enzymatic pathways whose involvement in metabolic clearance has become increasingly important as efforts to mitigate cytochrome P450 clearance are successful. Advances in the prediction of the fraction metabolized include newly developed methods to differentiate CYP3A4 from the polymorphic enzyme CYP3A5, scaling tools for UDP-glucuronosyltranferase, and estimation of fraction metabolized for substrates of aldehyde oxidase.

  1. Three-dimensional Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Supported Molybdenum Disulfide Nanoparticles as an Advanced Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Haifeng; Liu, Conghui; Ye, Haitao; Hu, Linping; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Dai, Wenhao; Cao, Yu; Qi, Xueqiang; Lu, Huiting; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-12-01

    An efficient three-dimensional (3D) hybrid material of nitrogen-doped graphene sheets (N-RGO) supporting molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoparticles with high-performance electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is fabricated by using a facile hydrothermal route. Comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic characterizations confirm the resulting hybrid material possesses a 3D crumpled few-layered graphene network structure decorated with MoS2 nanoparticles. Electrochemical characterization analysis reveals that the resulting hybrid material exhibits efficient electrocatalytic activity toward HER under acidic conditions with a low onset potential of 112 mV and a small Tafel slope of 44 mV per decade. The enhanced mechanism of electrocatalytic activity has been investigated in detail by controlling the elemental composition, electrical conductance and surface morphology of the 3D hybrid as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. This demonstrates that the abundance of exposed active sulfur edge sites in the MoS2 and nitrogen active functional moieties in N-RGO are synergistically responsible for the catalytic activity, whilst the distinguished and coherent interface in MoS2/N-RGO facilitates the electron transfer during electrocatalysis. Our study gives insights into the physical/chemical mechanism of enhanced HER performance in MoS2/N-RGO hybrids and illustrates how to design and construct a 3D hybrid to maximize the catalytic efficiency.

  2. Three-dimensional Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Supported Molybdenum Disulfide Nanoparticles as an Advanced Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Haifeng; Liu, Conghui; Ye, Haitao; Hu, Linping; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Dai, Wenhao; Cao, Yu; Qi, Xueqiang; Lu, Huiting; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-01-01

    An efficient three-dimensional (3D) hybrid material of nitrogen-doped graphene sheets (N-RGO) supporting molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoparticles with high-performance electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is fabricated by using a facile hydrothermal route. Comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic characterizations confirm the resulting hybrid material possesses a 3D crumpled few-layered graphene network structure decorated with MoS2 nanoparticles. Electrochemical characterization analysis reveals that the resulting hybrid material exhibits efficient electrocatalytic activity toward HER under acidic conditions with a low onset potential of 112 mV and a small Tafel slope of 44 mV per decade. The enhanced mechanism of electrocatalytic activity has been investigated in detail by controlling the elemental composition, electrical conductance and surface morphology of the 3D hybrid as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. This demonstrates that the abundance of exposed active sulfur edge sites in the MoS2 and nitrogen active functional moieties in N-RGO are synergistically responsible for the catalytic activity, whilst the distinguished and coherent interface in MoS2/N-RGO facilitates the electron transfer during electrocatalysis. Our study gives insights into the physical/chemical mechanism of enhanced HER performance in MoS2/N-RGO hybrids and illustrates how to design and construct a 3D hybrid to maximize the catalytic efficiency. PMID:26639026

  3. Advanced oxygen reduction reaction catalyst based on nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene in alkaline medium.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Li, Meng; Jiang, Liqing; Lin, Lin; Cui, Lili; He, Xingquan

    2014-11-14

    A novel nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene (N-S-G) catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has been prepared by pyrolysing graphite oxide and poly[3-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole] composite (PAMTa). The atomic percentage of nitrogen and sulfur for the prepared N-S-G can be adjusted by controlling the pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, the catalyst pyrolysed at 1000 °C, denoted N-S-G 1000, exhibits the highest catalytic activity for ORR, which displays the highest content of graphitic-N and thiophene-S among all the pyrolysed samples. The electrocatalytic performance of N-S-G 1000 is significantly better than that of PAMTa and reduced graphite oxide composite. Remarkably, the N-S-G 1000 catalyst is comparable with Pt/C in terms of the onset and half-wave potentials, and displays larger kinetic limiting current density and better methanol tolerance and stability than Pt/C for ORR in an alkaline medium. PMID:25255312

  4. Genetic Association of Curative and Adverse Reactions to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Chinese advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Yunfeng; Jiang, Jie; Guo, Liang; Li, Yan; Huang, Hailiang; Shen, Lu; Luan, Mengqi; Li, Mo; Du, Huihui; Ma, Cheng; He, Lin; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Qin, Shengying

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is an effective targeted therapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but also causes adverse drug reactions (ADRs) e.g., skin rash and diarrhea. SNPs in the EGFR signal pathway, drug metabolism/ transport pathways and miRNA might contribute to the interpersonal difference in ADRs but biomarkers for therapeutic responses and ADRs to TKIs in Chinese population are yet to be fully investigated. We recruited 226 Chinese advanced NSCLC patients who received TKIs erlotinib, gefitinib and icotinib hydrochloride and systematically studied the genetic factors associated with therapeutic responses and ADRs. Rs884225 (T > C) in EGFR 3′ UTR was significantly associated with lower risk of ADRs to erlotinib (p value = 0.0010, adjusted p value = 0.042). A multivariant interaction four-SNP model (rs884225 in EGFR 3′UTR, rs7787082 in ABCB1 intron, rs38845 in MET intron and rs3803300 in AKT1 5′UTR) was associated with ADRs in general and the more specific drug induced skin injury. The SNPs associated with both therapeutic responses and ADRs indicates they might share a common genetic basis. Our study provided potential biomarkers and clues for further research of biomarkers for therapeutic responses and ADRs in Chinese NSCLC patients. PMID:26988277

  5. Binary cobalt ferrite nanomesh arrays as the advanced binder-free electrode for applications in oxygen evolution reaction and supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Huijuan; Mu, Yanping; Bai, Yuanjuan; Wang, Yu

    2016-09-01

    The porous CoFe2O4nanomesh arrays are successfully synthesized on nickel foam substrate through a high temperature and pressure hydrothermal method, following by the thermal post-treatment in air. The CoFe2O4 nanomesh arrays own numerous pores and large specific surface area, which is in favor of exposing more active sites. In consideration of the structural preponderances and versatility of the materials, the CoFe2O4 nanomesh arrays have been researched as the binder-free electrode materials for electrocatalysis and supercapacitors. When the CoFe2O4nanomesh arrays on nickel foam (CoFe2O4 NM-As/Ni) directly act as the free-binder catalyst toward catalyzing the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) of electrochemical water splitting, CoFe2O4 NM-As/Ni exhibits an admirable OER property with a low onset potential of 1.47 V(corresponding to the onset overpotential of 240 mV), a minimal overpotential (η10 = 253 mV), a small Tafel slope (44 mV dec-1), large anodic currents and long-term durability for 35 h in alkaline media. In addition, as an electrode of supercapacitors, CoFe2O4 NM-As/Ni obtains a desired specific capacitance (1426 F/g at the current density of 1 A/g), remarkable rate capability (1024 F/g at the current density of 20 A/g) and eminent capacitance retention (92.6% after 3000 cycles). The above results demonstrate the CoFe2O4 NM-As/Ni possesses great potential application in electrocatalysis and supercapacitors.

  6. Advanced Monte Carlo modeling of prompt fission neutrons for thermal and fast neutron-induced fission reactions on Pu239

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talou, P.; Becker, B.; Kawano, T.; Chadwick, M. B.; Danon, Y.

    2011-06-01

    Prompt fission neutrons following the thermal and 0.5 MeV neutron-induced fission reaction of Pu239 are calculated using a Monte Carlo approach to the evaporation of the excited fission fragments. Exclusive data such as the multiplicity distribution P(ν), the average multiplicity as a function of fragment mass ν¯(A), and many others are inferred in addition to the most used average prompt fission neutron spectrum χ(Ein,Eout), as well as average neutron multiplicity ν¯. Experimental information on these more exclusive data help constrain the Monte Carlo model parameters. The calculated average total neutron multiplicity is ν¯c=2.871 in very close agreement with the evaluated value ν¯e=2.8725 present in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. The neutron multiplicity distribution P(ν) is in very good agreement with the evaluation by Holden and Zucker. The calculated average spectrum differs in shape from the ENDF/B-VII.0 spectrum, evaluated with the Madland-Nix model. In particular, we predict more neutrons in the low-energy tail of the spectrum (below about 300 keV) than the Madland-Nix calculations, casting some doubts on how much scission neutrons contribute to the shape of the low-energy tail of the spectrum. The spectrum high-energy tail is very sensitive to the total kinetic energy distribution of the fragments as well as to the total excitation energy sharing at scission. Present experimental uncertainties on measured spectra above 6 MeV are too large to distinguish between various theoretical hypotheses. Finally, comparisons of the Monte Carlo results with experimental data on ν¯(A) indicate that more neutrons are emitted from the light fragments than the heavy ones, in agreement with previous works.

  7. Browning reaction systems as sources of mutagens and antimutagens.

    PubMed Central

    Powrie, W D; Wu, C H; Molund, V P

    1986-01-01

    Heated food systems contain hundreds of chemical compounds, some being mutagenic and others being antimutagenic. Studies have indicated that foods exposed to drying, frying, roasting, baking, and broiling conditions possess net mutagenic activity as assessed by the Ames/Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test and the chromosome aberration assay with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. With the above-mentioned heat treatment of food, nonenzymic browning reactions are generally proceeding at rapid rates and are involved in the development of mutagens. Caramelization and Maillard reactions are two important pathways in the nonenzymic browning of food and are responsible for the formation of volatile aromatic compounds, intermediate nonvolatile compounds, and brown pigments called melanoidins. Heated sugar-amino acid mixtures possessed mutagenic activities which have been assessed by short-term bioassays. Purified Maillard and caramelization reaction products such as reductones, dicarbonyls, pyrazines, and furan derivatives have exhibited mutagenicity and clastogenicity. The water-insoluble fraction (WIF) of instant coffee and a model-system melanoidin (MSM) have been shown to inhibit the mutagenicity of known carcinogens--aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), and benzo(a)pyrene (BP)--in aqueous dispersion. WIF and MSM were found to be effective binding agents for the carcinogens. PMID:3757959

  8. Contribution of the toxic advanced glycation end-products-receptor axis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takino, Jun-ichi; Nagamine, Kentaro; Hori, Takamitsu; Sakasai-Sakai, Akiko; Takeuchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. The main etiologies of HCC are hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and non-hepatitis B/non-hepatitis C HCC (NBNC-HCC) has also been identified as an etiological factor. Although the incidence of HCV-related HCC in Japan has decreased slightly in recent years, that of NBNC-HCC has increased. The onset mechanism of NBNC-HCC, which has various etiologies, remains unclear; however, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, is known to be an important risk factor for NBNC-HCC. Among the different advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) formed by the Maillard reaction, glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs, the predominant components of toxic AGEs (TAGE), have been associated with NASH and NBNC-HCC, including NASH-related HCC. Furthermore, the expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) has been correlated with the malignant progression of HCC. Therefore, TAGE induce oxidative stress by binding with RAGE may, in turn, lead to adverse effects, such as fibrosis and malignant transformation, in hepatic stellate cells and tumor cells during NASH or NASH-related HCC progression. The aim of this review was to examine the contribution of the TAGE-RAGE axis in NASH-related HCC. PMID:26483867

  9. Engineered glycated amino dendritic polymers as specific nonviral gene delivery vectors targeting the receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Giron-Gonzalez, M Dolores; Morales-Portillo, Arturo; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Lopez-Jaramillo, F Javier; Hernandez-Mateo, Fernando; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Salto-Gonzalez, Rafael

    2014-06-18

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is involved in diabetes or angiogenesis in tumors. Under pathological conditions, RAGE is overexpressed and upon ligand binding and internalization stimulates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation. In this work, amino dendritic polymers PEI 25 kDa and alkylated derivatives of PAMAM-G2 were engineered by the nonenzymatic Maillard glycation reaction to generate novel AGE-containing gene delivery vectors targeting the RAGE. The glycated dendritic polymers were easily prepared and retained the capability to bind and protect DNA from endonucleases. Furthermore, while glycation decreased the transfection efficiency of the dendriplexes in CHO-k1 cells which do not express RAGE, glycated dendriplexes acted as efficient transfection reagents in CHO-k1 cells which stably express recombinant RAGE. In addition, preincubation with BSA-AGEs, a natural ligand of the RAGE, or dansyl cadaverine, an inhibitor of the RAGE internalization, blocked transfection, confirming their specificity toward RAGE. The results were confirmed in NRK and RAW264.7 cell lines, which naturally express the receptor. The glycated compounds retain their transfection efficiency in the presence of serum and promote in vivo transfection in a mouse model. Accordingly, RAGE is a suitable molecular target for the development of site-directed engineered glycated nonviral gene vectors.

  10. Limited hydrolysis combined with controlled Maillard-induced glycation does not reduce immunoreactivity of soy protein for all sera tested.

    PubMed

    Walter, Jordan; Greenberg, Yana; Sriramarao, P; Ismail, Baraem P

    2016-12-15

    Combining proteolysis and Maillard-induced glycation was investigated to reduce the immunoreactivity of soy protein. Soy protein was hydrolyzed by Alcalase following response surface methodology utilizing three variables, temperature, time, and enzyme:substrate ratio, with the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and percent reduction in immunoreactivity as response variables. Western blots and ELISA were used to evaluate immunoreactivity using human sera. Data were fitted to appropriate models and prediction equations were generated to determine optimal hydrolysis conditions. The hydrolysate produced under optimized conditions was subjected to glycation with dextran. Hydrolysate produced under optimal conditions had 7.8% DH and a percent reduction in immunoreactivity ranging from 20% to 52%, depending on the sera used. Upon glycation, immunoreactivity was further reduced only when using serum that had the highest soy-specific IgE. This work revealed limitations and provided premises for future studies intended to prove the potency of the combined modification approach to produce a hypoallergenic protein ingredient.

  11. Kinetics of acrylamide formation/elimination reactions as affected by water activity.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschouwer, Kristel; Van der Plancken, Iesel; Van Loey, Ann; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2007-01-01

    The influence of water activity on the kinetics of acrylamide formation and elimination reaction was investigated using low-moisture equimolar asparagine-glucose model systems, which were heated at temperatures between 120 and 200 degrees C for variable heating times. To determine the water content corresponding to the water activities tested, a sorption moisture isotherm was constructed experimentally. The acrylamide concentrations measured at different water activities could be modeled on the basis of a reaction scheme including not only acrylamide formation and elimination reactions but also an alternative Maillard reaction between both reactants. The corresponding rate constants and activation energies were estimated using nonlinear regression analysis. Whereas the rate constant for acrylamide formation varied only slightly with the initial water activity of the model system, the elimination rate constant showed a clear minimum around a water activity of 0.82. The opposite trend, namely, a maximum at a water activity of 0.82, was found for the Maillard reaction rate constant as a function of water activity, which confirms data from literature. The activation energies for the different reactions changed in a comparable way as the corresponding rate constant with water activity. PMID:17503764

  12. Participants' engagement with and reactions to the use of on-line action learning sets to support advanced nursing role development.

    PubMed

    Currie, Kay; Biggam, John; Palmer, Janette; Corcoran, Terry

    2012-04-01

    Professional role development in nursing is occurring at a rapid pace in the UK as elsewhere. Internationally, finding relevant, flexible, sustainable educational solutions to support the preparation of nurses for new roles presents significant challenges for Higher Education Institutions, health service managers and the clinical practitioners who are would-be students. The use of on-line learning is frequently advocated as one means of resolving these difficulties. This paper discusses participants' engagement with, and reactions to, the use of on-line Action Learning Sets (ALS) as part of a national pilot development pathway for Advanced Nursing Practice in Scotland. Data collection included: survey of participants' views of on-line ALS; survey comparing perceptions of ALS with other educational experiences within the pathway; in-depth interviews with case-site participants. A range of benefits and limitations of on-line ALS was identified. The benefit of flexible access and sharing experiences with others was emphasised. Conversely, multiple commitments and lack of group cohesiveness significantly interfered with the effectiveness of this process. Key recommendations for future implementation acknowledge participants' preference for a blended approach, with face-to-face sessions to provide 'getting-to-know-you' opportunities, enhancing commitment to the group process.

  13. Solution structure of the variable-type domain of the receptor for advanced glycation end products: new insight into AGE-RAGE interaction.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shigeyuki; Yoshida, Takuya; Murata, Hiroko; Harada, Shusaku; Fujita, Naoko; Nakamura, Shota; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Takuo; Yonekura, Hideto; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2008-11-25

    Diabetes is defined by chronic hyperglycemia due to deficiency in insulin action. It has been found that the amount of advanced glycation end products (AGE) from the Maillard reaction between proteins and sugar molecules increases in blood of diabetic patients and furthermore that AGE binding to their cell surface receptor (RAGE) triggers both macrovascular and microvascular impairments to cause diabetic complications. Due to the clinical significance of the vascular complications, RAGE is currently a focus as an attractive target for drug discovery of candidates which interfere with AGE-RAGE binding to prevent the subsequent intracellular signaling related to pathogenical effects. Here, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the recombinant AGE-binding domain by using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy and showed that the domain assumes a structure similar to those of other immunoglobulin V-type domains. The site-directed mutagenesis studies identified the basic amino acids which play a key role in the AGE binding activities. Our results obtained from this study provide new insight into AGE-RAGE interaction. PMID:19032093

  14. Controlling the aggregation propensity and thereby digestibility of allergens by Maillardation as illustrated for cod fish parvalbumin.

    PubMed

    de Jongh, Harmen H J; Taylor, Steve L; Koppelman, Stef J

    2011-02-01

    The aggregation propensity of heat-treated codfish parvalbumin is investigated upon Maillardation of the protein under food-relevant conditions. About twelve of the fourteen lysine residues had reacted with glucose under these conditions. It is shown using circular dichroism and fluorescence that extensive coupling of glucose moieties on the protein surface does not affect the secondary and tertiary structural fold nor severely impair calcium-binding under ambient conditions. The glucosylated protein has a 3 °C higher denaturation temperature, while the free energy change involved with denaturation is reduced by 5-10%. It is shown by establishing insight in the change in heat capacity involved in the denaturation process that glucosylation of the protein is likely to result in a lower exposed hydrophobicity in the unfolded state. Aggregation kinetics, as monitored using light scattering techniques, shows that this lower exposed hydrophobicity of the denatured state slows down the aggregation process, while the shape and size of formed aggregates are comparable to those formed by non-glucosylated protein. This lower aggregation propensity allows a significantly faster digestion of heat-treated materials by pepsin. This work demonstrates that (pre-)processing of ingredients containing potential allergens, like cod fish parvalbumin, using food-relevant conditions may provide an effective tool to minimize risks of provoked allergic responses during food consumption. PMID:20970374

  15. Improvement of Surface Functionalities, Including Allergenicity Attenuation, of Whole Buckwheat Protein Fraction by Maillard-Type Glycation with Dextran

    PubMed Central

    Tazawa, Shigeru; Katayama, Shigeru; Hirabayashi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Nakamura, Soichiro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of the introduction of polysaccharide chains onto the molecular surface of buckwheat proteins on buckwheat protein surface functionality. The whole buckwheat protein fraction (WBP) was prepared using 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.5) containing 0.5 M NaCl and covalently linked with 6 kDa, 17.5 kDa, 40 kDa, 70 kDa, or 200 kDa dextran by Maillard-type glycation through controlled dry-heating at 60°C and 79% relative humidity for two weeks. Conjugation with 40 kDa dextran improved the water solubility and emulsifying properties of WBP without causing a serious loss of available lysine; 84.9% of the free amino groups were conserved. In addition, we found that the introduction of dextran chains onto the molecular surfaces of WBP attenuated the antigenicity of WBP. PMID:25580398

  16. Photo degradation of methyl orange an azo dye by advanced Fenton process using zero valent metallic iron: influence of various reaction parameters and its degradation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gomathi Devi, L; Girish Kumar, S; Mohan Reddy, K; Munikrishnappa, C

    2009-05-30

    Advanced Fenton process (AFP) using zero valent metallic iron (ZVMI) is studied as a potential technique to degrade the azo dye in the aqueous medium. The influence of various reaction parameters like effect of iron dosage, concentration of H(2)O(2)/ammonium per sulfate (APS), initial dye concentration, effect of pH and the influence of radical scavenger are studied and optimum conditions are reported. The degradation rate decreased at higher iron dosages and also at higher oxidant concentrations due to the surface precipitation which deactivates the iron surface. The rate constant for the processes Fe(0)/UV and Fe(0)/APS/UV is twice compared to their respective Fe(0)/dark and Fe(0)/APS/dark processes. The rate constant for Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/UV process is four times higher than Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/dark process. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/UV process is attributed to the cleavage of stable iron complexes which produces Fe(2+) ions that participates in cyclic Fenton mechanism for the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/APS/UV or H(2)O(2) compared to dark process is due to continuous generation of hydroxyl radicals and also due to the frequent photo reduction of Fe(3+) ions to Fe(2+) ions. Though H(2)O(2) is a better oxidant than APS in all respects, but it is more susceptible to deactivation by hydroxyl radical scavengers. The decrease in the rate constant in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavenger is more for H(2)O(2) than APS. Iron powder retains its recycling efficiency better in the presence of H(2)O(2) than APS. The decrease in the degradation rate in the presence of APS as an oxidant is due to the fact that generation of free radicals on iron surface is slower compared to H(2)O(2). Also, the excess acidity provided by APS retards the degradation rate as excess H(+) ions acts as hydroxyl radical scavenger. The degradation of Methyl Orange (MO) using Fe(0) is an acid driven process shows higher efficiency at pH 3. The

  17. Non-enzymatic model glycation reactions--a comprehensive study of the reactivity of a modified arginine with aldehydic and diketonic dicarbonyl compounds by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Marco A; Borges, Carlos M; Florêncio, M Helena

    2006-06-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction) of long-lived proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes, and possibly aging and Alzheimer's disease. Among the amino residues in proteins arginine plays an important role, and its modification by sugar moieties generates the so-called advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Moreover, alpha-dicarbonyl compounds have been found as the main participants in those modifications. Four alpha-dicarbonyl compounds, aldehydic and ketonic, were reacted with the modified amino acid N(alpha)-acetyl-L-arginine (AcArg), in an attempt to establish structure/activity relationships for the reactivity of alpha-dicarbonyls with the amine compound. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), was used to identify and characterize reagents, intermediates and reaction products. The fragmentation patterns of precursor ions showed similarities in all reaction systems studied, in which fragmentation of the amino acid residue prevails, especially for the dehydrated and/or multiple dehydrated precursor ions. For the non-hydrated ion species, fragmentation of the arginyl guanidino group was mainly observed. Specific information regarding the nature of the ions formed, in which the dicarbonyl electrophile character played an important role, was obtained. As an example, singly and doubly hydrated acetyl-argpyrimidine ions were detected for the methylglyoxal reaction only. For symmetrical dicarbonyls, glyoxal and diacetyl, the importance of steric contributions with respect to the energetic ones is discussed. Furthermore, the dehydrated acetyl-tetrahydropyrimidine ions for methylglyoxal and phenylglyoxal reactions revealed fragment ion compositions including the protonated molecules of acetyl-argpyrimidine, -hydroimidazolone and -5-methylimidazolone. An explanation for the acetyl-argpyrimidine formation from the acetyl-hydroimidazolone formation reaction is proposed. Aspects such

  18. Effect of Maillard Reacted Peptides on Human Salt Taste and the Amiloride-Insensitive Salt Taste Receptor (TRPV1t)

    PubMed Central

    Katsumata, Tadayoshi; Nakakuki, Hiroko; Tokunaga, Chikara; Fujii, Noboru; Egi, Makoto; Phan, Tam-Hao T.; Mummalaneni, Shobha; DeSimone, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Maillard reacted peptides (MRPs) were synthesized by conjugating a peptide fraction (1000–5000 Da) purified from soy protein hydrolyzate with galacturonic acid, glucosamine, xylose, fructose, or glucose. The effect of MRPs was investigated on human salt taste and on the chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses to NaCl in Sprague–Dawley rats, wild-type, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) knockout mice. MRPs produced a biphasic effect on human salt taste perception and on the CT responses in rats and wild-type mice in the presence of NaCl + benzamil (Bz, a blocker of epithelial Na+ channels), enhancing the NaCl response at low concentrations and suppressing it at high concentrations. The effectiveness of MRPs as salt taste enhancers varied with the conjugated sugar moiety: galacturonic acid = glucosamine > xylose > fructose > glucose. The concentrations at which MRPs enhanced human salt taste were significantly lower than the concentrations of MRPs that produced increase in the NaCl CT response. Elevated temperature, resiniferatoxin, capsaicin, and ethanol produced additive effects on the NaCl CT responses in the presence of MRPs. Elevated temperature and ethanol also enhanced human salt taste perception. N-(3-methoxyphenyl)-4-chlorocinnamid (a blocker of TRPV1t) inhibited the Bz-insensitive NaCl CT responses in the absence and presence of MRPs. TRPV1 knockout mice demonstrated no Bz-insensitive NaCl CT response in the absence or presence of MRPs. The results suggest that MRPs modulate human salt taste and the NaCl + Bz CT responses by interacting with TRPV1t. PMID:18603652

  19. Darkening mechanism and kinetics of humification process in catechol-Maillard system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingchao; Yue, Dongbei; Ma, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Humic acids, products of humification process, are capable of interacting with contaminants and can be applied to environmental remediation. Browning mechanisms of humification is critical to understand and further control the process. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of abiotic humification by tracking the fate of the precursors in systems containing glucose, glycine, and various CT concentrations, which were promoted by MnO2. Results show that the N-containing organic molecules significantly contributed in controlling the darkening effect. Increasing CT promoted the formation of Fulvic-like acids (FLAs) and Humic-like acids (HLAs). The entire reaction could be divided into two steps following pseudo-second-order kinetics equation and pseudo-zero-order kinetics equation. Moreover, increasing CT contributed to the increase of the degree of unsaturation in HLAs. PMID:25770693

  20. White South Africans' Reactions to Black Advancement: A Two-Sample Confirmatory Investigation of the Structure of Attitude Using an Analogy to the Multitrait-Multimethod Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Terence R.; Chemel, Charles S.

    1991-01-01

    A questionnaire measuring affective, conative, and cognitive responses to 3 aspects of Black advancement in the workplace was administered to 128 White English-speaking and 140 Afrikaans-speaking South Africans. Results of confirmatory, single-group, and multigroup analyses of the data indicate that the structures were very similar across the…

  1. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  2. Real-time trace detection and identification of chemical warfare agent simulants using recent advances in proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Fredrik; Sulzer, Philipp; Mayhew, Chris A; Watts, Peter; Jordan, Alfons; Märk, Lukas; Märk, Tilmann D

    2009-12-01

    This work demonstrates for the first time the potential of using recent developments in proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry for the rapid detection and identification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in real-time. A high-resolution (m/Deltam up to 8000) and high-sensitivity (approximately 50 cps/ppbv) proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF 8000 from Ionicon Analytik GmBH) has been successfully used to detect a number of CWA simulants at room temperature; namely dimethyl methylphosphonate, diethyl methylphosphonate, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide. Importantly, we demonstrate in this paper the potential to identify CWAs with a high level of confidence in complex chemical environments, where multiple threat agents and interferents could also be present in trace amounts, thereby reducing the risk of false positives. Instantaneous detection and identification of trace quantities of chemical threats using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry could form the basis for a timely warning system capability with greater precision and accuracy than is currently provided by existing analytical technologies.

  3. Preparation of acid-base bifunctional mesoporous KIT-6 (KIT: Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) and its catalytic performance in Knoevenagel reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ling; Wang, Chunhua; Guan, Jingqi

    2014-05-01

    Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous catalysts Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} containing different aluminum content have been synthesized through post synthetic grafting method. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), IR spectra of pyridine adsorption, NH{sub 3}-TPD and TG analysis. The characterization results indicated that the pore structure of KIT-6 was well kept after the addition of aluminum and grafting of aminopropyl groups. The acid amount of Al-KIT-6 increased with enhancing aluminum content. Catalytic results showed that weak acid and weak base favor the Knoevenagel reaction, while catalysts with strong acid and weak base exhibited worse catalytic behavior. - Graphical abstract: The postulated steps of mechanism for the acid-base catalyzed process are as follows: (1) the aldehyde gets activated by the surface acidic sites which allow the amine undergoes nucleophilic to attack the carbonyl carbon of benzaldehyde. (2) Water is released in the formation of imine intermediate. (3) The ethyl cyanoacetate reacts with the intermediate. (4) The benzylidene ethyl cyanoacetate is formed and the amine is regenerated. - Highlights: • KIT-6 and Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} with different Si/Al ratios has been successfully prepared. • 79.4% Yield was obtained over 46-Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} within 20 min in Knoevenagel reaction. • Low Al-content Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} shows better catalytic stability than high Al-content catalysts. • There is acid-base synergistic effect in Knoevenagel reaction.

  4. Pd0-mediated rapid cross-coupling reactions, the rapid C-[11C]methylations, revolutionarily advancing the syntheses of short-lived PET molecular probes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaaki; Doi, Hisashi; Koyama, Hiroko; Zhang, Zhouen; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Onoe, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2014-06-01

    Positron emission tomography is a noninvasive method for monitoring drug (or diagnostic) behavior and its localization on the target molecules in the living systems, including the human body, using a short-lived positron-emitting radionuclide. New methodologies for introducing representative short-lived radionuclides, (11)C and (18)F, into the carbon frameworks of biologically active organic compounds have been established by developing rapid C-[(11)C]methylations and C-[(18)F]fluoromethylations using rapid Pd(0)-mediated cross-coupling reactions between [(11)C]methyl iodide (sp(3)-hybridized carbon) and an excess amount of organotributylstannane or organoboronic acid ester having sp(2) (phenyl, heteroaromatic, or alkenyl), sp(alkynyl), or sp(3) (benzyl and cinnamyl)-hybridized carbons; and [(18)F]fluoromethyl halide (iodide or bromide) and an organoboronic acid ester, respectively. These rapid reactions provide a firm foundation for an efficient and general synthesis of short-lived (11)C- or (18)F-labeled PET molecular probes to promote in vivo molecular imaging studies.

  5. Advanced Development of a Compact 5-15 lbf Lox/Methane Thruster for an Integrated Reaction Control and Main Engine Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Eric A.; McManamen, John Patrick; Sooknanen, Josh; Studak, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the advanced development and testing of a compact 5 to 15 lbf LOX/LCH4 thruster for a pressure-fed integrated main engine and RCS propulsion system to be used on a spacecraft "vertical" test bed (VTB). The ability of the RCS thruster and the main engine to operate off the same propellant supply in zero-g reduces mass and improves mission flexibility. This compact RCS engine incorporates several features to dramatically reduce mass and parts count, to ease manufacturing, and to maintain acceptable performance given that specific impulse (Isp) is not the driver. For example, radial injection holes placed on the chamber body for easier drilling, and high temperature Haynes 230 were selected for the chamber over other more expensive options. The valve inlets are rotatable before welding allowing different orientations for vehicle integration. In addition, the engine design effort selected a coil-on-plug ignition system which integrates a relay and coil with the plug electrode, and moves some exciter electronics to avionics driver board. The engine injector design has small dribble volumes to target minimum pulse widths of 20 msec. and an efficient minimum impulse bit of less than 0.05 lbf-sec. The propellants, oxygen and methane, were chosen because together they are a non-toxic, Mars-forward, high density, space storable, and high performance propellant combination that is capable of pressure-fed and pump-fed configurations and integration with life support and power subsystems. This paper will present the results of the advanced development testing to date of the RCS thruster and the integration with a vehicle propulsion system.

  6. Glycosylation of aromatic amines I: Characterization of reaction products and kinetic scheme.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Madhushree Y; Kearney, William R; Kirsch, Lee E

    2009-01-01

    The reactions of aliphatic and aromatic amines with reducing sugars are important in both drug stability and synthesis. The formation of glycosylamines in solution, the first step in the Maillard reaction, does not typically cause browning but results in decreased potency and is hence significant from the aspect of drug instability. The purpose of this research was to present (1) unreported ionic equilibria of model reactant (kynurenine), (2) the analytical methods used to characterize and measure reaction products, (3) the kinetic scheme used to measure reaction rates and (4) relevant properties of various reducing sugars that impact the reaction rate in solution. The methods used to identify the reversible formation of two products from the reaction of kynurenine and monosaccharides included LC mass spectrometry, UV spectroscopy, and 1-D and 2-D (1)H-(1)H COSY NMR spectroscopy. Kinetics was studied using a stability-indicating HPLC method. The results indicated the formation of alpha and beta glycosylamines by a pseudo first-order reversible reaction scheme in the pH range of 1-6. The forward reaction was a function of initial glucose concentration but not the reverse reaction. It was concluded that the reaction kinetics and equilibrium concentrations of the glycosylamines were pH-dependent and also a function of the acyclic content of the reacting glucose isomer. PMID:19306062

  7. Designed synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes@Cu@MoS2 hybrid as advanced electrocatalyst for highly efficient hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Li, Jing; Lin, Xiaoqing; Li, Xinzhe; Fang, Yiyun; Jiao, Lixin; An, Xincai; Fu, Yan; Jin, Jun; Li, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Design and synthesis of non-precious-metal catalyst for efficient electrochemical transformation of water to molecular hydrogen in acid environments is of paramount importance in reducing energy losses during the water splitting process. Here, the hybrid material of MoS2-coated Cu loaded on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs@Cu@MoS2) was synthesized using chemical process and hydrothermal method. It was found that the participation of MWCNTs and Cu nanoparticles not only improved the electrical conductivity of the catalyst, but also further enhanced the catalytic activity by synergistic effect with edge-exposed MoS2-coating. Electrochemical experiments demonstrated that the catalyst exhibited excellent hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity with large cathode currents (small overpotential of 184 mV for 10 mA cm-2 current density) and a Tafel slope as small as 62 mV per decade. Furthermore, it was discovered that the current density of this composite catalyst had a little decrease after the continual 1000 cycling, which showed the catalyst had a high stability in the recycling process. These findings confirmed that this catalyst was a useful and earth-abundant material for water splitting.

  8. Facile synthesis of N-rich carbon quantum dots by spontaneous polymerization and incision of solvents as efficient bioimaging probes and advanced electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhouyue; Xu, Shengjie; Wan, Jiaxun; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-01-28

    In this study, uniform nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CDs) were synthesized through a one-step solvothermal process of cyclic and nitrogen-rich solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethyl-imidazolidinone (DMEU), under mild conditions. The products exhibited strong light blue fluorescence, good cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, after a facile post-thermal treatment, it developed a lotus seedpod surface-like structure of seed-like N-CDs decorating on the surface of carbon layers with a high proportion of quaternary nitrogen moieties that exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity and long-term durability towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The peak potential was -160 mV, which was comparable to or even lower than commercial Pt/C catalysts. Therefore, this study provides an alternative facile approach to the synthesis of versatile carbon quantum dots (CDs) with widespread commercial application prospects, not only as bioimaging probes but also as promising electrocatalysts for the metal-free ORR.

  9. Facile synthesis of N-rich carbon quantum dots by spontaneous polymerization and incision of solvents as efficient bioimaging probes and advanced electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhouyue; Xu, Shengjie; Wan, Jiaxun; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, uniform nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CDs) were synthesized through a one-step solvothermal process of cyclic and nitrogen-rich solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethyl-imidazolidinone (DMEU), under mild conditions. The products exhibited strong light blue fluorescence, good cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, after a facile post-thermal treatment, it developed a lotus seedpod surface-like structure of seed-like N-CDs decorating on the surface of carbon layers with a high proportion of quaternary nitrogen moieties that exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity and long-term durability towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The peak potential was -160 mV, which was comparable to or even lower than commercial Pt/C catalysts. Therefore, this study provides an alternative facile approach to the synthesis of versatile carbon quantum dots (CDs) with widespread commercial application prospects, not only as bioimaging probes but also as promising electrocatalysts for the metal-free ORR.In this study, uniform nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CDs) were synthesized through a one-step solvothermal process of cyclic and nitrogen-rich solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethyl-imidazolidinone (DMEU), under mild conditions. The products exhibited strong light blue fluorescence, good cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, after a facile post-thermal treatment, it developed a lotus seedpod surface-like structure of seed-like N-CDs decorating on the surface of carbon layers with a high proportion of quaternary nitrogen moieties that exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity and long-term durability towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The peak potential was -160 mV, which was comparable to or even lower than commercial Pt/C catalysts. Therefore, this study provides an alternative facile approach to the synthesis of versatile carbon quantum dots (CDs) with widespread

  10. Advanced Monte Carlo modeling of prompt fission neutrons for thermal and fast neutron-induced fission reactions on {sup 239}Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Becker, B.; Danon, Y.; Chadwick, M. B.

    2011-06-15

    Prompt fission neutrons following the thermal and 0.5 MeV neutron-induced fission reaction of {sup 239}Pu are calculated using a Monte Carlo approach to the evaporation of the excited fission fragments. Exclusive data such as the multiplicity distribution P({nu}), the average multiplicity as a function of fragment mass {nu}-bar(A), and many others are inferred in addition to the most used average prompt fission neutron spectrum {chi}(E{sub in},E{sub out}), as well as average neutron multiplicity {nu}-bar. Experimental information on these more exclusive data help constrain the Monte Carlo model parameters. The calculated average total neutron multiplicity is {nu}-bar{sub c}=2.871 in very close agreement with the evaluated value {nu}-bar{sub e}=2.8725 present in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. The neutron multiplicity distribution P({nu}) is in very good agreement with the evaluation by Holden and Zucker. The calculated average spectrum differs in shape from the ENDF/B-VII.0 spectrum, evaluated with the Madland-Nix model. In particular, we predict more neutrons in the low-energy tail of the spectrum (below about 300 keV) than the Madland-Nix calculations, casting some doubts on how much scission neutrons contribute to the shape of the low-energy tail of the spectrum. The spectrum high-energy tail is very sensitive to the total kinetic energy distribution of the fragments as well as to the total excitation energy sharing at scission. Present experimental uncertainties on measured spectra above 6 MeV are too large to distinguish between various theoretical hypotheses. Finally, comparisons of the Monte Carlo results with experimental data on {nu}-bar(A) indicate that more neutrons are emitted from the light fragments than the heavy ones, in agreement with previous works.

  11. Role of oxygen radical reactions in the browning and cross-linking of lysozyme by glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, C.J.; Thorpe, S.R.; Baynes, J.W.

    1986-05-01

    Lysozyme (LZM) was used as a model protein for studies on the effects of oxygen on the Maillard reaction. During a 4 wk incubation in 0.25 M glucose (0.2 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, 37/sup 0/C) the kinetics of glycation of LZM were similar under air and N/sub 2/, yielding approx.2 mol Lys modified per mol LZM. Fructoselysine (FL) was the major Lys derivative formed under air and N/sub 2/, while N/sup epsilon/-carboxymethyllysine (CML) accounted for approx.30% of FL formed at 4 wk under air. A loss of 1 mol Arg per mol LZM was also observed under both air and N/sub 2/, with greater loss from LZM dimer vs. monomer, suggesting a role for Arg in the crosslinking reaction. Dimer and monomer did not differ in content of Lys, FL or CML (under air), but dimer was 4 times as fluorescent as monomer, suggesting that crosslink structures are fluorescent. Despite significant differences in kinetics of crosslinking, browning and development of fluorescence of LZM under air vs. N/sub 2/, products formed had similar absorbance and fluorescence spectra. Based on inhibition by chelators and radical scavengers, the more rapid crosslinking and development of fluorescence under air was shown to result from oxygen radical reactions. These results indicate that both radical and non-radical processes may contribute to the Maillard reaction, but that the browning, fluorescence and crosslinking of protein may proceed in the absence of oxygen and oxygen radicals.

  12. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  13. Studies on the Formation of Maillard and Caramelization Products from Glucosamine Incubated at 37 °C.

    PubMed

    Hrynets, Yuliya; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Betti, Mirko

    2015-07-15

    This experiment compared the in vitro degradation of glucosamine (GlcN), N-acetylglucosamine, and glucose in the presence of NH3 incubated at 37 °C in phosphate buffer from 0.5 to 12 days. The reactions were monitored with UV-vis absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopies, and the main products of degradation, quinoxaline derivatives of α-dicarbonyl compounds and condensation products, were determined using UHPLC-UV and Orbitrap mass spectrometry. GlcN produced two major dicarbonyl compounds, glucosone and 3-deoxyglucosone, ranging from 709 to 3245 mg/kg GlcN and from 272 to 4535 mg/kg GlcN, respectively. 3,4-Dideoxyglucosone-3-ene, glyoxal, hydroxypyruvaldehyde, methylglyoxal, and diacetyl were also detected in lower amounts compared to glucosone and 3-deoxyglucosone. Several pyrazine condensation products resulting from the reaction between dicarbonyls and GlcN were also identified. This study determined that GlcN is a significantly unstable molecule producing a high level of degradation products at 37 °C. PMID:26114422

  14. Formation pathways and opioid activity data for 3-hydroxypyridinium compounds derived from glucuronic acid and opioid peptides by Maillard processes.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Stefica; Roscić, Maja; Lemieux, Carole; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Schiller, Peter W

    2007-07-01

    The kinetics of formation and identity of the reaction products of the glucuronic acid with three representative opioid peptides were investigated in vitro. Peptides were conjugated with glucuronic acid either in solution or under dry-heating conditions. From the incubations performed in solution N-(1-deoxy-D-fructofuranos-1-yluronic acid)-peptide derivatives (Amadori compounds) were isolated, whereas from the dry-heated reactions products containing the 3-hydroxypyridinium moiety at the N-terminal of the peptide chain were obtained. Experiments performed under mild dry-heating conditions (40 degrees C) in model systems based on Leu-enkephalin and glucuronic acid, and in environment of either 40% or 75% relative humidity, revealed that the higher level of humidity promoted a process that enhanced 3-hydroxypyridinium compound generation. The mechanism of 3-hydroxypyridinium formation is discussed. In comparison with their respective parent peptides, the N-(1-deoxy-D-fructofuranosyl-uronic acid) derivatives of the opioid peptides showed three- to 11-fold lower mu- and delta-receptor-binding affinities and agonist potencies in the functional assays, likely as a consequence of the steric bulk introduced at the N-terminal amino group. The further decrease in opioid activity observed with the 3-hydroxypyridinium-containing peptides may be due to the lower pK(a) of the 3-hydroxypyridinium moiety and to delocalization of the positive charge in the pyridinium ring system. PMID:17630992

  15. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  16. Dearomatization through Halofunctionalization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Wei; Zheng, Chao; You, Shu-Li

    2016-08-16

    Recent advances in dearomatization through halofunctionalization reactions are summarized in this Minireview. Two general categories of strategies are currently employed in this field. On one hand, the reaction can be initiated with electrophilic halogenation at an alkyne or alkene moiety. The resulting halonium ion intermediate is then captured by a pendant aromatic ring at the ipso position, affording the dearomatization product. On the other hand, electrophilic halogenation can directly take place at a substituted arene, and the final dearomatization product is furnished by deprotonation or intramolecular nucleophilic trap. Highly enantioselective variants have been realized in the latter case by organocatalysis or transition metal catalysis. By applying these methods, various valuable halogenated polycyclic molecular architectures have been obtained from readily available starting materials. PMID:27377184

  17. Two types of radicals in whole milk powder. Effect of lactose crystallization, lipid oxidation, and browning reactions.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Marianne K; Lauridsen, Lene; Skibsted, Leif H; Risbo, Jens

    2005-03-01

    Whole milk powder was stored in closed vials at 60 degrees C to induce crystallization of lactose within a short time scale. After an induction period of 3-4 days simultaneous crystallization of lactose, increase of water activity, formation of browning products, and increase of radical content took place. Radicals detected before lactose crystallization were characterized by a narrow ESR spectrum (g = 2.006) and could be depleted by removal of oxygen and therefore were assigned to oxidation processes. Late-stage radicals present after crystallization of lactose gave much wider spectra (g = 2.0048) and were independent of oxygen availability and assigned to late-stage Maillard reaction products. The study indicates that the processes of lactose crystallization, browning, and formation of radical species (g = 2.0048) are strongly coupled, while lipid oxidation is less dependent on the other processes. PMID:15740077

  18. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  19. Enantioselective Vinylogous Organocascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Hamish B; Dell'Amico, Luca; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Cascade reactions are powerful tools for rapidly assembling complex molecular architectures from readily available starting materials in a single synthetic operation. Their marriage with asymmetric organocatalysis has led to the development of novel techniques, which are now recognized as reliable strategies for the one-pot enantioselective synthesis of stereochemically dense molecules. In recent years, even more complex synthetic challenges have been addressed by applying the principle of vinylogy to the realm of organocascade catalysis. The key to the success of vinylogous organocascade reactions is the unique ability of the chiral organocatalyst to transfer reactivity to a distal position without losing control on the stereo-determining events. This approach has greatly expanded the synthetic horizons of the field by providing the possibility of forging multiple stereocenters in remote positions from the catalyst's point of action with high selectivity, while simultaneously constructing multiple new bonds. This article critically describes the developments achieved in the field of enantioselective vinylogous organocascade reactions, charting the ideas, the conceptual advances, and the milestone reactions that have been essential for reaching highly practical levels of synthetic efficiency. PMID:27256039

  20. Entropy Generation in a Chemical Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, E. N.

    2010-01-01

    Entropy generation in a chemical reaction is analysed without using the general formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics at a level adequate for advanced undergraduates. In a first approach to the problem, the phenomenological kinetic equation of an elementary first-order reaction is used to show that entropy production is always positive. A…

  1. Investigation of heat induced reactions between lipid oxidation products and amino acids in lipid rich model systems and hazelnuts.

    PubMed

    Karademir, Yeşim; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Gökmen, Vural

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipid oxidation to non-enzymatic browning reactions in lipid rich model and actual food systems. Hazelnut oil and model reaction mixtures consisting of different amino acids were heated under certain conditions to determine possible lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reaction products. In model systems, the Schiff base of 2,4-decadienal, its decarboxylated form, and reaction products formed after hydrolytic cleavage of the Schiff base or decarboxylated form were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. No furosine was detected in hazelnuts after roasting at 160 °C while the concentration of free amino acids significantly decreased. 2,4-Decadienal reacted effectively with all amino acids studied through a Maillard type carbonyl-amine condensation pathway. (2E,4E)-Deca-2,4-dien-1-amine was identified as a typical reaction product in model systems and roasted hazelnuts. In lipid-rich foods like hazelnuts, lipid-derived carbonyls might be responsible for potential modifications of free and protein bound amino acids during heating. PMID:23474835

  2. Investigation of heat induced reactions between lipid oxidation products and amino acids in lipid rich model systems and hazelnuts.

    PubMed

    Karademir, Yeşim; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Gökmen, Vural

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipid oxidation to non-enzymatic browning reactions in lipid rich model and actual food systems. Hazelnut oil and model reaction mixtures consisting of different amino acids were heated under certain conditions to determine possible lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reaction products. In model systems, the Schiff base of 2,4-decadienal, its decarboxylated form, and reaction products formed after hydrolytic cleavage of the Schiff base or decarboxylated form were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. No furosine was detected in hazelnuts after roasting at 160 °C while the concentration of free amino acids significantly decreased. 2,4-Decadienal reacted effectively with all amino acids studied through a Maillard type carbonyl-amine condensation pathway. (2E,4E)-Deca-2,4-dien-1-amine was identified as a typical reaction product in model systems and roasted hazelnuts. In lipid-rich foods like hazelnuts, lipid-derived carbonyls might be responsible for potential modifications of free and protein bound amino acids during heating.

  3. Diamine Ligands in Copper-Catalyzed Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Surry, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of copper-mediated cross-coupling reactions has been significantly increased by the development of mild reaction conditions and the ability to employ catalytic amounts of copper. The use of diamine-based ligands has been important in these advances and in this review we discuss these systems, including the choice of reaction conditions and applications in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, natural products and designed materials. PMID:22384310

  4. Advance care directives

    MedlinePlus

    ... advance directive; Do-not-resuscitate - advance directive; Durable power of attorney - advance care directive; POA - advance care directive; Health care agent - advance care directive; Health care proxy - ...

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF REACTION-DRIVEN IONIC TRANSPORT MEMBRANES (ITMs) TECHNOLOGY: PHASE IV/BUDGET PERIOD 6 “Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Integration in IGCC and Other Advanced Power Generation Systems”

    SciTech Connect

    David, Studer

    2012-03-01

    Air Products and Chemicals, along with development participants and in association with the U.S. Department of Energy, has made substantial progress in developing a novel air separation technology. Unlike conventional cryogenic processes, this method uses high-temperature ceramic membranes to produce high-purity oxygen. The membranes selectively transport oxygen ions with high flux and infinite theoretical selectivity. Reaction-driven ceramic membranes are fabricated from non-porous, multi-component metallic oxides, operate at temperatures typically over 700°C, and have exceptionally high oxygen flux and selectivity. Oxygen from low-pressure air permeates as oxygen ions through the ceramic membrane and is consumed through chemical reactions, thus creating a chemical driving force that pulls oxygen ions across the membrane at high rates. The oxygen reacts with a hydrocarbon fuel in a partial oxidation process to produce a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture – synthesis gas. This project expands the partial-oxidation scope of ITM technology beyond natural gas feed and investigates the potential for ITM reaction-driven technology to be used in conjunction with gasification and pyrolysis technologies to provide more economical routes for producing hydrogen and synthesis gas. This report presents an overview of the ITM reaction-driven development effort, including ceramic materials development, fabrication and testing of small-scale ceramic modules, ceramic modeling, and the investigation of gasifier integration schemes

  6. Reactions among indoor pollutants.

    PubMed

    Weschler, C J

    2001-09-13

    This paper reviews recent studies in the field of "indoor chemistry"--reactions among indoor pollutants. Advances have occurred in a number of areas. A mouse bioassay procedure has shown that ozone/terpene reactions produce products that are more irritating than their precursors, although the agents responsible for the deleterious effects remain to be determined. Indoor ozone/terpene reactions have been demonstrated to produce hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, sub-micron particles, and ultrafine particles. New analytical techniques such as LC/MS and thermal desorption mass spectrometry have greatly improved our knowledge of the condensed-phase species associated with such particles. Indeed, the latter approach has identified a number of short-lived or thermally labile species, including organic hydroperoxides, peroxy-hemiacetals, and secondary ozonides, which would be missed by more conventional techniques. Investigators are making inroads into the poorly understood area of indoor heterogeneous chemistry. Systems studied include ozone/HVAC components, ozone/paint, and ozone/carpets. Another heterogeneous process that has been further examined is the indoor formation of nitrous acid through NO2/surface chemistry. Emissions from indoor sources that contribute to, or are altered by, indoor chemistry have also received attention. Researchers have expanded our awareness of reactive chemicals that can emanate from wood coatings and other products commonly used indoors. In a related vein, a number of recent investigations have shown that emissions from materials can be significantly altered by indoor chemistry. On the theoretical side, an outdoor atmospheric chemistry model has been modified for use as an indoor air model, the effects of ventilation rates on indoor chemistry have been simulated, and initial steps have been taken in applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to indoor chemistry.

  7. Reaction models in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We present different reaction models commonly used in nuclear astrophysics, in particular for the nucleosynthesis of light elements. Pioneering works were performed within the potential model, where the internal structure of the colliding nuclei is completely ignored. Significant advances in microscopic cluster models provided the first microscopic description of the 3He(α,&gamma)7 Be reaction more than thirty years ago. In this approach, the calculations are based on an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, but the cluster approximation should be made to simplify the calculations. Nowadays, modern microscopic calculations are able to go beyond the cluster approximation, and aim at finding exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. We discuss recent examples on the d+d reactions at low energies.

  8. Effects of sterilization, packaging, and storage on vitamin C degradation, protein denaturation, and glycation in fortified milks.

    PubMed

    Gliguem, H; Birlouez-Aragon, I

    2005-03-01

    Monitoring the nutritional quality of dietetic milk throughout its shelf life is particularly important due to the high susceptibility of some vitamins to oxidation, and the continuous development of the Maillard reaction during storage. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the vitamin C content and protein modification by denaturation and glycation on fortified milk samples (growth milks) destined for 1- to 3-yr-old children. The influences of the sterilization process, formulation, packaging, and storage duration at ambient temperature in the dark were studied. Vitamin C degradation was particularly influenced by type of packaging. The use of a 3-layered opaque bottle was associated with complete oxidation of vitamin C after 1 mo of storage, whereas in the 6-layered opaque bottle, which has an oxygen barrier, the vitamin C content slowly decreased to reach 25% of the initial concentration after 4 mo of storage. However, no significant effect of vitamin C degradation during storage could be observed in terms of Maillard reaction, despite the fact that a probable impact occurred during sterilization. Furosine content and the FAST (fluorescence of advanced Maillard products and soluble tryptophan) index-indicators of the early and advanced Maillard reaction, respectively-were significantly higher in the in-bottle sterilized milk samples compared with UHT samples, and in fortified milk samples compared with cow milk. However, after 1 mo, the impact of storage was predominant, increasing the furosine level and the FAST index at similar levels for the differently processed samples. The early Maillard reaction developed continuously throughout the storage period.In conclusion, only packaging comprising an oxygen and light barrier is compatible with vitamin C fortification of milk. Furthermore, short storage time or low storage temperature is needed to retard vitamin C degradation, protein denaturation, and development of the Maillard reaction. PMID:15738222

  9. Effects of sterilization, packaging, and storage on vitamin C degradation, protein denaturation, and glycation in fortified milks.

    PubMed

    Gliguem, H; Birlouez-Aragon, I

    2005-03-01

    Monitoring the nutritional quality of dietetic milk throughout its shelf life is particularly important due to the high susceptibility of some vitamins to oxidation, and the continuous development of the Maillard reaction during storage. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the vitamin C content and protein modification by denaturation and glycation on fortified milk samples (growth milks) destined for 1- to 3-yr-old children. The influences of the sterilization process, formulation, packaging, and storage duration at ambient temperature in the dark were studied. Vitamin C degradation was particularly influenced by type of packaging. The use of a 3-layered opaque bottle was associated with complete oxidation of vitamin C after 1 mo of storage, whereas in the 6-layered opaque bottle, which has an oxygen barrier, the vitamin C content slowly decreased to reach 25% of the initial concentration after 4 mo of storage. However, no significant effect of vitamin C degradation during storage could be observed in terms of Maillard reaction, despite the fact that a probable impact occurred during sterilization. Furosine content and the FAST (fluorescence of advanced Maillard products and soluble tryptophan) index-indicators of the early and advanced Maillard reaction, respectively-were significantly higher in the in-bottle sterilized milk samples compared with UHT samples, and in fortified milk samples compared with cow milk. However, after 1 mo, the impact of storage was predominant, increasing the furosine level and the FAST index at similar levels for the differently processed samples. The early Maillard reaction developed continuously throughout the storage period.In conclusion, only packaging comprising an oxygen and light barrier is compatible with vitamin C fortification of milk. Furthermore, short storage time or low storage temperature is needed to retard vitamin C degradation, protein denaturation, and development of the Maillard reaction.

  10. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  11. Advanced Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarantos, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    This is an excerpt from a course for advanced students, designed to teach proficiency in English composition by providing activities specifically geared to the elimination of native language interference. (LG)

  12. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    Various new cell culture experiments for the development of microparticles are conducted. These studies have also led to the development of an anticancer egg, in addition to the analysis of various vegetable soup chemical reactions.

  13. Destruction of microcystins (cyanotoxins) by UV-254 nm-based direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): influence of variable amino acids on the degradation kinetics and reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; de la Cruz, Armah A; Hiskia, Anastasia; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; O'Shea, Kevin; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-05-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) are the most frequently detected group of cyanobacterial toxins. This study investigated the degradation of common MC variants in water, MC-LR, MC-RR, MC-YR and MC-LA, by UV-254 nm-based processes, UV only, UV/H2O2, UV/S2O8(2-) and UV/HSO5(-). Limited direct photolysis of MCs was observed, while the addition of an oxidant significantly improved the degradation efficiency with an order of UV/S2O8(2-) > UV/HSO5(-) > UV/H2O2 at the same initial molar concentration of the oxidant. The removal of MC-LR by UV/H2O2 appeared to be faster than another cyanotoxin, cylindrospermopsin, at either the same initial molar concentration or the same initial organic carbon concentration of the toxin. It suggested a faster reaction of MC-LR with hydroxyl radical, which was further supported by the determined second-order rate constant of MCs with hydroxyl radical. Both isomerization and photohydration byproducts were observed in UV only process for all four MCs; while in UV/H2O2, hydroxylation and diene-Adda double bond cleavage byproducts were detected. The presence of a tyrosine in the structure of MC-YR significantly promoted the formation of monohydroxylation byproduct m/z 1061; while the presence of a second arginine in MC-RR led to the elimination of a guanidine group and the absence of double bond cleavage byproducts. It was therefore demonstrated in this study that the variable amino acids in the structure of MCs influenced not only the degradation kinetics but also the preferable reaction mechanisms.

  14. Destruction of microcystins (cyanotoxins) by UV-254 nm-based direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): influence of variable amino acids on the degradation kinetics and reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; de la Cruz, Armah A; Hiskia, Anastasia; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; O'Shea, Kevin; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-05-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) are the most frequently detected group of cyanobacterial toxins. This study investigated the degradation of common MC variants in water, MC-LR, MC-RR, MC-YR and MC-LA, by UV-254 nm-based processes, UV only, UV/H2O2, UV/S2O8(2-) and UV/HSO5(-). Limited direct photolysis of MCs was observed, while the addition of an oxidant significantly improved the degradation efficiency with an order of UV/S2O8(2-) > UV/HSO5(-) > UV/H2O2 at the same initial molar concentration of the oxidant. The removal of MC-LR by UV/H2O2 appeared to be faster than another cyanotoxin, cylindrospermopsin, at either the same initial molar concentration or the same initial organic carbon concentration of the toxin. It suggested a faster reaction of MC-LR with hydroxyl radical, which was further supported by the determined second-order rate constant of MCs with hydroxyl radical. Both isomerization and photohydration byproducts were observed in UV only process for all four MCs; while in UV/H2O2, hydroxylation and diene-Adda double bond cleavage byproducts were detected. The presence of a tyrosine in the structure of MC-YR significantly promoted the formation of monohydroxylation byproduct m/z 1061; while the presence of a second arginine in MC-RR led to the elimination of a guanidine group and the absence of double bond cleavage byproducts. It was therefore demonstrated in this study that the variable amino acids in the structure of MCs influenced not only the degradation kinetics but also the preferable reaction mechanisms. PMID:25744186

  15. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  16. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  17. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  18. Physiological aspects of free-radical reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, I; Tamura, M; Nakajima, R; Nakamura, M

    1985-01-01

    Enzymes which catalyze the formation of free radicals in vitro will catalyze similar reactions in vivo. We believe that the formation of some kinds of free radicals has definite physiological meanings in metabolism. In this sense, the enzymes forming such free radicals are concluded to be in evolutionally advanced states. Elaborated structure and function of enzymes such as horseradish peroxidase and microsomal flavoproteins support the idea. Deleterious and side reactions caused by free radicals are assumed to be minimized in vivo by localizing the reactions, but this assumption should be verified by future studies. PMID:3007098

  19. Modelling reaction kinetics inside cells

    PubMed Central

    Grima, Ramon; Schnell, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, advances in molecular biology such as the development of non-invasive single molecule imaging techniques have given us a window into the intricate biochemical activities that occur inside cells. In this article we review four distinct theoretical and simulation frameworks: (1) non-spatial and deterministic, (2) spatial and deterministic, (3) non-spatial and stochastic and (4) spatial and stochastic. Each framework can be suited to modelling and interpreting intracellular reaction kinetics. By estimating the fundamental length scales, one can roughly determine which models are best suited for the particular reaction pathway under study. We discuss differences in prediction between the four modelling methodologies. In particular we show that taking into account noise and space does not simply add quantitative predictive accuracy but may also lead to qualitatively different physiological predictions, unaccounted for by classical deterministic models. PMID:18793122

  20. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  1. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  2. Advanced Nanoemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryd, Michael M.; Mason, Thomas G.

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in the growing field of nanoemulsions are opening up new applications in many areas such as pharmaceuticals, foods, and cosmetics. Moreover, highly controlled nanoemulsions can also serve as excellent model systems for investigating basic scientific questions about soft matter. Here, we highlight some of the most recent developments in nanoemulsions, focusing on methods of formation, surface modification, material properties, and characterization. These developments provide insight into the substantial advantages that nanoemulsions can offer over their microscale emulsion counterparts.

  3. Tandem Catalysis Utilizing Olefin Metathesis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz K; Grela, Karol

    2016-07-01

    Since olefin metathesis transformation has become a favored synthetic tool in organic synthesis, more and more distinct non-metathetical reactions of alkylidene ruthenium complexes have been developed. Depending on the conditions applied, the same olefin metathesis catalysts can efficiently promote isomerization reactions, hydrogenation of C=C double bonds, oxidation reactions, and many others. Importantly, these transformations can be carried out in tandem with olefin metathesis reactions. Through addition of one portion of a catalyst, a tandem process provides structurally advanced products from relatively simple substrates without the need for isolation of the intermediates. These aspects not only make tandem catalysis very attractive from a practical point of view, but also open new avenues in (retro)synthetic planning. However, in the literature, the term "tandem process" is sometimes used improperly to describe other types of multi-reaction sequences. In this Concept, a number of examples of tandem catalysis involving olefin metathesis are discussed with an emphasis on their synthetic value.

  4. Clinical Pearls: Leprosy Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jane; Boggild, Andrea K

    2016-09-01

    Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur in the setting of Mycobacterium leprae infection. Precipitants of reactions can be pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic. Both type 1 and type 2 reactions typically occur before and during leprosy treatment but may also occur after treatment has been completed. Reactions cause morbidity due to nerve damage, and prompt corticosteroid therapy is warranted to minimize nerve damage due to reactions.

  5. Multicomponent reactions of cyclobutanones.

    PubMed

    Pirrung, Michael C; Wang, Jianmei

    2009-04-17

    Cyclobutanones are essentially unknown as reactants in isonitrile-based multicomponent reactions. Ugi reactions of cyclobutanone and Passerini reactions of tetramethylcyclobutane-1,3-dione have been performed in this work. These reactions are significantly enhanced by being conducted in water, a subject of recent interest whose basis is still in question but whose effects are beyond doubt. The Ugi reaction of cyclobutanone has been used in a brief synthesis of an aspartame analogue.

  6. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  7. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  8. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  9. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  10. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  11. Continuous detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principles of a controlled condensed detonation rather than on the principles of gas expansion. The detonation results in reaction products that are expelled at a much higher velocity.

  12. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  13. Catalytic diastereoselective petasis reactions.

    PubMed

    Muncipinto, Giovanni; Moquist, Philip N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-22

    Multicomponent Petasis reactions: the first diastereoselective Petasis reaction catalyzed by chiral biphenols that enables the synthesis of syn and anti β-amino alcohols in pure form has been developed. The reaction exploits a multicomponent approach that involves boronates, α-hydroxy aldehydes, and amines. PMID:21751322

  14. Advances in Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Jeet; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Bioconjugation is a burgeoning field of research. Novel methods for the mild and site-specific derivatization of proteins, DNA, RNA, and carbohydrates have been developed for applications such as ligand discovery, disease diagnosis, and high-throughput screening. These powerful methods owe their existence to the discovery of chemoselective reactions that enable bioconjugation under physiological conditions—a tremendous achievement of modern organic chemistry. Here, we review recent advances in bioconjugation chemistry. Additionally, we discuss the stability of bioconjugation linkages—an important but often overlooked aspect of the field. We anticipate that this information will help investigators choose optimal linkages for their applications. Moreover, we hope that the noted limitations of existing bioconjugation methods will provide inspiration to modern organic chemists. PMID:20622973

  15. Multiple reaction pathways of metallofullerenes investigated by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koshino, Masanori

    2014-05-28

    Recent advances in molecule-by-molecule transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have provided time-series structural information of individual molecules supported by nano-carbon materials, enabling researchers to trace their motions and reactions. In this paper, the chemical reactions of fullerenes and metallofullerene derivatives, focusing on their deformation process, are reviewed and discussed based on the single-molecule-resolved TEM analysis.

  16. Why Are Some Reactions Slower at Higher Temperatures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revell, Laura E.; Williamson, Bryce E.

    2013-01-01

    It is well understood by most chemistry students at advanced undergraduate levels that chemical reactions generally follow the Arrhenius law of temperature dependence with positive activation energies, proceeding faster at elevated temperatures. It is much less widely known that the rates of some Arrhenius-compliant reactions are retarded by…

  17. Enzyme Reactions in Nanoporous, Picoliter Volume Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Siuti, Piro; Retterer, Scott T; Choi, Chang Kyoung; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in nanoscale fabrication allow creation of small volume reaction containers that can facilitate the screening and characterization of enzymes. A porous, ~19 pL volume vessel has been used in this work to carry out enzyme reactions under varying substrate concentrations. Glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase can be contained in these structures and diffusively fed with a solution containing glucose and the fluorogenic substrate Amplex Red through the engineered nanoscale pore structure. Fluorescent microscopy was used to monitor the reaction, which was carried out under microfluidic control. Kinetic characteristics of the enzyme were evaluated and compared with results from conventional scale reactions. These picoliter, nanoporous containers can facilitate quick determination of enzyme kinetics in microfluidic systems without the requirement of surface tethering and can be used for applications in drug discovery, clinical diagnostics and high-throughput screening.

  18. Connectionist and diffusion models of reaction time.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, R; Van Zandt, T; McKoon, G

    1999-04-01

    Two connectionist frameworks, GRAIN (J. L. McClelland, 1993) and brain-state-in-a-box (J. A. Anderson, 1991), and R. Ratcliff's (1978) diffusion model were evaluated using data from a signal detection task. Dependent variables included response probabilities, reaction times for correct and error responses, and shapes of reaction-time distributions. The diffusion model accounted for all aspects of the data, including error reaction times that had previously been a problem for all response-time models. The connectionist models accounted for many aspects of the data adequately, but each failed to a greater or lesser degree in important ways except for one model that was similar to the diffusion model. The findings advance the development of the diffusion model and show that the long tradition of reaction-time research and theory is a fertile domain for development and testing of connectionist assumptions about how decisions are generated over time.

  19. Advancing empirical resilience research.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Raffael; Müller, Marianne B; Tüscher, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We are delighted by the broad, intense, and fruitful discussion in reaction to our target article. A major point we take from the many comments is a prevailing feeling in the research community that we need significantly and urgently to advance resilience research, both by sharpening concepts and theories and by conducting empirical studies at a much larger scale and with a much more extended and sophisticated methodological arsenal than is the case currently. This advancement can be achieved only in a concerted international collaborative effort. In our response, we try to argue that an explicitly atheoretical, purely observational definition of resilience and a transdiagnostic, quantitative study framework can provide a suitable basis for empirically testing different competing resilience theories (sects. R1, R2, R6, R7). We are confident that it should be possible to unite resilience researchers from different schools, including from sociology and social psychology, behind such a pragmatic and theoretically neutral research strategy. In sections R3 to R5, we further specify and explain the positive appraisal style theory of resilience (PASTOR). We defend PASTOR as a comparatively parsimonious and translational theory that makes sufficiently concrete predictions to be evaluated empirically. PMID:26815844

  20. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  1. Advanced capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. D.; Buritz, R. S.; Taylor, A. R.; Bullwinkel, E. P.

    1982-11-01

    An experimental development program was conducted to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. High rep rate and low rate capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, and high frequency ac capacitors for series resonant inverters were considered. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film. Initially, low breakdown strength was thought to be related to inclusions of conductive particles. The effect of filtration of the casting solution was investigated. These experiments showed that more filtration was not the entire solution to low breakdown. The film samples were found to contain dissolved ionic impurities that move through the dielectric when voltage is applied and cause enhancement of the electric field. These contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and can be partially removed. However, these treatments did not significantly improve the breakdown characteristics. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films. this is the first step toward a replacement for kraft paper.

  2. Advanced capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, J. B.; Buritz, R. S.

    1984-10-01

    This report describes an experimental program to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. Five classes of capacitors were considered: high rep rate and low rep rate pulse capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, high frequency AC capacitors for series resonant inverters, and AC filter capacitors. To meet these requirements, existing dielectric materials were modified, and new materials were developed. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film with fewer imperfections that could operate at significantly higher electrical stresses. It was shown that contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and that they can be partially removed. As far as developed, however, these treatments did not significantly improved the breakdown characteristics. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films -- the first step toward a replacement for Kraft paper. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. This material was selected for further study in model capacitor designs.

  3. [Advances in studies of renal adverse reactions of Leonurus heterophyllus].

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Ronghua; Bao, Zhaorigetu; Cai, Shaoqing

    2010-05-01

    Motherwort (Herb of Leonurus heterophyllus) was a traditional Chinese medicine used for the treatment of various kinds of gynaecological diseases, which was considered as non-toxic medicine since ancient times. However, adverse effects such as kidney damage, uterus damage, allergy and diarrhea were frequently reported recently. This paper reviews the possible target site, toxic dosage, chemical substance and other related factors of these kidney damage caused by motherwort from both the clinic and animal experiment view.

  4. Noncanonical reactions of flavoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a "molecular scaffold" in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  5. Anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, B. H.; Slagboom, G.; Demaeseneer, R.; Slootmaekers, V.; Thijs, I.; Olsson, S.

    1988-01-01

    During 1981 to mid-1988 three cases of anaphylactic shock after treatment with the quinolone derivative cinoxacin were reviewed by the Netherlands Centre for Monitoring of Adverse Reactions to Drugs and 17 cases of an anaphylactic type of reaction notified to the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring. In five out of six patients for whom data were available the reaction began shortly after taking a single capsule of a second or next course of treatment. Cinoxacin is related to nalidixic acid, and one patient previously treated with that agent subsequently had an anaphylactoid reaction to cinoxacin and later developed a skin reaction to nalidixic acid. There were no deaths, and patients treated as an emergency with plasma expanders or with adrenaline and corticosteroids generally recovered promptly and uneventfully. In view of the potentially fatal consequences of anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin and other quinolones doctors should take care when prescribing these drugs. PMID:3147004

  6. Reaction spreading on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension ds, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension dl. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)˜tdl. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)˜eαt with α proportional to ln, where is the average degree of the graph.

  7. Nuclear reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ``hot`` nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ``flow`` measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study {sup 40}Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs.

  8. Immune reaction to propanidid.

    PubMed

    Christmas, D

    1984-05-01

    An adverse reaction to the intravenous anaesthetic agent propanidid is described in which the main features were hypotension, facial erythema, and abdominal pain. Changes in serum complement levels and differential white cell counts indicate that this was an immune reaction mediated by the classical complement pathway. The immune reaction apparently involved antibodies other than those of the IgE (reagin) class, and circumstantial evidence suggests that it was specific to propanidid rather than to the entire formulation or to Cremophor EL.

  9. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  10. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  11. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  12. Chemical Reaction Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of chemical-equation problem solving in helping students predict reaction products. Methods for helping students learn this process must be taught to students and future teachers by using pedagogical skills within the content of chemistry. Emphasizes that solving chemical reactions should involve creative cognition where…

  13. Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes several oscillating chemical reactions which can be used in undergraduate chemistry laboratories. In one such reaction, ferroin oscillates from red (reducing solution) to blue (oxidizing solution) for about an hour at a frequency which can readily be shown to depend on such factors as the temperature, type of solvent, and concentration…

  14. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  15. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  16. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  17. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  18. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  19. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  20. Fractal reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, R

    1988-09-23

    Classical reaction kinetics has been found to be unsatisfactory when the reactants are spatially constrained on the microscopic level by either walls, phase boundaries, or force fields. Recently discovered theories of heterogeneous reaction kinetics have dramatic consequences, such as fractal orders for elementary reactions, self-ordering and self-unmixing of reactants, and rate coefficients with temporal "memories." The new theories were needed to explain the results of experiments and supercomputer simulations of reactions that were confined to low dimensions or fractal dimensions or both. Among the practical examples of "fractal-like kinetics" are chemical reactions in pores of membranes, excitation trapping in molecular aggregates, exciton fusion in composite materials, and charge recombination in colloids and clouds.

  1. N-Alkylation by Hydrogen Autotransfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiantao; Su, Chenliang; Xu, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Owing to the importance of amine/amide derivatives in all fields of chemistry, and also the green and environmentally benign features of using alcohols as alkylating reagents, the relatively high atom economic dehydrative N-alkylation reactions of amines/amides with alcohols through hydrogen autotransfer processes have received much attention and have developed rapidly in recent decades. Various efficient homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal catalysts, nano materials, electrochemical methods, biomimetic methods, asymmetric N-alkylation reactions, aerobic oxidative methods, and even certain transition metal-free, catalyst-free, or autocatalyzed methods, have also been developed in recent years. With a brief introduction to the background and developments in this area of research, this chapter focuses mainly on recent progress and technical and conceptual advances contributing to the development of this research in the last decade. In addition to mainstream research on homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal-catalyzed reactions, possible mechanistic routes for hydrogen transfer and alcohol activation, which are key processes in N-alkylation reactions but seldom discussed in the past, the recent reports on computational mechanistic studies of the N-alkylation reactions, and the newly emerged N-alkylation methods based on novel alcohol activation protocols such as air-promoted reactions and transition metal-free methods, are also reviewed in this chapter. Problems and bottlenecks that remained to be solved in the field, and promising new research that deserves greater future attention and effort, are also reviewed and discussed.

  2. N-Alkylation by Hydrogen Autotransfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiantao; Su, Chenliang; Xu, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Owing to the importance of amine/amide derivatives in all fields of chemistry, and also the green and environmentally benign features of using alcohols as alkylating reagents, the relatively high atom economic dehydrative N-alkylation reactions of amines/amides with alcohols through hydrogen autotransfer processes have received much attention and have developed rapidly in recent decades. Various efficient homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal catalysts, nano materials, electrochemical methods, biomimetic methods, asymmetric N-alkylation reactions, aerobic oxidative methods, and even certain transition metal-free, catalyst-free, or autocatalyzed methods, have also been developed in recent years. With a brief introduction to the background and developments in this area of research, this chapter focuses mainly on recent progress and technical and conceptual advances contributing to the development of this research in the last decade. In addition to mainstream research on homogeneous and heterogeneous transition metal-catalyzed reactions, possible mechanistic routes for hydrogen transfer and alcohol activation, which are key processes in N-alkylation reactions but seldom discussed in the past, the recent reports on computational mechanistic studies of the N-alkylation reactions, and the newly emerged N-alkylation methods based on novel alcohol activation protocols such as air-promoted reactions and transition metal-free methods, are also reviewed in this chapter. Problems and bottlenecks that remained to be solved in the field, and promising new research that deserves greater future attention and effort, are also reviewed and discussed. PMID:27573267

  3. Biochemical reaction engineering for redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Wandrey, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Redox reactions are still a challenge for biochemical engineers. A personal view for the development of this field is given. Cofactor regeneration was an obstacle for quite some time. The first technical breakthrough was achieved with the system formate/formate dehydrogenase for the regeneration of NADH2. In cases where the same enzyme could be used for chiral reduction as well as for cofactor regeneration, isopropanol as a hydrogen source proved to be beneficial. The coproduct (acetone) can be removed by pervaporation. Whole-cell reductions (often yeast reductions) can also be used. By proper biochemical reaction engineering, it is possible to apply these systems in a continuous way. By cloning a formate dehydrogenase and an oxidoreductase "designer bug" can be obtained where formate is used instead of glucose as the hydrogen source. Complex sequences of redox reactions can be established by pathway engineering with a focus on gene overexpression or with a focus on establishing non-natural pathways. The success of pathway engineering can be controlled by measuring cytosolic metabolite concentrations. The optimal exploitation of such systems calls for the integrated cooperation of classical and molecular biochemical engineering.

  4. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Ebert, Thomas; Cox, Rachel; Rahmatian, Laila; Wood, James; Schuler, Jason; Nick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) excavator robot is a teleoperated mobility platform with a space regolith excavation capability. This more compact, lightweight design (<50 kg) has counterrotating bucket drums, which results in a net-zero reaction horizontal force due to the self-cancellation of the symmetrical, equal but opposing, digging forces.

  5. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  7. Recent advances in hypersonic technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will focus on recent advances in hypersonic aerodynamic prediction techniques. Current capabilities of existing numerical methods for predicting high Mach number flows will be discussed and shortcomings will be identified. Physical models available for inclusion into modern codes for predicting the effects of transition and turbulence will also be outlined and their limitations identified. Chemical reaction models appropriate to high-speed flows will be addressed, and the impact of their inclusion in computational fluid dynamics codes will be discussed. Finally, the problem of validating predictive techniques for high Mach number flows will be addressed.

  8. Recent Advances in Nickel Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Sarah Z.; Standley, Eric A.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Preface The field of nickel catalysis has made tremendous advances in the past decade. There are several key properties of nickel that have allowed for a broad range of innovative reaction development, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and leveraged to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Herein, we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism. PMID:24828188

  9. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  10. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons. PMID:25245394

  11. Contact reactions to food.

    PubMed

    Killig, Claudia; Werfel, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    Cutaneous adverse reactions to foods, spices, and food additives can occur both in occupational and nonoccupational settings in those who grow, handle, prepare, or cook food. Because spices are also utilized in cosmetics and perfumes, other exposures are encountered that can result in adverse cutaneous reactions. This article describes the reaction patterns that can occur upon contact with foods, including irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. The ingestion of culprit foods by sensitized individuals can provoke a generalized eczematous rash, referred to as systemic contact dermatitis. Other contact reactions to food include contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis provoked by high-molecular-weight food proteins often encountered in patients with atopic dermatitis. Phototoxic and photoallergic contact dermatitis are also considered.

  12. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  13. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons.

  14. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  15. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  16. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle. PMID:16722770

  17. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  18. Untoward penicillin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, T.; Idsöe, O.; Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    The literature on untoward reactions following the administration of penicillin is reviewed. These reactions, including a certain number of deaths which have been reported, are of particular interest to health administrations and to WHO in view of the large-scale programmes for controlling the treponematoses which are now under way—programmes affecting millions of people in many parts of the world. The most serious problems are anaphylactic sensitivity phenomena and superinfection or cross-infection with penicillin-resistant organisms, and the reactions involved range in intensity from the mildest to the fatal; the incidence of the latter is estimated at 0.1-0.3 per million injections. The authors point out that with increasing use of penicillin, more persons are likely to become sensitized and the number of reactions can therefore be expected to rise. The best prevention against such an increase is the restriction of the unnecessary use of penicillin. PMID:13596877

  19. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  20. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  1. Advanced hybrid gasification facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H.; Johnson, S.A.; Dixit, V.B.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of this procurement is to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology for electric power generation applications. The proprietary CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc. PyGas{trademark} staged gasifier has been selected as the initial gasifier to be developed under this program. The gasifier is expected to avoid agglomeration when used on caking coals. It is also being designed to crack tar vapors and ammonia, and to provide an environment in which volatilized alkali may react with aluminosilicates in the coal ash thereby minimizing their concentration in the hot raw coal gas passing through the system to the gas turbine. This paper describes a novel, staged, airblown, fixed-bed gasifier designed to solve both through the incorporation of pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification. It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration which occurs in a fixed-bed process when coal is gradually heated through the 400{degrees}F to 900{degrees}F range. In a pyrolyzer, the coal is rapidly heated such that coal tar is immediately vaporized. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can be chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NOx from fuel home nitrogen, moisture is minimized to control ammonia generation, and HCN in the upper gasifier region is partially oxidized to NO which reacts with NH3/HCN to form N2.

  2. Cosmetic tattoo pigment reaction.

    PubMed

    Greywal, Tanya; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCutaneous reactions to tattoos are most commonly granulomatous or lichenoid.PurposeWe describe a woman who developed a lymphocytic reaction following a cosmetic tattoo procedure with black dye. The reaction occurred not only at the site of the tattoos (eyebrows and eyelash lines), but also in non-tattooed skin (bilateral malar cheeks).Methods and MaterialsWe reviewed PubMed for the following terms: cosmetic, dye, granuloma, granulomatous, lichenoid, lymphocytic, perivascular, pigment, pseudolymphoma, reaction, and tattoo. We also reviewed papers containing these terms and their references.ResultsHistopathologic examination of the left eyebrow and left cheek punch biopsies showed predominantly a perivascular lymphocytic reaction secondary to exogenous tattoo pigment.ConclusionsPerivascular lymphocytic reaction is an uncommonly described complication of tattooing. Our patient had an atypical presentation since she had no prior tattoos, became symptomatic only a few days after the procedure, reacted to black dye, and involved skin both within and outside the confines of the tattoos. Her symptoms and lesions resolved after treatment with systemic and topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines. PMID:27617722

  3. Advances in R&D in near-infrared spectroscopy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Sumio; Iwamoto, Mutsuo

    1991-02-01

    More than 20 years ago when Mr. K. H. Norris firstly introduced the near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a powerful technology in the field of composition analysis of cereals those who were interested in the area of classical spectroscopy would not like to recognize its potential. This tendency still remains at present however it leaves no room for doubt that from viewpoints of applied spectroscopy the NIRS has consolidated its position. From a viewpoint of NIRS application in the field of nondestructive or non invasive measuring techniques history of this technology is only the last decade in Japan. However since the technology was firstly introduced to composition analysis of agricultural commodities in the same manner as in other countries R and D have been growing more actively in diversified fields such as agriculture and industry as well as medical science. In addition the NIRS technology are becoming of general interest by combining other techniques to create various hyphenated instrumentations such as FTNIR MCFTNIR NIRCT and NIR-NMR. In this paper new trends of R D on NIR spectroscopy which are being conducted in Japan will be reviewed. 2. S1JMMARY OF PRESENT R D ON NIRS IN JAPAN NIRS applications reported in the last 3 years are summarized in Table 1. Table 1 Applications of NIRS in Japan Application for Agriculture Taste evaluation of rice and coffee Determination of chemical compositions rice for breeding Determination of chemical compositions in tea Determination of sugar contents in intact peaches Japanese pears Satsuma oranges and apples Determination of sugars and acids in intact tomatoes Determination of forage composition Application for Industry Analysis of state of water in foods Application of analyzing Maillard Reaction''s Process Pattern recognition of NIR spectra as related to process control of roasting coffee beans Quality control of tea processing Determination of moisture content of Surimi products 2 / SPIE Vol. 1379 Optics in Agriculture

  4. Tandem Catalysis Utilizing Olefin Metathesis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz K; Grela, Karol

    2016-07-01

    Since olefin metathesis transformation has become a favored synthetic tool in organic synthesis, more and more distinct non-metathetical reactions of alkylidene ruthenium complexes have been developed. Depending on the conditions applied, the same olefin metathesis catalysts can efficiently promote isomerization reactions, hydrogenation of C=C double bonds, oxidation reactions, and many others. Importantly, these transformations can be carried out in tandem with olefin metathesis reactions. Through addition of one portion of a catalyst, a tandem process provides structurally advanced products from relatively simple substrates without the need for isolation of the intermediates. These aspects not only make tandem catalysis very attractive from a practical point of view, but also open new avenues in (retro)synthetic planning. However, in the literature, the term "tandem process" is sometimes used improperly to describe other types of multi-reaction sequences. In this Concept, a number of examples of tandem catalysis involving olefin metathesis are discussed with an emphasis on their synthetic value. PMID:27203528

  5. Immediate reaction to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, S; Ricciardi, L; Fedele, R; Isola, S; Purello-D'Ambrosio, F

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin had during a drug challenge test. Personal allergic history was negative for respiratory allergies and positive for adverse drug reactions to general and regional anesthesia and to ceftriaxone. After the administration of 1/4 of therapeutic dose of clarithromycin the patient showed dyspnea, cough and bronchospasm in all the lung fields. The positivity of the test was confirmed by the negativity to the administration of placebo. The quickness and the clinical characteristic of the adverse reaction suggest a pathogenic mechanism of immediate-type hypersensitivity. On reviewing the literature we have found no reports of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin. Macrolides are a class of antibiotics mainly used in the last years in place of beta-lactams because of a broad spectrum of action and a low allergic power. In fact, there are few reports on allergic reactions to these molecules. Clarithromycin is one of the latest macrolides, characterised by the presence of a 14-carbon-atom lactone ring as erythromycin, active on a wide spectrum of pathogens.

  6. Potent protein glycation inhibition of plantagoside in Plantago major seeds.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Nobuyasu; Aradate, Tadashi; Kurosaka, Chihiro; Ubukata, Makoto; Kittaka, Shiho; Nakaminami, Yuri; Gamo, Kanae; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Ohara, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Plantagoside (5,7,4',5'-tetrahydroxyflavanone-3'-O-glucoside) and its aglycone (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavanone), isolated from a 50% ethanol extract of Plantago major seeds (Plantaginaceae), were established to be potent inhibitors of the Maillard reaction. These compounds also inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products in proteins in physiological conditions and inhibited protein cross-linking glycation. These results indicate that P. major seeds have potential therapeutic applications in the prevention of diabetic complications.

  7. Adverse reactions to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Dogra, A; Minocha, Y C; Kaur, S

    2003-01-01

    Adverse reaction to cosmetics constitute a small but significant number of cases of contact dermatitis with varied appearances. These can present as contact allergic dermatitis, photodermatitis, contact irritant dermatitis, contact urticaria, hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation or depigmentation, hair and nail breakage. Fifty patients were included for the study to assess the role of commonly used cosmetics in causing adverse reactions. It was found that hair dyes, lipsticks and surprisingly shaving creams caused more reaction as compared to other cosmetics. Overall incidence of contact allergic dermatitis seen was 3.3% with patients own cosmetics. Patch testing was also done with the basic ingredients and showed positive results in few cases where casual link could be established. It is recommended that labeling of the cosmetics should be done to help the dermatologists and the patients to identify the causative allergen in cosmetic preparation.

  8. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  9. Effects of yeast stress and pH on 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD)-producing reactions in model dough systems.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, C G; Sadd, P A

    2005-07-01

    A major precursor of 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) in leavened cereal products is glycerol, which is formed as a natural by-product of yeast fermentation. However, yeast metabolism is affected by stresses such as low osmotic pressure from, for example, the incorporation of sugar or salt in the dough recipe. Tests with model doughs have shown that glycerol production was proportional to yeast mass and limited by available sugars, but that high levels of yeast inhibited 3-MCPD formation. The yeast fraction responsible for the inhibition of 3-MCPD in model dough was shown to be the soluble cytosol proteins, and the inhibition mechanism could be explained by the known reactions of 3-MCPD and/or its precursors with ammonia/amino acids (from yeast proteins). Added glucose did not increase the production of glycerol by yeast but it did promote the generation of 3-MCPD in cooked doughs. The latter effect was attributed to the removal of 3-MCPD inhibitors such as ammonia and amino acids by their reactions with added glucose (e.g. Maillard). The thermal generation of organic acids from added glucose also reduced the pH of cooked doughs, so the effect of pH and short-chain organic acids on 3-MCPD generation in dough was measured. There was a good correlation between initial dough pH and the level of 3-MCPD generated. The effect was weaker than that predicted by simple kinetic modelling, suggesting that the involvement of H+ and/or the organic acid was catalytic. The results showed that modifications to dough recipes involving the addition of reducing sugars and/or organic acids can have a significant impact on 3-MPCD generation in bakery products.

  10. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J

    2003-10-21

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds, such as drugs, can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, and lungs. In many drug hypersensitivity reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognize drugs through their alphabeta T-cell receptors in an MHC-dependent way. Drugs stimulate T cells if they act as haptens and bind covalently to peptides or if they have structural features that allow them to interact with certain T-cell receptors directly. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthema reveal that distinct T-cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. In maculopapular exanthema, perforin-positive and granzyme B-positive CD4+ T cells kill activated keratinocytes, while a large number of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the epidermis is associated with formation of vesicles and bullae. Drug-specific T cells also orchestrate inflammatory skin reactions through the release of various cytokines (for example, interleukin-5, interferon) and chemokines (such as interleukin-8). Activation of T cells with a particular function seems to lead to a specific clinical picture (for example, bullous or pustular exanthema). Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T-cell reactions, which through the release of certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions.

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  12. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  13. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  14. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  15. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  16. Quinoprotein-catalysed reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, C

    1996-01-01

    This review is concerned with the structure and function of the quinoprotein enzymes, sometimes called quinoenzymes. These have prosthetic groups containing quinones, the name thus being analogous to the flavoproteins containing flavin prosthetic groups. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is non-covalently attached, whereas tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ), topaquinone (TPQ) and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ) are derived from amino acid residues in the backbone of the enzymes. The mechanisms of the quinoproteins are reviewed and related to their recently determined three-dimensional structures. As expected, the quinone structures in the prosthetic groups play important roles in the mechanisms. A second common feature is the presence of a catalytic base (aspartate) at the active site which initiates the reactions by abstracting a proton from the substrate, and it is likely to be involved in multiple reactions in the mechanism. A third common feature of these enzymes is that the first part of the reaction produces a reduced prosthetic group; this part of the mechanism is fairly well understood. This is followed by an oxidative phase involving electron transfer reactions which remain poorly understood. In both types of dehydrogenase (containing PQQ and TTQ), electrons must pass from the reduced prosthetic group to redox centres in a second recipient protein (or protein domain), whereas in amine oxidases (containing TPQ or LTQ), electrons must be transferred to molecular oxygen by way of a redox-active copper ion in the protein. PMID:9003352

  17. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  18. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  19. Adverse reactions to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Gendler, E

    1987-06-01

    Adverse reactions to cosmetics can be irritant or allergic and are most often caused by fragrances or preservatives. Preservatives include formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers, and parabens. Other agents that cause allergy are paraphenylenediamine in hair dyes and toluene sulfonamide formaldehyde resin in nail polishes.

  20. A Principal's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaretsky, Lindy

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a principal's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author applauds Marshall and Ward's efforts to address what is undoubtedly among the most fundamentally important issues facing principals today. Marshall and Ward illuminate the importance of…

  1. Family reaction to homicide.

    PubMed

    Burgess, A N

    1975-04-01

    This pilot study identifies a two-phased syndrome experienced by families of homicide victims. The crisis phase consists of an acute grief process, including immediate reactions to the homicide, the funeral details, and police investigations. The long-term reorganization phase includes the psychological issues of bereavement and the socio-legal issues of the criminal justice process. PMID:1146971

  2. Reactions to Others' Intimacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeldt, David E.; Olinger, Evanelle J.

    Research using behavioral measures has indicated that men react less positively to the touch of a same sex individual than women, that both men and women react more positively to the touch of an opposite sex individual than to the touch of a same sex individual, and that men and women do not differ in their reactions to opposite sex touch. This…

  3. Introducing the Wittig Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstead, D. E. F.

    1979-01-01

    An experiment is described which provides a simple example of the application of the Wittig reaction to the synthesis of unsaturated compounds. The experiment was designed with British HNC chemistry students in mind, but it is also suitable as a project-type exercise for final year GCE A-level students. (Author/BB)

  4. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  5. Exocharmic Reactions up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    The exocharmic reactions that can be observed microscopically are discussed. The students can discover the optimal concentration of an acidic lead nitrate solution, so that a crystal of potassium iodide, nudged to the edge of a drop, results in glinting golden hexagons of lead iodide.

  6. Reaction and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armento, Beverly J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Provides a reaction by three economic educators to an article by Raymond C. Miller calling for the elimination of economics. Contends that traditional economics does not necessarily lead to the degradation of the environment. Argues that economics should not promote any set of social values. (CFR)

  7. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  8. The aromatic ene reaction

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene having an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (i) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (ii) intramolecular aromatic ene, and (iii) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multi-stage, reagent- and byproduct-free, single-pot transformations. PMID:24345944

  9. [Ligase chain reaction (LCR)].

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, K; Yasuno, H

    1993-06-01

    Ligase chain reaction (LCR) is a ligation-mediated amplification technique of a target DNA sequence using oligonucleotides and thermostable ligase. LCR is useful for the detection of known DNA sequences and point mutations in a limited amount of DNA. We introduce the principle, development, and protocol of this simple and convenient technique for DNA analysis.

  10. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  11. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  12. Advancements of vertically aligned liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Jaggi, Chinky; Sharma, Vandna; Raina, Kuldeep Kumar

    2016-02-01

    This review describes the recent advancements in the field of the vertical aligned (VA) liquid crystal displays. The process and formation of different vertical alignment modes such as conventional VA, patterned VA, multi-domain VA, and polymer stabilised VA etc are widely discussed. Vertical alignment of liquid crystal due to nano particle dispersion in LC host, bifunctional PR-SAM formed by silane coupling reaction to oxide surfaces, azo dye etc., are also highlighted and discussed. Overall, the article highlights the advances in the research of vertical aligned liquid crystal in terms of their scientific and technological aspects.

  13. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator advanced studies, Mercury mission transport requirements, definition of super solar electric propulsion/solar sail mission discriminators, and advanced planning activities.

  14. Cofactor engineering for advancing chemical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yipeng; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2013-12-01

    Cofactors provide redox carriers for biosynthetic reactions, catabolic reactions and act as important agents in transfer of energy for the cell. Recent advances in manipulating cofactors include culture conditions or additive alterations, genetic modification of host pathways for increased availability of desired cofactor, changes in enzyme cofactor specificity, and introduction of novel redox partners to form effective circuits for biochemical processes and biocatalysts. Genetic strategies to employ ferredoxin, NADH and NADPH most effectively in natural or novel pathways have improved yield and efficiency of large-scale processes for fuels and chemicals and have been demonstrated with a variety of microbial organisms.

  15. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    A review covers the industrial applications of the water-gas shift reaction in hydrogen manufacturing, removing CO from ammonia synthesis feeds, and detoxifying town gas; and the catalyst characteristics, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanisms of the water-gas shift reactions catalyzed by iron-based, copper-based, or sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalysts.

  16. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  17. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  18. Hadron Cancer Therapy: Role of Nuclear Reactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chadwick, M. B.

    2000-06-20

    Recently it has become feasible to calculate energy deposition and particle transport in the body by proton and neutron radiotherapy beams, using Monte Carlo transport methods. A number of advances have made this possible, including dramatic increases in computer speeds, a better understanding of the microscopic nuclear reaction cross sections, and the development of methods to model the characteristics of the radiation emerging from the accelerator treatment unit. This paper describes the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved, and how the cross sections have been evaluated from theory and experiment, for use in computer simulations of radiation therapy. The simulations will allow the dose delivered to a tumor to be optimized, whilst minimizing the dos given to nearby organs at risk.

  19. Organocatalytic Asymmetric Reactions of Epoxides: Recent Progress.

    PubMed

    Meninno, Sara; Lattanzi, Alessandra

    2016-03-01

    In this Minireview recent advances in the asymmetric reactions of meso and racemic epoxides promoted by organocatalysts is reviewed. Organic promoters, such as chiral phosphoric acids, amino- and peptidyl thioureas, and sulfinamides, have been successfully used for a variety of enantioselective transformations of epoxides under catalytic conditions, involving direct nucleophilic attack at the oxirane ring, base-catalysed β-eliminations and Brønsted acid catalysed 1,2-rearrangements. Accordingly, highly valuable enantioenriched 1,2-functionalised alcohols, carbonyl compounds and nitroepoxides are attainable. Dual activation of the reagents, provided by the organocatalysts, appears to be the most recurrent strategy, potentially suitable to face other unmet challenges in asymmetric ring-opening reactions of epoxides.

  20. Advanced midwifery practice or advancing midwifery practice?

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel; Leap, Nicky; Homer, Caroline

    2010-09-01

    Advanced midwifery practice is a controversial notion in midwifery, particularly at present in Australia. The proposed changes in legislation around access to the publicly funded Medical Benefits Scheme (MBS) and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) in 2009-2010 have meant that the issue of advanced midwifery practice has again taken prominence. Linking midwifery access to MBS and PBS to a safety and quality framework that includes an 'advanced midwifery credentialling framework' is particularly challenging. The Haxton and Fahy paper in the December 2009 edition of Women and Birth is timely as it enables a reflection upon these issues and encourages debate and discussion about exactly what is midwifery, what are we educating our students for and is working to the full scope of practice practising at advanced level? This paper seeks to address some of these questions and open up the topic for further debate.

  1. Dynamics of fission and heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, J.R.; Sierk, A.J.

    1984-05-01

    Recent advances in a unified macroscopic-microscopic description of large-amplitude collective nuclear motion such as occurs in fission and heavy ion reactions are discussed. With the goal of finding observable quantities that depend upon the magnitude and mechanism of nuclear dissipation, one-body dissipation and two-body viscosity within the framework of a generalized Fokker-Planck equation for the time dependence of the distribution function in phase space of collective coordinates and momenta are considered. Proceeding in two separate directions, the generalized Hamilton equations of motion for the first moments of the distribution function with a new shape parametrization and other technical innovations are first solved. This yields the mean translational fission-fragment kinetic energy and mass of a third fragment that sometimes forms between the two end fragments, as well as the energy required for fusion in symmetric heavy-ion reactions and the mass transfer and capture cross section in asymmetric heavy-ion reactions. In a second direction, we specialize to an inverted-oscillator fission barrier and use Kramers' stationary solution to calculate the mean time from the saddle point to scission for a heavy-ion-induced fission reaction for which experimental information is becoming available. 25 references.

  2. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Systemic Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter outlines the advances and application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) since its development in 1984 and its enhancements and applications to detection of viruses, viroids and phytoplasma in pome and stone fruits. PCR is probably the most rapidly and widely adopted technology eve...

  3. 2011 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Stair

    2011-02-11

    The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is dedicated to promoting and advancing the fundamental science of interfacial chemistry and physics by providing surface scientists with the foremost venue for presentation and discussion of research occurring at the frontiers of their fields.

  4. Peformance Appraisal Behaviors: Supervisor Perceptions and Subordinate Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Peter W.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined supervisor perceptions and subordinate reactions to formal performance-appraisal reviews. There were three dimensions of formal performance appraisals: two developmental (being supportive; emphasizing performance improvement) and one administrative (discussing pay and advancement). Support in appraisal review was associated with higher…

  5. Four acid-catalysed dehydration reactions proceed without interference.

    PubMed

    Lirag, Rio Carlo; Miljanić, Ognjen Š

    2014-08-25

    Four acid-catalysed dehydration reactions can proceed in one pot, simultaneously and without interference, to yield one imine, one acetal (or boronic ester), one ester and one alkene, even though many other cross-products could be conceived. This advanced self-sorting behaviour is attributed to different dehydration rates, brought about by dissimilar electronic properties of starting materials.

  6. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    PubMed

    David, T J

    1987-02-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either by the parents or the nursing staff after the administration of placebo or active substances. Twenty two patients returned to a normal diet without problems, but the parents of two children insisted on continuing the diet. While popular belief has it that additives may have harmful behavioural effects, objective verification is required to prevent overdiagnosis. PMID:3548601

  7. Concordant Chemical Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shinar, Guy; Feinberg, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We describe a large class of chemical reaction networks, those endowed with a subtle structural property called concordance. We show that the class of concordant networks coincides precisely with the class of networks which, when taken with any weakly monotonic kinetics, invariably give rise to kinetic systems that are injective — a quality that, among other things, precludes the possibility of switch-like transitions between distinct positive steady states. We also provide persistence characteristics of concordant networks, instability implications of discordance, and consequences of stronger variants of concordance. Some of our results are in the spirit of recent ones by Banaji and Craciun, but here we do not require that every species suffer a degradation reaction. This is especially important in studying biochemical networks, for which it is rare to have all species degrade. PMID:22659063

  8. Cascade reactions in nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    van Oers, M C M; Rutjes, F P J T; van Hest, J C M

    2014-08-01

    In an attempt to mimic the biosynthetic efficiencies of nature and in a search for greener, more sustainable alternatives to nowadays ways of producing chemicals, one-pot cascade reactions have attracted a lot of attention in the past decade. Since most catalysts are not compatible with each other, compartmentalization techniques have often been applied to prevent catalyst inactivation. A various array of nanoreactors have been developed to meet the demand of having a site-isolated catalyst system, while maintaining the catalyst activity. Both multienzyme nanoreactors as well as enzyme/metal catalyst or organocatalyst systems have shown great potential in one-pot cascade reactions and hold promise for future developments in this field.

  9. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  10. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-20

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  11. Recent advances in homogeneous nickel catalysis.

    PubMed

    Tasker, Sarah Z; Standley, Eric A; Jamison, Timothy F

    2014-05-15

    Tremendous advances have been made in nickel catalysis over the past decade. Several key properties of nickel, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states, have allowed the development of a broad range of innovative reactions. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and used to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Here we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis, with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism.

  12. STM CONTROL OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS: Single-Molecule Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hla, Saw-Wai; Rieder, Karl-Heinz

    2003-10-01

    The fascinating advances in single atom/molecule manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip allow scientists to fabricate atomic-scale structures or to probe chemical and physical properties of matters at an atomic level. Owing to these advances, it has become possible for the basic chemical reaction steps, such as dissociation, diffusion, adsorption, readsorption, and bond-formation processes, to be performed by using the STM tip. Complete sequences of chemical reactions are able to induce at a single-molecule level. New molecules can be constructed from the basic molecular building blocks on a one-molecule-at-a-time basis by using a variety of STM manipulation schemes in a systematic step-by-step manner. These achievements open up entirely new opportunities in nanochemistry and nanochemical technology. In this review, various STM manipulation techniques useful in the single-molecule reaction process are reviewed, and their impact on the future of nanoscience and technology are discussed.

  13. Urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate reaction fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, D. T.; Redden, G. D.; Henriksen, J.; Fujita, Y.; Guo, L.; Huang, H.

    2010-12-01

    , characterized by the pH profile and hydrolysis reaction species, was extended downstream of the enzyme zone. Downstream extension of the reaction profile was due partially to the partial mobility of the enzyme in the column. The experiments are helping to illustrate the complexity of transient reaction fronts as well as the needs and challenges for advanced modeling approaches. A modeling platform developed at the Idaho National Laboratory, which is capable of simulating tightly coupled physical-chemical processes (the Reactive Transport simulator), is being applied to pre-experimental simulations and post-experimental interpretation of results.

  14. Heat damage and in vitro starch digestibility of puffed wheat kernels.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Stefano; Hidalgo, Alyssa; Masotti, Fabio; Stuknytė, Milda; Brandolini, Andrea; De Noni, Ivano

    2015-12-01

    The effect of processing conditions on heat damage, starch digestibility, release of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and antioxidant capacity of puffed cereals was studied. The determination of several markers arising from Maillard reaction proved pyrraline (PYR) and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) as the most reliable indices of heat load applied during puffing. The considerable heat load was evidenced by the high levels of both PYR (57.6-153.4 mg kg(-1) dry matter) and HMF (13-51.2 mg kg(-1) dry matter). For cost and simplicity, HMF looked like the most appropriate index in puffed cereals. Puffing influenced starch in vitro digestibility, being most of the starch (81-93%) hydrolyzed to maltotriose, maltose and glucose whereas only limited amounts of AGEs were released. The relevant antioxidant capacity revealed by digested puffed kernels can be ascribed to both the new formed Maillard reaction products and the conditions adopted during in vitro digestion.

  15. Volatiles, color characteristics and other physico-chemical parameters of commercial Moroccan honeys.

    PubMed

    Petretto, Giacomo Luigi; Tuberoso, Carlo Ignazio G; Vlahopoulou, Gina; Atzei, Alessandro; Mannu, Alberto; Zrira, Saadia; Pintore, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Seven commercial Moroccan honeys were considered for chemical characterisation. Volatile fraction, total polyphenols content, antioxidant and antiradical activities were evaluated by employing different analytical methodologies. Several physical parameters such as refractive index, pH, water content, solids content and colour were measured. Volatile fraction revealed an abundant presence of cis- and trans-linalool oxide in the seven studied samples. The presence of high levels of compounds related to the Maillard reaction, like furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural, could be the result of thermal treatments used to liquefy commercial honeys or of long storage times. The CIE L*a*b*C*(ab)h°(ab) chromatic coordinates confirmed the advanced stage of the Maillard reaction, showing L* values lower than the common values found for honey of similar typologies.

  16. Kinetics of Imidazole Catalyzed Ester Hydrolysis: Use of Buffer Dilutions to Determine Spontaneous Rate, Catalyzed Rate, and Reaction Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Anthony

    1982-01-01

    Described is an advanced undergraduate kinetics experiment using buffer dilutions to determine spontaneous rate, catalyzed rate, and reaction order. The reaction utilized is hydrolysis of p-nitro-phenyl acetate in presence of imidazole, which has been shown to enhance rate of the reaction. (Author/JN)

  17. Advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Lo, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Advance directives allow patients to have some control over decisions even when they are no longer able to make decisions themselves. All states authorize written advance directives, such as the appointment of a health care proxy, but commonly impose procedural requirements. Some states have restricted the use of oral advance directives, although they are frequently used in everyday practice. Advance directives are limited because they are infrequently used, may not be informed, and may conflict with the patient's current best interests. Moreover, surrogates often cannot state patients' preferences accurately. Furthermore, discussions among physicians and patients about advance directives are flawed. Physicians can improve discussions about advance directives by asking the patient who should serve as proxy and by ascertaining the patient's values and general preferences before discussing specific clinical situations. PMID:15538068

  18. Reaction Extrema: Extent of Reaction in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandezande, Jonathon E.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago de Donder introduced the term "extent of reaction", ?. We build on that work by defining the concept of reagent extrema for an arbitrary chemical reaction, aA + bB [reversible reaction] yY + zZ. The central equation is ?^[subscript i] = -n[subscript i,0]/?[subscript i]. The symbol ?^[subscript i] represents the…

  19. Procedures for Decomposing a Redox Reaction into Half-Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishtik, Ilie; Berka, Ladislav H.

    2005-01-01

    A simple algorithm for a complete enumeration of the possible ways a redox reaction (RR) might be uniquely decomposed into half-reactions (HRs) using the response reactions (RERs) formalism is presented. A complete enumeration of the possible ways a RR may be decomposed into HRs is equivalent to a complete enumeration of stoichiometrically…

  20. Insect bite reactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Mann, Baldeep Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK) disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr) as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some serious adverse effects

  1. Insect bite reactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Mann, Baldeep Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK) disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr) as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some serious adverse effects

  2. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters. PMID:26808300

  3. Electronegativity and redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Martínez González, Marco; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-08-10

    Using the maximum hardness principle, we show that the oxidation potential of a molecule increases as its electronegativity increases and also increases as its electronegativity in its oxidized state increases. This insight can be used to construct a linear free energy relation for the oxidation potential, which we train on a set of 31 organic redox couples and test on a set of 10 different redox reactions. Better results are obtained when the electronegativity of the oxidized/reduced reagents are adjusted to account for the reagents' interaction with their chemical environment.

  4. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters.

  5. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  6. Advancing the educational agenda.

    PubMed

    Baker, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    This timely paper provides a thought-provoking analysis of current advanced practice nursing education in Canada. It comes at a critical juncture in the evolution of Canadian healthcare services and the redefinition of nursing roles. Increasingly, multiple sectors of society are calling for more nurses with advanced practice preparation and for a wider range of advanced practice nursing specialties. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are being proposed as a solution to a financially overburdened national healthcare system, the increasing complexity of healthcare services, and a crisis in access to primary healthcare. Thus, governments seeking greater fiscal efficiency, medical specialists needing sophisticated collaborative support, and healthcare consumers see APNs as the way forward.

  7. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  8. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  9. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.

  10. Organic chemistry: Reactions triggered electrically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Limin; Tao, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule experiments have revealed that chemical reactions can be controlled using electric fields -- and that the reaction rate is sensitive to both the direction and the strength of the applied field. See Letter p.88

  11. Products of the Benzene + O(3P) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Meloni, Giovanni; Trevitt, Adam J.; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I.; Sirjean, Baptiste; Dames, Enoch; Wang, Hai

    2009-12-21

    The gas-phase reaction of benzene with O(3P) is of considerable interest for modeling of aromatic oxidation, and also because there exist fundamental questions concerning the prominence of intersystem crossing in the reaction. While its overall rate constant has been studied extensively, there are still significant uncertainties in the product distribution. The reaction proceeds mainly through the addition of the O atom to benzene, forming an initial triplet diradical adduct, which can either dissociate to form the phenoxy radical and H atom, or undergo intersystem crossing onto a singlet surface, followed by a multiplicity of internal isomerizations, leading to several possible reaction products. In this work, we examined the product branching ratios of the reaction between benzene and O(3P) over the temperature range of 300 to 1000 K and pressure range of 1 to 10 Torr. The reactions were initiated by pulsed-laser photolysis of NO2 in the presence of benzene and helium buffer in a slow-flow reactor, and reaction products were identified by using the multiplexed chemical kinetics photoionization mass spectrometer operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Phenol and phenoxy radical were detected and quantified. Cyclopentadiene and cyclopentadienyl radical were directly identified for the first time. Finally, ab initio calculations and master equation/RRKM modeling were used to reproduce the experimental branching ratios, yielding pressure-dependent rate expressions for the reaction channels, including phenoxy + H, phenol, cyclopentadiene + CO, which are proposed for kinetic modeling of benzene oxidation.

  12. Reactions of intermetallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, R. W.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1990-02-01

    Reaction of bismuth-alkali clusters with closed-shell HX acids provides insight into the structures, formation, and stabilities of these intermetallic species. HC1 and HI are observed to quantitatively strip BixNay and BixKy, respectively, of their alkali component, leaving bare bismuth clusters as the only bismuth-containing species detected. Product bismuth clusters exhibit the same distribution observed when pure bismuth is evaporated in the source. Though evaporated simultaneously from the same crucible, this suggests alkali atoms condense onto existing bismuth clusters and have negligible effect on their formation and consequent distribution. The indistinguishibility of reacted and pure bismuth cluster distributions further argues against the simple replacement of alkali atoms with hydrogen in these reactions. This is considered further evidence that the alkali atoms are external to the stable bismuth Zintl anionic structures. Reactivities of BixNay clusters with HC1 are estimated to lie between 3×10-13 for Bi4Na, to greater than 4×10-11 for clusters possessing large numbers of alkali atoms. Bare bismuth clusters are observed in separate experiments to react significantly more slowly with rates of 1-9×10-14 and exhibit little variation of reactivity with size. The bismuth clusters may thus be considered a relatively inert substrate upon which the alkali overlayer reacts.

  13. Low molecular weight anti-carboxymethyl lysine reactive bands in cashew extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Maillard Reaction is the non-enzymatic browning of foods during thermal processing, and is a result of the reaction of reducing sugar carbonyl groups and primary amine groups of proteins. Maillard Reaction products are unstable, and Amadori rearrangements result in a network of chemical modifica...

  14. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    An iodine clock reaction that gives a colorless to black result similar to that of the familiar Landolt iodate-bisulfite clock reaction is described. The vitamin C clock reaction uses chemicals that are readily available on the retail market: vitamin C, tincture of iodine, 3% hydrogen peroxide, and laundry starch. Orange juice may be used as the vitamin C source to give an orange to black reaction.

  15. Recent advances in transition-metal-catalyzed synthesis of conjugated enynes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yujing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-07-12

    Conjugated enynes are of great importance in organic synthesis, biochemistry and materials sciences. The most commonly used synthetic methods include cross coupling reactions and dimerization reactions of alkynes. Despite many robust strategies being established, the improvement of reaction efficiency and development of novel transformations have still been actively pursued in the past decade. This review covers recent advances in transition-metal-catalyzed reactions in these fields.

  16. Enzyme Mimics: Advances and Applications.

    PubMed

    Kuah, Evelyn; Toh, Seraphina; Yee, Jessica; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-13

    Enzyme mimics or artificial enzymes are a class of catalysts that have been actively pursued for decades and have heralded much interest as potentially viable alternatives to natural enzymes. Aside from having catalytic activities similar to their natural counterparts, enzyme mimics have the desired advantages of tunable structures and catalytic efficiencies, excellent tolerance to experimental conditions, lower cost, and purely synthetic routes to their preparation. Although still in the midst of development, impressive advances have already been made. Enzyme mimics have shown immense potential in the catalysis of a wide range of chemical and biological reactions, the development of chemical and biological sensing and anti-biofouling systems, and the production of pharmaceuticals and clean fuels. This Review concerns the development of various types of enzyme mimics, namely polymeric and dendrimeric, supramolecular, nanoparticulate and proteinic enzyme mimics, with an emphasis on their synthesis, catalytic properties and technical applications. It provides an introduction to enzyme mimics and a comprehensive summary of the advances and current standings of their applications, and seeks to inspire researchers to perfect the design and synthesis of enzyme mimics and to tailor their functionality for a much wider range of applications. PMID:27062126

  17. Report on Advanced Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Jewell

    2012-09-01

    Neutron, gamma and charged particle detection improvements are key to supporting many of the foreseen measurements and systems envisioned in the R&D programs and the future fuel cycle requirements, such as basic nuclear physics and data, modeling and simulation, reactor instrumentation, criticality safety, materials management and safeguards. This task will focus on the developmental needs of the FCR&D experimental programs, such as elastic/inelastic scattering, total cross sections and fission neutron spectra measurements, and will leverage a number of existing neutron detector development efforts and programs, such as those at LANL, PNNL, INL, and IAC as well as those at many universities, some of whom are funded under NE grants and contracts. Novel materials and fabrication processes combined with state-of-the-art electronics and computing provide new opportunities for revolutionary detector systems that will be able to meet the high precision needs of the program. This work will be closely coordinated with the Nuclear Data Crosscut. The Advanced Detector Development effort is a broadly-focused activity that supports the development of improved nuclear data measurements and improved detection of nuclear reactions and reactor conditions. This work supports the design and construction of large-scale, multiple component detectors to provide nuclear reaction data of unprecedented quality and precision. Examples include the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the DANCE detector at LANL. This work also supports the fabrication and end-user application of novel scintillator materials detection and monitoring.

  18. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  19. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an iodine clock reaction that produces an effect similar to the Landolt clock reaction. This reaction uses supermarket chemicals and avoids iodate, bisulfite, and mercury compounds. Ascorbic acid and tincture of iodine are the main reactants with alternate procedures provided for vitamin C tablets and orange juice. (DDR)

  20. More on Chemical Reaction Balancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinehart, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    A previous article stated that only the matrix method was powerful enough to balance a particular chemical equation. Shows how this equation can be balanced without using the matrix method. The approach taken involves writing partial mathematical reactions and redox half-reactions, and combining them to yield the final balanced reaction. (JN)

  1. Development of detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principle of a controlled condensed detonation. In this engine the gas products that are expelled from the engine to produce thrust are generated by the condensed detonation reaction. The engine is constructed of two basic sections consisting of a detonation wave generator section and a condensed detonation reaction section.

  2. Advanced glycation end products, physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of cooked lamb loins affected by cooking method and addition of flavour precursors.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Mar; Loebner, Jürgen; Degen, Julia; Henle, Thomas; Antequera, Teresa; Ruiz-Carrascal, Jorge

    2015-02-01

    The influence of the addition of a flavour enhancer solution (FES) (d-glucose, d-ribose, l-cysteine and thiamin) and of sous-vide cooking or roasting on moisture, cooking loss, instrumental colour, sensory characteristics and formation of Maillard reaction (MR) compounds in lamb loins was studied. FES reduced cooking loss and increased water content in sous-vide samples. FES and cooking method showed a marked effect on browning development, both on the meat surface and within. FES led to tougher and chewier texture in sous-vide cooked lamb, and enhanced flavour scores of sous-vide samples more markedly than in roasted ones. FES added meat showed higher contents of furosine; 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural did not reach detectable levels. N-ε-carboxymethyllysine amounts were rather low and not influenced by the studied factors. Cooked meat seems to be a minor dietary source of MR products, regardless the presence of reducing sugars and the cooking method. PMID:25172739

  3. Advanced glycation end products, physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of cooked lamb loins affected by cooking method and addition of flavour precursors.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Mar; Loebner, Jürgen; Degen, Julia; Henle, Thomas; Antequera, Teresa; Ruiz-Carrascal, Jorge

    2015-02-01

    The influence of the addition of a flavour enhancer solution (FES) (d-glucose, d-ribose, l-cysteine and thiamin) and of sous-vide cooking or roasting on moisture, cooking loss, instrumental colour, sensory characteristics and formation of Maillard reaction (MR) compounds in lamb loins was studied. FES reduced cooking loss and increased water content in sous-vide samples. FES and cooking method showed a marked effect on browning development, both on the meat surface and within. FES led to tougher and chewier texture in sous-vide cooked lamb, and enhanced flavour scores of sous-vide samples more markedly than in roasted ones. FES added meat showed higher contents of furosine; 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural did not reach detectable levels. N-ε-carboxymethyllysine amounts were rather low and not influenced by the studied factors. Cooked meat seems to be a minor dietary source of MR products, regardless the presence of reducing sugars and the cooking method.

  4. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  5. Drilling at Advanced Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Doug

    1977-01-01

    Instances where drilling is useful for advanced language are discussed. Several types of drills are recommended, with the philosophy that advanced level drills should have a lighter style and be regarded as a useful, occasional means of practicing individual new items. (CHK)

  6. ADVANCED PLACEMENT IN OHIO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Council on Advanced Placement, Columbus.

    THE DOCUMENT PRESENTS A DESCRIPTION OF THE ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM IN OHIO. ANSWERS ARE GIVEN TO KEY QUESTIONS ON THE FUNCTION OF ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ACADEMIC AREAS COVERED, PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION, COSTS, BENEFITS, VARIOUS ORGANIZATIONAL PATTERNS, STUDENT PARTICIPANTS, COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN OHIO AND REPRESENTATIVE NATIONAL INSTITUTIONS…

  7. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  8. Advanced cryo propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabata, William K.

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in viewgraph form: (1) advanced space engine (ASE) chronology; (2) an ASE description; (3) a single expander; (4) a dual expander; (5) split expander; (6) launch vehicle start; (7) space start; (8) chemical transfer propulsion; and (9) an advanced expander test bed.

  9. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  10. Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Life Support (ALS) Systems are presented. The topics include: 1) Fundamental Need for Advanced Life Support; 2) ALS organization; 3) Requirements and Rationale; 4) Past Integrated tests; 5) The need for improvements in life support systems; 6) ALS approach to meet exploration goals; 7) ALS Projects showing promise to meet exploration goals; and 9) GRC involvement in ALS.

  11. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical

  12. Portable centrifugal analyzer for the determination of rapid reaction kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Bauer, M.L.; McCracken, R.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1980-02-01

    A portable centrifugal analyzer prototype is capable of rapidly initiating reactions and monitoring 17 optical channels as they rotate past a stationary photodetector. An advanced rotor drive permits transfer of discretely loaded sample and reagent into a cuvette within 60 ms. Various rotor designs have been employed to ensure effieicnt mixing concurrent with solution transfer, thus permitting absorbance or luminescence measurements to be made almost immediately after solution contract. Dye-dillution studies have been used to investigate transfer and mixing efficiencies. Rotor designs with parallel access for sample and reagent into the cuvette were found to promote efficient mixing during liquid transfer. The hypochlorite-luminol chemiluminescent reaction served to demonstrate the utility of the system for performing rapid kinetic analyses. Appropriate adjustment of reaction conditions allows first-order reaction half-lives as short as 0.04 s to be measured. 13 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Physarum machines: encapsulating reaction-diffusion to compute spanning tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2007-12-01

    The Physarum machine is a biological computing device, which employs plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum as an unconventional computing substrate. A reaction-diffusion computer is a chemical computing device that computes by propagating diffusive or excitation wave fronts. Reaction-diffusion computers, despite being computationally universal machines, are unable to construct certain classes of proximity graphs without the assistance of an external computing device. I demonstrate that the problem can be solved if the reaction-diffusion system is enclosed in a membrane with few ‘growth points’, sites guiding the pattern propagation. Experimental approximation of spanning trees by P. polycephalum slime mold demonstrates the feasibility of the approach. Findings provided advance theory of reaction-diffusion computation by enriching it with ideas of slime mold computation.

  14. The plutonium-hydrogen reaction: SEM characterization of product morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, L. N.; McCall, S. K.; Saw, C. K.; Haschke, J. M.; Allen, P. G.; McLean, W.

    2014-08-01

    The product morphology of the hydrogen reaction with plutonium near the visibly observable reaction front, which separates the hydrided zone from the unreacted metal zone, has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicate the existence of a mixed phase of metal and metal hydride, located some 20-30 μm ahead of the visibly hydrided-zone. The mixed phase regions are often located next to a grain boundary network and exhibit rays of hydride advancing toward the unreacted metal regions. Analysis indicates that hydrogen transport and therefore the hydriding reaction are preferable along the grain boundary network and defects in the metal structure rather than through a homogeneous intragrain reaction. Product fracture and formation of small hydride particles during hydriding are likely results of such inhomogeneous growth.

  15. Syntheses and Reactions of Chalcogen-containing Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Sashida, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    The advances in my laboratory for the past 20-25 years concerning the chemistry of chalcogen-containing heterocycles are reviewed. The intramolecular cyclization of the chalcogenols (-TeH, -SeH, -SH) into a triple bond or appropriate leaving group produced various chalcogen-containing heterocycles. The reactions of the obtained products were examined: the reactions of 1-benzo- and 2-benzopyrylium salts containing a tellurium or selenium element with several nucleophiles, including alkoxides, amines, the cyanide ion, an active methyl compound (acetone), Grignard reagents, copper reagents, and tin reagents, along with hydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions, provided corresponding chromes or isochromes having various functional groups at the 2- or 1-C position. Isothiocyanate and isoselenocyanate were used as chalcogen sources for the preparation of five- or six-membered heterocycles. In addition, double intramolecular cyclization, ring-expansion reactions, electrophilic cyclization and iodocyclization were also carried out. PMID:27252064

  16. Advanced Chemical Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave; Alexander, Leslie A.; Krebsbach, Al

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed of advanced chemical propulsion technology application to space science (Code S) missions. The purpose was to begin the process of selecting chemical propulsion technology advancement activities that would provide greatest benefits to Code S missions. Several missions were selected from Code S planning data, and a range of advanced chemical propulsion options was analyzed to assess capabilities and benefits re these missions. Selected beneficial applications were found for higher-performing bipropellants, gelled propellants, and cryogenic propellants. Technology advancement recommendations included cryocoolers and small turbopump engines for cryogenic propellants; space storable propellants such as LOX-hydrazine; and advanced monopropellants. It was noted that fluorine-bearing oxidizers offer performance gains over more benign oxidizers. Potential benefits were observed for gelled propellants that could be allowed to freeze, then thawed for use.

  17. Polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Arnhelm, N. ); Levenson, C.H. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) an in-vitro method of amplifying DNA sequences. Beginning with DNA of any origin- bacterial, viral, plant, or animal- PCR can increase the amount of a DNA sequence hundreds of millions to billions of times. The procedure can amplify a targeted sequence even when it makes up less than one part in a million of the total initial sample. PCR is an enzymatic process that is carried out in discrete cycles of amplification, each of which can double the amount of target DNA in the sample. Thus, n cycles can produce 2{sup n} times as much target as was present to begin with. This paper discusses how PCR has had an impact on molecular biology, human genetics, infectious and genetic disease diagnosis, forensic science, and evolutionary biology.

  18. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  19. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  20. Force, reaction time, and precision of Kung Fu strikes.

    PubMed

    Neto, Osmar Pinto; Bolander, Richard; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu Tavares; Bir, Cynthia

    2009-08-01

    The goal was to compare values of force, precision, and reaction time of several martial arts punches and palm strikes performed by advanced and intermediate Kung Fu practitioners, both men and women. 13 Kung Fu practitioners, 10 men and three women, participated. Only the men, three advanced and seven intermediate, were considered for comparisons between levels. Reaction time values were obtained using two high speed cameras that recorded each strike at 2500 Hz. Force of impact was measured by a load cell. For comparisons of groups, force data were normalized by participant's body mass and height. Precision of the strikes was determined by a high speed pressure sensor. The results show that palm strikes were stronger than punches. Women in the study presented, on average, lower values of reaction time and force but higher values of precision than men. Advanced participants presented higher forces than intermediate participants. Significant negative correlations between the values of force and precision and the values of force and reaction time were also found.