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Sample records for advanced malignant disease

  1. Prognostic relevance of circulating CK19 mRNA in advanced malignant biliary tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leelawat, Kawin; Narong, Siriluck; Udomchaiprasertkul, Wandee; Wannaprasert, Jerasak; Treepongkaruna, Sa-ard; Subwongcharoen, Somboon; Ratanashu-ek, Tawee

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in prediction of the overall survival of patients with advanced malignant biliary tract obstruction. METHODS: We investigated the prognostic value of CTCs by examining two markers, cytokeratin (CK) 19 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA, in 40 patients diagnosed with advanced malignant biliary tract diseases. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect CK19 and hTERT mRNA in the peripheral blood of these patients. Overall survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling. RESULTS: Positive CK19 and hTERT mRNA expression was detected in 45% and 60%, respectively, of the 40 patients. Univariable analysis indicated that positive CK19 mRNA expression was significantly associated with worse overall survival (P = 0.009). Multivariable analysis determined that positive CK19 mRNA expression, patient’s age and serum bilirubin were each independently associated with overall survival. CONCLUSION: CK19 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood appear to provide a valuable marker to predict the overall survival of patients with advanced malignant biliary tract obstruction. PMID:22253524

  2. Infusing CD19-Directed T Cells to Augment Disease Control in Patients Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Advanced B-Lymphoid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kebriaei, Partow; Huls, Helen; Jena, Bipulendu; Munsell, Mark; Jackson, Rineka; Lee, Dean A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Limited curative treatment options exist for patients with advanced B-lymphoid malignancies, and new therapeutic approaches are needed to augment the efficacy of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Cellular therapies, such as adoptive transfer of T cells that are being evaluated to target malignant disease, use mechanisms independent of chemo- and radiotherapy with nonoverlapping toxicities. Gene therapy is employed to generate tumor-specific T cells, as specificity can be redirected through enforced expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to achieve antigen recognition based on the specificity of a monoclonal antibody. By combining cell and gene therapies, we have opened a new Phase I protocol at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) to examine the safety and feasibility of administering autologous genetically modified T cells expressing a CD19-specific CAR (capable of signaling through chimeric CD28 and CD3-ζ) into patients with high-risk B-lymphoid malignancies undergoing autologous HSCT. The T cells are genetically modified by nonviral gene transfer of the Sleeping Beauty system and CAR+ T cells selectively propagated in a CAR-dependent manner on designer artificial antigen-presenting cells. The results of this study will lay the foundation for future protocols including CAR+ T-cell infusions derived from allogeneic sources. PMID:22107246

  3. Total sternectomy for malignant disease.

    PubMed

    París, F; Blasco, E; Tarazona, V; Pastor, J; Zarza, A G; Padilla, J

    1980-09-01

    From 1972 to 1978, six total sternectomies for malignant disease of the sternum were carried out. The clinical data are summarized and the surgical technique is described. After sternectomy, the area of chest wall resection was repaired by suturing a sheet of silicone rubber to the edges of the defect and chest wall stability was assured by using one or two stainless steel struts. Finally the defect was covered with methylmethacrylate prepared and applied inthe operative field. The prosthetic material was shaped until curing by polymerization was complete. We discuss the advantages of this type of reconstruction, the technical details, the use of antibiotics, the surgical drainage, and the need for biopsy prior to carrying out a total sternectomy. PMID:7412352

  4. Pulmonary disease in patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Venerino; Trisolini, Rocco; Tura, Sante

    2002-03-01

    Patients with hematologic neoplasms frequently experience pulmonary disease. The possibility of a malignant involvement of the lung parenchyma is a well recognized and not unusual event, secondary spread due to lymphoproliferative disorders being the most common situation. Furthermore, the development and the advances in treatment options such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, radiation therapy and/or combined drug regimen use have significantly widened the spectrum of non-neoplastic pulmonary complications that can crop up in these patients. Infections, drug/radiation-induced toxicity, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-related complications account by now for most pulmonary problems in hematologic patients and represent a difficult challenge both in diagnostic and in therapeutic terms for the clinician. The aim of this review is to highlight the clinicopathologic spectrum of lung diseases which can occur in the setting of hematologic malignancies. A particular emphasis is devoted to the diagnostic approach, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) assuming a key role since different patterns of CT abnormalities are associated with a different yield of the available diagnostic tools and may help in narrowing the differential diagnosis. PMID:12002382

  5. Immunotherapy advances in uro-genital malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ratta, Raffaele; Zappasodi, Roberta; Raggi, Daniele; Grassi, Paolo; Verzoni, Elena; Necchi, Andrea; Di Nicola, Massimo; Salvioni, Roberto; de Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer has made significant progresses over the last 20 years. Multiple efforts have been attempted to restore immune-mediated tumor elimination, leading to the development of several targeted immunotherapies. Data from recent clinical trials suggest that these agents might improve the prognosis of patients with advanced genito-urinary (GU) malignancies. Nivolumab has been the first immune checkpoint-inhibitor approved for pre-treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Pembrolizumab and atezolizumab have shown promising results in both phase I and II trials in urothelial carcinoma. Brentuximab vedotin has demonstrated early signals of clinical activity and immunomodulatory effects in highly pre-treated patients with testicular germ cell tumors. In this review, we have summarized the major clinical achievements of immunotherapy in GU cancers, focusing on immune checkpoint blockade as well as the new immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under clinical evaluation for these malignancies. PMID:27372200

  6. Predicting Malignancy in Thyroid Nodules: Molecular Advances

    PubMed Central

    Melck, Adrienne L.; Yip, Linwah

    2016-01-01

    Over the last several years, a clearer understanding of the genetic alterations underlying thyroid carcinogenesis has developed. This knowledge can be utilized to tackle one of the greatest challenges facing thyroidologists: management of the indeterminate thyroid nodule. Despite the accuracy of fine needle aspiration cytology, many patients undergo invasive surgery in order to determine if a follicular or Hurthle cell neoplasm is malignant, and better diagnostic tools are required. A number of biomarkers have recently been studied and show promise in this setting. In particular, BRAF, RAS, PAX8-PPARγ, microRNAs and loss of heterozygosity have each been demonstrated as useful molecular tools for predicting malignancy and can thereby guide decisions regarding surgical management of nodular thyroid disease. This review summarizes the current literature surrounding each of these markers and highlights our institution’s prospective analysis of these markers and their subsequent incorporation into our management algorithms for thyroid nodules. PMID:21818817

  7. Role of stenting in gastrointestinal benign and malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Arena, Monica; Miraglia, Stefania; Consolo, Pierluigi; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Virgilio, Clara; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Advances in stents design have led to a substantial increase in the use of stents for a variety of digestive diseases. Initially developed as a non-surgical treatment for palliation of esophageal cancer, the stents now have an emerging role in the management of malignant and benign conditions as well as in all segments of the gastrointestinal tract. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the key-role of stenting in gastrointestinal benign and malignant diseases. PMID:25992186

  8. Endoscopic laser palliation for advanced malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Hawes, R; Matthewson, K; Swain, C P; Barr, H; Boulos, P B; Clark, C G

    1987-01-01

    Palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia aims to optimise swallowing for the maximum time possible with the minimum of general distress to these seriously ill patients. Thirty four patients considered unsuitable for surgery because of advanced malignancy, other major pathology or in whom previous surgery had been unsuccessful were treated endoscopically with the Nd YAG laser. Significant improvement was achieved in 29 (85%). On a scale of 0-4 (0 = normal swallowing; 4 = dysphagia for all fluids), mean improvement was 1.7, with 25 patients (74%) able to swallow most, or all solids after treatment. With increasing experience, the average number of treatment sessions required for each patient became less; initial time in hospital became comparable to that needed for intubation. Failures were caused by inappropriate patient selection (3), or laser related perforation (2). The mean survival in the whole group was 19 weeks (range 2-44). Eighteen patients needed further treatment for recurrent dysphagia, a mean of six weeks (range 2-15) after initial therapy. Ten of these responded, but eight eventually required insertion of a prosthetic tube. The duration of good palliation was very variable after initial laser therapy. Images Fig. 3 PMID:2443431

  9. Syed-Neblett interstitial template in locally advanced gynecological malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Ampuero, F.; Doss, L.L.; Khan, M.; Skipper, B.; Hilgers, R.D.

    1983-12-01

    Twenty-eight patients with locally advanced malignancies of the cervix and vagina were treated with a combination of external radiation therapy and after loading Syed-Neblett iridium template. There were 22 patients with squamous cell cancer and two patients with adenocarcinomas of the cervix. Four patients with squamous cell cancer of the vagina were treated with this method. Only patients with locally advanced disease (cervical lesion >4 cm in diameter) and poor vagnal anatomy were selected for this modality of therapy. In this series the incidence of distant failures of 39% seems to confirm the significance of local volume of disease as a prognostic indicator; despite a local control rate of 59%, only 33% of the patients are alive from 25-51 months. Complications occurred in 12 patients (42%). Six patients (22%) developed severe rectal stricture or rectovaginal fistula necessitating diverting sigmoid colostomy; five patients (18%) developed hemorrhagic proctitis with diarrhea and tenesmus; one patient developed vaginal vault necrosis. Complications occurred 7 to 24 months following therapy. Six of the 12 patients developing complications are dead of disease. On the basis of this study and because of the low cure rate and high incidence of complications, the value of the Syed-Neblett template in locally advanced gynecologic malignancies should be reconsidered.

  10. Photodynamic therapy of advanced malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian-xing; Dai, Lu-pin; Lu, Wen-qin

    1993-03-01

    Forty patients with advanced tumors were treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) from May 1991 to August 1991 in our hospital with age ranges from 30 to 81 years old. The pathological diagnosis shows that 13 had tumors in the colon, 3 in the stomach, 2 in the oesophageal, 2 in the palatum, 1 in the cervix, and 19 others with malignant cancers of the skin. The histology was as follows: squamous cell in 20, adenocarcinoma in 19, melanocarcinoma in 1. By TNM classification there were no cases of T1, 5 cases of T2, and 35 cases of T2 - T3. All patients were stage IV. The overall effective rate was 85%, our experience is that the PDT is suitable for the patients with advanced tumor, especially those whose tumor recurrences are hard to treat after conventional treatment (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy). The PDT appears to be a new and promising possibility to treat advanced tumors and to improve the patients' survival rates.

  11. Fludarabine Based Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplantation for Advanced Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Malignant Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Polycythemia Vera; Myelofibrosis; Aplastic Anemia

  12. Management of intestinal obstruction in advanced malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Henry John Murray; Ferguson, Claire Irene; Speakman, John; Ismail, Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Patients with incurable, advanced abdominal or pelvic malignancy often present to acute surgical departments with symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction. It is rare for bowel strangulation to occur in these presentations, and spontaneous resolution often occurs, so the luxury of time should be afforded while decisions are made regarding surgery. Cross-sectional imaging is valuable in determining the underlying mechanism and pathology. The majority of these patients will not be suitable for an operation, and will be best managed in conjunction with a palliative medicine team. Surgeons require a good working knowledge of the mechanisms of action of anti-emetics, anti-secretories and analgesics to tailor early management to individual patients, while decisions regarding potential surgery are made. Deciding if and when to perform operative intervention in this group is complex, and fraught with both technical and emotional challenges. Surgery in this group is highly morbid, with no current evidence available concerning quality of life following surgery. The limited evidence concerning operative strategy suggests that resection and primary anastomosis results in improved survival, over bypass or stoma formation. Realistic prognostication and involvement of the patient, care-givers and the multidisciplinary team in treatment decisions is mandatory if optimum outcomes are to be achieved. PMID:26288731

  13. Non-malignant complications of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Holmes, G K

    1996-05-01

    Patients with coeliac disease are at increased risk of developing complications which increase morbidity and mortality. Emphasis on malignant complications has often overshadowed the non-malignant risks, which have received relatively little attention, although some of these can be very troublesome and even life-threatening. This article points out that a large population of unidentified or neglected coeliac patients is at potential risk. The challenge is to identify this group by case-finding or screening programmes in selected populations, so that they can be offered a gluten-free diet and other treatments which will not only improve general health but may also prevent or reduce the development of health problems. The non-malignant risks are outlined and bone and neuropsychiatric disturbances considered in more detail because of recent developments in these areas. PMID:8783765

  14. Development of a Preclinical Orthotopic Xenograft Model of Ewing Sarcoma and Other Human Malignant Bone Disease Using Advanced In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Batey, Michael A.; Almeida, Gilberto S.; Wilson, Ian; Dildey, Petra; Sharma, Abhishek; Blair, Helen; Hide, I. Geoff; Heidenreich, Olaf; Vormoor, Josef; Maxwell, Ross J.; Bacon, Chris M.

    2014-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma represent the two most common primary bone tumours in childhood and adolescence, with bone metastases being the most adverse prognostic factor. In prostate cancer, osseous metastasis poses a major clinical challenge. We developed a preclinical orthotopic model of Ewing sarcoma, reflecting the biology of the tumour-bone interactions in human disease and allowing in vivo monitoring of disease progression, and compared this with models of osteosarcoma and prostate carcinoma. Human tumour cell lines were transplanted into non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NSG) and Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice by intrafemoral injection. For Ewing sarcoma, minimal cell numbers (1000–5000) injected in small volumes were able to induce orthotopic tumour growth. Tumour progression was studied using positron emission tomography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and bioluminescent imaging. Tumours and their interactions with bones were examined by histology. Each tumour induced bone destruction and outgrowth of extramedullary tumour masses, together with characteristic changes in bone that were well visualised by computed tomography, which correlated with post-mortem histology. Ewing sarcoma and, to a lesser extent, osteosarcoma cells induced prominent reactive new bone formation. Osteosarcoma cells produced osteoid and mineralised “malignant” bone within the tumour mass itself. Injection of prostate carcinoma cells led to osteoclast-driven osteolytic lesions. Bioluminescent imaging of Ewing sarcoma xenografts allowed easy and rapid monitoring of tumour growth and detection of tumour dissemination to lungs, liver and bone. Magnetic resonance imaging proved useful for monitoring soft tissue tumour growth and volume. Positron emission tomography proved to be of limited use in this model. Overall, we have developed an orthotopic in vivo model for Ewing sarcoma and other primary and secondary human bone malignancies, which

  15. Endometriosis Mimicking an Advanced Malignant Tumor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taisong; Xing, Yan; Zhao, Jinhua

    2016-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman with swelling left leg, groin pain, and increased serum CA125 level underwent FDG PET/CT to evaluate a pelvic mass revealed by an MRI performed from an outside hospital. A large hypermetabolic solid mass in the left pelvic wall and several lymph nodes with elevated FDG activity were noted, which indicated malignancy. However, histopathological examination demonstrated endometriosis. PMID:27187736

  16. Advances in Optical Adjunctive Aids for Visualisation and Detection of Oral Malignant and Potentially Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Nirav; Lalla, Yastira; Vu, An N.; Farah, Camile S.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of screening for oral potentially malignant disorders and oral malignancies involve a conventional oral examination with digital palpation. Evidence indicates that conventional examination is a poor discriminator of oral mucosal lesions. A number of optical aids have been developed to assist the clinician to detect oral mucosal abnormalities and to differentiate benign lesions from sinister pathology. This paper discusses advances in optical technologies designed for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities. The literature regarding such devices, VELscope and Identafi, is critically analysed, and the novel use of Narrow Band Imaging within the oral cavity is also discussed. Optical aids are effective in assisting with the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities; however, further research is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions from potentially malignant and malignant lesions. PMID:24078812

  17. Tracheal resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Zuin, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tracheal neoplasms are rare diseases, mostly represented by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Symptoms presentation is often misleading and diagnosis may be delayed for months or years, so clinical suspicion plays a fundamental role. Corner stones in the diagnostic pathway are represented by rigid endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) scan, necessary to correctly stage the patients and identify the optimal surgical candidate. When appropriate, surgical resection and reconstruction is still the best opportunity to achieve a long-term survival with a good quality of life, but this kind of surgery is always a very challenging procedure and a wide experience with an in-depth knowledge of every technical detail, from selection of patient, to choice of surgical approach to reconstruction techniques, are needed and recommended. PMID:26981265

  18. Serum fucose level in malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Sawke, N G; Sawke, G K

    2010-01-01

    We review the present knowledge of serum fucose with special attention to its relation with various malignant diseases. We summarize the role of serum fucose as a useful diagnostic and prognostic marker when used singly or in combination. The purpose of this review is to provide an expert opinion on the practical and applied aspect of serum fucose level in clinical practice and research settings. Our review is based on information from published research studies, library books, and electronic searches through Medline and PubMed. The available published data were used as the basis for recommendations. Each of the subsections concludes to provide information to assist the clinicians and the research scientists make informed decisions. PMID:21131761

  19. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies.

    PubMed

    Roopashri, G; Baig, Muqeet

    2013-12-01

    Necessity is the mother of all inventions. This is also true in case of cancer therapy. With increasing incidence of head and neck malignancies, remarkable developments have been made towards cancer development and treatment which continues to be a major challenge. Approximately fifty percent of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy which contributes towards forty percent of curative treatment for cancer. New developments in radiation oncology have helped to improve outlook for patients and find more effective treatment. With the advent of new technologies, radiotherapy seems to be promising in patients with head and neck malignancies these advancements include Altered fractionation, Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, Image Guided Radiotherapy, Stereotactic radiation, Charged-particle radiotherapy, and Intraoperative radiotherapy. How to cite this article: Roopashri G, Baig M. Current advances in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):119-23 . PMID:24453456

  20. Antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutics for malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ho, P T; Parkinson, D R

    1997-04-01

    The continued progress in our understanding of the biology of neoplasia and in the identification, cloning, and sequencing of genes critical to tumor cell function permits the exploitation of this information to develop specific agents that may directly modulate the function of these genes or their protein products. Antisense oligonucleotides are being investigated as a potential therapeutic modality that takes direct advantage of molecular sequencing. The antisense approach uses short oligonucleotides designed to hybridize to a target mRNA transcript through Watson-Crick base pairing. The formation of this oligonucleotide: RNA heteroduplex results in mRNA inactivation and consequent inhibition of synthesis of the protein product. A fundamental attraction of the antisense approach is that this method potentially may be applied to any gene product, in theory, for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, this simple and attractive model has proven to be much more complex in practice. A number of important challenges in the preclinical development of antisense oligonucleotides have been identified, including stability, sequence length, cellular uptake, target sequence selection, appropriate negative controls, oligonucleotide: protein interactions, and cost of manufacture. Although the biological activity of an oligonucleotide against its molecular target is theoretically sequence-dependent, the animal pharmacokinetics and toxicology of phosphorothioate analogues directed against vastly disparate gene products appear relatively non-sequence-specific. In oncology, a number of clinical trials have been initiated with antisense oligonucleotides directed against molecular targets including: p53; bcl-2; raf kinase; protein kinase C-alpha; c-myb. The experience gained from these early clinical trials will be applicable to the next generation of antisense agents in development. These may include molecules with novel backbones or other structural

  1. Multicohort model for prevalence estimation of advanced malignant melanoma in the USA: an increasing public health concern.

    PubMed

    Lin, Amy Y; Wang, Peter F; Li, Haojie; Kolker, Jennifer A

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the current prevalence of advanced cutaneous malignant melanoma in 2010 in the USA and to project prevalence estimates to the year 2015. An excel-based, multicohort natural disease history model was developed. It used incidence, recurrence, all-cause mortality, and US population data from the up-to-date surveillance, epidemiology, and end results program, the US census, and the literature. The prevalence was stratified by tumor stage, sex, and age. The model estimated that there were 800 735 malignant melanoma cases (258 per 100 000 individuals) in the USA in 2010, of which 10.4% were in advanced stages including stage III (22 per 100 000 individuals) and stage IV (four per 100 000 individuals). Among these advanced cases, 58.8% were men. In total, 42.1% of patients with advanced malignant melanoma were 65 years of age and older. Of these elderly patients with an advanced stage of the disease, 65.7% were men. The total number of cases and number of advanced cases were projected to increase from 2010 to 2015 by 24.4 and 21.0%, respectively. There will be approximately one million malignant melanoma cases (306 per 100 000 individuals) in the USA in 2015. The prevalence of advanced malignant melanoma is expected to increase in the next few years. Advanced malignant melanoma disproportionately affects men and the elderly in the USA. PMID:22990665

  2. Molecular and Therapeutic Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Malignant Pheochromocytomas and Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Aoife J.; Walsh, Siun; McDermott, Enda W.

    2013-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare catecholamine-secreting tumors derived from chromaffin cells originating in the neural crest. These tumors represent a significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenge because the diagnosis of malignancy is frequently made in retrospect by the development of metastatic or recurrent disease. Complete surgical resection offers the only potential for cure; however, recurrence can occur even after apparently successful resection of the primary tumor. The prognosis for malignant disease is poor because traditional treatment modalities have been limited. The last decade has witnessed exciting discoveries in the study of PCCs and PGLs; advances in molecular genetics have uncovered hereditary and germline mutations of at least 10 genes that contribute to the development of these tumors, and increasing knowledge of genotype-phenotype interactions has facilitated more accurate determination of malignant potential. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for malignant transformation in these tumors has opened avenues of investigation into targeted therapeutics that show promising results. There have also been significant advances in functional and radiological imaging and in the surgical approach to adrenalectomy, which remains the mainstay of treatment for PCC. In this review, we discuss the currently available diagnostic and therapeutic options for patients with malignant PCCs and PGLs and detail the molecular rationale and clinical evidence for novel and emerging diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23576482

  3. Palliative care for patients with non-malignant respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Clare

    2015-05-01

    Non-malignant respiratory disease is a chronic life-limiting condition that requires holistic palliative care. Patients with non-malignant respiratory disease have a range of biopsychosocial and spiritual needs, which healthcare professionals should recognise and manage effectively. Healthcare professionals have an important role in enabling the delivery of effective palliative care to this group of patients and their carers, and in recognising the many factors that may impede delivery of palliative care. PMID:25942985

  4. Oncolytic virotherapy for human malignant mesothelioma: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Boisgerault, Nicolas; Achard, Carole; Delaunay, Tiphaine; Cellerin, Laurent; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Cancer virotherapy is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments because it offers a wide range of antitumor effects due to 1) the diversity of the oncolytic viruses that are now available and 2) their multifaceted activities against both tumor cells and tumor vessels, in addition to their ability to induce antitumor immune responses. In this review, we summarize preclinical and clinical data regarding the targeting of malignant mesothelioma (MM) by oncolytic viruses. We also discuss the potential of other oncolytic viruses that have already shown antitumor effects against several malignancies in advanced clinical trials but are yet to be tested against MM cells. Finally, we review how the activation of the immune system and combinations with other types of anticancer treatments could support the development of oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of MM. PMID:27512676

  5. 78 FR 76507 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cancer (Malignant Neoplastic Diseases)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ...We propose to revise the criteria in parts A and B of the Listing of Impairments (listings) that we use to evaluate cases involving cancer (malignant neoplastic diseases) in adults and children under titles II and XVI of the Social Security Act (Act). These proposed revisions reflect our adjudicative experience, advances in medical knowledge, and recommendations from medical experts we......

  6. Advanced Coats' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Haik, B G

    1991-01-01

    Advanced Coats' disease and retinoblastoma can both present with the triad of a retinal detachment, the appearance of a subretinal mass, and dilated retinal vessels. Thus, even the most experienced observer may not be able to differentiate these entities on ophthalmoscopic findings alone. Coats' disease is the most common reason for which eyes are enucleated with the misdiagnosis of retinoblastoma. Ultrasonography is the auxiliary diagnostic test most easily incorporated into the clinical examination, and can be utilized repeatedly without biologic tissue hazard. Ultrasonically identifiable features allowing differentiation between Coats' disease and retinoblastoma include the topography and character of retinal detachment and presence or absence of subretinal calcifications. Ultrasonography is of lesser use in poorly calcified retinoblastoma and in detecting optic nerve or extraocular extension in heavily calcified retinoblastoma. CT is perhaps the single most valuable test because of its ability to: (a) delineate intraocular morphology, (b) quantify subretinal densities, (c) identify vascularities within the subretinal space through the use of contrast enhancement, and (d) detected associated orbital or intracranial abnormalities. Optimal computed tomographic studies, however, require multiple thin slices both before and after contrast introduction and expose the child to low levels of radiation if studies are repeated periodically. MR imaging is valuable for its multiplanar imaging capabilities, its superior contrast resolution, and its ability to provide insights into the biochemical structure and composition of tissues. It is limited in its ability to detect calcium, which is the mainstay of ultrasonic and CT differentiation. Aqueous LDH and isoenzyme levels were not valuable in distinguishing between Coats' disease and retinoblastoma. The value of aqueous NSE levels in the differentiation of advanced Coats' disease and exophytic retinoblastoma deserves

  7. Cause-Specific Mortality Due to Malignant and Non-Malignant Disease in Korean Foundry Workers

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Ahn, Yeon-Soon

    2014-01-01

    Background Foundry work is associated with serious occupational hazards. Although several studies have investigated the health risks associated with foundry work, the results of these studies have been inconsistent with the exception of an increased lung cancer risk. The current study evaluated the mortality of Korean foundry workers due to malignant and non-malignant diseases. Methods This study is part of an ongoing investigation of Korean foundry workers. To date, we have observed more than 150,000 person-years in male foundry production workers. In the current study, we stratified mortality ratios by the following job categories: melting-pouring, molding-coremaking, fettling, and uncategorized production work. We calculated standard mortality ratios (SMR) of foundry workers compare to general Korean men and relative risk (RR) of mortality of foundry production workers reference to non-production worker, respectively. Results Korean foundry production workers had a significantly higher risk of mortality due to malignant disease, including stomach (RR: 3.96; 95% CI: 1.41–11.06) and lung cancer (RR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.01–4.30), compared with non-production workers. High mortality ratios were also observed for non-malignant diseases, including diseases of the circulatory (RR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.18–3.14), respiratory (RR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.52–21.42 for uncategorized production worker), and digestive (RR: 2.27; 95% CI: 1.22–4.24) systems, as well as for injuries (RR: 2.36; 95% CI: 1.52–3.66) including suicide (RR: 3.64; 95% CI: 1.32–10.01). Conclusion This study suggests that foundry production work significantly increases the risk of mortality due to some kinds of malignant and non-malignant diseases compared with non-production work. PMID:24505454

  8. New therapeutic options for advanced non-resectable malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Simone; Weina, Kasia; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Utikal, Jochen

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor which is inclined to metastasize promptly into the lymphatic system and other organs such as lung, liver, brain or bone. Therefore early diagnosis remains crucial for improving clinical outcome for melanoma patients. Current chemotherapy and chemo-immunotherapy regimes have shown little clinical benefit with no improvement in overall survival. However, new advances in melanoma biology such as the discovery of predisposed gene signatures and key somatic events have changed clinical practice. New therapeutic approaches are being tested or have been approved by the FDA/EMA recently including targeted therapies, such as BRAF- and MEK-inhibitors, and novel immunotherapies, such as anti-CTLA4 or anti-PD1 therapies. For these therapies an improvement of progression-free and overall survival has been seen in patients with advanced non-resectable melanoma. The following review summarizes recent therapeutic options after the ASCO and ESMO annual meetings 2014 for the treatment of malignant melanoma. PMID:25596540

  9. Advanced MRI in malignant neoplasms of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Kido, Aki; Fujimoto, Koji; Okada, Tomohisa; Togashi, Kaori

    2013-02-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) such as T1-weighted and T2-weighted images of the female pelvis provide morphological information with excellent tissue contrast, which reflects the pathology of malignant diseases of the uterus. Owing to the recent improvement in hardware and software, in combination with extensive research in imaging techniques, not only MRI at higher magnetic field was facilitated, but also insight into tumor pathophysiology was provided. These methods include diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with pharmacokinetic analysis, and MR spectroscopy (MRS). The application of these techniques is expanding from the brain to the body because information on the tissue microenvironment and cytoarchitecture is helpful for lesion characterization, evaluation of treatment response after chemotherapy or radiation, differentiating posttherapeutic changes from residual active tumor, and for detecting recurrent cancer. These techniques may provide clues to optimize the treatment of patients with malignant diseases of the uterus. In the first half of this article we provide an overview of the technical aspects of MRI of the female pelvis, especially focusing on the state-of-the-art techniques such as 3 T MRI, DCE-MRI, DWI, etc. For the latter half we review the clinical aspects of these newly developed techniques, focusing on how these techniques are applicable, what has been revealed with respect to clinical impact, and the remaining problems. PMID:23355429

  10. BMT Abatacept for Non-Malignant Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Hurler Syndrome; Fanconi Anemia; Glanzmann Thrombasthenia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Dyskeratosis-congenita; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia; Thalassemia Major; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Sickle Cell Disease

  11. Systemic chemotherapy of advanced head and neck malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dowell, K E; Armstrong, D M; Aust, J B; Cruz, A B

    1975-04-01

    Several Phase II chemotherapy protocols were evaluated in patients with advanced malignancies; 158 were evaluable head and neck cases. The protocols were as follows: five-drug combination (COMFP), four-drug (COMF), (CCNU, Adriamycin, DTIC, and cytosine arabinoside. Insufficient numbers and data were received to adequately evaluate Yoshi 864, 5 Azacytidine, porfiromycin, BCNU, and Azaserine. Significant responses to therapy were noted in the four and five-drug combinations in which 30-44% of the patients had 50% or greater regression, with an average duration of 2.2 months. Adriamycin and CCNU demonstrated lesser antitumor effects, while DTIC and cytosine arabinoside did not demonstrate significant antitumor activity in the head and neck areas. Usual toxicity consisted largely of nausea and vomiting, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Alopecia was not pronouced in Adriamycin-treated patients. It appears that combination chemotherapy had a higher response rate compared to single agents used in the different cooperative protocols. PMID:1116105

  12. Second malignant lesions after therapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Schomberg, P.J.; Evans, R.G.; Banks, P.M.; White, W.L.; O'Connell, M.J.; Earle, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    Among 169 adult pathologically staged patients with Hodgkin's disease who were treated at the Mayo Clinic between 1974 and 1978, four cases of second malignant lesions were identified. The median duration of follow-up after diagnosis for the entire population was 4.1 years. Of the 169 patients, 73 received irradiation only, 19 received chemotherapy only, and 77 received both chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In all four patients with second malignant lesions, Hodgkin's disease was in apparent remission at the time of diagnosis of the second tumor. These four patients had received either total nodal irradiation or six or more cycles of chemotherapy as initial treatment (and one of them had received both treatment modalities). Thus, intensive therapy might be hypothesized to have played a role in the development of the second malignant tumor. The development of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma within a previously irradiated field after treatment of Hodgkin's disease with radiation therapy only is not know to have been reported previously. Although further studies with longer follow-up should be conducted, this analysis supports a definite risk for development of a second malignant lesion not only after combined-modality treatment or chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease but also after irradiation only.

  13. Emerging methods for disease monitoring in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ambady, Prakash; Bettegowda, Chetan; Holdhoff, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Summary MRI remains the backbone of measuring disease burden and treatment response in individuals with malignant gliomas. Traditional radiographic approaches, however, are largely limited to depicting anatomic changes and are not a direct measure of disease burden. For example, contrast enhancement is related to blood–brain barrier integrity rather than actual tumor size. Without accurate measures of disease, common clinical dilemmas include ‘pseudo-progression’ (e.g., after chemoradiation) or ‘pseudo-response’ (e.g., with steroid treatment and antiangiogenic agents), which can lead to delays in therapy, premature discontinuation of successful treatments and to unnecessary surgical procedures. This overview focuses on novel, minimally invasive approaches in the area of imaging and blood-based biomarkers that aim to more accurately determine disease status and response to treatment in malignant brain tumors. PMID:25054821

  14. Cholangiocarcinoma and malignant bile duct obstruction: A review of last decades advances in therapeutic endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, Helga; Frazzoni, Marzio; Mangiafico, Santi; Caruso, Angelo; Manno, Mauro; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Pigò, Flavia; Barbera, Carmelo; Manta, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades many advances have been achieved in endoscopy, in the diagnosis and therapy of cholangiocarcinoma, however blood test, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography scan may fail to detect neoplastic disease at early stage, thus the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma is achieved usually at unresectable stage. In the last decades the role of endoscopy has moved from a diagnostic role to an invaluable therapeutic tool for patients affected by malignant bile duct obstruction. One of the major issues for cholangiocarcinoma is bile ducts occlusion, leading to jaundice, cholangitis and hepatic failure. Currently, endoscopy has a key role in the work up of cholangiocarcinoma, both in patients amenable to surgical intervention as well as in those unfit for surgery or not amenable to immediate surgical curative resection owing to locally advanced or advanced disease, with palliative intention. Endoscopy allows successful biliary drainage and stenting in more than 90% of patients with malignant bile duct obstruction, and allows rapid reduction of jaundice decreasing the risk of biliary sepsis. When biliary drainage and stenting cannot be achieved with endoscopy alone, endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage represents an effective alternative method affording successful biliary drainage in more than 80% of cases. The purpose of this review is to focus on the currently available endoscopic management options in patients with cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:26078827

  15. Choledochoduodenostomy for benign and malignant biliary tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Birkenfeld, S; Serour, F; Levi, S; Abulafia, A; Balassiano, M; Krispin, M

    1988-04-01

    Although nonsurgical alternative treatments for primary or retained common bile duct stones--such as dissolution of gallstones with deoxycholic acids and, especially endoscopic papillotomy--have become available, choledochoduodenostomy (CDS) has been used with increasing frequency over the past decade, with extension of the indications for its use. We report our experience with side-to-side CDS in 116 patients with benign (65 patients) and malignant (46 patients) biliary diseases. Even though the mean age of our patients with benign disease--patients who underwent urgent operations because of obstructive jaundice (74%), liver damage (approximately 60%), and other biliary complications--was 66.8 years, the perioperative mortality was 3.07% and the long-term follow-up results were excellent with no biliary complications. In regard to the controversy about the use of CDS in malignant biliary obstructions, our experience shows that none of the 42 patients had any complication due to malignant invasion of the stoma, and only one patient had ascending cholangitis; the perioperative mortality in this group was 8.6%. In our opinion, CDS is a relatively safe, definitive procedure for treatment of benign and malignant biliary diseases, with good long-term results in high-risk, aged patients. PMID:3353854

  16. THE DIFFERENTIAL ALGORITHM BETWEEN RHEUMATOLOGIC AND MALIGN DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Këpuska, Arbnore Batalli; Spahiju, Lidvana; Bejiq, Ramush; Manqestena, Rufadije; Stavileci, Valbona; Ibraimi, Zana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the differential algorithm between rheumatism and malignant diseases. For every pediatrician, to be warned when attending joint pain and child arthralgia and prevent and treat within time malignant diseases. Methods: Our case presented in Pediatric Clinic, was referred by Regional Hospital of Ferizaj with suspected diagnose of Febris Rheumatica and Arthralgia. The main complaint was joint pain. Initially the patient was admitted at Cardiology and Rheumatology department. Then after examinations was referred to Hemato-Oncology department. Hospitalized during the period from 12.12.2014 to 18.01.2015. Results: Bone marrow biopsy as terminal diagnostic tool reviled severe malignant hematologic disease, which was masked by clinical and lab findings as Febris Rheumatica. Conclusion: Arthralgia as one of child’s often complain, should have a special attention paid to, as it might be a warning sign for a lot of diseases. Steroid treatment should not be used before final diagnose of the disease and before rolling out hematologic etiology with peripheral blood smear. PMID:27147926

  17. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  18. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-04-21

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  19. Bacterial Infections Following Splenectomy for Malignant and Nonmalignant Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Giuseppe; Pizzigallo, Eligio

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy, while often necessary in otherwise healthy patients after major trauma, finds its primary indication for patients with underlying malignant or nonmalignant hematologic diseases. Indications of splenectomy for hematologic diseases have been reducing in the last few years, due to improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In high-income countries, there is a clear decrease over calendar time in the incidence of all indication splenectomy except nonmalignant hematologic diseases. However, splenectomy, even if with different modalities including laparoscopic splenectomy and partial splenectomy, continue to be a current surgical practice both in nonmalignant hematologic diseases, such as Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), Congenital Hemolytic Anemia such as Spherocytosis, Sickle Cell Anemia and Thalassemia and Malignant Hematological Disease, such as lymphoma. Today millions of people in the world are splenectomized. Splenectomy, independently of its cause, induces an early and late increase in the incidence of venous thromboembolism and infections. Infections remain the most dangerous complication of splenectomy. After splenectomy, the levels of antibody are preserved but there is a loss of memory B cells against pneumococcus and tetanus, and the loss of marginal zone monocytes deputed to immunological defense from capsulated bacteria. Commonly, the infections strictly correlated to the absence of the spleen or a decreased or absent splenic function are due to encapsulated bacteria that are the most virulent pathogens in this set of patients. Vaccination with polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines again Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis should be performed before the splenectomy. This practice reduces but does not eliminate the occurrence of overwhelming infections due to capsulated bacteria. At present, most of infections found in splenectomized patients are due to Gram

  20. [Advanced malignant soft tissue tumors: plastic reconstructive options for palliative treatment].

    PubMed

    Vogt, P M; Jokuszies, A

    2010-12-01

    Plastic and reconstructive procedures for the oncological treatment of malignant tumors in the head and neck region, trunk and extremities are primarily curative. Less is known about the treatment options of plastic surgery in patients with locally advanced or incurable tumors. Therefore superficial, mostly exulcerated and superinfected tumors are treated with a palliative approach. A plethora of symptoms drastically restricts the quality of life in patients with advanced cancer. Pain, oozing of blood and bacterial superinfection with fetidness compromise the patient's general condition, self-esteem and activity. Many patients suffer from increasing isolation. A stage-adapted and plastic-reconstructive approach aiming at reducing the tumor mass and closing ulcerating wounds provides a considerable benefit especially in these patients. In this article a variety of treatment options regarding palliative resections and plastic reconstructive procedures and the disease alleviating benefits for patients with incurable tumors are presented. PMID:19949764

  1. Imaging of the thyroid in benign and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Intenzo, Charles M; Dam, Hung Q; Manzone, Timothy A; Kim, Sung M

    2012-01-01

    The thyroid gland was one of the first organs imaged in nuclear medicine, beginning in the 1940s. Thyroid scintigraphy is based on a specific phase or prelude to thyroid hormone synthesis, namely trapping of iodide or iodide analogues (ie, Tc99m pertechnetate), and in the case of radioactive iodine, eventual incorporation into thyroid hormone synthesis within the thyroid follicle. Moreover, thyroid scintigraphy is a reflection of the functional state of the gland, as well as the physiological state of any structure (ie, nodule) within the gland. Scintigraphy, therefore, provides information that anatomical imaging (ie, ultrasound, computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging) lacks. Thyroid scintigraphy plays an essential role in the management of patients with benign or malignant thyroid disease. In the former, the structure or architecture of the gland is best demonstrated by anatomical or cross-sectional imaging, such as ultrasound, CT, or even magnetic resonance imaging. The role of scintigraphy, however, is to display the functional state of the thyroid gland or that of a clinically palpable nodule within the gland. Such information is most useful in (1) patients with thyrotoxicosis, and (2) those patients whose thyroid nodules would not require tissue sampling if their nodules are hyperfunctioning. In neoplastic thyroid disease, thyroid scintigraphy is often standard of care for postthyroidectomy remnant evaluation and in subsequent thyroid cancer surveillance. Planar radioiodine imaging, in the form of the whole-body scan (WBS) and posttherapy scan (PTS), is a fundamental tool in differentiated thyroid cancer management. Continued controversy remains over the utility of WBS in a variety of patient risk groups and clinical scenarios. Proponents on both sides of the arguments compare WBS with PTS, thyroglobulin, and other imaging modalities with differing results. The paucity of large, randomized, prospective studies results in dependence on consensus

  2. Dual VEGF/VEGFR inhibition in advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kriti; Koon, Henry; Elson, Paul; Triozzi, Pierre; Dowlati, Afshin; Chen, Helen; Borden, Ernest C; Rini, Brian I

    2014-01-01

    Our prior phase I study of the combination of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody, bevacizumab, and VEGF receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor, sunitinib, in advanced solid tumors identified an encouraging response evaluation. An expansion phase of this study was thus undertaken to obtain further safety data, response assessment and characterization of pharmacodynamic biomarkers in melanoma, renal, and adrenal carcinoma patients. Patients with metastatic solid tumors received sunitinib (37.5 mg/d, 4 wk on/2 wk off) and bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 wk). Responses were assessed every 2 cycles. Serum levels of angiogenic molecules were measured using ELISA assays. Twenty-two patients were enrolled, including 11 melanoma, 5 renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 5 adrenal cancer, and 1 angiosarcoma. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were observed in 15 patients, including hypertension (41%), thrombocytopenia (23%), and fatigue (14%). Three RCC patients, and 1 melanoma patient developed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Partial response (PR) occurred in 21% patients, including melanoma (2), adrenal (1), and renal (1) carcinomas. Overall, 6 patients demonstrated some reduction in their tumor burden. Serum VEGF and several other proangiogenic proteins declined over the first 4 wk of treatment whereas the putative VEGF-resistant protein, prokineticin-2, increased over 10-fold. Occurrence of TMA related to dual VEGF/VEGFR inhibition can result from systemic or nephron specific injury even in non-renal malignancies. While the combination of sunitinib and bevacizumab was clinically efficacious in renal cell carcinoma and melanoma, the observance of microangiopathy, even in non-RCC patients, is a significant toxicity that precludes further clinical development. PMID:24842548

  3. [Primary treatment of advanced Hodgkin's disease].

    PubMed

    Illés, Arpád; Udvardy, Miklós; Molnár, Zsuzsa

    2005-01-30

    Primary treatment of advanced Hodgkin's disease. Hodgkin's disease is one of the few malignant diseases that can be cured even in an advanced stage in the majority of cases. By employing a polychemotherapy containing anthracyclines, a long remission and recovery can be achieved in 60-70% of the patients. At present the standard treatment is ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) scheme for the following reasons: besides good treatment results early side effects are more favourable; sterility and secondary acute leukemia present themselves less often than by employing regimens containing alkylating agents. Unfortunately, some of the patients do not react properly to the treatment and about one third of the patients who are in remission following primary treatment will relapse at a later stage. The main goal is now to further improve treatment (recovery) results without an increase, or even a decrease of early or late side effects. Awareness of prognostic factors should lead to the employment of a less intensive but not toxic therapy in patients with good prognosis to prevent overtreatment, while in cases with bad prognosis a more effective regimen is needed (even for the price of expected complications). The latest meta-analysis on the subject has shown that--similarly to sequential high dose therapy--the addition of radiotherapy to an effective chemotherapy does not seem to prolong the survival of patients. Despite the excellent therapeutic results achieved by the many new "intensive" chemotherapies, there is unfortunately no optimal therapy or protocol available today. The multicentre analysis to confirm these results and to compare them with standard scheme is still under way. It is to be hoped that risk adapted management for advanced stage Hodgkin's disease will also be available soon. PMID:15773586

  4. Genetically Modified T Cells for the Treatment of Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Agnieszka; Uharek, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Summary The broaden application of adoptive T-cell transfer has been constrained by the technical abilities to isolate and expand antigen-specific T cells potent to selectively kill tumor cells. With the recent progress in the design and manufacturing of cellular products, T cells used in the treatment of malignant diseases may be regarded as anticancer biopharmaceuticals. Genetical manipulation of T cells has given T cells desired specificity but also enable to tailor their activation and proliferation potential. Here, we summarize the recent developments in genetic engineering of T-cell-based biopharmaceuticals, covering criteria for their clinical application in regard to safety and efficacy. PMID:24474888

  5. Massive chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Foroulis, Christophoros N; Kleontas, Athanassios D; Tagarakis, George; Nana, Chryssoula; Alexiou, Ioannis; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Tossios, Paschalis; Papadaki, Elena; Kioumis, Ioannis; Baka, Sofia; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Anastasiadis, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    during the study period because of recurrent disease or complications of treatment for recurrent disease. Conclusion Chest wall tumors are in their majority mesenchymal neoplasms, which often require major chest wall resection for their eradication. Long-term survival is expected in low-grade tumors where a radical resection is achieved, while big tumors and histology of malignant fibrous histiocytoma are connected with the increase rate of recurrence. PMID:27143930

  6. [The impact of the VAC-treatment for locally advanced malignancy of the scalp].

    PubMed

    Schintler, M V; Prandl, E-C; Wittguber, G; Zink, B; Spendel, S; Hellbom, B; Scharnagl, E

    2004-05-01

    Locally advanced cutaneous malignancy of the scalp is a disease that requires an aggressive approach to resection and reconstruction. In cases where the pericranium is intact a split-thickness skin graft is a simple treatment, since direct closure often fails because due to the lack of elasticity of the scalp. If there is a loss of periosteum or a skull defect local or free flaps are necessary for sufficient coverage. Increasing geriatric and polymorbid patients with impaired wound healing require surgical treatment, considering pros and cons for general anaesthesia. A simple method of both, combining radicality of tumor resection with outer table bone and skin grafting as a two stage procedure, while minimizing perioperative risk using local anaesthesia and analgo-sedation, using the vacuum assisted closure device, is presented. PMID:15168314

  7. Advances in haplo-identical stem cell transplantation in adults with high-risk hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Michael J; Medin, Jeffrey A; Foley, Ronan S

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplant is a life-saving procedure for adults and children that have high-risk or relapsed hematological malignancies. Incremental advances in the procedure, as well as expanded sources of donor hematopoietic cell grafts have significantly improved overall rates of success. Yet, the outcomes for patients for whom suitable donors cannot be found remain a significant limitation. These patients may benefit from a hematopoietic cell transplant wherein a relative donor is fully haplotype mismatched. Previously this procedure was limited by graft rejection, lethal graft-versus-host disease, and increased treatment-related toxicity. Recent approaches in haplo-identical transplantation have demonstrated significantly improved outcomes. Based on years of incremental pre-clinical research into this unique form of bone marrow transplant, a range of approaches have now been studied in patients in relatively large phase II trials that will be summarized in this review. PMID:25258660

  8. Advances in haplo-identical stem cell transplantation in adults with high-risk hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Michael J; Medin, Jeffrey A; Foley, Ronan S

    2014-09-26

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplant is a life-saving procedure for adults and children that have high-risk or relapsed hematological malignancies. Incremental advances in the procedure, as well as expanded sources of donor hematopoietic cell grafts have significantly improved overall rates of success. Yet, the outcomes for patients for whom suitable donors cannot be found remain a significant limitation. These patients may benefit from a hematopoietic cell transplant wherein a relative donor is fully haplotype mismatched. Previously this procedure was limited by graft rejection, lethal graft-versus-host disease, and increased treatment-related toxicity. Recent approaches in haplo-identical transplantation have demonstrated significantly improved outcomes. Based on years of incremental pre-clinical research into this unique form of bone marrow transplant, a range of approaches have now been studied in patients in relatively large phase II trials that will be summarized in this review. PMID:25258660

  9. Consensus on the utility of bone markers in the malignant bone disease setting.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert; Costa, Luis; Saad, Fred; Cook, Richard; Hadji, Peyman; Terpos, Evangelos; Garnero, Patrick; Brown, Janet; Body, Jean-Jacques; Smith, Matthew; Lee, Ker-Ai; Major, Pierre; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Lipton, Allan

    2011-12-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover provide insight into ongoing rates of skeletal metabolism and tumor-bone interactions in patients with malignant bone disease. This article reviews the available recent evidence assessing the potential of bone markers for detecting and monitoring malignant bone lesions in patients with advanced cancers, and for assessing overall skeletal health and response to antiresorptive therapies in patients at all stages of cancer progression. Most data thus far are for urinary N-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX) in predicting risks of skeletal morbidity and death and monitoring response to zoledronic acid in patients with bone metastases. Ongoing studies are evaluating such correlations for other markers and therapies. Emerging evidence suggests that bone markers may help identify patients at high risk for bone metastasis or bone lesion progression, thereby allowing improved follow-up. Results from ongoing clinical trials evaluating such potential applications of bone markers are awaited. PMID:21411334

  10. Advances in haploidentical stem cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Montoro, Juan; Sanz, Jaime; Sanz, Guillermo F; Sanz, Miguel A

    2016-08-01

    One of the most important advances in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the use of alternative donors and cell sources, such as haploidentical transplants (haplo-HSCT) from family donors. Several approaches have been developed to overcome the challenging bidirectional alloreactivity. We discuss these approaches, including ex vivo T-cell-depleted grafts with megadose of CD34(+) cells, not requiring immunosuppression after allogeneic transplantation for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, and other strategies using unmanipulated T-cell-replete grafts with intensive immunosuppression or post-transplantation cyclophosphamide to minimize the GVHD. We also address the role of other strategies developed in the context of the haplo-HSCT platforms, such as ex vivo selective depletion of alloreactive donor T-cell subpopulations, infusion of antigen-specific T-cells against several pathogens, and infusion of regulatory T-cells, among other experimental approaches. Finally, some considerations about the selection of the most suitable donor, when more than one family member is available, are also addressed. PMID:27424663

  11. Limb Preservation With Isolated Limb Infusion for Locally Advanced Nonmelanoma Cutaneous and Soft-Tissue Malignant Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Turaga, Kiran K.; Beasley, Georgia M.; Kane, John M.; Delman, Keith A.; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Gonzalez, Ricardo J.; Letson, G. Douglas; Cheong, David; Tyler, Douglas S.; Zager, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the efficacy of isolated limb infusion (ILI) in limb preservation for patients with locally advanced soft-tissue sarcomas and nonmelanoma cutaneous malignant neoplasms. Background Locally advanced nonmelanoma cutaneous and soft-tissue malignant neoplasms, including soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremities, can pose significant treatment challenges. We report our experience, including responses and limb preservation rates, using ILI in cutaneous and soft-tissue malignant neoplasms. Methods We identified 22 patients with cutaneous and soft-tissue malignant neoplasms who underwent 26 ILIs with melphalan and actinomycin from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2009, from 5 institutions. Outcome measures included limb preservation and in-field response rates. Toxicity was measured using the Wieberdink scale and serum creatinine phosphokinase levels. Results The median age was 70 years (range, 19-92 years), and 12 patients (55%) were women. Fourteen patients (64%) had sarcomas, 7 (32%) had Merkel cell carcinoma, and 1 (5%) had squamous cell carcinoma. The median length of stay was 5.5 days (interquartile range, 4-8 days). Twenty-five of the 26 ILIs (96%) resulted in Wieberdink grade III or less toxicity, and 1 patient (4%) developed grade IV toxicity. The median serum creatinine phosphokinase level was 127 U/L for upper extremity ILIs and 93 U/L for lower extremity ILIs. Nineteen of 22 patients (86%) underwent successful limb preservation. The 3-month in-field response rate was 79% (21% complete and 58% partial), and the median follow-up was 8.6 months (range, 1-63 months). Five patients underwent resection of disease after an ILI, of whom 80% are disease free at a median of 8.6 months. Conclusions Isolated limb infusion provides an attractive alternative therapy for regional disease control and limb preservation in patients with limb-threatening cutaneous and soft-tissue malignant neoplasms. Short-term response rates appear encouraging, yet

  12. Recent Advances in Diverticular Disease.

    PubMed

    Peery, Anne F

    2016-07-01

    Diverticular disease is common and accounts for substantial health care utilization in the USA. Recent publications in the areas of diverticulosis and diverticular disease have highlighted several notable advances that are now changing practice. Despite colonic diverticula being common, only 1-4 % of individuals with colonic diverticula will develop diverticulitis. After a first occurrence of acute diverticulitis, the risk of recurrence is 20 % at 5 years. Complications most commonly occur with the first occurrence of acute diverticulitis and not with recurrent episodes. After an episode of diverticulitis, many patients continue to experience chronic gastrointestinal symptoms. Prophylactic surgery is an option to reduce the risk of recurrence and its negative impact on quality of life. Importantly, the rationale for surgery is no longer to prevent complications because this risk is low. The review concludes with practical recommendations for patients with diverticulosis and diverticular disease. PMID:27241190

  13. Recent Advances in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu Yeun

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is characterized with acute systemic vasculitis, occurs predominantly in children between 6 months to 5 years of age. Patients with this disease recover well and the disease is self-limited in most cases. Since it can lead to devastating cardiovascular complications, KD needs special attention. Recent reports show steady increases in the prevalence of KD in both Japan and Korea. However, specific pathogens have yet to be found. Recent advances in research on KD include searches for genetic susceptibility related to KD and research on immunopathogenesis based on innate and acquired immunity. Also, search for etiopathogenesis and treatment of KD has been actively sought after using animal models. In this paper, the recent progress of research on KD was discussed. PMID:26632378

  14. Fluorescence detection of premalignant, malignant, and micrometastatic disease using hexylpyropheophorbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Kinya; Crean, David H.; Mang, Thomas S.; Kato, Harubumi; Dougherty, Thomas J.

    1995-03-01

    We investigated the in vivo fluorescence detection of premalignant and malignant lesions in carcinogen-induced tumors of the hamster buccal cheek pouch and micrometastases in rat lymph nodes using hexylpyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) at 0.5 mg/kg and He-Ne laser-induced fluorescence photometry. Time course studies of HPPH in hamster tumor model showed maximal relative fluorescence readings at 48 hours after i.p. injection in each stage (dysplasia: 0.35, papilloma: 0.58, squamous cell carcinoma: 1.04). Squamous cell carcinoma showed significantly greater fluorescence than papillomas and dysplasias at all time points (p < 0.01). Metastatic lymph nodes were significantly greater than normal lymph nodes at all time points (p < 0.01). Maximal fluorescence levels of normal lymph nodes were observed at 6 hours after i.v. injection. Metastatic lymph nodes still showed high fluorescence levels at 72 hours. Micrometastases showed fluorescence levels between the levels of metastatic and normal lymph nodes (normal: 0.40 < micrometastasis: 0.62 < metastasis: 0.75 at 48 hours after i.v. injection). The results demonstrated good correlation between fluorescence levels and histopathological developments at all time points. Therefore, HPPH may be a promising fluorophore for the detection of developing malignancies and occult disease.

  15. Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery for benign and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Thijs; Klompmaker, Sjors; Abu Hilal, Mohammad; Kendrick, Michael L; Busch, Olivier R; Besselink, Marc G

    2016-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for benign and malignant pancreatic lesions has slowly been gaining acceptance over the past decade and is being introduced in many centres. Some studies suggest that this approach is equivalent to or better than open surgery, but randomized data are needed to assess outcomes. In this Review, we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in laparoscopic pancreatic surgery by aggregating high-quality published evidence. Various aspects, including the benefits, limitations, oncological efficacy, learning curve and latest innovations, are discussed. The focus is on laparoscopic Whipple procedure and laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for both benign and malignant disease, but robot-assisted surgery is also addressed. Surgical and oncological outcomes are discussed as well as quality of life parameters and the cost efficiency of laparoscopic pancreatic surgery. We have also included decision-aid algorithms based on the literature and our own expertise; these algorithms can assist in the decision to perform a laparoscopic or open procedure. PMID:26882881

  16. Management of growth failure in the treatment of malignant disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leiper, A.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Growth failure due to endocrine dysfunction as a result of treatment for malignant disease is becoming increasingly common. It may occur after cranial or craniospinal irradiation given in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors, and is often coupled with early or precocious puberty. It also occurs after neck and gonadal radiation and is particularly severe after total body irradiation where multiple endocrine deficiencies frequently occur. Failure to appreciate its occurrence or failure to institute therapy early enough may lead to short stature in adult life. Accurate and regular monitoring of standing and sitting height, bone age, and endocrine data should be undertaken by the oncologist in close collaboration with an endocrinologist, to ensure appropriate management of the patient. 17 references.

  17. A phase I study of indoximod in patients with advanced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hatem H.; Minton, Susan E.; Han, Hyo Sook; Ismail-Khan, Roohi; Neuger, Anthony; Khambati, Fatema; Noyes, David; Lush, Richard; Chiappori, Alberto A.; Roberts, John D.; Link, Charles; Vahanian, Nicholas N.; Mautino, Mario; Streicher, Howard; Sullivan, Daniel M.; Antonia, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Indoximod is an oral inhibitor of the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase pathway, which causes tumor-mediated immunosuppression. Primary endpoints were maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and toxicity for indoximod in patients with advanced solid tumors. Secondary endpoints included response rates, pharmacokinetics, and immune correlates. Experimental Design Our 3+3 phase I trial comprised 10 dose levels (200, 300, 400, 600, and 800 mg once/day; 600, 800, 1200, 1600, and 2000 mg twice/day). Inclusion criteria were measurable metastatic solid malignancy, age ≥18 years, and adequate organ/marrow function. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy ≤ 3 weeks prior, untreated brain metastases, autoimmune disease, or malabsorption. Results In 48 patients, MTD was not reached at 2000 mg twice/day. At 200 mg once/day, 3 patients previously treated with checkpoint inhibitors developed hypophysitis. Five patients showed stable disease >6 months. Indoximod plasma AUC and Cmax plateaued above 1200mg. Cmax (∼12 μM at 2000 mg twice/day) occurred at 2.9 hours, and half-life was 10.5 hours. C reactive protein (CRP) levels increased across multiple dose levels. Conclusions Indoximod was safe at doses up to 2000 mg orally twice/day. Best response was stable disease >6 months in 5 patients. Induction of hypophysitis, increased tumor antigen autoantibodies and CRP levels were observed. PMID:27008709

  18. Antithrombotic therapy and survival in patients with malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, A K; Macbeth, F

    2010-01-01

    A broad range of studies suggest a two-way relationship between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Patients with cancer have consistently been shown to be at elevated risk for VTE; this risk is partly driven by an intrinsic hypercoagulable state elicited by the tumour itself. Conversely, thromboembolic events in patients without obvious risk factors are often the first clinical manifestation of an undiagnosed malignancy. The relationship between VTE and cancer is further supported by a number of trials and meta-analyses which, when taken together, strongly suggest that antithrombotic therapy can extend survival in patients with cancer by a mechanism that extends beyond its effect in preventing VTE. Moreover, accumulating evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies has shown that tumour growth, invasion, and metastasis are governed, in part, by elements of the coagulation system. On 22 May 2009, a group of health-care providers based in the United Kingdom met in London, England, to examine recent advances in cancer-associated thrombosis and its implications for UK clinical practice. As part of the discussion, attendees evaluated evidence for and against an effect of antithrombotic therapy on survival in cancer. This paper includes a summary of the data presented at the meeting and explores potential mechanisms by which antithrombotic agents might exert antitumour effects. The summary is followed by a consensus statement developed by the group. PMID:20386547

  19. Clinical applications of recent molecular advances in urologic malignancies: no longer chasing a "mirage"?

    PubMed

    Netto, George J

    2013-05-01

    As our understanding of the molecular events leading to the development and progression of genitourologic malignancies, new markers of detection, prognostication, and therapy prediction can be exploited in the management of these prevalent tumors. The current review discusses the recent advances in prostate, bladder, renal, and testicular neoplasms that are pertinent to the anatomic pathologist. PMID:23574774

  20. Alternative donor transplants for patients with advanced hematologic malignancies, conditioned with thiotepa, cyclophosphamide and antithymocyte globulin.

    PubMed

    Lamparelli, T; van Lint, M T; Gualandi, F; Raiola, A M; Barbanti, M; Sacchi, N; Ficai, G; Ghinatti, C; Bregante, S; Berisso, G; Dominietto, A; Di Grazia, C; Bruno, B; Sessarego, M; Casarino, L; Verdiani, S; Bacigalupo, A

    2000-12-01

    Preparative regimens without total body irradiation (TBI) have been reported for alternative donor hemopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). Between 7 September 1994 and 7 June 1999 48 patients with advanced hematologic malignancies were conditioned with thiotepa (THIO) 15 mg/kg, cyclophosphamide (CY) 150 mg/kg and antithymocyte globulin (ATG). Donors were HLA mismatched family members (1-2 antigens) (FAM) (n = 24, median age 31 years) or HLA matched unrelated donors (UD) (n = 24, median age 34 years). GVHD prophylaxis was cyclosporine and methotrexate. Stem cell source was peripheral blood (n = 8) or bone marrow (n = 40). Hematologic recovery was seen in 42/46 (91%) evaluable patients and complete chimerism in 31/37 patients (85%). Acute GVHD grades III-IV were seen in 10/46 patients surviving 10 days (21%) and extensive chronic GVHD in 2/36 patients surviving 100 days (5%). Twenty-six patients died (54%), eight of recurrent disease (17%) and 18 of transplant-related complications (37%): main causes of TRM were GVHD (15%), infections (15%) and graft failure (4%). Twenty-two patients (46%) survive with a median follow-up of 877 days (287-1840). The actuarial 3-year survival is 49% for FAM and 42% for UD transplants. Results obtained with this regimen in unrelated grafts for advanced CML (n = 15) were not significantly different when compared to 21 concurrent UD grafts for advanced CML prepared with CY-TBI. In conclusion, the combination of THIO-CY-ATG allows engraftment of alternative donor hemopoietic stem cells. Results are similar when using unrelated matched donors or partially mismatched family donors, and not significantly different when compared to patients conditioned with CY-TBI. PMID:11223970

  1. Microenvironmental Effects of Cell Death in Malignant Disease.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Christopher D; Ford, Catriona A; Voss, Jorine J L P

    2016-01-01

    Although apoptosis is well recognized as a cell death program with clear anticancer roles, accumulating evidence linking apoptosis with tissue repair and regeneration indicates that its relationship with malignant disease is more complex than previously thought. Here we review how the responses of neighboring cells in the microenvironment of apoptotic tumor cells may contribute to the cell birth/cell death disequilibrium that provides the basis for cancerous tissue emergence and growth. We describe the bioactive properties of apoptotic cells and consider, in particular, how apoptosis of tumor cells can engender a range of responses including pro-oncogenic signals having proliferative, angiogenic, reparatory, and immunosuppressive features. Drawing on the parallels between wound healing, tissue regeneration and cancer, we propose the concept of the "onco-regenerative niche," a cell death-driven generic network of tissue repair and regenerative mechanisms that are hijacked in cancer. Finally, we consider how the responses to cell death in tumors can be targeted to provide more effective and long-lasting therapies. PMID:27558817

  2. Lin28 Enhances Tumorigenesis and is Associated With Advanced Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Srinivas R.; Powers, John T.; Einhorn, William; Hoshida, Yujin; Ng, Tony; Toffanin, Sara; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Lu, Jun; Philips, Letha A.; Lockhart, Victoria L.; Shah, Samar P.; Tanwar, Pradeep S.; Mermel, Craig H.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Azam, Mohammad; Teixeira, Jose; Meyerson, Matthew; Hughes, Timothy P.; Llovet, Josep M; Radich, Jerald; Mullighan, Charles G.; Golub, Todd R.; Sorensen, Poul H.; Daley, George Q.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple members of the let-7 family of miRNAs are often repressed in human cancers1,2, thereby promoting oncogenesis by de-repressing the targets K-Ras, c-Myc, and HMGA2 3,4. However, the mechanism by which let-7 miRNAs are coordinately repressed is unclear. The RNA-binding proteins Lin28 and Lin28B block let-7 precursors from being processed to mature miRNAs5–8, suggesting that over-expression of Lin28/Lin28B might promote malignancy via repression of let-7. Here we show that LIN28 and LIN28B are over-expressed in primary human tumors and human cancer cell lines (overall frequency ∼15%), and that over-expression is linked to repression of let-7 family miRNAs and de-repression of let-7 targets. Lin28/Lin28B facilitate cellular transformation in vitro, and over-expression is associated with advanced disease across multiple tumor types. Our work provides a mechanism for the coordinate repression of let-7 miRNAs observed in a subset of human cancers, and associates activation of LIN28/LIN28B with poor clinical prognosis. PMID:19483683

  3. Does celiac disease influence survival in lymphoproliferative malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Murray, Joseph A.; Green, Peter HR; Ekbom, Anders; Granath, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is associated with both lymphoproliferative malignancy (LPM) and increased death from LPM. Research suggests that co-existing autoimmune disease may influence survival in LPM. Through Cox regression we examined overall and cause-specific mortality in 316 individuals with CD+LPM vs. 689 individuals with LPM only. CD was defined as having villous atrophy according to biopsy reports at any of Sweden’s 28 pathology departments, and LPM as having a relevant disease code in the Swedish Cancer Register. During follow-up, there were 551 deaths (CD: n=200; non-CD: n=351). Individuals with CD+LPM were at an increased risk of death compared with LPM-only individuals (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.02–1.48). However, this excess risk was only seen in the first year after LPM diagnosis (aHR=1.76), with HRs decreasing to 1.09 in years 2–5 after LPM diagnosis and to 0.90 thereafter. Individuals with CD and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) were at a higher risk of any death as compared with NHL-only individuals (aHR=1.23; 95%CI=0.97–1.56). This excess risk was due to a higher proportion of T-cell lymphoma in CD patients. Stratifying for T- and B-cell status, the HR for death in individuals with CD+NHL was 0.77 (95%CI=0.46–1.31 In conclusion, we found no evidence that co-existing CD influences survival in individuals with LPM. The increased mortality in the first year after LPM diagnosis is related to the predominance of T-NHL in CD individuals. Individuals with CD+LPM should be informed that their prognosis is similar to that of individuals with LPM only. However, this study had low statistical power to rule our excess mortality in patients with CD and certain LPM subtypes. PMID:23463575

  4. Quality Assurance Guidelines for Superior Vena Cava Stenting in Malignant Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, Raman

    2006-06-15

    Superior vena cava stenting for the treatment of malignant superior vena cava obstruction is now well established. It offers simple, rapid, and safe palliation of a distressing and potentially fatal complication of mediastinal malignant disease and compares very favorably with standard therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The following are quality assurance guidelines for superior vena cava stenting.

  5. Second Malignant Neoplasms and Cardiovascular Disease Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Andrea K.; Allan, James M.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Kennedy, Ann R.; Xu, X. George; Purdy, James A.; Applegate, Kimberly; Yahalom, Joachim; Constine, Louis S.; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Boice, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are among the most serious and life-threatening late adverse effects experienced by the growing number of cancer survivors worldwide and are due in part to radiotherapy. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) convened an expert scientific committee to critically and comprehensively review associations between radiotherapy and SMNs and CVD, taking into account radiobiology; genomics; treatment (ie, radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy and other therapies); type of radiation; and quantitative considerations (ie, dose–response relationships). Major conclusions of the NCRP include: 1) the relevance of older technologies for current risk assessment when organ-specific absorbed dose and the appropriate relative biological effectiveness are taken into account and 2) the identification of critical research needs with regard to newer radiation modalities, dose–response relationships, and genetic susceptibility. Recommendation for research priorities and infrastructural requirements include 1) long-term large-scale follow-up of extant cancer survivors and prospectively treated patients to characterize risks of SMNs and CVD in terms of radiation dose and type; 2) biological sample collection to integrate epidemiological studies with molecular and genetic evaluations; 3) investigation of interactions between radiotherapy and other potential confounding factors, such as age, sex, race, tobacco and alcohol use, dietary intake, energy balance, and other cofactors, as well as genetic susceptibility; 4) focusing on adolescent and young adult cancer survivors, given the sparse research in this population; and 5) construction of comprehensive risk prediction models for SMNs and CVD to permit the development of follow-up guidelines and prevention and intervention strategies. PMID:22312134

  6. Recent advances in oesophageal diseases.

    PubMed

    Al Dulaimi, David

    2014-01-01

    -quadrant biopsy protocol which may have led to an underestimation of BE prevalence. The review highlights an increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West but unclear disease trend in Asia with inter-country variability. Similarly in Asian and Western countries BE is associated with the presence of hiatus hernia, advancing age, male gender, alcohol consumption, smoking, abdominal obesity and longer duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The authors postulate that Helicobacter pylori infection, more prevalent in Asia than the West, may have a protective effect on BE. There is a need for larger, prospective studies to further clarify the disease pattern of BE in Asian countries. Clearly standardisation of the diagnostic process for BE is important to validate the differences in disease trends between Asian and Western countries. Kiadaliri AA. Gender and social disparities in esophagus cancer incidence in Iran, 2003-2009: a time trend province-level study.Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014;15(2):623-7 Esophageal cancer (EC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality particuarly in Iran where the incidence rate exceeds the global average. An understanding of the factors influencing the province-specific incidence of EC in Iran is important to inform disease-prevention strategies and address health inequalities. This ecological study used cancer registry data to investigate the relationship between gender and social class and the incidence of EC in Iran at province-level between 2003 and 2009. The age standardised incidence rates (ASIR) of EC were greatest in the Northern provinces of Iran, specifically Razavi Khorasan in males and Kordestan in females. Overall the EC incidence did not significantly differ according to gender. Interestingly, during the study period the ASIR increased by 4.6% per year in females (p=0.08) and 6.5% per year in males (p=0.02). This may reflect increasing rates of establised risk factors for EC including obsesity and gastro

  7. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma as the Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Celiac Disease: A Rare Malignancy in a Common Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Jaleh; Afari, Maxwell Eyram; Cordova, Alfredo C.; Olszewski, Adam J.; Minami, Taro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Celiac disease is associated with an increased risk of small bowel malignancies, particularly lymphoma. Its association with small bowel carcinoma is less known. Case Description. We report a case of an 89-year-old woman with celiac disease who experienced recurrent episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding and was ultimately found to have adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. Discussion and Evaluation. Diagnosis of small bowel adenocarcinoma is often delayed because of the need for specialized modalities, which are often deferred in the inpatient setting. Although resection is the modality of choice for small bowel tumors, a majority is either locally advanced or metastatic at diagnosis, and even localized cancers have worse prognosis than stage-matched colorectal tumors. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy is uncertain, but it is often offered extrapolating data from other gastrointestinal cancers. Small bowel carcinomas occurring in the context of celiac disease appear to be associated with higher rates of microsatellite instability than sporadic tumors, although other specific genomic abnormalities and mechanisms of carcinogenesis in celiac disease remain unknown. Conclusion. Recurrent episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with celiac disease should prompt an early evaluation of the small bowel to assure timely diagnosis of carcinoma at an early curable stage. PMID:26290763

  8. Total thyroidectomy as the single surgical option for benign and malignant thyroid disease: a surgical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Tympa, Aliki; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Nikolakopoulos, Fotios; Petropoulou, Thalia; Smyrniotis, Vassilios

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Total thyroidectomy has been the treatment of choice for patients with malignant thyroid disease. However, the efficacy and safety of this procedure for patients with benign disease is still a matter of debate. The aim of this study is to show that total thyroidectomy can be safely performed for both malignant and benign disease. Material and methods A retrospective study on 216 patients was conducted. Once an indication for surgery was established, our single surgical treatment was total thyroidectomy. Age, sex, nature of thyroid disease, final pathology and postoperative complications were recorded. Results For both benign and malignant disease, total thyroidectomy resulted in no permanent laryngeal nerve injury and no permanent hypoparathyroidism. Temporary laryngeal nerve palsy occurred in 0.9% and 3% of patients with benign and malignant disease respectively (p = 0.245). Six percent of patients with benign and 10.0% of patients with malignant thyroid disease suffered temporary hypoparathyroidism (p = 0.280). Immediate reoperation for postoperative hemorrhage was performed in 1.7% of patients with benign disease and in 1.0% of patients with malignancy with an uneventful outcome (p = 0.650). Conclusions When performed by surgeons experienced in endocrine surgery, total thyroidectomy may be considered as the treatment of choice for both malignant and benign thyroid disease requiring surgical treatment. Total thyroidectomy virtually eliminates the requirement of completion thyroidectomy for incidentally diagnosed thyroid carcinoma and significantly reduces the rate of reoperation for recurrent disease, as it provides an immediate and permanent cure for all benign thyroid diseases, with a low incidence of postoperative complications. PMID:23515861

  9. NASA Bioreactors Advance Disease Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    the body. Experiments conducted by Johnson scientist Dr. Thomas Goodwin proved that the NASA bioreactor could successfully cultivate cells using simulated microgravity, resulting in three-dimensional tissues that more closely approximate those in the body. Further experiments conducted on space shuttle missions and by Wolf as an astronaut on the Mir space station demonstrated that the bioreactor s effects were even further expanded in space, resulting in remarkable levels of tissue formation. While the bioreactor may one day culture red blood cells for injured astronauts or single-celled organisms like algae as food or oxygen producers for a Mars colony, the technology s cell growth capability offers significant opportunities for terrestrial medical research right now. A small Texas company is taking advantage of the NASA technology to advance promising treatment applications for diseases both common and obscure.

  10. A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of a fiberglass manufacturing facility.

    PubMed Central

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Fryar, C

    1992-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to determine the influence of non-workplace factors on risk of respiratory disease among workers at the Owens-Corning Fiberglas plant in Newark, Ohio. Cases and controls were drawn from a historical cohort mortality study conducted on behalf of the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers Association (TIMA) of workers employed at Newark for at least one year between 1 January 1940 and 31 December 1963 and followed up to the end of 1982. The TIMA study reported a statistically significant increase in respiratory cancer (compared with national death rates). Interviews were completed for 144 lung cancer cases and 299 matching controls and 102 non-malignant respiratory disease cases and 201 matching controls. Unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess the association between lung cancer or non-malignant respiratory disease and birthplace, education, income, marital state, smoking with a duration of six months or more, age at which smoking first started, and duration of smoking. Only the smoking variables were statistically significant. For lung cancer, of the variables entered into a conditional logistic regression model, only the smoking OR of 23.4 (95% CI 3.2-172.9) was statistically significant. For non-malignant respiratory disease no variables entered into the final model were statistically significant. Results of the interview portion of our case-control study clearly indicate that smoking is the most important non-workplace factor for risk of lung cancer in this group of workers. Smoking does not seem to play as important a part, however, for non-malignant respiratory disease. Prevalence of cigarette smoking at the Newark plant was estimated for birth cohorts by calendar year. Corresponding data for the United States were compiled from national smoking surveys. Prevalence of cigarette smoking for Newark in 1955 appears to be sufficiently greater than the corresponding United States data in 1955 to suggest that some of the

  11. Degos diseasemalignant atrophic papulosis or cutaneointestinal lethal syndrome: rarity of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Pirolla, Eduardo; Fregni, Felipe; Miura, Irene K; Misiara, Antonio Carlos; Almeida, Fernando; Zanoni, Esdras

    2015-01-01

    Background Degos disease is a very rare syndrome with a rare type of multisystem vasculopathy of unknown cause that affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and central nervous system. Other organs such as the kidneys, lungs, pleura, liver, heart, and eyes, can also be involved. Objective To highlight the incidence of Degos disease with regard to age and sex, discuss the necessity of its accurate and early diagnosis, and demonstrate the most current techniques for its diagnosis; to discuss whether early therapeutic intervention can impact patient prognosis; and to present a literature review about this disease. Design With a retrospective, observational, nonrandomized trial, we described the evolution of the different forms of Degos disease and referenced the literature. Data sources Research on rare documented cases in the literature, including two cases of potentially lethal form of the disease involving the skin and gastrointestinal system and, possibly, the lungs, kidneys, and central nervous system. A case of the benign form of the disease involving the skin was observed by the authors. Main outcome measures Differences between outcomes in patients with the cutaneointestinal form and skin-only form of the disease. There was one fatal outcome. We reviewed possible new approaches to diagnosis and treatment. Results The study demonstrated the rapid evolution of the aggressive and malignant form of the disease. It also described newly accessible Phase I diagnostic tools being currently researched as well as new therapeutic approaches. Limitation The rarity of the disease, with only eleven cases throughout the literature. Conclusion The gastrointestinal form of Degos disease can be lethal. Its vascular etiology has finally been confirmed; however, new and more accurate early diagnostic modalities need to be developed. There are new therapeutic possibilities, but the studies of them are still in the early stages and have not yet shown the full effectiveness of

  12. Analgesia for patients with advanced disease: 2

    PubMed Central

    Hall, E; Sykes, N

    2004-01-01

    The first article in this series explored epidemiology and patterns of pain in advanced disease, non-pharmacological treatments, and the use of opioids to manage pain. This second article examines the use of non-opioid drugs and anaesthetic interventions for pain relief in advanced disease. It also discusses an approach to managing analgesia in dying patients and finally looks at future developments. PMID:15082837

  13. Malignant melanoma maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Seema; Sinha, Richi; Singh, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A malignant melanoma is a highly lethal melanocytic neoplasm. A neoplasm usually affects the skin. Malignant melanomas in the head and neck region are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Malignant melanoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses is an aggressive disease typically presenting at an advanced stage, with a 5-year survival rate ranging 20-30%. Melanomas are tumors arising from melanocytes, which are neuroectodermally derived cells located in the basal layers of the skin. This is a case report of a 35-year-old male, who presented with very aggressive disease and developed liver metastasis. PMID:26668467

  14. Therapeutic advances in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Kathleen M; Fraint, Avram

    2015-09-15

    Huntington's disease is a rare hereditary degenerative disease with a wide variety of symptoms that encompass movement, cognition, and behavior. The genetic mutation that causes the disease has been known for more than 20 y, and animal models have illuminated a host of intracellular derangements that occur downstream of protein translation. A number of clinical trials targeting these metabolic consequences have failed to produce a single effective therapy, although clinical trials continue. New strategies targeting the protein at the level of transcription, translation, and posttranslational modification and aggregation engender new hope that a successful strategy will emerge, but there is much work ahead. Some of the clinical manifestations of the illness, particularly chorea, affective symptoms, and irritability, are amenable to palliative strategies, but physicians have a poor evidence base on which to select the best agents. Clinical trials since 2013 have dashed hopes that coenzyme Q10 or creatine might have disease-modifying properties but suggested other agents were safe or hinted at efficacy (cysteamine, selisistat, hydroxyquinoline) and could proceed into later-stage disease modification trials. The hunt for effective symptom relief suggested that pridopidine might be shown effective given the right outcome measure. This review summarizes recent progress in HD and highlights promising new strategies for slowing disease progression and relieving suffering in HD. PMID:26226924

  15. Cheek-neck advancement-rotation flaps following Mohs excision of skin malignancies.

    PubMed

    Katz, A E; Grande, D J

    1986-09-01

    The cheek-neck advancement-rotation flap has proved extremely useful for delayed reconstruction of the face following the microscopically controlled surgical excision (MCSE) of skin malignancies. We have recently used these flaps successfully to repair combined defects of the cheek and nose in eight patients, isolated cheek defects in six patients, combined defects of the cheek and lips in two patients, and isolated defects of the nose, temple, and an antral cutaneous fistula in each of three patients. Defects as large as 6.0 X 10.0 cm have been closed in one stage with this flap. This flap is extremely hearty and its scars can be well concealed. It is especially valuable in the elderly patient and should always be considered as one of the options for reconstruction of the face following MCSE of skin malignancies. PMID:3745621

  16. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Rafay; Oborski, Matthew J; Hwang, Misun; Lieberman, Frank S; Mountz, James M

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies, and importantly, for facilitating patient management, sparing patients from weeks or months of toxicity and ineffective treatment. This review will present an overview of epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis and current advances in diagnoses, and management of malignant gliomas. PMID:24711712

  17. Phase I study of the safety and pharmacokinetics of trabectedin with docetaxel in patients with advanced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bookman, Michael; Meropol, Neal J.; Weiner, Louis M.; Sherman, Eric; Li, Jinhui; Knoblauch, Roland; Parekh, Trilok; Cohen, Roger B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Combination therapy with trabectedin and docetaxel was evaluated in patients with advanced malignancies. Methods In this open-label phase 1 study, docetaxel (60 or 75 mg/m2; 1-h intravenous infusion) was given on day 1 of a 21-day cycle in combination with escalating doses of trabectedin (0.4–1.3 mg/m2 by 3-h intravenous infusion, 1 h after docetaxel) and prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) as primary objective and safety, plasma pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity as secondary objectives were assessed. Results Patients (N = 49) received a median of four cycles of treatment. MTD was 1.3 mg/m2 trabectedin and 60 mg/m2 docetaxel for patients with limited and 1.1 mg/m2 trabectedin and 60 mg/m2 docetaxel for patients with unlimited prior chemotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicities (during cycle 1) included elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and fatigue in patients with limited prior chemotherapy and elevated ALT and febrile neutropenia in those with unlimited prior chemotherapy. The most common drug-related adverse events were nausea (65 %), fatigue (63 %), and neutropenia (53 %). One patient achieved a complete response. Thirty patients had stable disease, and 11 had stable disease for ≥6 months. Pharmacokinetic results for trabectedin plus docetaxel were similar to those previously reported for the single agents. Conclusion In patients with previously treated, advanced malignancies, the combination of therapeutic doses of trabectedin and docetaxel showed clinical activity and was tolerable with prophylactic G-CSF, with no evidence of clinically important drug interactions. PMID:25791363

  18. Gaucher disease and comorbidities: B-cell malignancy and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Cox, Timothy M; Rosenbloom, Barry E; Barker, Roger A

    2015-07-01

    Data emerging from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry together with other contemporary clinical surveys have revealed a close association between Gaucher disease and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma and myeloma and Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease. Several possible explanations for increased B-cell proliferation and neoplasia in Gaucher disease have been proposed, including the possible influence of sphingosine (derived from the extra lysosomal metabolism of glucosylceramide), gene modifiers, splenectomy and immune system deregulation induced by cytokines, chemokines, and hydrolases released from Gaucher cells. Parkinson's disease is frequently seen in the otherwise-healthy relatives of Gaucher disease patients leading to the finding that GBA mutations represent a genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of the association between GBA mutations and Parkinson's disease has yet to be elucidated but the pathogenesis appears distinct from that of Gaucher disease. Several pathogenic pathways have been proposed including lysosomal and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. The effect of Gaucher disease specific therapies on the incidence of cancer or Parkinson's disease are not clear and will likely be evaluated in future ICGG Gaucher Registry studies. PMID:26096744

  19. Second primary malignancies among patients with myeloma-related-diseases in the KMF database.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Satoru; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Nakatani, Eiji; Kida, Toru; Ohta, Kensuke; Kaneko, Hidemi; Yagi, Hideo; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Fuchida, Shin-Ichi; Nakaya, Aya; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Kuroda, Junya; Kamitsuji, Yuri; Uoshima, Nobuhiko; Adachi, Yoko; Tsudo, Mitsuru; Shimazaki, Chihiro; Nomura, Shosaku; Hino, Masayuki; Matsumura, Itaru; Taniwaki, Masashi; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of second primary malignancies (SPMs) in Japanese patients with myeloma or myeloma-related diseases was studied by using the Kansai Myeloma Forum (KMF) database registered from November 2012 to March 2015. We studied 1,571 cases. Hematologic malignancies were documented in 10 patients, and solid tumors in 36 during this period. The cumulative 5-year incidence was estimated to be 1.0% for hematological malignancies and 3.7% for solid tumors. In the patients with smoldering myeloma or MGUS without treatment, solid tumors but not hematologic malignancies developed, though the cumulative incidence of each malignancy did not differ significantly from that in patients receiving treatment. Although statistical analysis showed that treatment with melphalan, bortezomib, lenalidomide, or thalidomide had no effect on the occurrence of hematological malignancies, lenalidomide administration was more frequent in the patients with solid tumors. To evaluate the SPMs in myeloma or myeloma-related diseases more accurately, accumulation of a larger number of patients and longer observation are needed. PMID:27498726

  20. Advances in the treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Liren; Wu, Zhengcheng; Shen, Jianliang

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been widely used for the treatment of hematologic malignant and non-malignant hematologic diseases and other diseases. However, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a life-threatening complication of allogeneic transplantation. Acute GVHD may occur in 30% of transplant recipients, which is a syndrome of erythematous skin eruption, cholestatic liver disease and intestinal dysfunction, resulting from the activation of donor T lymphocytes by host antigen-presenting cells, resulting in an immune-mediated inflammatory response. Recent scientific advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis involved in the development of acute GVHD and clinical investigation have provided more effective therapeutic strategies for acute GVHD. This review focuses on major scientific and clinical advances in the treatment of acute GVHD. PMID:23802653

  1. Laparoscopic Splenectomy in the Management of Benign and Malignant Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boru, Cristian Eugeniu; Fantini, Aldo; Raparelli, Luigi; Greco, Francesco; Rizzello, Mario; Pecchia, Alessandro; Fabiano, Paolo; Basso, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The use of laparoscopy to treat malignant hematological diseases is not completely accepted. Our aim was to analyze operative and postoperative results of laparoscopic splenectomy performed for benign versus malignant hematological disorders. Methods: Between 1994 and 2003, 76 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic splenectomy. The first 38 cases were performed by using an anterior approach, whereas in the remaining 38 cases a semilateral position was used. Results: Baseline characteristics showed that patients with malignant diseases were significantly older (56.9 vs 32.6 years, P<0.001). Seventy-two (94.7%) procedures were completed laparoscopically. Conversion was required in 4 cases (5.2%). Mean operative time was 138.5 minutes for benign and 151.0 minutes for malignant diseases, (P>0.05, ns). The hand-assisted technique was used in 3 patients with massive splenomegaly. Pathologic features showed that spleen volume was higher in patients with malignant diseases (mean interpole diameter 18.1 cm vs 13.7 cm, P<0.001). Massive splenomegaly (interpole diameter over 20 cm, weight over 1000 g) was present in 13 patients (17.1%); 9 had malignant diseases. Overall perioperative mortality was 1.3% and major postoperative complications occurred in 6 patients (7.8%). Postoperative splenoportal partial thrombosis was identified in 9.7% of patients. Conclusions: Laparoscopic splenectomy is a well-accepted, less-invasive procedure for hematological disorders. Neoplastic diseases or splenomegaly, or both, do not seem to limit the indications for a minimally invasive approach after the learning curve. PMID:16882420

  2. Phase I trial of FOLFIRI in combination with sorafenib and bevacizumab in patients with advanced gastrointestinal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, George; Borad, Mitesh J.; Johnson, Elizabeth; Qin, Rui; Lensing, Janet; Puttabasavaiah, Suneetha; Wright, John; Erlichman, Charles; Grothey, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A previous phase II trial in patients with chemorefractory metastatic colorectal cancer demonstrated a 63 % disease control rate with a combination of bevacizumab and sorafenib. This phase I trial sought to determine the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of bevacizumab and sorafenib combined with standard cytotoxic therapy for advanced gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Methods A standard 3 + 3 trial design utilized 3 escalating sorafenib dose levels: (1) 200 mg daily, days 3–7, 10–14; (2) 200 mg twice daily, days 3–6, 10–13; and (3) 200 mg twice daily, days 3–7, 10–14 combined with standard dose FOLFIRI (5-fluouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan) and bevacizumab (5 mg/kg), repeated every 14 days. Results Fifteen patients were evaluable for safety and response assessment. There were no dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) at dose level 1 or 2. At dose level 3, two patients experienced DLTs (asymptomatic grade 3 hypophosphatemia, grade 3 dehydration and diarrhea). The MTD was determined to be dose level 2: sorafenib 200 mg twice daily, days 3–6, 10–13 combined with FOLFIRI and bevacizumab at standard doses. Four patients had a partial response and 8 had stable disease as best response (disease control rate of 80 %). Three patients with CRC had disease control >12 months. Conclusions The MTD of this regimen is sorafenib 200 mg twice daily, days 3–6, 10–13 combined with standard doses of FOLFIRI and bevacizumab. Dual antiangiogenic treatment combined with cytotoxic therapy may provide prolonged disease stabilization for select patients with advanced GI malignancies. PMID:26581401

  3. Precision oncology for patients with advanced cancer: the challenges of malignant snowflakes

    PubMed Central

    Kurzrock, Razelle; Giles, Francis J

    2015-01-01

    Precision oncology implies customizing treatment to the unique molecular and biologic characteristics of each individual and their cancer. Its implementation is being facilitated by remarkable technological advances in genomic sequencing, as well as the increasing availability of targeted and immunotherapeutic drugs. Yet, next generation sequencing may be a disruptive technology in that its results suggest that classic paradigms for clinical research and practice are a poor fit with the complex reality encountered in metastatic malignancies. Indeed, it is evident that advanced tumors have heterogeneous molecular landscapes that mostly differ between patients. Traditional modes of clinical research/practice are drug centered, with a strategy of finding commonalities between patients so that they can be grouped together and treated similarly. However, if each patient with metastatic cancer has a unique molecular portfolio, a new patient-centered, N-of-one approach that utilizes individually tailored treatment is needed. PMID:26030337

  4. Successful treatment of advanced malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the right forearm with apatinib: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guanghui; Hong, Liu; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is the most common soft-tissue sarcoma in late adult life. Unfortunately, advanced MFH has a poor prognosis due to a lack of effective drugs. We present here a case of advanced MFH with partial response to apatinib, a new potent oral small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting the intracellular domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report using apatinib for MFH. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed high expression of VEGFR-2 mRNA, suggesting that apatinib leads to clinical response by inhibiting VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase activity and the crucial role of VEGFR-2 for MFH. Apatinib could be a new option for the treatment of MFH. Further studies are needed to optimize the treatment. PMID:26917971

  5. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent. PMID:27200087

  6. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent. PMID:27200087

  7. Spinal cord compression after radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine analogue therapy in advanced malignant insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Alina Coutinho Rodrigues; Castro Júnior, Dálvaro Oliveira de; Rocha Filho, José; Moura, Melba; Andrade, Marcony Queiroz; Sanches, Adelina

    2015-04-01

    Malignant insulinomas are frequently diagnosed at a late stage. Medical management is necessary to slow progression of the disease and control of hypoglycemic symptoms when cure by surgical treatment is not possible. Multimodal treatment, in these cases, has been used with variable clinical response. We describe a 68-yr-old woman who presented response failure to usual treatment and was alternatively treated with radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine ([131I]-MIBG) analogue therapy with development of neurologic complications. We also present a review of the current role of [131I]-MIBG treatment in insulinomas. PMID:25993683

  8. Circulating HMGB1 and RAGE as Clinical Biomarkers in Malignant and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pilzweger, Christin; Holdenrieder, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    High molecular group box 1 (HMGB1) is a highly conserved member of the HMG-box-family; abundantly expressed in almost all human cells and released in apoptosis; necrosis or by activated immune cells. Once in the extracellular space, HMGB1 can act as a danger associated molecular pattern (DAMP), thus stimulating or inhibiting certain functions of the immune system; depending on the “combinatorial cocktail” of the surrounding milieu. HMGB1 exerts its various functions through binding to a multitude of membrane-bound receptors such as TLR-2; -4 and -9; IL-1 and RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products); partly complex-bound with intracellular fragments like nucleosomes. Soluble RAGE in the extracellular space, however, acts as a decoy receptor by binding to HMGB1 and inhibiting its effects. This review aims to outline today’s knowledge of structure, intra- and extracellular functions including mechanisms of release and finally the clinical relevance of HMGB1 and RAGE as clinical biomarkers in therapy monitoring, prediction and prognosis of malignant and autoimmune disease. PMID:26854151

  9. Advances in SPECT in evaluating coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Kelion, Andrew D

    2014-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is the longest established of the functional imaging investigations for patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. This article describes recent technical and clinical advances that are ensuring that the technique remains relevant some 40 years after its first introduction. PMID:25040515

  10. Increased prevalence of prior malignancies and autoimmune diseases in patients diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, N; Höglund, M; Stenke, L; Wållberg-Jonsson, S; Sandin, F; Björkholm, M; Dreimane, A; Lambe, M; Markevärn, B; Olsson-Strömberg, U; Wadenvik, H; Richter, J; Själander, A

    2016-07-01

    We recently reported an increased incidence of second malignancies in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). To elucidate whether this increase may be linked, not to TKI but rather to a hereditary or acquired susceptibility to develop cancer, we estimated the prevalence of malignancies, autoimmune disease (AD) and chronic inflammatory disease (CID) in CML patients prior to their CML diagnosis. Nationwide population-based registers were used to identify patients diagnosed with CML in Sweden 2002-2012 and to estimate the prevalence of other malignancies, AD and CID prior to their CML diagnosis. For each patient with CML, five matched controls were selected from the general population. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR). Nine hundred and eighty-four CML patients were assessed, representing more than 45 000 person-years of follow-up. Compared with matched controls, the prevalence of prior malignancies and AD was elevated in CML patients: OR 1.47 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-1.82) and 1.55 (95% CI 1.21-1.98), respectively. No associations were detected between CML and previous CID. An increased prevalence of other malignancies and AD prior to the diagnosis of CML suggest that a hereditary or acquired predisposition to cancer and/or autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of CML. PMID:27080811

  11. Advances in Identifying Beryllium Sensitization and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Dan; Kowalski, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Beryllium is a lightweight metal with unique qualities related to stiffness, corrosion resistance, and conductivity. While there are many useful applications, researchers in the 1930s and l940s linked beryllium exposure to a progressive occupational lung disease. Acute beryllium disease is a pulmonary irritant response to high exposure levels, whereas chronic beryllium disease (CBD) typically results from a hypersensitivity response to lower exposure levels. A blood test, the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT), was an important advance in identifying individuals who are sensitized to beryllium (BeS) and thus at risk for developing CBD. While there is no true “gold standard” for BeS, basic epidemiologic concepts have been used to advance our understanding of the different screening algorithms. PMID:20195436

  12. Peyronie's disease: review and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Langston, Joshua P; Carson, Culley C

    2014-08-01

    Peyronie's disease is an incurable, sexually debilitating fibrotic disease of the penis that results in penile curvature, coital failure, and significant psychological stress for patients and their partners. Appropriate treatment should be individualized and tailored to the patient's goals and expectations, disease history, physical exam findings, and erectile function. While medical treatments exist, there is little evidence to support their use. High-quality data supporting more recent advances in injectable therapies, interferon α-2b and collagenase clostridium histolyticum, show great promise for their application. Once the disease has stabilized, surgical correction is also an excellent option for patients with significant Peyronie's disease accompanied by functional impairment. Outcomes are satisfactory when proper treatment decisions are made, with the goal being expected return to normal sexual function following treatment. PMID:24984940

  13. Prognostic factors and disease-specific survival among immigrants diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Simberg-Danell, Caroline; Lyth, Johan; Månsson-Brahme, Eva; Frohm-Nilsson, Margareta; Carstensen, John; Hansson, Johan; Eriksson, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) among immigrants in Europe. We aimed to investigate clinical characteristics and disease-specific survival among first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden. This nationwide population-based study included 27,235 patients from the Swedish Melanoma Register diagnosed with primary invasive CMM, 1990-2007. Data were linked to nationwide, population-based registers followed up through 2013. Logistic regression and Cox regression models were used to determine the association between immigrant status, stage and CMM prognosis, respectively. After adjustments for confounders, first generation immigrants from Southern Europe were associated with significantly more advanced stages of disease compared to Swedish-born patients [Stage II vs. I: Odds ratio (OR) = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.61-3.50. Stage III-IV vs I: OR = 2.40, 95% CI = 1.08-5.37]. The ORs of stage II-IV versus stage I disease were increased among men (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.1-3.3; p = 0.020), and women (OR = 4.8; 95% CI = 2.6-9.1; p < 0.001) in a subgroup of immigrants from former Yugoslavia compared to Swedish-born patients. The CMM-specific survival was significantly decreased among women from former Yugoslavia versus Swedish-born women [hazard ratio (HR)=2.2; 95% CI = 1.1-4.2; p = 0.043]. After additional adjustments including stage, the survival difference was no longer significant. No survival difference between the second generation immigrant group and Swedish-born patients were observed. In conclusion, a worse CMM-specific survival in women from former Yugoslavia was associated with more advanced stages of CMM at diagnosis. Secondary prevention efforts focusing on specific groups may be needed to further improve the CMM prognosis. PMID:27004457

  14. [Palliative surgery for malignant bowel obstruction in patients with advanced and recurrent gastroenterological cancer].

    PubMed

    Kitani, Kotaro; Yukawa, Masao; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Tsujie, Masanori; Hara, Joji; Ikeda, Mitsunori; Sato, Katsuaki; Isono, Sayuri; Kawai, Kenji; Miura, Ken; Watatani, Masahiro; Inoue, Masatoshi

    2013-11-01

    We report the outcomes of palliative surgery for the treatment of malignant bowel obstruction in patients with advanced gastroenterological cancer. We studied 20 patients who had undergone palliative surgery over 3 years. We analyzed the clinical findings, surgical procedure, postoperative clinical course, and prognosis. The origin of the patients was colorectal cancer( 9 cases), gastric cancer( 4 cases), uterine cancer( 3 cases), pancreatic cancer( 2 cases), bladder( 1 case), and anal cancer (1 case). Small bowel obstruction was noted in 8 cases and colorectal obstruction was noted in 14 cases. Colostomy was performed in 13 cases, resection and reconstruction were performed in 6 cases, and bypass was performed in 4 cases. Ninety percent of the patients were able to eat solid food following the surgery, but 20% of the patients were forced to have bowel obstruction. The median survival time after palliative surgery was 3 (range, 0-15) months, and 6 patients (30%) died within 2 months. We concluded that palliative surgery for the treatment of malignant bowel obstruction could improve the patients' quality of life. The decision for performing palliative surgery should be made while considering the patient's prognosis, wishes, and potential for symptom improvement. PMID:24393893

  15. Outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stenting has become a widely method for the management of various malignant and benign pancreatico-biliary disorders. Biliary and pancreatic stents are devices made of plastic or metal used primarily to establish patency of an obstructed bile or pancreatic duct and may also be used to treat biliary or pancreatic leaks, pancreatic fluid collections and to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases. PMID:26290631

  16. Outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-08-14

    Endoscopic stenting has become a widely method for the management of various malignant and benign pancreatico-biliary disorders. Biliary and pancreatic stents are devices made of plastic or metal used primarily to establish patency of an obstructed bile or pancreatic duct and may also be used to treat biliary or pancreatic leaks, pancreatic fluid collections and to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases. PMID:26290631

  17. Diagnostic methods for invasive fungal diseases in patients with hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Riwes, Mary Mansour; Wingard, John R

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal disease is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in hematologic malignancy patients and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Timely recognition and treatment of invasive fungal diseases in these patients are essential and decrease mortality. However, conventional definitive diagnostic methods are difficult and time consuming. While conventional microbiological and histopathological methods are still needed for a definitive diagnosis of invasive fungal disease, new noninvasive diagnostic methods including serologic and molecular biomarkers are now available. These new diagnostic methods facilitate an early diagnosis of invasive fungal disease and allow for utilization of a pre-emptive treatment approach, which may ultimately lead to improved treatment outcomes and reduced toxicity. PMID:23216596

  18. New approach for treatment of advanced malignant tumors: combination of chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian-xing; Ju, Hua-lamg; Chem, Zhem-ming

    1995-03-01

    Eighty-three patients suffering from moderate or advanced malignant tumors were treated by combined chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT) in our hospital. The short term result of such management is very promising, the effectiveness seems to be nearly 100% and the general responsive rate is 79.5% (CR + PR). If compared with another group of 84 similar patients whom were treated with PDT alone, the short term efficacy is 85.7% while the general response rate is 54.7% (P < 0.01), there is a significant statistic. The better result of the combined approach is probably due to the action of the chemotherapeutic agent, potentially blocking the mitosis of the cellular cycle at certain phases of the cancer cells, making the cell membrane become more permeable to the photochemical agent, HPD, and eliciting a better cancerocidal effect.

  19. PELVIC ACTINOMYCOSIS MIMICKING A LOCALLY ADVANCED PELVIC MALIGNANCY--CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Velenciuc, Natalia; Velenciuc, I; Makkai Popa, S; Roată, C; Ferariu, D; Luncă, S

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a former user of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) for 10 years, diagnosed with a bulky, fixed pelvic tumor involving the internal genital organs and the recto sigmoid, causing luminal narrowing of the rectum, interpreted as locally advanced pelvic malignancy, probably of genital origin. Intraoperatively, a high index of suspicion made us collect a sample from the fibrous wall of the tumor mass, large Actinomyces colonies were thus identified. Surgery consisted in debridement, removal of a small amount of pus and appendectomy, thus avoiding a mutilating and useless surgery. Specific antibiotic therapy was administered for 3 months, with favorable postoperative and long-term outcomes. Pelvic actinomycosis should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of pelvic tumors in women using an IUD. The association of long-term antibiotic treatment is essential to eradicate the infection and prevent relapses. PMID:27483724

  20. Coping Styles, Health Status and Advance Care Planning in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Loberiza, Fausto R; Swore-Flecther, Barbara A.; Block, Susan D.; Back, Anthony L.; Goldman, Roberta E.; Tulsky, James A.; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated if measures of psychological well-being, including coping style are associated with advance care planning (ACP). Data were from the HEMA-COMM study, a prospective observational study of physician-patient communication in patients with hematologic malignancies. ACP was defined as having a living will, having a health care proxy, discussing life support with family or friends, and discussing life support with a doctor or nurse. 293 patients participated: only 45 (15%) had all the elements of ACP, 215 (73%) had at least 1 element of ACP, while 33 (11%) did not engage in ACP. In multivariate analysis, specific coping styles but not other measures of psychosocial well being were associated with having written ACP. Verbal ACP was associated with patient-reported health and physician estimate of life expectancy. Our study suggests that tailoring ACP discussions to a patient’s coping style may increase engagement in ACP. PMID:21851220

  1. Phase I study of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha in patients with advanced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H H; Nagel, G A; Mull, R; Flener, R; Pfizenmaier, K

    1988-01-01

    A clinical phase I trial with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rTNF-alpha) was performed in 30 patients with advanced malignancies. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) by 3 times weekly intramuscular (i.m.) application was 150 micrograms m-2. Main subjective toxicities including chills, fever, hypotension, fatigue, and anorexia were dose-related. In addition, transient changes in hematologic parameters and lipid metabolism were noted. Two out of 25 evaluated patients showed a minor tumor response after eight weeks of therapy. There was evidence for an improvement of in vivo immuneresponsiveness as revealed from positive delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin tests of 3 out of 6 pretherapeutically anergic patients. We conclude from this phase I trial that rTNF-alpha can be safely administered at doses up to 150 micrograms m-2 i.m., 3 times weekly, without evidence of cumulative toxicity in long-term treatment. PMID:3267369

  2. Treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Giugni, Juan C.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Later stage Parkinson’s disease (PD), sometimes referred to as advanced disease, has been characterized by motor complication, as well as by the potential emergence non-levodopa responsive motor and non-motor symptoms. The management of advanced stage PD can be complex. This review summarizes the currently available treatment strategies for addressing advanced PD. Recent findings We will discuss the latest pharmacological strategies (e.g. inhibitors of dopamine-metabolizing enzymes, dopamine agonists and extended release dopamine formulations) for addressing motor dysfunction. We will summarize the risks and benefits of current invasive treatments. Finally, we will address the current evidence supporting the treatment of non-motor symptoms in the advanced PD patient. We will conclude by detailing the potential non-pharmacological and multidisciplinary approaches for advanced stage PD. Summary The optimization of levodopa is in most cases the most powerful therapeutic option available, however medication optimization requires an advanced understanding of PD. Failure of conventional pharmacotherapy, should precipitate a discussion of the potential risks and benefits of more invasive treatments. Currently, there are no comparative studies of invasive treatment. Among the invasive treatments, deep brain stimulation has the largest amount of existing evidence, but also has the highest individual per patient risk. Non-motor symptoms will affect quality of life more than the motor PD symptoms, and these non-motor symptoms should be aggressively treated. Many advanced PD patients will likely benefit from multi- and interdisciplinary PD teams with multiple professionals collaborating to develop a collective and tailored strategy for an individual patient. PMID:24978634

  3. Early efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy combined with adoptive immunotherapy for advanced malignancies

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YI-SHAN; YANG, GUIQING; WANG, YUAN-YUAN; YANG, JIA-LIN; YANG, KE

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) concentrates radiation to a predefined target, affecting all the cells within it. Adoptive immunotherapy is not restricted by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in recognizing and eliminating target cells. We investigated the effects of the combined modality of SBRT and adoptive immunotherapy on patients with advanced malignant tumors. The database of 316 patients with 845 tumors who underwent SBRT between April, 2010 and February, 2012 was retrospectively reviewed. Of the 316 patients, 145 received biological immunotherapy and were assigned into the observation group, whereas the remaining patients constituted the control group. Patients in the two groups were recorded on efficacy assessment, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), cell phenotype expression level in vitro and the percentages of lymphocyte subsets and ratio of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. Following treatment, the total effectiveness [complete response (CR) + partial response (PR)], the KPS score, the percentages of lymphocyte subsets and the CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte ratio in the observation group were higher compared to those in the control group, with a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). The expression of CD3+ and CD3+CD56+ cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells were increased from 56.76±4.54% and 11.32±2.96% to 94.67±4.46% and 32.65±1.12%, respectively, when cultured in vitro (P<0.01). The percentages of lymphocyte subsets and the CD4+/CD8+ lymphocyte ratio were significantly increased compared to prior to treatment in the observation group (P<0.05). SBRT combined with adoptive immunotherapy may be a novel therapeutic option for patients with advanced malignant tumors. PMID:24649272

  4. Retroperitoneal Castleman's disease: benign in the midst of malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Jayant, Kumar; Agrawal, Swati; Agrawal, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old asymptomatic woman presented with localised mass on the left side of the abdomen for 8 months. An abdominal ultrasound and CT scan revealed a solid heterogenous mass located just below the left kidney in the retroperitoneum. Provisional diagnosis of soft tissue sarcoma was made. Following this, surgery was planned and open biopsy (frozen section) was performed, which demonstrated localised hyaline-vascular type of Castleman's disease, which was then excised completely. Thus, intraoperative diagnosis avoided extensive resection and radiation therapy, which reduced the patient's morbidity and expenses. Postoperative period was uneventful and no recurrence was seen even after 3 years of follow-up. PMID:24700042

  5. The Laminin Response in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Protection or Malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Spenlé, Caroline; Lefebvre, Olivier; Lacroute, Joël; Méchine-Neuville, Agnès; Barreau, Frédérick; Blottière, Hervé M.; Duclos, Bernard; Arnold, Christiane; Hussenet, Thomas; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Gullberg, Donald; Kedinger, Michèle; Sorokin, Lydia; Orend, Gertraud; Simon-Assmann, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Laminins (LM), basement membrane molecules and mediators of epithelial-stromal communication, are crucial in tissue homeostasis. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) are multifactorial pathologies where the microenvironment and in particular LM play an important yet poorly understood role in tissue maintenance, and in cancer progression which represents an inherent risk of IBD. Here we showed first that in human IBD colonic samples and in murine colitis the LMα1 and LMα5 chains are specifically and ectopically overexpressed with a concomitant nuclear p53 accumulation. Linked to this observation, we provided a mechanism showing that p53 induces LMα1 expression at the promoter level by ChIP analysis and this was confirmed by knockdown in cell transfection experiments. To mimic the human disease, we induced colitis and colitis-associated cancer by chemical treatment (DSS) combined or not with a carcinogen (AOM) in transgenic mice overexpressing LMα1 or LMα5 specifically in the intestine. We demonstrated that high LMα1 or LMα5 expression decreased susceptibility towards experimentally DSS-induced colon inflammation as assessed by histological scoring and decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Yet in a pro-oncogenic context, we showed that LM would favor tumorigenesis as revealed by enhanced tumor lesion formation in both LM transgenic mice. Altogether, our results showed that nuclear p53 and associated overexpression of LMα1 and LMα5 protect tissue from inflammation. But in a mutation setting, the same LM molecules favor progression of IBD into colitis-associated cancer. Our transgenic mice represent attractive new models to acquire knowledge about the paradoxical effect of LM that mediate either tissue reparation or cancer according to the microenvironment. In the early phases of IBD, reinforcing basement membrane stability/organization could be a promising therapeutic approach. PMID:25347196

  6. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Vasapolli, Riccardo; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kandulski, Arne

    2016-09-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been further decreased over the last decades along with decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated PUD. A delayed H. pylori eradication has been associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcer and reemphasized the importance of eradication especially in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). PUB associated with NSAID/aspirin intake and H. pylori revealed an additive interaction in gastric pathophysiology which favors the "test-and-treat" strategy for H. pylori in patients with specific risk factors. The H. pylori-negative and NSAID-negative "idiopathic PUD" have been increasingly observed and associated with slower healing tendency, higher risk of recurrence, and greater mortality. Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia has been further investigated and finally defined by the Kyoto consensus. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advised as first option in this group of patients. Only in the case of symptom persistence or recurrence after eradication therapy, dyspeptic patients should be classified as functional dyspepsia (FD). There were few new data in 2015 on the role of H. pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in particular Barrett's esophagus. A lower prevalence of gastric atrophy with less acid output in patients with erosive esophagitis confirmed previous findings. In patients with erosive esophagitis, no difference was observed in healing rates neither between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients nor between patients that underwent eradication therapy compared to patients without eradication. These findings are in line with the current consensus guidelines concluding that H. pylori eradication has no effects on symptoms and does not aggravate preexisting GERD. PMID:27531536

  7. Advances in microfluidics in combating infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Tay, Andy; Pavesi, Andrea; Yazdi, Saeed Rismani; Lim, Chwee Teck; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi

    2016-01-01

    One of the important pursuits in science and engineering research today is to develop low-cost and user-friendly technologies to improve the health of people. Over the past decade, research efforts in microfluidics have been made to develop methods that can facilitate low-cost diagnosis of infectious diseases, especially in resource-poor settings. Here, we provide an overview of the recent advances in microfluidic devices for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics for infectious diseases and emphasis is placed on malaria, sepsis and AIDS/HIV. Other infectious diseases such as SARS, tuberculosis, and dengue are also briefly discussed. These infectious diseases are chosen as they contribute the most to disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The current state of research in this area is evaluated and projection toward future applications and accompanying challenges are also discussed. PMID:26854743

  8. The therapeutic hope for HDAC6 inhibitors in malignancy and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Batchu, Sri N; Brijmohan, Angela S; Advani, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Recent years have witnessed an emergence of a new class of therapeutic agents, termed histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) inhibitors. HDAC6 is one isoform of a family of HDAC enzymes that catalyse the removal of functional acetyl groups from proteins. It stands out from its cousins in almost exclusively deacetylating cytoplasmic proteins, in exerting deacetylation-independent effects and in the success that has been achieved in developing relatively isoform-specific inhibitors of its enzymatic action that have reached clinical trial. HDAC6 plays a pivotal role in the removal of misfolded proteins and it is this role that has been most successfully targeted to date. HDAC6 inhibitors are being investigated for use in combination with proteasome inhibitors for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies, whereby HDAC6-dependent protein disposal currently limits the cytotoxic effectiveness of the latter. Similarly, numerous recent studies have linked altered HDAC6 activity to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by misfolded protein accumulation. It seems likely though that the function of HDAC6 is not limited to malignancy and neurodegeneration, the deacetylase being implicated in a number of other cellular processes and diseases including in cardiovascular disease, inflammation, renal fibrosis and cystogenesis. Here, we review the unique features of HDAC6 that make it so appealing as a drug target and its currently understood role in health and disease. Whether HDAC6 inhibition will ultimately find a clinical niche in the treatment of malignancy or prevalent complex chronic diseases remains to be determined. PMID:27154743

  9. Advanced Querying Features for Disease Surveillance Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Mohammad R.

    2010-01-01

    Most automated disease surveillance systems notify users of increases in the prevalence of reports in syndrome categories and allow users to view patient level data related to those increases. Occasionally, a more dynamic level of control is required to properly detect an emerging disease in a community. Dynamic querying features are invaluable when using existing surveillance systems to investigate outbreaks of newly emergent diseases or to identify cases of reportable diseases within data being captured for surveillance. The objective of the Advance Querying Tool (AQT) is to build a more flexible query interface for most web-based disease surveillance systems. This interface allows users to define and build their query as if they were writing a logical expression for a mathematical computation. The AQT allows users to develop, investigate, save, and share complex case definitions. It provides a flexible interface that accommodates both advanced and novice users, checks the validity of the expression as it is built, and marks errors for users. PMID:23569575

  10. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  11. An approach to dyspnea in advanced disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Romayne

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To describe an approach to assessment and treatment of dyspnea. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: New level I evidence can guide management of dyspnea in advanced illness. Assessment and use of adjuvant medications and oxygen relies on level II and III evidence. MAIN MESSAGE: Opioids are first-line therapy for managing dyspnea in advanced illness. They are safe and effective in reducing shortness of breath. Neuroleptics are useful adjuvant medications. Evidence does not support use of oxygen for every patient experiencing dyspnea; it should be tried for patients who do not benefit from first-line medications and nonmedicinal therapies. CONCLUSION: Opioids relieve dyspnea and are indicated as first-line treatment for dyspnea arising from advanced disease of any cause. PMID:14708926

  12. Advanced medical interventions in pleural disease.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Rahul; Corcoran, John P; Maldonado, Fabien; Feller-Kopman, David; Janssen, Julius; Astoul, Philippe; Rahman, Najib M

    2016-06-01

    The burden of a number of pleural diseases continues to increase internationally. Although many pleural procedures have historically been the domain of interventional radiologists or thoracic surgeons, in recent years, there has been a marked expansion in the techniques available to the pulmonologist. This has been due in part to both technological advancements and a greater recognition that pleural disease is an important subspecialty of respiratory medicine. This article summarises the important literature relating to a number of advanced pleural interventions, including medical thoracoscopy, the insertion and use of indwelling pleural catheters, pleural manometry, point-of-care thoracic ultrasound, and image-guided closed pleural biopsy. We also aim to inform the reader regarding the latest updates to more established procedures such as chemical pleurodesis, thoracentesis and the management of chest drains, drawing on contemporary data from recent randomised trials. Finally, we shall look to explore the challenges faced by those practicing pleural medicine, especially relating to training, as well as possible future directions for the use and expansion of advanced medical interventions in pleural disease. PMID:27246597

  13. A phase I trial to determine the safety of imatinib in combination with vatalanib in patients with advanced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Spigel, David; Jones, Suzanne; Hainsworth, John; Infante, Jeff; Greco, F Anthony; Thompson, Dana; Doss, Habib; Burris, Howard

    2011-05-01

    The role of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the treatment of advanced malignancies is well established. Imatinib and vatalanib are oral TKIs with different mechanisms of action. This trial sought to establish the safety, tolerability, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the two agents in combination. Secondary objectives included determination of potential pharmacologic interactions among vatalanib and imatinib and observation of antitumor activity. Patients with biopsy-proven advanced refractory solid tumors were enrolled in this single-center dose-escalation trial. Patients initially received imatinib and vatalanib once daily following a 14-day run-in period of daily oral vatalanib only, and were observed for a full 28-day treatment cycle prior to dose escalation. An amendment divided the vatalanib dose into two daily doses and gradually escalated the dose over a 2-3 week period. Patients continued combination therapy until disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Forty-five patients were enrolled between September 2004 and November 2007. As of September 2009, a total of 247 cycles of treatment had been administered (range: 1 -44+, median = 2 ). The MTD was determined to be vatalanib 1250 mg daily and imatinib 400 mg daily. Thirty-five patients (78%) were evaluable for response; 2 patients achieved PR, while 14 patients had SD ( 10 had stable disease ≥ 6 cycles). The combination of vatalanib and imatinib was well tolerated. Twice-daily vatalanib dosing improved tolerability and ease of full-dose administration. These results suggest that vatalanib-containing combinations may be active and tolerable, warranting further study. PMID:21469980

  14. Myeloma today: Disease definitions and treatment advances.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2016-01-01

    There have been major advances in the diagnosis, staging, risk-stratification, and management of multiple myeloma (MM). In addition to established CRAB (hypercalcemia, renal failure, anemia, and lytic bone lesions) features, new diagnostic criteria include three new biomarkers to diagnose the disease: bone marrow clonal plasmacytosis ≥60%, serum involved/uninvolved free light chain ratio ≥100, and >1 focal lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. MM can be classified into several subtypes based on baseline cytogenetics, and prognosis varies according to underlying cytogenetic abnormalities. A Revised International Staging System has been developed which combines markers of tumor burden (albumin, beta-2 microglobulin) with markers of aggressive disease biology (high-risk cytogenetics and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase). Although the approach to therapy remains largely the same, the treatment options at every stage of the disease have changed. Carfilzomib, pomalidomide, panobinostat, daratumumab, elotuzumab, and ixazomib have been approved for the treatment of the disease. These drugs combined with older agents such as cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone, thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide dramatically increase the repertoire of regimens available for the treatment of MM. This review provides a concise overview of recent advances in MM, including updates to diagnostic criteria, staging, risk-stratification, and management. PMID:26565896

  15. Molecular advances in genetic skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Dawn H; Howard, Renee

    2002-08-01

    The genes for several genetic skin diseases have been identified in recent years. This development improves diagnostic capabilities and genetic counseling, and investigators can now turn to the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. The identification of the causative genes has led to the generation of mouse models for some genetic skin diseases. A study of the keratin 10 deficient mouse, a model for epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, and a mouse model for Bloom syndrome are reviewed in this article. Several studies also evaluate the relation between genotype and phenotype. In this article, the clinical findings and molecular advances in tuberous sclerosis complex, neurofibromatosis type 1, Bloom syndrome, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, X-linked ichthyosis, Netherton syndrome, and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome are reviewed. PMID:12130905

  16. Spray cryotherapy (SCT): institutional evolution of techniques and clinical practice from early experience in the treatment of malignant airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J. Francis; Parrish, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Spray cryotherapy (SCT) was initially developed for gastroenterology (GI) endoscopic use in the esophagus. In some institutions where a device has been utilized by GI, transition to use in the airways by pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons occurred. Significant differences exist, however, in the techniques for safely using SCT in the airways. Methods We describe the early experience at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center from 2011 to 2013 using SCT in patients with malignant airway disease and the evolution of our current techniques and clinical practice patterns for SCT use in patients. In November 2013 enrollment began in a multi-institutional prospective SCT registry in which we are still enrolling and will be reported on separately. Results Twenty-seven patients that underwent 80 procedures (2.96 procedures/patient). The average age was 63 years with a range of 20 to 87 years old. The average Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status was 1.26. All malignancies were advanced stage disease. All procedures were performed in the central airways. Other modalities were used in combination with SCT in 31 (39%) of procedures. Additionally 45 of the 80 (56%) procedures were performed in proximity to a silicone, hybrid, or metal stent. Three complications occurred out of the 80 procedures. All three were transient hypoxia that limited continued SCT treatments. These patients were all discharged from the bronchoscopy recovery room to their pre-surgical state. Conclusions SCT can be safely used for treatment of malignant airway tumor (MAT) in the airways. Understanding passive venting of the nitrogen gas produced as the liquid nitrogen changes to gas is important for safe use of the device. Complications can be minimized by adopting strict protocols to maximize passive venting and to allow for adequate oxygenation in between sprays. PMID:26807288

  17. Gastric Pouch After Simple or Radical Cystectomy for Benign and Malignant Bladder Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamsa, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a controversy regarding the use of gastric pouch for benign and malignant bladder diseases. Objectives: The aim of this retrospective study was to report our experience, mostly on gastric neobladder (not gastrocystoplasty) for benign and malignant bladder diseases, its complications, outcomes and follow-up results. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective case series, we described our experience on seven gastric pouches (2 gastrocystoplasty and 5 gastric neobladders). Results: Postoperative complications were rare. Continence was defined as bladder capacity over 400 mL. Their follow-up period ranged from five months up to writing the article. One of the studied cases is still alive and awaiting renal transplantation. Conclusions: Gastric pouch is a suitable segment for bladder cystoplasty and neobladder. Continence is mostly related to the capacity of pouch. PMID:25738108

  18. A Giant Intrathoracic Malignant Schwannoma Causing Respiratory Failure in a Patient without von Recklinghausen's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Angelopoulos, Epameinondas; Eleftheriou, Konstantinos; Kyriakopoulos, Georgios; Athanassiadi, Kalliopi; Rontogianni, Dimitra; Routsi, Christina

    2016-01-01

    We report an unusual case of a thoracic opacity due to a huge mediastinal malignant schwannoma which compressed the whole left lung and the mediastinum causing respiratory failure in a 73-year-old woman without von Recklinghausen's disease. Although the tumor was resected, the patient failed to wean from mechanical ventilation and died one month later because of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. PMID:27118974

  19. Minimal residual disease monitoring: the new standard for treatment evaluation of haematological malignancies?

    PubMed

    Hauwel, Mathieu; Matthes, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) refers to the small number of malignant cells that remain after therapy when the patient is in remission and shows no symptoms or overt signs of disease. Current treatment protocols for haematological malignancies allow most patients to obtain some form of MRD state, but cure seldom follows and in most cases fatal relapses occur sooner or later, leaving a bitter impression of having won a battle yet lost the war. MRD detection and quantification are used for evaluation of treatment efficiency, patient risk stratification and long-term outcome prediction. Whereas multicolour flow cytometry (MCFC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods constitute the two most commonly used techniques for MRD detection, next generation sequencing will certainly be widely employed in the future. As MRD reflects the nature of the malignant disease itself, including its sensitivity to the drug regimens applied, it constitutes the ideal method for surveillance and patient follow-up. The morphological examination of peripheral blood or bone marrow smears, although still an indispensable part of routine laboratory testing, is clearly insufficient for patient management, and clinicians should not ask themselves whether to look for MRD or not, but how and when. PMID:24452390

  20. Systematic review of emergent laparoscopic colorectal surgery for benign and malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Manish; Siddiqui, Muhammed RS; Gupta, Ashish; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Tekkis, Paris; Parvaiz, Amjad; Mirnezami, Alex H; Qureshi, Tahseen

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become well established in the management of both and malignant colorectal disease. The last decade has seen increasing numbers of surgeons trained to a high standard in minimally-invasive surgery. However there has not been the same enthusiasm for the use of laparoscopy in emergency colorectal surgery. There is a perception that emergent surgery is technically more difficult and may lead to worse outcomes. The present review aims to provide a comprehensive and critical appraisal of the available literature on the use of laparoscopic colorectal surgery (LCS) in the emergency setting. The literature is broadly divided by the underlying pathology; that is, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis and malignant obstruction. There were no randomized trials and the majority of the studies were case-matched series or comparative studies. The overall trend was that LCS is associated with shorter hospital stay, par or fewer complications but an increased operating time.Emergency LCS can be safely undertaken for both benign and malignant disease providing there is appropriate patient selection, the surgeon is adequately experienced and there are sufficient resources to allow for a potentially more complex operation. PMID:25493008

  1. The Awakening of an Advanced Malignant Cancer: An Insult to the Mitochondrial Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Cody C.; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Background In only months-to-years a primary cancer can progress to an advanced phenotype that is metastatic and resistant to clinical treatments. As early as the 1900s, it was discovered that the progression of a cancer to the advanced phenotype is often associated with a shift in the metabolic profile of the disease from a state of respiration to anaerobic fermentation – a phenomenon denoted as the Warburg Effect. Scope of Review Reports in the literature strongly suggest that the Warburg Effect is generated as a response to a loss in the integrity of the sequence and/or copy number of the mitochondrial genome content within a cancer. Multiple studies regarding the progression of cancer indicate that mutation, and/or, a flux in the copy number, of the mitochondrial genome content can support the early development of a cancer, until; the mutational load and/or the reduction-to-depletion of the copy number of the mitochondrial genome content induces the progression of the disease to an advanced phenotype. General Significance Collectively, evidence has revealed that the human cell has incorporated the mitochondrial genome content into a cellular mechanism that, when pathologically actuated, can de (un)differentiate a cancer from the parental tissue of origin into an autonomous disease that disrupts the hierarchical structure-and-function of the human body. PMID:21920409

  2. The news advances on Alzheimer's disease's therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sun, H-Q; Zhang, X; Huang, W-J; Chen, W-W

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifaceted disorder, characterized by the failure of memory and dementia. AD affects mostly elder above 65 years of age and is confirmed by post-mortem detection in the brain, of extracellular senile plaques of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. These pathological hallmarks appear in the brain when the disease is already installed. The difficulty of earlier diagnosis and possibly, the poor understanding of the disease etiology, limit the benefits afforded by available treatments. Indeed, several putative drugs resulting from thorough investigations in preclinical studies have failed to produce clinical results, suggesting the development of further therapeutic alternatives. Recently, the regular practice of physical activity has been shown as one of the effective preventive or curative mean against AD. This finding rekindles the debate on the place of the intrinsic vascular component in the AD pathogenesis which is an aspect of the disease often considered as a distinct pathology. A new integrative conception of the disease may offer an advantage to current therapies which may gain in potency if combined in a multi-target manner to yield true improvements. This review will revisit the pathophysiology of AD and discuss the advanced therapeutics currently in use. PMID:27212186

  3. Ultrathin needle aspiration of the lung in infectious and malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Zavala, D C; Schoell, J E

    1981-01-01

    Fifty patients with either malignant (n = 25) or infectious/inflammatory (n = 25) chest lesions had lung aspirations using ultrathin needles, 24 to 25 gauge. The procedure's overall sensitivity was 87%, and the specificity was 100%. The diagnostic yield was 90% (9/10) from peripheral malignant coin lesions, 100% (3/3) from malignant cavities, and 42% (5/12) from infected, nonmalignant cavities. Antimicrobial therapy probably contributed to poor microbiologic results in the latter group. Twenty-two of the patients previously had flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy with negative results. In this select group, a diagnosis was established in 45% (10/22): 7 had malignant lesions, 2 had anaerobic lung abscesses, and 1 had histoplasmosis. In patients with infectious diseases, a variety of bacterial, mycobacterial, and fungal infections were confirmed including the diagnosis of Legionella pneumophila in 2 patients. A definitive diagnosis was obtained in 6 of 8 immunosuppressed patients who presented with indeterminate infiltrates on chest radiographs. Complications were minimal, although 21 patients (42%) had COPD, and 13 patients (26%) had moderate to severe hypoxemia (PaO2, 40 60 torr). Mild hemoptysis occurred in 2 patients (4%), and pneumothorax occurred in 4 patients (8%) of whom 2 required chest tube insertion. When compared with other studies using large gauge needles (18 to 22 gauge), ultrathin needle aspiration of the lung produced fewer complications, while maintaining an exceptionally good diagnostic yield. PMID:7458076

  4. Local Tumor Treatment in Combination with Systemic Ipilimumab Immunotherapy Prolongs Overall Survival in Patients with Advanced Malignant Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Theurich, Sebastian; Rothschild, Sacha I; Hoffmann, Michael; Fabri, Mario; Sommer, Andrea; Garcia-Marquez, Maria; Thelen, Martin; Schill, Catherine; Merki, Ramona; Schmid, Thomas; Koeberle, Dieter; Zippelius, Alfred; Baues, Christian; Mauch, Cornelia; Tigges, Christian; Kreuter, Alexander; Borggrefe, Jan; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Schlaak, Max

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibition with ipilimumab has revolutionized cancer immunotherapy and significantly improved outcomes of patients with advanced malignant melanoma. Local peripheral treatments (LPT), such as radiotherapy or electrochemotherapy, have been shown to modulate systemic immune responses, and preliminary data have raised the hypothesis that the combination of LPT with systemic immune checkpoint blockade might be beneficial. Clinical data from 127 consecutively treated melanoma patients at four cancer centers in Germany and Switzerland were analyzed. Patients received either ipilimumab (n = 82) or ipilimumab and additional LPT (n = 45) if indicated for local tumor control. The addition of LPT to ipilimumab significantly prolonged overall survival (OS; median OS 93 vs. 42 weeks, unadjusted HR, 0.46; P = 0.0028). Adverse immune-related events were not increased by the combination treatment, and LPT-induced local toxicities were in most cases mild. In a multivariable Cox regression analysis, we show that the effect of added LPT on OS remained statistically significant after adjusting for BRAF status, tumor stage, tumor burden, and central nervous system metastases (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-1.01, P = 0.05). Our data suggest that the addition of LPT to ipilimumab is safe and effective in patients with metastatic melanoma irrespective of clinical disease characteristics and known risk factors. Induction of antitumor immune responses is most likely the underlying mechanism and warrants prospective validation. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(9); 744-54. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27466265

  5. Advances in the in Vivo Raman Spectroscopy of Malignant Skin Tumors Using Portable Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Balatsoukas, Ioannis; Moulia, Violetta; Elka, Aspasia; Gaitanis, Georgios; Bassukas, Ioannis D.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for real-time clinical diagnosis of malignant skin tumors offering a number of potential advantages: it is non-intrusive, it requires no sample preparation, and it features high chemical specificity with minimal water interference. However, in vivo tissue evaluation and accurate histopathological classification remain a challenging task for the successful transition from laboratory prototypes to clinical devices. In the literature, there are numerous reports on the applications of Raman spectroscopy to biomedical research and cancer diagnostics. Nevertheless, cases where real-time, portable instrumentations have been employed for the in vivo evaluation of skin lesions are scarce, despite their advantages in use as medical devices in the clinical setting. This paper reviews the advances in real-time Raman spectroscopy for the in vivo characterization of common skin lesions. The translational momentum of Raman spectroscopy towards the clinical practice is revealed by (i) assembling the technical specifications of portable systems and (ii) analyzing the spectral characteristics of in vivo measurements. PMID:26132563

  6. Total body irradiation, fludarabine, melphalan, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for advanced pediatric hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, D; Worth, L L; Mullen, C A; Madden, R; Mahajan, A; Choroszy, M; Ha, C S; Champlin, R C; Chan, K W

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of adding 9 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI), in three single daily fractions of 3 Gy, to the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine 30 mg/m2 i.v. x 4 days and melphalan 140 mg/m2 i.v. x 1 day in advanced pediatric hematologic malignancies. Twenty-two acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), six acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and one non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients were transplanted. Of these, 13 were beyond second remission, and five had prior hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Twenty-one donors were unrelated, of which 19 were from cord blood (CB) units. Three of the eight related donors were genotypically disparate. Oral mucositis and diarrhea were the most common toxicities. Twenty-seven patients achieved neutrophil engraftment (median 16 days), and 23 had platelet engraftment (median 42 days). One patient had primary graft failure. Seven patients died of non-relapse causes in the first 100 days. With a median follow-up of 52 months, seven of 22 ALL, five of six AML, and one of one lymphoma patients are alive and in remission. The regimen of TBI, fludarabine, and melphalan allows the engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (including mismatched CB). It was fairly well tolerated in pediatric patients, even for second transplants. Its efficacy requires further evaluation. PMID:16435013

  7. Scientifically advanced solutions for chestnut ink disease.

    PubMed

    Choupina, Altino Branco; Estevinho, Letícia; Martins, Ivone M

    2014-05-01

    On the north regions of Portugal and Spain, the Castanea sativa Mill. culture is extremely important. The biggest productivity and yield break occurs due to the ink disease, the causal agent being the oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomi. This oomycete is also responsible for the decline of many other plant species in Europe and worldwide. P. cinnamomi and Phytophthora cambivora are considered, by the generality of the authors, as the C. sativa ink disease causal agents. Most Phytophthora species secrete large amounts of elicitins, a group of unique highly conserved proteins that are able to induce hypersensitive response (HR) and enhances plant defense responses in a systemic acquired resistance (SAR) manner against infection by different pathogens. Some other proteins involved in mechanisms of infection by P. cinnamomi were identified by our group: endo-1,3-beta-glucanase (complete cds); exo-glucanase (partial cds) responsible by adhesion, penetration, and colonization of host tissues; glucanase inhibitor protein (GIP) (complete cds) responsible by the suppression of host defense responses; necrosis-inducing Phytophthora protein 1 (NPP1) (partial cds); and transglutaminase (partial cds) which inducts defense responses and disease-like symptoms. In this mini-review, we present some scientifically advanced solutions that can contribute to the resolution of ink disease. PMID:24622889

  8. Immunotherapy of malignant disease using chimeric antigen receptor engrafted T cells.

    PubMed

    Maher, John

    2012-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR-) based immunotherapy has been under development for almost 25 years, over which period it has progressed from a new but cumbersome technology to an emerging therapeutic modality for malignant disease. The approach involves the genetic engineering of fusion receptors (CARs) that couple the HLA-independent binding of cell surface target molecules to the delivery of a tailored activating signal to host immune cells. Engineered CARs are delivered most commonly to peripheral blood T cells using a range of vector systems, most commonly integrating viral vectors. Preclinical refinement of this approach has proceeded over several years to the point that clinical testing is now being undertaken at several centres, using increasingly sophisticated and therapeutically successful genetic payloads. This paper considers several aspects of the pre-clinical and clinical development of CAR-based immunotherapy and how this technology is acquiring an increasing niche in the treatment of both solid and haematological malignancies. PMID:23304553

  9. Immunotherapy of Malignant Disease Using Chimeric Antigen Receptor Engrafted T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maher, John

    2012-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR-) based immunotherapy has been under development for almost 25 years, over which period it has progressed from a new but cumbersome technology to an emerging therapeutic modality for malignant disease. The approach involves the genetic engineering of fusion receptors (CARs) that couple the HLA-independent binding of cell surface target molecules to the delivery of a tailored activating signal to host immune cells. Engineered CARs are delivered most commonly to peripheral blood T cells using a range of vector systems, most commonly integrating viral vectors. Preclinical refinement of this approach has proceeded over several years to the point that clinical testing is now being undertaken at several centres, using increasingly sophisticated and therapeutically successful genetic payloads. This paper considers several aspects of the pre-clinical and clinical development of CAR-based immunotherapy and how this technology is acquiring an increasing niche in the treatment of both solid and haematological malignancies. PMID:23304553

  10. Opportunities and limitations of NK cells as adoptive therapy for malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Davies, James O. J.; Stringaris, Kate; Barrett, John A.; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-01-01

    While NK cells can be readily generated for adoptive therapy with current techniques, their optimal application to treat malignant diseases requires an appreciation of the dynamic balance between signals that either synergise with, or antagonise each other. Individuals display wide differences in NK function which determine their therapeutic efficacy. The ability of NK cells to kill target cells or produce cytokines depends on the balance between signals from activating and inhibitory cell-surface receptors. The selection of NK cells with a predominant activating profile is critical for delivering successful antitumor activity. This can be achieved through selection of KIR mismatched NK donors and by using blocking molecules against inhibitory pathways. Optimum NK cytotoxicity may require licensing or priming with tumor cells. Recent discoveries in the molecular and cellular biology of NK cells inform in the design of new strategies, including adjuvant therapies, to maximise the cytotoxic potential of NK cells for adoptive transfer to treat human malignancies. PMID:24856895

  11. Coexistence of malignant phyllodes tumor and her2-positive locally advanced breast cancer in distinct breasts: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomoi; Muto, Ichiro; Sakai, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare biphasic neoplasm, accounting for less than 1% of all breast tumors. Coexistence of phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts is extremely rare. Case presentation A 47-year-old Japanese woman presented with bilateral breast lumps. A HER2-positive, unresectable invasive carcinoma in the right breast and fibroadenoma in the left were diagnosed via core needle biopsy. During chemotherapy with anti-HER2 therapy, the breast cancer shrank quickly, while the left breast lump suddenly enlarged. Under a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of the breast, left mastectomy was performed. Malignant phyllodes tumor was diagnosed by postoperative histological examination and recurred in multiple areas as early as 2 months after surgery. Discussion Only 10 cases of coexisting phyllodes tumor and breast cancer in distinct breasts have been reported in the English literature. Phyllodes tumor associated with breast cancer in distinct breasts tends to be malignant. This is the first case of phyllodes tumor rapidly enlarging during anti-HER2 chemotherapy for locally advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. Conclusion Even during effective treatment of advanced or recurrent breast cancer, attention should also be paid to the contralateral breast for the possible association of a second malignancy such as phyllodes tumor. PMID:26773878

  12. Advanced clinical insights & practice: ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Benner, Randall W; Zavarella, Matthew S

    2008-03-01

    This issue sees the debut of a new series of continuing education articles. The series, Advanced Clinical Insights & Practice, is designed to provide continuing education to an ever-expanding realm of paramedicine that needs more of it: the critical care transport paramedic. Secondly, and equally important, are the benefits that can be reaped by other certification levels reading this feature. For EMT-Basics and Intermediates, it will provide a great enhancement to your core knowledge, although most of the interventions discussed will be beyond your traditional scope. For paramedics, it will augment both your pathophysiological understanding and clinical assessment/management skills of diseases and injuries discussed. Ultimately though, it is hoped that anyone who reads these articles will become a better clinician. The next article will appear in the July issue. PMID:18814637

  13. [Dermatological diseases of the external male genitalia : Part 2: Infectious and malignant dermatological].

    PubMed

    Köhn, F M; Schultheiss, D; Krämer-Schultheiss, K

    2016-07-01

    The urological and andrological examination of male patients should include inspection of the genital skin in order to detect malignant neoplasms, such as erythroplasia of Queyrat and infectious diseases, such as genital warts (condylomata acuminata). Independent of the incidental finding of relevant dermatological alterations in the genital area, sexually transmitted diseases such as syphilis must again be considered more often as the incidence has greatly increased in Germany during the last few years. In addition, urologists should be able to adequately advise patients on all aspects of diseases caused by human papillomavirus. As patients are often alarmed by genital skin lesions and worried that the sex life can be impaired, the initiation of adequate therapy is of great importance. PMID:27364818

  14. Fertility-Preserving Treatment Options in Patients with Malignant Hematological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Küçük, Mert; Bolaman, Ali Zahit; Yavaşoğlu, İrfan; Kadıköylü, Gürhan

    2012-01-01

    The number of patients of reproductive age diagnosed with various malignant hematological diseases increases every year. These patients undergo chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and various other treatments that may have gonadotoxic effects. The life expectancy of these patients is increasing rapidly due to the variety of treatment options. As such, an increasing number of patients—as well as their parents and spouses—express their concerns about the patient’s fertility post treatment. In the present review it was aimed to provide an overview of current fertility-preserving treatment options and the future of fertility preservation. PMID:24744663

  15. Risk of ovarian failure and fertility preserving methods in girls and adolescents with a malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, K T; Larsen, E C; Andersen, C Y; Andersen, A N

    2010-01-01

    Girls and young women suffering from a malignant disease that requires treatment with chemo- and/or radiotherapy are at risk of losing fertility. The most significant risk factors are age and type of treatment given. Preserving fertility is of high priority to both the young patient and her parents. This article reviews the effect of chemo- and radiotherapy on gonadal function, and thus fertility, and offers different fertility preserving methods based on the literature. Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is a possible way of preserving fertility in this group of patients in the future. PMID:19874293

  16. Limited health literacy in advanced kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Dominic M; Bradley, John A; Bradley, Clare; Draper, Heather; Johnson, Rachel; Metcalfe, Wendy; Oniscu, Gabriel; Robb, Matthew; Tomson, Charles; Watson, Chris; Ravanan, Rommel; Roderick, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Limited health literacy may reduce the ability of patients with advanced kidney disease to understand their disease and treatment and take part in shared decision making. In dialysis and transplant patients, limited health literacy has been associated with low socioeconomic status, comorbidity, and mortality. Here, we investigated the prevalence and associations of limited health literacy using data from the United Kingdom-wide Access to Transplantation and Transplant Outcome Measures (ATTOM) program. Incident dialysis, incident transplant, and transplant wait-listed patients ages 18 to 75 were recruited from 2011 to 2013 and data were collected from patient questionnaires and case notes. A score >2 in the Single-Item Literacy Screener was used to define limited health literacy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify patient factors associated with limited health literacy. We studied 6842 patients, 2621 were incident dialysis, 1959 were wait-listed, and 2262 were incident transplant. Limited health literacy prevalence was 20%, 15%, and 12% in each group, respectively. Limited health literacy was independently associated with low socioeconomic status, poor English fluency, and comorbidity. However, transplant wait-listing, preemptive transplantation, and live-donor transplantation were associated with increasing health literacy. PMID:27521115

  17. Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ESR1) Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) Affect Malignant Melanoma Susceptibility and Disease Course

    PubMed Central

    Glatthaar, Hanna; Katto, Judith; Vogt, Thomas; Mahlknecht, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma in the developed world is continuously increasing. We conducted a case–control study in order to evaluate the association between each of the four estrogen receptor alpha polymorphisms (ESR1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs] +2464C/T, −4576A/C, +1619A/G, and +6362C/T) and malignant melanoma susceptibility and disease course. The study population consisted of 205 Caucasian patients who were diagnosed as having malignant melanoma and 208 healthy Caucasian controls. Through DNA genotyping, we identified a SNP-dependent malignant melanoma susceptibility as well as a SNP-dependent effect on the course of disease and response to therapy. PMID:26949342

  18. The Microbiome of Aseptically Collected Human Breast Tissue in Benign and Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hieken, Tina J.; Chen, Jun; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Walther-Antonio, Marina; Johnson, Stephen; Ramaker, Sheri; Xiao, Jian; Radisky, Derek C.; Knutson, Keith L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Yao, Janet Z.; Baddour, Larry M.; Chia, Nicholas; Degnim, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    Globally breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. The breast consists of epithelium, stroma and a mucosal immune system that make up a complex microenvironment. Growing awareness of the role of microbes in the microenvironment recently has led to a series of findings important for human health. The microbiome has been implicated in cancer development and progression at a variety of body sites including stomach, colon, liver, lung, and skin. In this study, we assessed breast tissue microbial signatures in intraoperatively obtained samples using 16S rDNA hypervariable tag sequencing. Our results indicate a distinct breast tissue microbiome that is different from the microbiota of breast skin tissue, breast skin swabs, and buccal swabs. Furthermore, we identify distinct microbial communities in breast tissues from women with cancer as compared to women with benign breast disease. Malignancy correlated with enrichment in taxa of lower abundance including the genera Fusobacterium, Atopobium, Gluconacetobacter, Hydrogenophaga and Lactobacillus. This work confirms the existence of a distinct breast microbiome and differences between the breast tissue microbiome in benign and malignant disease. These data provide a foundation for future investigation on the role of the breast microbiome in breast carcinogenesis and breast cancer prevention. PMID:27485780

  19. Newcastle disease virus, rituximab, and doxorubicin combination as anti-hematological malignancy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed; Rameez, Huda; Al-Taee, Maha F

    2016-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are important diseases that need more powerful therapeutics. Even with current targeting therapies, such as rituximab and other chemotherapeutic agents, there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Combination therapy seems the best option to target the tumor cells by different mechanisms. Virotherapy is a very promising treatment modality, as it is selective, safe, and causes cancer destruction. The Iraqi strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has proved to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. In the current work, we tested its ability on anti-hematological tumors and enhanced current treatments with combination therapy, and studied this combination using Chou–Talalay analysis. p53 concentration was measured to evaluate the mechanism of this proposed synergism. The results showed that NDV was synergistic with doxorubicin in low doses on plasmacytoma cells, with no involvement of p53 pathways, but involved p53 when the combination was used on non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. NDV in combination with rituximab showed enhanced cytotoxicity that was p53-independent. In conclusion, this work proposes a novel combination modality for treatment of some hematological malignancies. PMID:27579294

  20. The Microbiome of Aseptically Collected Human Breast Tissue in Benign and Malignant Disease.

    PubMed

    Hieken, Tina J; Chen, Jun; Hoskin, Tanya L; Walther-Antonio, Marina; Johnson, Stephen; Ramaker, Sheri; Xiao, Jian; Radisky, Derek C; Knutson, Keith L; Kalari, Krishna R; Yao, Janet Z; Baddour, Larry M; Chia, Nicholas; Degnim, Amy C

    2016-01-01

    Globally breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. The breast consists of epithelium, stroma and a mucosal immune system that make up a complex microenvironment. Growing awareness of the role of microbes in the microenvironment recently has led to a series of findings important for human health. The microbiome has been implicated in cancer development and progression at a variety of body sites including stomach, colon, liver, lung, and skin. In this study, we assessed breast tissue microbial signatures in intraoperatively obtained samples using 16S rDNA hypervariable tag sequencing. Our results indicate a distinct breast tissue microbiome that is different from the microbiota of breast skin tissue, breast skin swabs, and buccal swabs. Furthermore, we identify distinct microbial communities in breast tissues from women with cancer as compared to women with benign breast disease. Malignancy correlated with enrichment in taxa of lower abundance including the genera Fusobacterium, Atopobium, Gluconacetobacter, Hydrogenophaga and Lactobacillus. This work confirms the existence of a distinct breast microbiome and differences between the breast tissue microbiome in benign and malignant disease. These data provide a foundation for future investigation on the role of the breast microbiome in breast carcinogenesis and breast cancer prevention. PMID:27485780

  1. Newcastle disease virus, rituximab, and doxorubicin combination as anti-hematological malignancy therapy.

    PubMed

    Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed; Rameez, Huda; Al-Taee, Maha F

    2016-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are important diseases that need more powerful therapeutics. Even with current targeting therapies, such as rituximab and other chemotherapeutic agents, there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Combination therapy seems the best option to target the tumor cells by different mechanisms. Virotherapy is a very promising treatment modality, as it is selective, safe, and causes cancer destruction. The Iraqi strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has proved to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. In the current work, we tested its ability on anti-hematological tumors and enhanced current treatments with combination therapy, and studied this combination using Chou-Talalay analysis. p53 concentration was measured to evaluate the mechanism of this proposed synergism. The results showed that NDV was synergistic with doxorubicin in low doses on plasmacytoma cells, with no involvement of p53 pathways, but involved p53 when the combination was used on non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. NDV in combination with rituximab showed enhanced cytotoxicity that was p53-independent. In conclusion, this work proposes a novel combination modality for treatment of some hematological malignancies. PMID:27579294

  2. The cellular origin for malignant glioma and prospects for clinical advancements

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Hui; Verhaak, Roel GW; Canoll, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Glioma remains incurable despite great advancements in medicine. Targeting the cell of origin for gliomas could bring great hope for patients. However, as a collection of diverse diseases, each subtype of glioma could derive from a distinct cell of origin. To resolve such a complex problem, one must use multiple research approaches to gain deep insights. Here we review current evidence regarding the cell of origin from clinical observations, whole-genome molecular pathology and glioma animal models. We conclude that neural stem cells, glial progenitors (including oligodendrocyte progenitor cells) and astrocytes could all serve as cells of origin for gliomas, and that cells incurring initial mutations (cells of mutation) might not transform, while their progeny cells could instead transform and act as cells of origin. Further studies with multidisciplinary approaches are needed to link each subtype to a particular cell of origin, and to develop effective therapies that target the signaling network within these cells. PMID:22616703

  3. Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Transplantation Provides High Event-Free And Overall Survival In Patients With Advanced Indolent B Cell Malignancies: CALGB 109901

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Thomas; Johnson, Jeffrey; Westervelt, Peter; Farag, Sherif; McCarty, John; Bashey, Asad; Isola, Luis; Baxter-Lowe, Lee-Anne; Kelly, Michael; Owzar, Kouros; Linker, Charles

    2011-01-01

    CALGB conducted a Phase II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen with allogeneic transplantation to treat patients with recurrent low grade B cell malignancies. Patients over age 18 with a diagnosis of relapsed, chemotherapy-sensitive disease underwent transplantation with a matched sibling donor and conditioning with cyclophosphamide (1 g/m2/d × 3) and fludarabine phosphate (25 mg/m2/d × 5). GVH prophylaxis included cyclosporine or tacrolimus plus low-dose methotrexate. Forty-four evaluable patients with a median age of 53 and median of two prior regimens were accrued. Sixteen patients had follicular NHL and 28 had histologies including 7 indolent B cell lymphomas, 4 mantle cell, 15 chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and 2 prolymphocytic leukemia pts. The six-month treatment-related mortality (TRM) was 2.4% and three-year TRM was 9%. Three-year event-free and overall survival were.75 and .81 for the follicular patients, .59 and .71 for the CLL/PLL patients, and .55 and .64 for the other histologies. The incidence of grade 2–4 acute graft vs host disease (GVHD) was 29% and extensive chronic GVHD was 18%. This report demonstrates that allogeneic sibling transplantation with a reduced intensity conditioning regimen is safe and efficacious for patients with advanced indolent B cell malignancies enrolled on a Cooperative Group study. PMID:21296675

  4. A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of a fiberglass manufacturing facility. II. Exposure assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Fryar, C; Kozono, J

    1993-01-01

    A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of the Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation's Newark, Ohio plant was undertaken. The aim was to determine the extent to which exposures to substances in the Newark plant environment, to non-workplace factors, or to a combination may play a part in the risk of mortality from respiratory disease among workers in this plant. A historical environmental reconstruction of the plant was undertaken to characterise the exposure profile for workers in this plant from its beginnings in 1934 to the end of 1987. The exposure profile provided estimates of cumulative exposure to respirable fibres, fine fibres, asbestos, talc, formaldehyde, silica, and asphalt fumes. Employment histories from Owens-Corning Fiberglas provided information on employment characteristics (duration of employment, year of hire, age at first hire) and an interview survey obtained information on demographic characteristics (birthdate, race, education, marital state, parent's ethnic background, and place of birth), lifetime residence, occupational and smoking histories, hobbies, and personal and family medical history. Matched, unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess the association between lung cancer or non-malignant respiratory disease and the cumulative exposure history, demographic characteristics, and employment variables. Only the smoking variables and employment characteristics (year of hire and age at first hire) were statistically significant for lung cancer. For non-malignant respiratory disease, only the smoking variables were statistically significant in the univariate analysis. Of the variables entered into a conditional logistic regression model for lung cancer, only smoking (smoked for six months or more v never smoked: OR = 26.17, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 3.316-206.5) and age at first hire (35 and over v less than 35: OR = 0.244, 95% CI 0.083-0.717) were statistically significant. There

  5. Non-Malignant Thyroid Diseases Following a Wide Range of Radiation Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Elaine; Brenner, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Background The thyroid gland is one of the most radiosensitive human organs. While it is well known that radiation exposure increases the risk of thyroid cancer, less is known about its effects in relation to non-malignant thyroid diseases. Objectives The aim of this review is to evaluate the effects of high and low dose radiation on benign structural and functional diseases of the thyroid. Methods We examined the results of major studies from cancer patients treated with high-dose radiotherapy or thyrotoxicosis patients treated with high doses of iodine-131, patients treated with moderate to high dose radiotherapy for benign diseases, persons exposed to low doses from environmental radiation and survivors of the atomic bombings who were exposed to a range of doses. We evaluated radiation effects on structural (tumors, nodules), functional (hyper- and hypothyroidism), and autoimmune thyroid diseases. Results Following a wide range of doses of ionizing radiation, an increased risk of thyroid adenomas and nodules was observed in a variety of populations and settings. The dose response appeared to be linear at low to moderate doses, but in one study there was some suggestion of a reduction in risk above 5 Gy. The elevated risk for benign tumors continues for decades following exposure. Considerably less consistent findings are available regarding functional thyroid diseases including autoimmune diseases. In general, associations for these outcomes were fairly weak and significant radiation effects were most often observed following high doses, particularly for hypothyroidism. Conclusions A significant radiation dose-response relation was demonstrated for benign nodules and follicular adenomas. The effects of radiation on functional thyroid diseases are less clear, partly due to the greater difficulties studying these diseases. PMID:21128812

  6. [A patient with Parkinson's disease complicated by hypothyroidism who developed malignant syndrome after discontinuation of etizolam].

    PubMed

    Kawajiri, Masakazu; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Furuya, Hirokazu; Araki, Takehisa; Inoue, Naohide; Esaki, Shigemitsu; Yamada, Takeshi; Kira, Junichi

    2002-02-01

    A 59-year-old man, who was diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease and depression seven years ago and was on oral antiparkinsonian agents, antianxiety agents, and antidepressants, developed a high fever, disturbed consciousness, and marked muscle rigidity after discontinuation of etizolam and amitriptyline. He was admitted to a nearby hospital. Hypothyroidism had been noted two months before admission. Marked muscle rigidity and increased serum CK were observed. Since discontinuation of benzodiazepine has been known to rarely trigger a neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), he was diagnosed as having NMS. After receiving dantrolene and bromocriptine, these symptoms temporarily improved but he again developed consciousness disturbance, and convulsive seizures associated with an elevated serum CK. He was transferred to our hospital. On admission, the CK level was normal at 168 IU/l, while free T4 was 0.6 ng/dl (normal range, 0.9-2.3) and TSH was 108.7 mU/ml (normal range, 0.2-4.2) in serum, indicating the presence of primary hypothyroidism. As an increase in thyroid hormone dosage improved the thyroid function to normal level, his disturbed consciousness and muscle rigidity gradually improved. Convulsive seizure and recurrence of NMS in a short interval are unusual in neuroleptic malignant syndrome. In this patient, hypothyroidism may have contributed to the development of malignant syndrome through metabolic changes of the central dopaminergic system, and discontinuation of etizolam, a kind of benzodiazepine, may have triggered NMS, since there has not been reported that discontinuation of antidepressants including amitriptyline triggers NMS. PMID:12424963

  7. A Dose Escalation Study in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Advanced Solid Tumors With Alterations of FGFR1, 2 and/or 3;; Squamous Lung Cancer With FGFR1 Amplification;; Bladder Cancer With FGFR3 Mutation or Fusion; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR1 Amplication,; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR2 Amplication,; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR3 Mutation

  8. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population. PMID:26594349

  9. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy and other biopsies in suspected intraocular malignant disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Eide, Nils; Walaas, Lisa

    2009-09-01

    preparation is obligatory. An open biopsy is still an option in the anterior segment, but has been abandoned in the posterior segment. Although vitrectomy-based procedures are becoming increasingly popular, we recommend using FNAB as part of a stepwise approach. A vitrectomy-assisted biopsy should be considered in cases where FNAB fails. In any adult patient with suspected intraocular malignancy in which enucleation is not the obvious treatment, the clinician should strive for a diagnosis based on biopsy. When the lesion is too small for biopsy or the risks related to the procedure are too great, it is reasonable to be reluctant to biopsy. The standards applied in the treatment of intraocular malignant diseases should be equivalent to those in other fields of oncology. Our view is controversial and contrary to opinion that supports current standards of care for this group of patients. PMID:19719804

  10. Transcatheter Embolization for the Treatment of Both Vaginal and Lower Intestinal Bleeding Due to Advanced Pelvic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Bulent; Oren, Nisa Cem; Andic, Cagatay; Ustunsoz, Bahri

    2010-01-01

    We report a 31-year-old woman with end-stage cervical carcinoma who suffers both lower intestinal and vaginal bleeding. A selective internal iliac arteriogram demonstrated pseudoaneurysm formation in the vaginal branch of the left internal iliac artery. There was also a fistula between the pseudoaneurysm and the lower intestinal segments. Selective transcatheter coil embolization was performed, and the bleeding was treated successfully. We conclude that the internal iliac artery should be evaluated first in patients with advanced pelvic malignancy when searching for the source of lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Additionally, transcatheter arterial embolization is a safe and effective treatment technique. PMID:25610148

  11. Advancing frontiers in Alzheimer's disease research

    SciTech Connect

    Glenner, G.G.; Wurtman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 16 chapters. Some of the titles are: Transmitter Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Cortical Dysfunction as Suggested by Positron Emission Tomography; Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Clinical Evaluation of Dementia; Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease; Down's Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: What is the Relationship; and Beta Protein: A Possible Marker for Alzheimer's Disease.

  12. Postoperative monitoring in pregnant patients undergoing surgery for advanced malignancy in last trimester: How long is enough?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arushi; Verma, Abhishek; Sood, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Surgery for advanced breast malignancy in the last trimester of pregnancy is uncommon. We present successful management of a 32-year-old woman, 30 weeks pregnant with stage 3 breast malignancy, for surgery followed by normal labor and chemotherapy. Surgery and intraoperative period were uneventful. Patient had uterine contractions 36 h postsurgery, which were managed timely with active interventions and tocolytics. Risk of premature labor following nonobstetric surgery in pregnant patients is estimated to be 8.3%, but majority of the studies have been carried out in second trimester following appendectomy. There is insufficient data in literature regarding the estimation and duration of persistence of risk of premature labor in these patients. No guidelines are available regarding how long they need to be monitored for premature labor. There is some evidence, although little that risk of premature labor persists for 7 days postsurgery. In the absence of convincing studies and guidelines, we recommend postoperative monitoring for at least 7 days in patients undergoing major surgeries for malignancies in last trimester. Multidisciplinary approach is required to manage these patients. PMID:24803777

  13. Invasive pneumococcal disease in patients with haematological malignancies before routine use of conjugate vaccines in Finland.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Vesa; Aittoniemi, Janne; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Klemets, Peter; Ollgren, Jukka; Silvennoinen, Raija; Nuorti, J Pekka; Sinisalo, Marjatta

    2016-05-01

    The baseline national invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence rate, serotype distribution and serotype coverage of pneumococcal vaccines were evaluated in patients with Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, myeloma and leukaemia within 1 year after haematological diagnosis during 1995-2002, before introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Pneumococcal serotype distribution among these patients was different from serotypes causing IPD in the general population. The serotype coverages of PCV13 and PPSV23 were 57% and 64%, respectively, lower than in the general population. This reflects a higher predisposition to IPD in vaccinated patients with haematological malignancies and possibly less benefit of herd immunity gained with the wide use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in the general population. This data will be useful as a baseline for determining the future role of adult PCV vaccination in these patient groups. PMID:26635103

  14. Expression of Human Herpesvirus-6 Antigens in Benign and Malignant Lymphoproliferative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luppi, Mario; Barozzi, Patrizia; Garber, Richard; Maiorana, Antonio; Bonacorsi, Goretta; Artusi, Tullio; Trovato, Raffaella; Marasca, Roberto; Torelli, Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry was used to look for the expression of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) antigens in a well characterized series of benign, atypical, and malignant lymphoid lesions, which tested positive for the presence of HHV-6 DNA. A panel of specific antibodies against HHV-6 antigens, characteristic either of the early (p41) or late (p101K, gp106, and gp116) phases of the viral cycle, was applied to the lymphoid tissues from 15 non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, 14 Hodgkin’s disease cases, 5 angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathies with dysproteinemia, 14 reactive lymphadenopathies, and 2 cases of sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease). In lymphomatous tissues, the expression of late antigens was documented only in reactive cells, and mainly in plasma cells. Of interest, the expression of the early p41 antigen was detected in the so-called “mummified” Reed-Sternberg cells, in two Hodgkin’s disease cases. In reactive lymphadenopathies, the HHV-6 late antigen-expressing cells were plasma cells, histiocytes, and rare granulocytes distributed in interfollicular areas. In both cases of Rosai-Dorfman disease, the p101K showed an intense staining in follicular dendritic cells of germinal centers, whereas the gp106 exhibited an intense cytoplasmic reaction in the abnormal histiocytes, which represent the histological hallmark of the disease. The expression of HHV-6 antigens is tightly controlled in lymphoid tissues. The lack of HHV-6 antigen expression in neoplastic cells and the limited expression in degenerating Reed-Sternberg cells argue against a major pathogenetic role of the virus in human lymphomagenesis. The detection of a rather unique pattern of viral late antigen expression in Rosai-Dorfman disease suggests a possible pathogenetic involvement of HHV-6 in some cases of this rare lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:9736030

  15. Biomonitoring of organochlorines in women with benign and malignant breast disease

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, M.K.J. . E-mail: mkjs@rediffmail.com; Anand, M.; Mehrotra, P.K.; Sarangi, R.; Mathur, N.

    2005-06-01

    Established risk factors for breast cancer explain breast cancer risk only partially. Organochlorines are considered to be a possible cause for hormone-dependent cancers. A hospital-based case-control study, the first from India, was conducted among 50 women undergoing surgery for breast disease to examine the association between organochlorine exposure and breast cancer risk. Blood, tumor, and surrounding adipose tissue of the breast were collected from the subjects with benign (control) and malignant breast (study) lesions and analyzed to determine organochlorine insecticides using a gas-liquid chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. The {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, and {delta} isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), o,p'-DDT, p,p-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane were frequently detected in three specimens. Total HCH and total DDT levels were higher in the blood of the study group (25 cases) than in those of the controls (25 cases) with only {gamma}-HCH being significantly different (P0.05). However, both total HCH and total DDT were higher in the tumor tissues of the controls than in those of the study group; {gamma}-HCH was significantly different (P0.05). The level of total HCH ({alpha}-HCH was significantly different, P0.05) was higher in the breast adipose tissue of the study group, whereas total DDT was higher in the breast adipose tissue of the control group. The distribution of known confounders of breast cancer including age, body mass index, age at menarche and menopause, duration of breast feeding, and family history related to breast disease did not differ significantly between benign and malignant groups. This pilot study with limited statistical power does not support a positive association between exposure to organochlorines and risk of breast cancer but paves the way for a larger Indian study with greater statistical power encompassing different

  16. MicroRNA-214 and MicroRNA-126 Are Potential Biomarkers for Malignant Endothelial Proliferative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Heishima, Kazuki; Mori, Takashi; Ichikawa, Yukie; Sakai, Hiroki; Kuranaga, Yuki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Yuiko; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Masuzawa, Mikio; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Murakami, Mami; Yamada, Nami; Akao, Yukihiro; Maruo, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Malignant endothelial proliferative diseases including human angiosarcoma (AS) and canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) are serious diseases with a grave prognosis. Establishing liquid biopsy-based biomarkers for screening has definite clinical utility; however, plasma miRNAs up- or down-regulated in these sarcomas have been unclear. For identifying possible diagnostic plasma miRNAs for these sarcomas, we investigated whether plasma miR-214 and miR-126, which miRNAs play important roles in angiogenesis and tumorigenesis, were elevated in malignant endothelial proliferative diseases. For this investigation, human angiosarcoma and canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines and clinical plasma samples of canine hemangiosarcoma were examined by performing miRNA qRT-PCR. We report here that human angiosarcoma and canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines over-secreted miR-214 and miR-126 via microvesicles; in addition, their levels in the plasma samples from canines with hemangiosarcoma were increased. Moreover, the surgical resection of primary tumors decreased the levels of plasma miR-214 and miR-126. Our findings suggest that these malignant endothelial proliferative diseases over-secreted miR-214 and miR-126, thus suggesting that these miRNAs have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for malignant endothelial proliferative diseases in canine and possible in human angiosarcoma. PMID:26512652

  17. Second malignant neoplasms complicating Hodgkin's disease: the National Cancer Institute experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, W.J.; Kinsella, T.J.; Waller, B.; Makuch, R.W.; Kelley, P.A.; Glatstein, E.; DeVita, V.T.

    1984-07-01

    The medical records of all patients treated for Hodgkin's disease during the years 1964-1981 were reviewed. Four hundred seventy-three previously untreated patients were analyzed. Thirty-four subsequent second malignant neoplasms were observed in 33 patients among those treated for Hodgkin's disease. Eight cases of acute nonlymphocyctic leukemia, one case of chronic myeloid leukemia, three cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, three cases of sarcoma, and 19 other tumors were identified. The ten-year estimated risk of leukemia by treatment was the following: radiotherapy only (0), chemotherapy only (0.02), initial combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy (0.06), and salvage combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy (0.09). The ten-year estimated risk of solid tumors was 0.07 overall, with all treatment groups associated with similar risks. Unlike some other reports, a greater risk of leukemia in patients who began treatment for Hodgkin's disease at age 40 or older was not found. However, a positive association was noted between increasing risk of solid tumors and increasing patient age.

  18. Urinary excretion of glycosaminoglycans in malignant diseases of the haemopoietic and lymphatic tissues.

    PubMed

    Friman, C; Juvani, M

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made of the urinary excretion of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) in 50 patients with malignancies, including 6 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), 11 with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), 10 with chronic lymphatic leukaemia (CLL), 10 with multiple myeloma (MM), 7 with Hodgkin's disease and 6 with mycosis fungoides (MF). The total urinary GAG were isolated by precipitation with cetyltrimethyl-ammoniumbromide (CTAB), and assayed in terms of their hexuronic acid content. A statistically highly significant increase in the excretion of total GAG was observed in all the disorders studied, except Hodgkin's disease, the highest value being seen in myeloid leukaemia (ML). Constant amounts of non-dialysable urinary GAG were electrophoresed in 0.5 M lithium acetate on cellulose acetate strips, and stained with alcian blue. The densitometric tracing derived from the electrophoresis strips were analysed with a Du Pont Curve Resolver. The electrophoretic data suggested the existence of a qualitative deviation in GAG excretion in CLL and in MF, in that patients with these diseases excreted on an average larger than normal amounts of slowly migrating GAG fractions. Pooled crude urinary GAG material from patients with CLL, MF, AML and CML and from control subjects was further purified and subjected to analytical studies. These indicated that a similar qualitative urinary GAG distribution exists in ML and in controls, whereas the urinary GAG in CLL and MF patients contained relatively more dermatan sulphate (DS, in terms of iduronate) than those of the controls. PMID:126635

  19. Exploring Spirituality in Family Caregivers of Patients With Primary Malignant Brain Tumors Across the Disease Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Alyssa G.; Jean Choi, Chien-Wen; Donovan, Heidi S.; Schulz, Richard; Bender, Catherine; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine whether the perceived level of spirituality in family caregivers of patients with primary malignant brain tumors (PMBTs) changes across the disease trajectory. Design Ongoing descriptive, longitudinal study. Setting Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sample 50 family caregivers of patients with PMBT. Methods Caregivers and care recipients were recruited at time of diagnosis. Participants were interviewed at two subse-quent time points, four and eight months following diagnosis. Main Research Variables Care recipients’ symptoms, neuro-psychologic status, and physical function, as well as caregiver social support. Findings Results showed no significant difference in spirituality scores reported at baseline and eight months (p = 0.8), suggesting that spirituality may be a stable trait across the disease trajectory. Conclusions Spirituality remains relatively stable along the course of the disease trajectory. Reports of caregiver depressive symptoms and anxiety were lower when paired with higher reports of spirituality. Implications for Nursing Clinicians can better identify caregivers at risk for negative outcomes by identifying those who report lower levels of spirituality. Future interventions should focus on the development and implementation of interventions that provide protective buffers such as increased social support. Knowledge Translation Spirituality is a relatively stable trait. High levels of spirituality can serve as a protective buffer from negative mental health outcomes. Caregivers with low levels of spirituality may be at risk for greater levels of burden, anxiety, and stress. PMID:23615145

  20. CREST biorepository for translational studies on malignant mesothelioma, lung cancer and other respiratory tract diseases: Informatics infrastructure and standardized annotation

    PubMed Central

    UGOLINI, DONATELLA; NERI, MONICA; BENNATI, LUCA; CANESSA, PIER ALDO; CASANOVA, GEORGIA; LANDO, CECILIA; LEONCINI, GIACOMO; MARRONI, PAOLA; PARODI, BARBARA; SIMONASSI, CLAUDIO; BONASSI, STEFANO

    2012-01-01

    Advances in molecular epidemiology and translational research have led to the need for biospecimen collection. The Cancer of the Respiratory Tract (CREST) biorepository is concerned with pleural malignant mesothelioma (MM) and lung cancer (LC). The biorepository staff has collected demographic and epidemiological data directly from consenting subjects using a structured questionnaire, in agreement with The Public Population Project in Genomics (P3G). Clinical and follow-up data were collected. Sample data were also recorded. The architecture is based on a database designed with Microsoft Access. Data standardization was carried out to conform with established conventions or procedures. As from January 31, 2011, the overall number of recruited subjects was 1,857 (454 LC, 245 MM, 130 other cancers and 1,028 controls). Due to its infrastructure, CREST was able to join international projects, sharing samples and/or data with other research groups in the field. The data management system allows CREST to be involved, through a minimum data set, in the national project for the construction of the Italian network of Oncologic BioBanks (RIBBO), and in the infrastructure of a pan-European biobank network (BBMRI). The CREST biorepository is a valuable tool for translational studies on respiratory tract diseases, because of its simple and efficient infrastructure. PMID:22969926

  1. Closing faucets: the role of anti-angiogenic therapies in malignant pleural diseases.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Medina, D; Popat, S

    2016-08-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) represents 15-35 % of pleural effusions and markedly worsens the prognosis and quality of life of patients with cancer. Malignant mesothelioma (MM) and lung adenocarcinoma are the most frequent primary and secondary causes, respectively, of MPE. Effective treatments for cancer-related MPE are warranted in order to improve symptoms, reduce the number of invasive pleural procedures, and prolong patient life. Since angiogenesis plays a key role in MPE development, the potential role of bevacizumab and other anti-angiogenic therapies have been explored in this review. No relevant phase III trials have specifically analysed the benefit from adding bevacizumab to platinum-based chemotherapy in lung cancer-related MPE. However, small retrospective series reported 71.4-93.3 % MPE control rate, a reduction in invasive procedures, and a safe profile with this combination. Being approved for the first-line treatment of non-squamous advanced NSCLC, the addition of bevacizumab should be considered for patients presenting with MPE. In addition, further studies in this are recommended. In MM, the addition of bevacizumab to platinum-based chemotherapy did not meet primary endpoints in two phase II trials. However, the beneficial results on OS reported in comparison with historical cohorts and the statistically significant benefit on PFS and OS observed in the phase III MAPS trial foretell an eventual role for the combination of platinum/pemetrexed/bevacizumab as front-line systemic therapy for pleural MM. To date, no other anti-angiogenic drug has showed significant benefit in the treatment of patients with either MPE or MM. However, new promising drugs such as ramucirumab or recombinant human endostar warrant further investigation. PMID:26680633

  2. Recent advances in the development of Aurora kinases inhibitors in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Choudary, Iqra; Barr, Paul M.; Friedberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, since the discovery of Drosophila mutants in 1995, much effort has been made to understand Aurora kinase biology. Three mammalian subtypes have been identified thus far which include the Aurora A, B and C kinases. These regulatory proteins specifically work at the cytoskeleton and chromosomal structures between the kinetochores and have vital functions in the early phases of the mitotic cell cycle. Today, there are multiple phase I and phase II clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical studies taking place looking at Aurora kinase inhibitors in both hematologic and solid malignancies. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of Aurora kinase inhibitors in hematological malignancy and discusses their therapeutic potential. PMID:26622997

  3. Immunotherapy using unconjugated CD19 monoclonal antibodies in animal models for B lymphocyte malignancies and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Norihito; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Poe, Jonathan C; Tedder, Thomas F

    2005-10-18

    Immunotherapy with unconjugated CD20 monoclonal antibodies has proven effective for treating non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and autoimmune disease. CD20 immunotherapy depletes mature B cells but does not effectively deplete pre-B or immature B cells, some B cell subpopulations, antibody-producing cells, or their malignant counterparts. Because CD19 is expressed earlier during B cell development, a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of early lymphoblastic leukemias/lymphomas was developed by using CD19-specific monoclonal antibodies in a transgenic mouse expressing human CD19. Pre-B cells and their malignant counterparts were depleted as well as antibody- and autoantibody-producing cells. These results demonstrate clinical utility for the treatment of diverse B cell malignancies, autoimmune disease, and humoral transplant rejection. PMID:16217038

  4. Sustained response of malignant pericardial effusion to intrapericardial bevacizumab in an advanced lung cancer patient: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dawei; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Fang; Li, Minghuan; Zhu, Hui; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pericardial effusion (MPCE) is a common complication of advanced malignant tumors, and interferes severely with patient prognosis and quality of life. The standard treatment for this complication is intracavitary perfusion of chemotherapeutic drugs, which is limited by unsatisfactory therapeutic effects and serious adverse events. We report a patient with MPCE who was treated with bevacizumab by pericardial perfusion, resulting in a complete response. This case supports the use of intrapericardial bevacizumab as a potential treatment for MPCE. PMID:26491350

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Malignancies: A Preliminary Toxicity and Disease Outcomes Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pepek, Joseph M.; Willett, Christopher G.; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to reduce toxicities associated with chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. This study reports the results of using IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Records of patients with anal malignancies treated with IMRT at Duke University were reviewed. Acute toxicity was graded using the NCI CTCAEv3.0 scale. Overall survival (OS), metastasis-free survival (MFS), local-regional control (LRC) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Forty-seven patients with anal malignancy (89% canal, 11% perianal skin) were treated with IMRT between August 2006 and September 2008. Median follow-up was 14 months (19 months for SCC patients). Median radiation dose was 54 Gy. Eight patients (18%) required treatment breaks lasting a median of 5 days (range, 2-7 days). Toxicity rates were as follows: Grade 4: leukopenia (7%), thrombocytopenia (2%); Grade 3: leukopenia (18%), diarrhea (9%), and anemia (4%); Grade 2: skin (93%), diarrhea (24%), and leukopenia (24%). The 2-year actuarial overall OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 85%, 78%, 90% and 82%, respectively. For SCC patients, the 2-year OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 100%, 100%, 95%, and 91%, respectively. Conclusions: IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer results in significant reductions in normal tissue dose and acute toxicities versus historic controls treated without IMRT, leading to reduced rates of toxicity-related treatment interruption. Early disease-related outcomes seem encouraging. IMRT is emerging as a standard therapy for anal cancer.

  6. Idiopathic CD4 Lymphocytopenia: Spectrum of opportunistic infections, malignancies, and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Dina S.; Esmadi, Mohammad; Steinmann, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL) was first defined in 1992 by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as the repeated presence of a CD4+ T lymphocyte count of fewer than 300 cells per cubic millimeter or of less than 20% of total T cells with no evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and no condition that might cause depressed CD4 counts. Most of our knowledge about ICL comes from scattered case reports. The aim of this study was to collect comprehensive data from the previously published cases to understand the characteristics of this rare condition. We searched the PubMed database and Science Direct for case reports since 1989 for Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia cases. We found 258 cases diagnosed with ICL in 143 published papers. We collected data about age, sex, pathogens, site of infections, CD4 count, CD8 count, CD4:CD8 ratio, presence of HIV risk factors, malignancies, autoimmune diseases and whether the patients survived or died. The mean age at diagnosis of first opportunistic infection (or ICL if no opportunistic infection reported) was 40.7 ± 19.2 years (standard deviation), with a range of 1 to 85. One-sixty (62%) patients were males, 91 (35.2%) were females, and 7 (2.7%) patients were not identified whether males or females. Risk factors for HIV were documented in 36 (13.9%) patients. The mean initial CD4 count was 142.6 ± 103.9/mm3 (standard deviation). The mean initial CD8 count was 295 ± 273.6/mm3 (standard deviation). The mean initial CD4:CD8 ratio was 0.6 ± 0.7 (standard deviation). The mean lowest CD4 count was 115.4 ± 87.1/mm3 (standard deviation). The majority of patients 226 (87.6%) had at least one infection. Cryptococcal infections were the most prevalent infections in ICL patients (26.6%), followed by mycobacterial infections (17%), candidal infections (16.2%), and VZV infections (13.1%). Malignancies were reported in 47 (18.1%) patients. Autoimmune diseases were reported in 37 (14.2%) patients

  7. Malignant transformation of Madelung’s disease in a patient with a coincidental diagnosis of breast cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Madelung’s disease or multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology which typically presents symmetrically subcutaneous accumulation of non-encapsulated adipose tissue which slowly grows around the neck, upper part of the arms, pelvis, back and thigh. This disease is also frequently associated with hepatopathy, glucose intolerance, hyperuricemia, and malignant tumors of the upper airways. Nevertheless, only one description of malignant transformation of Madelung’s disease has been presented in literature. Here, we report a case of liposarcomatous transformation of Madelung’s disease in a 59-year-old Italian woman with a coincidental diagnosis of breast cancer. Virtual slide The virtual slide for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/3480884087499351 PMID:22937763

  8. Photodynamic therapy--1994: treatment of benign and malignant upper aerodigestive tract disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Vanessa G.

    1995-03-01

    From 1983 to 1994 Phase II and III clinical studies at Henry Ford Hospital demonstrated complete or partial responses in 46 of 47 patients treated with hematoporphyrin-derivative photodynamic therapy (HPD-PDT) for a variety of benign and malignant upper aerodigestive tract disease: (1) superficial `condemned mucosa' or `field cancerization' of the oral cavity; (2) stage III/IV head and neck cancer; (3) mucocutaneous AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma of the upper aerodigestive tract; (4) recurrent laryngotracheal papillomatosis; (5) severe dysplasia/adenocarcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus; (6) partial or completely obstructing terminal esophageal cancer. HPD-PDT produced complete responses in 19 patients (follow up 6 months to 8 years) with `field cancerization' (CIS, T1) of the oral cavity and larynx (6), adenocarcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus (2), mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (9), obstructing esophageal carcinoma (1), and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx (1). PDT treatment protocols, results, complications, and application as adjunct or primary oncologic therapy for head and neck disease are reviewed.

  9. Phase I Study of Oral Rigosertib (ON 01910.Na), a Dual Inhibitor of the PI3K and Plk1 Pathways, in Adult Patients with Advanced Solid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Daniel W.; Diamond, Jennifer R.; Lam, Elaine T.; Weekes, Colin D.; Astling, David P.; Anderson, Ryan T.; Leong, Stephen; Gore, Lia; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Vogler, Brian W.; Keysar, Stephen B.; Freas, Elizabeth; Aisner, Dara L.; Ren, Chen; Tan, Aik-Chook; Wilhelm, Francois; Maniar, Manoj; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Messersmith, Wells A.; Jimeno, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the pharmacokinetics (PK), maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, and antitumor activity of an oral formulation of rigosertib, a dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) pathway inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid malignancies. Experimental Design Patients with advanced solid malignancies received rigosertib twice daily continuously in 21-day cycles. Doses were escalated until intolerable grade ≥ 2 toxicities, at which point the previous dose level was expanded to define the MTD. All patients were assessed for safety, PK, and response. Urinary PK were performed at the MTD. Archival tumors were assessed for potential molecular biomarkers with multiplex mutation testing. A subset of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) underwent exome sequencing. Results Forty-eight patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy at 5 dose levels. Rigosertib exposure increased with escalating doses. Dose-limiting toxicities were hematuria and dysuria. The most common grade ≥2 drug-related toxicities involved urothelial irritation. The MTD is 560 mg twice daily. Activity was seen in head and neck SCCs (1 complete response, 1 partial response) and stable disease for ≥ 12 weeks was observed in 8 additional patients. Tumors experiencing ≥partial response had PI3K pathway activation, inactivated p53, and unique variants in ROBO3 and FAT1, two genes interacting with the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Conclusions The recommended phase II dose of oral rigosertib is 560 mg twice daily given continuously. Urinary toxicity is the dose-limiting and most common toxicity. Alterations in PI3K, p53, and Wnt/β-catenin pathway signaling should be investigated as potential biomarkers of response in future trials. PMID:24493827

  10. Carbon ion therapy for advanced sinonasal malignancies: feasibility and acute toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate feasibility and toxicity of carbon ion therapy for treatment of sinonasal malignancies. First site of treatment failure in malignant tumours of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity is mostly in-field, local control hence calls for dose escalation which has so far been hampered by accompanying acute and late toxicity. Raster-scanned carbon ion therapy offers the advantage of sharp dose gradients promising increased dose application without increase of side-effects. Methods Twenty-nine patients with various sinonasal malignancies were treated from 11/2009 to 08/2010. Accompanying toxicity was evaluated according to CTCAE v.4.0. Tumor response was assessed according to RECIST. Results Seventeen patients received treatment as definitive RT, 9 for local relapse, 2 for re-irradiation. All patients had T4 tumours (median CTV1 129.5 cc, CTV2 395.8 cc), mostly originating from the maxillary sinus. Median dose was 73 GyE mostly in mixed beam technique as IMRT plus carbon ion boost. Median follow- up was 5.1 months [range: 2.4 - 10.1 months]. There were 7 cases with grade 3 toxicity (mucositis, dysphagia) but no other higher grade acute reactions; 6 patients developed grade 2 conjunctivits, no case of early visual impairment. Apart from alterations of taste, all symptoms had resolved at 8 weeks post RT. Overall radiological response rate was 50% (CR and PR). Conclusion Carbon ion therapy is feasible; despite high doses, acute reactions were not increased and generally resolved within 8 weeks post radiotherapy. Treatment response is encouraging though follow-up is too short to estimate control rates or evaluate potential late effects. Controlled trials are warranted. PMID:21466696

  11. Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Skull Base Malignancies with Prior External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Karen M.; Quan, Kimmen; Clump, David A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is an attractive modality to treat malignancies invading the skull base as it can deliver a highly conformal dose with minimal toxicity. However, variation exists in the prescribed dose and fractionation. The purpose of our study is to examine the local control, survival, and toxicities in SABR for the treatment of previously irradiated malignant skull base tumors. Materials and methods: A total of 31 patients and 40 locally advanced or recurrent head and neck malignancies involving the skull base treated with a common SABR regimen, which delivers a radiation dose of 44 Gy in 5 fractions from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The local control rate (LC), progression-free survival rate, overall survival (OS) rate, and toxicities were reported. Results: The median follow-up time of all patients was 11.4 months (range: 0.6–67.2 months). The median tumor volume was 27 cm3 (range: 2.4–205 cm3). All patients received prior external beam radiation therapy with a median radiation dose of 64 Gy (range: 24–75.6 Gy) delivered in 12–42 fractions. Twenty patients had surgeries prior to SABR. Nineteen patients received chemotherapy. Specifically, eight patients received concurrent cetuximab (Erbitux™) with SABR. The median time-to-progression (TTP) was 3.3 months (range: 0–16.9 months). For the 29 patients (93.5%) who died, the median time from the end of first SABR to death was 10.3 months (range: 0.5–41.4 months). The estimated 1-year OS rate was 35%. The estimated 2-year OS rate was 12%. Treatment was well-tolerated without grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicities. Conclusion: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has been shown to achieve low toxicities in locally advanced or recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck malignancies invading the skull base. PMID:25853093

  12. Cytochrome P450 2J2 Is Highly Expressed in Hematologic Malignant Diseases and Promotes Tumor Cell GrowthS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Wei, Xin; Rao, Xiaoquan; Wu, Jun; Yang, Shenglan; Chen, Fuqiong; Ma, Ding; Zhou, Jianfeng; Dackor, Ryan T.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2J2 (CYP2J2) epoxygenase converts arachidonic acid to four regioisomeric epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) that exert multiple biological effects in the cardiovascular system and in various human solid cancers. However, it is unknown whether this enzyme is expressed or plays any role in malignant hematological diseases. In this study, we found strong and highly selective CYP2J2 expression in five human-derived malignant hematological cell lines and in leukemia cells from peripheral blood and bone marrow in 36 of 42 patients (86%) with malignant hematologic diseases. Furthermore, increased levels of EETs were detected in urine and blood samples from these patients. Addition of exogenous EET or CYP2J2 overexpression in cultured human-derived malignant hematologic cell lines markedly accelerated proliferation and attenuated apoptosis. Addition of the selective CYP2J2 inhibitor compound 26 (C26; 1-[4-(vinyl) phenyl]-4-[4-(diphenyl-hydroxymethyl)-piperidinyl]-butanone hydrochloride) inhibited cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, an effect that was significantly reversed by EET. CYP2J2 overexpression and exogenous EET activated AMP-activated protein kinase, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathways, and increased epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation levels. CYP2J2 overexpression also enhanced malignant xenograft growth, which was efficiently inhibited by oral administration of C26 in Tie2-CYP2J2 transgenic mice and in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) xenograft mice. Together, these results suggest that CYP2J2 plays a key role in the pathogenesis of human hematologic malignant diseases. Selective inhibition of CYP2J2 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for these conditions. PMID:21030485

  13. Role of HERG1 potassium channel in both malignant transformation and disease progression in head and neck carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Sofía T; Rodrigo, Juan P; Alvarez-Teijeiro, Saúl; Villaronga, M Ángeles; Allonca, Eva; Vallina, Aitana; Astudillo, Aurora; Barros, Francisco; Suárez, Carlos; García-Pedrero, Juana M

    2012-08-01

    Evidence indicates that human ether à-go-go-related gene 1 (HERG1) voltage-gated potassium channels could represent new valuable membrane therapeutic targets and diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in various cancers. This study is the first to investigate the expression pattern of HERG1 potassium channel subunit in both primary tumors and precancerous lesions to establish its clinical and biological role during the development and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. HERG1 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 133 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas and 75 patients with laryngeal dysplasia, and correlated with clinical data. Our findings demonstrate that HERG1 is frequently aberrantly expressed in a high percentage of primary tumors (87%), whereas expression was negligible in both stromal cells and normal-adjacent epithelia. HERG1 expression increased during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma progression and was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P=0.04), advanced disease stages (P<0.001), regional tumor recurrence (P=0.004), distant metastasis (P=0.03) and reduced disease-specific survival (P=0.012, log-rank test). HERG1-positive expression was also detected in 31 (41%) of 75 laryngeal dysplasias. Interestingly, HERG1 expression increased with the grade of dysplasia; however, HERG1 expression but not histology correlated significantly with increased laryngeal cancer risk (P=0.007). In addition, functional studies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma-derived cell lines further revealed that HERG1 expression promotes anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth and invasive capability, although independently of its ion-conducting function. Our data demonstrate that HERG1 expression is a biologically and clinically relevant feature in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma progression and also during malignant transformation, and a

  14. ADVANCES AND UPDATE ON MAREK'S DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease virus has evolved toward greater forms of virulence within the last 50 years. The two consequences of such evolution to the poultry industry are the more complicated diagnosis and the lower protection conferred by the currently available vaccines. Diagnosis of Marek's disease has bec...

  15. Dysphagia in stroke, neurodegenerative disease, and advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Richards, Amanda; Goldberg, Leanne; Frucht, Steven; McCabe, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Aspiration risk from dysphagia increases with central and peripheral neurologic disease. Stroke, microvascular ischemic disease, a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, and advancing dementia all have unique aspects. However, there are distinct commonalities in this population. Increasing nutritional requirements to stave off oropharyngeal muscular atrophy and a sedentary lifestyle further tax the patient's abilities to safely swallow. This article reviews stroke, muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and advanced dementia. Approaches to screening and evaluation, recognizing sentinel indicators of decline that increase aspiration risk, and options for managing global laryngeal dysfunction are also presented. PMID:24262965

  16. Interdisciplinary Management of Patient with Advanced Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Gagan Deep; Jayan, B; Chopra, S S; Mechery, Reenesh; Goel, Manish; Verma, Munish

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary management of an adult patient with advanced periodontal disease. Treatment involved orthodontic and periodontal management. Good esthetic results and dental relationships were achieved by the treatment. PMID:27319043

  17. Thiopurines related malignancies in inflammatory bowel disease: Local experience in Granada, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-García, María; Cabello-Tapia, Maria José; Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De Teresa-Galván, Javier; Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence of neoplasms in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and the potential causative role of thiopurines. METHODS: We performed an observational descriptive study comparing the incidence of malignancies in IBD patients treated with thiopurines and patients not treated with these drugs. We included 812 patients which were divided in two groups depending on whether they have received thiopurines or not. We have studied basal characteristics of both groups (age when the disease was diagnosed, sex, type of IBD, etc.) and treatments received (Azathioprine, mercaptopurine, infliximab, adalimumab or other immunomodulators), as well as neoplasms incidence. Univariate analysis was performed with the student t test, χ2 test or Wilcoxon exact test as appropriate. A logistic regression analysis was performed as multivariate analysis. Statistical significance was establish at P values of less than 0.05, and 95%CI were used for the odds ratios. RESULTS: Among 812 patients included, 429 (52.83%) have received thiopurines: 79.5% azathioprine, 14% mercaptopurine and 6.5% both drugs. 44.76% of patients treated with thiopurines and 46, 48% of patients who did not receive this treatment were women (P > 0.05). The proportion of ulcerative colitis patients treated with thiopurines was 30.3% compare to 66. 67% of patients not treated (P < 0.001). Mean azathioprine dose was 123.79 ± 36.5 mg/d (range: 50-250 mg/d), mean usage time was 72.16 ± 55.7 mo (range: 1-300 mo) and the accumulated dose along this time was 274.32 ± 233.5 g (1.5-1350 g). With respect to mercaptopurine, mean dose was 74.7 ± 23.9 mg/d (range: 25-150 mg/d), mean usage time of 23.37 ± 27.6 mo (range: 1-118 mo), and the accumulated dose along this time was 52.2 ± 63.5 g (range: 1.5-243 g). Thiopurine S-methyltransferase activity was tested in 66% of patients treated with thiopurines, among which 98.2% had an intermediate or high activity. Among the patients treated with thiopurines

  18. Advancing swine models for human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S

    2013-01-01

    Swine models are relatively new kids on the block for modeling human health and diseases when compared to rodents and dogs. Because of the similarity to humans in size, physiology, and genetics, the pig has made significant strides in advancing the understanding of the human condition, and is thus an excellent choice for an animal model. Recent technological advances to genetic engineering of the swine genome enhance the utility of swine as models of human genetic diseases. PMID:23829105

  19. Recent advances in tropical diseases research.

    PubMed

    Lucas, A O

    1983-05-15

    The past few years have witnessed renewed effort to develop new tools for the conquest of parasitic and other infectious tropical diseases. The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases was initiated by the WHO, following a resolution of the World Health Assembly calling for the intensification of research into tropical diseases. The Programme, co-sponsored by UNDP and the World Bank, has developed a network of activities with two inter-related objective: Research and development towards new and improved tools to control six tropical diseases; and Strengthening of national institutions, including training, to increase the research capabilities of the tropical countries effected by the diseases. The six target diseases are: malaria, schistosomiasis, filariasis, trypanosomiasis (both African sleeping sickness and Chagas' disease), leishmaniasis and leprosy. Early scientific results include progress in chemotherapy for malaria, schistosomiasis and filariasis; in the developing and testing of a vaccine against leprosy; in the fundamental knowledge required to develop a vaccine against malaria; and in simple and accurate diagnostic field tests for malaria, leprosy and African trypanosomiasis. In addition, institution strengthening and training support, awarded exclusively to institutions and scientists of developing endemic countries, has increased rapidly. The programme has collaborated with other agencies which are active in this area and with the pharmaceutical industry. Additional scientists and institutions are involved in the planning, implementation and evaluation of the Programme. PMID:6684365

  20. MHC class II allosteric site drugs: new immunotherapeutics for malignant, infectious and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Li, J; Gulfo, J V; Von Hofe, E; Humphreys, R E

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of the interactions of the 'Ii-Key' segment of the Ii protein with the major histocmpatibility complex (MHC) Class II allosteric site, which is adjacent to the antigenic peptide-binding site, creates therapeutic opportunities by regulating the antigenic peptide binding to MHC class II molecules. The binding of Ii-Key to the MHC class II allosteric site loosens the hold of the MHC Class II 'clamshell' on antigenic peptides and leads to highly efficient antigenic peptide charging to or releasing from the MHC class II antigenic peptide-binding groove. Ii-Key peptide-induced spilling of bound antigenic peptide, or replacement with inert blockers, leads to 'inert immunosuppression'. Highly efficient replacement of ambient with vaccine peptides by Ii-Key permits 'active immunosuppression' for antigen-specific control of autoimmune diseases in the absence of cytokines or adjuvants. On the other hand, active immunization against cancer or infectious disease can result from epitope replacement mediated by Ii-Key and accompanied by cytokines or other adjuvants. Finally, linking the Ii-Key peptide through a simple polymethylene bridge to an antigenic sequence vastly increases the potency of MHC Class II peptide vaccines. In summary, the discovery of the MHC class II allosteric site allows one to increase the efficiency of MHC class II-related, antigenic epitope-specific therapy for malignant, infectious, and autoimmune diseases. The focus of this review is on the mechanism and potential clinical use of such novel allosteric site-directed, Ii-key drugs. PMID:11439146

  1. Advances in Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shyamal H; Adler, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and the numbers are projected to double in the next two decades with the increase in the aging population. An important focus of current research is to develop interventions to slow the progression of the disease. However, prerequisites to it include the development of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis which would identify at-risk groups and disease progression. In this review, we present updated evidence of already known clinical biomarkers (such as hyposmia and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD)) and neuroimaging biomarkers, as well as newer possible markers in the blood, CSF, and other tissues. While several promising candidates and methods to assess these biomarkers are on the horizon, it is becoming increasingly clear that no one candidate will clearly fulfill all the roles as a single biomarker. A multimodal and combinatorial approach to develop a battery of biomarkers will likely be necessary in the future. PMID:26711276

  2. A Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study of TAK-901 in Subjects With Advanced Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Philadelphia Chromosome-negative CML; Myeloid Metaplasia; Myelofibrosis; Advanced Polycythemia; Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

  3. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M P J; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. PMID:25552386

  4. The use of the pectoralis major flap for advanced and recurrent head and neck malignancy in the medically compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Avery, C M E; Crank, S T; Neal, C P; Hayter, J P; Elton, C

    2010-11-01

    A retrospective review of seventy-one PPM flaps used between 1996 and 2010 primarily for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma presenting as either advanced stage IV primary disease (41/43), extensive recurrent (10) or metastatic (9) neck disease. The PPM flap was most commonly used following resection of the mandible (23) or the tongue/oropharynx (19). When the PPM flap was the preferred reconstruction option (54) the main indication, in addition to advanced disease, was significant medical co-morbidity (23). The majority of PPM flaps (75%) were used in the latter half of the series for an increasing number of patients in poor health with advanced disease. There was no evidence of an increase in age, ASA grade or extent of disease during this period. Approximately one quarter (17) of the flaps were used after failure of a free flap, most commonly a DCIA (7) or radial (6) flap. The 30day mortality in this group of compromised patients undergoing major surgery for advanced disease was 7% (5/71). The overwhelming majority had significant co-morbidity (94% grade 2 or higher with 63% ASA grade 3) and 90% had already undergone previous major surgery and/or radiotherapy. The 1-year, 3-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 65.5%, 39.1% and 11.0% respectively with cancer-specific survival rates of 82.0%, 65.5% and 65.5%. The majority died of disease related to the underlying co-morbidity. We recommend an aggressive approach to the surgical resection of advanced and recurrent disease but a pragmatic approach to reconstruction. The PPM major flap is reliable for reconstruction of defects of the mandible, tongue and oropharynx with a complete flap failure rate of 2.8%. Lateral defects of the mandible were managed without a plate and with an acceptable outcome in the context of limited life expectancy. This is the largest study of the use of the PPM flap for this type of patient group. The flap retains a major role in the management of advanced primary or

  5. [Porcine malignant catarrhal fever: diagnostic findings and first detection of the pathogenic agent in diseased swine in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Albini, S; Zimmermann, W; Neff, F; Ehlers, B; Häni, H; Li, H; Hüssy, D; Casura, Ch; Engels, M; Ackermann, M

    2003-02-01

    For the first time Ovine Herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) was identified in Swiss pigs as the causative agent of Porcine Malignant Catarrhal Fever (MCF). Diseased animals from two farms were observed to show weakness, anorexia, fever up to 41 degrees C, and neurological symptoms, i.e. ataxia, convulsions and hyperesthesia, erosion on the snout and in the oral and nasal mucosa, as well as multiple skin lesions. Histopathological findings included severe non-purulent inflammation with mononuclear cell infiltration in several organs. Most dominant were meningo-encephalitis, disseminated nephritis as well as purulent catarrhalic bronchopneumonia. The findings were quite reminiscent of the lesions due to MCF in cattle and give therefore substantial proof to use Porcine Malignant Catarrhal Fever as the term for the disease. Identification of the causative agent was done with a quantitative PCR specific for OvHV-2. Different tissues from diseased animals were positive. Furthermore, one animal which had been ill for more than five days tested positive for antibodies against an epitope conserved among MCF viruses. Serum samples from diseased animals reacted negative towards Classical Swine Fever- and Pseudorabies virus antigen. A weakly positive reaction against porcine enterovirus type I argued against the involvement of enteroviruses in the observed disease. Moreover, by means of different conventional PCRs, we detected the newly discovered porcine lymphotropic herpesviruses for the first time in Switzerland and could at the same time exclude their involvement in Porcine Malignant Catarrhal Fever. PMID:12649951

  6. Elevation of soluble major histocompatibility complex class I related chain A protein in malignant and infectious diseases in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elevation of soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (sMICA) products in serum has been linked to tissue/organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases and some malignant disorders. Cells infected by microbiological pathogens may release sMICA, whereas less is known whether and to what extent serum sMICA levels may change in infectious diseases. Methods The present study determined serum sMICA levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a southern China population, including patients (n = 1041) suffering from several types of malignant and infectious diseases and healthy controls (n = 141). Results Relative to controls, serum sMICA elevation was significant in patients of hepatic cancer, and was approaching statistical significance in patients with lung, gastric and nasopharyngeal cancers. sMICA elevation was also associated with some bacterial (Enterobacteriaceae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive cocci), viral (hepatitis B and C) and the Microspironema pallidum infections. Conclusion Serum sMICA levels may be informative for the diagnosis of some malignant and infectious diseases. The results also indicate that microbiological infections should be considered as a potential confounding clinical condition causing serum sMICA elevation while using this test to evaluate the status of other disorders, such as cancers, host-graft response and autoimmune diseases. PMID:23181907

  7. Phase 1/2 trial of total marrow and lymph node irradiation to augment reduced-intensity transplantation for advanced hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jeffrey; Stein, Anthony; Qian, Dajun; Hitt, Debbie; Naeem, Hossameldin; Dagis, Andrew; Thomas, Sandra H.; Forman, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This phase 1/2 study assessed the augmentation of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) with total marrow and lymph node irradiation (TMLI), for peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, in patients with advanced hematologic disease. The regimen consisted of fludarabine 25 mg/m2 per day for 5 days, melphalan 140 mg/m2 for one day, and TMLI radiation at 150 cGy/fraction in 8 fractions over 4 days. Eligible patients were over 50 years old and/or had compromised organ function. Median age of the 33 evaluable patients was 55.2 years. Eighteen events of nonhematologic grade III or higher toxicities occurred in 9 patients. Day 30 and day 100 mortalities were 3% and 15%, respectively. Patients achieved myeloid and platelet engraftment at a median of 14 days after transplantation. Long-term toxicities occurred in 2 patients: hypokalemia and tremor, both grade III, on days 370 and 361 after transplantation. Fourteen patients died, 7 of relapse-related causes and 7 of non–relapse-related causes. With a median follow-up for living patients of 14.7 months, 1-year overall survival, event-free survival, and non–relapse-related mortality were 75%, 65%, and 19%, respectively. Addition of TMLI to RIC is feasible and safe and could be offered to patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who might not otherwise be candidates for RIC. PMID:20876852

  8. Advances in apheresis therapy for glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Wada, Takashi; Zhang, Wei; Yamaya, Hideki; Asaka, Mitsuhiro

    2007-06-01

    This article is an overview of the immunomodulatory effects of apheresis in renal diseases, especially primary and secondary glomerulonephritis, and the clinical evidence for the efficacy of apheresis therapy. Permeability factor(s) derived from circulating T cells are speculated to have a crucial role in the proteinuria of nephrotic syndrome (NS). Plasma exchange (PE); immunoadsorption plasmapheresis (IAPP), using protein A sepharose cartridges; low-density lipoprotein apheresis; and lymphocytapheresis (LCAP) have been used to remove such factors or pathogenic T cells. Other glomerular diseases induced by specific antibodies such as anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, and immune-complexes have also been treated with PE, double-filtration plasmapheresis, IAPP, and LCAP. Recommendations, based on the evidence from recent randomized controlled studies, have been established in apheresis therapy for various glomerular diseases. PMID:17593511

  9. [Advances in Genomics Studies for Coronary Artery Disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhu, Hui-juan; Zeng, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the major life-threatening diseases. In addition to traditional risk factors including age, sex, smoking, hypertension,and diabetes, genomic studies have shown that CAD has obvious genetic predisposition. In recent years, the rapid advances in genomics shed new light on early diagnosis, risk stratification and new treatment targets. PMID:26564468

  10. Treatment-related toxicities with Fluosol-DA 20% infusion during radiation in advanced head and neck malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, B.H.; Janjan, N.A.; Byhardt, R.W.; Toohill, R.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Fluosol-DA 20%, a synthetic perfluorocarbon emulsion first developed as a blood substitute, is currently being investigated as a radiation sensitizer. Theoretically, an oxygen-carrying perfluorocarbon emulsion combined with oxygen inhalation might be able to increase tumor response by decreasing the relative proportion of hypoxic tumor cells. Twenty-one patients with advanced head and neck malignancies receiving primary radiation therapy were evaluated for treatment-related toxicity. Mucosal reactions and weight loss during treatment in the group of patients who received the perfluorocarbon emulsion and the group who did not were comparable. Late sequelae appeared comparable. No patient in either group who completed radiation therapy required an interruption of the treatment course. We conclude that Fluosol-DA 20% is a tolerated adjunct to primary radiation therapy. Further study is needed to determine whether the agent will improve local/regional tumor control.

  11. Coloanal anastomosis in the management of benign and malignant rectal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, D.B.; Pemberton, J.H.; Beart, R.W. Jr.; Dozois, R.R.; Wolff, B.G.

    1987-11-01

    The aim was to determine the efficacy, safety, and long-term clinical and functional results of coloanal anastomosis in patients with complicated benign and malignant rectal disease. Twenty-nine patients underwent coloanal or colopouch-anal anastomosis for either carcinoma of the rectum not technically amenable to conventional low anterior resection, severe radiation injury, large benign lower third tumors, or complications of previous operations. The mean age of the patients was 61 years and 82% were men. A diverting colostomy was constructed in 55% of the patients. The mean (+/- SEM) length of follow-up was 20 +/- 3 months. There was no operative mortality. Transient urinary retention, however, occurred in 40%, anastomotic stricture in 28%, and anastomotic leakage in 3.4%. Four patients (14%) could not have intestinal continuity restored and therefore were considered failures. The stool frequency for all remaining patients (N = 25) was 3 +/- 1 per day (mean +/- SEM) and did not vary with age, sex, or indication for operation. Complete continence was achieved by 84% of patients, but no patient was incapacitated by poor bowel function. In patients in whom a conventional colorectostomy is impractical or unwise, coloanal anastomosis is a safe and efficacious alternative operation that preserves anal continence.

  12. Second acute leukemia and other malignancies following treatment for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Valagussa, P.; Santoro, A.; Fossati-Bellani, F.; Banfi, A.; Bonadonna, G.

    1986-06-01

    The records of 1329 patients with Hodgkin's disease admitted from 1965 to 1982 were analyzed to assess the relative frequency of second neoplasms. Within a median follow-up of 9.5 years, a total of 68 new cancers were documented. Nineteen cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, 6 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and 43 cases with different types of solid tumors were identified. The overall risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was 1.3% +/- 0.6% and of solid tumors was 8.3% +/- 1.5% when basal cell carcinomas were included and 6.7% +/- 1.4% when basal cell carcinomas were excluded. No cases of leukemia were documented in patients treated with radiation therapy only. The 12-year estimate of leukemia by treatment was as follows: chemotherapy only 1.4% +/- 2.3%; radiation plus MOPP (mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) 10.2% +/- 5.2%; radiation plus ABVD (Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine) 0; and radiation plus other drug regimens 4.8% +/- 1.6%. The risk of leukemia was particularly high (15.5% +/- 7.4%) in patients who received salvage MOPP after radiation failure. A positive association was also noted between increasing age and risk of second malignancies, especially leukemia. The incidence of second neoplasms can be markedly decreased by deleting from potentially curative therapy certain drugs such as alkylating agents, procarbazine, and nitrosourea derivatives.

  13. Secretory Products of Trichinella spiralis Muscle Larvae and Immunomodulation: Implication for Autoimmune Diseases, Allergies, and Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ilic, Natasa; Pinelli, Elena; Gruden-Movsesijan, Alisa

    2015-01-01

    Trichinella spiralis has the unique ability to make itself “at home” by creating and hiding in a new type of cell in the host body that is the nurse cell. From this immunologically privileged place, the parasite orchestrates a long-lasting molecular cross talk with the host through muscle larvae excretory-secretory products (ES L1). Those products can successfully modulate parasite-specific immune responses as well as responses to unrelated antigens (either self or nonself in origin), providing an anti-inflammatory milieu and maintaining homeostasis. It is clear, based on the findings from animal model studies, that T. spiralis and its products induce an immunomodulatory network (which encompasses Th2- and Treg-type responses) that may allow the host to deal with various hyperimmune-associated disorders as well as tumor growth, although the latter still remains unclear. This review focuses on studies of the molecules released by T. spiralis, their interaction with pattern recognition receptors on antigen presenting cells, and subsequently provoked responses. This paper also addresses the immunomodulatory properties of ES L1 molecules and how the induced immunomodulation influences the course of different experimental inflammatory and malignant diseases. PMID:26114122

  14. Comparative study of frequency of micronuclei in normal, potentially malignant diseases and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sangle, Varsha Ajit; Bijjaragi, Shobha; Shah, Nishat; Kangane, Suresh; Ghule, Hrishikesh M.; Rani, SR Ashwini

    2016-01-01

    Context: The assessment of micronuclei (MN) in exfoliated oral epithelial cells is a promising tool for the study of epithelial carcinogens and can be used to detect chromosome breakage or mitotic interference, thought to be relevant to carcinogenesis. Aims: To detect MN in exfoliated oral mucosal cells in individuals using various tobacco forms and also to detect frequency of MN in premalignant lesions and conditions (potentially malignant diseases [PMD's]) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). To correlate frequency of MN in oral exfoliated cells in clinically diagnosed cases of OSCC followed by a histopathological grading. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 subjects (30 smokeless tobacco users, 30 smokers and 30 nontobacco users) consisted of clinically diagnosed cases of PMD's and OSCC were selected for the study. Cytosmears from the groups were stained with rapid Papanicolaou stain. MN was identified according to the Tolbert et al. criteria. Results: MN cells were found to be significantly higher in smokeless tobacco users than in smokers. The frequency of MN was three to four times higher in patients with OSCC as compared to patients in PMD's (P < 0.0001). The frequency of MN correlated with the histopathological grade was statistically significant. Conclusion: MN index can be used as a biomarker/screening test among the high-risk groups particularly the smokeless tobacco users and PMD's. MN can be a candidate to serve as a biomarker for prediction of the grade of OSCC. PMID:27003966

  15. Effect of carnitine on muscular glutamate uptake and intramuscular glutathione in malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Breitkreutz, R; Babylon, A; Hack, V; Schuster, K; Tokus, M; Böhles, H; Hagmüller, E; Edler, L; Holm, E; Dröge, W

    2000-01-01

    Abnormally low intramuscular glutamate and glutathione (GSH) levels and/or a decreased muscular uptake of glutamate by the skeletal muscle tissue have previously been found in malignant diseases and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and may contribute to the development of cachexia. We tested the hypothesis that an impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism may compromise the Na+-dependent glutamate transport. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was designed to study the effects of L -carnitine, i.e. an agent known to enhance mitochondrial integrity and function, on the glutamate transport and plasma glutamate level of cancer patients. The effect of carnitine on the intramuscular glutamate and GSH levels was examined in complementary experiments with tumour-bearing mice. In the mice, L -carnitine treatment ameliorated indeed the tumour-induced decrease in muscular glutamate and GSH levels and the increase in plasma glutamate levels. The carnitine-treated group in the randomized clinical study showed also a significant decrease in the plasma glutamate levels but only a moderate and statistically not significant increase in the relative glutamate uptake in the lower extremities. Further studies may be warranted to determine the effect of L -carnitine on the intramuscular GSH levels in cancer patients. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10646895

  16. NIH Research: Advances in Parkinson's Disease Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... fundamental contributions to the understanding of nervous system development. Neurological disorders—such as Parkinson's disease (PD)—strike an estimated 50 million Americans each year, exacting an incalculable personal toll and an annual economic cost of hundreds of billions of dollars in ...

  17. Multidetector CT Findings and Differential Diagnoses of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma and Metastatic Pleural Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Lee, Kyung Won; Yi, Chin A; Koo, Jin Mo; Jung, Soon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the multidetector CT (MDCT) features of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and metastatic pleural disease (MPD). Materials and Methods The authors reviewed the MDCT images of 167 patients, 103 patients with MPM and 64 patients with MPD. All 167 cases were pathologically confirmed by sonography-guided needle biopsy of pleura, thoracoscopic pleural biopsy, or open thoracotomy. CT features were evaluated with respect to pleural effusion, pleural thickening, invasion of other organs, lung abnormality, lymphadenopathy, mediastinal shifting, thoracic volume decrease, asbestosis, and the presence of pleural plaque. Results Pleural thickening was the most common CT finding in MPM (96.1%) and MPD (93.8%). Circumferential pleural thickening (31.1% vs. 10.9%, odds ratio [OR] 3.670), thickening of fissural pleura (83.5% vs. 67.2%, OR 2.471), thickening of diaphragmatic pleura (90.3% vs. 73.4%, OR 3.364), pleural mass (38.8% vs. 23.4%, OR 2.074), pericardial involvement (56.3% vs. 20.3%, OR 5.056), and pleural plaque (66.0% vs. 21.9%, OR 6.939) were more frequently seen in MPM than in MPD. On the other hand, nodular pleural thickening (59.2% vs. 76.6%, OR 0.445), hilar lymph node metastasis (5.8% vs. 20.3%, OR 0.243), mediastinal lymph node metastasis (10.7% vs. 37.5%, OR 0.199), and hematogenous lung metastasis (9.7% vs. 29.2%, OR 0.261) were less frequent in MPM than in MPD. When we analyzed MPD from extrathoracic malignancy (EMPD) separately and compared them to MPM, circumferential pleural thickening, thickening of interlobar fissure, pericardial involvement and presence of pleural plaque were significant findings indicating MPM than EMPD. MPM had significantly lower occurrence of hematogenous lung metastasis, as compared with EMPD. Conclusion Awareness of frequent and infrequent CT findings could aid in distinguishing MPM from MPD. PMID:27390546

  18. Regional hyperthermia in the treatment of clinically advanced, deep seated malignancy: results of a pilot study employing an annular array applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Sapozink, M.D.; Gibbs, F.A. Jr.; Gates, K.S.; Stewart, J.R.

    1984-06-01

    From October 1980 through December 1982, 46 patients were entered into a pilot study at the University of Utah Medical Center to assess the feasibility and safety of heating deep-seated, advanced, pelvic and abdominal malignancies with an annular array of electromagnetic wave (EMW) applicators. The patients, most of whom were heavily pretreated, were treated on a protocol in which most of the patients received combined hyperthermia and low dose X ray therapy. Discomforting local symptoms were the predominant treatment related acute side effects in 28 patients with pelvic disease, while systemic hyperthermia and associated symptoms were the predominant side effects in 18 patients with abdominal disease. Minor subacute toxicity was minimal and no serious treatment related, chronic toxicity was observed. The treatments of 22 patients with sufficiently detailed thermometry were analyzed at arbitrary index temperatures of 41/sup 0/C and 43/sup 0/C. Objective response rates in 22 evaluable patients were 67% and 9% for pelvic and abdominal sites respectively.

  19. Advances in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma characterization and disease model development

    PubMed Central

    Brien, Dennis O’; Jacob, Aishwarya G.; Qualman, Stephen J.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a form of soft tissue sarcoma, is one of the most common pediatric malignancies. A complex disease with at least three different subtypes, it is characterized by perturbations in a number of signaling pathways and genetic abnormalities. Extensive clinical studies have helped classify these tumors into high and low risk groups to facilitate different treatment regimens. Research into the etiology of the disease has helped uncover numerous potential therapeutic intervention points which can be tested on various animal models of RMS; both genetically modified models and tumor Xenograft models. Taken together, there has been a marked increase in the survival rate of RMS patients but the highly invasive, metastatic forms of the disease continue to baffle researchers. This review aims to highlight and summarize some of the most important developments in characterization and in vivo model generation for RMS research, in the last few decades. PMID:22127592

  20. Advances in the prevention of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mangialasche, Francesca; Kivipelto, Miia

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, has reached epidemic proportions, with major social, medical and economical burdens. With no currently available curative treatments, both the World Health Organization and the G8 Dementia Summit recently identified dementia and AD prevention as a major public health priority. Dementia and AD have a wide range of risk factors (genetic, vascular/metabolic and lifestyle-related), which often co-occur and thus interact with each other. Previous intervention efforts aimed at preventing dementia and AD focused on the management of single risk factors, with relatively modest findings. Also, the effect of risk factors depends on age at exposure, indicating that the timing of preventive interventions needs to be carefully considered. In view of the complex multifactorial nature of AD, as well as its long pre-clinical (asymptomatic) phase, interventions simultaneously targeting multiple risk factors and disease mechanisms at an early stage of the disease are most likely to be effective. Three large European multidomain prevention trials have been launched with the goal of preventing cognitive decline, dementia and AD in older adults with different risk profiles. Pharmacological trials are also shifting towards prevention of Alzheimer dementia, by targeting at-risk individuals prior to the onset of cognitive symptoms. The current review will summarize and discuss the evidence on risk and protective factors from observational studies, ongoing lifestyle-related and pharmacological randomized controlled trials (RCTs), as well as future directions for dementia and AD prevention. PMID:26097723

  1. Pilot Study of Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation in Adult Patient With Advanced Hematopoietic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-13

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myelodysplasia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Multiple Myeloma; Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral; T-NK Cell Lymphoma; Hodgkin Disease

  2. [Malignant biliary obstruction].

    PubMed

    Hucl, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma are the most common causes of malignant biliary obstruction. They are diseases of increasing incidence and unfavorable prognosis. Only patients with localized disease indicated for surgery have a chance of long-term survival. These patients represent less than 20 % of all patients, despite the progress in our diagnostic abilities.Locally advanced and metastatic tumors are treated with palliative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy; the results of such treatments are unsatisfactory. The average survival of patients with unresectable disease is 6 months and only 5-10 % of patients survive 5 years.Biliary drainage is an integral part of palliative treatment. Endoscopically or percutaneosly placed stents improve quality of life, decrease cholestasis and pruritus, but do not significantly improve survival. Biliary stents get occluded over time, possibly resulting in acute cholangitis and require repeated replacement.Photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation, locally active endoscopic methods, have been increasingly used in recent years in palliative treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. In photodynamic therapy, photosensitizer accumulates in tumor tissue and is activated 48 hours later by light of a specific wave length. Application of low voltage high frequency current during radiofrequency ablation results in tissue destruction by heat. Local ablation techniques can have a significant impact in a large group of patients with malignant biliary obstruction, leading to improved prognosis, quality of life and stent patency. PMID:26898789

  3. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  4. Advances in the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiquan; Wu, Xinshu; Wu, Licun; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare cancer originated from pleural mesothelial cells. MPM has been associated with long-term exposure to asbestos. The prognosis of MPM is poor due to the difficulty of making diagnosis in the early stage, the rapid progression, the high invasiveness and the lack of effective treatment. Although the incidence of MPM is low in China to date, it has a tendency to increase in the coming years. The variety of clinical features may cause the delay of diagnosis and high rate of misdiagnosis. The diagnosis of MPM is based on biopsy of the pleura and immunohistochemistry. As China has become the largest country in the consumption of asbestos, it would give rise to a new surge of MPM in the future. The current treatment of MPM is multimodality therapy including surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Two surgical procedures are commonly applied: extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and pleurectomy/decortication (P/D). Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on the 3D imaging to define the tumor. Cisplatin combined with pemetrexed (PEM) is the first-line chemotherapy for MPM. The principal targets in immunotherapy include T cells (Treg), CTLA-4 and PD-1. The diagnosis, treatment and prognosis still remain a major challenge for clinical research and will do so for years to come. PMID:26366399

  5. Treatment of locally advanced, high-grade, malignant tumors of major salivary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, S.P.; Marks, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    A retrospective review of 45 patients with Stage III and IV malignant tumors of the major salivary glands was undertaken to determine tumor control and patient survival after treatment with surgery and conventional ionizing-radiation therapy. Eight of the 23 patients received early postoperative radiotherapy after initial surgical resection, with a local control rate of 75%. Twelve of 23 patients had surgery as definitive treatment and the tumor recurred locally in all; seven of these 12 patients were subsequently salvaged by further surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy or by radiotherapy alone, with 58% ultimate local control. The remaining three patients had unresectable tumors at diagnosis and received radiation alone, with a local tumor control rate of 33%. Patients were also analyzed according to the extent of surgical resection prior to radiation therapy and according to radiation dose. Eighty-eight percent of completely resected, 50% of partially resected, and 44% of unresected tumors were locally controlled for an overall local control rate of 61%. The 5-year survival rate was significantly higher for patients with local tumor control than for patients who failed locally (31% vs. 0%).

  6. Prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in patients with non-malignant terminal disease admitted to a hospice.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G; O'Doherty, C A; Collins, S

    2001-05-01

    A prospective survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in patients with non-malignant terminal disease admitted to a hospice. Of the 78 admissions surveyed, 10 patients were confused or too unwell to take part and 25 were pain-free. The remaining 43 reported 86 pains (range 1-6 per patient); of these patients, 27 (63%) had breakthrough pain and identified 52 pains (range 1-5 per patient). Breakthrough pain was classified as somatic (46%) visceral (14%), neuropathic (25%) or mixed aetiology (15%); 60% of pains were severe or excruciating. The mean number of daily breakthrough pain episodes was five (range 1-13), 54% of which occurred suddenly. Most pains (56%) were unpredictable; 75% lasted less than 30 min. These findings suggest that breakthrough pain is common in patients with non-malignant terminal disease; it is frequent, short lasting and often unpredictable, thus making treatment difficult. PMID:11407195

  7. Palliative radiotherapy for advanced malignancies in a changing oncologic landscape: guiding principles and practice implementation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joshua A; Simone, Charles B

    2014-07-01

    Radiotherapy can provide safe, cost-effective, efficient palliation of various symptoms of advanced cancer with minimal side effects. Radiotherapy can palliate pain related to bone metastases and growing visceral metastases or primary cancers, neurologic symptoms related to brain and spine metastases, other symptoms including cough and dyspnea from advanced cancers in the lung, bleeding from various internal and external tumors, and obstructive symptoms. Palliative radiotherapy should be offered in the context of a multidisciplinary oncology team including medical oncologists, palliative care clinicians and various surgical and interventional subspecialists. The prescription of radiotherapy should balance the convenience and fewer side effects associated with short, hypofractionated courses of radiotherapy with the potential greater durability associated with longer courses of radiotherapy in patients with more prolonged life expectancies. The judicious use of advanced techniques in radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), may be warranted in select patients, and they can potentially improve symptom control and durability but are associated with increased technical and economic costs. PMID:25841695

  8. Usefulness of pallidotomy in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, F; Malm, J; Nordh, E; Hariz, M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The combined effect of posteroventral pallidotomy and optimal medical treatment was assessed in 22 patients with levodopa sensitive Parkinson's disease. METHODS: Timed motor tests, video recordings, and computer assisted optoelectronic movement analysis were used for serial hourly assessments performed preoperatively and four and 12 months after operation. Tests were made while patients were on optimal medical therapy. RESULTS: There were no serious adverse events of surgery. Two of the 22 patients could not complete all the tests after operation. The proportion of dyskinesia periods decreased in the 20 patients and there was a proportional increase in normal or fairly normal occasions. "Off" periods were not significantly affected. In 12 of 13 patients with limb dyskinesia this symptom was completely abolished in the contralateral limbs. There was also some degree of improvement axially and ipsilaterally. Tremor was moderately improved contralaterally. Bradykinesia remained unchanged. Results at 12 months follow up were similar to those at four months. CONCLUSION: Pallidotomy produced a pronounced positive effect on dyskinesia and a moderate effect on tremor. Bradykinesia was not affected. Posteroventral pallidotomy may be useful in patients with Parkinson's disease who have severe motor fluctuations and may allow an increase in levodopa dose to alleviate bradykinesia in "off" states. Images PMID:9048711

  9. Image cytometry of duct cells from benign and malignant breast disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Gadenne, C.; King, E.B.; Chew, K.L.; Duarte, L.A.; Petrakis, N.L.

    1987-01-22

    We used image cytometry to classify benign and malignant breast lesions, to identify parameters that classify premalignant lesions, and to assess these parameters for a biological association that may be linked with malignancy. Results suggest that quantitative image analysis is able to discriminate ''normal'' from ''abnormal'' breast lesions. Thus image cytometry may provide an objective approach for early detection of malignant changes in the breast. The parameters selected by stepwise discriminant and regression analyses as being most useful for discriminating among breast lesions relate to nuclear size, shape and DNA content. These parameters are robust and easily measured and are similar to those used by others for discriminating benign from malignant lesions. Significantly, no parameter based on nuclear chromatin distribution ranked as highly in this study, unlike our experience with studies of other premalignant lesions. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Phase I Trial of Bortezomib and Concurrent External Beam Radiation in Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Chen Changhu; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Swing, Robyn; Raben, David

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated dose of bortezomib with concurrent external beam radiation therapy in patients with incurable solid malignant tumors requiring palliative therapy. Methods and Materials: An open label, dose escalation, phase I clinical trial evaluated the safety of three dose levels of bortezomib administered intravenously (1.0 mg/m{sup 2}, 1.3 mg/m{sup 2}, and 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}/ dose) once weekly with concurrent radiation in patients with histologically confirmed solid tumors and a radiographically appreciable lesion suitable for palliative radiation therapy. All patients received 40 Gy in 16 fractions to the target lesion. Dose-limiting toxicity was the primary endpoint, defined as any grade 4 hematologic toxicity, any grade {>=}3 nonhematologic toxicity, or any toxicity requiring treatment to be delayed for {>=}2 weeks. Results: A total of 12 patients were enrolled. Primary sites included prostate (3 patients), head and neck (3 patients), uterus (1 patient), abdomen (1 patient), breast (1 patient), kidney (1 patient), lung (1 patient), and colon (1 patient). The maximum tolerated dose was not realized with a maximum dose of 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}. One case of dose-limiting toxicity was appreciated (grade 3 urosepsis) and felt to be unrelated to bortezomib. The most common grade 3 toxicity was lymphopenia (10 patients). Common grade 1 to 2 events included nausea (7 patients), infection without neutropenia (6 patients), diarrhea (5 patients), and fatigue (5 patients). Conclusions: The combination of palliative external beam radiation with concurrent weekly bortezomib therapy at a dose of 1.6 mg/m{sup 2} is well tolerated in patients with metastatic solid tumors. The maximum tolerated dose of once weekly bortezomib delivered concurrently with radiation therapy is greater than 1.6 mg/m{sup 2}.

  11. An Open-Label Study of a Novel JAK-inhibitor, INCB047986, Given in Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Advanced Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

  12. Recent advances in chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, David

    2014-11-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by abnormities in the NADPH Oxidase that is involved in the respiratory burst responsible for initiating the killing of microbes ingested by phagocytic cells. The hallmark of CGD is recurrent infection but the inflammatory complications can prove difficult to treat. New insights into the mechanisms responsible for the inflammatory complications have led to new therapies. The treatment of CGD colitis with an anti-tumour necrosis alpha agent has been shown to be successful but associated with significant infectious complications. Haematopoietic stem cell transplants offer the possibility of cure for those with ether a matched or unrelated donor transplant, with results of the latter improving significantly over recent years. Gene Therapy offers the promise of cure without the need for a transplant but better vectors are required. PMID:25264161

  13. Alzheimer's disease: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ubhi, Kiren; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory deficits and other cognitive disturbances. Neuropathologically, AD is characterized by the progressive loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that innervate the hippocampus and cortex and the abnormal extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β and intracellular tau protein. Current research on AD is focused on the mechanisms underlying the abnormal oligomerization, fibrillation, and accumulation of the amyloid-β and tau proteins, mechanisms that may alter the dynamics of this accumulation and on experimental therapeutics approaches aimed at the clearance of the abnormally folded proteins and other potentially neuroprotective interventions. This review will summarize the main areas of investigation in AD and present ways forward for future work. PMID:22810100

  14. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology, in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part II we review six topics: absorption, short bowel syndrome, smooth muscle function and intestinal motility, tumors, diagnostic imaging, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22807605

  15. Haploidentical stem cell transplantation after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen for the treatment of advanced hematologic malignancies: posttransplantation CD8-depleted donor lymphocyte infusions contribute to improve T-cell recovery.

    PubMed

    Dodero, Anna; Carniti, Cristiana; Raganato, Anna; Vendramin, Antonio; Farina, Lucia; Spina, Francesco; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Di Terlizzi, Simona; Milanesi, Marco; Longoni, Paolo; Gandola, Lorenza; Lombardo, Claudia; Corradini, Paolo

    2009-05-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation provides an option for patients with advanced hematologic malignancies lacking a compatible donor. In this prospective phase 1/2 trial, we evaluated the role of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) followed by early add-backs of CD8-depleted donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs). The RIC regimen consisted of thiotepa, fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and 2 Gy total body irradiation. Twenty-eight patients with advanced lymphoproliferative diseases (n = 24) or acute myeloid leukemia (n = 4) were enrolled. Ex vivo and in vivo T-cell depletion was carried out by CD34(+) cell selection and alemtuzumab treatment. The 2-year cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality was 26% and the 2-year overall survival (OS) was 44%, with a better outcome for patients with chemosensitive disease (OS, 75%). Overall, 54 CD8-depleted DLIs were administered to 23 patients (82%) at 3 different dose levels without loss of engraftment or acute toxicities. Overall, 6 of 23 patients (26%) developed grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease, mainly at dose level 2. In conclusion, our RIC regimen allowed a stable engraftment with a rather low nonrelapse mortality in poor-risk patients; OS is encouraging with some long-term remissions in lymphoid malignancies. CD8-depleted DLIs are feasible and promote the immune reconstitution. PMID:19211934

  16. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 th century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 st century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  17. Hypercalcemia of advanced chronic liver disease: a forgotten clinical entity!

    PubMed Central

    Kuchay, Mohammad Shafi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Farooqui, Khalid Jamal; Bansal, Beena; Wasir, Jasjeet Singh; Mithal, Ambrish

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hypercalcemia caused by advanced chronic liver disease (CLD) without hepatic neoplasia is uncommonly reported and poorly understood condition. We are reporting two cases of advanced CLD who developed hypercalcemia in the course of the disease. This diagnosis of exclusion was made only after meticulous ruling out of all causes of hypercalcemia. The unique feature of this type of hypercalcemia is its transient nature that may or may not require treatment. This clinical condition in patients with CLD should be kept in mind while evaluating the cause of hypercalcemia in them. PMID:27252737

  18. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C M

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 (th) century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 (st) century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  19. Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Salivary Gland Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Dale H.

    1984-01-01

    Salivary glands may be involved in a wide variety of diseases, which may be broadly grouped into (1) inflammatory, (2) noninflammatory, nonneoplastic and (3) neoplastic categories. Most inflammatory and noninflammatory, nonneoplastic diseases should be managed conservatively and symptomatically. The common exceptions are first-arch branchialcleft cysts and calculi. Neoplastic lesions always require resection if that is feasible. For benign tumors, simple excision with a cuff of normal tissue around it will usually suffice. The prevailing trend for treatment of malignant neoplasms is conservatism. No longer is the facial nerve routinely sacrificed. The resection done is dictated by the tumor size and the facial nerve is spared unless directly invaded. Postoperative radiation therapy is increasingly used. PMID:6328773

  20. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Intravenous Zoledronic Acid in Malignant Pleural Disease: A Proof of Principle Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Clive, Amelia O.; Hooper, Clare E.; Edey, Anthony J.; Morley, Anna J.; Zahan-Evans, Natalie; Hall, David; Lyburn, Iain; White, Paul; Braybrooke, Jeremy P.; Sequeiros, Iara; Lyen, Stephen M.; Milton, Tim; Kahan, Brennan C.; Maskell, Nick A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Animal studies have shown Zoledronic Acid (ZA) may diminish pleural fluid accumulation and tumour bulk in malignant pleural disease (MPD). We performed a pilot study to evaluate its effects in humans. Methods We undertook a single centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in adults with MPD. Patients were randomised (1:1) to receive 2 doses of intravenous ZA or placebo, 3 weeks apart and were followed-up for 6 weeks. The co-primary outcomes were change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score measured breathlessness during trial follow-up and change in the initial area under the curve (iAUC) on thoracic Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) from randomisation to week 5. Multiple secondary endpoints were also evaluated. Results Between January 2010 and May 2013, 30 patients were enrolled, 24 randomised and 4 withdrew after randomisation (1 withdrew consent; 3 had a clinical decline). At baseline, the ZA group were more breathless, had more advanced disease on radiology and worse quality of life than the placebo group. There was no significant difference between the groups with regards change in breathlessness (Adjusted mean difference (AMD) 4.16 (95%CI −4.7 to 13.0)) or change in DCE-MRI iAUC (AMD −15.4 (95%CI −58.1 to 27.3). Two of nine (22%) in the ZA arm had a >10% improvement by modified RECIST (vs 0/11 who received placebo). There was no significant difference in quality of life measured by the QLQ-C30 score (global QOL: AMD -4.1 (-13.0 to 4.9)), side effects or serious adverse event rates. Conclusions This is the first human study to evaluate ZA in MPD. The study is limited by small numbers and imbalanced baseline characteristics. Although no convincing treatment effect was identified, potential benefits for specific subgroups of patients cannot be excluded. This study provides important information regarding the feasibility of future trials to evaluate the effects of ZA further. Trial Registration UK Clinical

  1. Malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alastair J; Parker, Robert J; Wiggins, John

    2008-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a fatal asbestos-associated malignancy originating from the lining cells (mesothelium) of the pleural and peritoneal cavities, as well as the pericardium and the tunica vaginalis. The exact prevalence is unknown but it is estimated that mesotheliomas represent less than 1% of all cancers. Its incidence is increasing, with an expected peak in the next 10–20 years. Pleural malignant mesothelioma is the most common form of mesothelioma. Typical presenting features are those of chest pain and dyspnoea. Breathlessness due to a pleural effusion without chest pain is reported in about 30% of patients. A chest wall mass, weight loss, sweating, abdominal pain and ascites (due to peritoneal involvement) are less common presentations. Mesothelioma is directly attributable to occupational asbestos exposure with a history of exposure in over 90% of cases. There is also evidence that mesothelioma may result from both para-occupational exposure and non-occupational "environmental" exposure. Idiopathic or spontaneous mesothelioma can also occur in the absence of any exposure to asbestos, with a spontaneous rate in humans of around one per million. A combination of accurate exposure history, along with examination radiology and pathology are essential to make the diagnosis. Distinguishing malignant from benign pleural disease can be challenging. The most helpful CT findings suggesting malignant pleural disease are 1) a circumferential pleural rind, 2) nodular pleural thickening, 3) pleural thickening of > 1 cm and 4) mediastinal pleural involvement. Involvement of a multidisciplinary team is recommended to ensure prompt and appropriate management, using a framework of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery and symptom palliation with end of life care. Compensation issues must also be considered. Life expectancy in malignant mesothelioma is poor, with a median survival of about one year following diagnosis. PMID:19099560

  2. Transcatheter therapy for malignant neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Coldwell, D M; Mortimer, J E

    1989-01-01

    Interventional radiology has developed into a subspecialty with application in the treatment and palliation of patients with advanced malignant diseases. A directed catheter delivers high concentrations of chemotherapy directly into the tumor bed. Embolic particles may be injected to stop hemorrhage or to occlude the blood supply of a cancer, resulting in pain relief or tumor shrinkage. These techniques can be incorporated into a multidisciplinary approach to cancer. Images PMID:2686168

  3. Subcutaneous nephrovesical bypass: Treatment for ureteral obstruction in advanced metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUNYAN; WANG, GONGCHENG; HOU, PEIJIN; ZHUANG, HAIJUN; YANG, XIAOSONG; GU, SHUO; WANG, HENGBING; JI, LU; XU, ZONGYUAN; MENG, JUNSONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the value of subcutaneous nephrovesical bypass (SNVB) for the treatment of ureteral obstruction due to pelvic metastatic disease. SNVB stents (n=30) were implanted in 24 patients with advanced metastatic disease between January 2008 and December 2012. Urinalysis, serum creatinine (SCr), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), quality of life (QoL) scores, and renal ultrasonography were evaluated at follow-up. The SNVB procedures were successful in all 24 patients. Patient follow-ups occurred at an average of 10.6 months. Preoperative hydronephrosis was eliminated in 16 cases (53.3%) and reduced in the remaining patients. Following surgery, SCr levels reduced significantly from 256±46 to 124±23 μmol/l (P<0.001). GFRs increased from 25±4.8 to 45±5.3 ml/min (P<0.01). The mean QoL scores were 3.4±1.4 preoperatively and 7.6±1.0 postoperatively (P<0.001). The results showed that SNVB is a minimally invasive, effective and safe procedure for patients with ureteral obstruction resulting from advanced malignant disease. As an alternative procedure to percutaneous nephrostomy, SNVB offers patients a better QoL. PMID:25435997

  4. Urinary Stone Disease: Advancing Knowledge, Patient Care, and Population Health.

    PubMed

    Scales, Charles D; Tasian, Gregory E; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Goldfarb, David S; Star, Robert A; Kirkali, Ziya

    2016-07-01

    Expanding epidemiologic and physiologic data suggest that urinary stone disease is best conceptualized as a chronic metabolic condition punctuated by symptomatic, preventable stone events. These acute events herald substantial future chronic morbidity, including decreased bone mineral density, cardiovascular disease, and CKD. Urinary stone disease imposes a large and growing public health burden. In the United States, 1 in 11 individuals will experience a urinary stone in their lifetime. Given this high incidence and prevalence, urinary stone disease is one of the most expensive urologic conditions, with health care charges exceeding $10 billion annually. Patient care focuses on management of symptomatic stones rather than prevention; after three decades of innovation, procedural interventions are almost exclusively minimally invasive or noninvasive, and mortality is rare. Despite these advances, the prevalence of stone disease has nearly doubled over the past 15 years, likely secondary to dietary and health trends. The NIDDK recently convened a symposium to assess knowledge and treatment gaps to inform future urinary stone disease research. Reducing the public health burden of urinary stone disease will require key advances in understanding environmental, genetic, and other individual disease determinants; improving secondary prevention; and optimal population health strategies in an increasingly cost-conscious care environment. PMID:26964844

  5. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Caravatta, Luciana; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Macchia, Gabriella; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa; Rossi, Marco; Flocco, Mariano; Scapati, Andrea; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  6. Advances in subtyping methods of foodborne disease pathogens.

    PubMed

    Boxrud, Dave

    2010-04-01

    Current subtyping methods for the detection of foodborne disease outbreaks have limitations that reduce their use by public health laboratories. Recent advances in subtyping of foodborne disease pathogens utilize techniques that identify nucleic acid polymorphisms. Recent methods of nucleic acid characterization such as microarrays and mass spectrometry (MS) may provide improvements such as increasing speed and data portability while decreasing labor compared to current methods. This article discusses multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, nucleic acid sequencing, whole genome sequencing, variable absent or present loci, microarrays and MS as potential subtyping methods to enhance our ability to detect foodborne disease outbreaks. PMID:20299203

  7. Mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease in the fibreglass manufacturing industry

    PubMed Central

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D; Fryar, C; Fayerweather, W; Kozono, J; Biggs, V

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the question of whether there is an association between workplace exposures and sociodemographic factors and mortality from non-malignant respiratory disease excluding influenza and pneumonia (NMRDxIP) among workers in a fibreglass wool manufacturing facility. Methods: A case-control study with cases and controls derived from deaths recorded from the Kansas City plant in the Owens Corning mortality surveillance system. The cases are defined as decedents with NMRDxIP as the underlying cause of death. Matched, unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess any association between NMRDxIP and cumulative exposure history and sociodemographic factors individually. Matched, adjusted ORs were obtained by conditional logistic regression to estimate the effect of any one variable while controlling for the effect of all the others. Results: Results of the unadjusted analysis, considering variables one at a time, yielded no significant associations between NMRDxIP and any of the exposure or sociodemographic variables. The smoking OR was substantially increased (OR 5.09; 95%CI 0.65 to undeterimed). Also, there were no significant variables in a conditional logistic regression analysis in which all variables were simultaneously adjusted. ORs for respirable glass fibres were below unity at all concentrations of exposure in the adjusted analysis. For respirable silica there was no consistent relation across all exposure levels. The ORs increased through the first three exposure concentrations but decreased for the highest exposure. However, ORs although not significant, are greater than unity for all respirable concentrations of silica exposure. Conclusions: The findings for Kansas City show no association between respirable glass fibres and NMRDxIP. The adjusted ORs for all exposures to respirable fibres were less than unity. On the other hand, the ORs for silica exposures were all above unity although there was no clear dose-response relation and

  8. Advances in Diagnosis of Respiratory Diseases of Small Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandip; Kumar, Amit; Tiwari, Ruchi; Rahal, Anu; Malik, Yash; Dhama, Kuldeep; Pal, Amar; Prasad, Minakshi

    2014-01-01

    Irrespective of aetiology, infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats contribute to 5.6 percent of the total diseases of small ruminants. These infectious respiratory disorders are divided into two groups: the diseases of upper respiratory tract, namely, nasal myiasis and enzootic nasal tumors, and diseases of lower respiratory tract, namely, peste des petits ruminants (PPR), parainfluenza, Pasteurellosis, Ovine progressive pneumonia, mycoplasmosis, caprine arthritis encephalitis virus, caseous lymphadenitis, verminous pneumonia, and many others. Depending upon aetiology, many of them are acute and fatal in nature. Early, rapid, and specific diagnosis of such diseases holds great importance to reduce the losses. The advanced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antigen as well as antibodies directly from the samples and molecular diagnostic assays along with microsatellites comprehensively assist in diagnosis as well as treatment and epidemiological studies. The present review discusses the advancements made in the diagnosis of common infectious respiratory diseases of sheep and goats. It would update the knowledge and help in adapting and implementing appropriate, timely, and confirmatory diagnostic procedures. Moreover, it would assist in designing appropriate prevention protocols and devising suitable control strategies to overcome respiratory diseases and alleviate the economic losses. PMID:25028620

  9. Immunomodulation during prolonged treatment with combined interleukin-2 and interferon-alpha in patients with advanced malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    von Rohr, A.; Ghosh, A. K.; Thatcher, N.; Stern, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    Treatment with combined IL-2 and alpha-IFN has resulted in synergistic antitumour efficacy in animal studies. The mechanisms responsible for this synergy remain unclear. In this study, several immune parameters which might be involved in mediating antitumour activity have been monitored serially in 15 patients with advanced malignant melanoma or renal cell cancer during treatment with concurrent IL-2 and alpha-IFN. Both drugs were given subcutaneously in low to moderate (outpatient) dosages but for a prolonged duration. This treatment resulted in remarkable immunomodulation. In vivo induction of cytotoxicity against K562 and Daudi target cells was consistently seen, and percentages of peripheral blood cells expressing CD 25 (IL-2 receptor) and CD 56 (Leu-19) increased. In vitro proliferation of lymphocytes in response to IL-2 was enhanced during the treatment periods, whereas spontaneous proliferation was inhibited. Moreover, correlations between immune parameters and subsequent clinical responses were present in the early phase of the study. Cytotoxicity levels generated in vivo as well as the percentage of CD 56+ lymphocytes were higher in patients who responded to treatment than in non-responders. In contrast, responders had lower levels of CD 25+ cells. These findings indicate that it might be possible to select patients who are likely to benefit from prolonged immunotherapy. PMID:7678979

  10. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  11. Molecular Profiling and Targeted Therapy for Advanced Thoracic Malignancies: A Biomarker-Derived, Multiarm, Multihistology Phase II Basket Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Chavez, Ariel; Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Raffeld, Mark; Morrow, Betsy; Kelly, Ronan; Carter, Corey Allan; Guha, Udayan; Killian, Keith; Lau, Christopher C.; Abdullaev, Zied; Xi, Liqiang; Pack, Svetlana; Meltzer, Paul S.; Corless, Christopher L.; Sandler, Alan; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Liewehr, David J.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Berman, Arlene; Doyle, Austin; Szabo, Eva; Wang, Yisong; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a basket clinical trial to assess the feasibility of such a design strategy and to independently evaluate the effects of multiple targeted agents against specific molecular aberrations in multiple histologic subtypes concurrently. Patients and Methods We enrolled patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), small-cell lung cancer, and thymic malignancies who underwent genomic characterization of oncogenic drivers. Patients were enrolled onto a not-otherwise-specified arm and treated with standard-of-care therapies or one of the following five biomarker-matched treatment groups: erlotinib for EGFR mutations; selumetinib for KRAS, NRAS, HRAS, or BRAF mutations; MK2206 for PIK3CA, AKT, or PTEN mutations; lapatinib for ERBB2 mutations or amplifications; and sunitinib for KIT or PDGFRA mutations or amplification. Results Six hundred forty-seven patients were enrolled, and 88% had their tumors tested for at least one gene. EGFR mutation frequency was 22.1% in NSCLC, and erlotinib achieved a response rate of 60% (95% CI, 32.3% to 83.7%). KRAS mutation frequency was 24.9% in NSCLC, and selumetinib failed to achieve its primary end point, with a response rate of 11% (95% CI, 0% to 48%). Completion of accrual to all other arms was not feasible. In NSCLC, patients with EGFR mutations had the longest median survival (3.51 years; 95% CI, 2.89 to 5.5 years), followed by those with ALK rearrangements (2.94 years; 95% CI, 1.66 to 4.61 years), those with KRAS mutations (2.3 years; 95% CI, 2.3 to 2.17 years), those with other genetic abnormalities (2.17 years; 95% CI, 1.3 to 2.74 years), and those without an actionable mutation (1.85 years; 95% CI, 1.61 to 2.13 years). Conclusion This basket trial design was not feasible for many of the arms with rare mutations, but it allowed the study of the genetics of less common malignancies. PMID:25667274

  12. Recent advances in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rangan, G K; Tchan, M C; Tong, A; Wong, A T Y; Nankivell, B J

    2016-08-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic renal disease in adults, affecting one in every 1000 Australians. It is caused by loss-of-function heterozygous mutations in either PKD1 or PKD2 , which encode the proteins, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 respectively. The disease hallmark is the development of hundreds of microscopic fluid-filled cysts in the kidney during early childhood, which grow exponentially and continuously through life at varying rates (between 2% and 10% per year), causing loss of normal renal tissue and up to a 50% lifetime risk of dialysis-dependent kidney failure. Other systemic complications include hypertensive cardiac disease, hepatic cysts, intracranial aneurysms, diverticular disease and hernias. Over the last two decades, advances in the genetics and pathogenesis of this disease have led to novel treatments that reduce the rate of renal cyst growth and may potentially delay the onset of kidney failure. New evidence indicates that conventional therapies (such as angiotensin inhibitors and statins) have mild attenuating effects on renal cyst growth and that systemic levels of vasopressin are critical for promoting renal cyst growth in the postnatal period. Identifying and integrating patient-centred perspectives in clinical trials is also being advocated. This review will provide an update on recent advances in the clinical management of ADPKD. PMID:27553994

  13. Recent Advances in Imaging Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Braskie, Meredith N.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in brain imaging technology in the past five years have contributed greatly to the understanding of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we review recent research related to amyloid imaging, new methods for magnetic resonance imaging analyses, and statistical methods. We also review research that evaluates AD risk factors and brain imaging, in the context of AD prediction and progression. We selected a variety of illustrative studies, describing how they advanced the field and are leading AD research in promising new directions. PMID:22672880

  14. Advances in graft-versus-host disease biology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Blazar, Bruce R.; Murphy, William J.; Abedi, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Preface Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is used to treat a variety of disorders, but its efficacy is limited by the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The past decade has brought impressive advances in our understanding of the role of both donor and host adaptive and innate immune stimulatory and immune suppressive factors that influence GVHD pathogenesis. New insights in basic immunology, preclinical models and clinical studies have led to novel prevention or treatment approaches. This review highlights recent advances in GVHD pathophysiology and its treatment with a focus on immune system manipulations that are amenable to clinical application. PMID:22576252

  15. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all parts of gastroenterology and hepatology, there have been many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed for 2008 and 2009, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part I of this Editorial Review, seven topics are considered: intestinal development; proliferation and repair; intestinal permeability; microbiotica, infectious diarrhea and probiotics; diarrhea; salt and water absorption; necrotizing enterocolitis; and immunology/allergy. These topics were chosen because of their importance to the practicing physician. PMID:22807604

  16. Advances in non-dopaminergic treatments for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Stayte, Sandy; Vissel, Bryce

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1960's treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) have traditionally been directed to restore or replace dopamine, with L-Dopa being the gold standard. However, chronic L-Dopa use is associated with debilitating dyskinesias, limiting its effectiveness. This has resulted in extensive efforts to develop new therapies that work in ways other than restoring or replacing dopamine. Here we describe newly emerging non-dopaminergic therapeutic strategies for PD, including drugs targeting adenosine, glutamate, adrenergic, and serotonin receptors, as well as GLP-1 agonists, calcium channel blockers, iron chelators, anti-inflammatories, neurotrophic factors, and gene therapies. We provide a detailed account of their success in animal models and their translation to human clinical trials. We then consider how advances in understanding the mechanisms of PD, genetics, the possibility that PD may consist of multiple disease states, understanding of the etiology of PD in non-dopaminergic regions as well as advances in clinical trial design will be essential for ongoing advances. We conclude that despite the challenges ahead, patients have much cause for optimism that novel therapeutics that offer better disease management and/or which slow disease progression are inevitable. PMID:24904259

  17. Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease - Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Adriana R.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States and Europe. Culture for B. burgdorferi is not routinely available. PCR can be helpful in synovial fluid of patients with Lyme arthritis. The majority of laboratory tests performed for the diagnosis of Lyme disease are based on detection of the antibody responses against B. burgdorferi in serum. The sensitivity of antibody-based tests increases with the duration of the infection, and patients who present very early in their illness are more likely to have a negative result. Patients with erythema migrans should receive treatment based on the clinical diagnosis. The current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for serodiagnosis of Lyme disease is a 2-tiered algorithm, an initial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) followed by separate IgM and IgG Western blots if the first EIA test result is positive or borderline. The IgM result is only relevant for patients with illness duration of less than a month. While the 2-tier algorithm works well for later stages of the infection, it has low sensitivity during early infection. A major advance has been the discovery of VlsE and its C6 peptide as markers of antibody response in Lyme disease. Specificity is extremely important in Lyme disease testing, as the majority of tests are being performed in situations with low likelihood of the disease, a situation where a positive result is more likely to be a false positive. Current assays do not distinguish between active and inactive infection, and patients may continue to be seropositive for years. There is a need to simplify the testing algorithm for Lyme disease, improving sensitivity in early disease while still maintaining high specificity and providing information about the stage of infection. The development of a point of care assay and biomarkers for active infection would be major advances for the field. PMID:25999225

  18. TGF-beta signal transduction in oro-facial health and non-malignant disease (part I).

    PubMed

    Prime, S S; Pring, M; Davies, M; Paterson, I C

    2004-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) family of cytokines consists of multi-functional polypeptides that regulate a variety of cell processes, including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, extracellular matrix elaboration, angiogenesis, and immune suppression, among others. In so doing, TGF-beta plays a key role in the control of cell behavior in both health and disease. In this report, we review what is known about the mechanisms of activation of the peptide, together with details of TGF-beta signal transduction pathways. This review summarizes the evidence implicating TGF-beta in normal physiological processes of the craniofacial complex-such as palatogenesis, tooth formation, wound healing, and scarring-and then evaluates its role in non-malignant disease processes such as scleroderma, submucous fibrosis, periodontal disease, and lichen planus. PMID:15574677

  19. Appraisals of Bangladeshi Medicinal Plants Used by Folk Medicine Practitioners in the Prevention and Management of Malignant Neoplastic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kabidul Azam, Md. Nur; Rahman, Md. Mizanur; Biswas, Samanta

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which is categorized to differentiate into diverse cell types and move around in the body to sites of organogenesis that is key to the process of tumor genesis. All types of cancer fall into the group of malignant neoplastic diseases. In Bangladesh, cancer is now one of the foremost killer diseases and its personal, social, and economic bearing are huge. Plant-derived natural compounds (vincristine, vinblastine, etoposide, paclitaxel, camptothecin, topotecan, and irinotecan) are useful for the treatment of cancer. Since there is no extensive ethnobotanical research study in Bangladesh regarding the traditional uses of medicinal plants against neoplasms, therefore, a randomized ethnopharmacological surveys were carried out in 3 districts of Bangladesh to learn more about the usage of anticancer medicinal plants and their chemical constituents having antineoplastic activity. Comprehensive interviews were conducted to the folk medicine practitioners and medicinal plants as pointed out by them were photographed, collected, deposited, and identified at the Bangladesh National Herbarium. The various plant parts have been used by the healers which included whole plant, leaves, fruits, barks, roots, and seeds. This study evaluated considerable potential for discovery of novel compounds with less side effects in the management and prevention of malignancy in cancer. PMID:27382642

  20. Appraisals of Bangladeshi Medicinal Plants Used by Folk Medicine Practitioners in the Prevention and Management of Malignant Neoplastic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kabidul Azam, Md Nur; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Biswas, Samanta; Ahmed, Md Nasir

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which is categorized to differentiate into diverse cell types and move around in the body to sites of organogenesis that is key to the process of tumor genesis. All types of cancer fall into the group of malignant neoplastic diseases. In Bangladesh, cancer is now one of the foremost killer diseases and its personal, social, and economic bearing are huge. Plant-derived natural compounds (vincristine, vinblastine, etoposide, paclitaxel, camptothecin, topotecan, and irinotecan) are useful for the treatment of cancer. Since there is no extensive ethnobotanical research study in Bangladesh regarding the traditional uses of medicinal plants against neoplasms, therefore, a randomized ethnopharmacological surveys were carried out in 3 districts of Bangladesh to learn more about the usage of anticancer medicinal plants and their chemical constituents having antineoplastic activity. Comprehensive interviews were conducted to the folk medicine practitioners and medicinal plants as pointed out by them were photographed, collected, deposited, and identified at the Bangladesh National Herbarium. The various plant parts have been used by the healers which included whole plant, leaves, fruits, barks, roots, and seeds. This study evaluated considerable potential for discovery of novel compounds with less side effects in the management and prevention of malignancy in cancer. PMID:27382642

  1. An optimized semi-automatic rate method for serum glutathione reductase activity and its application to patients with malignant disease.

    PubMed Central

    Delides, A; Spooner, R J; Goldberg, D M; Neal, F E

    1976-01-01

    An improved and optimized method for serum glutathione reductase is described. The reference range for normal subjects is 47-79 IU/1. The method is more sensitive than conventional enzyme tests in the detection of malignant disease. It was not raised more frequently in patients with clinical evidence of metastases than in those clinically free of such metastases, and it did not seem to correlate with prognosis among those patients who failed to survive six months from the time the analysis was first conducted. PMID:2624

  2. Advances in combating fungal diseases: vaccines on the threshold

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Jim E.; Deepe, George S.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2008-01-01

    The dramatic increase in fungal diseases in recent years can be attributed to the increased aggressiveness of medical therapy and other human activities. Immunosuppressed patients are at risk of contracting fungal diseases in healthcare settings and from natural environments. Increased prescribing of antifungals has led to the emergence of resistant fungi, resulting in treatment challenges. These concerns, together with the elucidation of the mechanisms of protective immunity against fungal diseases, have renewed interest in the development of vaccines against the mycoses. Most research has used murine models of human disease and, as we review in this article, the knowledge gained from these studies has advanced to the point where the development of vaccines targeting human fungal pathogens is now a realistic and achievable goal. PMID:17160002

  3. Linear and Curvilinear Trajectories of Cortical Loss with Advancing Age and Disease Duration in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Daniel O; Dobolyi, David G; Isaacs, David A; Roman, Olivia C; Herb, Joshua; Wylie, Scott A; Neimat, Joseph S; Donahue, Manus J; Hedera, Peter; Zald, David H; Landman, Bennett A; Bowman, Aaron B; Dawant, Benoit M; Rane, Swati

    2016-05-01

    Advancing age and disease duration both contribute to cortical thinning in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the pathological interactions between them are poorly described. This study aims to distinguish patterns of cortical decline determined by advancing age and disease duration in PD. A convenience cohort of 177 consecutive PD patients, identified at the Vanderbilt University Movement Disorders Clinic as part of a clinical evaluation for Deep Brain Stimulation (age: M= 62.0, SD 9.3), completed a standardized clinical assessment, along with structural brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan. Age and gender matched controls (n=53) were obtained from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and Progressive Parkinson's Marker Initiative (age: M= 63.4, SD 12.2). Estimated changes in cortical thickness were modeled with advancing age, disease duration, and their interaction. The best-fitting model, linear or curvilinear (2(nd), or 3(rd) order natural spline), was defined using the minimum Akaike Information Criterion, and illustrated on a 3-dimensional brain. Three curvilinear patterns of cortical thinning were identified: early decline, late decline, and early-stable-late. In contrast to healthy controls, the best-fit model for age related changes in PD is curvilinear (early decline), particularly in frontal and precuneus regions. With advancing disease duration, a curvilinear model depicts accelerating decline in the occipital cortex. A significant interaction between advancing age and disease duration is evident in frontal, motor, and posterior parietal areas. Study results support the hypothesis that advancing age and disease duration differentially affect regional cortical thickness and display regional dependent linear and curvilinear patterns of thinning. PMID:27330836

  4. Treatment strategies in early and advanced Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ossig, Christiana; Reichmann, Heinz

    2015-02-01

    The initiation of therapy in Parkinson disease (PD), altering the medication, adding new substances, and switching to alternative therapies throughout the disease is always a matter of debate. In the past, experts in PD have propagated different medication strategies. Even though there is no new medical treatment on the horizon, much has changed in consideration of the known treatments in the early and advanced therapy for PD. Therapeutic regimens have to be adapted and adjusted on a regular basis to accomplish the best medical care for the predominant symptom of the individual patient with PD. PMID:25432721

  5. Phase I trial of a monoclonal antibody specific for alphavbeta3 integrin (MEDI-522) in patients with advanced malignancies, including an assessment of effect on tumor perfusion.

    PubMed

    McNeel, Douglas G; Eickhoff, Jens; Lee, Fred T; King, David M; Alberti, Dona; Thomas, James P; Friedl, Andreas; Kolesar, Jill; Marnocha, Rebecca; Volkman, Jennifer; Zhang, Jianliang; Hammershaimb, Luz; Zwiebel, James A; Wilding, George

    2005-11-01

    At present, a variety of agents targeting tumor angiogenesis are under clinical investigation as new therapies for patients with cancer. Overexpression of the alpha(v)beta(3) integrin on tumor vasculature has been associated with an aggressive phenotype of several solid tumor types. Murine models have shown that antibodies targeting the alpha(v)beta(3) integrin can affect tumor vasculature and block tumor formation and metastasis. These findings suggest that antibodies directed at alpha(v)beta(3) could be investigated in the treatment of human malignancies. The current phase I dose escalation study evaluated the safety of MEDI-522, a monoclonal antibody specific for the alpha(v)beta(3) integrin, in patients with advanced malignancies. Twenty-five patients with a variety of metastatic solid tumors were treated with MEDI-522 on a weekly basis with doses ranging from 2 to 10 mg/kg/wk. Adverse events were assessed weekly; pharmacokinetic studies were done; and radiographic staging was done every 8 weeks. In addition, dynamic computed tomography imaging was done at baseline and at 8 weeks in patients with suitable target lesions amenable to analysis, to potentially identify the effect of MEDI-522 on tumor perfusion. Treatment was well tolerated, and a maximum tolerated dose was not identified by traditional dose-limiting toxicities. The major adverse events observed were grade 1 and 2 infusion-related reactions (fever, rigors, flushing, injection site reactions, and tachycardia), low-grade constitutional and gastrointestinal symptoms (fatigue, myalgias, and nausea), and asymptomatic hypophosphatemia. Dynamic computed tomography imaging suggested a possible effect on tumor perfusion with an increase in contrast mean transit time from baseline to the 8-week evaluation with increasing doses of MEDI-522. No complete or partial responses were observed. Three patients with metastatic renal cell cancer experienced prolonged stable disease (34 weeks, >1 and >2 years) on

  6. Phase III randomized study of fotemustine and dacarbazine versus dacarbazine with or without interferon-α in advanced malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of the addition of fotemustine and/or interferon (IFN) to standard therapy with dacarbazine alone in patients with advanced malignant melanoma was investigated in a multicenter, randomized 2x2 factorial design trial. Methods A total of 260 patients were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: (A) fotemustine and dacarbazine repeated on 3-week cycle; (B) same treatment as (A) plus IFN-α2b three times per week; (C) dacarbazine alone repeated on 3-week cycle; (D) same treatment as (C) plus IFN-α2b three times per week. Two comparisons were planned to assess the efficacy of fotemustine (groups A+B vs. C+D) and IFN-α2b (groups A+C vs. B+D). Results Addition of fotemustine did not significantly improve overall survival (OS) (p=0.28) or progression-free survival (PFS) (p=0.55); Hazard ratio (HR) for OS was 0.93 (95% CI 0.71-1.21). Similarly, addition of IFN-α2b did not improve OS (p=0.68) or PFS (p=0.65); HR for OS was 0.92 (95% CI 0.70-1.20). Overall response rate was not improved by the addition of either fotemustine (p=0.87) or IFN-α2b (p=0.57). The combination of all three drugs resulted in the highest occurrence of adverse events. Conclusions No significant improvement in outcomes were observed with the addition of either fotemustine or IFN-α2b to dacarbazine. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01359956 PMID:23402397

  7. Advances in computed tomography evaluation of skull base diseases.

    PubMed

    Prevedello, Luciano M

    2014-10-01

    Introduction Computed tomography (CT) is a key component in the evaluation of skull base diseases. With its ability to clearly delineate the osseous anatomy, CT can provide not only important tips to diagnosis but also key information for surgical planning. Objectives The purpose of this article is to describe some of the main CT imaging features that contribute to the diagnosis of skull base tumors, review recent knowledge related to bony manifestations of these conditions, and summarize recent technological advances in CT that contribute to image quality and improved diagnosis. Data Synthesis Recent advances in CT technology allow fine-detailed evaluation of the bony anatomy using submillimetric sections. Dual-energy CT material decomposition capabilities allow clear separation between contrast material, bone, and soft tissues with many clinical applications in the skull base. Dual-energy technology has also the ability to decrease image degradation from metallic hardwares using some techniques that can result in similar or even decreased radiation to patients. Conclusions CT is very useful in the evaluation of skull base diseases, and recent technological advances can increase disease conspicuity resulting in improved diagnostic capabilities and enhanced surgical planning. PMID:25992136

  8. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    malignant subepithelial tumours. Recent reports suggest that EUS elastography enables highly accurate discrimination of colorectal adenocarcinomas from adenomas, while inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes can be distinguished based on the strain ratio calculation. Among EUS-guided therapies, the drainage of abdominal and pelvic collections has been regarded as a safe and effective procedure to be used as an alternative for the transcutaneous route, while the placing of fiducial markers under EUS guidance for targeted radiotherapy in rectal cancer or the use of contrast microbubbles as drug-delivery vehicles represent experimental therapeutic applications that could greatly impact the forthcoming management of patients with colorectal diseases, pending on further investigations. PMID:26855535

  9. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    malignant subepithelial tumours. Recent reports suggest that EUS elastography enables highly accurate discrimination of colorectal adenocarcinomas from adenomas, while inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes can be distinguished based on the strain ratio calculation. Among EUS-guided therapies, the drainage of abdominal and pelvic collections has been regarded as a safe and effective procedure to be used as an alternative for the transcutaneous route, while the placing of fiducial markers under EUS guidance for targeted radiotherapy in rectal cancer or the use of contrast microbubbles as drug-delivery vehicles represent experimental therapeutic applications that could greatly impact the forthcoming management of patients with colorectal diseases, pending on further investigations. PMID:26855535

  10. Treosulfan-based conditioning regimens for allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with non-malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Slatter, M A; Boztug, H; Pötschger, U; Sykora, K-W; Lankester, A; Yaniv, I; Sedlacek, P; Glogova, E; Veys, P; Gennery, A R; Peters, C

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of children with non-malignant diseases can be cured by allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Treosulfan (L-treitol-1,4-bis-methanesulfonate) is being used more frequently for conditioning, owing to its' lower toxicity profile compared with conventional myeloablative regimens. A retrospective analysis was performed of children registered in the EBMT database, who received treosulfan before HSCT between January 2005 and 2010, to identify possible dose-related toxicity and determine the incidence of engraftment, treatment-related mortality and overall survival (OS). Results from 316 transplants from 11 different countries are presented. Ninety-five (30%) were under 1 year of age at the time of transplant. OS was 83% and event-free survival was 76%; 3-year OS and event-free survival of infants below 1 year were 79% and 73%, respectively. No association was found with age at transplant, dose of treosulfan given, other agents used in combination with treosulfan, donor type, stem cell source, or second or subsequent transplant. In this report of the largest number of children to date receiving treosulfan for non-malignant diseases, treosulfan is shown to be a safe and effective agent even for those under 1 year of age at the time of transplant. Further prospective studies are needed using precisely defined protocols with pharmacokinetic monitoring and detailed chimerism analysis. In addition, long-term studies will be vital to determine long-term effects, for example, on fertility in comparison with other regimens. PMID:26259076

  11. Advances in Diagnosis and Management of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciarán P.; Bai, Julio C.; Liu, Edwin; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder induced by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has a prevalence of ∼1% in many populations worldwide. New diagnoses have increased substantially, due to increased awareness, better diagnostic tools, and probable, real increases in incidence. The breadth of recognized clinical presentations continues to expand, making the disorder highly relevant to all physicians. Newer diagnostic tools, including serologic tests for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptide, greatly facilitate diagnosis. Tests for celiac-permissive HLA DQ2 and DQ8 molecules are useful in defined clinical situations. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histopathologic examination of duodenal biopsies. However, according to recent controversial guidelines, a diagnosis can be made without biopsy in certain circumstances, especially for children. Symptoms, mortality, and risk for malignancy can each be reduced by adherence to a gluten-free diet. This treatment is a challenge, however, as the diet is expensive, socially isolating, and not always effective in controlling symptoms or intestinal damage. Hence, there is increasing interest in developing non-dietary therapies. PMID:25662623

  12. Prolonged Subcutaneous Administration of 852A, a Novel Systemic Toll-like Receptor 7 Agonist, to Activate Innate Immune Responses in Patients with Advanced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Brenda J.; Cooley, Sarah; DeFor, Todd; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Chen, Wei; Blazar, Bruce R.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    The toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonist 852A, a small-molecule imidazoquinoline, stimulates plasmacytoid dendritic cells to produce multiple cytokines. We conducted a Phase II study of 852A in patients with recurrent hematologic malignancies. The primary objective was assessing the activity of 852A administered subcutaneously twice weekly for 12 weeks. Secondary objectives were assessing the safety of 852A and its ability to activate the immune system with prolonged dosing. Methods Patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies of any age with adequate organ function were eligible. Patients initiated dosing at 0.6 mg/m2 twice weekly and escalated by 0.2 mg/m2 after every 2 doses as tolerated to a target dose of 1.2 mg/m2. Patients with responses or stable disease were eligible for additional cycles. Results Seventeen patients (15 males) entered the study: 6 with AML, 5 ALL, 4 NHL, 1 Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and 1 multiple myeloma. The mean age was 41 years (12–71 years). The median number of prior chemotherapy regimens was 5 (range=1–14). Thirteen patients completed all 24 injections. Grade 3–4 toxicities included nausea, dyspnea, fever, myalgia, malaise, and cough. Responses included 1 complete response (ALL), 1 partial response (AML), 2 stable disease (AML and NHL), and 9 progressive disease. Conclusions This is the first in-human hematologic malignancy trial of a subcutaneously (SC) delivered TLR7 agonist using a prolonged dosing schedule. 852A was safely administered up to 1.2 mg/m2 twice weekly with evidence of sustained tolerability and clinical activity in hematologic malignancies. Systemic TLR agonists for the treatment of hematologic malignancies warrant further study. PMID:22718533

  13. Advances and highlights in mechanisms of allergic disease in 2015.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Paulina; Akdis, Cezmi A; Finkelman, Fred D; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2016-06-01

    This review highlights some of the advances in mechanisms of allergic disease, particularly anaphylaxis, including food allergy, drug hypersensitivity, atopic dermatitis (AD), allergic conjunctivitis, and airway diseases. During the last year, a mechanistic advance in food allergy was achieved by focusing on mechanisms of allergen sensitization. Novel biomarkers and treatment for mastocytosis were presented in several studies. Novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis showed that promising supplementation of the infant's diet in the first year of life with immunoactive prebiotics might have a preventive role against early development of AD and that therapeutic approaches to treat AD in children might be best directed to the correction of a TH2/TH1 imbalance. Several studies were published emphasizing the role of the epithelial barrier in patients with allergic diseases. An impaired skin barrier as a cause for sensitization to food allergens in children and its relationship to filaggrin mutations has been an important development. Numerous studies presented new approaches for improvement of epithelial barrier function and novel biologicals used in the treatment of inflammatory skin and eosinophilic diseases. In addition, novel transcription factors and signaling molecules that can develop as new possible therapeutic targets have been reported. PMID:27090934

  14. Joint Leveling for Advanced Kienbock’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, Ryan P.; Van Steyn, Marlo O.; Gyuricza, Cassie; Adams, Amelia; Weiland, Andrew J.; Gelberman, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The use of joint leveling procedures to treat Kienbock’s disease has been limited by the degree of disease advancement. This study was designed to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes of wrists with more advanced Kienbock’s disease (stage IIIB) to wrists with less advanced disease (stage II/IIIA) following radius shortening osteotomy. METHODS This retrospective study enrolled 31 adult wrists (30 patients, mean age 39 years), treated by radius shortening osteotomy between two institutions for either stage IIIB (n=14) or stage II/IIIA (n=17) disease. Evaluation was carried out at a mean of 74 months (IIIB, 77 months; II/IIIA, 72 months). Radiographic assessment determined disease progression. Clinical outcomes were determined by validated patient-based and objective measures. RESULTS Patient-based outcome ratings of wrists treated for stage IIIB were similar to those with stage II/IIIA [QuickDASH (15 vs 12:p=.63), MMWS (84 vs 87:p=.59), VAS pain (1.2 vs 1.7:p=.45), VAS function (2.6 vs 2.1:p=.59)]. The average flexion/extension arc was 102° for wrists with stage IIIB and 106° for wrists with stage II/IIIA Kienbock’s (p=.70). Grip strength was 77% of the opposite side for stage IIIB wrists versus 85% for stage II/IIIA (p=.25). Postoperative carpal height ratio and radioscaphoid angle were worse (p<.05) for wrists treated for stage IIIB (0.46:65°) than stage II/IIIA (0.53:53°) disease. Radiographic disease progression occurred in 7 wrists (6 stage II/IIIA: 1 stage IIIB). The one stage IIIB wrist that progressed underwent wrist arthrodesis. CONCLUSIONS In this limited series, clinical outcomes of radius shortening using validated, patient-based assessment instruments and objective measures failed to demonstrate predicted “clinically relevant” differences between stage II/IIIA and IIIB Kienbock’s. Provided the high percentage successful clinical outcomes in this case series of 14 stage IIIB wrists, we believe that static carpal malalignment

  15. Recent Advances in the Genetics of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ian; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies have provided valuable insight into the pathological mechanisms underlying Parkinson’s disease (PD). The elucidation of the genetic components to what was once largely considered a non-genetic disease has given rise to a multitude of cell and animal models enabling the dissection of molecular pathways involved in disease etiology. Here, we review advances obtained from models of dominant mutations in α-synuclein and LRRK2 as well as recessive PINK1, Parkin and DJ-1 mutations. Recent genome-wide association studies have implicated genetic variability at two of these loci, α-synuclein and LRRK2, as significant risk factors for developing sporadic PD. This, coupled to the established role of mitochondrial impairment in both familial and sporadic PD highlights the likelihood of common mechanisms fundamental to the etiology of both. PMID:21639795

  16. Spinal Tuberculosis (Pott's disease) Mimicking Paravertebral Malignant Tumor in a Child Presenting with Spinal Cord Compression

    PubMed Central

    Emir, Suna; Erdem, Arzu Y; Demir, Haci A; Kaçar, Ayper; Tunç, Bahattin

    2012-01-01

    Paravertebral tumors may interfere with the radiological and clinical features of spinal tuberculosis. We report a case of a 3-year-old boy with spinal tuberculosis who was initially misdiagnosed as having a paraspinal tumor. The diagnosis of tuberculosis was made on the basis of intraoperative findings and confirmed by histopathology. This case highlights the importance of awareness of the different radiographic features of spinal tuberculosis, which can mimic a spinal malignancy. In order to avoid delayed diagnosis, pediatricians and radiologists must be aware of spinal tuberculosis, which may interfere with other clinical conditions. PMID:23439455

  17. Diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in assessing response and recurrent disease in gynaecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hameeduddin, Ayshea; Sahdev, Anju

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has an established role in imaging pelvic gynaecological malignancies. It is routinely used in staging endometrial and cervical cancer, characterizing adnexal masses, selecting optimal treatment, monitoring treatment and detecting recurrent disease. MRI has also been shown to have an excellent performance and an evolving role in surveillance of patients after chemoradiotherapy in cervical cancer, post-trachelectomy, detecting early recurrence and planning exenterative surgery in isolated central recurrences in both cervical and endometrial cancer and in young patients on surveillance for medically managed endometrial cancer. However, conventional MRI still has limitations when the morphological appearance of early recurrent or residual disease overlaps with normal pelvic anatomy or treatment effects in the pelvis. In particular, after chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer, distinguishing between radiotherapy changes and residual or early recurrent disease within the cervix or the vaginal vault can be challenging on conventional MRI alone. Therefore, there is an emerging need for functional imaging to overcome these limitations. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the emerging functional MRI techniques and their applications in predicting treatment response, detecting residual disease and early recurrent disease to optimize the treatment options available using diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast enhancement particularly in cervical and endometrial cancer. PMID:25889065

  18. [Plasminogen activator system and its clinical significance in patients with a malignant disease].

    PubMed

    Halámková, J; Kiss, I; Tomásek, J; Pavlovský, Z; Cech, Z; Tutek, S; Hanáková, L; Moulis, M; Penka, M

    2011-01-01

    Urokinase (uPA) plays an essential role in the activation of plasminogen to plasmin, a serine protease participating in the activation of matrixmetaloproteinases, latent elastases, growth factors and cytokines involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix elements. Together with its receptor (uPAR), tissue activator (tPA) and urokinase inhibitors (PAI-1, PAI-2, PAI-3 and protease nexin), it forms the plasminogen activator system (PAS), a component of metastatic cascade importantly contributing to the invasive growth and angiogenesis of malignant tumours. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 inhibits uPA-dependent invasiveness of some cancer cell lines. The vitronectin-PAI-1 complex inhibits migration of smooth muscle cells by binding alpha(v)beta3 integrin to vitronectin. PAI-1 or its deficiency interferes with signalling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and JAK/STAT and it is included in the processes of maintaining the integrity of the endothelial cells and thereby regulation of cell death. PAI-1 affects apoptosis by reducing cell adhesion and functioning of intracellular signalling pathways. The individual components of PAS undoubtedly play an important role in angiogenesis and metastasising of malignant tumours. In the near future, results of published studies with various types of cancer could be reflected in diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms and, at the same time, could serve as the goal for targeted therapies. PMID:22257230

  19. Midkine: A Novel Biomarker to Predict Malignancy in Patients with Nodular Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Fatih; Arpaci, Dilek; Altas, Ayfer; Haytaoglu, Gürkan; Can, Murat; Barut, Figen; Kokturk, Furuzan; Ilikhan, Sevil Uygun; Bayraktaroglu, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Background. Midkine (MK), a new heparin-binding growth factor, plays important roles in a variety of biological phenomena such as carcinogenesis, inflammation, and angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate serum midkine (SMK) and nodular midkine (NMK) levels in patients with thyroid nodules to predict malignancy and whether there was any association between. Methods. A total of 105 patients (74 women, 31 men) with thyroid nodules were enrolled. The levels of SMK and NMK were measured. Any possible correlation between SMK, NMK, and biochemical, cytopathological, or radiological variables was investigated. Results. Both SMK and NMK were found to be higher in hypoechoic nodules with an irregular border and without a halo (p < 0.05). Serum MK levels were significantly higher in nodules with microcalcifications than nodules with macrocalcification or without calcification (p = 0.001). SMK levels were found to be correlated with NMK levels (SMK 0.63 ng/ml versus 1.04 ng/mL and NMK 0.55 ng/mL versus 0.55 ng/mL, r2 = 0.54, p < 0.001). Conclusion. Both SMK and NMK can predict tumorigenesis of highly malignant/suspicious thyroid cytopathology and also well correlated with sonographic features of thyroid nodules. We suggest that MK levels may serve as an alternative biomarker, in conjunction with the cytopathological results in preoperative assessment of thyroid nodules. PMID:27446208

  20. An overview of advance care planning for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease: The basics.

    PubMed

    Wasylynuk, Betty Ann; Davison, Sara N

    2016-01-01

    As the number of Canadians living with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) continues to grow, even higher numbers are living with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many of these people will eventually require renal replacement therapy (RRT), either dialysis or transplantation. More than 50% of patients starting RRT today are aged 65 or older, with the fastest growing group being patients 75 years and older. Despite advances to dialysis technology and dialysis care, the mortality rates remain high and dialysis patients' end-of-life care may not align with their preferences or values. Advance care planning (ACP) is an essential component of quality comprehensive kidney care. Kidney care teams develop strong relationships with their patients and are well positioned to integrate ACP into routine kidney care. This article defines ACP, outlines the essential components of ACP, and discusses the benefits, challenges, and special considerations of ACP. By enhancing the kidney care team's understanding of ACP, this article aims to assist in integrating ACP into routine kidney care for patients with advanced CKD. PMID:27215058

  1. Palliative care for patients with advance chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, C A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades there has been a dramatic rise in the number of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. The fastest expanding group receiving dialysis has been the elderly. However, for those patients who are very elderly with co-morbidity, dialysis may not offer a survival advantage. Therefore, active conservative management is a growing service offered by many renal units in the UK and focuses on non-dialytic correction of fluid and electrolyes, management of renal anaemia, and assessment and management of symptoms. The five-year survival of a patient over 75 years of age starting dialysis is 20% and if a patient is over 75 years, has co-morbidity, or a poor performance status, dialysis may not offer any survival advantage. Whether a patient is managed by dialysis or by conservative management the symptom burden suffered is high. These symptoms are under-recognised and often managed poorly because of increased drug toxicity in renal failure. This complex group of patients require close working between renal, palliative care, medicine for the elderly, and community teams, to allow best quality of life and end of life care. This review describes some of the challenges in providing Advanced Care Planning for dialysis and conservatively managed patients, highlights the symptom burden of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, and offers guidance in how to manage the symptoms effectively. PMID:25318401

  2. Detection of acquired hemoglobinopathy in children with hematological malignancies at disease onset: results form a national referral centre.

    PubMed

    Maritsi, Despoina N; Kosmidis, Helen V; Douna, Varvara; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne; Tsolia, Maria N; Kossiva, Lydia

    2013-11-01

    Abnormal hemoglobin synthesis is usually inherited but may also arise as a secondary manifestation of a hematological neoplasia. The objective of this study is to identify the presence of acquired hemoglobinopathy in children diagnosed with hematological malignancies and compare these against healthy controls. Prospective matched case-control study held from 2010 to 2012. For each patient with hematological malignancy two healthy controls matched on gender, age and race were recruited. Patients with other co-morbidities were excluded. All samples underwent supravital staining and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) electrophoresis. Following identification of abnormal results, molecular genetic testing for all α- and β-thalassemia mutations prevalent in the Greek population was performed. Other causes of anemia were ruled out based on specific testing. A total of 44 (32 males) patients with a mean age of 7.1 years were enrolled in the study. Hematological disorders included acute lymphocytic leukemia (24), acute myeloid leukemia (8), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (8), Hodgkin disease (3), and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (1). Following exclusion of congenital hemoglobinopathies, atypical HPLC electrophoretic findings persisted in 18.1 % of the patient group, compared to 0 % in the control group (p < 0.001). The patient group showed marked microcytic anemia (p < 0.01) and detection of small inclusions (p = 0.034) on supravital staining. Comparison of the HPLC findings between the groups demonstrated significantly lower percentages of HbA (p = 0.02), normal HbA2 and higher percentage of fast moving Hb bands (p = 0.04) in the patient group. Interestingly, the majority of these patients belonged to the high-risk group. Acquired hemoglobinopathy is recognized in adult patients. This is a novel study describing evidence of abnormal erythropoiesis in children with hematological malignancies and in particular those classified as high-risk cancer patients according to

  3. A phase I trial of bryostatin 1 in patients with advanced malignancy using a 24 hour intravenous infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Jayson, G. C.; Crowther, D.; Prendiville, J.; McGown, A. T.; Scheid, C.; Stern, P.; Young, R.; Brenchley, P.; Chang, J.; Owens, S.

    1995-01-01

    Bryostatin 1 is a macrocyclic lactone derived from the marine invertebrate Bugula neritina. In vitro, bryostatin 1 activates protein kinase C (PKC), induces the differentiation of a number of cancer cell lineages, exhibits anti-tumour activity and augments the response of haemopoietic cells to certain growth factors. In vivo, bryostatin 1 is also immunomodulatory, but the range of tumours which respond to bryostatin 1 in xenograft tumour models is mostly the same as the in vitro tumour types, suggesting a direct mode of action. Nineteen patients with advanced malignancy were entered into a phase I study in which bryostatin 1 was given as a 24 h intravenous infusion, weekly, for 8 weeks. Myalgia was the dose-limiting toxicity and the maximum tolerated dose was 25 micrograms m-2 per week. The myalgia was cumulative and dose related, and chiefly affected the thighs, calves and muscles of extraocular movement. The mechanism of the myalgia is unknown. CTC grade 1 phlebitis affected every patient for at least one cycle and was caused by the diluent, PET, which contains polyethylene glycol, ethanol and Tween 80. Most patients experienced a 1 g dl-1 decrease in haemoglobin within 1 h of commencing the infusion which was associated with a decrease in haematocrit. Radiolabelled red cell studies were performed in one patient to investigate the anaemia. The survival of radiolabelled red cells during the week following treatment was the same as that seen in the week before treatment. However, there was a temporary accumulation of radiolabelled red cells in the liver during the first hour of treatment, suggesting that pooling of erythrocytes in the liver might account for the decrease in haematocrit. Total or activated PKC concentrations were measured in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of three patients for the first 4 h of treatment and during the last hour of the infusion. This showed that PKC activity was significantly modulated during the infusion. Bryostatin

  4. Elastic Deformation Properties of Implanted Endobronchial Wire Stents in Benign and Malignant Bronchial Disease: A Radiographic In Vivo Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hautmann, Hubert; Rieger, Johannes; Huber, Rudolf M.; Pfeifer, Klaus J.

    1999-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term mechanical behavior in vivo of expandable endobronchial wire stents, we imaged three different prostheses in the treatment of tracheobronchial disease. Methods: Six patients with bronchial stenoses (three benign, three malignant) underwent insertion of metallic stents. Two self-expandable Wallstents, two balloon-expandable tantalum Strecker stents and two self-expandable nitinol Accuflex stents were used. Measurements of deformation properties were performed during voluntary cough by means of fluoroscopy, at 1 month and 7-10 months after implantation. The procedures were videotaped, their images digitized and the narrowing of stent diameters calculated at intervals of 20 msec. Results: After stent implantation all patients improved with respect to ventilatory function. Radial stent narrowing during cough reached 53% (Wallstent), 59% (tantalum Strecker stent), and 52% (nitinol Accuflex stent) of the relaxed post-implantation diameter. Stent compression was more marked in benign compared with malignant stenoses. In the long term permanent deformation occurred with the tantalum Strecker stents; the other stents were unchanged. Conclusion: Endobronchial wire stents can be helpful in the treatment of major airway collapse and obstructing bronchial lesions. However, evidence of material fatigue as a possible effect of exposure to recurrent mechanical stress on the flexible mesh tube may limit their long-term use. This seems to be predominantly important in benign bronchial collapse.

  5. Highlight on Advances in Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease in North America

    PubMed Central

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Farshidpour, Maham; Allen, Mary Beth; Ebrahimi, Golnaz; Falkinham, Joseph O.

    2014-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous in the environment and exist as an important cause of pulmonary infections in humans. Pulmonary involvement is the most common disease manifestation of NTM and the incidence of NTM is growing in North America. Susceptibility to NTM infection is incompletely understood; therefore preventative tools are not well defined. Treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is difficult and entails multiple antibiotics and an extended treatment course. Also, there is a considerable variation in treatment management that should be considered before initiating treatment. We highlight the new findings in the epidemiology diagnosis and treatment of mycobacterial infections. We debate new advances regarding NTM infection in cystic fibrosis patients and solid organ transplant recipients. Finally, we introduce a new epidemiologic model for NTM disease based on virulence-exposure-host factors. PMID:25574470

  6. Targeting advanced glycation endproducts and mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ward, Micheal S; Fortheringham, Amelia K; Cooper, Mark E; Forbes, Josephine M

    2013-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of mortality in the Western World. The development and onset of disease can be attributed to many risk factors including genetic susceptibility, diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis. Numerous studies highlight the production of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and interaction with their receptor (RAGE) as playing a key pathogenic role. The AGEs-RAGE axis is thought to contribute to a proinflammatory environment inducing cellular dysfunction which cascades towards pathology. Mitochondrial dysfunction concurrently plays a role in these proinflammatory responses presenting excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under pathological conditions. This ROS release can exacerbate the production of AGEs fuelling the fire somewhat. However, the AGEs-RAGE axis may influence mitochondrial function independently of inflammation. Therefore instigation of the AGEs-RAGE axis may facilitate spiralling towards pathology on many fronts including CVD development. PMID:23871446

  7. Recommendations for Risk Categorization and Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Diseases in Hematological Malignancies: A Critical Review of Evidence and Expert Opinion (TEO-4)

    PubMed Central

    Boğa, Can; Bolaman, Zahit; Çağırgan, Seçkin; Karadoğan, İhsan; Özcan, Mehmet Ali; Özkalemkaş, Fahir; Saba, Rabin; Sönmez, Mehmet; Şenol, Esin; Akan, Hamdi; Akova, Murat

    2015-01-01

    This is the last of a series of articles on invasive fungal infections prepared by opinion leaders in Turkey. The aim of these articles is to guide clinicians in managing invasive fungal diseases in hematological malignancies and stem cell transplantation based on the available best evidence in this field. The previous articles summarized the diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal disease and this article aims to explain the risk categorization and guide the antifungal prophylaxis in invasive fungal disease. PMID:26316478

  8. Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Diseases in Hematological Malignancies: A Critical Review of Evidence and Turkish Expert Opinion (TEO-2)

    PubMed Central

    Arıkan Akdağlı, Sevtap; Azap, Alpay; Başaran Demirkazık, Figen; Ener, Beyza; Aşcıoğlu Hayran, Sibel; Özdemir Kumbasar, Özlem; Metan, Gökhan; Odabaşı, Zekaver; Uzun, Ömrüm; Akan, Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    One of the most problematic issues in hematological malignancies is the diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases. Especially, the difficulty of mycological diagnosis and the necessity of immediate intervention in molds have led to the adoption of “surrogate markers” that do not verify but rather strongly suggest fungal infection. The markers commonly used are galactomannan (GM), beta-glucan, and imaging methods. Although there are numerous studies on these diagnostic approaches, none of these markers serve as a support for the clinician, as is the case in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections. This paper has been prepared to explain the diagnostic tests. As molecular tests have not been standardized and are not used routinely in the clinics, they will not be mentioned here. PMID:25541650

  9. Recent Advances and Future Needs in Interstitial Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark G; Richeldi, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are a diverse range of conditions affecting the lung interstitium. The prototypic ILD, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), is a chronic progressive fibrotic lung disease with a median survival of only 3 years from the time of diagnosis. Recently significant progress has been made in both our understanding of the pathogenesis and of the therapeutic targeting of IPF. This culminated in the worldwide approval of the first antifibrotic therapies nintedanib and pirfenidone. While an important first step, patients continue to progress and better therapies are urgently required. The aim of this article is to highlight some of the recent advances that have been made in our understanding of genetics, disease classification, clinical trial design, and novel antifibrotic therapy in IPF. It discusses future priorities if we are to continue to increase the length and quality of life of patients with IPF, and considers possible approaches to translate the progress made in IPF to other progressive fibrotic lung diseases where our understanding remains limited. PMID:27231869

  10. Successful fertilization and pregnancy outcome in in-vitro fertilization using cryopreserved/thawed spermatozoa from patients with malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, E; Oehninger, S; Acosta, A A; Morshedi, M; Veeck, L; Bryzyski, R G; Muasher, S J

    1992-01-01

    Cryopreservation of spermatozoa before treatment is the only proven effective method available to circumvent the sterilizing effect of therapy in some patients with malignant diseases. Because of impaired sperm quality after freezing and thawing in-vitro fertilization/embryo transfer (IVF/ET) was indicated in 10 patients (12 cycles) during 1986-1990. The patient's mean age was 33.4 +/- 1.6 years. The following diagnoses were made: seminoma (1), testicular carcinoma (3), leiomyosarcoma of the prostate (1), Wegener's granulomatosis (1), non-Hodgkin's (1) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (3). When motile spermatozoa could be recovered after thawing, the total fraction of motile spermatozoa after swim-up separation ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 x 10(6) spermatozoa/ml (eight patients, nine cycles). In all these cases, insemination was performed with multiple oocytes per dish. Fertilization was achieved when swim-up recovered a mean of 1.8 +/- 0.5 x 10(6) spermatozoa/ml and when insemination was performed with at least a calculated concentration of motile spermatozoa of 1 x 10(5) spermatozoa/oocyte. The fertilization rate of preovulatory oocytes was 60%. Four patients achieved a pregnancy: two of them delivered a single healthy baby, one delivered triplet healthy babies and one had a preclinical abortion. In two patients (three cycles), no motile spermatozoa were recovered after thawing, and micromanipulation of oocytes for assisted fertilization was performed. Although fertilized oocytes were transferred, those couples did not achieve a pregnancy. Patients with lymphopathies had the best results, whilst those with testicular neoplasms had the poorest outcome, thus suggesting a poor gametogenic function in the non-affected testis. These results give hope to some patients with malignant diseases to maintain their reproductive capacity through sperm banking and IVF/ET. PMID:1551943

  11. Advanced Nanobiomaterials: Vaccines, Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Torres-Sangiao, Eva; Holban, Alina Maria; Gestal, Monica Cartelle

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles has contributed to many advances due to their important properties such as, size, shape or biocompatibility. The use of nanotechnology in medicine has great potential, especially in medical microbiology. Promising data show the possibility of shaping immune responses and fighting severe infections using synthetic materials. Different studies have suggested that the addition of synthetic nanoparticles in vaccines and immunotherapy will have a great impact on public health. On the other hand, antibiotic resistance is one of the major concerns worldwide; a recent report of the World Health Organization (WHO) states that antibiotic resistance could cause 300 million deaths by 2050. Nanomedicine offers an innovative tool for combating the high rates of resistance that we are fighting nowadays, by the development of both alternative therapeutic and prophylaxis approaches and also novel diagnosis methods. Early detection of infectious diseases is the key to a successful treatment and the new developed applications based on nanotechnology offer an increased sensibility and efficiency of the diagnosis. The aim of this review is to reveal and discuss the main advances made on the science of nanomaterials for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Highlighting innovative approaches utilized to: (i) increasing the efficiency of vaccines; (ii) obtaining shuttle systems that require lower antibiotic concentrations; (iii) developing coating devices that inhibit microbial colonization and biofilm formation. PMID:27376260

  12. Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD. PMID:25210423

  13. Thromboembolic disease in surgery for malignancy-rationale for prolonged thromboprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Khushal, Amjad; Quinlan, Dan; Alikhan, Raza; Gardner, Jeremy; Bailey, Clare; Cohen, Ander

    2002-12-01

    Patients undergoing surgery for malignancy are at increased risk of initial and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). Several factors have been found to increase the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in cancer patients both during the first days after the operation and after discharge from hospital. Although, in general, thromboprophylaxis is provided to cancer patients after surgery, the length of time these patients require prophylaxis has not yet been established. Autopsy series, clinical series, and clinical trials indicate that up to about 40% of VTE occurs post discharge. General surgical patients undergoing major abdominal surgery require VTE prophylaxis, and prolonged thromboprophylaxis should be considered in the post-discharge period in high-risk patients, particularly those with cancer. Evidence from studies in general and orthopedic surgery show that prolonged prophylaxis reduces the number of thromboembolic events after discharge from hospital. Prophylaxis should be simple, safe, and effective and should be administered easily to allow continuation of therapy after discharge. Low-molecular-weight heparins are potentially the most suitable agents for long-term thromboprophylaxis in cancer patients. PMID:12536350

  14. Malignant Catarrhal Fever: An Emerging Disease in the African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Pfitzer, S; Last, R; Espie, I; van Vuuren, M

    2015-06-01

    Within the tribe Bovini in the subfamily Bovinae, the water buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis), American bison (Bison bison), European bison (Bubalus bonasus) and yak (Bos grunniens) are recognized as species highly susceptible to malignant catarrhal fever (MCF). In contrast, the lack of reports describing clinical MCF in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) whether free ranging or captive has led to a perception that African buffaloes are resistant to MCF. During the last decade, several cases of MCF in African buffaloes were confirmed in South Africa and experience with seven of these cases is described in this report. Detection of viral nucleic acid in blood or tissues was successful in six African buffaloes that suffered from clinical signs compatible with MCF. Four were positive for infection with ovine herpesvirus type 2 (the causative virus of sheep-associated MCF), and two were positive for alcelaphine herpesvirus type 1 (causative virus of wildebeest-associated MCF). Histopathological examination of tissue samples from all the animals yielded typical lesions that were consistent with those described for MCF in domestic cattle. Developments in the management of African buffaloes translocated from their traditional habitats have likely contributed to the identification of another susceptible host in the subfamily Bovinae. PMID:23957274

  15. Nanocarriers for respiratory diseases treatment: recent advances and current challenges.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Adriana; Gioia, Sante Di; Castellani, Stefano; Carbone, Annalucia; Cavallaro, Gennara; Trapani, Giuseppe; Conese, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary delivery of locally-acting drugs encapsulated in nanocarriers provides several advantages for the treatment of respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, cystic fibrosis, tuberculosis and lung cancer. These advantages include, among others, sustained drug delivery to the lungs, reduced therapeutic dose and improved patient compliance. The aim of this review is to give an updated overview on recent advances recorded in the last few years in this field as well as on the major challenges still existing and that remain to be overcome before any clinical application. After an outline on the cellular and extracellular barriers affecting drug delivery to the airways both in physiological and pathological conditions, the significant developments recorded using inhaled polymeric- and lipid-based nanocarriers for drug and gene delivery to the lung are presented. In this discussion, the major challenges existing in the field are evidenced including the understanding of the factors governing the mucus penetration capability of these nanocarriers and the identification of new technologies for delivering drugs to specific regions or cell types of the lungs. In this regard, the recognition of receptor expressed only at lung level may facilitate drug targeting to this organ and it should improve the therapeutic efficacy of nanocarrier-based treatments for respiratory diseases. PMID:24678708

  16. Advances in Epigenetics and Epigenomics for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Irfan A.

    2015-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, epigenetic factors—literally those that are “over” or “above” genetic ones and responsible for controlling the expression and function of genes—have emerged as important mediators of development and aging; gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions; and the pathophysiology of complex disease states. Here, we provide a brief overview of the major epigenetic mechanisms (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNA regulation). We highlight the nearly ubiquitous profiles of epigenetic dysregulation that have been found in Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases. We also review innovative methods and technologies that enable the characterization of individual epigenetic modifications and more widespread epigenomic states at high resolution. We conclude that, together with complementary genetic, genomic, and related approaches, interrogating epigenetic and epigenomic profiles in neurodegenerative diseases represent important and increasingly practical strategies for advancing our understanding of and the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. PMID:21671162

  17. Advances in stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SUN, RONGRONG; LI, XIANCHI; LIU, MIN; ZENG, YI; CHEN, SHUANG; ZHANG, PEYING

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the primary cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, and represents a group of disorders associated with the loss of cardiac function. Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathologic mechanisms of the disease, the majority of the currently available therapies remain at best palliative, since the problem of cardiac tissue loss has not yet been addressed. Indeed, few therapeutic approaches offer direct tissue repair and regeneration, whereas the majority of treatment options aim to limit scar formation and adverse remodeling, while improving myocardial function. Of all the existing therapeutic approaches, the problem of cardiac tissue loss is addressed uniquely by heart transplantation. Nevertheless, alternative options, particularly stem cell therapy, has emerged as a novel and promising approach. This approach involves the transplantation of healthy and functional cells to promote the renewal of damaged cells and repair injured tissue. Bone marrow precursor cells were the first cell type used in clinical studies, and subsequently, preclinical and clinical investigations have been extended to the use of various populations of stem cells. This review addresses the present state of research as regards stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease. PMID:27220939

  18. The relationship between resting energy expenditure and weight loss in benign and malignant disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hansell, D T; Davies, J W; Burns, H J

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between cancer, weight loss, and resting energy expenditure (REE) has been investigated in 136 patients using indirect calorimetry. Ninety-one patients had gastric, colorectal, or nonsmall cell bronchial neoplasm, seven patients had other malignancies, and 38 patients had nonmalignant illness. Four groups were studied: weight stable cancer patients (CWS: N = 56), weight losing cancer patients (CWL: N = 42), weight stable patients with nonmalignant illness (NCWS: N = 22), and weight losing patients with nonmalignant illness (NCWL: N = 16). In each group REE correlated significantly with body weight, metabolic body size, and lean body mass (LBM: estimated from total body water measurements). The closest correlation was between REE and lean body mass, with the slope of the CWL regression line differing significantly from that of the CWS (p less than 0.05) and NCWS (p less than 0.02) groups. However, there was no difference in REE expressed as kcal/kg LBM/d between the groups. The slopes of the regressions between REE and LBM were almost identical when all cancer patients were compared with all patients with nonmalignant illness. However, when all weight stable patients were compared with all weight losing patients, there was a highly significant difference between the slopes of the regressions (p less than 0.005). This indicates that the weight losing state rather than the presence or absence of cancer is responsible for an alteration in the relationship between REE and LBM. There were no differences in REE between the different tumor types. It is concluded that REE is not elevated in patients with gastric, colorectal, or nonsmall cell bronchial cancer. Elevation of REE contributes very little to the etiology of cancer cachexia. PMID:3082302

  19. Declining Use of Radiotherapy in Stage I and II Hodgkin's Disease and Its Effect on Survival and Secondary Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Matthew; Rich, Shayna E.; Mahmood, Usama; Kwok, Young

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Concerns regarding long-term toxicities have led some to withhold radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of Stage I and II Hodgkin's disease (HD). The present study was undertaken to assess the use of RT for HD and its effect on overall survival and the development of secondary malignancies. Methods and Materials: The present study included data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from patients aged {>=}20 years who had been diagnosed with Stage I or II HD between 1988 and 2006. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Cox multivariate regression model was used to analyze trends. Results: A total of 12,247 patients were selected, and 51.5% had received RT. The median follow-up for the present cohort was 4.9 years, with 21% of the cohort having >10 years of follow-up. Between 1988 and 1991, 62.9% had undergone RT, but between 2004 and 2006, only 43.7% had undergone RT (p < .001). The 5-year overall survival rate was 76% for patients who had not received RT and 87% for those who had (p < .001). The hazard ratio adjusted for other variables in the regression model showed that patients who had not undergone RT (hazard ratio, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.72-2.02) was associated with significantly worse survival compared with patients who had received RT. The actuarial rate of developing a second malignancy was 14.6% vs. 15.0% at 15 years for those who had and had not undergone RT, respectively (p = .089). Conclusions: The present study is one of the largest studies to examine the role of RT for Stage I and II HD. Our results revealed a survival benefit with the addition of RT with no increase in the development of secondary malignancies compared with patients who had not received RT. Furthermore, the present nationwide study revealed a >20% absolute decrease in the use of RT from 1988 to 2006.

  20. Cytogenetic and molecular delineation of the smallest commonly deleted region of chromosome 5 in malignant myeloid diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Neuman, W L; Stock, W; Roulston, D; Larson, R A; Keinanen, M; Westbrook, C A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of a whole chromosome 5 or a deletion of its long arm (5q) is a recurring abnormality in malignant myeloid neoplasms. To determine the location of genes on 5q that may be involved in leukemogenesis, we examined the deleted chromosome 5 homologs in a series of 135 patients with malignant myeloid diseases. By comparing the breakpoints, we identified a small segment of 5q, consisting of band 5q31, that was deleted in each patient. This segment has been termed the critical region. Distal 5q contains a number of genes encoding growth factors, hormone receptors, and proteins involved in signal transduction or transcriptional regulation. These include several genes that are good candidates for a tumor-suppressor gene, as well as the genes encoding five hematopoietic growth factors (CSF2, IL3, IL4, IL5, and IL9). By using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have refined the localization of these genes to 5q31.1 and have determined the order of these genes and of other markers within 5q31. By hybridizing probes to metaphase cells with overlapping deletions involving 5q31, we have narrowed the critical region to a small segment of 5q31 containing the EGR1 gene. The five hematopoietic growth factor genes and seven other genes are excluded from this region. The EGR1 gene was not deleted in nine other patients with acute myeloid leukemia who did not have abnormalities of chromosome 5. By physical mapping, the minimum size of the critical region was estimated to be 2.8 megabases. This cytogenetic map of 5q31, together with the molecular characterization of the critical region, will facilitate the identification of a putative tumor-suppressor gene in this band. PMID:8516290

  1. Advances in designs for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development. PMID:23383393

  2. Advances in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sanjeev R.

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world, and its prevalence is predicted to rise in the future in parallel with rising levels of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is commonly associated with insulin resistance. Many patients have coexisting obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia or hyperglycaemia, and are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Although patients with simple steatosis have a good prognosis, a significant percentage will develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis which may progress to cirrhosis, end-stage liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite promising results from several pilot studies and small to medium randomized controlled trials, there is currently no pharmacological agent that is licensed for the treatment of NAFLD. At present the mainstay of treatment for all patients is lifestyle modification using a combination of diet, exercise and behavioural therapy. With recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD, the goal of treatment has shifted from simply trying to clear fat from the liver and prevent progressive liver damage to addressing and treating the metabolic risk factors for the condition. To reduce liver-related and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, all patients with NAFLD should be invited to enrol in adequately powered, randomized controlled studies testing novel therapies, many of which are targeted at reducing insulin resistance or preventing progressive liver disease. Coexisting obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia or hyperglycaemia should be treated aggressively. Orlistat, bariatric surgery, angiotensin receptor blockers, statins, fibrates, metformin and thiazolidinediones should all be considered, but treatments should be carefully tailored to meet the specific requirements of each patient. The efficacy and safety of any new treatment, as well as its cost-effectiveness, will need to be carefully evaluated

  3. Comparative effectiveness in hepatic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Page, Andrew J; Cosgrove, David; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of applying comparative effectiveness research (CER) strategies to the management of cancer are important. As the incidence of cancer increases both in the United States and worldwide, accurate analysis of which tests and treatments should be applied in which situations is critical, both in terms of measurable and meaningful clinical outcomes and health care costs. In the last 20 years alone, multiple controversies have arisen in the diagnosis and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors of the liver, making the management of liver malignancies a prime example of CER. Contributing factors to the development of these controversies include improvements in molecular characterization of these diseases and technological advances in surgery and radiology. The relative speed of these advances has outpaced data from clinical trials, in turn making robust data to inform clinical practice lacking. Indeed, many of the current treatment recommendations for the management of liver malignancies are based primarily on retrospective data. We herein review select CER issues concerning select decision-making topics in the management of liver malignancies. PMID:25677025

  4. CAP--advancing the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer disease treatments.

    PubMed

    Reiman, Eric M; Langbaum, Jessica B; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Bateman, Randall J; Morris, John C; Sperling, Reisa A; Aisen, Paul S; Roses, Allen D; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Carrillo, Maria C; Weninger, Stacie

    2016-01-01

    If we are to find treatments to postpone, reduce the risk of, or completely prevent the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), we need faster methods to evaluate promising preclinical AD treatments, new ways to work together in support of common goals, and a determination to expedite the initiation and performance of preclinical AD trials. In this article, we note some of the current challenges, opportunities and emerging strategies in preclinical AD treatment. We describe the Collaboration for Alzheimer's Prevention (CAP)-a convening, harmonizing and consensus-building initiative to help stakeholders advance AD prevention research with rigour, care and maximal impact-and we demonstrate the impact of CAP on the goals and design of new preclinical AD trials. PMID:26416539

  5. Advances in nanotechnology for the management of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C

    2013-02-01

    Nanotechnology holds tremendous potential to advance the current treatment of coronary artery disease. Nanotechnology may assist medical therapies by providing a safe and efficacious delivery platform for a variety of drugs aimed at modulating lipid disorders, decreasing inflammation and angiogenesis within atherosclerotic plaques, and preventing plaque thrombosis. Nanotechnology may improve coronary stent applications by promoting endothelial recovery on a stent surface utilizing bio-mimetic nanofibrous scaffolds, and also by preventing in-stent restenosis using nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs that are decoupled from stents. Additionally, nanotechnology may enhance tissue-engineered graft materials for application in coronary artery bypass grafting by facilitating cellular infiltration and remodeling of a graft matrix. PMID:23245913

  6. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  7. [Latent malignant lymphoma diagnosed at autopsy in a patient with cold agglutinin disease coexisting thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Shigeoka, Toru; Yamagata, Hiroki; Ishido, Aki; Tominaga, Takayuki; Kamei, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Toru

    2013-12-01

    An 89-year-old woman presented to our hospital with hemolytic anemia and a high titer of cold agglutinins. Red cell agglutination was observed on a blood smear. Agglutination visibly decreased after warming the blood; therefore, the patient was diagnosed with cold agglutinin disease (CAD). Bone marrow aspiration revealed no infiltration of malignant cells. Computed tomography indicated moderate splenomegaly. The patient had neither an infection nor autoimmune disease. Initial steroid therapy was ineffective and hemolysis worsened. Meanwhile, thrombocytopenia, delirium, fever, and schistocytes in the blood were observed. The progression of hemolysis was attributed not only to CAD but also to coexisting thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) because of the decreased ADAMTS 13 level. Autopsy revealed mild paraaortic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. Microscopic examination revealed lymphoma cell infiltration in the spleen, liver, bone marrow, and paraaortic lymph nodes. These observations suggested that TTP and CAD were both secondary complications. This case highlights the importance of an autopsy for the detection of latent lymphoma, which can be difficult to diagnose before the patient's death. Careful examination to exclude lymphomas is important in patients with CAD at the time of diagnosis. PMID:24452150

  8. Ionizing radiation promotes advanced malignant traits in nasopharyngeal carcinoma via activation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    SU, ZHONGWU; LI, GUO; LIU, CHAO; REN, SHULING; TIAN, YONGQUAN; LIU, YONG; QIU, YUANZHENG

    2016-01-01

    Post-irradiation residual mass and recurrence always suggest a worse prognosis for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Our study aimed to investigate the malignant behaviors of post-irradiation residual NPC cells, to identify the potential underlying mechanisms and to search for appropriate bio-targets to overcome this malignancy. Two NPC cell lines were firstly exposed to 60 Gy irradiation, and residual cells were collected. In our previous study, colony formation assay detected the radioresistance of these cells. Here, the CCK-8 assay examined the cell sensitivity to paclitaxel and cisplatin. Wound-healing and Transwell assays were performed to investigate cell motility and invasion capabilities. Inverted phase-contrast microscopy was used to observe and photograph the morphology of cells. Expression levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related proteins were detected by western blot assay in NPC cells and tissues. The mRNA levels of cancer stem cell (CSC)-related genes were detected via qRT-PCR. The results revealed that residual NPC cells exhibited enhanced radioresistance and cross-resistance to paclitaxel and cisplatin. Higher capacities of invasion and migration were also observed. An elongated morphology with pseudopodia formation and broadening in the intercellular space was observed in the residual cells. Downregulation of E-cadherin and upregulation of vimentin were detected in the residual NPC cells and tissues. CSC-related Lgr5 and c-myc were significantly upregulated in the CNE-2-Rs and 6-10B-Rs radioresistance cells. Higher proportions of Lgr5+ cells were observed in radioresistant cells via immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that residual NPC cells had an advanced malignant transition and presented with both EMT and a CSC phenotype. This provides a possible clue and treatment strategy for advanced and residual NPC. PMID:27108809

  9. Dietary intakes, resting metabolic rates, and body composition in benign and malignant gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, M; Bryson, E I; Kark, A E

    1980-01-01

    Dietary protein and energy intakes were assessed in 42 patients with cancer and 24 with benign conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. The relations of dietary intake to body composition was examined. Resulting metabolic rate was measured in 51 patients. No significant differences in dietary intake or metabolic rate were found between patients with cancer and those with benign disease. There were significant positive correlations between protein and energy intakes and the ratio of total body potassium to total body water in patients with benign disease but not in those with cancer. Weight loss was probably due to inadequate food intake, the main defect being energy deficiency, since protein intake was usually well maintained. Supplementing with energy the voluntary ingested diet of patients with cancer would probably prevent weight loss in most cases. PMID:7427083

  10. Recent advancement of therapeutic endoscopy in the esophageal benign diseases.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Robert; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-05-16

    Over the past 30 years, the field of endoscopy has witnessed several advances. With the advent of endoscopic mucosal resection, removal of large mucosal lesions have become possible. Thereafter, endoscopic submucosal resection was refined, permitting en bloc removal of large superficial neoplasms. Such techniques have facilitated the development of antireflux mucosectomy, a promising novel treatment for gastroesophageal reflux. The introduction and use of over the scope clips has allowed for endoscopic closure of defects in the gastrointestinal tract, which were traditionally treated with surgical intervention. With the development of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), the treatment of achalasia and spastic disorders of the esophagus have been revolutionized. From the submucosal tunnelling technique developed for POEM, Per oral endoscopic tumor resection of subepithelial tumors was made possible. Simultaneously, advances in biotechnology have expanded esophageal stenting capabilities with the introduction of fully covered metal and plastic stents, as well as biodegradable stents. Once deemed a primarily diagnostic tool, endoscopy has quickly transcended to a minimally invasive intervention and therapeutic tool. These techniques are reviewed with regards to their application to benign disease of the esophagus. PMID:25992187

  11. Recent advancement of therapeutic endoscopy in the esophageal benign diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, Robert; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the field of endoscopy has witnessed several advances. With the advent of endoscopic mucosal resection, removal of large mucosal lesions have become possible. Thereafter, endoscopic submucosal resection was refined, permitting en bloc removal of large superficial neoplasms. Such techniques have facilitated the development of antireflux mucosectomy, a promising novel treatment for gastroesophageal reflux. The introduction and use of over the scope clips has allowed for endoscopic closure of defects in the gastrointestinal tract, which were traditionally treated with surgical intervention. With the development of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), the treatment of achalasia and spastic disorders of the esophagus have been revolutionized. From the submucosal tunnelling technique developed for POEM, Per oral endoscopic tumor resection of subepithelial tumors was made possible. Simultaneously, advances in biotechnology have expanded esophageal stenting capabilities with the introduction of fully covered metal and plastic stents, as well as biodegradable stents. Once deemed a primarily diagnostic tool, endoscopy has quickly transcended to a minimally invasive intervention and therapeutic tool. These techniques are reviewed with regards to their application to benign disease of the esophagus. PMID:25992187

  12. Human BK Polyomavirus—The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV) family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD). HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future. PMID:26184314

  13. T cell-depleted partial matched unrelated donor transplant for advanced myeloid malignancy: KIR ligand mismatch and outcome.

    PubMed

    Weisdorf, Daniel; Cooley, Sarah; Devine, Steven; Fehniger, Todd A; DiPersio, John; Anasetti, Claudio; Waller, Edmund K; Porter, David; Farag, Sherif; Drobyski, William; Defor, Todd; Haagenson, Michael; Curtsinger, Julie; Miller, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the applicability of high-dose conditioning, CD34 selection, and enhanced natural killer (NK) cell alloreactivity reported as promising after haploidentical transplantation, we tested the same strategy for patients with advanced/high-risk myeloid leukemia lacking either related or well-matched unrelated donors (URD). In a prospective multicenter clinical trial using pretransplantation conditioning of thiotepa (5 mg/kg/day × 2), fludarabine (40 mg/mg/M(2)/day × 5), and total body radiation (800 cGy) plus thymoglobulin (2.5 mg/kg/day × 2), as well as a CD34 selected filgrastim stimulated peripheral blood graft from a partial matched URD, we treated 24 patients. The patients (median age 40 [range: 22-61]) were mismatched at 1-3 of 10 HLA loci with their donors; all were mismatched at HLA-C. Thirty-seven percent were ethnic or racial minorities. Twenty-one of 24 engrafted promptly with 1 primary graft failure and 2 early deaths. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) (34%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 14-54%), chronic GVHD (20%, 95% CI, 2%-38%), and relapse (26%, 95% CI, 8%-84%) were unaffected by KIR ligand donor:recipient mismatch (n = 5) versus KIR ligand match (n = 19). Only 3 (12%) had grade III-IV GVHD. Nonrelapse occurred in 17% (95% CI, 30%-31%) by 100 days and in 35% (95% CI, 15%-55%) by 1 year. Two-year survival and leukemia-free survival were each 40% (95% CI, 21%-59%) and was similar in KIR ligand matched or mismatched patients. Infections, mostly in the first 2 months, were frequent, and were the cause of death in 5 patients (35% of deaths). T cell recovery and NK cell proliferation and functional maturation were not altered by KIR ligand match or mismatch status. For these high-risk patients, this high intensity regimen and T depleted approach yielded satisfactory outcomes, but logistical difficulties in arranging URD grafts for patients with high-risk, unstable leukemia limited accrual

  14. New Targeted Treatment May Slow Disease in Patients with Advanced GIST

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients with Advanced GIST A new oral drug, regorafenib (Stivarga®), may delay the progression of advanced gastrointestinal ... in The Lancet demonstrated that patients treated with regorafenib lived longer without their disease progressing than patients ...

  15. MOLECULAR ADVANCES IN AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Anna Rachel; Germino, Gregory G.; Somlo, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD) is the most common form of inherited kidney disease that results renal failure. The understanding the pathogenesis of ADPKD has advanced significantly since the discovery of the two causative genes, PKD1 or PKD2. Dominantly inherited gene mutations followed by somatic second hit mutations inactivating the normal copy of the respective gene result in renal tubular cyst formation that deforms the kidney and eventually impairs its function. The respective gene products, polycystin-1 and polycystin-2, work together in a common cellular pathway. Polycystin-1, a large receptor molecule, forms a receptor-channel complex with polycystin-2, which is a cation channel belonging to the TRP family. Both polycystin proteins have been localized to the primary cilium, a non-motile microtubule based structure that extends from the apical membrane of tubular cells into the lumen. Here we discuss recent insights in the pathogenesis of ADPKD including the genetics of ADPKD, the properties of the respective polycystin proteins, the role of cilia, and some cell signaling pathways that have been implicated in the pathways related to PKD1 and PKD2. PMID:20219615

  16. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymer Materials for Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Fengting; Qiu, Tian; Liu, Libing; Ying, Jianming; Wang, Shu

    2016-02-10

    The extraordinary optical amplification and light-harvesting properties of conjugated polymers impart sensing systems with higher sensitivity, which meets the primary demands of early cancer diagnosis. Recent advances in the detection of DNA methylation and mutation with polyfluorene derivatives based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a means to modulate fluorescent responses attest to the great promise of conjugated polymers as powerful tools for the clinical diagnosis of diseases. To facilitate the ever-changing needs of diagnosis, the development of detection approaches and FRET signal analysis are highlighted in this review. Due to their exceptional brightness, excellent photostability, and low or absent toxicity, conjugated polymers are verified as superior materials for in-vivo imaging, and provide feasibility for future clinical molecular-imaging applications. The integration of conjugated polymers with clinical research has shown profound effects on diagnosis for the early detection of disease-related biomarkers, as well as in-vivo imaging, which leads to a multidisciplinary scientific field with perspectives in both basic research and application issues. PMID:26679834

  17. [Infections related to central venous catheters in children affected from malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2011-06-27

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are an essential part of the treatment of children with haematological and oncological diseases. Unfortunately, CVC also represent a major risk factor of bloodstream infections. Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in children are often diagnosed based on blood cultures from the CVC only. Most CRBSI can be treated without catheter removal. On suspicion of CRBSI empirical antibiotic treatment with piperacillin-tazobactam, meropenem or ampicillin in combination with gentamicin is recommended. The systemic treatment can be combined with catheter-lock therapy. PMID:21712011

  18. Synchronous bilateral primary breast malignant phyllodes tumor and carcinoma of the breast with Paget’s disease: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyuan; Cheng, Xiaoming; Sun, Suhong; Yang, Weiming; Kong, Fanli; Zeng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous bilateral primary breast malignant phyllodes tumor or/and carcinoma of the breast with Paget’s disease is rare. In the article, we present a case of bilateral carcinoma of the breast with Paget’s disease of the right breast and malignant phyllodes tumor of the left breast. A 44-years-old Chinese woman presented with a 1 month history of the right breast nipple with eczema and fester and growing and palpable mass of left breast. Molybdenum target X-ray revealed microcalcification in the right breast, which was highly suspected of malignant tumor, and round-like mass with smooth surface and homogeneous density in the left breast. Color ultrasound showed a lobulated lump which circumferential blood flows around in the left breast, and which did not show any mass in the right breast. The patient was undertaken the bilateral modified radical mastectomy. The histological diagnosis was Paget’s disease associated with infiltrating ductal carcinoma in the right breast and malignant phyllodes tumor the left breast. The patient also received 6 cycles of the postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy by using T.T. regimen comprised docetaxel (100 mg) and pirarubicin (60 mg). PMID:26770378

  19. Timing of the loss of Pten protein determines disease severity in a mouse model of myeloid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Webster, Cody; Shao, Lijian; Lensing, Shelly Y.; Ni, Hongyu; Feng, Wei; Colorado, Natalia; Pathak, Rupak; Xiang, Zhifu; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Li, Shaoguang; Zhou, Daohong; Emanuel, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive pediatric mixed myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN). JMML leukemogenesis is linked to a hyperactivated RAS pathway, with driver mutations in the KRAS, NRAS, NF1, PTPN11, or CBL genes. Previous murine models demonstrated how those genes contributed to the selective hypersensitivity of JMML cells to granulocyte macrophage–colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a unifying characteristic in the disease. However, it is unclear what causes the early death in children with JMML, because transformation to acute leukemia is rare. Here, we demonstrate that loss of Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog) protein at postnatal day 8 in mice harboring Nf1 haploinsufficiency results in an aggressive MPN with death at a murine prepubertal age of 20 to 35 days (equivalent to an early juvenile age in JMML patients). The death in the mice was due to organ infiltration with monocytes/macrophages. There were elevated activities of protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in cells at physiological concentrations of GM-CSF. These were more pronounced in mice with Nf1 haploinsufficiency than in littermates with wild-type Nf1, but this model is insufficient to cause cells to be GM-CSF hypersensitive. This new model represents a murine MPN model with features of a pediatric unclassifiable mixed MDS/MPN and mimics many clinical manifestations of JMML in terms of age of onset, aggressiveness, and organ infiltration with monocytes/macrophages. Our data suggest that the timing of the loss of PTEN protein plays a critical role in determining the disease severity in myeloid malignancies. This model may be useful for studying the pathogenesis of pediatric diseases with alterations in the Ras pathway. PMID:26764354

  20. Timing of the loss of Pten protein determines disease severity in a mouse model of myeloid malignancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y Lucy; Yan, Yan; Webster, Cody; Shao, Lijian; Lensing, Shelly Y; Ni, Hongyu; Feng, Wei; Colorado, Natalia; Pathak, Rupak; Xiang, Zhifu; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Li, Shaoguang; Zhou, Daohong; Emanuel, Peter D

    2016-04-14

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive pediatric mixed myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN). JMML leukemogenesis is linked to a hyperactivated RAS pathway, with driver mutations in theKRAS,NRAS,NF1,PTPN11, orCBLgenes. Previous murine models demonstrated how those genes contributed to the selective hypersensitivity of JMML cells to granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a unifying characteristic in the disease. However, it is unclear what causes the early death in children with JMML, because transformation to acute leukemia is rare. Here, we demonstrate that loss of Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog) protein at postnatal day 8 in mice harboringNf1haploinsufficiency results in an aggressive MPN with death at a murine prepubertal age of 20 to 35 days (equivalent to an early juvenile age in JMML patients). The death in the mice was due to organ infiltration with monocytes/macrophages. There were elevated activities of protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in cells at physiological concentrations of GM-CSF. These were more pronounced in mice withNf1haploinsufficiency than in littermates with wild-typeNf1,but this model is insufficient to cause cells to be GM-CSF hypersensitive. This new model represents a murine MPN model with features of a pediatric unclassifiable mixed MDS/MPN and mimics many clinical manifestations of JMML in terms of age of onset, aggressiveness, and organ infiltration with monocytes/macrophages. Our data suggest that the timing of the loss of PTEN protein plays a critical role in determining the disease severity in myeloid malignancies. This model may be useful for studying the pathogenesis of pediatric diseases with alterations in the Ras pathway. PMID:26764354

  1. Do malignant diseases affect semen quality? Sperm parameters of men with cancers.

    PubMed

    Caponecchia, L; Cimino, G; Sacchetto, R; Fiori, C; Sebastianelli, A; Salacone, P; Marcucci, I; Tomassini, S; Rago, R

    2016-04-01

    The advent of modern treatments together with the improvement of the surgical techniques has significantly increased 5-year survival rates of young patients with cancer. Although the deleterious effects of chemotherapy and radiation are well documented, controversies exist about the effect of cancer itself on semen parameters before treatment. We collected data on 236 patients representative of different types of cancers reoffered at our institution for sperm cryopreservation with the aim to correlate the pre-freeze semen parameters with type of cancer, disease stage and with semen quality of 102 fertile and healthy men. The median baseline semen parameters of all our patients with cancer are placed above the 5th percentile of the World Health Organization reference value, but the type of cancer may impact the sperm parameters. In testicular tumours and in Hodgkin lymphoma, we show a semen concentration statistically lower than in the fertile population, while in patients with other cancers, there is no difference with the healthy men. We found no correlation between semen quality and disease stage. Eighty-six per cent of our patients do not have children at the time of semen cryopreservation, and the only established clinical option for preserving fertility of these men is cryopreservation of spermatozoa. PMID:26173956

  2. [Intracytoplasmic lumina of benign and malignant breast diseases--a light and electron microscopic study].

    PubMed

    Gu, C M

    1990-07-01

    Intracytoplasmic lumina (ICLs) of 70 cases with breast carcinoma and 29 cases with benign breast diseases were observed by light and electron microscopy. ICLs were morphologically divided into two types. Type A was characterized by the presence of secretory materials stained with eosin in the lumen and Type B by the cytoplasmic vacuoles under light microscope. Electron microscopic observation on Type A ICLs showed numerous filiform microvilli projecting towards the lumen and various amounts of secretory materials in the lumen. Type B of ICLs only had scanty and short microvilli and rarely secretory materials in the lumen. The results indicated that: 1. The frequency of ICLs in breast cancer was significantly higher than that in benign breast disease (P less than 0.01). 2. The frequency of ICLs in breast cancer showed strong negative correlation with its histological grades but not with its histological types. 3. ICLs had similar frequency under both light and electron microscopes. As a relatively specific structure in breast carcinoma cells, ICLs may be helpful in the diagnosis of breast carcinoma and establishment of the breast origin for metastatic carcinoma. PMID:2176965

  3. [Problems occurring in the application of cytogenetic biomarkers for alcoholics with and without malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Gundy, Sarolta; Székely, Gábor; Farkas, Gyöngyi; Pulay, Attila; Remenár, Eva

    2008-06-01

    Applicability of alcohol- and smoking-related cancer-risk biomarkers might be modified by several factors. Among those, reality of self-reports on alcohol consumption of alcoholic patients with different diseases and extreme high mutagen hypersensitivity of Hungarians, as well as the immunologic role of peripheral lymphocytes as experimental objects of cytogenetic biomarkers seem to be new viewpoints of interest. To clarify these problems, 432 head and neck cancer patients (HNCP), 62 alcoholics with alcoholic hepatitis (ALCL), and 101 disease-free chronic alcoholics (ALC) were examined. Despite clinically confirmed alcohol-related diagnoses (and GGT and MCV values) only about half of HNCPs and ALCLs reported about any alcohol consumption, in contrast to the realistic self-reports of ALCs. In cytogenetic case control investigations no difference between the spontaneous rate of chromosomal aberrations (CAs) of healthy controls and ALCs was found, however, genetic instability expressed as a 40-50% elevation rate of CAs in HNCPs and ALCLs might be associated with systemic inflammatory reaction of lymphocytes. Bleomycin sensitivity assay showed the highest break/cell (b/c) values not in HNCPs (1.06 b/c) as it was reported earlier, but in "healthy" ALCs (1.52 b/c). This phenomenon can be related to the local effect of genotoxins (alcohol, smoking, and in particular the diet), which probably reflects merely a reaction of mucosal immune system. Nearly 50% of mutagen-hypersensitive Hungarian controls, in contrary to the expected 10-20% ones, might also be explained by this. Similarly, HNCPs with oral cancer, where the local mutagen effect was the most intensive, had the highest b/c values. In conclusion, when cytogenetic biomarkers of alcoholism are examined, the subjective character of self-reports at epidemiologic level and immunologic role of lymphocyte subpopulations as genetic confounders must also be taken into consideration. PMID:18640891

  4. Central Nervous System Disease in Hematological Malignancies: Historical Perspective and Practical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Thiel, Eckhard

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) 5-year survival rates are approaching 90% in children and 50% in adults who are receiving contemporary risk-directed treatment protocols. Current efforts focus not only on further improving cure rate but also on patient quality of life. Hence, all protocols decrease or limit the use of cranial irradiation as central nervous system (CNS)-directed therapy, even in patients with high-risk presenting features, such as the presence of leukemia cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (even resulting from traumatic lumbar puncture), adverse genetic features, T-cell immunophenotype, and a large leukemia-cell burden. Current strategies for CNS-directed therapy involve effective systemic chemotherapy (eg, dexamethasone, high-dose methotrexate, intensive asparaginase, ifosfamide) and early intensification and optimization of intrathecal therapy. Options under investigation for the treatment of relapsed or refractory CNS leukemia in ALL patients include thiotepa and intrathecal liposomal cytarabine. CNS involvement in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) is associated with young age, advanced stage, number of extranodal sites, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, and International Prognostic Index score. Refractory CNS lymphoma in patients with NHL carries a poor prognosis, with a median survival of 2 to 6 months; the most promising treatment, autologous stem cell transplant, can extend median survival from 10 to 26 months. CNS prophylaxis is required during the initial treatment of NHL subtypes that carry a high risk of CNS relapse, such as B-cell ALL, Burkitt’s lymphoma, and lymphoblastic lymphoma. The use of CNS prophylaxis in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is controversial because of the low risk of CNS relapse (~5%) in this population. In this article, we review current and past practice of intrathecal therapy in ALL and NHL and the risk-models that aim to identify predictors of CNS relapse in NHL. PMID:19660680

  5. Chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from women irradiated for benign and malignant gynecological disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinerman, R.A.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Inskip, P.D.; Tarone, R.E.; Littlefield, L.G.; Sayer, A.M.; Cookfair, D.L.; Wactawski-Wende, J.

    1994-07-01

    Excess leukemias have occurred after partial-body radiotherapy for cervical cancer and benign gynecological disease (BGD). However, the level of risk is nearly the same in both groups, about twofold, despite a tenfold difference in average dose to active bone marrow. High-dose cell killing has been postulated as one explanation for this apparent inconsistency. To examine whether chromosome aberration rates observed in lymphocytes many years after exposure might serve as population markers of cancer risk, blood samples were taken from 60 women treated for BGD (34 with radiation) and cytogenetic data compared with previous results from 96 women irradiated for cervical cancer. Remarkably, the rate of stable aberrations, which reflects nonlethal damage in surviving stem cells, was only slightly higher among the cancer patients. Thus the lower-dose regimens to treat benign disorders resulted in much higher aberration yields per unit dose than those for cervical cancer. Assuming that the fraction of cytogenetically aberrant stem cells that survive radiotherapy contributes to the leukemogenic process, these data are then consistent with the epidemiological observations of comparable overall leukemia risks seen in these two irradiated populations. Accordingly, for patient populations given partial-body radiotherapy, stable aberrations at a long time after exposure appear to serve as biomarkers of effective risk rather than as biomarkers of radiation dose received. 30 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity and lymphocyte-depleted variants of Hodgkin's disease are probable dendritic cell malignancies.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, I C; Hart, D N; Colls, B M; Nimmo, J C; Willis, D A; Angus, H B

    1989-01-01

    The normal counterpart of the Reed-Sternberg cell and its mononuclear variant, collectively referred to as Hodgkin's cells (HC), remains controversial. The possibility that HC are malignant dendritic cells was tested by using a panel of 38 monoclonal antibodies to phenotype the cells from 16 cases of Hodgkin's disease (HD), excluding lymphocyte-predominant HD, and the Hodgkin's cell line L428. The results were then compared with the known phenotype of human dendritic cells. HC stained strongly for HLA Class I and Class II antigens. The leucocyte common antigen was weakly expressed in most cases. Expression of T and B cell markers was unusual, with the exception of the CD40 antigen which was found on a majority of HC. HC commonly expressed the CD11a, CR4 (CD11c), CD15, CD18 and a number of activation antigens but did not stain with a variety of macrophage-specific antibodies. The antigenic phenotype of L428 and the HC of case material were similar. This immunocytological analysis failed to support a lymphocyte or macrophage origin for HC. Instead the antigenic phenotype of the Reed-Sternberg cell and its mononuclear variant more closely resembles that of dendritic cells than of any other haemopoietic cell normally resident in lymph nodes. PMID:2787713

  7. A novel reduced intensity conditioning regimen for unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation in children with non-malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Suhag H.; Mendizabal, Adam; Benjamin, Cara L.; Komanduri, Krishna V.; Antony, Jeyaraj; Petrovic, Aleksandra; Hale, Gregory; Driscoll, Timothy A.; Martin, Paul L.; Page, Kristin; Flickinger, Ketti; Moffet, Jerelyn; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Szabolcs, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have the potential to decrease transplant-related morbidity and mortality. However, engraftment failure has been prohibitively high after RIC unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) in chemotherapy-naïve children with non-malignant diseases (NMD). Twenty-two children with a median age of 2.8 years, many with severe comorbidities and prior viral infections were enrolled in a novel RIC protocol consisting of hydroxyurea, alemtuzumab, fludarabine, melphalan and thiotepa followed by single UCBT. Patients were transplanted for inherited metabolic disorders (N=8), primary immunodeficiencies (N=9), hemoglobinopathies (N=4) and Diamond Blackfan anemia (N=1). Most UCB units were HLA-mismatched with median infused total nucleated cell dose of 7.9 × 107/kg. No serious organ toxicities were attributable to the regimen. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment was 86.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 65%–100%) in a median of 20 days, with the majority sustaining >95% donor chimerism at 1 year. Cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grades II–IV and III–IV by day 180 was 27.3% (95% CI, 8.7%–45.9%) and 13.6% (95 CI, 0%–27.6%), respectively. Cumulative incidence of extensive chronic GVHD was 9.1% (95% CI, 0%–20.8%). The primary causes of death were viral infections (N=3), acute GVHD (N=1) and transfusion reaction (N=1). One-year overall and event-free survivals were 77.3% (95% CI, 53.7%–89.8%) and 68.2% (95% CI, 44.6%–83.4%) with 31 months median follow-up. This is the first RIC protocol demonstrating durable UCB engraftment in children with NMD. Future risk-based modifications of this regimen could decrease the incidence of viral infections. (www.clinicaltrials.gov/NCT00744692) PMID:24296492

  8. Recent Advances in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yifei; Menon, Madhav C; Deng, Yueyi; Chen, Yiping; He, John Cijiang

    2015-09-01

    Because current treatment options for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are limited, many patients seek out alternative therapies such as traditional Chinese medicine. However, there is a lack of evidence from large clinical trials to support the use of traditional medicines in patients with CKD. Many active components of traditional medicine formulas are undetermined and their toxicities are unknown. Therefore, there is a need for research to identify active compounds from traditional medicines and understand the mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as their potential toxicity, and subsequently perform well-designed, randomized, controlled, clinical trials to study the efficacy and safety of their use in patients with CKD. Significant progress has been made in this field within the last several years. Many active compounds have been identified by applying sophisticated techniques such as mass spectrometry, and more mechanistic studies of these compounds have been performed using both in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, several well-designed, large, randomized, clinical trials have recently been published. We summarize these recent advances in the field of traditional medicines as they apply to CKD. In addition, current barriers for further research are also discussed. Due to the ongoing research in this field, we believe that stronger evidence to support the use of traditional medicines for CKD will emerge in the near future. PMID:26015275

  9. Aortic Stenosis, a Left Ventricular Disease: Insights from Advanced Imaging.

    PubMed

    Badiani, Sveeta; van Zalen, Jet; Treibel, Thomas A; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Moon, James C; Lloyd, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common primary valve disorder in the elderly with an increasing prevalence. It is increasingly clear that it is also a disease of the left ventricle (LV) rather than purely the aortic valve. The transition from left ventricular hypertrophy to fibrosis results in the eventual adverse effects on systolic and diastolic function. Appropriate selection of patients for aortic valve intervention is crucial, and current guidelines recommend aortic valve replacement in severe AS with symptoms or in asymptomatic patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50 %. LVEF is not a sensitive marker and there are other parameters used in multimodality imaging techniques, including longitudinal strain, exercise stress echo and cardiac MRI that may assist in detecting subclinical and subtle LV dysfunction. These findings offer potentially better ways to evaluate patients, time surgery, predict recovery and potentially offer targets for specific therapies. This article outlines the pathophysiology behind the LV response to aortic stenosis and the role of advanced multimodality imaging in describing it. PMID:27384950

  10. Malignant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, L S; Huang, M H; Lin, T S; Huang, B S; Chien, K Y

    1992-07-15

    Sixty-one patients underwent operations for malignant thymomas between 1961 and 1989. Twenty-three patients had associated myasthenia gravis (MG), an incidence of 37.7%. Upon being admitted to the hospital, the patients' most common symptoms included chest pain, MG, cough, and dyspnea. Only 7 of 61 (11.5%) patients had no symptom. Tumor staging of 58 patients with invasive thymomas was performed according to Masaoka classification. The patients were classified as follows: Stage II disease, 5; Stage III, 41; Stage IVa, 8; and Stage IVb, 4. In addition, thymic carcinoma was present in three patients. The series had a resection rate of 55.7%. The incidence of operative complications was 16.3%. Only one patient died of myocardial infarction; the incidence of operative mortality was 1.6%. The patients with MG had a higher rate of resection (69.6%) and a higher incidence of complete thymectomy (14 of 23 patients; 60.9%). Mixed lymphoepithelial tumors and epithelial cell predominant tumors were the most frequent histologic patterns (45.9% and 34.4%, respectively). Fifty-two patients had postoperative radiation therapy, and 10 patients had chemotherapy. The overall cumulative survival rates in the series were 59% and 34% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The results demonstrated that the factors affecting the prognosis may include resectability, postoperative irradiation or chemotherapy, MG, and tumor staging. The influence of histologic variation on survival rates could not be clearly defined in the series. Surgical resection, particularly complete thymectomy, followed by irradiation is the primary option of therapeutic management for malignant thymoma. PMID:1617594

  11. A Case of Pediatric Melanoma: Treatment Considerations in Advanced Disease.

    PubMed

    Albino, Frank P; Wood, Benjamin C; Oh, Albert; Rogers, Gary F; Sauerhammer, Tina

    2015-05-01

    We document a 3-year-old healthy African American girl who developed malignant melanoma on her lower extremity. The clinical appearance offered little indication of the lesion's severity (T4), and only the history of de novo presentation and disproportionate growth raised clinical suspicion. This case report highlights the subtle clinical findings of this condition and presents controversies related to surgical management of pediatric melanoma. PMID:26090292

  12. The Malignant Protein Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    When most people hear the words malignant and brain, cancer immediately comes to mind. But our authors argue that proteins can be malignant too, and can spread harmfully through the brain in neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, CTE, and ALS. Studying how proteins such as PrP, amyloid beta, tau, and others aggregate and spread, and kill brain cells, represents a crucial new frontier in neuroscience. PMID:27408676

  13. Low acute hematological toxicity during chemotherapy predicts reduced disease control in advanced Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Brosteanu, O; Hasenclever, D; Loeffler, M; Diehl, V

    2004-03-01

    Chemotherapy-treated patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease (HD) differ considerably in acute hematotoxicity. Hematotoxicity may be indicative of pharmacological and metabolic heterogeneity. We hypothesized that low hematotoxicity might correlate with reduced systemic dose and thus reduced disease control. A total of 266 patients with advanced HD treated with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone, doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (COPP-ABVD) were analyzed (HD6 trial of the German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group). The reported WHO grade of leukocytopenia was averaged over chemotherapy cycles given and weighted with the reciprocal dose intensity of the corresponding cycle. The low and high toxicity groups were defined in retrospect as having had an averaged WHO grade of leukocytopenia 2.1, respectively. The independent impact of low hematological toxicity on freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) was assessed multivariately adjusting for the international prognostic score for advanced HD. The results were validated in two independent cohorts [181 patients treated with COPP-ABVD (HD9-trial) and 250 patients treated with COPP-ABV-ifosfamide, methotrexate, etoposide, and prednisone (IMEP) (HD6 trial)]. The 5-year FFTF rates were 68% for patients with high toxicity vs 47% for patients with low toxicity [multivariate relative risk (RR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-3.0, p=0.0002]. Patients with low toxicity received significantly higher nominal dose ( p=0.02) and dose intensity ( p<0.0001). This finding was confirmed in both validation cohorts (multivariate RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.8, p=0.01 and RR 1.5, 95% CI 1.01-2.26, p=0.04, respectively). Patients with low hematotoxicity have significantly higher failure rates despite higher doses and dose intensity. Hematotoxicity is an independent prognostic factor for treatment outcome. This observation suggests a strategy of individualized dosing adapted to hematotoxicity

  14. Advances in the management of patients with thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, H J; Meier, D A; Kaplan, M

    1995-07-01

    Discoveries related to thyroid immunology, especially concerning the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor, may facilitate new immunologic approaches to the therapy of Graves' disease and the thyroiditis syndromes. Advances in genetics are being applied to the thyroid hormone resistance syndromes and papillary and medullary carcinomas. The development of ever more sensitive TSH assays has led to the detection of subclinical thyroid disease, which has special implications for the sick and elderly patients. Sensitive TSH assays also allow more precise titration of levothyroxine (T4) dosages, especially for patients with a past history of thyroid cancer. Evidence continues to accumulate suggesting that postmenopausal women on T4 doses that suppress the TSH level below 0.1 ulU/mL have lower bone mineral density than matched patients with healthy TSH levels. Also, pregnant hypothyroid women need higher T4 doses to normalize the TSH levels. In the evaluation of thyroid nodules, fine-needle aspiration biopsy is the single most definitive modality in selecting the patients for surgery. Scintigraphy provides a complimentary role, especially in defining autonomously functioning thyroid adenomas (AFTA), because these should not be treated with T4 suppression. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy is occasionally helpful with nodules that are difficult to palpate. Concern for possible tracheal compression after treatment of toxic multinodular goiter with large doses of radioactive iodine (I-131) in the range of 50 to 150 mCi (1.85 to 5.5 GBq) does not seem warranted. Work, primarily out of Italy, suggests AFTA can be ablated with repeat ethanol injections. Residual tissues after thyroidectomy for differentiated carcinoma can be "stunned" by tracer doses of 131I greater than 3.0 mCi (111 MBq), which diminishes the uptake and effectiveness of a subsequent therapy dose. Positron emission tomograph, imaging with thallium-201, and Technetium 99m Sestamibi can identify a small number

  15. A GFP endometriosis model reveals important morphological characteristics of the angiogenic process that govern benign and malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Palumbo, Antônio; Santos, João Marcos; Mattos, Rômulo Medina; dos Santos, Thiago Alves; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Boldrini, Leonardo da Cunha; Perini, Jamila Alessandra; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico

    2014-07-01

    Endometriosis involves the growth of endometriotic tissue outside the uterine cavity, and is frequently associated with different malignancies. A well-reported alteration in the disease microenvironment is the proliferation of new blood vessels around the lesions, as part of a necessary repertory to contribute to the invasiveness and development of infiltrating endometriosis. Therefore, the establishment of a reliable experimental model is essential to elucidate the contribution of angiogenesis and to develop new therapeutic approaches to endometriosis treatment. For this purpose we transplanted endometrial fragments from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-mice (n=20) into the peritoneal cavity of wild-type mice (n=20), and then analyzed the morphological changes and the process of angiogenesis. The lesions were cystic and vascularized, and showed morphological hallmarks such as endometrial glands and stroma. An increase in endometriotic lesion vascular density was revealed by immunostaining and RNAm expression for Vegf and its receptor Flk-1, and the lesions were confirmed as a tissue-donor source by GFP fluorescent cells. The same pattern was observed through staining of activated macrophages and an increase of about 25% in the number of macrophage-positive cells was also demonstrated in endometriotic lesions by flow cytometry, which concords with previous data that correlate endometriosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. According to our understanding, this is the first demonstration that the pattern of the angiogenic process in the GFP endometriosis model is very similar to that of cancer. These observations will be useful for investigation of the process of angiogenesis involved in the attachment and invasion of endometrial cells, as well as an in vivo platform model to study the effects of antiangiogenic drugs. PMID:24385307

  16. Antiplatelet Management for Coronary Heart Disease: Advances and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Michael; Morneau, Kathleen; Hoang, Vu; Virani, Salim; Jneid, Hani

    2016-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the leading cause of death in the USA. CHD accounts for 48 % of all cardiovascular mortality or approximately one of every seven deaths. Disruption of atherosclerotic plaques-usually by rupture or erosion-and superimposed thrombosis can result in acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death. Silent plaque disruption may also occur and result in coronary plaque progression and ultimately the symptomatic manifestations of stable CHD. Antiplatelet agents remain the cornerstone therapy for acute thrombotic coronary syndromes and are essential for thromboprophylaxis against these events in patients with stable CHD. Antiplatelet drugs are also important adjunct therapies during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as they mitigate equipment-associated thrombotic complications that are partially induced by iatrogenic plaque rupture by interventionalists during balloon angioplasty in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Since the introduction of clopidogrel, there has been considerable development in this field with at least three novel P2Y12 antagonists approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) over the past decade. Rapidly accumulating evidence is helping to guide the optimal duration of treatment with dual antiplatelet therapy after stenting, especially with the newer drug-eluting stents. More data are also emerging on the hazards and long-term safety of these agents. It is therefore prudent for clinicians to remain current on treatment options and recent advances in this area. We herein review current and emerging antiplatelet therapies and summarize their characteristics and indications of use as well as challenges and areas of ongoing research. PMID:27139709

  17. Advanced Tracers in PET Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Hua; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers by positron emission tomography (PET) allows for the noninvasive detection and characterization of biological changes at the molecular level, leading to earlier disease detection, objective monitoring of therapies, and better prognostication of cardiovascular diseases progression. Here we review, the current role of PET in cardiovascular disease, with emphasize on tracers developed for PET imaging of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25389529

  18. Predictors of severe gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy and interstitial brachytherapy for advanced or recurrent gynecologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kasibhatla, Mohit . E-mail: Mohit.S.Kasibhatla@Hitchcock.org; Clough, Robert W. B.A.; Montana, Gustavo S.; Oleson, James R.; Light, Kim C.; Steffey, Beverley A.; Jones, Ellen L.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective review of patients with gynecologic malignancies treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and interstitial brachytherapy was to determine the rate of Grade {>=}2 rectovaginal fistula and Grade {>=}4 small bowel obstruction as defined by the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers were treated with EBRT and interstitial brachytherapy. Median doses to tumor, bladder, and rectum were 75 Gy, 61 Gy, and 61 Gy, respectively. A univariate analysis was performed to identify variables that correlated with toxicity. Results: At median follow-up of 19 months, the 3-year risk of small bowel obstruction was 6%. Those patients with prior abdomino-pelvic surgery who received EBRT with antero-posterior fields had higher rates of obstruction than patients without prior abdomino-pelvic surgery or those who received EBRT with four fields (50% vs. 0%, p < 0.0001). The 3-year risk of rectovaginal fistula was 18% and was significantly higher in patients who received >76 Gy to the rectum compared with those who received {<=}76 Gy (100% vs. 7%, p = 0.009). Conclusions: Patients treated with EBRT and interstitial brachytherapy after abdomino-pelvic surgery should receive EBRT with four fields and the cumulative rectal dose should be {<=}76 Gy.

  19. Thymoma: benign appearance, malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Richard F; Burfeind, William R

    2006-09-01

    Thymoma is a rare tumor with a largely indolent growth pattern. It does, however, have malignant potential as a result of its ability to invade locally and metastasize regionally. Often associated with a number of immune- and nonimmune-mediated paraneoplastic syndromes, patient outcomes are directly related to stage of disease and the ability to achieve a complete surgical resection. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with adjuvant radiation recommended for invasive thymoma. Sensitive to both chemotherapy and radiation, durable responses are achievable in incompletely resected and inoperable patients. We present two cases of thymoma followed by a general discussion with an emphasis on treatment for both early and advanced-stage disease. PMID:16951392

  20. Extended resections for thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cameron D

    2010-10-01

    Almost all series reporting on the results of resection in thymic tumors indicate that the performance of a complete resection is probably the most important prognostic factor. This issue is not a factor in Masaoka stage I and II tumors that are almost always easily completely resected and have an excellent prognosis. Masaoka stage III tumors that invade the pericardium, lungs, or great vessels have relatively higher incomplete resection rates, significantly higher recurrence rates, and thus a worse prognosis. There are several small reports on the efficacy of resection of the great veins when involved by a thymic malignancy with low morbidity and meaningful long-term survival. Superior vena cava reconstruction is commonly performed by a polytetrafluroethylene, venous, or pericardial graft. These cases can usually be identified preoperatively and, thus, considered for induction therapy. Because these types of cases are almost always of marginal respectability in terms of obtaining a true en bloc resection, there is an increasing enthusiasm for offering induction therapy in an effort to enhance resectability. Preliminary results suggest increased R0 resection rates and improved survival with induction therapy for locally advanced tumors. The optimal induction treatment is unknown. The ultimate extended surgery for advanced thymic tumors is an extrapleural pneumonectomy performed for extensive pleural disease (Masaoka stage IVA). These rarely performed operations are done for IVA disease found at initial presentation and for recurrent disease as a salvage procedure. Again these advanced patients are probably best managed by induction chemotherapy followed by resection. PMID:20859130

  1. Improvement with ongoing Enzyme Replacement Therapy in advanced late-onset Pompe disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura E; Koeberl, Dwight D; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; DeArmey, Stephanie M; Mackey, Joanne; Kishnani, Priya S

    2008-12-01

    Benefits of enzyme replacement therapy with Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa), anecdotally reported in late-onset Pompe disease, range from motor and pulmonary improvement in less severely affected patients, to stabilization with minimal improvement in those with advanced disease. We report a case of a 63-year-old patient with significant morbidity who made notable motor and pulmonary function gains after two years on therapy. Thus, improvements in those with advanced disease may be possible after long-term treatment. PMID:18930676

  2. Allergic diseases and risk of hematopoietic malignancies in a cohort of postmenopausal women: A report from the Iowa Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Linabery, Amy M.; Prizment, Anna E.; Anderson, Kristin E.; Cerhan, James R.; Poynter, Jenny N.; Ross, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic diseases signify immune dysregulation attributable to underlying genetics and environmental exposures. Associations between various allergies and hematopoietic cancers have been observed, albeit inconsistently, however few prospective studies have examined the risk, and even fewer among older adults. Methods We examined risk of incident hematopoietic cancers in those reporting allergic diseases in a population-based cohort of 22,601 older women (Iowa Women’s Health Study). Self-reported allergic status, including asthma, hay fever, eczema and/or other allergies, was determined via questionnaire in 1997 (mean age=72 years, range 63–81 years). Incident cancers were ascertained by linkage with the Iowa Cancer Registry from 1997–2011. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to estimate multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for myeloid (N=177) and lymphoid (N=437) malignancies, respectively. Results Allergic diseases were not associated with risk of myeloid (HR=1.00, 95% CI: 0.72–1.37) or lymphoid (HR=0.99, 95% CI: 0.81–1.22) malignancies overall, or for most allergic and malignant subtypes examined. Self-reported asthma was positively associated with development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, HR=2.00, 95% CI: 0.93–4.32). In addition, there was a 30–40% decrease in risk of both lymphoid and myeloid cancers in those reporting rural residences but no association in those reporting urban residences; the interaction between residence and allergy was statistically significant for lymphoid malignancies (Pinteraction=0.05). Conclusions and Impact These results suggest asthma may contribute to the pathogenesis of MDS, a finding consistent with the chronic antigen stimulation hypothesis. Susceptibility differences by location of residence are concordant with the hygiene hypothesis and merit additional exploration. PMID:24962839

  3. A phase I dose-escalation study of MSC1992371A, an oral inhibitor of aurora and other kinases, in advanced hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Graux, Carlos; Sonet, Anne; Maertens, Johan; Duyster, Justus; Greiner, Jochen; Chalandon, Yves; Martinelli, Giovanni; Hess, Dagmar; Heim, Dominik; Giles, Francis J; Kelly, Kevin R; Gianella-Borradori, Athos; Longerey, Blandine; Asatiani, Ekaterine; Rejeb, Narmyn; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2013-09-01

    A phase I dose-escalation study of MSC1992371A, an oral aurora kinase inhibitor, was carried out in patients with hematologic malignancies. Patients received escalating doses either on days 1-3 and 8-10 (n=36) or on days 1-6 (n=39) of a 21-day cycle. The maximum tolerated doses were 37 and 28 mg/m(2)/day, respectively. Dose-limiting toxicities included severe neutropenia with infection and sepsis, mucositis/stomatitis, and diarrhea. Complete responses occurred in 3 patients. Four disease-specific expansion cohorts then received the dose and schedule dictated by the escalation phase but the study was prematurely discontinued due to hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicity at clinically effective doses. PMID:23746966

  4. Current advances on genetic resistance to rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most threatening fungal diseases resulting in significant annual crop losses worldwide. Blast disease has been effectively managed by a combination of resistant (R) gene deployment, application of fungicides, and suita...

  5. Malignant hyperpyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Hyam; Barlow, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The history, clinical presentation, and management of malignant hyperpyrexia are presented. The aetiology seems to be associated with some inherited abnormality which affects the movement and binding of calcium ions in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, sarcoplasm, and mitochondria. Whether this is a primary muscular defect or secondary to some trophic neural influence is yet to be established. The subjects carrying the abnormal trait show evidence of a myopathy which is subclinical in most instances and revealed only by estimation of serum CPK or biopsy. In some families where the myopathy is clinically obvious there may be, in addition, a variety of musculoskeletal abnormalities. A plea is made for routine monitoring of temperature during anaesthesia and for procainamide or procaine to be readily available in all operating theatres. A history of anaesthetic deaths in a family calls for special care, and, if the serum CPK is elevated, suxamethonium and halothane are to be avoided. Families with orthopaedic and muscular abnormalities are at increased risk and should have estimation of serum CPK before surgery. As a bonus of this study it is suggested that serum CPK estimations be used to screen pigs for selective breeding and so eliminate the disease, which causes soft exudative pork. Images PMID:4708457

  6. Natural History of Malignant Bone Disease in Renal Cancer: Final Results of an Italian Bone Metastasis Survey

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Daniele; Procopio, Giuseppe; Porta, Camillo; Ibrahim, Toni; Barni, Sandro; Mazzara, Calogero; Fontana, Andrea; Berruti, Alfredo; Berardi, Rossana; Vincenzi, Bruno; Ortega, Cinzia; Ottaviani, Davide; Carteni, Giacomo; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Virzì, Vladimir; Santoni, Matteo; Silvestris, Nicola; Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Collovà, Elena; Russo, Antonio; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Fedeli, Stefano Luzi; Tanca, Francesca Maria; Adamo, Vincenzo; Maiello, Evaristo; Sabbatini, Roberto; Felici, Alessandra; Cinieri, Saverio; Tonini, Giuseppe; Bracarda, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone metastasis represents an increasing clinical problem in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as disease-related survival improves. There are few data on the natural history of bone disease in RCC. Patients and methods Data on clinicopathology, survival, skeletal-related events (SREs), and bone-directed therapies for 398 deceased RCC patients (286 male, 112 female) with evidence of bone metastasis were statistically analyzed. Results Median time to bone metastasis was 25 months for patients without bone metastasis at diagnosis. Median time to diagnosis of bone metastasis by MSKCC risk was 24 months for good, 5 months for intermediate, and 0 months for poor risk. Median number of SREs/patient was one, and 71% of patients experienced at least one SRE. Median times to first, second, and third SRE were 2, 5, and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 12 months after bone metastasis diagnosis and 10 months after first SRE. Among 181 patients who received zoledronic acid (ZOL), median time to first SRE was significantly prolonged versus control (n = 186) (3 months vs 1 month for control; P<0.05). Conclusions RCC patients with bone metastasis are at continuous risk of SREs, and in this survey ZOL effectively reduced this risk. PMID:24386138

  7. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of < 4 mo. New endoscopic techniques may actually extend stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27326319

  8. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment.

    PubMed

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-06-15

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of < 4 mo. New endoscopic techniques may actually extend stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27326319

  9. Central pontine myelinolysis in advanced HIV infection with tuberculosis and multicentric Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, J; Branding, G; Stocker, H

    2013-07-01

    We present a case of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) in a patient with advanced HIV infection and miliary tuberculosis. While hospitalized the patient developed an unusual ataxic variant of CPM with full clinical recovery. Follow-up imaging revealed resolution of pontine lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a clinical and radiological recovery from CPM in advanced HIV disease. Our report extends our knowledge of neurological presentations in patients with advanced HIV infection. It highlights the importance of considering CPM in patients with advanced HIV disease presenting with an ataxic syndrome, even in the absence of an electrolyte derangement. PMID:23970776

  10. Dexamethasone-induced recrudescence of malignant catarrhal fever and associated lymphosarcoma and granulomatous disease in a Formosan sika deer (Cervus nippon taiouanus).

    PubMed

    Heuschele, W P; Nielsen, N O; Oosterhuis, J E; Castro, A E

    1985-07-01

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) was diagnosed in a 2-week-old Formosan sika deer. The fawn had been previously exposed to a clinically normal neonatal wildebeest calf from which alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 was isolated. Alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 was isolated from buffy coat leukocytes and nasal and ocular secretions of the fawn during the acute illness. The fawn clinically recovered after 3 weeks. Virus was not recovered from blood at this time. Dexamethasone, given 4 months after clinical recovery, resulted in reisolation of MCF virus from blood and recrudescence of clinical MCF. The deer was euthanatized. At necropsy, pathognomonic lesions of MCF, granulomatous disease, and malignant lymphoma were observed. Antibodies to bovine leukosis viral antigens were not detected in the serum. The epidemiologic and pathogenetic importance of the findings are discussed. PMID:3839641

  11. Surgery for Malignant Sublingual and Minor Salivary Gland Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Patrick J; Ferris, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Malignant sublingual gland neoplasms are rare, early-stage neoplasms presenting as painless non-ulcerated masses in the antero-lateral floor of the mouth. The majority of patients present with advanced disease, with symptoms of pain or anaesthesia of the tongue. Malignant minor salivary gland neoplasms are more common, the majority (>80%) of which present in the oral cavity, most frequently in the palatal area, as painless masses or as obstructive symptoms in the head and neck region. The most frequent pathologies are adenoid cystic carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma (>85%), with the majority presenting at an advanced stage (III/IV). Wide tumour-free surgical margin excision is the treatment of choice, followed by radiotherapy, after discussion of the multidisciplinary head and neck cancer tumour board. Improvements in survival and quality of life have been achieved since the introduction of endoscopic and robotic surgeries for many minor salivary gland malignancies. PMID:27092950

  12. Linear and Curvilinear Trajectories of Cortical Loss with Advancing Age and Disease Duration in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Daniel O.; Dobolyi, David G.; Isaacs, David A.; Roman, Olivia C.; Herb, Joshua; Wylie, Scott A.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Donahue, Manus J.; Hedera, Peter; Zald, David H.; Landman, Bennett A.; Bowman, Aaron B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Rane, Swati

    2016-01-01

    Advancing age and disease duration both contribute to cortical thinning in Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the pathological interactions between them are poorly described. This study aims to distinguish patterns of cortical decline determined by advancing age and disease duration in PD. A convenience cohort of 177 consecutive PD patients, identified at the Vanderbilt University Movement Disorders Clinic as part of a clinical evaluation for Deep Brain Stimulation (age: M= 62.0, SD 9.3), completed a standardized clinical assessment, along with structural brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan. Age and gender matched controls (n=53) were obtained from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and Progressive Parkinson’s Marker Initiative (age: M= 63.4, SD 12.2). Estimated changes in cortical thickness were modeled with advancing age, disease duration, and their interaction. The best-fitting model, linear or curvilinear (2nd, or 3rd order natural spline), was defined using the minimum Akaike Information Criterion, and illustrated on a 3-dimensional brain. Three curvilinear patterns of cortical thinning were identified: early decline, late decline, and early-stable-late. In contrast to healthy controls, the best-fit model for age related changes in PD is curvilinear (early decline), particularly in frontal and precuneus regions. With advancing disease duration, a curvilinear model depicts accelerating decline in the occipital cortex. A significant interaction between advancing age and disease duration is evident in frontal, motor, and posterior parietal areas. Study results support the hypothesis that advancing age and disease duration differentially affect regional cortical thickness and display regional dependent linear and curvilinear patterns of thinning. PMID:27330836

  13. Allogeneic marrow transplantation following cyclophosphamide and escalating doses of hyperfractionated total body irradiation in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies: A phase I/II trial

    SciTech Connect

    Demirer, T.; Petersen, F.B.; Appelbaum, F.R.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of unshielded total body irradiation (TBI) delivered from dual {sup 60}C sources at an exposure rate of 0.08 Gy/min and given in thrice daily fractions of 1.2 Gy in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. Forty-four patients with a median age of 28 (range 6-48) years were entered into a Phase I/II study. All patients received cyclophosphamide (Cy), 120 mg/kg administered over 2 days before TBI. Marrow from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical siblings was infused following the last dose of TBI. An escalation-deescalation schema designed to not exceed an incidence of 25% of Grade 3-4 regimen-related toxicities (RRTs) was used. The first dose level tested was 13.2 Gy followed by 14.4 Gy. None of the four patients at the dose level of 13.2 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT. Two of the first eight patients receiving 14.4 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT, establishing this as the MTD. An additional 32 patients were evaluated at the 14.4 Gy level to confirm these initial observations. Of 40 patients receiving 14.4 Gy, 13 (32.5%) developed Grade 3-4 RRTs; 46% in adults and 12% in children. The primary dose limiting toxicity was Grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity, which occurred in 12.5% of patients. Noninfectious Grade 3-4 interstitial pneumonia syndrome occurred in 5% of patients. The actuarial probabilities of event-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality at 2 years were 0.10, 0.81, and 0.47, respectively, for patients who received 14.4 Gy of TBI. The outcome for patients receiving 14.4 Gy of TBI was not different from previous studies of other CY and TBI regimens in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. These data showed that the incidence of Grade 3-4 RRTs in adults was greater than the 25% maximum set as the goal of this study, suggesting that 13.2 Gy is a more appropriate dose of TBI for adults, while 14.4 Gy is an appropriate dose for children. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Ibex-associated malignant catarrhal fever-like disease in a group of bongo antelope (Tragelaphus euryceros)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A private zoological facility experienced an outbreak of fatal malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in a group of bongo antelope (Tragelaphus euryceros). Three periparturient female bongos exhibited an acute onset of anorexia beginning ~6 weeks after being housed with a Nubian ibex (Capra nubiana). Disea...

  15. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Luis E; Craft, Meggan E

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks. PMID:27547199

  16. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Luis E.; Craft, Meggan E.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks. PMID:27547199

  17. Use of high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of both benign and malignant prostatic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernen, Kenneth M.; Miles, Brian J.

    2000-05-01

    Prostate cancer, the most common malignancy in men in the United States, accounts for more than 29% of all male cancers diagnosed and 13% of all cancer deaths. This translates into approximately 200,000 men diagnosed and 37,000 men who will die from the disease this year in this country. A significant number of patients ultimately choose external beam radiation or interstitial radioactive implants (brachytherapy) combined with external beam radiotherapy as their primary treatment. Approximately 25 - 35% of external beam irradiation patients and 20 - 30% of interstitial implants combined with external beam radiotherapy will fail within 10 years. The treatment options for patients with localized radiorecurrent disease include watchful waiting, endocrine therapy, salvage radiotherapy, and salvage radical prostatectomy, cryotherapy and now high intensity focused ultrasound therapy (HIFU). Although some studies regarding watchful waiting demonstrated comparable results to formal treatment for early prostate cancer, other studies have shown metastatic and mortality rates that are significantly higher, and that radiorecurrent patients would have even greater rates of metastasis and progression to death. Prostate cancer cure by means of endocrine therapy is highly unlikely and its role is still one of palliation with a side effect profile which includes hot flashes, osteoporosis, fatigue, loss of muscle mass, anemia, loss of libido and potency. The role of salvage radiotherapy may offer local control, however long term efficacy has yet to be determined. In a recent series, only 50% of the patients were controlled for a mean of four years with salvage radiotherapy. Salvage prostatectomy has the advantage of providing excellent local control and even a cure if the cancer is confined to the prostate or within the surrounding periprostatic tissue. Historically, salvage prostatectomy is technically demanding and fraught with higher complications. In one large series

  18. Na+ Micro-Current Value Detection as a New Modality for Identification of Benign and Malignant Disease in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Long, Zhi-Da; Liu, Xue-Min; Ma, Feng; Li, Qiang; Lv, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Increase of intracellular positive ions (mainly Na+) indicates greater possibility of cell malignancy. The present study investigated the correlation between the Na+ micro-current value (MCV) and tissue characteristics (normal, benign or malignant). 346 tissue samples have been detected within 30 min after surgical isolation by Na+ detector. MCV in 102 malignant tumor was significantly higher than that in benign/borderline tumor or normal tissue (33.3 ± 8.9 μA vs. 24.4 ± 8.6 μA and 14.0 ± 4.0 μA, p < 0.001, respectively). MCV in malignant tumor parenchyma was significantly higher than that in the paired paracanceroustissue, normal tissue and surgical margin tissue (33.3 ± 8.9 μA vs. 18.9 ± 4.1, 14.2 ± 4.0 or 15.2 ± 3.3, p < 0.001, respectively). However, the coincidence rate between Na+ detector and pathological examination was different in tissues from different organs or systems, which was high in pancreas, bile duct system, gastrointestinal system, esophagus, breasts, lungs, nose & throat and thyroids, but poor in urinary tissue. The overall coincidence rate was 83.1% (108/130) between Na+ detector and pathological examination. The sensitivity and specificity of correct diagnosis by Na+ detector was 83.3% (70/84) and 82.6% (38/46), respectively. This new modality may have diagnostic potential in complementing frozen examination in differentiating malignant tumor from benign or normal tissue, justifying tumor metastatic scope and confirming surgical margin. PMID:27103487

  19. Na(+) Micro-Current Value Detection as a New Modality for Identification of Benign and Malignant Disease in Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Feng; Long, Zhi-Da; Liu, Xue-Min; Ma, Feng; Li, Qiang; Lv, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Increase of intracellular positive ions (mainly Na(+)) indicates greater possibility of cell malignancy. The present study investigated the correlation between the Na(+) micro-current value (MCV) and tissue characteristics (normal, benign or malignant). 346 tissue samples have been detected within 30 min after surgical isolation by Na(+) detector. MCV in 102 malignant tumor was significantly higher than that in benign/borderline tumor or normal tissue (33.3 ± 8.9 μA vs. 24.4 ± 8.6 μA and 14.0 ± 4.0 μA, p < 0.001, respectively). MCV in malignant tumor parenchyma was significantly higher than that in the paired paracanceroustissue, normal tissue and surgical margin tissue (33.3 ± 8.9 μA vs. 18.9 ± 4.1, 14.2 ± 4.0 or 15.2 ± 3.3, p < 0.001, respectively). However, the coincidence rate between Na(+) detector and pathological examination was different in tissues from different organs or systems, which was high in pancreas, bile duct system, gastrointestinal system, esophagus, breasts, lungs, nose &throat and thyroids, but poor in urinary tissue. The overall coincidence rate was 83.1% (108/130) between Na(+) detector and pathological examination. The sensitivity and specificity of correct diagnosis by Na(+) detector was 83.3% (70/84) and 82.6% (38/46), respectively. This new modality may have diagnostic potential in complementing frozen examination in differentiating malignant tumor from benign or normal tissue, justifying tumor metastatic scope and confirming surgical margin. PMID:27103487

  20. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Archer, John K. J.; Black, Richard A.; Mann, David

    2006-02-01

    Within the next 50 years Alzheimer's disease is expected to affect 100 million people worldwide. The progressive decline in the mental health of the patient is caused by severe brain atrophy generated by the breakdown and aggregation of proteins, resulting in β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The greatest challenge to Alzheimer's disease lies in the pursuit of an early and definitive diagnosis, in order that suitable treatment can be administered. At the present time, definitive diagnosis is restricted to post-mortem examination. Alzheimer's disease also remains without a long-term cure. This research demonstrates the potential role of Raman spectroscopy, combined with principle components analysis (PCA), as a diagnostic method. Analyses of ethically approved ex vivo post-mortem brain tissues (originating from frontal and occipital lobes) from control (3 normal elderly subjects and 3 Huntingdon's disease subjects) and Alzheimer's disease (12 subjects) brain sections, and a further set of 12 blinded samples are presented. Spectra originating from these tissues are highly reproducible, and initial results indicate a vital difference in protein content and conformation, relating to the abnormally high levels of aggregated proteins in the diseased tissues. Further examination of these spectra using PCA allows for the separation of control from diseased tissues. The validation of the PCA models using blinded samples also displays promise for the identification of Alzheimer's disease, in conjunction with secondary information regarding other brain diseases and dementias. These results provide a route for Raman spectroscopy as a possible non-invasive, non-destructive tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Genotype-guided Dosing of mFOLFIRINOX Chemotherapy in Patients With Previously Untreated Advanced Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of Unknown Primary; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Newly Diagnosed Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  2. Natural History of Malignant Bone Disease in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Final Results of a Multicenter Bone Metastasis Survey

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Daniele; Pantano, Francesco; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Di Costanzo, Giovan Giuseppe; Addeo, Raffaele; Guida, Francesco Maria; Ceruso, Mariella Spalato; Barni, Sandro; Bertocchi, Paola; Marinelli, Sara; Marchetti, Paolo; Russo, Antonio; Scartozzi, Mario; Faloppi, Luca; Santoni, Matteo; Cascinu, Stefano; Maiello, Evaristo; Silvestris, Franco; Tucci, Marco; Ibrahim, Toni; Masi, Gianluca; Gnoni, Antonio; Comandone, Alessandro; Fazio, Nicola; Conti, Alessandro; Imarisio, Ilaria; Pisconti, Salvatore; Giommoni, Elisa; Cinieri, Saverio; Catalano, Vincenzo; Palmieri, Vincenzo Ostilio; Infante, Giovanni; Aieta, Michele; Trogu, Antonio; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone is an uncommon site of metastasis in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, there are few studies concerning the natural history of bone metastasis in patients with HCC. Patients and Methods Data on clinicopathology, survival, skeletal-related events (SREs), and bone-directed therapies for 211 deceased HCC patients with evidence of bone metastasis were statistically analyzed. Results The median age was 70 years; 172 patients were male (81.5%). The median overall survival was 19 months. The median time to the onset of bone metastasis was 13 months (22.2% at HCC diagnosis); 64.9% patients had multiple bone metastases. Spine was the most common site of bone metastasis (59.7%). Most of these lesions were osteolytic (82.4%); 88.5% of them were treated with zoledronic acid. At multivariate analysis, only the Child Score was significantly correlated with a shorter time to diagnosis of bone metastases (p = 0.001, HR = 1.819). The median survival from bone metastasis was 7 months. At multivariate analysis, HCC etiology (p = 0.005), ECOG performance status (p = 0.002) and treatment with bisphosphonate (p = 0.024) were associated with shorter survival after bone disease occurrence. The site of bone metastasis but not the number of bone lesions was associated with the survival from first skeletal related event (SRE) (p = 0.021) and OS (p = 0.001). Conclusions This study provides a significant improvement in the understanding the natural history of skeletal disease in HCC patients. An early and appropriate management of these patients is dramatically needed in order to avoid subsequent worsening of their quality of life. PMID:25170882

  3. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: pathophysiological insights and clinical advances

    PubMed Central

    Steinke, John W; Wilson, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis are heterogeneous airway diseases of the lower and upper airways, respectively. Molecular and cellular studies indicate that these diseases can be categorized into unique endotypes, which have therapeutic implications. One such endotype is aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which encompasses the triad of asthma, aspirin (or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) hypersensitivity, and nasal polyposis. AERD has unique pathophysiological features that distinguish it from aspirin-tolerant asthma and other forms of chronic rhinosinusitis. This review details molecular and cellular features of AERD and highlights current and future therapies that are based on these insights. PMID:27022293

  4. Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: pathophysiological insights and clinical advances.

    PubMed

    Steinke, John W; Wilson, Jeff M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis are heterogeneous airway diseases of the lower and upper airways, respectively. Molecular and cellular studies indicate that these diseases can be categorized into unique endotypes, which have therapeutic implications. One such endotype is aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), which encompasses the triad of asthma, aspirin (or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) hypersensitivity, and nasal polyposis. AERD has unique pathophysiological features that distinguish it from aspirin-tolerant asthma and other forms of chronic rhinosinusitis. This review details molecular and cellular features of AERD and highlights current and future therapies that are based on these insights. PMID:27022293

  5. Phase I study of temozolomide in combination with thiotepa and carboplatin with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue in patients with malignant brain tumors with minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    Egan, G; Cervone, K A; Philips, P C; Belasco, J B; Finlay, J L; Gardner, S L

    2016-04-01

    Recurrence of malignant brain tumors results in a poor prognosis with limited treatment options. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue (AHCR) has been used in patients with recurrent malignant brain tumors and has shown improved outcomes compared with standard chemotherapy. Temozolomide is standard therapy for glioblastoma and has also shown activity in patients with medulloblastoma/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET), particularly those with recurrent disease. Temozolomide was administered twice daily on days -10 to -6, followed by thiotepa 300 mg/m(2) per day and carboplatin dosed using the Calvert formula or body surface area on days -5 to -3, with AHCR day 0. Twenty-seven patients aged 3-46 years were enrolled. Diagnoses included high-grade glioma (n=12); medulloblastoma/PNET (n=9); central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumor (n=4); ependymoma (n=1) and spinal cord PNET (n=1). Temozolomide doses ranged from 100 mg/m(2) per day to 400 mg/m(2) per day. There were no toxic deaths. Prolonged survival was noted in several patients including those with recurrent high-grade glioma, medulloblastoma and CNS germ cell tumor. Increased doses of temozolomide are feasible with AHCR. A phase II study using temozolomide, carboplatin and thiotepa with AHCR for children with recurrent malignant brain tumors is being conducted through the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium. PMID:26726947

  6. Malignant Transformation of Hepatic Adenoma in Glycogen Storage Disease Type-1a: Report of an Exceptional Case Diagnosed on Surveillance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baheti, Akshay D.; Yeh, Matthew M.; O'Malley, Ryan; Lalwani, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular adenoma is a heterogeneous group of benign neoplasms arising from hepatocellular cells and can be subclassified into four major groups based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. These four subtypes are hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 1α-inactivated, β-catenin–activated, inflammatory, and unclassified adenomas. Immunohistochemistry studies have demonstrated that since β-catenin–activated adenomas have a higher risk of malignant transformation, the identification of the subtype of adenoma remains crucial in patient management. However, malignant transformation of hepatic adenoma without β-catenin overexpression can be seen in 30–65% cases. We report a case of malignant transformation of hepatic adenoma without overexpression of β-catenin in a 31-year-old man with a known glycogen storage disease (GSD) Type-1a, which was diagnosed on surveillance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI showed a mild interval increase in one lesion with relative stability of the other adenomas. The lesion was presumed to be suspicious for a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and was confirmed on pathology. PMID:26430540

  7. Polycystic liver diseases: advanced insights into the molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Perugorria, Maria J.; Masyuk, Tatyana V.; Marin, Jose J.; Marzioni, Marco; Bujanda, Luis; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Banales, Jesus M.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic liver diseases are genetic disorders characterized by progressive bile duct dilatation and/or cyst development. The large volume of hepatic cysts causes different symptoms and complications such as abdominal distension, local pressure with back pain, hypertension, gastro-oesophageal reflux and dyspnea as well as bleeding, infection and rupture of the cysts. Current therapeutic strategies are based on surgical procedures and pharmacological management, which partially prevent or ameliorate the disease. However, as these treatments only show short-term and/or modest beneficial effects, liver transplantation is the only definitive therapy. Therefore, interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis is increasing so that new targets for therapy can be identified. In this Review, the genetic mechanisms underlying polycystic liver diseases and the most relevant molecular pathways of hepatic cystogenesis are discussed. Moreover, the main clinical and preclinical studies are highlighted and future directions in basic as well as clinical research are indicated. PMID:25266109

  8. Advances in the Care of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Viviane G; Kussman, Barry D

    2015-09-01

    The significant decline in mortality among children and adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with an increasing prevalence of CHD in adults, particularly those with moderate to severe defects. As a significant percentage of adolescents and young adults are lost to follow-up in the transition from pediatric to adult care, they may present for elective procedures with substantial CHD-associated morbidity. In addition to the specific cardiac defect, the procedures performed, and the current pathophysiological status, several factors should be considered when managing the adult with CHD. These include the type of setting (adult vs pediatric institution); surgeon (pediatric vs adult cardiac surgeon); coexisting diseases associated with CHD, such as coronary artery disease, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, cerebrovascular accidents, myopathy, and coagulation disorders; acquired diseases of aging; pregnancy; and psychosocial functioning. The current status of the management of common and important congenital cardiac defects is also described. PMID:25542866

  9. Inherited CHST11/MIR3922 deletion is associated with a novel recessive syndrome presenting with skeletal malformation and malignant lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Sameer S; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Duzkale, Hatice; McLaughlin, Heather; Giovanni, Monica; Zhang, Chengsheng; Stitziel, Nathan; Fingeroth, Joyce; Joyce, Robin M; Lebo, Matthew; Rehm, Heidi; Vuzman, Dana; Maas, Richard; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Murray, Michael; Cassa, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as chondroitin are ubiquitous disaccharide carbohydrate chains that contribute to the formation and function of proteoglycans at the cell membrane and in the extracellular matrix. Although GAG-modifying enzymes are required for diverse cellular functions, the role of these proteins in human development and disease is less well understood. Here, we describe two sisters out of seven siblings affected by congenital limb malformation and malignant lymphoproliferative disease. Using Whole-Genome Sequencing (WGS), we identified in the proband deletion of a 55 kb region within chromosome 12q23 that encompasses part of CHST11 (encoding chondroitin-4-sulfotransferase 1) and an embedded microRNA (MIR3922). The deletion was homozygous in the proband but not in each of three unaffected siblings. Genotyping data from the 1000 Genomes Project suggest that deletions inclusive of both CHST11 and MIR3922 are rare events. Given that CHST11 deficiency causes severe chondrodysplasia in mice that is similar to human limb malformation, these results underscore the importance of chondroitin modification in normal skeletal development. Our findings also potentially reveal an unexpected role for CHST11 and/or MIR3922 as tumor suppressors whose disruption may contribute to malignant lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26436107

  10. Advances in the genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ombrello, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Monogenic diseases usually demonstrate Mendelian inheritance and are caused by highly penetrant genetic variants of a single gene. In contrast, genetically-complex diseases arise from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The concept of autoinflammation originally emerged from the identification of individual, activating lesions of the innate immune system as the molecular basis of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes. In addition to these rare, monogenic forms of autoinflammation, genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases like the periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), Behçet’s disease, and systemic arthritis also fulfill the definition of autoinflammatory diseases - namely the development of apparently unprovoked episodes of inflammation without identifiable exogenous triggers and in the absence of autoimmunity. Interestingly, investigations of these genetically-complex autoinflammatory diseases have implicated both innate and adaptive immune abnormalities, blurring the line between autoinflammation and autoimmunity. This reinforces the paradigm of concerted innate and adaptive immune dysfunction leading to genetically-complex autoinflammatory phenotypes. PMID:26077134

  11. Association of thyroid diseases with primary extra-thyroidal malignancies in women: results of a cross-sectional study of 6,386 patients.

    PubMed

    Prinzi, Natalie; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Baldini, Enke; De Vito, Corrado; Tuccilli, Chiara; Catania, Antonio; Coccaro, Carmela; Bianchini, Marta; Nesca, Angela; Grani, Giorgio; Mocini, Renzo; De Antoni, Enrico; D'Armiento, Massimino; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    We here analyzed the prevalence of extra-thyroidal malignancies (EM) in 6,386 female patients affected by different thyroid disease (TD). At first, an age-matched analysis of EM in all patients was performed. We then evaluated EM prevalence in four TD diagnostic categories: non-nodular TD (n = 2,159); solitary nodule (n = 905); multinodular TD (n = 2,871); differentiated thyroid cancers (n = 451). Finally, patients were grouped based on the absence (n = 3,820) or presence of anti-thyroglobulin (TgAb) and/or anti-thyroperoxidase (TPOAb) (n = 2,369), or anti-Thyroid Stmulating Hormone (TSH) receptor autoantibodies (n = 197). A total of 673 EM were recorded. EM prevalence in TD patients was higher compared to the general population (Odds Ratio, OR 3.21) and the most frequent EM was breast cancer (OR 3.94), followed by colorectal (OR 2.18), melanoma (OR 6.71), hematological (OR 8.57), uterus (OR 2.52), kidney (OR 3.40) and ovary (OR 2.62) neoplasms. Age-matched analysis demonstrated that the risk of EM was maximal at age 0-44 yr (OR 11.28), remaining lower, but significantly higher that in the general population, in the 45-59 and 60-74 year age range. Breast and hematological malignancies showed an increased OR in all TD, while other cancers associated with specific TD. An increased OR for melanoma, breast and hematological malignancies was observed in both TPOAb and/or TgAb autoantibody negative and positive patients, while colorectal, uterus, kidney and ovary cancers showed an increased OR only in thyroid autoantibody negative patients. In conclusions, women affected by both benign and malignant TD, especially at a younger age and in absence of thyroid autoimmunity, have an increased risk of developing primary EM, thus requiring a careful follow-up and surveillance. PMID:25826596

  12. Malignant Catarrhal Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal viral disease of ruminant species, particularly cattle, bison, and deer. Clinical signs vary between species. Two major epidemiologic types of MCF exist, and are defined by the ruminant species that serve as natural reservoir hosts for infection...

  13. Advances and Challenges in Genomic Selection for Disease Resistance.

    PubMed

    Poland, Jesse; Rutkoski, Jessica

    2016-08-01

    Breeding for disease resistance is a central focus of plant breeding programs, as any successful variety must have the complete package of high yield, disease resistance, agronomic performance, and end-use quality. With the need to accelerate the development of improved varieties, genomics-assisted breeding is becoming an important tool in breeding programs. With marker-assisted selection, there has been success in breeding for disease resistance; however, much of this work and research has focused on identifying, mapping, and selecting for major resistance genes that tend to be highly effective but vulnerable to breakdown with rapid changes in pathogen races. In contrast, breeding for minor-gene quantitative resistance tends to produce more durable varieties but is a more challenging breeding objective. As the genetic architecture of resistance shifts from single major R genes to a diffused architecture of many minor genes, the best approach for molecular breeding will shift from marker-assisted selection to genomic selection. Genomics-assisted breeding for quantitative resistance will therefore necessitate whole-genome prediction models and selection methodology as implemented for classical complex traits such as yield. Here, we examine multiple case studies testing whole-genome prediction models and genomic selection for disease resistance. In general, whole-genome models for disease resistance can produce prediction accuracy suitable for application in breeding. These models also largely outperform multiple linear regression as would be applied in marker-assisted selection. With the implementation of genomic selection for yield and other agronomic traits, whole-genome marker profiles will be available for the entire set of breeding lines, enabling genomic selection for disease at no additional direct cost. In this context, the scope of implementing genomics selection for disease resistance, and specifically for quantitative resistance and quarantined pathogens

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance based metabolomics and liver diseases: Recent advances and future clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Amathieu, Roland; Triba, Mohamed Nawfal; Goossens, Corentine; Bouchemal, Nadia; Nahon, Pierre; Savarin, Philippe; Le Moyec, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is defined as the quantitative measurement of the dynamic multiparametric metabolic response of living systems to pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modification. It is an “omics” technique that is situated downstream of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. Metabolomics is recognized as a promising technique in the field of systems biology for the evaluation of global metabolic changes. During the last decade, metabolomics approaches have become widely used in the study of liver diseases for the detection of early biomarkers and altered metabolic pathways. It is a powerful technique to improve our pathophysiological knowledge of various liver diseases. It can be a useful tool to help clinicians in the diagnostic process especially to distinguish malignant and non-malignant liver disease as well as to determine the etiology or severity of the liver disease. It can also assess therapeutic response or predict drug induced liver injury. Nevertheless, the usefulness of metabolomics is often not understood by clinicians, especially the concept of metabolomics profiling or fingerprinting. In the present work, after a concise description of the different techniques and processes used in metabolomics, we will review the main research on this subject by focusing specifically on in vitro proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomics approaches in human studies. We will first consider the clinical point of view enlighten physicians on this new approach and emphasis its future use in clinical “routine”. PMID:26755887

  15. Malignant pleural effusions in lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shahid; Shahid, Rabia K; Rimawi, Rola; Siddiqui, Anita K; Rossoff, Leonard; Sison, Cristina P; Steinberg, Harry; Rai, Kanti R

    2005-07-01

    In order to determine variables that correlate with malignant pleural effusion and mortality in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders and pleural effusion, a retrospective study was performed. Clinical data of hospitalized patients with a lymphoid malignancy and pleural effusion who underwent thoracentesis from January 1993 to December 2002 were collected. A logistic regression analysis was carried out to determine prognostic variables that predict malignant pleural effusion and hospital mortality. There were 86 patients who were admitted on 91 occasions. The median age was 70 years (range 4 - 92) and the male:female ratio was 44:42. Sixty-four patients (74%) had advanced disease, 43 (50%) had received prior chemotherapy and 9 (10%) were in remission. Of 91 cases of pleural effusions, 44 (48%) were bilateral, 80 (88%) were exudates and 48 (53%) were due to malignant involvement of pleura. In multivariate analysis, symptomatic pleural effusion (odds ratio 10.3, 95% confidence interval 1.7 - 98.3), pleural fluid mesothelial cell count < 5% (odds ratio 8.0, 95% confidence interval 1.4 - 58.2), pleural fluid:serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) > or =1 (odds ratio 6.4, 95% confidence interval 1.2 - 45.6) and pleural fluid lymphocyte percentage > or =50 (odds ratio 6.4, 95% confidence interval 1.2 - 50) were significantly correlated with malignant effusion. A secondary cancer (odds ratio 11.9, 95% confidence interval 2.3 - 88.8), pleural fluid:serum LDH > or =1 (odds ratio 10.9, 95% confidence interval 2.6 - 64.9), and pneumonia (odds ratio 6.4, 95% confidence interval 1.7 - 28.6) were significantly correlated with hospital mortality. In conclusion, malignant pleural effusion is the common etiology of pleural effusion in patients with lymphoid malignancy. Many clinical and cytochemical markers have discriminatory values in identifying malignant effusion. A high pleural fluid to serum LDH level correlates with malignant pleural involvement and hospital mortality. PMID

  16. Favorable outcome in children and adolescents with a high proportion of advanced phase disease using single/multiple autologous or matched/mismatched allogeneic stem cell transplantations.

    PubMed

    Niederwieser, C; Starke, S; Fischer, L; Krahl, R; Beck, J; Gruhn, B; Ebell, W; Körholz, D; Wößmann, W; Bader, P; Lang, P; Al-Ali, H-K; Cross, M; Eisfeld, A-K; Heyn, S; Vucinic, V; Franke, G-N; Lange, T; Pönisch, W; Behre, G; Christiansen, H

    2016-02-01

    We determined the indication, outcome, and risk factors of single and multiple hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(s) (HSCT) in children and adolescents mostly with advanced disease. Forty-one out of 483 patients (8.5 %; median age 9 years) diagnosed at the University of Leipzig with hematological and oncological diseases required HSCT from 1999 to 2011. Patients had overall survival (OS) of 63 ± 10 and 63 ± 16 %, event-free survival (EFS) of 57 ± 10 and 42 ± 16 %, relapse incidence (RI) of 39 ± 10 and 44 ± 18 % and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) of 4 ± 4 and 13 ± 9 % at 10 years after one or more allogeneic and autologous HSCT, respectively. One patient in CR1 and five with advanced disease received two HSCT. Four of the six patients maintained/achieved CR for a median of 13 months. Three died of progression and one of NRM. Two patients had a third HSCT and one survived in CR +231 days after HSCT. Risk factors for OS and EFS were disease stage at HSCT and EBMT risk score. Center (pediatric or JACIE accredited pediatric/adult) was not a determinant for survival. Pediatric single and multiple HSCT are important curative approaches for high-risk malignant diseases with low NRM. Efforts to reduce high RI remain the major aim. PMID:26696465

  17. Advances in the Urinary Exosomes in Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Pei; Qin, Yan; Li, Xue-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Cells secrete around 30-100 nm membrane-enclosed vesicles that are released into the extracellular spaceis termed exosomes(EXs). EXs widely present in body fluids and incorporated proteins,nucleic acids that reflect the physiological state of their cells of origin and they may play an important role in cell-to-cell communication in various physiological and disease processes. In this article we review the recent basic and clinical studies in urinary EXs in renal diseases,focusing on their biological characteristics and potential roles as new biological markers,intervention treatment goals,and targeted therapy vectors in renal diseases.However,some issues still exist;in particular,the clinical application of EXs as a liquid biopsy technique warrants further investigations. PMID:27594162

  18. Persistence of Self in Advanced Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tappen, Ruth M.; Williams, Christine; Fishman, Sarah; Touhy, Theris

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To determine if evidence of the persistence of a sense of self or personal identity could be found in people in the middle and late stages of Alzheimer’s disease. The theme of diminishing self pervades both the popular and professional literature on Alzheimer’s disease. Design Qualitative using conversational analysis. The purposive sample was 23 residents of two urban nursing homes in the southeastern United States who were in the middle and late stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Their mean Mini-Mental State examination score was 10.65. Nineteen subjects were women, four were men in this 1993-1997 study. Methods Analysis of 45 conversations lasting 30 minutes with nursing home residents with a diagnosis of probable Alzheimer’s disease. Use of the first person indexical and other evidence, such as awareness and reactions to the changes that had taken place, in support of and counter to the notion of persistence of self, were sought in conversational analysis. Findings Respondents used the first person indexical frequently, freely, and coherently. Evidence was also present that participants were aware of their cognitive changes. Many struggled to provide an explanation, but none mentioned Alzheimer’s disease. Conclusions Evidence suggests the persistence of awareness of self into the middle and late stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Failure to recognize the continuing awareness of self and the human experience of the person in the middle and late stages can lead to task-oriented care and low expectations for therapeutic interventions. The bafflement noted in respondents suggests that people should be told their diagnosis and offered an explanation of what this diagnosis means. PMID:10380386

  19. Advances in percutaneous therapy for upper extremity arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Capers, Quinn; Phillips, John

    2011-08-01

    Upper extremity arteries are affected by occlusive diseases from diverse causes, with atherosclerosis being the most common. Although the overriding principle in managing patients with upper extremity arterial occlusive disease should be cardiovascular risk reduction by noninvasive and pharmacologic means, when target organ ischemia produces symptoms or threatens the patient's well-being, revascularization is necessary. Given their minimally invasive nature and successful outcomes, percutaneous catheter-based therapies are preferred to surgical approaches. The fact that expertise in these techniques resides in not one but several disciplines (vascular surgery, radiology, cardiology, vascular medicine) makes this an area ripe for multidisciplinary collaboration to the benefit of patients. PMID:21803225

  20. Advances in the Development of Vaccines for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Rosenberg, Roger N.

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of our society is to find a treatment or cure for Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is the leading form of age-related dementia and with the increase of life expectancy worldwide, the social and economic burden from this disease will increase dramatically. It is a progressive and, in regard to clinical scores, a highly variable disease. AD pathogenesis has been associated with the accumulation, aggregation, and deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides in the brain. Hallmarks of AD are the amyloid plaques consisting of fibrillar Abeta and neurofibrillary tangles which are intracellular fibrils of hyperphosphorylated tau protein that develop later in this disease. The amyloid cascade hypothesis postulates that Abeta deposition is an initial event in the multifactorial pathogenesis and Abeta deposition may precede AD symptoms in some patients by at least 20 years. Amyloid beta therapy with active and passive immunizations against Abeta has a high possibility to be effective in removing Abeta from brain and might thus prevent the downstream pathology. Since 2000 a number of clinical trials for AD immunotherapy have started, have failed, and are continuing to be pursued. This article will review these clinical trials and ongoing research in this regard. PMID:23725605

  1. Advances in nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: Review

    PubMed Central

    Wędrychowicz, Andrzej; Zając, Andrzej; Tomasik, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic, life-long, and relapsing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there are no complete cure possibilities, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy may induce remission of the disease. Malnutrition and specific nutritional deficiencies are frequent among IBD patients, so the majority of them need nutritional treatment, which not only improves the state of nutrition of the patients but has strong anti-inflammatory activity as well. Moreover, some nutrients, from early stages of life are suspected as triggering factors in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. Both parenteral and enteral nutrition is used in IBD therapy, but their practical utility in different populations and in different countries is not clearly established, and there are sometimes conflicting theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD. This review presents the actual data from research studies on the influence of nutrition on the etiopathogenesis of IBD and the latest findings regarding its mechanisms of action. The use of both parenteral and enteral nutrition as therapeutic methods in induction and maintenance therapy in IBD treatment is also extensively discussed. Comparison of the latest research data, scientific theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD, and different opinions about them are also presented and discussed. Additionally, some potential future perspectives for nutritional therapy are highlighted. PMID:26811646

  2. Advances in nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: Review.

    PubMed

    Wędrychowicz, Andrzej; Zając, Andrzej; Tomasik, Przemysław

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are chronic, life-long, and relapsing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there are no complete cure possibilities, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy may induce remission of the disease. Malnutrition and specific nutritional deficiencies are frequent among IBD patients, so the majority of them need nutritional treatment, which not only improves the state of nutrition of the patients but has strong anti-inflammatory activity as well. Moreover, some nutrients, from early stages of life are suspected as triggering factors in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. Both parenteral and enteral nutrition is used in IBD therapy, but their practical utility in different populations and in different countries is not clearly established, and there are sometimes conflicting theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD. This review presents the actual data from research studies on the influence of nutrition on the etiopathogenesis of IBD and the latest findings regarding its mechanisms of action. The use of both parenteral and enteral nutrition as therapeutic methods in induction and maintenance therapy in IBD treatment is also extensively discussed. Comparison of the latest research data, scientific theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD, and different opinions about them are also presented and discussed. Additionally, some potential future perspectives for nutritional therapy are highlighted. PMID:26811646

  3. Basic science breaks through: New therapeutic advances in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brundin, Patrik; Atkin, Graham; Lamberts, Jennifer T

    2015-09-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and is typically associated with progressive motor dysfunction, although PD patients also exhibit a variety of non-motor symptoms. The neuropathological hallmark of PD is intraneuronal inclusions containing primarily α-Synuclein (α-Syn), and several lines of evidence point to α-Syn as a key contributor to disease progression. Thus, basic research in the field of PD is largely focused on understanding the pathogenic properties of α-Syn. Over the past 2 y, these studies helped to identify several novel therapeutic strategies that have the potential to slow PD progression; such strategies include sequestration of extracellular α-Syn through immunotherapy, reduction of α-Syn multimerization or intracellular toxicity, and attenuation of the neuroinflammatory response. This review describes these and other putative therapeutic strategies, together with the basic science research that led to their identification. The current breadth of novel targets for the treatment of PD warrants cautious optimism in the fight against this devastating disease. PMID:26177603

  4. Sodium and Volume Disorders in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sana; Floris, Matteo; Pani, Antonello; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2016-07-01

    The kidney has a remarkable ability to modulate sodium and water excretion to maintain homeostasis despite a widely varying dietary intake. However, as glomerular filtration rate falls to less than 30 mL/min, this ability can be compromised leading to an increased risk for disorders of serum sodium and extracellular volume. In all cases, these disorders are associated with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality. Management strategies to both prevent and treat these conditions are available but requiring special attention to the unique circumstance of advanced CKD to maximize therapeutic response and prevent complications. PMID:27324677

  5. The Right Heart in Congenital Heart Disease, Mechanisms and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Guihaire, Julien; Haddad, François; Mercier, Olaf; Murphy, Daniel J.; Wu, Joseph C.; Fadel, Elie

    2012-01-01

    In patients with congenital heart disease, the right heart may support the pulmonary or the systemic circulation. Several congenital heart diseases primarily affect the right heart including Tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of great arteries, septal defects leading to pulmonary vascular disease, Ebstein anomaly and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. In these patients, right ventricular dysfunction leads to considerable morbidity and mortality. In this paper, our objective is to review the mechanisms and management of right heart failure associated with congenital heart disease. We will outline pearls and pitfalls in the management of congenital heart disease affecting the right heart and highlight recent advances in the field. PMID:23483726

  6. Use of high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of both benign and malignant prostatic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernen, Kenneth M.; Miles, Brian J.

    2000-05-01

    Prostate cancer, the most common malignancy in men in the United States, accounts for more than 29% of all male cancers diagnosed and 13% of all cancer deaths. This translates into approximately 200,000 men diagnosed and 37,000 men who will die from the disease this year in this country. A significant number of patients ultimately choose external beam radiation or interstitial radioactive implants (brachytherapy) combined with external beam radiotherapy as their primary treatment. Approximately 25 - 35% of external beam irradiation patients and 20 - 30% of interstitial implants combined with external beam radiotherapy will fail within 10 years. The treatment options for patients with localized radiorecurrent disease include watchful waiting, endocrine therapy, salvage radiotherapy, and salvage radical prostatectomy, cryotherapy and now high intensity focused ultrasound therapy (HIFU). Although some studies regarding watchful waiting demonstrated comparable results to formal treatment for early prostate cancer, other studies have shown metastatic and mortality rates that are significantly higher, and that radiorecurrent patients would have even greater rates of metastasis and progression to death. Prostate cancer cure by means of endocrine therapy is highly unlikely and its role is still one of palliation with a side effect profile which includes hot flashes, osteoporosis, fatigue, loss of muscle mass, anemia, loss of libido and potency. The role of salvage radiotherapy may offer local control, however long term efficacy has yet to be determined. In a recent series, only 50% of the patients were controlled for a mean of four years with salvage radiotherapy. Salvage prostatectomy has the advantage of providing excellent local control and even a cure if the cancer is confined to the prostate or within the surrounding periprostatic tissue. Historically, salvage prostatectomy is technically demanding and fraught with higher complications. In one large series

  7. Solitary intracranial tuberculoma mimicking a malignant tumor in a patient without tubercular lesions or a history of disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier A.; Sua, Luz F.; Astudillo, Miryam; Bravo, Luis E.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral tuberculoma is a rare cause of intracranial mass. In Latin America and Colombia where tuberculosis is endemic, it represents between 5 and 30% of brain tumours. A 53-year-old Colombian woman was admitted to a third-level hospital in Cali, Colombia, after reporting loss of consciousness, headache, paresthesia, and flight of ideas for a two-week period. Imaging studies showed a left frontal mass of malignant appearance whose first possible diagnosis was metastatic neoplasia or glioma. With the initial results, absence of history of chronic infectious diseases and a history of thyroidectomy, a surgical procedure was carried out and a histopathological and molecular evaluation was conducted. The pathology report noted necrotizing granulomatous inflammation and tissue staining and molecular tests for detection of M. tuberculosis were positive and the patient was managed with anti-tubercular treatment. Intracranial masses are frequently targeted as a malignant neoplastic disease for surgical treatment. Considering an infectious etiology must be a diagnostic option. PMID:23725511

  8. New advances on glial activation in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kim Mai; MacLean, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    In addition to being the support cells of the central nervous system (CNS), astrocytes are now recognized as active players in the regulation of synaptic function, neural repair, and CNS immunity. Astrocytes are among the most structurally complex cells in the brain, and activation of these cells has been shown in a wide spectrum of CNS injuries and diseases. Over the past decade, research has begun to elucidate the role of astrocyte activation and changes in astrocyte morphology in the progression of neural pathologies, which has led to glial-specific interventions for drug development. Future therapies for CNS infection, injury, and neurodegenerative disease are now aimed at targeting astrocyte responses to such insults including astrocyte activation, astrogliosis and other morphological changes, and innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25964871

  9. [Advances in research on the genetics of peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Han, Qi; Li, Xueyang; Liu, Zhenjie

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) shows increasing morbidity and mortality. Clinical manifestations of PAD, such as intermittent claudication, rest pain and nonhealing ulcer, contribute to impaired quality of life, and ischemic stroke caused by PAD can be life-threatening. Unfortunately, PAD patients often receive suboptimal treatment, and pathogenesis of the disease is still unclear. Over the past decade, the evolving technology and interdisciplinary collaboration have enabled improvement of diagnosis and treatment for PAD. This review makes a brief summary of the current status and progress in genetics research on PAD, which included candidate gene studies, linkage analyses, genome-wide association studies, and applications and development prospects of epigenetics, mitochondrial DNA and other new technologies. PMID:26663072

  10. Amyloid cascade in Alzheimer's disease: Recent advances in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Tarek; Shakeri, Arash; Rao, Praveen P N

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is of major concern all over the world due to a number of factors including (i) an aging population (ii) increasing life span and (iii) lack of effective pharmacotherapy options. The past decade has seen intense research in discovering disease-modifying multitargeting small molecules as therapeutic options. The pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is attributed to a number of factors such as the cholinergic dysfunction, amyloid/tau toxicity and oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction. In recent years, targeting the amyloid cascade has emerged as an attractive strategy to discover novel neurotherapeutics. Formation of beta-amyloid species, with different degrees of solubility and neurotoxicity is associated with the gradual decline in cognition leading to dementia. The two commonly used approaches to prevent beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain include (i) development of beta-secretase inhibitors and (ii) designing direct inhibitors of beta-amyloid (self-induced) aggregation. This review highlights the amyloid cascade hypothesis and the key chemical features required to design small molecules that inhibit lower and higher order beta-amyloid aggregates. Several recent examples of small synthetic molecules with disease-modifying properties were considered and their molecular docking studies were conducted using either a dimer or steric-zipper assembly of beta-amyloid. These investigations provide a mechanistic understanding on the structural requirements needed to design novel small molecules with anti-amyloid aggregation properties. Significantly, this work also demonstrates that the structural requirements to prevent aggregation of various amyloid species differs considerably, which explains the fact that many small molecules do not exhibit similar inhibition profile toward diverse amyloid species such as dimers, trimers, tetramers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils. PMID:26945113

  11. The role of estrogen receptor {beta} (ER{beta}) in malignant diseases-A new potential target for antiproliferative drugs in prevention and treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2010-05-21

    The discovery of ER{beta} in the middle of the 1990s represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of estrogen signaling. It has turned out that estrogen action is not mediated by one receptor, ER{alpha}, but by two balancing factors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}, which are often antagonistic to one another. Excitingly, ER{beta} has been shown to be widespread in the body and to be involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological events. This has led to a strong interest of the pharmaceutical industry to target ER{beta} by drugs against various diseases. In this review, focus is on the role of ER{beta} in malignant diseases where the anti proliferative activity of ER{beta} gives hope of new therapeutic approaches.

  12. Recent advances in prostate development and links to prostatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Powers, Ginny L; Marker, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    The prostate is a branched ductal-acinar gland that is part of the male reproductive tract. Prostate development depends upon the integration of steroid hormone signals, paracrine interactions between the stromal and epithelial tissue layers, and the actions of cell autonomous factors. Several genes and signaling pathways are known to be required for one or more steps of prostate development including epithelial budding, duct elongation, branching morphogenesis, and/or cellular differentiation. Recent progress in the field of prostate development has included the application of genome-wide technologies including serial analysis of gene expression, expression profiling microarrays, and other large-scale approaches to identify new genes and pathways that are essential for prostate development. The aggregation of experimental results into online databases by organized multilab projects including the Genitourinary Developmental Molecular Atlas Project has also accelerated the understanding of molecular pathways that function during prostate development and identified links between prostate anatomy and molecular signaling. Rapid progress has also recently been made in understanding the nature and role of candidate stem cells in the developing and adult prostate. This has included the identification of putative prostate stem cell markers, lineage tracing, and organ reconstitution studies. However, several issues regarding their origin, precise nature, and possible role(s) in disease remain unresolved. Nevertheless, several links between prostatic developmental mechanisms and the pathogenesis of prostatic diseases including benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer have led to recent progress on targeting developmental pathways as therapeutic strategies for these diseases. PMID:23335485

  13. Mortality of copper cadmium alloy workers with special reference to lung cancer and non-malignant diseases of the respiratory system, 1946-92.

    PubMed Central

    Sorahan, T; Lister, A; Gilthorpe, M S; Harrington, J M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To identify and quantify any relations between occupational exposure to cadmium oxide fume and mortalities from lung cancer and from chronic non-malignant diseases of the respiratory system. METHODS--The mortality experience of 347 copper cadmium alloy workers, 624 workers employed in the vicinity of copper cadmium alloy work (vicinity workers), and 521 iron and brass foundry workers (all men) was investigated for the period 1946-92. All subjects were first employed in these types of work in the period 1922-78 and for a minimum period of one year at one of two participating factories. Two analytical approaches were used, indirect standardisation and Poisson regression. RESULTS--Compared with the general population of England and Wales, mortality from lung cancer among copper cadmium alloy workers was close to expectation (observed deaths 18, expected deaths 17.8, standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 101, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 60 to 159). A significant excess was shown for lung cancer among vicinity workers but not among iron and brass foundry workers (vicinity workers: observed 55, expected 34.3, SMR 160, 95% CI 121 to 209, P < 0.01; iron and brass foundry workers: observed 19, expected 17.8, SMR 107, 95% CI 64 to 167). Increased SMRs for non-malignant diseases of the respiratory system were shown for each of the three groups (alloy workers: observed 54, expected 23.5, SMR 230, 95% CI 172 to 300, P < 0.001; vicinity workers: observed 71, expected 43.0, SMR 165, 95% CI 129 to 208, P < 0.001; iron and brass foundry workers: observed 34, expected 17.1, SMR 199, 95% CI 137 to 278, P < 0.01). Work histories of the copper cadmium alloy workers were combined with independent assessments of cadmium exposures over time to develop individual estimates of cumulative exposure to cadmium; this being a time dependent variable. Poisson regression was used to investigate risks of lung cancer and risks of chronic non-malignant diseases of the respiratory system

  14. Why musical memory can be preserved in advanced Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jörn-Henrik; Stelzer, Johannes; Fritz, Thomas Hans; Chételat, Gael; La Joie, Renaud; Turner, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Musical memory is considered to be partly independent from other memory systems. In Alzheimer's disease and different types of dementia, musical memory is surprisingly robust, and likewise for brain lesions affecting other kinds of memory. However, the mechanisms and neural substrates of musical memory remain poorly understood. In a group of 32 normal young human subjects (16 male and 16 female, mean age of 28.0 ± 2.2 years), we performed a 7 T functional magnetic resonance imaging study of brain responses to music excerpts that were unknown, recently known (heard an hour before scanning), and long-known. We used multivariate pattern classification to identify brain regions that encode long-term musical memory. The results showed a crucial role for the caudal anterior cingulate and the ventral pre-supplementary motor area in the neural encoding of long-known as compared with recently known and unknown music. In the second part of the study, we analysed data of three essential Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in a region of interest derived from our musical memory findings (caudal anterior cingulate cortex and ventral pre-supplementary motor area) in 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease (10 male and 10 female, mean age of 68.9 ± 9.0 years) and 34 healthy control subjects (14 male and 20 female, mean age of 68.1 ± 7.2 years). Interestingly, the regions identified to encode musical memory corresponded to areas that showed substantially minimal cortical atrophy (as measured with magnetic resonance imaging), and minimal disruption of glucose-metabolism (as measured with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography), as compared to the rest of the brain. However, amyloid-β deposition (as measured with (18)F-flobetapir positron emission tomography) within the currently observed regions of interest was not substantially less than in the rest of the brain, which suggests that the regions of interest were still in a very early stage of the expected course of

  15. Cutaneous leishmaniasis: advances in disease pathogenesis, diagnostics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ameen, M

    2010-10-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most common tropical dermatoses worldwide and is of major public health importance. It is caused by numerous Leishmania protozoa species, which are responsible for its clinical diversity. With changes in vector (sandfly) habitat and increased travel among human populations, its incidence is rising, and in nonendemic countries, including the UK, it is increasingly diagnosed in migrants, returned travellers, and military personnel. Diagnostic tests have not always been sufficiently sensitive, and despite a wide range of treatments, poor therapeutic responses and adverse effects are common. In the past decade, there have been notable advances in molecular diagnostics, in the understanding of host immune responses to infection, and in new therapeutic interventions and vaccine development. PMID:20831602

  16. Patients Presenting with Advanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease: Epidemiological Features by Age Group

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We explored factors influencing presentation with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease by age group. Data were derived from a city-wide cross-sectional survey of 759 HIV-infected adults living in Seoul, Korea. The significance of each observed factor was assessed via multivariate logistic regression. Of subjects aged 20-34 years, lower educational level had a positive influence on presentation with advanced HIV disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-4.34); those recently diagnosed with HIV were more likely to be presented with advanced HIV disease (aOR, 3.17; 95% CI, 0.99-10.2). Of the subjects aged 35-49 years, those w ith advanced HIV disease were more likely to have been diagnosed during health check-ups (aOR, 2.91; 95% CI, 1.15-7.32) or via clinical manifestations (aOR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.39-9.36). Of the subjects aged ≥ 50 years, presentation with advanced HIV disease was significantly more common in older subjects (aOR per increment of 5 years, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.32-3.23) and less common among individuals diagnosed with HIV in 2000-2006 (aOR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.04-0.83). In conclusion, a lower educational level in younger subjects and more advanced age in older subjects positively influence the presentation of advanced HIV disease. PMID:26839469

  17. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  18. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  19. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye.

    PubMed

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  20. Advances in pediatrics in 2014: current practices and challenges in allergy, gastroenterology, infectious diseases, neonatology, nutrition, oncology and respiratory tract illnesses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Cesari, Silvia; Sciorio, Elisa; Povesi-Dascola, Carlotta; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in the conduct of pediatric practice have been reported in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2014. This review highlights developments in allergy, gastroenterology, infectious diseases, neonatology, nutrition, oncology and respiratory tract illnesses. Investigations endorse a need to better educate guardians and improve nutritional management in food allergy. Management of hyperbilirubinemia in neonates and of bronchiolitis have been improved by position statements of scientific societies. Novel treatments for infant colic and inflammatory bowel diseases have emerged. Studies suggest the diagnostic utility of ultrasonography in diagnosing community-acquired pneumonia. Progress in infectious diseases should include the universal varicella vaccination of children. Recommendations on asphyxia and respiratory distress syndrome have been highlighted in neonatology. Studies have evidenced that malnutrition remains a common underestimated problem in developing countries, while exposure to cancer risk factors in children is not negligible in Western countries. Advances in our understanding of less common diseases such as cystic fibrosis, plastic bronchitis, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis facilitate diagnosis and management. Researches have led to new therapeutic approaches in patent ductus arteriosus and pediatric malignancies. PMID:26518317

  1. Hypercalcemia of Malignancy: An Update on Pathogenesis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia of malignancy is a common finding typically found in patients with advanced stage cancers. We aimed to provide an updated review on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of malignancy-related hypercalcemia. We searched PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science for original articles, case reports, and case series articles focused on hypercalcemia of malignancy published from 1950 to December 2014. Hypercalcemia of malignancy usually presents with markedly elevated calcium levels and therefore, usually severely symptomatic. Several major mechanisms are responsible for the development of hypercalcemia of malignancy including parathyroid hormone-related peptide-mediated humoral hypercalcemia, osteolytic metastases-related hypercalcemia, 1,25 Vitamin D-mediated hypercalcemia, and parathyroid hormone-mediated hypercalcemia in patients with parathyroid carcinoma and extra parathyroid cancers. Diagnosis should include the history and physical examination as well as measurement of the above mediators of hypercalcemia. Management includes hydration, calcitonin, bisphosphonates, denosumab, and in certain patients, prednisone and cinacalcet. Patients with advanced underlying kidney disease and refractory severe hypercalcemia should be considered for hemodialysis. Hematology or oncology and palliative care specialists should be involved early to guide the options of cancer targeted therapies and help the patients and their closed ones with the discussion of comfort-oriented care. PMID:26713296

  2. Advances in alcoholic liver disease: An update on alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Randy; Liu, Andy; Perumpail, Ryan B; Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis is a pro-inflammatory chronic liver disease that is associated with high short-term morbidity and mortality (25%-35% in one month) in the setting of chronic alcohol use. Histopathology is notable for micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, acute inflammation with neutrophil infiltration, hepatocellular necrosis, perivenular and perisinusoidal fibrosis, and Mallory hyaline bodies found in ballooned hepatocytes. Other findings include the characteristic eosinophilic fibrillar material (Mallory’s hyaline bodies) found in ballooned hepatocytes. The presence of focal intense lobular infiltration of neutrophils is what typically distinguishes alcoholic hepatitis from other forms of hepatitis, in which the inflammatory infiltrate is primarily composed of mononuclear cells. Management consists of a multidisciplinary approach including alcohol cessation, fluid and electrolyte correction, treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and pharmacological therapy based on the severity of the disease. Pharmacological treatment for severe alcoholic hepatitis, as defined by Maddrey’s discriminant factor ≥ 32, consists of either prednisolone or pentoxifylline for a period of four weeks. The body of evidence for corticosteroids has been greater than pentoxifylline, although there are higher risks of complications. Recently head-to-head trials between corticosteroids and pentoxifylline have been performed, which again suggests that corticosteroids should strongly be considered over pentoxifylline. PMID:26576078

  3. The Advancing Clinical Impact of Molecular Imaging in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Eric A; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging seeks to unravel critical molecular and cellular events in living subjects by providing complementary biological information to current structural clinical imaging modalities. In recent years, molecular imaging efforts have marched forward into the clinical cardiovascular arena, and are now actively illuminating new biology in a broad range of conditions, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, thrombosis, vasculitis, aneurysm, cardiomyopathy, and valvular disease. Development of novel molecular imaging reporters is occurring for many clinical cardiovascular imaging modalities (PET, SPECT, MRI), as well in translational platforms such as intravascular fluorescence imaging. The ability to image, track, and quantify molecular biomarkers in organs not routinely amenable to biopsy (e.g. the heart and vasculature) open new clinical opportunities to tailor therapeutics based on a cardiovascular disease molecular profile. In addition, molecular imaging is playing an increasing role in atherosclerosis drug development in Phase II clinical trials. Here we present state-of-the-art clinical cardiovascular molecular imaging strategies, and explore promising translational approaches positioned for clinical testing in the near term. PMID:24332285

  4. Therapeutic advances in the treatment of Peyronie's disease.

    PubMed

    Yafi, F A; Pinsky, M R; Sangkum, P; Hellstrom, W J G

    2015-07-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is an under-diagnosed condition with prevalence in the male population as high as 9%. It is a localized connective tissue disorder of the penis characterized by scarring of the tunica albuginea. Its pathophysiology, however, remains incompletely elucidated. For the management of the acute phase of PD, there are currently numerous available oral drugs, but the scientific evidence for their use is weak. In terms of intralesional injections, collagenase clostridium histolyticum is currently the only Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for the management of patients with PD and a palpable plaque with dorsal or dorsolateral curvature >30°. Other available intralesional injectable drugs include verapamil and interferon-alpha-2B, however, their use is considered off-label. Iontophoresis, shockwave therapy, and radiation therapy have also been described with unconvincing results, and as such, their use is currently not recommended. Traction therapy, as part of a multimodal approach, is an underused additional tool for the prevention of PD-associated loss of penile length, but its efficacy is dependent on patient compliance. Surgical therapy remains the gold standard for patients in the chronic phase of the disease. In patients with adequate erectile function, tunical plication and/or incision/partial excision and grafting can be offered, depending on degree of curvature and/or presence of destabilizing deformity. In patients with erectile dysfunction non-responsive to oral therapy, insertion of an inflatable penile prosthesis with or without straightening procedures should be offered. PMID:26097120

  5. Recent Advances in Surgery of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerbode, Frank; Sharma, Giridhari

    1970-01-01

    In the cyanotic group palliative procedures for transposition of the great arteries are frequently life-saving in infancy, and the definitive operations such as the atrial baffle, and the Rastelli procedure for those with ventricular septal defect and pulmonic stenosis, are now firmly established. In tetralogy of Fallot shunting procedures continue to be employed in infancy and early childhood, and the complete repair is usually done after the age of five. Corrective operations for total anomalous venous return may have to be staged, and the results are more satisfactory in older children. The various forms of endocardial cushion defects can usually be recognized accurately preoperatively, and where the normal anatomical relationships can be restored, excellent results obtained. Brilliant operative success can now be had in some forms of truncus arteriosus and double outlet right ventricle. It is quite common to find congenital heart disease in adults, frequently after many years of having been treated as rheumatic heart disease. The operative risk in this group is less than 10 percent, and in most instances such patients are restored to their normal physiological age after operation. PMID:4926370

  6. Advancing the Minimal Residual Disease Concept in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hokland, Peter; Ommen, Hans B; Mulé, Matthew P; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2015-07-01

    The criteria to evaluate response to treatment in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have changed little in the past 60 years. It is now possible to use higher sensitivity tools to measure residual disease burden in AML. Such minimal or measurable residual disease (MRD) measurements provide a deeper understanding of current patient status and allow stratification for risk of subsequent clinical relapse. Despite these obvious advantages, and after over a decade of laboratory investigation and preclinical validation, MRD measurements are not currently routinely used for clinical decision-making or drug development in non-acute promyelocytic leukemia (non-APL) AML. We review here some potential constraints that may have delayed adoption, including a natural hesitancy of end users, economic impact concerns, misperceptions regarding the meaning of and need for assay sensitivity, the lack of one single MRD solution for all AML patients, and finally the need to involve patients in decision-making based on such correlates. It is our opinion that none of these issues represent insurmountable barriers and our hope is that by providing potential solutions we can help map a path forward to a future where our patients will be offered personalized treatment plans based on the amount of AML they have left remaining to treat. PMID:26111465

  7. von Willebrand disease: advances in pathogenetic understanding, diagnosis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is the most common autosomally inherited bleeding disorder. The disease represents a range of quantitative and qualitative pathologies of the adhesive glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for the type 2 qualitative variants of VWF are now well characterized, with most mutations representing missense substitutions influencing VWF multimer structure and interactions with platelet GPIbα and collagen and with factor VIII. The molecular pathology of type 3 VWD has been similarly well characterized, with an array of different mutation types producing either a null phenotype or the production of VWF that is not secreted. In contrast, the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for type 1 VWD remain only partially resolved. In the hemostasis laboratory, the measurement of VWF:Ag and VWF:RCo are key components in the diagnostic algorithm for VWD, although the introduction of direct GPIbα-binding assays may become the functional assay of choice. Molecular genetic testing can provide additional benefit, but its utility is currently limited to type 2 and 3 VWD. The treatment of bleeding in VWD involves the use of desmopressin and plasma-derived VWF concentrates and a variety of adjunctive agents. Finally, a new recombinant VWF concentrate has just completed clinical trial evaluation and has demonstrated excellent hemostatic efficacy and safety. PMID:24065240

  8. Recent Advances of Vaccine Adjuvants for Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Trang

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines are the most effective and cost-efficient method for preventing diseases caused by infectious pathogens. Despite the great success of vaccines, development of safe and strong vaccines is still required for emerging new pathogens, re-emerging old pathogens, and in order to improve the inadequate protection conferred by existing vaccines. One of the most important strategies for the development of effective new vaccines is the selection and usage of a suitable adjuvant. Immunologic adjuvants are essential for enhancing vaccine potency by improvement of the humoral and/or cell-mediated immune response to vaccine antigens. Thus, formulation of vaccines with appropriate adjuvants is an attractive approach towards eliciting protective and long-lasting immunity in humans. However, only a limited number of adjuvants is licensed for human vaccines due to concerns about safety and toxicity. We summarize current knowledge about the potential benefits of adjuvants, the characteristics of adjuvants and the mechanisms of adjuvants in human vaccines. Adjuvants have diverse modes of action and should be selected for use on the basis of the type of immune response that is desired for a particular vaccine. Better understanding of current adjuvants will help exploring new adjuvant formulations and facilitate rational design of vaccines against infectious diseases. PMID:25922593

  9. Plasma Proteomics Biomarkers in Alzheimer's Disease: Latest Advances and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Perneczky, Robert; Guo, Liang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    The recent paradigm shift towards a more biologically oriented definition of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in clinical settings increases the need for sensitive biomarkers that can be applied in population-based settings. Blood plasma is easily accessible and contains a large number of proteins related to cerebral processes. It is therefore an ideal candidate for AD biomarker discovery. The present chapter provides an overview of the current research landscape in relation to blood-based AD biomarkers. Both clinical and methodological issues are covered. A brief summary is given on two relevant laboratory techniques to ascertain blood biomarker changes due to AD; methodological and clinical challenges in the field are also discussed. PMID:26235089

  10. Recent advances in understanding cardiac contractility in health and disease.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Ken T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of some of the emerging ideas and experimental findings in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology that were published in 2015. To provide context for the non-specialist, a brief summary of cardiac contraction and calcium (Ca) regulation in the heart in health and disease is provided. Thereafter, some recently published articles are introduced that indicate the current thinking on (1) the Ca regulatory pathways modulated by Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, (2) the potential influences of nitrosylation by nitric oxide or S-nitrosated proteins, (3) newly observed effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on contraction and Ca regulation following myocardial infarction and a possible link with changes in mitochondrial Ca, and (4) the effects of some of these signaling pathways on late Na current and pro-arrhythmic afterdepolarizations as well as the effects of transverse tubule disturbances. PMID:27508064

  11. Recent advances in understanding cardiac contractility in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Ken T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of some of the emerging ideas and experimental findings in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology that were published in 2015. To provide context for the non-specialist, a brief summary of cardiac contraction and calcium (Ca) regulation in the heart in health and disease is provided. Thereafter, some recently published articles are introduced that indicate the current thinking on (1) the Ca regulatory pathways modulated by Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, (2) the potential influences of nitrosylation by nitric oxide or S-nitrosated proteins, (3) newly observed effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on contraction and Ca regulation following myocardial infarction and a possible link with changes in mitochondrial Ca, and (4) the effects of some of these signaling pathways on late Na current and pro-arrhythmic afterdepolarizations as well as the effects of transverse tubule disturbances. PMID:27508064

  12. Advances in Surgical Treatment of Congenital Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Ragalie, William S; Mitchell, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) is frequently present in infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Infants with CHD and TBM appear to do worse than those without TBM. The principle of operative intervention for TBM is to improve function of the airway and clinical status. When indicated, conventional surgical options include tracheostomy, aortopexy, tracheoplasty, and anterior tracheal suspension. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment of severe tracheobonchomalacia, which can be associated with a mortality rate as high as 80%. Congenital tracheal stenosis is also frequently associated with CHD (vascular rings, atrioventricular canal defects, and septal defects) and may require concomitant repair. Repair of tracheal stenosis is often associated with distal TBM. This article addresses new techniques that can be performed in corrective surgery for both TBM and congenital tracheal stenosis. PMID:27568138

  13. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angelica M. V.; Barros, Paulo S. M.; Morelhao, Sergio L.

    2006-07-15

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength {lambda}=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  14. Recent advances in biological therapy for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kurtovic, Jelica; Segal, Isidor

    2004-01-01

    Immune system is a major determinant of pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and cytokines are well known mediators of immune system. Recently, informations on pro-inflammatory cytokines and their role in IBD have led to development of potential therapeutic approach to manipulate these cytokines and there by inhibiting inflammation in IBD. These therapeutic approaches include inhibitors of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha lymphocyte trafficking, type 1 T helper (Th1) cell polarization and nuclear factor type beta; immunoregulatory cytokines and various growth factors. Studies on these therapies have documented variable results and the outcomes of many clinical trials are awaited. However, these potential therapies, if become real may revolutionise approach in patients with IBD. Analysis of the inflammed mucosa from patients with Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) have shown increased expression of certain proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and TNF-alpha. The latter is important in the recruitment of neutrophils into inflammed tissue, a process which results from three physiological steps: (i) rolling, (ii) adhesion, and (iii) transendothelial migration. Understanding of the biology of chronic inflammation has expanded the therapies available for IBD and particularly CD. At present, the biological therapies that are being used in clinical practice or investigated for the treatment of IBD are predominantly proteins, usually delivered intravenously or subcutaneously. The therapies used include: 1. TNF-alpha inhibitors: infliximab, CDP 571, etanercept, onercept, CNI- 1493 and thalidomide. 2. Inhibitors of lymphocyte trafficking: natalizumab, LPD-02 and ICAM-1. 3. Inhibitors of Th1 polarization: monoclonal antibodies for IL-12, interferon (IFN)-gamma and anti IFN-gamma. 4. Immunoregulatory cytokines: IL-10 and IL-11. 5. Inhibitors of nuclear factor kappa (beta NF-kbeta.) 6. Growth factors

  15. A Phase I Study of the First-in-Class Anti-Mitochondrial Metabolism Agent, CPI-613, in Patients with Advanced Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Timothy S.; Lee, King; Luddy, John; Maturo, Claudia; Rodriguez, Robert; Isom, Scott; Miller, Lance D.; Stadelman, Kristin M.; Levitan, Denise; Hurd, David; Ellis, Leslie R.; Harrelson, Robin; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Lyerly, Susan; Powell, Bayard L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The lipoate derivative CPI-613 is a first-in-class agent that targets mitochondrial metabolism. This study determined the effects of CPI-613 on mitochondrial function and defined the maximally tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics (PKs), and safety in patients with relapsed or refractory hematologic malignancies. Experimental Design Human leukemia cell lines were exposed to CPI-613 and mitochondrial function was assayed. A phase I trial was conducted in which CPI-613 was given as a 2-hour infusion on days 1 and 4 for 3 weeks every 28 days. Results CPI-613 inhibited mitochondrial respiration of human leukemia cells consistent with the proposed mechanism of action. In the phase I trial, 26 patients were enrolled. CPI-613 was well tolerated with no marrow suppression observed. When the infusion time was shortened to 1 hour renal failure occurred in 2 patients. At 3780 mg/m2, there were 2 dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs). At a dose of 2940 mg/m2 over 2 hours, no DLTs were observed, establishing this as the MTD. Renal failure occurred in a total of 4 patients and resolved in all but 1, who chose hospice care. CPI-613 has a triphasic elimination with an alpha half-life of ~1.34 hours. Of 21 evaluable, heavily pretreated, patients, 4 achieved an objective response and 2 achieved prolonged stabilization of disease for a clinical benefit rate of 29%. Following drug exposure, gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from responders demonstrated immune activation. Conclusion CPI-613 inhibits mitochondrial function and demonstrates activity in a heavily pretreated cohort of patients. PMID:25165100

  16. Malignant thymoma: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Lara, P N

    2000-04-01

    Malignant thymomas are rare indolent tumours of the anterior superior mediastinum. Despite a benign histologic appearance, some thymomas invade nearby structures or metastasize. Patients are commonly asymptomatic, but some may present with unusual paraneoplastic syndromes such as myasthenia gravis, pure red cell aplasia, or hypogammaglobulinemia. Since tumour biopsy may potentially disrupt the thymic capsule, it is often not performed. Patients are therefore diagnosed and staged at the time of definitive surgery. Thymomas can generally be categorized into two stages: non-invasive and invasive. Prognosis closely parallels the disease stage. Surgery is the principal treatment and is curative in early stage disease. Radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, is an option for both incompletely or completely resected disease. Chemotherapy is offered to patients with locally advanced, recurrent, or metastatic thymoma, with excellent responses and prolonged survival. Multicentre co-operative group clinical trials are required to assess novel thymoma therapies to maximize patient resources in this uncommon tumour. PMID:10772969

  17. Non-coding RNA repertoires in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Leah; Finn, Stephen P; Cuffe, Sinead; Gray, Steven G

    2015-12-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare malignancy, with extremely poor survival rates. There are limited treatment options, with no second line standard of care for those who fail first line chemotherapy. Recent advances have been made to characterise the underlying molecular mechanisms of mesothelioma, in the hope of providing new targets for therapy. With the discovery that non-coding regions of our DNA are more than mere junk, the field of research into non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has exploded in recent years. Non-coding RNAs have diverse and important roles in a variety of cellular processes, but are also implicated in malignancy. In the following review, we discuss two types of non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs and microRNAs, in terms of their role in the pathogenesis of MPM and their potential as both biomarkers and as therapeutic targets in this disease. PMID:26791801

  18. Drug-eluting stent in malignant biliary obstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Ki; Jang, Sung Ill

    2012-10-01

    Endoscopic stent insertion is the treatment of choice for patients with malignant biliary obstruction. However, conventional stents enable only mechanical palliation of the obstruction, without any anti-tumor effects. Drugeluting stent (DES), which was first introduced in coronary artery disease, are currently under investigation for sustaining stent patency and prolonging patient survival by inhibiting tumor ingrowth in malignant biliary obstruction. Many factors affecting efficient drug delivery have been studied to determine how drugs with antitumor effects suppress tumor ingrowth, including the specific drugs incorporated, means of incorporating the drugs, mode of drug release, and stent structure. Advances have resulted in the construction of more effective non-vascular DES and ongoing clinical research. Non-vascular DES is expected to play a vital role in prolonging the survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.

  19. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the colon in a patient with von Recklinghausen's disease: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Marwah, Sanjay; Gurawalia, Jai Prakash; Sheoran, Kapil Dev; Marwah, Nisha; Gupta, Sumiti; Ranga, Hansraj

    2013-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) arising from the colon is an extremely rare clinical entity. We report one such case of an adult female with neurofibromatosis type I who presented with pain and a lump in her abdomen. A computed tomographic scan revealed a 10 × 8-cm mass in the splenic flexure of her colon that was compressing its lumen, but the results of a colonoscopy were normal. Segmental resection of the left colon was performed based on the clinical possibility of gastrointestinal stromal tumor. However, on histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining, the final diagnosis came out to be MPNST. This case highlights that, although rare, the possibility of MPNST should be considered when dealing with extramucosal colonic wall tumors. PMID:26182132

  20. Recent advances in PET imaging for evaluation of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sioka, Chrissa; Fotopoulos, Andreas; Kyritsis, Athanassios P

    2010-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) consists of loss of pigmented dopamine-secreting neurons in the pars compacta of the midbrain substantia nigra. These neurons project to the striatum (putamen and caudate nucleus) and their loss leads to alterations in the activity of the neural circuits that regulate movement. In a simplified model, two dopamine pathways are involved: the direct pathway, which is mediated through facilitation of the D(1) receptors, and the indirect pathway through D(2) receptors (inhibitory). Positron emission tomography (PET) tracers to image the presynaptic sites of the dopaminergic system include 6-[(18)F]FDOPA and 6-[(18)F]FMT, [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine, [(11)C]nomifensine and various radiolabelled cocaine derivatives. Postsynaptically, for the dopamine D(1) subtype the most commonly used ligands are [(11)C]SCH 23390 or [(11)C]NNC 112 and for the D(2) subtype [(11)C]raclopride, [(11)C]MNPA and [(18)F]DMFP. PET is a sensitive and specific non-invasive molecular imaging technique that may be helpful for evaluation of PD and its differential diagnosis from other parkinsonian syndromes. PMID:20107789

  1. Advancing a vaccine to prevent hookworm disease and anemia.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia M; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2016-06-01

    A human hookworm vaccine is under development and in clinical trials in Africa and the Americas. The vaccine contains the Na-APR-1 and Na-GST-1 antigens. It elicits neutralizing antibodies that interfere with establishment of the adult hookworm in the gut and the ability of the parasite to feed on blood. The vaccine target product profile is focused on the immunization of children to prevent hookworm infection and anemia caused by Necator americanus. It is intended for use in low- and middle-income countries where hookworm is highly endemic and responsible for at least three million disability-adjusted life years. So far, the human hookworm vaccine is being developed in the non-profit sector through the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership (PDP), in collaboration with the HOOKVAC consortium of European and African partners. We envision the vaccine to be incorporated into health systems as part of an elimination strategy for hookworm infection and other neglected tropical diseases, and as a means to reduce global poverty and address the Sustainable Development Goals. PMID:27040400

  2. Disease-specific mutations in mature lymphoid neoplasms: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Enami, Terukazu; Yokoyama, Yasuhisa; Chiba, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Mature lymphoid neoplasms (MLN) are clinically and pathologically more complex than precursor lymphoid neoplasms. Until recently, molecular characterization of MLN was mainly based on cytogenetics/fluorescence in situ hybridization, allele copy number, and mRNA expression, approaches that yielded scanty gene mutation information. Use of massive parallel sequencing technologies has changed this outcome, and now many gene mutations have been discovered. Some of these are considerably frequent in, and substantially specific to, distinct MLN subtypes, and occur at single or several hotspots. They include the V600E BRAF mutation in hairy cell leukemia, the L265P MYD88 mutation in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, the G17V RHOA mutation in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and the Y640F//D661Y/V/H/I//N647I STAT3 mutations in T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Detecting these mutations is highly valuable in diagnosing MLN subtypes. Defining these mutations also sheds light on the molecular pathogenesis of MLN, furthering development of molecular targeting therapies. In this review, we focus on the disease-specific gene mutations in MLN discovered by recent massive sequencing technologies. PMID:24689848

  3. Cardiovascular complications of radiation therapy for thoracic malignancies: the role for non-invasive imaging for detection of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Groarke, John D.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Nohria, Anju; Ferrari, Roberto; Cheng, Susan; Moslehi, Javid

    2014-01-01

    Radiation exposure to the thorax is associated with substantial risk for the subsequent development of cardiovascular disease. Thus, the increasing role of radiation therapy in the contemporary treatment of cancer, combined with improving survival rates of patients undergoing this therapy, contributes to a growing population at risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Associated cardiovascular injuries include pericardial disease, coronary artery disease, valvular disease, conduction disease, cardiomyopathy, and medium and large vessel vasculopathy—any of which can occur at varying intervals following irradiation. Higher radiation doses, younger age at the time of irradiation, longer intervals from the time of radiation, and coexisting cardiovascular risk factors all predispose to these injuries. The true incidence of radiation-related cardiovascular disease remains uncertain due to lack of large multicentre studies with a sufficient duration of cardiovascular follow-up. There are currently no consensus guidelines available to inform the optimal approach to cardiovascular surveillance of recipients of thoracic radiation. Therefore, we review the cardiovascular consequences of radiation therapy and focus on the potential role of non-invasive cardiovascular imaging in the assessment and management of radiation-related cardiovascular disease. In doing so, we highlight characteristics that can be used to identify individuals at risk for developing post-radiation cardiovascular disease and propose an imaging-based algorithm for their clinical surveillance. PMID:23666251

  4. Subretinal Fluid Drainage and Vitrectomy Are Helpful in Diagnosing and Treating Eyes with Advanced Coats' Disease.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Ayako; Kusaka, Shunji; Takaesu, Sugie; Sawaguchi, Shoichi; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Severe forms of Coats' disease are often associated with total retinal detachment, and a differential diagnosis from retinoblastoma is critically important. In such eyes, laser- and/or cryoablation is often ineffective or sometimes impossible to perform. We report a case of advanced Coats' disease in which a rapid pathological examination of subretinal fluid was effective for the diagnosis, and external subretinal drainage combined with vitrectomy was effective in preserving the eye. PMID:27462247

  5. Subretinal Fluid Drainage and Vitrectomy Are Helpful in Diagnosing and Treating Eyes with Advanced Coats' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Ayako; Kusaka, Shunji; Takaesu, Sugie; Sawaguchi, Shoichi; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Severe forms of Coats' disease are often associated with total retinal detachment, and a differential diagnosis from retinoblastoma is critically important. In such eyes, laser- and/or cryoablation is often ineffective or sometimes impossible to perform. We report a case of advanced Coats' disease in which a rapid pathological examination of subretinal fluid was effective for the diagnosis, and external subretinal drainage combined with vitrectomy was effective in preserving the eye. PMID:27462247

  6. Pilot study of modified LMB-based therapy for children with ataxia-telangiectasia and advanced stage high grade mature b-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sandlund, J. T.; Hudson, M. M.; Kennedy, W.; Onciu, M.; Kastan, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Children with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and cancer have a poorer prognosis due in part to increased treatment-related toxicity. We piloted a curative intent approach in five children with A-T who presented with advanced stage (III, n=2; IV, n=3) B-NHL (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, n=4; Burkitt leukemia, n=1) using a modified LMB-based protocol. Two achieved sustained CCR (one, CCR at 6 years; one, pulmonary death after 3 years in CCR). Two died from toxicity during induction and 1 failed induction with progressive disease. Novel therapeutic approaches which overcome drug resistance and are less toxic are needed for children with A-T and B-NHL. PMID:23900766

  7. Primary intrahepatic malignant epithelioid mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Perysinakis, Iraklis; Nixon, Alexander M.; Spyridakis, Ioannis; Kakiopoulos, George; Zorzos, Charalampos; Margaris, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Primary malignant hepatic mesotheliomas are extremely rare. We report the case of a patient with primary intrahepatic malignant mesothelioma who was treated in our department. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 66-year old male patient was admitted to our department for the evaluation of anemia. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a large space occupying lesion in the right liver lobe. DISCUSSION The tumor was subsequently resected and a diagnosis of primary intrahepatic malignant mesothelioma was made after pathologic examination. The patient did not receive adjuvant therapy and is currently alive and free of disease, 36 months after the resection. CONCLUSION To our knowledge this is the eighth adult case of primary intrahepatic malignant mesothelioma reported in the literature. These tumors are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. Absence of previous asbestos exposure does not exclude malignant mesothelioma from the differential diagnosis. Proper surgical treatment may offer prolonged survival to the patient, without adjuvant therapy. PMID:25460485

  8. Identifying human disease genes: advances in molecular genetics and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, S M; Ali, A; Baig, S M; Barh, D; Miyoshi, A; Azevedo, V

    2014-01-01

    The human genome project is one of the significant achievements that have provided detailed insight into our genetic legacy. During the last two decades, biomedical investigations have gathered a considerable body of evidence by detecting more than 2000 disease genes. Despite the imperative advances in the genetic understanding of various diseases, the pathogenesis of many others remains obscure. With recent advances, the laborious methodologies used to identify DNA variations are replaced by direct sequencing of genomic DNA to detect genetic changes. The ability to perform such studies depends equally on the development of high-throughput and economical genotyping methods. Currently, basically for every disease whose origen is still unknown, genetic approaches are available which could be pedigree-dependent or -independent with the capacity to elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms. Computer algorithms and programs for linkage analysis have formed the foundation for many disease gene detection projects, similarly databases of clinical findings have been widely used to support diagnostic decisions in dysmorphology and general human disease. For every disease type, genome sequence variations, particularly single nucleotide polymorphisms are mapped by comparing the genetic makeup of case and control groups. Methods that predict the effects of polymorphisms on protein stability are useful for the identification of possible disease associations, whereas structural effects can be assessed using methods to predict stability changes in proteins using sequence and/or structural information. PMID:25061732

  9. Disease evaluations and agronomic traits of advanced peanut breeding lines in 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 23 commercially available peanut cultivars and high-oleic advanced breeding lines were evaluated in small field plots in 2014 for agronomic traits (crop value, yield, seed grade, and characteristics) and resistance to soilborne diseases. Among the 16 runner entries evaluated, Tamrun OL11...

  10. The Care Needs of Community-Dwelling Seniors Suffering from Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donna M.; Ross, Carolyn; Goodridge, Donna; Davis, Penny; Landreville, Alison; Roebuck, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the care needs of Canadian seniors living at home with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Background: COPD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although hospitalizations for illness exacerbations and end-stage care may be common, most persons with COPD live out…

  11. Disease evaluations and agronomic traits of advanced peanut breeding lines in 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 21 peanut cultivars and high-oleic advanced breeding lines were evaluated in small field plots in 2013 for agronomic traits (crop value, yield, seed grade, and characteristics) and resistance to diseases (Sclerotinia blight, southern blight, and Pythium and Rhizoctonia pod rot). Among th...

  12. Big Fleas Have Little Fleas: How discoveries of invertebrate diseases are advancing modern science.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Review of: “Big Fleas Have Little Fleas: How discoveries of invertebrate diseases are advancing modern science”. Elizabeth W. Davdison. 2006. The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, AZ. 208 pp. Dr. Davidson links many of the accomplishments in invertebrate pathology to subsequent successes in the l...

  13. Palliative Care in Advanced Lung Disease: The Challenge of Integrating Palliation Into Everyday Care.

    PubMed

    Rocker, Graeme M; Simpson, A Catherine; Horton, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The tendency toward "either/or" thinking (either cure or comfort) in traditional biomedical care paradigms does little to optimize care in advancing chronic illness. Calls for improved palliation in chronic lung disease mandate a review of related care gaps and current clinical practices. Although specialist palliative services have their advocates, adding yet another element to an already fragmented, often complex, care paradigm can be a challenge. Instead, we propose a more holistic, patient-centered approach based on elements fundamental to palliative and best care practices generally and integrated as needed across the entire illness trajectory. To support this approach, we review the concept of primary palliative care competencies, identify vulnerability specific to those living with advanced COPD (an exemplar of chronic lung disease), and describe the need for care plans shaped by patient-centered communication, timely palliative responsiveness, and effective advance care planning. A costly systemic issue in the management of chronic lung disease is patients' increasing dependency on episodic ED care to deal with preventable episodic crises and refractory dyspnea. We address this issue as part of a proposed model of care that provides proactive, collaborative case management and the appropriate and carefully monitored use of opioids. We encourage and support a renewed primary care resolve to integrate palliative approaches to care in advanced lung disease that, in concert with judicious referral to appropriate specialist palliative care services, is fundamental to what should be a more sustainable systematic improvement in palliative care delivery. PMID:25742140

  14. Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Challenges and Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Mosli, Mahmoud; Al Beshir, Mohammad; Al-Judaibi, Bandar; Al-Ameel, Turki; Saleem, Abdulaziz; Bessissow, Talat; Ghosh, Subrata; Almadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, several advances have been made in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from both evaluative and therapeutic perspectives. This review discusses the medical advancements that have recently been made as the standard of care for managing patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD) and to identify the challenges associated with implementing their use in clinical practice. A comprehensive literature search of the major databases (PubMed and Embase) was conducted for all recent scientific papers (1990–2013) giving the recent updates on the management of IBD and the data were extracted. The reported advancements in managing IBD range from diagnostic and evaluative tools, such as genetic tests, biochemical surrogate markers of activity, endoscopic techniques, and radiological modalities, to therapeutic advances, which encompass medical, endoscopic, and surgical interventions. There are limited studies addressing the cost-effectiveness and the impact that these advances have had on medical practice. The majority of the advances developed for managing IBD, while considered instrumental by some IBD experts in improving patient care, have questionable applications due to constraints of cost, lack of availability, and most importantly, insufficient evidence that supports their role in improving important long-term health-related outcomes. PMID:24705146

  15. Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Denvir, M A; Murray, S A; Boyd, K J

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient's journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction. Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation. Larger, randomised trials are needed to assess the impact on patient outcomes and experiences. PMID:25900977

  16. Top-down lipidomics of low density lipoprotein reveal altered lipid profiles in advanced chronic kidney disease[S

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Ana; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Chariyavilaskul, Pajaree; Dhaun, Neeraj; Melville, Vanessa; Goddard, Jane; Webb, David J.; Pitt, Andrew R.; Spickett, Corinne M.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the molecular lipidomic profile of LDL in patients with nondiabetic advanced renal disease and no evidence of CVD to that of age-matched controls, with the hypothesis that it would reveal proatherogenic lipid alterations. LDL was isolated from 10 normocholesterolemic patients with stage 4/5 renal disease and 10 controls, and lipids were analyzed by accurate mass LC/MS. Top-down lipidomics analysis and manual examination of the data identified 352 lipid species, and automated comparative analysis demonstrated alterations in lipid profile in disease. The total lipid and cholesterol content was unchanged, but levels of triacylglycerides and N-acyltaurines were significantly increased, while phosphatidylcholines, plasmenyl ethanolamines, sulfatides, ceramides, and cholesterol sulfate were significantly decreased in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Chemometric analysis of individual lipid species showed very good discrimination of control and disease sample despite the small cohorts and identified individual unsaturated phospholipids and triglycerides mainly responsible for the discrimination. These findings illustrate the point that although the clinical biochemistry parameters may not appear abnormal, there may be important underlying lipidomic changes that contribute to disease pathology. The lipidomic profile of CKD LDL offers potential for new biomarkers and novel insights into lipid metabolism and cardiovascular risk in this disease. PMID:25424003

  17. Comparative study of serum zinc concentrations in benign and malignant prostate disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Wu, Qingjiang; Hu, Xiaoyan; Dong, Xingyou; Wang, Liang; Liu, Qian; Long, Zhou; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the relationship between serum zinc concentration and prostatic disease, but have shown inconsistent results. Hence, we performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to assess the correlation between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. Systematic literature searches were conducted with PubMed, EMBASE, Science Direct/Elsevier, MEDLINE, CNKI and the Cochrane Library up to June 2015 for studies that involved the relationship between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. Fourteen studies were identified from the databases. Our results illustrated that the serum zinc concentrations in prostate cancer patients were significantly lower than those in Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients and normal controls (SMD (95% CI), -0.94 [-1.57, -0.32]; -1.18 [-1.90, -0.45]). However, the serum zinc concentrations in BPH patients were significantly higher than those in normal controls (SMD (95% CI) 1.77 [0.15, 3.39]). The present study showed that different levels of serum zinc concentrations are correlated with different prostatic disease. Serum zinc concentration may be used as a tool for the diagnosis and screening of prostate disease. But, further studies with well-designed larger sample studies are needed in this field to further clarify the correlation between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. PMID:27170414

  18. Comparative study of serum zinc concentrations in benign and malignant prostate disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang; Wu, Qingjiang; Hu, Xiaoyan; Dong, Xingyou; Wang, Liang; Liu, Qian; Long, Zhou; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the relationship between serum zinc concentration and prostatic disease, but have shown inconsistent results. Hence, we performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to assess the correlation between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. Systematic literature searches were conducted with PubMed, EMBASE, Science Direct/Elsevier, MEDLINE, CNKI and the Cochrane Library up to June 2015 for studies that involved the relationship between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. Fourteen studies were identified from the databases. Our results illustrated that the serum zinc concentrations in prostate cancer patients were significantly lower than those in Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients and normal controls (SMD (95% CI), −0.94 [−1.57, −0.32]; −1.18 [−1.90, −0.45]). However, the serum zinc concentrations in BPH patients were significantly higher than those in normal controls (SMD (95% CI) 1.77 [0.15, 3.39]). The present study showed that different levels of serum zinc concentrations are correlated with different prostatic disease. Serum zinc concentration may be used as a tool for the diagnosis and screening of prostate disease. But, further studies with well-designed larger sample studies are needed in this field to further clarify the correlation between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. PMID:27170414

  19. SnapShot: Key Advances in hiPSC Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Valeria; Mummery, Christine

    2016-03-01

    This SnapShot presents a timeline of key advances in directed differentiation and disease modeling using human pluripotent stem cells. The selected papers are color-coded for different systems and show progress in the field, from making disease- and tissue-specific hiPSC derivatives to the development of disease models for drug screening and therapeutics and the generation of complex systems that mimic tissue architecture and self-organized structures. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26942854

  20. Advances in the pharmacological treatment of Parkinson's disease: targeting neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Brichta, Lars; Greengard, Paul; Flajolet, Marc

    2013-09-01

    For several decades, the dopamine precursor levodopa has been the primary therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, not all of the motor and non-motor features of PD can be attributed solely to dopaminergic dysfunction. Recent clinical and preclinical advances provide a basis for the identification of additional innovative therapeutic options to improve the management of the disease. Novel pharmacological strategies must be optimized for PD by: (i) targeting disturbances of the serotonergic, noradrenergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic, and cholinergic systems in addition to the dopaminergic system, and (ii) characterizing alterations in the levels of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters that are associated with the various manifestations of the disease. PMID:23876424

  1. Interleukin 10 promoter region polymorphisms and susceptibility to advanced alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Grove, J; Daly, A; Bassendine, M; Gilvarry, E; Day, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The factors determining why less than 10% of heavy drinkers develop advanced alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remain elusive, although genetic factors may be important. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is an important cytokine with anti-inflammatory, anti-immune, and antifibrotic functions. Several polymorphisms have been identified in the IL-10 promoter and recent evidence suggests that some of these may have functional effects on IL-10 secretion.
AIMS—To test the hypothesis that IL-10 promoter region polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to ALD.
METHODS—The allele frequencies for the two single base pair substitutions at positions −627 (C→A) and −1117 (A→G) in the IL-10 promoter were determined in 287 heavy drinkers with biopsy proved advanced ALD, 107 heavy drinkers with no evidence of liver disease or steatosis only on biopsy, and 227 local healthy volunteers.
RESULTS—At position −627, 50% of patients with advanced ALD had a least one A allele compared with 33% of controls (p<0.0001) and 34% of drinkers with no or mild disease (p=0.017). At position −1117, the slight excess of the A allele in drinkers with advanced disease was because of linkage disequilibrium between the A alleles at the two sites.
CONCLUSIONS—Among heavy drinkers, possession of the A allele at position −627 in the IL-10 promoter is associated with an increased risk of advanced liver disease. This is consistent with recent functional data that the −627*A allele is associated with low IL-10 expression which will favour inflammatory, immune mediated, and profibrotic mechanisms of alcohol related liver injury.


Keywords: ethyl alcohol; cirrhosis; interleukin 10; genetic polymorphism PMID:10716685

  2. Advances in understanding and treating liver diseases during pregnancy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Hirokazu; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Kobayashi, Yuji; Nomoto, Minoru; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease in pregnancy is rare but pregnancy-related liver diseases may cause threat to fetal and maternal survival. It includes pre-eclampsia; eclampsia; haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome; acute fatty liver of pregnancy; hyperemesis gravidarum; and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Recent basic researches have shown the various etiologies involved in this disease entity. With these advances, rapid diagnosis is essential for severe cases since the decision of immediate delivery is important for maternal and fetal survival. The other therapeutic options have also been shown in recent reports based on the clinical trials and cooperation and information sharing between hepatologist and gynecologist is important for timely therapeutic intervention. Therefore, correct understandings of diseases and differential diagnosis from the pre-existing and co-incidental liver diseases during the pregnancy will help to achieve better prognosis. Therefore, here we review and summarized recent advances in understanding the etiologies, clinical courses and management of liver disease in pregnancy. This information will contribute to physicians for diagnosis of disease and optimum management of patients. PMID:25954092

  3. Current approaches to the treatment of advanced-stage Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rusthoven, J J

    1986-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy (CT) has been the mainstay of treatment of advanced-stage Hodgkin's disease since the late 1960s. Although treatment with MOPP (nitrogen mustard, vincristine sulfate [Oncovin], procarbazine and prednisone) has resulted in long-term disease-free survival rates exceeding 50%, newer approaches have been studied to improve on this success rate and to reduce the toxic effects associated with MOPP. Prognostic factors have now been defined that identify patients who may require more aggressive treatment; they include age greater than 40 years, presence of B symptoms and more advanced (especially extranodal) disease. A small number of patients with pathological stage III disease may still be successfully treated with extensive radiotherapy (RT) alone. Among patients with advanced-stage disease, significantly better therapeutic results are being obtained with newer treatment approaches than with MOPP, particularly in patients with factors that predict a poor outcome. These newer approaches include combination CT plus RT, alternating cycles of two non-cross-resistant CT regimens and hybrid regimens, which combine agents from two different CT regimens in one cycle. The prognosis of patients who suffer relapse after combination CT remains poor, even with newer drug regimens. The newer treatment approaches may well lead to better cure rates and fewer short-term and long-term toxic effects. PMID:2427176

  4. Surgical indications and optimization of patients for resectable esophageal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Joshua C.; Valero, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a devastating diagnosis with very dire long-term survival rates. This is largely due to its rather insidious progression, which leads to most patients being diagnosed with advanced disease. Recently, however, a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of esophageal malignancies has afforded surgeons and oncologists with new opportunities for intervention and management. Coupled with improvements in imaging, staging, and medical therapies, surgeons have continued to enhance their knowledge of the nuances of esophageal resection, which has resulted in the development of minimally invasive approaches with similar overall oncologic outcomes. This marriage of more efficacious induction therapy and diminished morbidity after esophagectomy offers new promise to patients diagnosed with this aggressive form of cancer. The following review will highlight these most recent advances and will offer insight into our own approach to patients with resectable esophageal malignancy. PMID:24624289

  5. A review of advances in the study of diseases of fish: 1954-1964

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Post, G.

    1965-01-01

    STUDY OF DISEASE IN ANIMALS, INCLUDING MAN, has progressed rapidly in the past decade. Looking back, we find amazing success in the study of man's diseases and possibly only a little less success in studies of diseases of domesticated homeothermic animals. We who are interested in the poikilothermic animals may feel at times that we have not advanced so rapidly in our field. The reason for this may be closely associated with economics. The market for drugs and therapeutic agents is greater for domestic livestock than for cultured fishes. A larger income is derived from rearing domestic livestock. Therefore, more public funds are available for study of diseases of man and domestic livestock, while such funds are limited for the study of diseases of fish. The Federal and State fish-cultural systems, as well as colleges and universities, have been most active in research on fish disease and probably will continue to be so.

  6. Aspirin-Exacerbated Diseases: Advances in Asthma with Nasal Polyposis, Urticaria, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney; Buchheit, Kathleen; Cahill, Katherine N

    2015-12-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated diseases are important examples of drug hypersensitivities and include aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), aspirin- or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced urticaria/angioedema, and aspirin- or NSAID-induced anaphylaxis. While each disease subtype may be distinguished by unique clinical features, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these phenotypes are not fully understood. However, the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 enzyme is thought to play a significant role. Additionally, eosinophils, mast cells, and their products, prostaglandins and leukotrienes, have been identified in the pathogenesis of AERD. Current diagnostic and treatment strategies for aspirin-exacerbated diseases remain limited, and continued research focusing on each of the unique hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin is essential. This will not only advance the understanding of these disease processes, but also lead to the subsequent development of novel therapeutics that patients who suffer from aspirin-induced reactions desperately need. PMID:26475526

  7. Therapeutic advances in the management of Pompe disease and other metabolic myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Semplicini, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The world of metabolic myopathies has been dramatically modified by the advent of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), the first causative treatment for glycogenosis type II (GSDII) or Pompe disease, which has given new impetus to research into that disease and also other pathologies. This article reviews new advances in the treatment of GSDII, the consensus about ERT, and its limitations. In addition, the most recent knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, phenotype, and genotype of the disease is discussed. Pharmacological, immunotherapy, nutritional, and physical/rehabilitative treatments for late-onset Pompe disease and other metabolic myopathies are covered, including treatments for defects in glycogen metabolism, such as glycogenosis type V (McArdle disease), and glycogenosis type III (debrancher enzyme deficiency), and defects in lipid metabolism, such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency and electron transferring flavoprotein dehydrogenase deficiency, or riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. PMID:23997816

  8. An incidental finding of a nodal recurrence of cutaneous malignant melanoma after a 45-year disease-free period

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Jenny; Cozon, Caroline Louise; Liew, Se Hwang

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of an 84-year-old woman who had a nodal recurrence of melanoma 45 years after the primary diagnosis of an extremity cutaneous melanoma. It is believed to be the longest disease-free latency period reported between primary melanoma diagnosis and recurrence to date. Late recurrences of melanoma are rare and recurrence after four decades extremely rare. This article suggests melanoma is a disease with a potentially lifelong risk of recurrence and thus clinicians and patients must be vigilant and aware of this risk, particularly if late recurrences are to be recognised early and management optimised. PMID:24895394

  9. Karnofsky Performance Status and Lactate Dehydrogenase Predict the Benefit of Palliative Whole-Brain Irradiation in Patients With Advanced Intra- and Extracranial Metastases From Malignant Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Partl, Richard; Richtig, Erika; Avian, Alexander; Berghold, Andrea; Kapp, Karin S.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine prognostic factors that allow the selection of melanoma patients with advanced intra- and extracerebral metastatic disease for palliative whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) or best supportive care. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 87 patients who underwent palliative WBRT between 1988 and 2009 for progressive or multiple cerebral metastases at presentation. Uni- and multivariate analysis took into account the following patient- and tumor-associated factors: gender and age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), neurologic symptoms, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, number of intracranial metastases, previous resection or stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases, number of extracranial metastasis sites, and local recurrences as well as regional lymph node metastases at the time of WBRT. Results: In univariate analysis, KPS, LDH, number of intracranial metastases, and neurologic symptoms had a significant influence on overall survival. In multivariate survival analysis, KPS and LDH remained as significant prognostic factors, with hazard ratios of 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-6.5) and 2.8 (95% CI 1.6-4.9), respectively. Patients with KPS ≥70 and LDH ≤240 U/L had a median survival of 191 days; patients with KPS ≥70 and LDH >240 U/L, 96 days; patients with KPS <70 and LDH ≤240 U/L, 47 days; and patients with KPS <70 and LDH >240 U/L, only 34 days. Conclusions: Karnofsky performance status and serum LDH values indicate whether patients with advanced intra- and extracranial tumor manifestations are candidates for palliative WBRT or best supportive care.

  10. A first in man, dose-finding study of the mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor OSI-027 in patients with advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Joaquin; Olmos, David; Dumez, Herlinde; Poondru, Srinivasu; Samberg, Nancy L; Barr, Sharon; Van Tornout, Jan M; Jie, Fei; Sandhu, Shahneen; Tan, Daniel S; Moreno, Victor; LoRusso, Patricia M; Kaye, Stan B; Schöffski, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background: The kinase activity of mTOR involves 2 multiprotein complexes, (mTORC1-mTORC2). Targeting mTORC1 with rapalogues induces compensatory feedback loops resulting in AKT/ERK activation, which may be abrogated by mTORC2 inhibition. A first-in-human trial evaluating tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the dual TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor OSI-027 was conducted. Methods: Dose escalation was pursued for three schedules of administration (three consecutive days per week (S1), once a week (S2) and daily dosing (S3)), until dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) were identified. Expansion cohorts with paired tumour biopsies were initiated based on tolerability and pharmacodynamics. Results: One hundred and twenty eight patients with advanced cancer were enrolled. DLT consisted predominantly of fatigue, renal function disturbances and cardiac events. OSI-027 exposure was dose proportional, with Tmax within 4 h and a half-life of ∼14 h. Expansion cohorts were initiated for S1 and S2, as MTD for S3 was overall considered suboptimal. Target modulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were observed from 30 mg, but in tumour biopsies 120 mg QD were needed, which was a non-tolerable dose due to renal toxicity. No RECIST responses were recorded, with stable disease >6 months in six (5%) patients. Conclusions: OSI-027 inhibits mTORC1/2 in patients with advanced tumour s in a dose-dependent manner but doses above the tolerable levels in S1 and S3 are required for a sustained biological effect in tumour biopsies. PMID:27002938

  11. CD34+ Stem Cell Selection for Patients Receiving Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Non-Malignant Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Bone Marrow Failure Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Schwachman Diamond Syndrome; Primary Immunodeficiency Syndromes; Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromes; Histiocytic Syndrome; Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphocytosis; Lymphohistiocytosis; Macrophage Activation Syndrome; Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH); Hemoglobinopathies; Sickle Cell Disease; Sickle Cell-beta-thalassemia

  12. Human epidemiology: a review of fiber type and characteristics in the development of malignant and nonmalignant disease.

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, J A

    1990-01-01

    Consideration of the human epidemiology of diseases arising from exposure to naturally occurring and man-made mineral fibers encompasses the several forms of asbestos (chrysotile, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite, tremolite-actinolite), other naturally occurring silicates (talc, sepiolite, erionite, attapulgite, vermiculite, and wollastonite), and man-made mineral fibers (glass continuous filament, glass/rock/slag insulation wools, ceramic and other refractory fibers, and glass microfibers). The diseases arising from exposures to some of these fibers include pleural thickening (plaques, diffuse pleural thickening, and calcification), pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancers, mesothelioma of the pleura and peritoneum, and other cancers). Risk factors important in assessing these diseases include assessment of latency, duration of exposure, cumulative exposure, fiber origin and characteristics (length and diameter), other possible confounding occupational or environmental exposures, and smoking. Methodological issues commonly presenting problems in evaluation of these data include assessment of the adequacy of environmental exposures, particularly in regard to fiber identification, distribution, and concentration over the duration of exposure, and the adequacy of study design to detect health effects (disease frequency, latency, and cohort size). Research priorities include further assessment and standardization of pleural thickening relative to fiber exposure, uniform mesothelioma surveillance, further epidemiological assessment of certain silicate and man-made mineral fiber cohorts with emphasis given to assessment of tremolite and small diameter glass and ceramic fibers. Further assessment of possible health risks of the general public should await improved definition of relevant fiber exposure in ambient air. PMID:2272325

  13. Disease control with sunitinib in advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma resistant to gemcitabine-oxaliplatin chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Chantal; Sablin, Marie-Paule; Bouattour, Mohamed; Neuzillet, Cindy; Ronot, Maxime; Dokmak, Safi; Belghiti, Jacques; Guedj, Nathalie; Paradis, Valérie; Raymond, Eric; Faivre, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Advanced cholangiocarcinoma is associated with poor prognostic survival and has limited therapeutic options available at present. The importance of angiogenesis and expression of pro-angiogenic factors in intrahepatic forms of cholangiocarcinoma suggest that therapies targeting angiogenesis might be useful for the treatment of this disease. Here we report three cases of patients with advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma progressive after standard chemotherapy and treated with sunitinib 50 mg/d in 6-wk cycles of 4 wk on treatment followed by 2 wk off treatment (Schedule 4/2). In all three patients, sunitinib treatment was associated with a sustained disease control superior to 4 mo, patients achieving either a partial response or stable disease. A reduction in tumor size and density was observed in all cases, suggesting tumor necrosis as a result of sunitinib treatment in these patients. In addition, sunitinib was generally well tolerated and the occurrence of side effects was managed with standard medical interventions, as required. Our results suggest that sunitinib therapy may be associated with favorable outcomes and tolerability in patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma. Those observations contributed to launch a prospective phase II multicenter trial investigating sunitinib in advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (SUN-CK study; NCT01718327). PMID:25937868

  14. The Declining Utilization of Radiation Therapy in Stage I and II Hodgkin's Disease and its Impact on Survival and Secondary Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Matthew; Rich, Shayna E.; Mahmood, Usama; Kwok, Young

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Concerns regarding long-term toxicities have led some to withhold radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of stage I and II Hodgkin's disease (HD). This study was undertaken to assess the utilization of RT in HD and its impact on overall survival (OS) and secondary malignancies. Materials This was a study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database that included patients who were 20 years and older who had been diagnosed with stage I or II HD diagnosed from 1988–2006. OS was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox multivariable Regression model was used to analyze trends. Results A total of 12,247 patients were selected and 51.5% received RT. The median follow up for this cohort was 4.9 years, with 21% of the cohort with > 10 years of follow-up. In 1988–1991, 62.9% received RT whereas in 2004–2006 only 43.7% received RT (p < 0.001). Among this cohort the 5 year OS was 76% for patients who did not receive RT and 87% for those that did receive RT (p < 0.001). The hazard ratio adjusted for other variables in regression model showed that patients who did not receive RT (HR – 1.72, 95% CI – 1.72–2.02) was associated with significantly worse survival when compared to patients who received RT. The actuarial rate of developing a second malignancy was 14.6% vs 15.0% at 15 years for patients who received RT vs. those with no RT (p = 0.089). Conclusions This is one of the largest studies to examine the role of RT in stage I and II HD and revealed a survival benefit with the addition of RT with no increase in secondary malignancies compared to patients who did not receive radiation therapy. Furthermore, this nationwide study revealed an over 20% absolute decrease in the utilization of RT from 1988–2006. PMID:22251881

  15. Established and Emerging Biomarkers in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Verykiou, Stamatina; Ellis, Robert A; Lovat, Penny E

    2014-01-01

    In an era of personalized medicine, disease specific biomarkers play an increasing role in the stratification of high-risk patient groups. Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer with an ever-increasing global incidence, especially in patients under 35-years of age. Despite the excellent prognosis for patients diagnosed with early stage disease, metastatic disease still carries significant overall mortality. Biomarkers aim not only to identify high-risk patients, but also to provide potential therapeutic targets for differing patient subgroups. Furthermore, accessibility to tissue samples from a range of disease stages in malignant melanoma, unlike most other solid tissue tumours, provides the unique opportunity to explore the biology of tumour progression that may be relevant in the biology of cancer as a whole. Over the past decade, there have been major advances in targeted therapies, providing new avenues and hope to patients with this devastating disease. This review will focus on most up to date histological, serological and molecular biomarkers in malignant melanoma.

  16. Oral submucous fibrosis: review on mechanisms of malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Ekanayaka, Rasika Priyadharshani; Tilakaratne, Wanninayake Mudiyanselage

    2016-08-01

    Research studies focusing on various aspects of carcinogenesis in the background of fibrosis have advanced significantly in the recent past, allowing us to understand the mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), the most prevalent potentially malignant oral disorder in South Asia. The role of areca nut as a carcinogen has been proven beyond doubt, with a large number of animal studies demonstrating its carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and genotoxicity. Studies on the molecules implicated in cell cycle regulation, hypoxia, processes leading to DNA double-strand breaks, senescence, and many other pathways related to carcinogenesis have shown ample evidence for the malignant transformation in OSF induced by areca nut. More importantly, the understanding of the mechanisms of malignant transformation may lead to early diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma arising in the background of OSF, which is now considered to constitute a clinicopathologically distinct disease, and the differences are believed to arise from the differential mechanisms of areca nut carcinogenesis. Therefore, the objective of this study is to review the literature on the various mechanisms leading to the malignant transformation of OSF. PMID:27289264

  17. Towards a molecular risk map--recent advances on the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenstiel, Philip; Sina, Christian; Franke, Andre; Schreiber, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    Recent advances have enabled a comprehensive understanding of the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with over 30 identified and replicated disease loci. The pathophysiological consequences of disease gene variants in Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, the two main subentities of IBD, so far are only understood on the single disease gene level, yet complex network analyses linking the individual risk factors into a molecular risk map are still missing. In this review, we will focus on recent pathways and cellular functions that emerged from the genetic studies (e.g. innate immunity, autophagy) and delineate the existence of shared (e.g. IL23R, IL12B) and unique (e.g. NOD2 for CD) risk factors for the disease subtypes. Ultimately, the defined molecular profiles may identify individuals at risk early in life and may serve as a guidance to administer personalized interventions for causative therapies and/or early targeted prevention strategies. Due to this comparatively advanced level of molecular understanding in the field, IBD may represent precedent also for future developments of individualized genetic medicine in other polygenic disorders in general. PMID:19926490

  18. Congenital heart disease and rheumatic heart disease in Africa: recent advances and current priorities

    PubMed Central

    Zühlke, Liesl; Mirabel, Mariana; Marijon, Eloi

    2013-01-01

    Africa has one of the highest prevalence of heart diseases in children and young adults, including congenital heart disease (CHD) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). We present here an extensive review of recent data from the African continent highlighting key studies and information regarding progress in CHD and RHD since 2005. Main findings include evidence that the CHD burden is underestimated mainly due to the poor outcome of African children with CHD. The interest in primary prevention for RHD has been recently re-emphasised, and new data are available regarding echocardiographic screening for subclinical RHD and initiation of secondary prevention. There is an urgent need for comprehensive service frameworks to improve access and level of care and services for patients, educational programmes to reinforce the importance of prevention and early diagnosis and a relevant research agenda focusing on the African context. PMID:23680886

  19. Treatment of Malignant Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Ajallé, R.; Plouin, P. F.; Pacak, K.; Lehnert, H.

    2013-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PCC) is a rare disease, mainly sporadic, but also associated with some familial disorders, with a malignancy frequency of approximately 10%. Only the presence of distant metastases, derived from large pleomorphic chromaffin cells, is widely accepted as a criterion of malignancy. Variable symptoms may be caused by production and release of catecholamines. Since there is no curative treatment for malignant PCC and due to its unfavorable prognosis, assuring quality of life is one of the main therapeutic objectives. Besides a long-term medical treatment of symptoms using selective α-1 blockers and nonselective, noncompetitive α- and / or β-blockers, debulking surgery is the first treatment step. In case of a sufficient uptake of 123I-MIBG treatment with targeted radiation therapy, use of 131I-MIBG is an option as an adjuvant therapy, following debulking surgery. Chemotherapy should be applied to patients without positive MIBG-scan, with no response to 131I-MIBG or progression after radionuclide treatment, and especially in cases with high proliferation index. The most effective chemotherapy regimen appears to be the CVD-scheme, including cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and dacarbazine. The so-called targeted molecular therapies with treatment combinations of temozolomide and thalidomide, or sunitinib monotherapy, and novel therapeutic somatostatin analogues have shown promising results and should thus encourage clinical trials to improve the prognosis of metastatic PCC. Within this review the current treatment modalities and novel molecular strategies in the management of this disease are discussed and a treatment algorithm is suggested. PMID:19672813

  20. Advances in Cell and Gene-based Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Mayumi; Sinn, Patrick L; McCray Jr, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease characterized by airway infection, inflammation, remodeling, and obstruction that gradually destroy the lungs. Direct delivery of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene to airway epithelia may offer advantages, as the tissue is accessible for topical delivery of vectors. Yet, physical and host immune barriers in the lung present challenges for successful gene transfer to the respiratory tract. Advances in gene transfer approaches, tissue engineering, and novel animal models are generating excitement within the CF research field. This review discusses current challenges and advancements in viral and nonviral vectors, cell-based therapies, and CF animal models. PMID:22371844

  1. Advances in cell and gene-based therapies for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Oakland, Mayumi; Sinn, Patrick L; McCray, Paul B

    2012-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease characterized by airway infection, inflammation, remodeling, and obstruction that gradually destroy the lungs. Direct delivery of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene to airway epithelia may offer advantages, as the tissue is accessible for topical delivery of vectors. Yet, physical and host immune barriers in the lung present challenges for successful gene transfer to the respiratory tract. Advances in gene transfer approaches, tissue engineering, and novel animal models are generating excitement within the CF research field. This review discusses current challenges and advancements in viral and nonviral vectors, cell-based therapies, and CF animal models. PMID:22371844

  2. Advanced therapeutic endoscopist and inflammatory bowel disease: Dawn of a new role

    PubMed Central

    Modha, Kunjam; Navaneethan, Udayakumar

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy plays a key role in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Colonoscopy has been traditionally used in the diagnosis of IBD and helps in determination of an important end point in patient management, “mucosal healing”. However, the involvement of an advanced endoscopist has expanded with innovations in therapeutic and newer imaging techniques. Endoscopists are increasingly being involved in the management of anastomotic and small bowel strictures in these patients. The advent of balloon enteroscopy has helped us access areas not deemed possible in the past for dilations. An advanced endoscopist also plays an integral part in managing ileal pouch-anal anastomosis complications including management of pouch strictures and sinuses. The use of rectal endoscopic ultrasound has been expanded for imaging of perianal fistulae in patients with Crohn’s disease and appears much more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging and exam under anesthesia. Advanced endoscopists also play an integral part in detection of dysplasia by employing advanced imaging techniques. In fact the paradigm for neoplasia surveillance in IBD is rapidly evolving with advancements in endoscopic imaging technology with pancolonic chromoendoscopy becoming the main imaging modality for neoplasia surveillance in IBD patients in most institutions. Advanced endoscopists are also called upon to diagnose primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and also offer options for endoscopic management of strictures through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In addition, PSC patients are at increased risk of developing cholangiocarcinoma with a 20% lifetime risk. Brush cytology obtained during ERCP and use of fluorescence in situ hybridization which assesses the presence of chromosomal aneuploidy (abnormality in chromosome number) are established initial diagnostic techniques in the investigation of patients with biliary strictures. Thus advanced

  3. Microbiome and Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Plottel, Claudia S.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Current knowledge is insufficient to explain why only a proportion of individuals exposed to environmental carcinogens or carrying a genetic predisposition to cancer develop disease. Clearly, other factors must be important and one such element that has recently received attention is the human microbiome, the residential microbes including Bacteria, Archaea, Eukaryotes, and viruses that colonize humans. Here, we review principles and paradigms of microbiome-related malignancy, as illustrated by three specific microbial-host interactions. We review the effects of the microbiota on local and adjacent-neoplasia, present the estrobolome model of distant effects, and discuss the complex interactions with a latent virus leading to malignancy. These are separate facets of a complex biology interfacing all the microbial species we harbor from birth onward toward early reproductive success and eventual senescence. PMID:22018233

  4. A rare and sinister variant of a common ailment: Fungal malignant otitis externa

    PubMed Central

    Lilic, N; Mowjood, MT; Wong, MHW

    2012-01-01

    A recent case report in this journal highlighted the pathophysiology and management of bacterial malignant otitis externa (MOE) (1). We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who had a delayed diagnosis of fungal MOE with advanced diseased at time of diagnosis. This case highlights the changing microbiology of this serious disease and the difficulty in diagnosis given the rarity of this form of otitis externa relative to its uncomplicated form. PMID:24960790

  5. Biliary atresia and other cholestatic childhood diseases: Advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Verkade, Henkjan J; Bezerra, Jorge A; Davenport, Mark; Schreiber, Richard A; Mieli-Vergani, Georgina; Hulscher, Jan B; Sokol, Ronald J; Kelly, Deirdre A; Ure, Benno; Whitington, Peter F; Samyn, Marianne; Petersen, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Biliary Atresia and other cholestatic childhood diseases are rare conditions affecting the function and/or anatomy along the canalicular-bile duct continuum, characterised by onset of persistent cholestatic jaundice during the neonatal period. Biliary atresia (BA) is the most common among these, but still has an incidence of only 1 in 10-19,000 in Europe and North America. Other diseases such as the genetic conditions, Alagille syndrome (ALGS) and Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis (PFIC), are less common. Choledochal malformations are amenable to surgical correction and require a high index of suspicion. The low incidence of such diseases hinder patient-based studies that include large cohorts, while the limited numbers of animal models of disease that recapitulate the spectrum of disease phenotypes hinders both basic research and the development of new treatments. Despite their individual rarity, collectively BA and other cholestatic childhood diseases are the commonest indications for liver transplantation during childhood. Here, we review the recent advances in basic research and clinical progress in these diseases, as well as the research needs. For the various diseases, we formulate current key questions and controversies and identify top priorities to guide future research. PMID:27164551

  6. Mucin glycosylating enzyme GALNT2 suppresses malignancy in gastric adenocarcinoma by reducing MET phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shin-Yun; Shun, Chia-Tung; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Hsu, Chia-Lang; Huang, Min-Chuan; Lai, I-Rue

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation affects malignancy in cancer. Here, we report that N- acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (GALNT2), an enzyme that mediates the initial step of mucin type-O glycosylation, suppresses malignant phenotypes in gastric adenocarcinoma (GCA) by modifying MET (Hepatocyte growth factor receptor) activity. GALNT2 mRNA and protein were downregulated in GCAs, and this reduction was associated with more advanced disease stage and shorter recurrence-free survival. Suppressing GALNT2 expression in GCA cells increased cell growth, migration, and invasion in vitro, and tumor metastasis in vivo. GALNT2 knockdown enhanced phosphorylation of MET and decreased expression of the Tn antigen on MET. Inhibiting MET activity with PHA665752 decreased the malignant phenotypes caused by GALNT2 knockdown in GCA cells. Our results indicate that GALNT2 suppresses the malignant potential of GCA cells and provide novel insights into the significance of O-glycosylation in MET activity and GCA progression. PMID:26848976

  7. Advancing research diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease: the IWG-2 criteria.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Bruno; Feldman, Howard H; Jacova, Claudia; Hampel, Harald; Molinuevo, José Luis; Blennow, Kaj; DeKosky, Steven T; Gauthier, Serge; Selkoe, Dennis; Bateman, Randall; Cappa, Stefano; Crutch, Sebastian; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Fox, Nick C; Galasko, Douglas; Habert, Marie-Odile; Jicha, Gregory A; Nordberg, Agneta; Pasquier, Florence; Rabinovici, Gil; Robert, Philippe; Rowe, Christopher; Salloway, Stephen; Sarazin, Marie; Epelbaum, Stéphane; de Souza, Leonardo C; Vellas, Bruno; Visser, Pieter J; Schneider, Lon; Stern, Yaakov; Scheltens, Philip; Cummings, Jeffrey L

    2014-06-01

    In the past 8 years, both the International Working Group (IWG) and the US National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association have contributed criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that better define clinical phenotypes and integrate biomarkers into the diagnostic process, covering the full staging of the disease. This Position Paper considers the strengths and limitations of the IWG research diagnostic criteria and proposes advances to improve the diagnostic framework. On the basis of these refinements, the diagnosis of AD can be simplified, requiring the presence of an appropriate clinical AD phenotype (typical or atypical) and a pathophysiological biomarker consistent with the presence of Alzheimer's pathology. We propose that downstream topographical biomarkers of the disease, such as volumetric MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET, might better serve in the measurement and monitoring of the course of disease. This paper also elaborates on the specific diagnostic criteria for atypical forms of AD, for mixed AD, and for the preclinical states of AD. PMID:24849862

  8. Advances in Biomedical Imaging, Bioengineering, and Related Technologies for the Development of Biomarkers of Pancreatic Disease: Summary of a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Workshop.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kimberly A; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Brand, Randall E; Liu, Christina H; Singh, Vikesh K; Srivastava, Sudhir; Wasan, Ajay D; Yadav, Dhiraj; Andersen, Dana K

    2015-11-01

    A workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering focused on research gaps and opportunities in the development of new biomarkers of pancreatic disease. The session was held on July 22, 2015, and structured into 6 sessions: 1) Introduction and Overview; 2) Keynote Address; 3) New Approaches to the Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis; 4) Biomarkers of Pain and Inflammation; 5) New Approaches to the Detection of Pancreatic Cancer; and 6) Shed Exosomes, Shed Cells, and Shed Proteins. Recent advances in the fields of pancreatic imaging, functional markers of pancreatic disease, proteomics, molecular and cellular imaging, and detection of circulating cancer cells and exosomes were reviewed. Knowledge gaps and research needs were highlighted. The development of new methods for the noninvasive determination of pancreatic pathology; the use of cellular markers of pancreatic function, inflammation, pain, and malignancy; and the refinement of methods to identify cells and cellular constituents of pancreatic cancer were discussed. The further refinement of sophisticated technical methods and the need for clinical studies to validate these new approaches in large-scale studies of patients at risk for the development of pancreatic disease were repeatedly emphasized. PMID:26465948

  9. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products: from disease marker to potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Geroldi, Diego; Falcone, Colomba; Emanuele, Enzo

    2006-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a cell-bound receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily which may be activated by a variety of proinflammatory ligands including advanced glycoxidation end products, S100/calgranulins, high mobility group box 1, and amyloid beta-peptide. RAGE has a secretory splice isoform, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), that lacks the transmembrane domain and therefore circulates in plasma. By competing with cell-surface RAGE for ligand binding, sRAGE may contribute to the removal/neutralization of circulating ligands thus functioning as a decoy. Clinical studies have recently shown that higher plasma levels of sRAGE are associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease, hypertension, the metabolic syndrome, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease. Increasing the production of plasma sRAGE is therefore considered to be a promising therapeutic target that has the potential to prevent vascular damage and neurodegeneration. This review presents the state of the art in the use of sRAGE as a disease marker and discusses the therapeutic potential of targeting sRAGE for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:16842191

  10. Advances in the prevention of oral disease; the role of the International Association for Dental Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Since its foundation in 1920, prevention of oral disease has been a priority for the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and the commitment of the organisation to the subject area is clearly expressed in its mission to improve oral health worldwide. The IADR has a current global membership of almost 11,000 people who share an interest in oral and craniofacial research. Contribution of IADR This paper provides an overview of the contribution of IADR to supporting research and associated activities in disease prevention, in disseminating knowledge and in advocating for better oral health for all citizens of the world. It looks back over time and summarises current supports. Two more recent initiatives in disease prevention are described in more detail, the Global Oral Health Inequalities Research Agenda (GOHIRA) and the proceedings at the 2013 World Conference on Preventive Dentistry (WCPD, 2013), a joint initiative between IADR and WHO. Through organisational structure, meetings, publications, scientific groups and networks and external relations, IADR has been at the forefront of advancing research for the prevention of oral diseases. Conclusions IADR is committed to ensuring research advances get disseminated and implemented and at the same time encourages and advocates for basic, clinical and translational research across disciplines so that we may uncover the major breakthrough in prevention of oral disease. PMID:26391001

  11. Advanced biomaterials and their potential applications in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Guofeng; Feng, Zhihong; Dong, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Li, Bei; Bai, Shizhu; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease is considered as a widespread infectious disease and the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. Attempts for developing periodontal disease treatment strategies, including drug delivery and regeneration approaches, provide a useful experimental model for the evaluation of future periodontal therapies. Recently, emerging advanced biomaterials including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and particles, hold great potential to be utilized as cell/drug carriers for local drug delivery and biomimetic scaffolds for future regeneration therapies. In this review, first, we describe the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, including plaque formation, immune response and inflammatory reactions caused by bacteria. Second, periodontal therapy and an overview of current biomaterials in periodontal regenerative medicine have been discussed. Third, the roles of state-of-the-art biomaterials, including hydrogels, films, micro/nanofibers and micro/nanoparticles, developed for periodontal disease treatment and periodontal tissue regeneration, and their fabrication methods, have been presented. Finally, biological properties, including biocompatibility, biodegradability and immunogenicity of the biomaterials, together with their current applications strategies are given. Conclusive remarks and future perspectives for such advanced biomaterials are discussed. PMID:26004052

  12. Gynaecological Malignancies from Palliative Care Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Kamlesh

    2011-01-01

    Of the approximately 80,000 new cases of all cancers detected every year in India, 10–15% are gynecological malignancies. As per population-based registries under the National Cancer Registry Program, the leading sites of cancer among women are the cervix uteri, breast, and oral cavity. About 50–60% of all cancers among women in India are mainly of the following four organs: cervix uteri, breast, corpus uteri, and ovaries. Over 70% of these women report for diagnostic and treatment services at an advanced stage of disease, resulting in poor survival and high mortality rates. Among all gynecological cancers, ovarian cancer is the deadliest one and, in 2/3rd of the cases, is detected in an advanced stage. But, in India and in other developing countries, due to inadequate screening facilities for the preventable cancer cervix, this kills more women than any other cancer in females. Gynecology Oncologist as a sub-specialist has an immensely important role in curtailing the menace of gynecological malignancies by providing comprehensive preventive, curative, palliative and follow-up services, with the aim of assuring a good quality of life to women as a cornerstone of cancer management. PMID:21811372

  13. Malignant Catarrhal Fever-Like Disease in Barbary Red Deer (Cervus elaphus barbarus) Naturally Infected with a Virus Resembling Alcelaphine Herpesvirus 2†

    PubMed Central

    Klieforth, Robert; Maalouf, Gabriel; Stalis, Ilse; Terio, Karen; Janssen, Donald; Schrenzel, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Eight Barbary red deer (Cervus elaphus barbarus) developed clinical signs suggestive of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) over a 28-day period. These animals were housed outdoors with four other species of ruminants. Affected red deer had lethargy, ocular signs, and nasal discharge and were euthanatized within 48 h. Lesions included ulcers of the muzzle, lips, and oral cavity associated with infiltrates of neutrophils and lymphocytes. Serologically, six of seven red deer tested during the outbreak were positive by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies to a shared MCF virus antigen. PCR using oligonucleotide primers designed for a conserved protein of alcelaphine herpesviruses 1 (AlHV-1) and 2 (AlHV-2) and for conserved regions of a herpesvirus DNA polymerase gene was positive for tissues from all eight clinically affected animals and negative for eight out of eight red deer without clinical signs of MCF. DNA sequencing of PCR amplicons from the diseased red deer indicated that they were infected with a novel herpesvirus closely related to AlHV-2; immunohistochemistry using polyclonal anti-AlHV-2 serum and in situ hybridization demonstrated the presence of virus within salivary glands adjacent to oral lesions of affected animals. A survey of other ruminants near the outbreak subsequently showed that normal Jackson's hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus jacksoni) that were cohoused with the diseased red deer were infected with the same virus and were shedding the virus in nasal excretions. These findings suggest that a herpesvirus closely related to AlHV-2 caused the MCF-like disease epizootic in Barbary red deer and that the virus may have originated from Jackson's hartebeest. PMID:12202582

  14. A retrospective study on malignant neoplasms of bladder, lung and liver in blackfoot disease endemic area in Taiwan.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C. J.; Chuang, Y. C.; You, S. L.; Lin, T. M.; Wu, H. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A total of 69 bladder cancer, 76 lung cancer and 59 liver cancer deceased cases and 368 alive community controls group-matched on age and sex were studied to evaluate the association between high-arsenic artesian well water and cancers in the endemic area of blackfoot disease (BFD), a unique peripheral vascular disease related to continuous arsenic exposure. According to a standardized structured questionnaire, information on risk factors was obtained through proxy interview of the cases and personal interview of the controls. A positive dose-response relationship was observed between the exposure to artesian well water and cancers of bladder, lung and liver. The age-sex-adjusted odds ratios of developing bladder, lung and liver cancers for those who had used artesian well water for 40 or more years were 3.90, 3.39, and 2.67, respectively, as compared with those who never used artesian well water. Multiple binary logistic regression analyses showed that the dose-response relationships and odds ratios remained much the same while other risk factors were further adjusted. PMID:3964542

  15. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Michael A.; Simon, Elias D.; Little, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  16. Managing uncertainty in advanced liver disease: a qualitative, multiperspective, serial interview study

    PubMed Central

    Kimbell, Barbara; Boyd, Kirsty; Kendall, Marilyn; Iredale, John; Murray, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand the experiences and support needs of people with advanced liver disease and those of their lay and professional carers to inform improvements in the supportive and palliative care of this rapidly growing but currently neglected patient group. Design Multiperspective, serial interviews. We conducted up to three qualitative in-depth interviews with each patient and lay carer over 12 months and single interviews with case-linked healthcare professionals. Data were analysed using grounded theory techniques. Participants Patients with advanced liver disease of diverse aetiologies recruited from an inpatient hepatology ward, and their lay carers and case-linked healthcare professionals nominated by the patients. Setting Primary and secondary care in South-East Scotland. Results 37 participants (15 patients, 11 lay and 11 professional carers) completed 51 individual and 13 joint patient-carer interviews. Nine patients died during the study. Uncertainty dominated experiences throughout the course of the illness, across patients’ considerable physical, psychological, social and existential needs and affected patients, lay carers and professionals. This related to the nature of the condition, the unpredictability of physical deterioration and prognosis, poor communication and information-sharing, and complexities of care. The pervasive uncertainty also shaped patients’ and lay carers’ strategies for coping and impeded care planning. While patients’ acute medical care was usually well coordinated, their ongoing care lacked structure and focus. Conclusions Living, dying and caring in advanced liver disease is dominated by pervasive, enduring and universally shared uncertainty. In the face of high levels of multidimensional patient distress, professionals must acknowledge this uncertainty in constructive ways that value its contribution to the person's coping approach. Pervasive uncertainty makes anticipatory care planning in advanced liver

  17. [Application of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Toth, Adrián; Nagy, Helga; Wacha, Judit; Bereczki, Dániel; Takáts, Annamária

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder around the world. Levodopa has remained the "gold standard" of the therapy even several decades after its introduction. Chronic levodopa treatment is associated with the development of motor complications in most patients. Advanced Parkinson's disease is characterized by these complications: motor and non-motor fluctuation and disturbing dyskinesia. Continuous dopaminergic stimulation might reduce these complications. In advanced Parkinson's disease levodopa is still effective. In the treatment of this stage there are several advanced or device-aided therapies: apomorphine pump, deep brain stimulation and levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel. Levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel is an aqueous gel that can be delivered to the jejunum via a percutaneous gastrojejunostomy tube which is connected to an infusion pump dosing the levodopa gel continuously to the place of absorption. Levodopa/carbidopa gel infusion can be used as monotherapy, can be tested, can be used individually and this therapy is reversible. Several clinical trials demonstrated that levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel therapy is of long-term benefit, improves the quality of life of the patients and can reduce motor fluctuation and dyskinesia. PMID:26727723

  18. Deep Assessment: A Novel Framework for Improving the Care of People with Very Advanced Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Gordon; Arthur-Kelly, Michael; Eidels, Ami; Mavratzakis, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Best practice in understanding and caring for people with advanced Alzheimer's disease presents extraordinary challenges. Their severe and deteriorating cognitive impairments are such that carers find progressive difficulty in authentically ascertaining and responding to interests, preferences, and needs. Deep assessment, a novel multifaceted framework drawn from research into the experiences of others with severe cognitive impairments, has potential to empower carers and other support professionals to develop an enhanced understanding of people with advanced Alzheimer's disease and so deliver better calibrated care in attempts to maximize quality of life. Deep assessment uses a combination of techniques, namely, Behaviour State Observation, Triangulated Proxy Reporting, and Startle Reflex Modulation Measurement, to deliver a comprehensive and deep assessment of the inner states (awareness, preferences, likes, and dislikes) of people who cannot reliably self-report. This paper explains deep assessment and its current applications. It then suggests how it can be applied to people with advanced Alzheimer's disease to develop others' understanding of their inner states and to help improve their quality of life. An illustrative hypothetical vignette is used to amplify this framework. We discuss the potential utility and efficacy of this technique for this population and we also propose other human conditions that may benefit from research using a deep assessment approach. PMID:26688817

  19. ‘Reality and desire’ in the care of advanced chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Marrón, Belén; Craver, Lourdes; Remón, César; Prieto, Mario; Gutiérrez, Josep Mª; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    There is a long distance between the actual worldwide reality in advanced chronic kidney disease care and the desire of how these patients should be managed to decrease cardiovascular and general morbidity and mortality. Implementation of adequate infrastructures may improve clinical outcomes and increase the use of home renal replacement therapies (RRT). Current pitfalls should be addressed to optimise care: inadequate medical training for nephrological referral and RRT selection, late referral to nephrologists, inadequate patient education for choice of RRT modality, lack of multidisciplinary advanced kidney disease clinics and lack of programmed RRT initiation. These deficiencies generate unintended consequences, such as inequality of care and limitations in patient education and selection-choice for RRT technique with limited use of peritoneal dialysis. Multidisciplinary advanced kidney disease clinics may have a direct impact on patient survival, morbidity and quality of life. There is a common need to reduce health care costs and scenarios increasing PD incidence show better efficiency. The following proposals may help to improve the current situation: defining the scope of the problem, disseminating guidelines with specific targets and quality indicators, optimising medical speciality training, providing adequate patient education, specially through the use of general decision making tools that will allow patients to choose the best possible RRT in accordance with their values, preferences and medical advice, increasing planned dialysis starts and involving all stakeholders in the process. PMID:25984045

  20. Nonalcoholic Lipid Accumulation and Hepatocyte Malignant Transformation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Juanjuan; Yao, Min; Yao, Dengbing; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuli; Yao, Dengfu

    2016-06-28

    Worldwide incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is steadily increasing, highlighting its status as a public health concern, particularly due to its significant association with other comorbidities, such as diabetes. However, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a primary risk factor, with its own prevalence increasing in recent years, and it has gradually caught up with the historical primary etiological factors of infection with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus, exposure to aflatoxin, or alcohol liver disease. The deeply worrisome aspects of all of these high risk factors, however, are their remarkable presence within populations. Systemic and genetic mechanisms involved in the malignant transformation of liver cells, as well as useful biomarkers of early stage HCC are being investigated. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the interrelation of NAFLD and HCC remain largely unknown. In this review, some of the recent advances in our understanding of liver lipid accumulation are summarized and discussed to provide insights into the relationship between NAFLD and hepatocyte malignant transformation. PMID:27350942

  1. Nonalcoholic Lipid Accumulation and Hepatocyte Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Juanjuan; Yao, Min; Yao, Dengbing; Wang, Li; Yang, Xuli; Yao, Dengfu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Worldwide incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is steadily increasing, highlighting its status as a public health concern, particularly due to its significant association with other comorbidities, such as diabetes. However, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a primary risk factor, with its own prevalence increasing in recent years, and it has gradually caught up with the historical primary etiological factors of infection with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus, exposure to aflatoxin, or alcohol liver disease. The deeply worrisome aspects of all of these high risk factors, however, are their remarkable presence within populations. Systemic and genetic mechanisms involved in the malignant transformation of liver cells, as well as useful biomarkers of early stage HCC are being investigated. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the interrelation of NAFLD and HCC remain largely unknown. In this review, some of the recent advances in our understanding of liver lipid accumulation are summarized and discussed to provide insights into the relationship between NAFLD and hepatocyte malignant transformation. PMID:27350942

  2. A Phase I Study of a Combination of Yttrium-90 labeled Anti-CEA Antibody and Gemcitabine in Patients with CEA Producing Advanced Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Stephen; Raubitschek, Andrew; Leong, Lucille; Koczywas, Marianna; Williams, Lawrence; Zhan, Jiping; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose of combined therapy using an yttrium-90 labeled anti-CEA antibody with gemcitabine in patients with advanced CEA producing solid tumors. Experimental Design The chimeric human/murine cT84.66 is an anti-CEA intact IgG1, with high affinity and specificity to CEA. This was given at a fixed yttrium-90 labeled dose of 16.6 mCi/m2 to subjects who had and an elevated CEA in serum or in tumor by immunohistochemistry. Also required was a tumor that imaged with an 111In labeled cT84.66 antibody. Patients were treated with escalating doses of gemcitabine given intravenously over 30 minutes on day 1 and 3 after the infusion of the yttrium-90 labeled antibody. Patients were treated in cohorts of 3. The maximum tolerated dose was determined as the highest level at which no more than 1 of 6 patients experienced a dose limiting toxicity. Results A total of 36 patients were enrolled, and all but one had prior systemic therapy. The maximum tolerated dose of gemcitabine in this combination was 150mg/m2. Dose limiting toxicities at a gemcitabine dose of 165mg/m2 included a grade 3 rash and grade 4 neutropenia. One partial response was seen in a patient with colorectal cancer, and 4 patients had a > 50% decrease in baseline CEA levels associated with stable disease. Human antichimeric antibody responses were the primary reason for stopping treatment in 12 patients. Conclusions feasibility of combining gemcitabine with an yttrium-90 labeled anti-CEA antibody is demonstrated with preliminary evidence of clinical response. PMID:19351765

  3. Obesity: The Metabolic Disease, Advances on Drug Discovery and Natural Product Research.

    PubMed

    Castro, Mafalda; Preto, Marco; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Urbatzka, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global health threat. OECD reported that more than half (52%) of the adult population in the European Union is overweight or obese. Obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities have deep negative effects on morbidity, mortality, professional and personal quality of life. Healthcare costs represent a negative impact of this disease, with an associated economic cost of 100 billion US$ per year in the United States. The most prescribed drugs for obesity treatment worldwide are orlistat, and phentermine/topiramate extended release, while the major prescribed drug for the same disease in the US are exenatide and dapagliflozin. The so far developed drugs, targeting weight loss, have a long history of malignant secondary effects. There is still a lack of efficient and safe drugs to treat obesity and related metabolic complications since in many cases cure cannot be reached by bariatric surgery or healthy lifestyle habits. Terrestrial and aquatic organisms are a promising source of valuable, bioactive compounds, often with interest for human health. Some of the natural compounds or organisms have been used for centuries by humans as traditional medicine foods. In this review, we give insights into the adipose tissue function and development, and the progress in traditional anti-obesity pharmacotherapy. A major focus is to highlight the state of the art of natural compounds with anti-obesity properties and their potential as candidates for drug development; an overview is given about natural compounds derived from different marine animal sources, cyanobacteria, marine phytoplankton, fungus or plants. PMID:27086785

  4. Malignant Catatonia Mimicking Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dailin

    2013-01-01

    Malignant catatonia is an unusual and highly fatal neuropsychiatric condition which can present with clinical and biochemical manifestations similar to those of pheochromocytoma. Differentiating between the two diseases is essential as management options greatly diverge. We describe a case of malignant catatonia in a 20-year-old male who presented with concurrent psychotic symptoms and autonomic instability, with markedly increased 24-hour urinary levels of norepinephrine at 1752 nmol/day (normal, 89–470 nmol/day), epinephrine at 1045 nmol/day (normal, <160 nmol/day), and dopamine at 7.9 μmol/day (normal, 0.4–3.3 μmol/day). The patient was treated with multiple sessions of electroconvulsive therapy, which led to complete clinical resolution. Repeat urine collections within weeks of this presenting event revealed normalization or near normalization of his catecholamine and metanephrine levels. Malignant catatonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the hypercatecholamine state, particularly in a patient who also exhibits concurrent catatonic features. PMID:24251048

  5. Endometriosis-associated Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, N.; Banys-Paluchowski, M.; Schmidt, D.; Ulrich, U.; Fehm, T.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common condition in women of reproductive age. According to several epidemiological studies endometriosis may be associated with increased risk of various malignancies. However, endometriosis-associated malignancy (EAM) is defined by certain histological criteria. About 80 % of EAM have been found in the ovary, whereas 20 % are localized in extragonadal sites like intestine, rectovaginal septum, abdominal wall, pleura and others. Some authors suggest that EAM arise from atypical endometriosis as an intermediate lesion between endometriosis and cancer. Moreover, a number of genetic alterations, like loss of heterozygosity (LOH), PTEN, ARID1 A and p53 mutations have been found in both endometriosis and EAM. Endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer (EAOC) is mostly a well or intermediately differentiated tumor of endometrioid or clear cell histological sub-type. Women affected by EAOC are on average five to ten years younger than non-EAOC patients; in most of the cases EAOC is a low stage disease with favorable clinical outcome. Since EAM is a rare condition systematic data on EAM are still missing. A systematic retrospective study on endometriosis-associated malignancies (EAM study) is currently being conducted by the Endometriosis Research Foundation together with the study groups on ovarian and uterine tumors of the working group for gynecological oncology (AGO) (gyn@mlk-berlin.de). PMID:26941451

  6. Malignant hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... and an enlarged heart. This disease may also affect the results of these tests: Level of aldosterone (a hormone from the adrenal gland) Cardiac enzymes (markers of heart damage) CT scan of the ...

  7. Malignant hyperthermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a disease that causes a fast rise in body temperature and severe muscle contractions when someone with the ... is passed down through families. Hyperthermia means high body temperature. This condition is not the same as hyperthermia ...

  8. Malignant hyperthermia

    MedlinePlus

    ... contractions when someone with the disease gets general anesthesia . It is passed down through families. Hyperthermia means ... is often discovered after a person is given anesthesia during surgery. There may be a family history ...

  9. Extra-intestinal malignancies in inflammatory bowel disease: results of the 3rd ECCO Pathogenesis Scientific Workshop (III).

    PubMed

    Magro, Fernando; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Sokol, Harry; Aldeger, Xavier; Costa, Antonia; Higgins, Peter D; Joyce, Joel C; Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Lopez, Anthony; de Xaxars, Teresa Mas; Toader, Elena; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of lymphoproliferative disorders (LD) is increasing in developed countries. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) exposed to thiopurines are at additional risk of three specific forms of LD: Epstein-Barr-Virus-related post-transplant like LD, hepato-splenic T-cell lymphoma and post-mononucleosis lymphoproliferation. The risk of the two latter forms of LD can be reduced when considering specific immunosuppressive strategies in young males. It is still unclear whether the risk of uterine cervix abnormalities is increased in IBD women, irrespective of the use of immunosuppressants. Given the excess risk demonstrated in various other contexts of immunosuppression, it is currently recommended that all women with IBD, particularly those receiving immunosuppressants, strictly adhere to a screening program of cervical surveillance and undergo vaccination against HPV, when appropriate. Patients with IBD receiving immunosuppressants are at increased risk of skin cancers. The risk of non-melanoma skin cancer is notably increased in patients receiving thiopurines. Recent data suggest that the risk of melanoma is mildly increased in patients exposed to anti-TNF therapy. All IBD patients should adhere to a program of sun protection and dermatological surveillance, whose details should take into account the other non-IBD-related risk factors. PMID:23721759

  10. Exploring the Feasibility of Dose Escalation Positron Emission Tomography-Positive Disease with Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and the Effects on Normal Tissue Structures for Thoracic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Lehendrick M.; Howard, Joshua A.; Dehghanpour, Pouya; Barrett, Renee D.; Rebueno, Neal; Palmer, Matthew; Vedam, Sastry; Klopp, Ann; Komaki, Ritsuko; Welsh, James W.

    2011-01-01

    The pattern of failure is one of the major causes of mortality among thoracic patients. Studies have shown a correlation between local control and dose. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has resulted in conformal dose distributions while limiting dose to normal tissue. However, thoracic malignancies treated with IMRT to highly conformal doses up to 70 Gy still have been found to fail. Thus, the need for dose escalation through simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) may prove effective in minimizing reoccurrences. For our study, 28 thoracic IMRT plans were reoptimized via dose escalation to the gross tumor volume (GTV) and planning target volume (PTV) of 79.2 Gy and 68.4 Gy, respectively. Reoccurrences in surrounding regions of microscopic disease are rare therefore, dose-escalating regional nodes (outside GTV) were not included. Hence, the need to edit GTV margins was acceptable for our retrospective study. A median dose escalation of approximately 15 Gy (64.8-79.2 Gy) via IMRT using SIB was deemed achievable with minimal percent differences received by critical structures compared with the original treatment plan. The target's mean doses were significantly increased based on p-value analysis, while the normal tissue structures were not significantly changed.

  11. Respiratory Cancer and Non-Malignant Respiratory Disease-Related Mortality among Older Construction Workers-Findings from the Health and Retirement Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuanwen; Dong, Xiuwen Sue; Welch, Laura; Largay, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explored the risk of respiratory cancer and non-malignant respiratory disease (NMRD)-related mortality among older construction workers. Methods Analyzed data from the 1992–2010 RAND Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and the HRS National Death Index – Cause of Death file. About 25,183 workers aged 50 years and older were examined, including 5,447 decedents and 19,736 survivors, of which 1,460 reported their longest job was in construction. Multinomial logistic regression assessed the differences in mortality between workers’ longest occupations, controlling for confounders. Results After adjusting for smoking and demographics, construction workers were almost twice as likely to die from respiratory cancer (OR = 1.65; CI: 1.10–2.47) or NMRD (OR = 1.73; CI: 1.16–2.58) compared to white-collar workers. Conclusions This study adds to the growing evidence that respiratory cancer and NMRD are frequently associated with construction exposure. PMID:27500180

  12. Advanced lung disease: quality of life and role of palliative care.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Christopher R; Smith, Cecilia M

    2009-02-01

    Advanced restrictive lung diseases remain a challenge for both the clinician and patient alike. Because there are few available treatment options that prolong survival for patients with diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, improvement in quality of life and palliation of significant symptoms become realistic treatment goals. Several validated instruments that assess quality of life and health-related quality of life have demonstrated the dramatic impact that lung disease has on patients. Quality-of-life assessments of patients with interstitial lung disease have commonly cited respiratory complaints as problematic, but other distressing symptoms often not addressed include fear, social isolation, anxiety, and depression. Not only do respiratory symptoms limit this patient population, but the awareness of decreased independence and ability for social participation also has an impact on the quality of life. Some patients describe a deepened spiritual well-being during their disease process; however, many patients' mental health suffers with experiences of fear, worry, anxiety, and panic. Many patients express desire for more attention to end-of-life issues from their physicians. Fears of worsening symptoms and suffocation exist with an expressed desire by most to die peacefully with symptom control. Interventions to improve quality of life are largely directed at symptom control. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions have been helpful in relieving dyspnea. Studies have demonstrated that the use of supplemental oxygen in the face of advancing hypoxemia can have both positive and negative effects on quality of life. Patients using nasal prongs describe feelings of self-consciousness, embarrassment, and social withdrawal. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended, with some studies noting increased quality-of-life scores and decreased sensations of dyspnea. Sleep deprivation and poor sleep quality also have a negative impact on quality of life

  13. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  14. Update on celiac disease – etiology, differential diagnosis, drug targets, and management advances

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Samantha A; Murray, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to wheat gluten and similar proteins found in rye and barley that affects genetically susceptible persons. This immune-mediated enteropathy is characterized by villous atrophy, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and crypt hyperplasia. Once thought a disease that largely presented with malnourished children, the wide spectrum of disease activity is now better recognized and this has resulted in a shift in the presenting symptoms of most patients with CD. New advances in testing, both serologic and endoscopic, have dramatically increased the detection and diagnosis of CD. While the gluten-free diet is still the only treatment for CD, recent investigations have explored alternative approaches, including the use of altered nonimmunogenic wheat variants, enzymatic degradation of gluten, tissue transglutaminase inhibitors, induction of tolerance, and peptides to restore integrity to intestinal tight junctions. PMID:22235174

  15. Predictive and preventive strategies to advance the treatments of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases: the Ukrainian context

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite great efforts in treatments of cardiovascular diseases, the field requires innovative strategies because of high rates of morbidity, mortality and disability, indicating evident deficits in predictive vascular diagnosis and individualized treatment approaches. Talking about the vascular system, currently, physicians are not provided with integrated medical approaches to diagnose and treat vascular diseases. Only an individual global approach to the analysis of all segments in the vascular system of a patient allows finding the optimal way for vascular disease treatment. As for the existing methodology, there is a dominance of static methods such as X-ray contrast angiography and magnetic resonance imaging in angiomode. Taking into account the world experience, this article deals with innovative strategies, aiming at predictive diagnosis in vascular system, personalization of the biomedical treatment approaches, and targeted prevention of individual patient cohorts. Clinical examples illustrate the advances in corresponding healthcare sectors. Recommendations are provided to promote the field. PMID:23083430

  16. Wildebeest-associated malignant catarrhal fever: perspectives for integrated control of a lymphoproliferative disease of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Wambua, Lillian; Wambua, Peninah Nduku; Ramogo, Allan Maurice; Mijele, Domnic; Otiende, Moses Yongo

    2016-01-01

    Wildebeest-associated malignant catarrhal fever (WA-MCF), an acute lymphoproliferative disease of cattle caused by alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), remains a significant constraint to cattle production in nomadic pastoralist systems in eastern and southern Africa. The transmission of WA-MCF is dependent on the presence of the wildlife reservoir, i.e. wildebeest, belonging to the species Connochaetes taurinus and Connochaetes gnou; hence, the distribution of WA-MCF is largely restricted to Kenya, Tanzania and the Republic of South Africa, where wildebeest are present. WA-MCF is analogous to sheep-associated MCF (SA-MCF) in many aspects, with the latter having sheep as its reservoir host and a more global distribution, mainly in developed countries with intensive livestock production systems. However, unlike SA-MCF, the geographic seclusion of WA-MCF may have contributed to an apparent neglect in research efforts aimed at increased biological understanding and control of the disease. This review aims to highlight the importance of WA-MCF and the need for intensified research towards measures for its integrated control. We discuss current knowledge on transmission and geographical distribution in eastern and southern Africa and the burden of WA-MCF in affected vulnerable pastoral communities in Africa. Recent findings towards vaccine development and pertinent knowledge gaps for future research efforts on WA-MCF are also considered. Finally, integrated control of WA-MCF based on a logical three-pronged framework is proposed, contextualizing vaccine development, next-generation diagnostics, and diversity studies targeted to the viral pathogen and cattle hosts. PMID:26446889

  17. Cortical neurons express nerve growth factor receptors in advanced age and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mufson, E J; Kordower, J H

    1992-01-01

    Using a monoclonal antibody directed against the primate nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor, we examined the expression of NGF receptors within neuronal perikarya of normal adult human cerebral cortex (27-98 years old) and individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD). This expression of cortical NGF receptors was compared with that seen in other neurological diseases and normal human development as well as in young and aged nonhuman primates. NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were not observed in young adults (less than 50 years old) and were observed only infrequently in non-demented elderly individuals (50-80 years old). In contrast, numerous NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were seen in AD patients of all ages and in one 98-year-old nondemented patient. In advanced age and AD, numerous NGF receptor-positive neurons were located within laminae II-VI of temporal association cortices whereas only a few were seen in the subicular complex, entorhinal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, and amygdaloid complex. These perikarya appeared healthy, with bipolar, fusiform, or multipolar morphologies and extended varicose dendritic arbors. These neurons failed to express neurofibrillary tangle-bearing material. In contrast to AD, NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were not observed in Parkinson disease, Pick disease, or Shy-Drager syndrome. The NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons seen in advanced age and AD were similar in morphology to those observed in human fetal cortex. No NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were observed in young or aged nonhuman primates. These findings suggest that neurons within the human cerebral cortex exhibit plasticity in their expression of NGF receptors in AD and extreme advanced aging. Images PMID:1309947

  18. Socioeconomic Status Correlates with the Prevalence of Advanced Coronary Artery Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bashinskaya, Bronislava; Nahed, Brian V.; Walcott, Brian P.; Coumans, Jean-Valery C. E.; Onuma, Oyere K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasingly studies have identified socioeconomic factors adversely affecting healthcare outcomes for a multitude of diseases. To date, however, there has not been a study correlating socioeconomic details from nationwide databases on the prevalence of advanced coronary artery disease. We seek to identify whether socioeconomic factors contribute to advanced coronary artery disease prevalence in the United States. Methods and Findings State specific prevalence data was queried form the United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2009. Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft were identified as principal procedures. Non-cardiac related procedures, lung lobectomy and hip replacement (partial and total) were identified and used as control groups. Information regarding prevalence was then merged with data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, the largest, on-going telephone health survey system tracking health conditions and risk behaviors in the United States. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated for individual socioeconomic variables including employment status, level of education, and household income. Household income and education level were inversely correlated with the prevalence of percutaneous coronary angioplasty (−0.717; −0.787) and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (−0.541; −0.618). This phenomenon was not seen in the non-cardiac procedure control groups. In multiple linear regression analysis, socioeconomic factors were significant predictors of coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (p<0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Conclusions Socioeconomic status is related to the prevalence of advanced coronary artery disease as measured by the prevalence of percutaneous coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:23050011

  19. The role of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in benign and malignant bone disease.

    PubMed

    Horger, Marius; Bares, Roland

    2006-10-01

    Radiological (plain radiographs, computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and nuclear medicine methods (bone scan, leukocyte scan) both provide unique information about the status of the skeleton. Both have typical strengths and weaknesses, which often lead to the sequential use of different procedures in daily routine. This use causes the unnecessary loss of time and sometimes money, if redundant information is obtained without establishing a final diagnosis. Recently, new devices for hybrid imaging (single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography [SPECT/CT], positron emission tomography/computed tomography [PET/CT]) were introduced, which allow for direct fusion of morphological (CT) and functional (SPECT, PET) data sets. With regard to skeletal abnormalities, this approach appears to be extremely useful because it combines the advantages of both techniques (high-resolution imaging of bone morphology and high sensitivity imaging of bone metabolism). By the accurate correlation of both, a new quality of bone imaging has now become accessible. Although researchers undertaking the initial studies exclusively used low-dose CT equipment, a new generation of SPECT/CT devices has emerged recently. By integrating high-resolution spiral CT, quality of bone imaging may improve once more. Ongoing prospective studies will have to show whether completely new diagnostic algorithms will come up for classification of bone disease as a consequence of this development. Besides, the role of ultrasonography and MRI for bone and soft-tissue imaging also will have to be re-evaluated. Looking at the final aim of all imaging techniques--to achieve correct diagnosis in a fast, noninvasive, comprehensive, and inexpensive way--we are now on the edge of a new era of multimodality imaging that will probably change the paths and structure of medicine in many ways. Presently, hybrid imaging using SPECT/CT has been proven to increase sensitivity and specificity

  20. The microenvironment in mature B-cell malignancies: a target for new treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ghia, Paolo; Rosenwald, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Despite major therapeutic advances, most mature B-cell malignancies remain incurable. Compelling evidence suggests that crosstalk with accessory stromal cells in specialized tissue microenvironments, such as the bone marrow and secondary lymphoid organs, favors disease progression by promoting malignant B-cell growth and drug resistance. Therefore, disrupting the crosstalk between malignant B cells and their milieu is an attractive novel strategy for treating selected mature B-cell malignancies. Here we summarize the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular interactions between neoplastic B lymphocytes and accessory cells that shape a supportive microenvironment, and the potential therapeutic targets that are emerging, together with the new problems they raise. We discuss clinically relevant aspects and provide an outlook into future biologically oriented therapeutic strategies. We anticipate a paradigm shift in the treatment of selected B-cell malignancies, moving from targeting primarily the malignant cells toward combining cytotoxic drugs with agents that interfere with the microenvironment's proactive role. Such approaches hopefully will help eliminating residual disease, thereby improving our current therapeutic efforts. PMID:19636060

  1. Cryptococcus neoformans infection in malignancy.

    PubMed

    Schmalzle, Sarah A; Buchwald, Ulrike K; Gilliam, Bruce L; Riedel, David J

    2016-09-01

    Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic invasive fungal infection that is well described and easily recognised when it occurs as meningitis in HIV-infected persons. Malignancy and its treatment may also confer a higher risk of infection with Cryptococcus neoformans, but this association has not been as well described. A case of cryptococcosis in a cancer patient is presented, and all cases of coincident C. neoformans infection and malignancy in adults published in the literature in English between 1970 and 2014 are reviewed. Data from these cases were aggregated in order to describe the demographics, type of malignancy, site of infection, clinical manifestations, treatment and outcomes of cryptococcosis in patients with cancer. Haematologic malignancies accounted for 82% of cases, with lymphomas over-represented compared to US population data (66% vs. 53% respectively). Cryptococcosis was reported rarely in patients with solid tumours. Haematologic malignancy patients were more likely to have central nervous system (P < 0.001) or disseminated disease (P < 0.001), receive Amphotericin B as part of initial therapy (P = 0.023), and had higher reported mortality rates than those with solid tumours (P = 0.222). Providers should have heightened awareness of the possibility of cryptococcosis in patients with haematologic malignancy presenting with infection. PMID:26932366

  2. Risk of liver injury after α-glucosidase inhibitor therapy in advanced chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chih-Chin; Wu, Pei-Chen; Wu, Che-Hsiung; Chen, Li-kwang; Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Wu, Mai-Szu; Wu, Vin-Cent

    2016-01-01

    Although α-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are commonly used for controlling postprandial blood glucose, AGIs-induced liver injuries have been reported. However, the relationship between AGIs and liver injuries in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients remains unexplored. In this nationwide case-control study, we recruited 1765 advanced diabetic CKD patients, who received AGIs therapy from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010 as the study sample and 5295 matched controls. Recent and former AGIs users were defined as patients who received the AGIs prescription for 30–60 d and 30–210 d before the event of liver injury. The risk of AGIs-induced liver injury was examined using time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model. Liver injury occurred in 3.9% of patients in the study group and 3.3% of patients in the control group. AGIs use did not increase the risk of liver injury in advanced CKD patients (P = 0.19). The stratified analysis indicated no increased risk of liver injury in all AGIs-using subgroups (all P > 0.05). The available evidence supports extending the use of AGIs without increasing the risk of liver injury in patients with advanced CKD. Additional randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm our results. PMID:26751038

  3. Tumor Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase Signaling and Development of Metastatic Disease in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Anne Hansen; Kristensen, Annette Torgunrud; Saelen, Marie Grøn; de Wijn, Rik; Edvardsen, Hege; Jovanovic, Jovana; Abrahamsen, Torveig Weum; Dueland, Svein; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2012-01-01

    Background Recognizing EGFR as key orchestrator of the metastatic process in colorectal cancer, but also the substantial heterogeneity of responses to anti-EGFR therapy, we examined the pattern of composite tumor kinase activities governed by EGFR-mediated signaling that might be implicated in development of metastatic disease. Patients and Methods Point mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA and ERBB2 amplification were determined in primary tumors from 63 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer scheduled for radical treatment. Using peptide arrays with tyrosine kinase substrates, ex vivo phosphopeptide profiles were generated from the same baseline tumor samples and correlated to metastasis-free survival. Results Unsupervised clustering analysis of the resulting phosphorylation of 102 array substrates defined two tumor classes, both consisting of cases with and without KRAS/BRAF mutations. The smaller cluster group of patients, with tumors generating high ex vivo phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-related substrates, had a particularly aggressive disease course, with almost a half of patients developing metastatic disease within one year of follow-up. Conclusion High phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-mediated signaling activity of the primary tumor, rather than KRAS/BRAF mutation status, was identified as a hallmark of poor metastasis-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing radical treatment of the pelvic cavity. PMID:23226389

  4. [Efficacy and safety of selective estrogen receptor modulators in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators(SERMs)have beneficial effects on the improvement of bone mineral density of the spine and hip, and decrease the vertebral fracture in postmenopausal women. Similar to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, including dialysis patients, however, SERMs cannot decrease the risk of hip fracture, which is extremely high in Japanese dialysis patients. One of the most important disadvantages of SERMs is an increase in the risk of venous thromboembolic events and fatal stroke in high-risk groups of the Framingham Stroke Risk Score. On the other hand, SERMs may be used in unique osteoporosis drugs for reducing the incidence and progression of breast cancer. Moreover, SERMs attenuate oxidative stress and may lessen the deterioration of kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease. The evidences for the efficacy and safety of SERMs in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease are insufficient, and knowledge concerning the selection and indication of osteoporosis drugs for those patients need to be developed. PMID:27561348

  5. Strategies to Circumvent Testosterone Surge and Disease Flare in Advanced Prostate Cancer: Emerging Treatment Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Pokuri, Venkata K; Nourkeyhani, Houman; Betsy, Bodie; Herbst, Laurie; Sikorski, Marcus; Spangenthal, Edward; Fabiano, Andrew; George, Saby

    2015-07-01

    The testosterone surge and disease flare is a feared complication from initiation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist treatment in advanced prostate adenocarcinoma. It is a common practice to start an average 7-day pretreatment regimen with an antiandrogen agent before initiating GnRH agonist therapy, to circumvent disease flare from testosterone surge. However, this might not be the best strategy and can be harmful, especially in patients at high risk of imminent organ damage from minimal testosterone surge. Surgical castration is a simple and cost-effective method that should be considered in these scenarios. But most patients refuse this procedure because of the permanent and psychologic impact of surgery. Novel GnRH antagonists, such as degarelix, and cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, achieve castrate-equivalent serum testosterone levels much faster than traditional GnRH agonists without the need for coadministration of antiandrogens. This article reports on 3 cases of impending oncologic emergencies in advanced prostate adenocarcinoma treated promptly with degarelix and ketoconazole without any disease flare related to testosterone surge. In the setting of symptomatic hormone-naïve metastatic prostate cancer, the authors suggest clinical trials using abiraterone, orteronel, and other newer agents that target the CYP17 axis (eg, ketoconazole) for fine-tuning the emergent medical castration methods and avoiding the dangers from the flare phenomenon. PMID:26150586

  6. Advances and challenges in biosensor-based diagnosis of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Mandy LY; Mach, Kathleen E; Wong, Pak Kin; Liao, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Conventional in vitro diagnostics for infectious diseases are time-consuming and require centralized laboratories, experienced personnel and bulky equipment. Recent advances in biosensor technologies have potential to deliver point-of-care diagnostics that match or surpass conventional standards in regards to time, accuracy and cost. Broadly classified as either label-free or labeled, modern biosensors exploit micro- and nanofabrication technologies and diverse sensing strategies including optical, electrical and mechanical transducers. Despite clinical need, translation of biosensors from research laboratories to clinical applications has remained limited to a few notable examples, such as the glucose sensor. Challenges to be overcome include sample preparation, matrix effects and system integration. We review the advances of biosensors for infectious disease diagnostics and discuss the critical challenges that need to be overcome in order to implement integrated diagnostic biosensors in real world settings. PMID:24524681

  7. Advances in the Development of Disease-Modifying Treatments for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moujalled, Diane; White, Anthony R

    2016-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive adult-onset, neurodegenerative disease characterized by the degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Over recent years, numerous genes ha ve been identified that promote disease pathology, including SOD1, TARDBP, and the expanded hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) within C9ORF72. However, despite these major advances in identifying genes contributing to ALS pathogenesis, there remains only one currently approved therapeutic: the glutamate antagonist, riluzole. Seminal breakthroughs in the pathomechanisms and genetic factors associated with ALS have heavily relied on the use of rodent models that recapitulate the ALS phenotype; however, while many therapeutics have proved to be significant in animal models by prolonging life and rescuing motor deficits, they have failed in human clinical trials. This may be due to fundamental differences between rodent models and human disease, the fact that animal models are based on overexpression of mutated genes, and confounding issues such as difficulties mimicking the dosing schedules and regimens implemented in mouse models to humans. Here, we review the major pathways associated with the pathology of ALS, the rodent models engineered to test efficacy of candidate drugs, the advancements being made in stem cell therapy for ALS, and what strategies may be important to circumvent the lack of successful translational studies in the clinic. PMID:26895253

  8. Role of dual time fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography in identifying co-existing inflammatory and malignant disease: Who holds it (FDG) longer?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anirudh V.; Sandya, C. J.; Shagos, G.S.; Anirudh, Soumya; Rajamma, Bindhu Mangalath; Ramachandran, P. V.; Moorthy, Srikanth

    2015-01-01

    18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is an integral part of imaging in the follow-up of head and neck malignancies. Very often distinguishing inflammatory/infective from malignant recurrence cannot be made confidently with standard uptake value (SUV) alone, as inflammatory lesions have shown to have a very high SUV, and in some cases both can co-exist. In such doubtful cases, dual time PET-CT (3–5 h delayed) is of paramount importance in confidently differentiating inflammatory/infective from a malignant cause. PMID:25829732

  9. Translational research in immune and inflammatory diseases; what are the challenges, expected advances, and innovative therapies?

    PubMed

    Joubert, Jean-Michel; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Paintaud, Gilles; Augendre-Ferrante, Béatrice; Cans, Christophe; Cellier, Dominique; Chevalier, Marie-Pierre; Diaz, Isabelle; Filipecki, Jamila; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Le Men, Johan; Mulleman, Denis; Urbain, Rémi; Vasmant, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Despite very different aetiologies and clinical expressions, advancing knowledge in the physiopathology and treatment of immune and inflammatory diseases (IID) prompts us to consider them as a whole. These are chronic, often incapacitating and painful illnesses that progress and destroy organs. Management by discipline too often leads to erroneous diagnoses and sometimes inappropriate treatment. More integrated translational research would further understanding of the complex relationships between cytokines and organ damage, which vary with the conditions and patients, making it possible to develop new biomarkers and personalize treatment. The research in France has very many strengths but its organization is fragmented. Better coordinated research into IID, which could be based on creating a strategic valorization field (domaine de valorisation stratégique, DVS) and thematic multi-organization institute (Institut thématique multi-organismes ITMO), would advance patient management. PMID:25099671

  10. Inflammation Biomarkers of Advanced Disease in Nongingival Tissues of Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Thiago Alvares; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; Alves, Polyanna Miranda; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Barcelos, Emilio Zorzo; Giani, Max Antonio Alves; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; da Silva, João Santana; Rodrigues Júnior, Virmondes; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that affects supporting structures of the teeth. Although the gingival response is largely described, little is known about the immune changes in the alveolar bone and neighboring tissues that could indicate periodontal disease (PD) activity. Then, in this study we identified the ongoing inflammatory changes and novel biomarkers for periodontitis in the tissues directly affected by the destructive disease in PD patients. Samples were collected by osteotomy in 17 control subjects during extraction of third molars and 18 patients with advanced PD, in which alveoloplasty was necessary after extraction of teeth with previous extensive periodontal damage. Patients presented mononuclear cells infiltration in the connective tissue next to the bone and higher fibrosis area, along with increased accumulation of IL-17+ and TRAP+ cells. The levels of TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA were also elevated compared to controls and a positive and significant correlation was observed between TNF-α and MMP-2 mRNA expression, considering all samples evaluated. In conclusion, nongingival tissues neighboring large periodontal pockets present inflammatory markers that could predict ongoing bone resorption and disease spreading. Therefore, we suggested that the detailed evaluation of these regions could be of great importance to the assessment of disease progression. PMID:26063981

  11. Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Recent Advances on the Path to New Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rountree, C. Bart; Mishra, Lopa; Willenbring, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have potential for therapy of liver diseases, but may also be involved in the formation of liver cancer. Recently, the AASLD Henry M. and Lillian Stratton Basic Research Single Topic Conference “Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Discovery and Promise” brought together a diverse group of investigators to define the status of research on stem cells and cancer stem cells in the liver and identify problems and solutions on the path to clinical translation. This report summarizes the outcomes of the conference and provides an update on recent research advances. Progress in liver stem cell research includes isolation of primary liver progenitor cells (LPC), directed hepatocyte differentiation of primary LPC and pluripotent stem cells, findings of transdifferentiation, disease-specific considerations for establishing a therapeutically effective cell mass, and disease modeling in cell culture. Tumor initiating stem-like cells (TISC) that emerge during chronic liver injury share expression of signaling pathways, including those organized around TGF-β and β-catenin, and surface markers with normal LPC. Recent investigations of the role of TISC in hepatocellular carcinoma have provided insight into the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of hepatocarcinogenesis. Targeted chemotherapies for TISC are in development as a means to overcome cellular resistance and mechanisms driving disease progression in liver cancer. PMID:22030746

  12. CT angiography after 20 years: a transformation in cardiovascular disease characterization continues to advance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Geoffrey D; Leipsic, Jonathon; Joseph Schoepf, U; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2014-06-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5-15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  13. The Origin of Malignant Malaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of malignant malaria, which is among the most severe human infectious diseases. Despite its overwhelming significance to human health, the parasite’s origins remain unclear. The favored origin hypothesis holds that P. falciparum and its closest known rel...

  14. Genetic polymorphism of N-acetyltransferases, glutathione S-transferase M1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase in relation to malignant and benign pancreatic disease risk. The International Pancreatic Disease Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H; Malaveille, C; Lowenfels, A B; Maisonneuve, P; Hautefeuille, A; Boyle, P

    1998-06-01

    Carcinogens present in cigarette smoke and diet have been associated with pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that heterocyclic and aromatic amines implicated in these exposures could be involved as causative agents and that therefore genetic variation in enzymes metabolizing these carcinogens could modify the risk of developing malignant and benign pancreatic disease. The effect of the genetic polymorphism of acetyltransferases (NAT1) and NAT2), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) on the risk of pancreatic diseases (cancer, pancreatitis) was examined in a case-control study. PCR-based assays were used for genotype analysis of genomic DNA from whole blood cells. Samples collected from Caucasian patients with diagnosed pancreatic cancer (n = 81), with non-alcoholic (n = 41) and alcoholic pancreatitis (n = 73) and from asymptomatic control subjects (n = 78) were analysed. The prevalence of GSTM1 null genotype and of NAT2 fast and slow acetylator genotypes and the distribution of frequencies for NQO1 genotypes did not differ in subjects with pancreatic diseases vs controls. For NAT1 slow acetylators a non-significant excess (P = 0.18) was found among pancreatic cancer cases vs controls. There was a significant over-representation of the GSTM1 AB or B genotype in all pancreatic disease cases combined (OR = 2.6; P < 0.05). When concurrent controls were pooled with literature controls (n = 1427), OR was 1.4 (P = 0.08). The results of this study, requiring confirmation, suggest that the polymorphism of GSTM1 and NAT1 enzymes may be associated with a modest increase in susceptibility to pancreatic diseases. PMID:9696930

  15. Unusual appearance of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and fatal cancer arising from the mesothelial cells lining the peritoneum. This typically occurs in men in their fifth and sixth decades, but can be seen in women and any age group. Pleural and extrapleural mesothelioma can arise in the setting of asbestos exposure, but other reported causes of MPM include exposure to silicate fibers and radiation therapy. Because it presents with vague symptoms such as abdominal pain, anorexia, and weight loss, it is generally advanced at diagnosis. This is a case of MPM that presented initially at contrast-enhanced computed tomography as a small focal lesion in the lesser sac, ultimately resulting in death from complications of the disease. PMID:25793652

  16. Cancer stem cells in haematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Golab, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    At least several types of human haematological malignancies can now be seen as ‘stem-cell diseases’. The best-studied in this context is acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). It has been shown that these diseases are driven by a pool of ‘leukaemia stem cells (LSC)’, which remain in the quiescent state, have the capacity to survive and self-renew, and are responsible for the recurrence of cancer after classical chemotherapy. It has been understood that LSC must be eliminated in order to cure patients suffering from haematological cancers. Recent advances in LSC research have allowed for description of LSC phenotype and identification of potential targets for anti-LSC therapies. This concise review summarises the current view on LSC biology and targeted approaches against LSC. PMID:25691816

  17. Role of laparoscopy in hepatobiliary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Balarajah, Vickna; Watt, Jennifer; Abraham, Ajit T; Bhattacharya, Satyajit; Kocher, Hemant M

    2016-04-01

    The many benefits of laparoscopy, including smaller incision, reduced length of hospital stay and more rapid return to normal function, have seen its popularity grow in recent years. With concurrent improvements in non-surgical cancer management the importance of accurate staging is becoming increasingly important. There are two main applications of laparoscopic surgery in managing hepato-pancreatico-biliary (HPB) malignancy: accurate staging of disease and resection. We aim to summarize the use of laparoscopy in these contexts. The role of staging laparoscopy has become routine in certain cancers, in particular T[2] staged, locally advanced gastric cancer, hilar cholangiocarcinoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. For other cancers, in particular colorectal, laparoscopy has now become the gold standard management for resection such that there is no role for stand-alone staging laparoscopy. In HPB cancers, although staging laparoscopy may play a role, with ever improving radiology, its role remains controversial. PMID:27377496

  18. Role of laparoscopy in hepatobiliary malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Balarajah, Vickna; Watt, Jennifer; Abraham, Ajit T.; Bhattacharya, Satyajit; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2016-01-01

    The many benefits of laparoscopy, including smaller incision, reduced length of hospital stay and more rapid return to normal function, have seen its popularity grow in recent years. With concurrent improvements in non-surgical cancer management the importance of accurate staging is becoming increasingly important. There are two main applications of laparoscopic surgery in managing hepato-pancreatico-biliary (HPB) malignancy: accurate staging of disease and resection. We aim to summarize the use of laparoscopy in these contexts. The role of staging laparoscopy has become routine in certain cancers, in particular T2 staged, locally advanced gastric cancer, hilar cholangiocarcinoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. For other cancers, in particular colorectal, laparoscopy has now become the gold standard management for resection such that there is no role for stand-alone staging laparoscopy. In HPB cancers, although staging laparoscopy may play a role, with ever improving radiology, its role remains controversial. PMID:27377496

  19. HGV2012: Leveraging Next-Generation Technology and Large Datasets to Advance Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaludo, Nina; Zheng, Hong-Xiang; Wang, Jiucun; Chanock, Stephen J.; Jin, Li; Scherer, Stephen; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Brookes, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    The 13th International Meeting on Human Genome Variation and Complex Genome Analysis (HGV2012: Shanghai, China, 6th 8th September 2012) was a stimulating workshop where researchers from academia and industry explored the latest progress, challenges, and opportunities in genome variation research. Key themes included advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, investigation of common and rare diseases, employing NGS in the clinic, utilizing large datasets that leverage biobanks and population-specific cohorts, and exploration of genomic features. PMID:23315969

  20. Sneddon-Wilkinson disease induced by sorafenib in a patient with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Kazuto; Nakajima, Takahiko; Kawai, Kengo; Minemura, Masami;