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Sample records for advanced mask inspection

  1. Inspectability and printability of lines and spaces halftone masks for the advanced DRAM node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, Arndt C.; Gutjahr, Karsten; Heumann, Jan; Stengl, Martin; Katzwinkel, Frank; Frangen, Andreas; Witte, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    With decreasing pattern sizes the absolute size of acceptable pattern deviations decreases. For mask-makers a new technology requires a review, which mask design variations print on the wafer under production illumination conditions and whether these variations can be found reliably (100%) with the current inspection tools. As defect dispositioning is performed with an AIMS-tool, the critical AIMS values, above which a defect prints lithographically significant on the wafer, needs to be determined. In this paper we present a detailed sensitivity analysis for programmed defects on 2 different KLA 5xx tools employing the pixel P90 at various sensitivity settings in die-to-die transmitted mode. Comparing the inspection results with the wafer prints of the mask under disar illumination it could be shown that all critical design variations are reliably detected using a state-of-the-art tool setup. Furthermore, AIMS measurements on defects with increasing defect area of various defect categories were taken under the same illumination conditions as for the wafer prints. The measurements were evaluated in terms of AIMS intensity variation (AIV). It could be shown that the AIMS results exhibit a linear behavior if plotted against the square-root area (SRA) of the defects on the mask as obtained from mask SEM images. A consistent lower AIV value was derived for all defect categories.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet patterned mask inspection performance of advanced projection electron microscope system for 11nm half-pitch generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Novel projection electron microscope optics have been developed and integrated into a new inspection system named EBEYE-V30 ("Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) , and the resulting system shows promise for application to half-pitch (hp) 16-nm node extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask inspection. To improve the system's inspection throughput for 11-nm hp generation defect detection, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and an image capture area deflector that operates simultaneously with the mask scanning motion have been developed. A learning system has been used for the mask inspection tool to meet the requirements of hp 11-nm node EUV patterned mask inspection. Defects are identified by the projection electron microscope system using the "defectivity" from the characteristics of the acquired image. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and costs associated with adjustment of the detection capability to cope with newly-defined mask defects. We describe the integration of the developed elements into the inspection tool and the verification of the designed specification. We have also verified the effectiveness of the learning system, which shows enhanced detection capability for the hp 11-nm node.

  3. A study of defects on EUV mask using blank inspection, patterned mask inspection, and wafer inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, S.; Ren, L.; Chan, D.; Wurm, S.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Nakajima, T.; Kishimoto, M.; Ahn, B.; Kang, I.; Park, J.-O.; Cho, K.; Han, S.-I.; Laursen, T.

    2010-03-12

    The availability of defect-free masks remains one of the key challenges for inserting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into high volume manufacturing. yet link data is available for understanding native defects on real masks. In this paper, a full-field EUV mask is fabricated to investigate the printability of various defects on the mask. The printability of defects and identification of their source from mask fabrication to handling were studied using wafer inspection. The printable blank defect density excluding particles and patterns is 0.63 cm{sup 2}. Mask inspection is shown to have better sensitivity than wafer inspection. The sensitivity of wafer inspection must be improved using through-focus analysis and a different wafer stack.

  4. Computational defect review for actinic mask inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Corcoran, Noel; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram

    2013-04-01

    As optical lithography continues to extend into low-k1 regime, resolution of mask patterns continues to diminish. The limitation of 1.35 NA posed by water-based lithography has led to the application of various resolution enhancement techniques (RET), for example, use of strong phase-shifting masks, aggressive OPC and sub-resolution assist features, customized illuminators, etc. The adoption of these RET techniques combined with the requirements to detect even smaller defects on masks due to increasing MEEF, poses considerable challenges for a mask inspection engineer. Inspecting masks under their actinic-aerial image conditions would detect defects that are more likely to print under those exposure conditions. However, this also makes reviewing such defects in their low-contrast aerial images very challenging. On the other hand, inspecting masks under higher resolution inspection optics would allow for better viewing of defects post-inspection. However, such inspections generally would also detect many more defects, including printable and nuisance, thereby making it difficult to judge which are of real concern for printability on wafer. Often, an inspection engineer may choose to use Aerial and/or high resolution inspection modes depending on where in the process flow the mask is and the specific device-layer characteristics of the mask. Hence, a comprehensive approach is needed in handling defects both post-aerial and post-high resolution inspections. This analysis system is designed for the Applied Materials Aera™ mask inspection platform, all data reported was collected using the Aera.

  5. Actinic inspection of multilayer defects on EUV masks

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Liu, Y; Gullikson, E; Taylor, J S; Wood, O

    2005-03-24

    The production of defect-free mask blanks, and the development of techniques for inspecting and qualifying EUV mask blanks, remains a key challenge for EUV lithography. In order to ensure a reliable supply of defect-free mask blanks, it is necessary to develop techniques to reliably and accurately detect defects on un-patterned mask blanks. These inspection tools must be able to accurately detect all critical defects whilst simultaneously having the minimum possible false-positive detection rate. There continues to be improvement in high-speed non-actinic mask blank inspection tools, and it is anticipated that these tools can and will be used by industry to qualify EUV mask blanks. However, the outstanding question remains one of validating that non-actinic inspection techniques are capable of detecting all printable EUV defects. To qualify the performance of non-actinic inspection tools, a unique dual-mode EUV mask inspection system has been installed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In high-speed inspection mode, whole mask blanks are scanned for defects using 13.5-nm wavelength light to identify and map all locations on the mask that scatter a significant amount of EUV light. In imaging, or defect review mode, a zone plate is placed in the reflected beam path to image a region of interest onto a CCD detector with an effective resolution on the mask of 100-nm or better. Combining the capabilities of the two inspection tools into one system provides the unique capability to determine the coordinates of native defects that can be used to compare actinic defect inspection with visible light defect inspection tools under commercial development, and to provide data for comparing scattering models for EUV mask defects.

  6. A novel approach to mask defect inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiv, Amir; Shirman, Yuri; Mangan, Shmoolik

    2008-10-01

    Memory chips, now constituting a major part of semiconductor market, posit a special challenge for inspection, as they are generally produced with the smallest half-pitch available with today's technology. This is true, in particular, to photomasks of advanced memory devices, which are at the forefront of the "low-k1" regime. In this paper we present a novel photomask inspection approach, that is particularly suitable for low-k1 layers of advanced memory chips, owing to their typical dense and periodic structure. The method we present can produce a very strong signal for small mask defects, by suppression of the modulation of the pattern's image. Unlike dark-field detection, however, here a single diffraction order associated with the pattern generates a constant "gray" background image, that is used for signal enhancement. We define the theoretical basis for the new detection technique, and show, both analytically and numerically, that it can easily achieve a detection line past the printability spec, and that in cases it is at least as sensitive as high-resolution based detection. We also demonstrate this claim experimentally on a customer mask, using the platform of Applied Material's newly released Aera2TM mask inspection tool. The high sensitivity demonstrates the important and often overlooked concept that resolution is not synonymous with sensitivity. The novel detection method is advantageous in several other aspects, such as the very simple implementation, the high throughput, and the relatively simple pre- and post-processing algorithms required for signal extraction. These features, and in particular the very high sensitivity, make this novel detection method an attractive inspection option for advanced memory devices.

  7. Practical mask inspection system with printability and pattern priority verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Hideo; Ozaki, Fumio; Takahara, Kenichi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kikuiri, Nobutaka

    2011-05-01

    Through the four years of study in Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) on reducing mask manufacturing Turn Around Time (TAT) and cost, we have been able to establish a technology to improve the efficiency of the review process by applying a printability verification function that utilizes computational lithography simulations to analyze defects detected by a high-resolution mask inspection system. With the advent of Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) and other technologies that extend the life of existing optical lithography, it is becoming extremely difficult to judge a defect only by the shape of a mask pattern, while avoiding pseudo-defects. Thus, printability verification is indispensable for filtering out nuisance defects from high-resolution mask inspection results. When using computational lithography simulations to verify printability with high precision, the image captured by the inspection system must be prepared with extensive care. However, for practical applications, this preparation process needs to be simplified. In addition, utilizing Mask Data Rank (MDR) to vary the defect detection sensitivity according to the patterns is also useful for simultaneously inspecting minute patterns and avoiding pseudo-defects. Combining these two technologies, we believe practical mask inspection for next generation lithography is achievable. We have been improving the estimation accuracy of the printability verification function through discussion with several customers and evaluation of their masks. In this report, we will describe the progress of these practical mask verification functions developed through customers' evaluations.

  8. Inspection of lithographic mask blanks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2001-01-01

    A visible light method for detecting sub-100 nm size defects on mask blanks used for lithography. By using optical heterodyne techniques, detection of the scattered light can be significantly enhanced as compared to standard intensity detection methods. The invention is useful in the inspection of super-polished surfaces for isolated surface defects or particulate contamination and in the inspection of lithographic mask or reticle blanks for surface defects or bulk defects or for surface particulate contamination.

  9. Computational mask defect review for contamination and haze inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Corcoran, Noel; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram; Wolf, Yulian; Shah, Pinkesh

    2013-09-01

    As optical lithography continues to extend into sub-0.35 k1 regime, mask defect inspection and subsequent review has become tremendously challenging, and indeed the largest component to mask manufacturing cost. The routine use of various resolution enhancement techniques (RET) have resulted in complex mask patterns, which together with the need to detect even smaller defects due to higher MEEFs, now requires an inspection engineer to use combination of inspection modes. This is achieved in 193nm AeraTM mask inspection systems wherein masks are not only inspected at their scanner equivalent aerial exposure conditions, but also at higher Numerical Aperture resolution, and special reflected-light, and single-die contamination modes, providing better coverage over all available patterns, and defect types. Once the required defects are detected by the inspection system, comprehensively reviewing and dispositioning each defect then becomes the Achilles heel of the overall mask inspection process. Traditionally, defects have been reviewed manually by an operator, which makes the process error-prone especially given the low-contrast in the convoluted aerial images. Such manual review also limits the quality and quantity of classifications in terms of the different types of characterization and number of defects that can practically be reviewed by a person. In some ways, such manual classification limits the capability of the inspection tool itself from being setup to detect smaller defects since it often results in many more defects that need to be then manually reviewed. Paper 8681-109 at SPIE Advanced Lithography 2013 discussed an innovative approach to actinic mask defect review using computational technology, and focused on Die-to-Die transmitted aerial and high-resolution inspections. In this approach, every defect is characterized in two different ways, viz., quantitatively in terms of its print impact on wafer, and qualitatively in terms of its nature and origin in

  10. A Dual-Mode Actinic EUV Mask Inspection Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Barty, A; Gullikson, E; S.Taylor, J; Liddle, J A; Wood, O

    2005-03-21

    To qualify the performance of non-actinic inspection tools, a novel EUV mask inspection system has been installed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Similar to the older generation actinic mask inspection tool, the new system can operate in scanning mode, when mask blanks are scanned for defects using 13.5-nm in-band radiation to identify and map all locations on the mask that scatter a significant amount of EUV light. By modifying and optimizing beamline optics (11.3.2 at ALS) and replacing K-B focusing mirrors with a high quality Schwarzschild illuminator, the new system achieves an order of magnitude improvement on in-band EUV flux density at the mask, enabling faster scanning speed and higher sensitivity to smaller defects. Moreover, the system can also operate in imaging mode, when it becomes a zone-plate-based full-field EUV microscope with spatial resolution better than 100 nm. The microscope utilizes an off-axis setup, making it possible to obtain bright field images over a field-of-view of 5 x 5 {micro}m.

  11. Pattern inspection of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2015-07-01

    Patterned mask inspection for an etched multilayer (ML) EUV mask was investigated. In order to optimize the mask structure from the standpoint of not only a pattern inspection by using a projection electron microscope (PEM), but also by considering the other fabrication processes using electron beam (EB) techniques such as CD metrology and mask repair, we employed a conductive layer between the ML and substrate. By measuring the secondary electron emission coefficients (SEECs) of the candidate materials for conductive layer, we evaluated the image contrast and the influence of charging effect. In the cases of 40-pair-ML, 16 nm sized extrusion and intrusion defects were found to be detectable more than 10 sigma in hp 44 nm, 40 nm, and 32 nm line and space (L/S) patterns. Reducing 40-pair-ML to 20-pair-ML degraded the image contrast and the defect detectability. However, by selecting B4C as a conductive layer, 16 nm sized defects remained detectable. A double layer structure with 2.5-nm-thik B4C on metal film used as a conductive layer was found to have sufficient conductivity and also was found to be free from the surface charging effect and influence of native oxide.

  12. Pattern inspection of etched multilayer EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2015-10-01

    Patterned mask inspection for an etched multilayer (ML) EUV mask was investigated. In order to optimize the mask structure from the standpoint of not only a pattern inspection by using a projection electron microscope (PEM), but also by considering the other fabrication processes using electron beam (EB) techniques such as CD metrology and mask repair, we employed a conductive layer between the ML and substrate. By measuring the secondary electron emission coefficients (SEECs) of the candidate materials for conductive layer, we evaluated the image contrast and the influence of charging effect. In the cases of 40-pair-ML, 16 nm sized extrusion and intrusion defects were found to be detectable more than 10 sigma in hp 44 nm, 40 nm, and 32 nm line and space (L/S) patterns. Reducing 40-pair-ML to 20-pair-ML degraded the image contrast and the defect detectability. However, by selecting B4C as a conductive layer, 16 nm sized defects remained detectable. These defects were also detected after the etched part was refilled with Si. Moreover, the simulation shows a high sensitivity for detecting the residual-type defects (etching residues). A double layer structure with 2.5-nm-thik B4C on metal film used as a conductive layer was found to have sufficient conductivity and also was found to be free from the surface charging effect and influence of native oxide.

  13. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  14. Evaluation of EUVL mask pattern defect inspection using 199nm inspection tool with super-resolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemura, Hiroyuki; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Nishiyama, Yasushi; Suga, Osamu; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Hashimoto, Hideaki; Takahara, Kenichi; Usuda, Kinya; Kikuiri, Nobutaka; Hirano, Ryoichi

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we will report on our experimental and simulation results on the impact of EUVL mask absorber structure and of inspection system optics on mask defect detection sensitivity. We employed a commercial simulator EM-Suite (Panoramic Technology, Inc.) which calculated rigorously using FDTD (Finite-difference time-domain) method. By using various optical constants of absorber stacks, we calculated image contrasts and defect image signals as obtained from the mask defect inspection system. We evaluated the image contrast and the capability of detecting defects on the EUVL masks by using a new inspection tool made by NuFlare Technology, Inc. (NFT) and Advanced Mask Inspection Technology, Inc. (AMiT). This tool is based on NPI-5000 which is the leading-edge photomask defect inspection system using 199nm wavelength inspection optics. The programmed defect masks with LR-TaBN and LRTaSi absorbers were used which had various sized opaque and clear extension defects on hp-160nm, hp-225nm, and hp- 325nm line and space patterns. According to the analysis, reflectivity of EUVL mask absorber structures and the inspection optics have large influence on image contrast and defect sensitivity. It is very important to optimize absorber structure and inspection optics for the development of EUVL mask inspection technology, and for the improvement of performance of EUV lithographic systems.

  15. Advanced mask inspection optical system (AMOS) using 198.5-nm wavelength for 65-nm (hp) node and beyond: system development and initial state D/D inspection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tojo, Toru; Hirano, Ryoich; Tsuchiya, Hideo; Oaki, Junji; Nishizaka, Takeshi; Sanada, Yasushi; Matsuki, Kazuto; Isomura, Ikunao; Ogawa, Riki; Kobayashi, Noboru; Nakashima, Kazuhiro; Sugihara, Shinji; Inoue, Hiromu; Imai, Shinichi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Sekine, Akihiko; Taya, Makoto; Miwa, Akemi; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Ohira, Katsumi; Chung, Dong-Hoon; Otaki, Masao

    2004-12-01

    A novel high-resolution mask inspection platform using DUV wavelength has been developed. This platform is designed to enable the defect inspection of high quality masks for 65nm node used in 193nm lithography. In this paper, newly developed optical system and its performance are reported. The system is operated at wavelength of 198.5nm, which wavelength is nearly equal to 193nm-ArF laser exposure tool. Some defect image data and defect inspection sensitivity due to simulation-base die-to-die (D/D) inspection are shown on standard programmed defect test mask. As an initial state D/D inspection performance, 20-60 nm defects are certified. System capabilities for 65nm node inspection and beyond are also discussed.

  16. Study of EUVL mask defect inspection using 199-nm inspection tool with super-resolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemura, Hiroyuki; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Suga, Osamu; Hashimoto, Hideaki; Saito, Masanori; Takeda, Masaya; Kikuiri, Nobutaka; Hirano, Ryoichi

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we will report on our experimental results on the impact of inspection system optics on mask defect detection sensitivity. We evaluated the capability of detecting defects on the EUVL masks by using a new inspection tool (NPI6000EUVα) made by NuFlare Technology, Inc. (NFT) and Advanced Mask Inspection Technology, Inc. (AMiT). This tool is based on NPI-5000 which is the leading-edge photomask defect inspection system using 199nm wavelength inspection optics. The programmed defect mask with LR-TaBN absorber was used which had various sized opaque and clear extension defects on hp-180nm, hp-128nm, and hp-108nm line and space patterns. According to the analysis, to obtain optimum sensitivity for various types of defects, using both C- and P-polarized illumination conditions were found to be effective. At present, sufficient defect-detection sensitivity is achieved for opaque and clear extension defects in hp128nm (hp32nm at wafer). For hp108nm (hp27nm at wafer), using both C- and P- polarized illumination is effective. However, further developments in defect-detection sensitivity are necessary.

  17. Actinic EUV mask inspection beyond 0.25 NA

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Anderson, Erik H.; Rekawa, Seno B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Huh, S.; Han, H.-S.

    2008-08-06

    Operating at EUV wavelengths, the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a zoneplate microscope that provides high quality aerial image measurements in routine operations for SEMATECH member companies. We have upgraded the optical performance of the AIT to provide multiple image magnifications, and several inspection NA values up to 0.35 NA equivalent (0.0875 mask-side). We report on the improved imaging capabilities including resolution below 100-nm on the mask side (25 nm, 4x wafer equivalent). EUV reticles are intricate optical systems made from of several materials with wavelength-specific optical properties. The combined interactions of the substrate, multilayer-stack, buffer layer and absorber layer produce a reflected EUV optical field that is challenging to model accurately, and difficult to fully assess without actinic at-wavelength inspection. Understanding the aerial image from lithographic printing alone is complicated by photoresist properties. The AIT is now used to investigate mask issues such as amplitude and phase defect printability, pattern repair techniques, contamination, inspection damage, and mask architecture. The AIT has a 6{sup o} illumination angle, and high-resolution exposure times are typically 20 seconds per image. The AIT operates semi-automatically capturing through-focus imaging series with step sizes as small as 0.1 {micro}m (0.5-0.8 {micro}m are typical), and a step resolution of 0.05 {micro}m. We believe it is the most advanced EUV mask inspection tool in operation today. In the AIT, an EUV image of the mask is projected by a zoneplate lens with high magnification (680-910x) onto a CCD camera. The CCD over-samples the image, providing equivalent pixel sizes down to 15 nm in mask coordinates-several image pixels per resolution element. The original AIT zoneplate specifications were designed to emulate the resolution of a 0.25-NA 4x stepper, and thorough benchmarking analysis of the aberrations, flare, contrast

  18. Bridging the gaps between mask inspection/review systems and actual wafer printability using computational metrology and inspection (CMI) technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Linyong; Tolani, Vikram; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Liu, Tingyang; Chen, Dongxue; Gleason, Bob; Vacca, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    Computational techniques have become increasingly important to improve resolution of optical lithography. Advanced computational lithography technologies, such as inverse lithography (ILT) and source mask optimization (SMO), are needed to print the most challenging layers, such as contact and metal, at the 20nm node and beyond. In order to deploy SMO and ILT into production, improvements and upgrades of mask manufacturing technology are required. These include writing, inspection, defect review, and repair. For example, mask plane inspection detects defect at highest resolution, but does not correlate accurately with scanner images. Aerial plane mask inspection and AIMSTM produce images close to those of a scanner, but except fot the latest AIMS-32TM, it does not have the flexibility needed to capture all the characteristics of free-form illumination. Advanced Computational Inspection and Metrology provides solutions to many of these issues.

  19. A new approach for defect inspection on large area masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuring, Gerd; Döbereiner, Stefan; Hillmann, Frank; Falk, Günther; Brück, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-02-01

    Besides the mask market for IC manufacturing, which mainly uses 6 inch sized masks, the market for the so called large area masks is growing very rapidly. Typical applications of these masks are mainly wafer bumping for current packaging processes, color filters on TFTs, and Flip Chip manufacturing. To expose e.g. bumps and similar features on 200 mm wafers under proximity exposure conditions 9 inch masks are used, while in 300 mm wafer bumping processes (Fig. 1) 14 inch masks are handled. Flip Chip manufacturing needs masks up to 28 by 32 inch. This current maximum mask dimension is expected to hold for the next 5 years in industrial production. On the other hand shrinking feature sizes, just as in case of the IC masks, demand enhanced sensitivity of the inspection tools. A defect inspection tool for those masks is valuable for both the mask maker, who has to deliver a defect free mask to his customer, and for the mask user to supervise the mask behavior conditions during its lifetime. This is necessary because large area masks are mainly used for proximity exposures. During this process itself the mask is vulnerable by contacting the resist on top of the wafers. Therefore a regular inspection of the mask after 25, 50, or 100 exposures has to be done during its whole lifetime. Thus critical resist contamination and other defects, which lead to yield losses, can be recognized early. In the future shrinking feature dimensions will require even more sensitive and reliable defect inspection methods than they do presently. Besides the sole inspection capability the tools should also provide highly precise measurement capabilities and extended review options.

  20. Method and apparatus for inspecting an EUV mask blank

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2005-11-08

    An apparatus and method for at-wavelength EUV mask-blank characterization for inspection of moderate and low spatial frequency coating uniformity using a synchrotron or other source of EUV light. The apparatus provides for rapid, non-destruction, non-contact, at-wavelength qualification of large mask areas, and can be self-calibrating or be calibrated to well-characterized reference samples. It can further check for spatial variation of mask reflectivity or for global differences among masks. The apparatus and method is particularly suited for inspection of coating uniformity and quality and can detect defects in the order of 50 .mu.m and above.

  1. Mask blank defect printability comparison using optical and SEM mask and wafer inspection and bright field actinic mask imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangat, Pawitter; Verduijn, Erik; Wood, Obert R.; Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2015-07-01

    Despite significant enhancements in defect detection using optical and e-beam methodology, the smaller length scales and increasing challenges of future technology nodes motivate ongoing research into the need and associated cost of actinic inspection for EUV masks. This paper reports an extensive study of two EUV patterned masks, wherein the mask blank defectivity was characterized using optical (mask and wafer) methods and bright-field mask imaging (using the SHARP actinic microscope) of previously identified blank defects. We find that the bright field actinic imaging tool microscope captures and images many defects that are not seen by the automated optical inspection of patterned masks and printed wafers. In addition, actinic review reveals the impact of multilayer damage and depicts the printability profile which can be used as an added metric to define the patterned mask repair and defect compensation strategies.

  2. Improve mask inspection capacity with Automatic Defect Classification (ADC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Crystal; Ho, Steven; Guo, Eric; Wang, Kechang; Lakkapragada, Suresh; Yu, Jiao; Hu, Peter; Tolani, Vikram; Pang, Linyong

    2013-09-01

    As optical lithography continues to extend into low-k1 regime, resolution of mask patterns continues to diminish. The adoption of RET techniques like aggressive OPC, sub-resolution assist features combined with the requirements to detect even smaller defects on masks due to increasing MEEF, poses considerable challenges for mask inspection operators and engineers. Therefore a comprehensive approach is required in handling defects post-inspections by correctly identifying and classifying the real killer defects impacting the printability on wafer, and ignoring nuisance defect and false defects caused by inspection systems. This paper focuses on the results from the evaluation of Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) product at the SMIC mask shop for the 40nm technology node. Traditionally, each defect is manually examined and classified by the inspection operator based on a set of predefined rules and human judgment. At SMIC mask shop due to the significant total number of detected defects, manual classification is not cost-effective due to increased inspection cycle time, resulting in constrained mask inspection capacity, since the review has to be performed while the mask stays on the inspection system. Luminescent Technologies Automated Defect Classification (ADC) product offers a complete and systematic approach for defect disposition and classification offline, resulting in improved utilization of the current mask inspection capability. Based on results from implementation of ADC in SMIC mask production flow, there was around 20% improvement in the inspection capacity compared to the traditional flow. This approach of computationally reviewing defects post mask-inspection ensures no yield loss by qualifying reticles without the errors associated with operator mis-classification or human error. The ADC engine retrieves the high resolution inspection images and uses a decision-tree flow to classify a given defect. Some identification mechanisms adopted by ADC to

  3. Mask defect verification using actinic inspection and defect mitigation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Sungmin; Kearney, Patrick; Wurm, Stefan; Goodwin, Frank; Goldberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric

    2009-04-14

    The availability of defect-free masks remains one of the key challenges for inserting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into high volume manufacturing. The successful production of defect-free masks will depend on the timely development of defect inspection tools, including both mask blank inspection tools and absorber pattern inspection tools to meet the 22 nm half-pitch node. EUV mask blanks with embedded phase defects were inspected with a reticle actinic inspection tool (AIT) and the Lasertec M7360. The Lasertec M7360 is operated at SEMA TECH's Mask blank Development Center (MBDC) in Albany, with sensitivity to multilayer defects down to 40-45 nm, which is not likely sufficient for mask blank development below the 32 nm half-pitch node. Phase defect printability was simulated to calculate the required defect sensitivity for the next generation blank inspection tool to support reticle development for the sub-32 nm half-pitch technology node. This paper will also discuss the kind of infrastructure that will be required in the development and mass production stages.

  4. Accurate mask model for advanced nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Ndiaye, El Hadji Omar; Mishra, Kushlendra; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Bork, Ingo; Buck, Peter; Toublan, Olivier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Standard OPC models consist of a physical optical model and an empirical resist model. The resist model compensates the optical model imprecision on top of modeling resist development. The optical model imprecision may result from mask topography effects and real mask information including mask ebeam writing and mask process contributions. For advanced technology nodes, significant progress has been made to model mask topography to improve optical model accuracy. However, mask information is difficult to decorrelate from standard OPC model. Our goal is to establish an accurate mask model through a dedicated calibration exercise. In this paper, we present a flow to calibrate an accurate mask enabling its implementation. The study covers the different effects that should be embedded in the mask model as well as the experiment required to model them.

  5. An open-architecture approach to defect analysis software for mask inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Mark; Pai, Ravi R.; Reddy, Murali Mohan; Krishna, Ravi M.

    2009-04-01

    possible for the end-users to make use of their collected knowledge through the years of experience in mask inspection process by encapsulating the knowledge into software utilities and plugging them into NxDAT. The plug-in interface is designed with the intent of enabling the pro-active mask defect analysis teams to build competitive differentiation into their defect analysis process while protecting their knowledge internally within their company. By providing interface with all major standard layout and mask data formats, NxDAT enables correlation of defect data on reticles with design and mask databases, further extending the effectiveness of defect analysis for D2DB inspection. NxDAT also includes many other advanced features for easy and fast navigation, visual display of defects, defect selection, multi-tier classification, defect clustering and gridding, sophisticated CD and contact measurement analysis, repeatability analysis such as adder analysis, defect trend, capture rate etc.

  6. Through-pellicle defect inspection of EUV masks using an ArF-based inspection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Dario L.; Broadbent, William; Wylie, Mark; Felix, Nelson; Corliss, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The use of EUV photomasks in a semiconductor manufacturing environment requires their periodic inspection to ensure they are continually free of defects that could impact device yield. Defects typically occur from fall-on particles or from surface degradation such as "haze". The proposed use of a polycrystalline-based EUV pellicle to prevent fall-on particles would preclude periodic through-pellicle mask defect inspection using e-beam, as well as, DUV inspection tools (the pellicle is opaque at DUV wavelengths). Thus, to use these types of defect inspection tools would require removal of the EUV pellicle before inspection. After inspection, the pellicle would need to be re-attached and the mask re-qualified using a test wafer, thus causing expense and delays. While EUV-wavelength inspection tools could inspect through such a pellicle precluding the need to remove the pellicle, these tools are not likely to be available in the commercial marketplace for many years. An alternate EUV pellicle material has been developed that is semi-transparent to 193nm wavelengths, thus allowing through-pellicle inspection using existing ArF-based, or other 193nm wavelength mask inspection tools. This eliminates the requirement to remove the pellicle for defect inspection and the associated time and expense. In this work, we will conduct an initial evaluation of through-pellicle EUV mask defect inspection using an existing 193nm mask inspection tool. This initial evaluation will include durability of the pellicle to defect inspection, and impact of the pellicle on inspection tool performance.

  7. Top Level User Specifications for Mask Inspection Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Taylor, J S

    2002-01-31

    This document compiles top-level user specifications for an EUV microscope for characterizing EUVL mask defects. Two broad categories of application are considered: (1) emulation of the imaging characteristics of a stepper for printability analysis (AIM mode); and (2) high-resolution imaging for obtaining a more detailed characterization of defects or mask features. It is generally assumed that the mask defects that are to be characterized have been located by a previous inspection procedure and the spatial coordinates of the defect can be transferred to the microscope.

  8. Pattern inspection of etched multilayer extreme ultraviolet mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Patterned mask inspection for an etched multilayer (ML) extreme ultraviolet mask was investigated. In order to optimize the mask structure from the standpoint of a pattern inspection the mask structure not only from the standpoint of a pattern inspection by using a projection electron microscope but also by using a projection electron microscope but also by considering the other fabrication processes using electron beam techniques such as critical dimension metrology and mask repair, we employed a conductive layer between the ML and substrate. By measuring the secondary electron emission coefficients of the candidate materials for the conductive layer, we evaluated the image contrast and the influence of the charging effect. In the cases of 40-pair ML, 16-nm-sized extrusion and intrusion defects were found to be detectable more than 10 sigma in half pitch 44, 40, and 32 nm line-and-space patterns. Reducing 40-pair ML to 20-pair ML degraded the image contrast and the defect detectability. However, by selecting B4C as a conductive layer, 16-nm-sized defects and etching residues remained detectable. The 16-nm-sized defects were also detected after the etched part was refilled with Si. A double-layer structure with 2.5-nm-thick B4C on metal film used as a conductive layer was found to have sufficient conductivity and also was found to be free from the surface charging effect and influence of native oxide.

  9. Actinic Mask Inspection at the ALS Initial Design Review

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Chapman, H; Sweeney, D; Levesque, R; Bokor, J; Gullikson, E; Jong, S; Liu, Y; Yi, M; Denbeaux, G; Goldberg, K; Naulleau, P; Denham, P; Rekawa, S; Baston, P; Tackaberry, R; Barale, P

    2003-03-05

    This report is the first milestone report for the actinic mask blank inspection project conducted at the VNL, which forms sub-section 3 of the Q1 2003 mask blank technology transfer program at the VNL. Specifically this report addresses deliverable 3.1.1--design review and preliminary tool design. The goal of this project is to design an actinic mask inspection tool capable of operating in two modes: high-speed scanning for the detection of multilayer defects (inspection mode), and a high-resolution aerial image mode in which the image emulates the imaging illumination conditions of a stepper system (aerial image or AIM mode). The purpose and objective of these two modes is as follows: (1) Defect inspection mode--This imaging mode is designed to scan large areas of the mask for defects EUV multilayer coatings. The goal is to detect the presence of multilayer defects on a mask blank and to store the co-ordinates for subsequent review in AIM mode, thus it is not essential that the illumination and imaging conditions match that of a production stepper. Potential uses for this imaging mode include: (a) Correlating the results obtained using actinic inspection with results obtained using other non-EUV defect inspection systems to verify that the non-EUV scanning systems are detecting all critical defects; (b) Gaining sufficient information to associate defects with particular processes, such as various stages of the multilayer deposition or different modes of operation of the deposition tool; and (c) Assessing the density and EUV impact of surface and multilayer anomalies. Because of the low defect density achieved using current multilayer coating technology it is necessary to be able to efficiently scan large areas of the mask in order to obtain sufficient statistics for use in cross-correlation experiments. Speed of operation as well as sensitivity is therefore key to operation in defect inspection mode. (2) Aerial Image Microscope (AIM) mode--In AIM mode the tool is

  10. Method and apparatus for inspecting reflection masks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Bokor, Jeffrey; Lin, Yun

    2003-04-29

    An at-wavelength system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank defect detection is provided. When a focused beam of wavelength 13 nm is incident on a defective region of a mask blank, three possible phenomena can occur. The defect will induce an intensity reduction in the specularly reflected beam, scatter incoming photons into an off-specular direction, and change the amplitude and phase of the electric field at the surface which can be monitored through the change in the photoemission current. The magnitude of these changes will depend on the incident beam size, and the nature, extent and size of the defect. Inspection of the mask blank is performed by scanning the mask blank with 13 nm light focused to a spot a few .mu.m in diameter, while measuring the reflected beam intensity (bright field detection), the scattered beam intensity (dark-field detection) and/or the change in the photoemission current.

  11. EUV mask and wafer defectivity: strategy and evaluation for full die defect inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonam, Ravi; Tien, Hung-Yu; Chou, Acer; Meli, Luciana; Halle, Scott; Wu, Ivy; Huang, Xiaoxia; Lei, Chris; Kuan, Chiyan; Wang, Fei; Corliss, Daniel; Fang, Wei; Jau, Jack; Qi, Zhengqing John; Badger, Karen; Turley, Christina; Rankin, Jed

    2016-03-01

    Over the past few years numerous advancements in EUV Lithography have proven its feasibility of insertion into High Volume Manufacturing (HVM).1, 2 A lot of progress is made in the area of pellicle development but a commercially solution with related infrastructure is currently unavailable.3, 4 Due to current mask structure and unavailability of a pellicle, a comprehensive strategy to qualify (native defects) and monitor (adder defects) defectivity on mask and wafer is required for implementing EUV Lithography in High Volume Manufacturing. In this work, we assess multiple strategies for mask and wafer defect inspection including a two-fold solution to leverage resolution of e-beam inspection along with throughput of optical inspection are evaluated. Defect capture rates for inspections based on full-die, critical areas based on priority and hotspots based on design and prior inspection data are evaluated. Each strategy has merits and de-merits, particularly related to throughput, effective die coverage and computational overhead. A production ready EUV Exposure tool was utilized to perform exposures at the IBM EUV Center of Excellence in Albany, NY for EUV Lithography Development along with a fully automated line of EUV Mask Infrastructure tools. We will present strategies considered in this study and discuss respective results. The results from the study indicate very low transfer rate of defect detection events from optical mask inspection. They also suggest a hybrid strategy of utilizing both optical and e-beam inspection can provide a comprehensive defect detection which can be employed in High Volume Manufacturing.

  12. ILT based defect simulation of inspection images accurately predicts mask defect printability on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Prakash; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    At advanced technology nodes mask complexity has been increased because of large-scale use of resolution enhancement technologies (RET) which includes Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and Source Mask Optimization (SMO). The number of defects detected during inspection of such mask increased drastically and differentiation of critical and non-critical defects are more challenging, complex and time consuming. Because of significant defectivity of EUVL masks and non-availability of actinic inspection, it is important and also challenging to predict the criticality of defects for printability on wafer. This is one of the significant barriers for the adoption of EUVL for semiconductor manufacturing. Techniques to decide criticality of defects from images captured using non actinic inspection images is desired till actinic inspection is not available. High resolution inspection of photomask images detects many defects which are used for process and mask qualification. Repairing all defects is not practical and probably not required, however it's imperative to know which defects are severe enough to impact wafer before repair. Additionally, wafer printability check is always desired after repairing a defect. AIMSTM review is the industry standard for this, however doing AIMSTM review for all defects is expensive and very time consuming. Fast, accurate and an economical mechanism is desired which can predict defect printability on wafer accurately and quickly from images captured using high resolution inspection machine. Predicting defect printability from such images is challenging due to the fact that the high resolution images do not correlate with actual mask contours. The challenge is increased due to use of different optical condition during inspection other than actual scanner condition, and defects found in such images do not have correlation with actual impact on wafer. Our automated defect simulation tool predicts

  13. Mask cost of ownership for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzio, Edward G.; Seidel, Philip K.

    2000-07-01

    As technology advances, becoming more difficult and more expensive, the cost of ownership (CoO) metric becomes increasingly important in evaluating technical strategies. The International SEMATECH CoC analysis has steadily gained visibility over the past year, as it attempts to level the playing field between technology choices, and create a fair relative comparison. In order to predict mask cots for advanced lithography, mask process flows are modeled using bets-known processing strategies, equipment cost, and yields. Using a newly revised yield mode, and updated mask manufacture flows, representative mask flows can be built. These flows are then used to calculate mask costs for advanced lithography down to the 50 nm node. It is never the goal of this type of work to provide absolute cost estimates for business planning purposes. However, the combination of a quantifiable yield model with a clearly defined set of mask processing flows and a cost model based upon them serves as an excellent starting point for cost driver analysis and process flow discussion.

  14. Actinic EUV mask inspection beyond 0.25 NA

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Anderson, Erik H.; Rekawa, Seno. B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Huh, S.; Han, H.-S.; Naulleau, P.; Huh, S.

    2008-03-24

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is an EUV-wavelength mask inspection microscope designed for direct aerial image measurements, and pre-commercial EUV mask research. Operating on a synchrotron bending magnet beamline, the AIT uses an off-axis Fresnel zoneplate lens to project a high-magnification EUV image directly onto a CCD camera. We present the results of recent system upgrades that have improved the imaging resolution, illumination uniformity, and partial coherence. Benchmarking tests show image contrast above 75% for 100-nm mask features, and significant improvements and across the full range of measured sizes. The zoneplate lens has been replaced by an array of user-selectable zoneplates with higher magnification and NA values up to 0.0875, emulating the spatial resolution of a 0.35-NA 4x EUV stepper. Illumination uniformity is above 90% for mask areas 2-{micro}m-wide and smaller. An angle-scanning mirror reduces the high coherence of the synchrotron beamline light source giving measured {sigma} values of approximately 0.125 at 0.0875 NA.

  15. Benchmarking EUV mask inspection beyond 0.25 NA

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Anderson, Erik H.; Rekawa, Seno B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Huh, S.; Han, H.-S.; Naulleau, P.; Gunion, R.F.

    2008-09-18

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is an EUV-wavelength mask inspection microscope designed for direct aerial image measurements, and pre-commercial EUV mask research. Operating on a synchrotron bending magnet beamline, the AIT uses an off-axis Fresnel zoneplate lens to project a high-magnification EUV image directly onto a CCD camera. We present the results of recent system upgrades that have improved the imaging resolution, illumination uniformity, and partial coherence. Benchmarking tests show image contrast above 75% for 100-nm mask features, and significant improvements and across the full range of measured sizes. The zoneplate lens has been replaced by an array of user-selectable zoneplates with higher magnification and NA values up to 0.0875, emulating the spatial resolution of a 0.35-NA 4 x EUV stepper. Illumination uniformity is above 90% for mask areas 2-{micro}m-wide and smaller. An angle-scanning mirror reduces the high coherence of the synchrotron beamline light source giving measured {sigma} values of approximately 0.125 at 0.0875 NA.

  16. Mask rule check for inspection of leading-edge photomask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Wakahiko; Yamasaki, Kiyoshi; Narukawa, Shogo; Hayashi, Naoya

    2005-11-01

    Leading-edge photomask, to which optical proximity correction (OPC) and dummy pattern are applied, almost always has complex patterns. Complex patterns such as "Narrow Space", "Thin Pattern", "Dummy Pattern", "Closely Face-to-Face Heads" of Posi Serifs, "Narrow Waisted Pattern" formed by a Nega Serif, "Jogs", etc. are a factor to complicate photomask manufacturing. Some the problems caused by complex patterns are increase in EB writing time, and decrease in performance of etching and cleaning process caused by Cr peeling and, above all, increase in the inspection time. Patterns whose complexity is beyond the resolution limit of inspection tool are detected as false defects. Therefore, it will greatly take time for the data investigation and re-inspection, etc. for assurance, and this causes congestion of half-finished products. To improve the process efficiency, it is necessary to locate false defects, so that the Do-Not-Inspection-Area(DNIR) or replaced with simpler patterns. In order to locate false defects, it is proposed to apply Mask Rule Check (MRC) to mask data for EB-writing.

  17. Advances in inspection automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Walter H.; Mair, H. Douglas; Jansen, Dion; Lombardi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    This new session at QNDE reflects the growing interest in inspection automation. Our paper describes a newly developed platform that makes the complex NDE automation possible without the need for software programmers. Inspection tasks that are tedious, error-prone or impossible for humans to perform can now be automated using a form of drag and drop visual scripting. Our work attempts to rectify the problem that NDE is not keeping pace with the rest of factory automation. Outside of NDE, robots routinely and autonomously machine parts, assemble components, weld structures and report progress to corporate databases. By contrast, components arriving in the NDT department typically require manual part handling, calibrations and analysis. The automation examples in this paper cover the development of robotic thickness gauging and the use of adaptive contour following on the NRU reactor inspection at Chalk River.

  18. High-throughput parallel SPM for metrology, defect, and mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghian, H.; Herfst, R. W.; van den Dool, T. C.; Crowcombe, W. E.; Winters, J.; Kramer, G. F. I. J.

    2014-10-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a promising candidate for accurate assessment of metrology and defects on wafers and masks, however it has traditionally been too slow for high-throughput applications, although recent developments have significantly pushed the speed of SPM [1,2]. In this paper we present new results obtained with our previously presented high-throughput parallel SPM system [3,4] that showcase two key advances that are required for a successful deployment of SPM in high-throughput metrology, defect and mask inspection. The first is a very fast (up to 40 lines/s) image acquisition and a comparison of the image quality as function of speed. Secondly, a fast approach method: measurements of the scan-head approaching the sample from 0.2 and 1.0 mm distance in under 1.4 and 6 seconds respectively.

  19. High quality mask storage in an advanced Logic-Fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähnert, Carmen; Fritsche, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    High efficient mask logistics as well as safe and high quality mask storage are essential requirements within an advanced lithography area of a modern logic waferfab. Fast operational availability of the required masks at the exposure tool with excellent mask condition requires a safe mask handling, safeguarding of high mask quality over the whole mask usage time without any quality degradation and an intelligent mask logistics. One big challenge is the prevention of haze on high advanced phase shift masks used in a high volume production line for some thousands of 248nm or 193nm exposures. In 2008 Infineon Dresden qualified a customer specific developed semi-bare mask storage system from DMSDynamic Micro Systems in combination with a high advanced mask handling and an interconnected complex logistic system. This high-capacity mask storage system DMS M1900.22 for more than 3000 masks with fully automated mask and box handling as well as full-blown XCDA purge has been developed and adapted to the Infineon Lithotoollandscape using Nikon and SMIF reticle cases. Advanced features for ESD safety and mask security, mask tracking via RFID and interactions with the exposure tools were developed and implemented. The stocker is remote controlled by the iCADA-RSM system, ordering of the requested mask directly from the affected exposure tool allows fast access. This paper discusses the advantages and challenges for this approach as well as the practical experience gained during the implementation of the new system which improves the fab performance with respect to mask quality, security and throughput. Especially the realization of an extremely low and stable humidity level in addition with a well controlled air flow at each mask surface, preventing masks from haze degradation and particle contamination, turns out to be a notable technical achievement. The longterm stability of haze critical masks has been improved significantly. Relevant environmental parameters like

  20. Mask pattern recovery by level set method based inverse inspection technology (IIT) and its application on defect auto disposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Hyung; Chung, Paul D. H.; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Cho, Han Ku; Pang, Linyong; Peng, Danping; Tolani, Vikram; Cecil, Tom; Kim, David; Baik, KiHo

    2009-10-01

    At the most advanced technology nodes, such as 32nm and 22nm, aggressive OPC and Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) are required. However, their use results in significantly increased mask complexity, making mask defect disposition more challenging than ever. This paper describes how mask patterns can first be recovered from the inspection images by applying patented algorithms using Level Set Methods. The mask pattern recovery step is then followed by aerial/wafer image simulation, the results of which can be plugged into an automated mask defect disposition system based on aerial/wafer image. The disposition criteria are primarily based on wafer-plane CD variance. The system also connects to a post-OPC lithography verification tool that can provide gauges and CD specs, thereby enabling them to be used in mask defect disposition as well. Results on both programmed defects and production defects collected at Samsung mask shop are presented to show the accuracy and consistency of using the Level Set Methods and aerial/wafer image based automated mask disposition.

  1. Evidence of printing blank-related defects on EUV masks missed by blank inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, Rik; Van den Heuvel, Dieter; Bret, Tristan; Hofmann, Thorsten; Magana, John; Aharonson, Israel; Meshulach, Doron; Hendrickx, Eric; Ronse, Kurt

    2011-03-01

    In this follow-up paper for our contribution at BACUS 2010, first evidence is shown that also the more advanced Lasertec M7360 has missed a few printing reticle defects caused by an imperfection of its EUV mirror, a so-called multilayer defect (ML-defect). This work continued to use a combination of blank inspection (BI), patterned mask inspection (PMI) and wafer inspection (WI) to find as many as possible printing defects on EUV reticles. The application of more advanced wafer inspection, combined with a separate repeater analysis for each of the multiple focus conditions used for exposure on the ASML Alpha Demo Tool (ADT) at IMEC, has allowed to increase the detectability of printing MLdefects. The latter uses the previous finding that ML-defects may have a through-focus printing behavior, i.e., they cause a different grade of CD impact on the pattern in their neighborhood, depending on the focus condition. Subsequent reticle review is used on the corresponding locations with both SEM (Secondary Electron Microscope) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscope). This review methodology has allowed achieving clear evidence of printing ML defects missed by this BI tool, despite of an unacceptable nuisance rate reported before. This is a next step in the investigation if it is possible to avoid actinic blank inspection (ABI) at all, the only presently known technique that is expected to be independent from the presence of a (residual) topography of the ML-defect at the top of the EUV mirror, in detecting those defects. This is considered an important asset of blank inspection, because the printability of a ML-defect on the EUV scanner and its detectability by ABI is determined by the distortion throughout the multilayer, not that at the surface.

  2. Enabling inspection solutions for future mask technologies through the development of massively parallel E-Beam inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Wurm, Stefan; Jindal, Vibhu; Mukhtar, Maseeh; Quoi, Kathy; Kemen, Thomas; Zeidler, Dirk; Eberle, Anna Lena; Garbowski, Tomasz; Dellemann, Gregor; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    The new device architectures and materials being introduced for sub-10nm manufacturing, combined with the complexity of multiple patterning and the need for improved hotspot detection strategies, have pushed current wafer inspection technologies to their limits. In parallel, gaps in mask inspection capability are growing as new generations of mask technologies are developed to support these sub-10nm wafer manufacturing requirements. In particular, the challenges associated with nanoimprint and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask inspection require new strategies that enable fast inspection at high sensitivity. The tradeoffs between sensitivity and throughput for optical and e-beam inspection are well understood. Optical inspection offers the highest throughput and is the current workhorse of the industry for both wafer and mask inspection. E-beam inspection offers the highest sensitivity but has historically lacked the throughput required for widespread adoption in the manufacturing environment. It is unlikely that continued incremental improvements to either technology will meet tomorrow's requirements, and therefore a new inspection technology approach is required; one that combines the high-throughput performance of optical with the high-sensitivity capabilities of e-beam inspection. To support the industry in meeting these challenges SUNY Poly SEMATECH has evaluated disruptive technologies that can meet the requirements for high volume manufacturing (HVM), for both the wafer fab [1] and the mask shop. Highspeed massively parallel e-beam defect inspection has been identified as the leading candidate for addressing the key gaps limiting today's patterned defect inspection techniques. As of late 2014 SUNY Poly SEMATECH completed a review, system analysis, and proof of concept evaluation of multiple e-beam technologies for defect inspection. A champion approach has been identified based on a multibeam technology from Carl Zeiss. This paper includes a discussion on the

  3. Novel glass inspection method for advanced photomask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Masaru; Kikuchi, Toshiharu; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Ohkubo, Yasushi

    2007-05-01

    Recently, extremely-high-quality-quartz substrates have been demanded for advancing ArF-lithography. HOYA has developed a novel inspection method for interior defects as well as surface defects. The total internal reflection of the substrate is employed to produce an ideal dark field illumination. The novel inspection method can detect a "nano-pit" of 12nm-EDS, the Equivalent of the Diameter of a Sphere (EDS). It will meet the sensitivity for 32nm node and beyond. Moreover, a type of unique defect is detected, which induces Serious Transmittance Error for Arf-LiTHography. We call it the "STEALTH" defect. It is a killer defect in wafer printing; but it cannot be detected with any conventional inspection in the mask-making process so far. In this paper, the performance of the novel inspection method for quartz substrates and the investigation of "STEALTH" are reported.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Mask Production CAR Development Process with Stepwise Defect Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo-Gun; Lee, Jung-Kwan; Park, Dong-Il; Park, Eu-Sang; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Seo, Sun-Kyu; Lee, Dong-Heok; Kim, Jin-Min; Choi, Sang-Soo; Jeong, Soo-Hong

    2002-12-01

    Chemically amplified resist (CAR) provides superior lithographic performance compared to traditional e-beam resists in production maskmaking. Parameters benefiting the most are contrast, resolution, and sensitivity. In spite of CAR's advantages, defect control and tighter 50KeV e-beam CAR process restrictions are significantly more critical thanks to smaller geometries, tighter CD specifications, and optical proximity correction (OPC) for 90nm node mask technology. Among defect root causes, resist development is considered to be the one of the most important steps because post-development residue can generate printable defects on finished masks. We investigated the CAR development process across different resist development methods, such as binary and fan-type nozzle spin spray, and puddle development. Several high density binary and embedded-attenuated phase shift masks (EAPSMs) with 70% clear area in the main pattern field were evaluated in an effort to identify and contain post-develop defects in a typical mask production flow. Development step process residue was examined at the after-develop inspection (ADI) step and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for individual defect review. The KLA-Tencor SLF77 TeraStar inspection tool was used to inspect patterns after the development, Cr/MoSiON layer dry etch, and clean steps. The effectiveness of the various CAR development methods has been also studied following development, dry etch, and cleaning inspection by using identical binary and EAPSM masks from production. The mechanism and defect source during the stepwise process and inspections were scrutinized and discussed. Experimental results showed that stepwise process inspection was effective in identifying defects and their sources to prevent defects, and in optimizing each process step. It was found that CAR development and dry etch processes are the most important process steps to control defects in CAR-based mask production. Suggested optimized

  5. Wavelength-specific reflections: A decade of EUV actinic mask inspection research

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopo

    2010-12-31

    Mask inspection is essential for the success of any pattern-transfer lithography technology, and EUV Lithography in particular faces unique challenges. EUV masks resonant-reflective multilayer coatings have a narrow, wavelength-specific response that dramatically affects the way that defects appear, or disappear, at various illuminating wavelengths. Furthermore, the ever-shrinking size of 'critical' defects limits the potential effectiveness of DUV inspection techniques over time. Researchers pursuing numerous ways of finding and characterizing defects on EUV masks and have met with varying degrees of success. Their lessons inform the current, urgent exploration to select the most effective techniques for high-volume manufacturing. Ranging from basic research and demonstration experiments to commercial inspection tool prototypes, we survey the recent history of work in this area, including sixteen projects in Europe, Asia, and America. Solutions range from scanning beams to microscopy, dark field imaging to pattern transfer.

  6. Impact of EUVL mask surface roughness on an actinic blank inspection image and a wafer image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Terasawa, Tsuneo

    2012-11-01

    An impact of EUVL mask surface roughness on actinic inspection was studied. The background level (BGL) of an actinic inspection image is caused by the light scattered from the mask blank surface roughness. The BGL is found to be proportional to the square of the mask surface roughness measured by AFM. By using this proportionality coefficient, a global distribution of the surface roughness can be obtained at the same time while inspection a mask. On the other hand, any local variation of BGL indicates variation of the mask surface roughness at each pixel. Assuming that the roughness at a center pixel is 0.15 nm rms (SEMI standard specification) and those at the surrounding pixels are 0.1 nm rms, the signal intensity at the center pixel is found to be approximately the same as that of a 1.2 nm-high and 40 nm-wide programmed defect. In that case, CD error on a wafer image due to the reflectivity loss by the roughness is found to be not critical. This means that the local roughness should be less than 0.15 nm rms, and that the inspection system can detect such a local variation of the roughness with 100 % probability.

  7. Coherent scattering microscopy as an effective inspection tool for analyzing performance of phase shift mask.

    PubMed

    Woo, Dong Gon; Lee, Jae Uk; Hong, Seong Chul; Kim, Jung Sik; Ahn, Jinho

    2016-05-30

    The imaging performance of a half-tone phase shift mask (PSM) has been analyzed using coherent scattering microscopy (CSM), which allows analysis of the actinic characteristics of an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask such as its reflectivity, diffraction efficiency, and phase information. This paper presents the 1st experimental result showing the effect of 180° phase difference between the absorber and reflector in EUV mask. This reveals that a PSM offers a 46% improvement in 1st/0th diffraction efficiency and 14% improvement in image contrast when compared to a binary intensity mask (BIM). The horizontal-vertical critical dimension (H-V CD) bias is also reduced by 1.37 nm at 22 nm line and space (L/S) patterns. Since the performance of PSM can be evaluated without a wafer patterning process, CSM is expected to be a useful inspection tool for the development of novel EUV masks. PMID:27410126

  8. Comparison of critical dimension measurements of a mask inspection system with a CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Jan P.; Ullrich, Albrecht; Utzny, Clemens S.; Meusemann, Stefan; Kromer, Frank; Whittey, John M.; Garcia, Edgardo; Wagner, Mark; Schmidt, Norbert J.

    2012-11-01

    Critical dimension uniformity (CDU) is an important parameter for photomask and wafer manufacturing. In order to reduce long-range CD variation, compensation techniques for mask writers and scanners have been developed. Both techniques require mask CD measurements with high spatial sampling. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), which provide CD measurements at very high precision, cannot in practice provide the required spatial sampling due to their low speed. In contrast mask inspection systems, some of which have the ability to perform optical CD measurements with very high sampling frequencies, are an interesting alternative. In this paper we evaluate the CDU measurement results with those of a CD-SEM.

  9. Characterization of an advanced performance reticle defect inspection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, James N.; Aquino, Christopher M.; Burnham, Douglas V.; Vacca, Anthony

    1997-07-01

    KLA-Tencor has developed a new reticle defect inspection algorithm, APA (advanced performance algorithm), which replaces the current 300 series algorithm (P183), and offers significant improvements in the detection of important defect types on advanced reticles, including OPC reticles. The improvements with APA can also allow inspections with larger pixel sizes compared with P183, resulting in faster inspection times. A suite of test masks was used for evaluating APA's performance on a 351 reticle inspection system at 488 nm using 0.5, 0.375 and 0.25 micrometer pixel sizes. The test suite included a VeriThoroTM 890EX test reticle and a SEMI- standard programmed defect test pattern scaled by 50%, 33%, 25%, and 20% (producing nominal primary features sizes of 1.5, 1.0, 0.75 and 0.60 micrometer). APA's improved performance allowed the use of the 0.375 micrometer pixel size for the 1.5 and 1.0 micrometer linewidth patterns resulting in faster inspection times (compared with the 0.25 micrometer pixel size for P183); it further allowed the successful inspection of the 0.75 and 0.60 micrometer linewidth patterns. A methodology was developed to analyze, summarize and compare the performance results of APA and P183. Finally, APA successfully inspected various actual product reticles with patterns of 0.75 micrometer and below including an advanced MicroUnity OPC (optical proximity correction) reticle with 0.75 micrometer serif and 0.35 micrometer database neck dimensions.

  10. Technique for rapid at-wavelength inspection of extreme ultraviolet mask blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, S. J.; White, D. L.; Tennant, D. M.; Ocola, L. E.; Novembre, A. E.; Peabody, M. L.; Wood, O. R. II

    1999-11-01

    We have developed two new methods for at-wavelength inspection of mask blanks for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In one method an EUV photoresist is applied directly to a mask blank which is then flood exposed with EUV light and partially developed. In the second method, the photoresist is applied to an EUV transparent membrane that is placed in close proximity to the mask and then exposed and developed. Both reflectivity defects and phase defects alter the exposure of the resist, resulting in mounds of resist at defect sites that can then be located by visual inspection. In the direct application method, a higher contrast resist was shown to increase the height of the mounds, thereby improving the sensitivity of the technique. In the membrane method, a holographic technique was used to reconstruct an image of the mask, revealing the presence of very small defects, approximately 0.2 {mu}m in size. The demonstrated clean transfer of phase and amplitude defects to resist features on a membrane will be important when flagging defects in an automatic inspection tool. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  11. Toward defect guard-banding of EUV exposures by full chip optical wafer inspection of EUV mask defect adders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halle, Scott D.; Meli, Luciana; Delancey, Robert; Vemareddy, Kaushik; Crispo, Gary; Bonam, Ravi; Burkhardt, Martin; Corliss, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The detection of EUV mask adder defects has been investigated with an optical wafer defect inspection system employing a methodology termed Die-to-"golden" Virtual Reference Die (D2VRD). Both opaque and clear type mask absorber programmed defects were inspected and characterized over a range of defect sizes, down to (4x mask) 40 nm. The D2VRD inspection system was capable of identifying the corresponding wafer print defects down to the limit of the defect printability threshold at approximately 30 nm (1x wafer). The efficacy of the D2VRD scheme on full chip wafer inspection to suppress random process defects and identify real mask defects is demonstrated. Using defect repeater analysis and patch image classification of both the reference die and the scanned die enables the unambiguous identification of mask adder defects.

  12. Your worst nightmare: inspection of aggressive OPC on 14nm masks with emphasis on defect sensitivity and wafer defect print predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen D.; Hibbs, Michael; Rankin, Jed; Seki, Kazunori; Stobert, Ian; Dechene, Daniel J.; Bleiman, Ben; Ghosal, Mini; Broadbent, William; Redding, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    To prevent catastrophic failures during wafer manufacturing, mask manufacturers employ sophisticated reticle inspection systems to examine every image on every reticle to identify defects. These advanced systems inspect at resolutions typically 3x higher at the reticle-plane than advanced wafer scanners; thus enabling them to detect the small defects necessary to ensure reticle quality. The most thorough inspection is done using a reticle-to-database comparison that ensures the reticle pattern matches the design pattern. For high defect sensitivity, the database must be carefully modeled to exactly match the reticle pattern. Further, sub-resolution OPC shapes are often at the limit of the mask manufacturing process, which adds subtle variations on such shapes across the reticle. These modeling errors and process variations can cause high numbers of unwanted detections, thereby limiting inspection system defect detection sensitivity.[1] OPC designs are expected to become more aggressive for future generations and may stress the performance of current reticle inspection systems. To systematically assess the capability of various inspection approaches and identify needed areas for improvement, a new "Nightmare" test reticle has been designed by IBM. The test reticle contains various sizes and shapes of sub-resolution features that might appear on reticle generations from today's 22nm to future 7nm. It also contains programmed defects to assess defect detection capability of current and future generation inspection systems. This paper will discuss the design of the "Nightmare" test reticle, and the inspection results of the current generation reticle inspection methods with emphasis on both inspectability and defect sensitivity. The subresolution features will be ranked according to importance for advanced OPC design. The reticle will also be evaluated using wafer print simulation so lithographic impact of features and defects can be measured and compared against

  13. Investigation of buried EUV mask defect printability using actinic inspection and fast simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, C. H.; Chan, T. T.; Neureuther, A. R.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Liang, T.

    2009-06-16

    The fast simulator RADICAL and the Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) are used in advance of availability of high volume manufacturing quality exposure tools, resists, and masks to assess the expected defect printability levels in production conditions. AIT images are analyzed to qualitatively demonstrate general trends in defect printability: defects smaller than 0.5nm tall on the multilayer surface can cause an unacceptable critical dimension (CD) change, CD change increases for taller defects, and defect printability varies asymmetrically through focus. RADICAL is used to derive quantitative limits for defect size and demonstrate the effects of focus and illumination for 22nm and 16nm dense lines. For 22nm dense lines at best focus a 0.8nm tall defect causes a 10% CD change. For 16nm lines a 0.4nm tall defect causes a 10% CD change. The CD is shown to be more sensitive to buried defects out of focus, but less sensitive to defects in focus if annular or dipole illumination is used.

  14. Massively parallel E-beam inspection: enabling next-generation patterned defect inspection for wafer and mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Wurm, Stefan; Mukhtar, Maseeh; Quoi, Kathy; Kemen, Thomas; Zeidler, Dirk; Eberle, Anna Lena; Garbowski, Tomasz; Dellemann, Gregor; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    SEMATECH aims to identify and enable disruptive technologies to meet the ever-increasing demands of semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM). As such, a program was initiated in 2012 focused on high-speed e-beam defect inspection as a complement, and eventual successor, to bright field optical patterned defect inspection [1]. The primary goal is to enable a new technology to overcome the key gaps that are limiting modern day inspection in the fab; primarily, throughput and sensitivity to detect ultra-small critical defects. The program specifically targets revolutionary solutions based on massively parallel e-beam technologies, as opposed to incremental improvements to existing e-beam and optical inspection platforms. Wafer inspection is the primary target, but attention is also being paid to next generation mask inspection. During the first phase of the multi-year program multiple technologies were reviewed, a down-selection was made to the top candidates, and evaluations began on proof of concept systems. A champion technology has been selected and as of late 2014 the program has begun to move into the core technology maturation phase in order to enable eventual commercialization of an HVM system. Performance data from early proof of concept systems will be shown along with roadmaps to achieving HVM performance. SEMATECH's vision for moving from early-stage development to commercialization will be shown, including plans for development with industry leading technology providers.

  15. Inspection of 32nm imprinted patterns with an advanced e-beam inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hong; Ma, Long; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Yan; Jau, Jack; Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-10-01

    We used electron beam (e-beam) inspection (EBI) systems to inspect nano imprint lithography (NIL) resist wafers with programmed defects. EBI with 10nm pixel sizes has been demonstrated and capability of capturing program defects sized as small as 4nm has been proven. Repeating defects have been captured by the EBI in multiple die inspections to identify the possible mask defects. This study demonstrated the feasibility of EBI as the NIL defect inspection solution of 32nm and beyond.

  16. ACTINIC MASK INSPECTION AT THE ALS: RISK REDUCTION ACTIVITIES FOR 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Levesque, R; Ayers, J; Liu, Y; Gullikson, E; Barale, P

    2004-01-05

    This document reports on risk reduction activities performed at the VNL during CY2003 as a part of the Lith-343 actinic inspection project funded by International SEMATECH. The risk reduction activities described in this document comprise deliverable items 3.1.3, 3.1.4, 3.1.5 and 3.1.6 of Amendment 6 to the VNL EUV mask blank technology transfer contract.

  17. Aerial Image Microscopes for the Inspection of Defects in EUV Masks

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Taylor, J S; Hudyma, R; Spiller, E; Sweeney, D W; Shelden, G; Urbach, J-P

    2002-10-22

    The high volume inspection equipment currently available to support development of EUV blanks is non-actinic. The same is anticipated for patterned EUV mask inspection. Once potential defects are identified and located by such non-actinic inspection techniques, it is essential to have instrumentation to perform detailed characterization, and if repairs are performed, re-evaluation. The ultimate metric for the acceptance or rejection of a mask due to a defect, is the wafer level impact. Thus measuring the aerial image for the site under question is required. An EUV Aerial Image Microscope (''AIM'') similar to the current AIM tools for 248nm and 193nm exposure wavelength is the natural solution for this task. Due to the complicated manufacturing process of EUV blanks, AIM measurements might also be beneficial to accurately assessing the severity of a blank defect. This is an additional application for an EUV AIM as compared to today's use In recognition of the critical role of an EUV AIM for the successful implementation of EUV blank and mask supply, International SEMATECH initiated this design study with the purpose to define the technical requirements for accurately simulating EUV scanner performance, demonstrating the feasibility to meet these requirements and to explore various technical approaches to building an EUV AIM tool.

  18. Recent advances in SEMATECH's mask blank development program, the remaining technical challenges, and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Frank; Kearney, Patrick; Kadaksham, Arun J.; Wurm, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    film for the device. In addition to the increase in complexity of the mask, introduction of EUVL requires infrastructure development of new substrate, mask blank, and finished reticle inspection tools and techniques for handling and storage of a mask without a pellicle. This paper will highlight recent advances in the ability to produce pilot line quality EUV mask blanks to meet the near-term requirements and review the existing technology gaps which must be closed to extend the current capability to meet HVM needs. A special focus will be put on substrate and mask blank defect densities; other process and infrastructure challenges will also be discussed.

  19. Enhanced defect detection capability using learning system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask inspection tool with projection electron microscope optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Terao, Kenji; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask defect detection is a major issue that must be addressed to realize EUVL-based device fabrication. We have designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics for integration into a mask inspection system, and the resulting PEM system performs well in half-pitch (hp) 16-nm-node EUVL patterned mask inspection applications. A learning system has been used in this PEM patterned mask inspection tool. The PEM identifies defects using the "defectivity" parameter that is derived from the acquired image characteristics. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and the costs associated with adjustment of the PEM's detection capabilities to cope with newly defined mask defects. The concepts behind this learning system and the parameter optimization flow are presented here. The learning system for the PEM is based on a library of registered defects. The learning system then optimizes the detection capability by reconciling previously registered defects with newly registered defects. Functional verification of the learning system is also described, and the system's detection capability is demonstrated by applying it to the inspection of hp 11-nm EUV masks. We can thus provide a user-friendly mask inspection system with reduced cost of ownership.

  20. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  1. Printability and inspectability of programmed pit defects on teh masks in EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, I.-Y.; Seo, H.-S.; Ahn, B.-S.; Lee, D.-G.; Kim, D.; Huh, S.; Koh, C.-W.; Cha, B.; Kim, S.-S.; Cho, H.-K.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    Printability and inspectability of phase defects in ELlVL mask originated from substrate pit were investigated. For this purpose, PDMs with programmed pits on substrate were fabricated using different ML sources from several suppliers. Simulations with 32-nm HP L/S show that substrate pits with below {approx}20 nm in depth would not be printed on the wafer if they could be smoothed by ML process down to {approx}1 nm in depth on ML surface. Through the investigation of inspectability for programmed pits, minimum pit sizes detected by KLA6xx, AIT, and M7360 depend on ML smoothing performance. Furthermore, printability results for pit defects also correlate with smoothed pit sizes. AIT results for pattemed mask with 32-nm HP L/S represents that minimum printable size of pits could be {approx}28.3 nm of SEVD. In addition, printability of pits became more printable as defocus moves to (-) directions. Consequently, printability of phase defects strongly depends on their locations with respect to those of absorber patterns. This indicates that defect compensation by pattern shift could be a key technique to realize zero printable phase defects in EUVL masks.

  2. Advances in the detection capability on actinic blank inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Noriaki; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Mori, Ichro; Ino, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Takehisa, Kiwamu; Miyai, Hiroki; Kusunose, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    Improvements in the detection capability of a high-volume-manufacturing (HVM) actinic blank inspection (ABI) prototype for native defects caused by illumination numerical aperture (NA) enlargement were evaluated. A mask blank was inspected by varying the illumination NA. The defect signal intensity increased with illumination NA enlargement as predicted from simulation. The mask blank was also inspected with optical tools, and no additional phase defect was detected. All of the printable phase defects were verified to have been detected by the HVM ABI prototype.

  3. Phase defect analysis with actinic full-field EUVL mask blank inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Suga, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    We had developed an actinic full-field inspection system to detect multilayer phase-defects with dark field imaging. Regarding the actinic inspection of native defects, the influence of the defect's surface dimension and multilayer structure, on the intensity-signal obtained from the inspection was analyzed. Three mask blanks were inspected from which 55 defects, observed with AFM and SEM, were classified as amplitude-defects or phase-defects. The surface dimensions and SEVDs (sphere equivalent volume diameters) of the defects were measured with the AFM. In the case where their SEVDs were same as of the programmed phase-defects, they were found to produce stronger intensitysignals in comparison to the ones from the programmed phase-defects. Cross-sectional multilayer structures of two native phase-defects were observed with TEM, and those defects formed non-conformal structures in the multilayer. This result means that most of the native phase-defects tend to form a non-conformal structure, and can make large impact on the wafer image in comparison to the ones from a conformal structure. Besides phase-defects, the actinic inspection also detected amplitude-defects. Although the sensitivities of the amplitude-defects were found to be lower than those of the phase-defects, an amplitude-defect higher than 30 nm could be detected with high probability.

  4. E-beam inspection of EUV mask defects: To etch or not to etch?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonam, Ravi; Tien, Hung-Yu; Park, Chanro; Halle, Scott; Wang, Fei; Corliss, Daniel; Fang, Wei; Jau, Jack

    2014-04-01

    EUV Lithography is aimed to be inserted into mainstream production for sub-20nm pattern fabrication. Unlike conventional optical lithography, frequent defectivity monitors (adders, repeaters etc.) are required in EUV lithography. Due to sub-20nm pattern and defect dimensions e-beam inspection of critical pattern areas is essential for yield monitor. In previous work we showed sub-10nm defect detection sensitivity1 on patterned resist wafers. In this work we report 8-10× improvement in scan rates of etched patterns compared to resist patterns without loss in defect detection sensitivity. We observed good etch transfer of sub-10nm resist features. A combination of smart scan strategies with improved etched pattern scan rates can further improve throughput of e-beam inspection. An EUV programmed defect mask with Line/Space, Contact patterns was used to evaluate printability of defects and defect detection (Die-Die and Die-Database) capability of the e-beam inspection tool. Defect inspection tool parameters such as averaging, threshold value were varied to assess its detection capability and were compared to previously obtained results on resist patterns.

  5. Sensitivity comparison of fast integrated die-to-die T+R pattern inspection, standard database inspection, and STARlight2 contamination mode for application in mask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalfuss, Heiko; Schulmeyer, Thomas; Heumann, Jan; Lang, Michael; Sier, Jean-Paul

    2007-10-01

    'Fast Integrated Die-to-Die T+R' pattern inspection (DDTR), reflected tritone database inspection (DBRt) and STARlight2 TM (SL2) contamination inspection are employed by mask makers in order to detect pattern defects and contamination defects on photomasks for in process inspection steps. In this paper we compare the detection capabilities of these modes on real production masks with a representative set of contamination and pattern defects. Currently, SL2 inspection is used to find contamination defects and die-to-die and die-to-database are used for pattern defects. In this paper we will show that the new introduced 'Fast Integrated Die-to-Die T+R' pattern inspection (DDTR)1 in combination with the DBRt can be used in production environment, instead of SL2 without any loss in the sensitivity. During the study, we collected and analyzed inspection data on critical layers such as lines & spaces and contact holes. Besides, performance of the modes on product plates characterization was done using a test mask with programmed defects.

  6. Enhancing productivity and sensitivity in mask production via a fast integrated die-to-database T+R inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Eric Haodong; Wu, David; Chen, Ellison; Badoni, Raj

    2007-10-01

    Inspection strategies of transmitted die-to-database pattern inspection (DBT), reflected die-to-database inspection (DBR) and STARlight2 TM (SL2) contamination inspection are employed by mask makers in order to detect pattern defects and contamination defects on photo-masks in process inspection steps and outgoing quality control (OQC). Currently, SL2 inspection is used to detect contamination defects while die-to-database inspections are used to detect pattern defects. However, such inspection strategies need two passes to detect both pattern defects and contamination defects. In this paper we introduce 'Fast Integrated Die-to-Database T+R' (Fast dbTR) and compare its detection capabilities and the productivity to conventional standard detection modes, such as, DBT, DBR and SL2. Programmed reticles and production reticles with pattern defects and contamination defects were used for comparative data collection. During the study, we collected and analyzed inspection data on critical layers such as lines & spaces and contact holes. Empirical data show that 'Fast dbTR' is able to cover the sensitivity required by DBT, DBR and SL2 to detect both pattern defects and contamination defects in one single scan without any loss of productivity in production runs.

  7. A study on the factors that affect the advanced mask defect verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sungha; Jang, Heeyeon; Lee, Youngmo; Kim, Sangpyo; Yim, Donggyu

    2015-10-01

    Defect verification has become significantly difficult to higher technology nodes over the years. Traditional primary method of defect (include repair point) control consists of inspection, AIMS and repair steps. Among them, AIMS process needs various wafer lithography conditions, such as NA, inner/outer sigma, illumination shape and etc. It has a limit to analyze for every layer accurately because AIMS tool uses the physical aperture system. And it requires meticulous management of exposure condition and CD target value which change frequently in advanced mask. We report on the influence of several AIMS parameters on the defect analysis including repair point. Under various illumination conditions with different patterns, it showed the significant correlation in defect analysis results. It is able to analyze defect under certain error budget based on the management specification required for each layer. In addition, it provided us with one of the clues in the analysis of wafer repeating defect. Finally we will present 'optimal specification' for defect management with common AIMS recipe and suggest advanced mask process flow.

  8. Impact of B4C capping layer for EUV mask on the sensitivity of patterned mask inspection using projection electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2014-10-01

    The inspection sensitivity of a patterned extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask with B4C capped multilayer (ML) was investigated using a simulated projection electron microscope (PEM) image. Extrusion and intrusion defects with 16 nm in size were detected with their intensity of > 10 times the standard deviation of the background level on a half-pitch (hp) 64 nm line and space pattern. The defect detection sensitivity in this case was higher than that of Ru capped ML sample, and has a potential to meet the requirement for beyond 16 nm node generation from the standpoint of patterned mask inspection using the PEM technique. These results indicate that B4C capping layer besides its good durability has an advantage for high sensitivity of patterned mask inspection. The optimal condition of the incident beam energy was found to be 500 and 1000 eV for the samples of B4C capped ML and B4C buffered Ru capped ML, respectively. The sensitivity of defect detection was strongly affected by the difference of secondary electron emission coefficients (SEECs) between the absorber layer and capping layer. However, severely scattered electrons near the pattern edge become a source of noise and then they block the effect of large SEEC difference. Thus, the small incident beam energy was found to be preferable when the SEEC difference was relatively high.

  9. Robotic NDE inspection of advanced solid rocket motor casings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneelege, Glenn E.; Sarantos, Chris

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor program determined the need to inspect ASRM forgings and segments for potentially catastrophic defects. To minimize costs, an automated eddy current inspection system was designed and manufactured for inspection of ASRM forgings in the initial phases of production. This system utilizes custom manipulators and motion control algorithms and integrated six channel eddy current data acquisition and analysis hardware and software. Total system integration is through a personal computer based workcell controller. Segment inspection demands the use of a gantry robot for the EMAT/ET inspection system. The EMAT/ET system utilized similar mechanical compliancy and software logic to accommodate complex part geometries. EMAT provides volumetric inspection capability while eddy current is limited to surface and near surface inspection. Each aspect of the systems are applicable to other industries, such as, inspection of pressure vessels, weld inspection, and traditional ultrasonic inspection applications.

  10. Recent results from extreme ultraviolet lithography patterned mask inspection for 11 nm half-pitch generation using projection electron microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is a promising technique for 1X nm half-pitch (hp) generation lithography. The inspection of patterned EUVL masks is one of the main issues that must be addressed during mask fabrication for manufacture of devices with 11 nm hp feature sizes. We have already designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics that have been integrated into a new inspection system called Model EBEYE-V30 (where "Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) and this system seems quite promising for 16 nm hp generation EUVL patterned mask inspection. The defect inspection sensitivity of this system was evaluated via capture of an electron image that was generated at the mask by focusing the image through the projection optics onto a time-delay integration (TDI) image sensor. For increased throughput and higher defect detection sensitivity, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and a simultaneous deflector for the image capture area that follows the mask scanning motion have been developed. Using a combination of synchronous deflection and mask scanning, the image can be integrated into both the fixed area image sensor and the TDI image sensor. We describe our experimental results for EUV patterned mask inspection using the above system. Elements have been developed for inspection tool integration and the designed specification has been verified. The system performance demonstrates the defect detectability required for 11 nm hp generation EUVL masks.

  11. Advances in Low-Defect Multilayers for EUVL Mask Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, J A; Davidson, J C; Larson, C C; Walton, C C; Kearney, P A

    2002-04-15

    Low-defect multilayer coatings are required to fabricate mask blanks for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL). The mask blanks consist of high reflectance E W multilayers on low thermal expansion substrates. A defect density of 0.0025 printable defects/cm{sup 2} for both the mask substrate and the multilayer is required to provide a mask blank yield of 60%. Current low defect multilayer coating technology allows repeated coating-added defect levels of 0.05/cm{sup 2} for defects greater than 90 nm polystyrene latex sphere (PSL) equivalent size for lots of 20 substrates. Extended clean operation of the coating system at levels below 0.08/cm{sup 2} for 3 months of operation has also been achieved. Two substrates with zero added defects in the quality area have been fabricated, providing an existence proof that ultra low defect coatings are possible. Increasing the ion source-to-target distance from 410 to 560 mm to reduce undesired coating of the ion source caused the defect density to increase to 0.2/cm{sup 2}. Deposition and etching diagnostic witness substrates and deposition pinhole cameras showed a much higher level of ion beam spillover (ions missing the sputter target) than expected. Future work will quantify beam spillover, and test designs to reduce spillover, if it is confirmed to be the cause of the increased defect level. The LDD system will also be upgraded to allow clean coating of standard format mask substrates. The upgrade will confirm that the low defect process developed on Si wafers is compatible with the standard mask format 152 mm square substrates, and will provide a clean supply of EUVL mask blanks needed to support development of EUVL mask patterning processes and clean mask handling technologies.

  12. Microwave discharge plasma production with resonant cavity for EUV mask inspection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashima, Saya; Ohnishi, Masami; Hugrass, Waheed; Sugimoto, Keita; Sakaguchi, Masatugu; Osawa, Hodaka; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Matsukuma, Hiraku

    2015-12-01

    A microwave-discharge-produced plasma source was developed to generate 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation for application as a mask inspection tool. The EUV radiation of a system with a high Q-factor (>3900) resonant cavity and a solid-state oscillator was studied. The gas pressure and microwave power dependences on the EUV radiation for transverse-magnetic mode TM010 and transverse-electric mode TE111 were determined. For the solid-state oscillator, the efficiency of the EUV radiation over the input power was 5.8 times higher than that for a magnetron. EUV radiation of 10 mW/(2πsr) was observed under a gas pressure of 5 Pa and microwave power of 400 W. We expect that more EUV power and a smaller plasma is generated when a magnetic field is applied to confirm the plasma and a facility is operated with an improved system to cool an entire cavity.

  13. Implementation of reflected light die-to-die inspection and ReviewSmart to improve 65nm DRAM mask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Young; Cho, Won Il; Park, Jin Hyung; Chung, Dong Hoon; Cha, Byung Chul; Choi, Seong Woon; Han, Woo Sung; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, Nam Wook; Hess, Carl; Ma, Weimin; Kim, David

    2005-11-01

    As the design rule continues to shrink towards 65nm size and beyond the defect criteria are becoming ever more challenging. Pattern fidelity and reticle defects that were once considered as insignificant or nuisance are now becoming significant yield impacting defects. The intent of this study is to utilize the new generation DUV system to compare Die-to-Die Reflected Light inspection and Die-to-Die Transmitted Light Inspection to increase defect detection for optimization of the 65nm node process. In addition, the ReviewSmart will be implemented to help categorically identify systematic tool and process variations and thus allowing user to expedite the learning process to develop a production worthy 65nm node mask process. The learning will be applied to Samsung's pattern inspection strategy, complementing Transmitted Light Inspection, on critical layers of 65 nm node to gain ability to find defects that adversely affect process window.

  14. [Study advance on formation, transformation and detection of masked deoxynivalenol].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanchuan; Yu, Hongxia; Li, Fengqin

    2009-03-01

    Conjugated deoxynivalenol, in which the toxins were usually bound to a more polar substance like glucose in crops, is referred to as masked deoxynivalenol. It could not detected with routine detection methods, but could release its toxic precursor after hydrolysis in gastrointestinal tract. In this paper, summarizes the formation, transformation and detection of masked deoxynivalenol as well as its relationship with human health were reviewed.

  15. Extreme ultraviolet mask defect inspection with a half pitch 16-nm node using simulated projection electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Hirano, Ryoichi; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2013-04-01

    According to an International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS-2012) update, the sensitivity requirement for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask pattern inspection system is to be less than 18 nm for half pitch (hp) 16-nm node devices. The inspection sensitivity of extrusion and intrusion defects on hp 64-nm line-and-space patterned EUV mask were investigated using simulated projection electron microscope (PEM) images. The obtained defect images showed that the optimization of current density and image processing techniques were essential for the detection of defects. Extrusion and intrusion defects 16 nm in size were detected on images formed by 3000 electrons per pixel. The landing energy also greatly influenced the defect detection efficiency. These influences were different for extrusion and intrusion defects. These results were in good agreement with experimentally obtained yield curves of the mask materials and the elevation angles of the defects. These results suggest that the PEM technique has a potential to detect 16-nm size defects on an hp 64-nm patterned EUV mask.

  16. Advanced ground-penetrating, imaging radar for bridge inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Warhus, J.P.; Mast, J.E.; Johansson, E.M.; Nelson, S.E.; Lee, Hua

    1993-08-01

    Inspecting high-value structures, like bridges and buildings using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is an application of the technology that is growing in importance. In a typical inspection application, inspectors use GPR to locate structural components, like reinforcing bars embedded in concrete, to avoid weakening the structure while collecting core samples for detailed inspection. Advanced GPR, integrated with imaging technologies for use as an NDE tool, can provide the capability to locate and characterize construction flaws and wear- or age-induced damage in these structures without the need for destructive techniques like coring. In the following sections, we discuss an important inspection application, namely, concrete bridge deck inspection. We describe an advanced bridge deck inspection system concept and provide an overview of a program aimed at developing such a system. Examples of modeling, image reconstruction, and experimental results are presented.

  17. High-radiance LDP source: clean, reliable, and stable EUV source for mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Yusuke; Santos, Bárbara; Mertens, Guido; Kops, Ralf; Kops, Margarete; von Wezyk, Alexander; Bergmann, Klaus; Yabuta, Hironobu; Nagano, Akihisa; Ashizawa, Noritaka; Taniguchi, Yuta; Shirai, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kazuya; Kasama, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    High-throughput and -resolution actinic mask inspection tools are needed as EUVL begins to enter into volume production phase. To realize such inspection tools, a high-radiance EUV source is necessary. Ushio's laser-assisted discharge-produced plasma (LDP) source is able to meet industry's requirements in radiance, cleanliness, stability and reliability. Ushio's LDP source has shown the peak radiance at plasma of 180 W/mm2/sr and the area-averaged radiance in a 200-μm-diameter circle behind the debris mitigation system of 120 W/mm2/sr. A new version of the debris mitigation system is in testing phase. Its optical transmission was confirmed to be 73 %, which is 4 % lower than that of the previous version and therefore will be improved. Cleanliness of the system is evaluated by exposing Ru mirrors placed behind the debris mitigation system. Ru sputter rate was proven to be sufficiently low as 3~5 nm/Gpulse at 7 kHz, whereas frequency-dependent sputter rate was 1~3 nm/Gpulse at 5~9 kHz as previously reported. Sn deposition remained very low (< 0.05 nm) and did not grow over time. A new technique to suppress debris was tested and preliminary results were promising. Time-of-flight signal of fast ions was completely suppressed and Ru sputter rate of exposed mirrors at 3 kHz was approximately 1.3 nm/Gpulse, whereas the conventional mitigation system (new version) resulted in Ru sputter rate of 0.7 nm/Gpulse. This new technique also allows increasing the radiance efficiency by 30 %. Stability tests were done at several different discharge frequencies. Pulse energy stability was approximately 10 %. Dose energy stability dropped from approximately 2 % to 0.1 % when feedback control was activated. EUV emission position stability was studied at 3 kHz. Deviation of the plasma center of gravity was 6 μm, which is 3 % of plasma diameter and therefore considered to be negligible. Reliability tests were performed on both R and D and prototype machines and up to 200 hours of non

  18. Industrial Inspection with Open Eyes: Advance with Machine Vision Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng; Ukida, H.; Niel, Kurt; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2015-10-01

    Machine vision systems have evolved significantly with the technology advances to tackle the challenges from modern manufacturing industry. A wide range of industrial inspection applications for quality control are benefiting from visual information captured by different types of cameras variously configured in a machine vision system. This chapter screens the state of the art in machine vision technologies in the light of hardware, software tools, and major algorithm advances for industrial inspection. The inspection beyond visual spectrum offers a significant complementary to the visual inspection. The combination with multiple technologies makes it possible for the inspection to achieve a better performance and efficiency in varied applications. The diversity of the applications demonstrates the great potential of machine vision systems for industry.

  19. Vision Based Autonomous Robotic Control for Advanced Inspection and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, Walter S.

    2014-01-01

    The advanced inspection system is an autonomous control and analysis system that improves the inspection and remediation operations for ground and surface systems. It uses optical imaging technology with intelligent computer vision algorithms to analyze physical features of the real-world environment to make decisions and learn from experience. The advanced inspection system plans to control a robotic manipulator arm, an unmanned ground vehicle and cameras remotely, automatically and autonomously. There are many computer vision, image processing and machine learning techniques available as open source for using vision as a sensory feedback in decision-making and autonomous robotic movement. My responsibilities for the advanced inspection system are to create a software architecture that integrates and provides a framework for all the different subsystem components; identify open-source algorithms and techniques; and integrate robot hardware.

  20. AIMS D2DB simulation for DUV and EUV mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Danping; Li, Ying; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Chen, Jerry; Hsu, S. C.; Lai, Rick; Lin, C. S.; Tuo, Laurent C. C.

    2012-02-01

    AIMS™ Die-to-Die (D2D) is widely used in checking the wafer printability of mask defects for DUV lithography. Two AIMS images, a reference and a defect image, are captured and compared with differences larger than certain tolerances identified as real defects. Since two AIMS images are needed, and since AIMS system time is precious, it is desirable to save image search and capture time by simulating reference images from the OPC mask pattern and AIMS optics. This approach is called Die-to-Database (D2DB). Another reason that D2DB is desirable is in single die mask, where the reference image from another die does not exist. This paper presents our approach to simulate AIMS optics and mask 3D effects. Unlike OPC model, whose major concern is predicting printed CD, AIMS D2DB model must produce simulated images that match measured images across the image field. This requires a careful modeling of all effects that impact the final image quality. We present a vector-diffraction theory that is based on solid theoretical foundations and a general formulation of mask model that are applicable to both rigorous Maxwell solver and empirical model that can capture the mask 3D-effects. We demonstrated the validity of our approach by comparing our simulated image with AIMS machine measured images. We also briefly discuss the necessary changes needed to model EUV optics. Simulation is particularly useful while the industry waits for an actinic EUV-AIMS tool.

  1. Mask inspection microscopy with 13.2 nm table-top laser illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Brizuela, Fernando; Wang, Yong; Brewer, Courtney A.; Pedaci, Francesco; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Liu, Yanwei; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Marconi, Mario C.; Attwood, David T.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2008-10-14

    We report the demonstration of a reflection microscope that operates at 13.2-nm wavelength with a spatial resolution of 55 {+-} 3 nm. The microscope uses illumination from a table-top EUV laser to acquire aerial images of photolithography masks with a 20 second exposure time. The modulation transfer function of the optical system was characterized.

  2. 13.2 nm Table-Top Inspection Microscope for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defect Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Brizuela, F.; Wang, Y.; Brewer, C.; Pedaci, F.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.; Liu, Y.; Goldberg, K.; Naulleau, P.; Wachulak, P.; Marconi, M.; Attwood, D.; Rocca, J.; Menoni, C.

    2009-04-07

    We report on a reflection microscope that operates at 13.2-nm wavelength with a spatial resolution of 55{+-}3 nm. The microscope uses a table-top EUV laser to acquire images of photolithography masks in 20 seconds.

  3. Process window impact of progressive mask defects: its inspection and disposition techniques (go/no-go criteria) via a lithographic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jerry; Peng, Lan-Hsin; Chu, Chih-Wei; Bhattacharyya, Kaustuve; Eynon, Ben; Mirzaagha, Farzin; Dibiase, Tony; Son, Kong; Cheng, Jackie; Chen, Ellison; Wang, Den

    2005-11-01

    Progressive mask defect problem is an industry wide mask reliability issue. During the start of this problem when the defects on masks are just forming and are still non-critical, it is possible to continue to run such a problem mask in production with relatively low risk of yield impact. But when the defects approach more critical state, a decision needs to be made whether to pull the mask out of production to send for clean (repair). As this problem increases on the high-end masks running DUV lithography where masks are expensive, it is in the interest of the fab to sustain these problem masks in production as long as possible and take these out of production only when absolutely necessary; i.e., when the defects have reached such a critical condition on these masks that it will impact the process window. During the course of this technical work, investigation has been done towards understanding the impact of such small progressive defects on process window. It was seen that a small growing defect may not print at the best focus exposure condition, but it can still influence the process window and can shrink it significantly. With the help of a high-resolution direct reticle inspection, early detection of these defects is possible, but fabs are still searching for a way to disposition (make a go / no-go decision) on these defective masks. But it is not an easy task as the impact of these defects will depend on not only their size, but also on their transmission and MEEF. A lithographic detector has been evaluated to see if this can predict the criticality of such progressive mask defects.

  4. Extending CO2 cryogenic aerosol cleaning for advanced optical and EUV mask cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Ivin; Bowers, Charles W.; Balooch, Mehdi

    2011-11-01

    Cryogenic CO2 aerosol cleaning being a dry, chemically-inert and residue-free process is used in the production of optical lithography masks. It is an attractive cleaning option for the mask industry to achieve the requirement for removal of all printable soft defects and repair debris down to the 50nm printability specification. In the technique, CO2 clusters are formed by sudden expansion of liquid from high to almost atmospheric pressure through an optimally designed nozzle orifice. They are then directed on to the soft defects or debris for momentum transfer and subsequent damage free removal from the mask substrate. Unlike aggressive acid based wet cleaning, there is no degradation of the mask after processing with CO2, i.e., no critical dimension (CD) change, no transmission/phase losses, or chemical residue that leads to haze formation. Therefore no restriction on number of cleaning cycles is required to be imposed, unlike other cleaning methods. CO2 aerosol cleaning has been implemented for several years as full mask final clean in production environments at several state of the art mask shops. Over the last two years our group reported successful removal of all soft defects without damage to the fragile SRAF features, zero adders (from the cleaning and handling mechanisms) down to a 50nm printability specification. In addition, CO2 aerosol cleaning is being utilized to remove debris from Post-RAVE repair of hard defects in order to achieve the goal of no printable defects. It is expected that CO2 aerosol cleaning can be extended to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks. In this paper, we report advances being made in nozzle design qualification for optimum snow properties (size, velocity and flux) using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) technique. In addition the two new areas of focus for CO2 aerosol cleaning i.e. pellicle glue residue removal on optical masks, and ruthenium (Ru) film on EUV masks are presented. Usually, the residue left over after the pellicle

  5. Mask characterization for critical dimension uniformity budget breakdown in advanced extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2013-04-01

    As the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors critical dimension uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. We will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for advanced extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography with 1D (dense lines) and 2D (dense contacts) feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CDs and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples. Mask stack reflectivity variations should also be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We also observed mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) through field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may play a role towards the total intrafield CDU and may need to be taken into account for EUV lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, with results herein, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to quantifying the mask part of

  6. Comparison of fast 3D simulation and actinic inspection for EUV masks with buries defects

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, C. H.; Wiraatmadja, S.; Chan, T. T.; Neureuther, A. R.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Liang, T.

    2009-02-23

    Aerial images for isolated defects and the interactions of defects with features are compared between the Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the fast EUV simulation program RADICAL. Comparisons between AIT images from August 2007 and RADICAL simulations are used to extract aberrations. At this time astigmatism was the dominant aberration with a value of 0.55 waves RMS. Significant improvements in the imaging performance of the AIT were made between August 2007 and December 2008. A good match will be shown between the most recent AIT images and RADICAL simulations without aberrations. These comparisons will demonstrate that a large defect, in this case 7nm tall on the surface, is still printable even if it is centered under the absorber line. These comparisons also suggest that the minimum defect size is between 1.5nm and 0.8nm surface height because a 1.5nm defect was printable but a 0.8nm was not. Finally, the image of a buried defect near an absorber line through focus will demonstrate an inversion in the effect of the defect from a protrusion of the dark line into the space to a protrusion of the space into the line.

  7. SEM-contour shape analysis based on circuit structure for advanced systematic defect inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yasutaka; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Hojo, Yutaka; Fuchimoto, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a practicable measurement technique that can help to achieve reliable inspections for systematic defects in advanced semiconductor devices. Systematic defects occurring in the design and mask processes are a dominant component of integrated circuit yield loss in nano-scaled technologies. Therefore, it is essential to ensure systematic defects are detected at an early stage of wafer fabrication. In the past, printed pattern shapes have been evaluated by human eyes or by taking manual critical dimension (CD) measurements. However, these operations are sometimes unstable and inaccurate. Last year, we proposed a new technique for taking measurements by using a SEM contour [1]. This technique enables a highly precise quantification of various complex 2D shaped patterns by comparing a contour extracted from a SEM image using a CD measurement algorithm and an ideal pattern. We improved this technique to enable the carrying out of inspections suitable for every pattern structure required for minimizing the process margin. This technique quantifies a pattern shape of a target-layer pattern using information on a multi-layered circuit structure. This enabled it to confirm the existence of a critical defect in a circuit connecting upper/lower-layers. This paper describes the improved technique and the evaluation results obtained in evaluating it in detail.

  8. DSA hole defectivity analysis using advanced optical inspection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harukawa, Ryota; Aoki, Masami; Cross, Andrew; Nagaswami, Venkat; Tomita, Tadatoshi; Nagahara, Seiji; Muramatsu, Makoto; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Kosugi, Hitoshi; Rathsack, Benjamen; Kitano, Takahiro; Sweis, Jason; Mokhberi, Ali

    2013-04-01

    This paper discusses the defect density detection and analysis methodology using advanced optical wafer inspection capability to enable accelerated development of a DSA process/process tools and the required inspection capability to monitor such a process. The defectivity inspection methodologies are optimized for grapho epitaxy directed self-assembly (DSA) contact holes with 25 nm sizes. A defect test reticle with programmed defects on guide patterns is designed for improved optimization of defectivity monitoring. Using this reticle, resist guide holes with a variety of sizes and shapes are patterned using an ArF immersion scanner. The negative tone development (NTD) type thermally stable resist guide is used for DSA of a polystyrene-b-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) block copolymer (BCP). Using a variety of defects intentionally made by changing guide pattern sizes, the detection rates of each specific defectivity type has been analyzed. It is found in this work that to maximize sensitivity, a two pass scan with bright field (BF) and dark field (DF) modes provides the best overall defect type coverage and sensitivity. The performance of the two pass scan with BF and DF modes is also revealed by defect analysis for baseline defectivity on a wafer processed with nominal process conditions.

  9. Advanced antireflective nanostructures etched down from nanosilver colloid-transformed island mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seong-Je; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hye; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Lee, Eung-Sug; Choi, Jun-Hyuk

    2012-11-01

    Advanced fabrication methods for antireflective nanostructures are presented via the formation of thermally grown nanosilver islands from continuously deposited colloidal multilayers, followed by a multi-step reactive ion etch (RIE) with optimized gas mixture rate. This process allows the formation of a random array of nanostructures of diameter 150 nm or less and height greater than 200 nm. The reflectance falls to around 0.7% in the visible region, with reasonably enhanced broadband stability and reduced incidence angle dependence. The tunability of antireflection was investigated with respect to several parameters associated with the nanosilver etch mask fabrication and RIE conditions.

  10. Advanced maintenance, inspection & repair technology for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, B.M.

    1994-12-31

    Maintenance, inspection, and repair technology for nuclear power plants is outlined. The following topics are discussed: technology for reactor systems, reactor refueling bridge, fuel inspection system, fuel shuffling software, fuel reconstitution, CEA/RCCA/CRA inspection, vessel inspection capabilities, CRDM inspection and repair, reactor internals inspection and repair, stud tensioning system, stud/nut cleaning system, EDM machining technology, MI Cable systems, core exit T/C nozzle assemblies, technology for steam generators, genesis manipulator systems, ECT, UT penetrant inspections, steam generator repair and cleaning systems, technology for balance of plant, heat exchangers, piping and weld inspections, and turbogenerators.

  11. SEMATECH EUVL mask program status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Henry; Goodwin, Frank; Huh, Sungmin; Orvek, Kevin; Cha, Brian; Rastegar, Abbas; Kearney, Patrick

    2009-04-01

    As we approach the 22nm half-pitch (hp) technology node, the industry is rapidly running out of patterning options. Of the several lithography techniques highlighted in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), the leading contender for the 22nm hp insertion is extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). Despite recent advances with EUV resist and improvements in source power, achieving defect free EUV mask blank and enabling the EUV mask infrastructure still remain critical issues. To meet the desired EUV high volume manufacturing (HVM) insertion target date of 2013, these obstacles must be resolved on a timely bases. Many of the EUV mask related challenges remain in the pre-competitive stage and a collaborative industry based consortia, such as SEMATECH can play an important role to enable the EUVL landscape. SEMATECH based in Albany, NY is an international consortium representing several of the largest manufacturers in the semiconductor market. Full members include Intel, Samsung, AMD, IBM, Panasonic, HP, TI, UMC, CNSE (College of Nanoscience and Engineering), and Fuller Road Management. Within the SEMATECH lithography division a major thrust is centered on enabling the EUVL ecosystem from mask development, EUV resist development and addressing EUV manufacturability concerns. An important area of focus for the SEMATECH mask program has been the Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC). At the MBDC key issues in EUV blank development such as defect reduction and inspection capabilities are actively pursued together with research partners, key suppliers and member companies. In addition the mask program continues a successful track record of working with the mask community to manage and fund critical mask tools programs. This paper will highlight recent status of mask projects and longer term strategic direction at the MBDC. It is important that mask technology be ready to support pilot line development HVM by 2013. In several areas progress has been

  12. Development of mask-DFM system MiLE load estimation of mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamura, Yoshikazu; Hosono, Kunihiro; Narukawa, Shogo; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Kato, Masahiro; Kawase, Hidemichi

    2007-10-01

    Load of photomask manufacturing for the most advanced semiconductor devices is increasing due to the complexity of mask layouts caused by highly accurate RET or OPC, tight specification for 2D/3D mask structures, and requirements of quick deliveries. The mask cost becomes a concern of mask users especially in SoC businesses because the number of masks required throughout the wafer process is almost the same for each product regardless of the variety in production volume when a unified platform is applied to the designs. Shares of mask cost within total production cost cannot be ignored especially in small volume SoC products. DFM (design for manufacturing) is inevitable in a mask level as well as in a wafer level to solve the cost problem. "Mask-DFM" is a method to decrease the burden of mask manufacturing and to improve the yield and quality of masks, not only by modification of mask pattern layouts (design) but also all other things including utilization of designer's intents. We have developed our Mask-DFM system called "MiLE", that calculates mask-manufacturing workload through layout analyses combining information of mask configuration, and visualizes the consequence of Mask-DFM efforts. "MiLE (Mask manufacturIng Load Estimation)" calculates a relative index which represents the mask manufacturing workload determined by factors of 1) EB writing, 2) defect inspection/repair, 3) materials and processes and 4) specification. All the factors are computed before tape-outs for mask making in the system by the following methods. To estimate EB writing time, we applied high-throughput simulator and counted the number of "shot", minimum figure unit in EB writing, by using post-OPC layout data. Mask layout that caused troubles and extra load in mask inspection or repair was specified from MRC (mask rule checking) of the same post-OPC data. Additional layout analysis perceives designer's intents that are described in the layout data and these are reflected in the

  13. Rapid Intelligent Inspection Process Definition for dimensional measurement in advanced manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.W.

    1993-03-01

    The Rapid Intelligent Inspection Process Definition (RIIPD) project is an industry-led effort to advance computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems for the creation and modification of inspection process definitions. The RIIPD project will define, design, develop, and demonstrate an automated tool (i.e., software) to generate inspection process plans and coordinate measuring machine (CMM) inspection programs, as well as produce support information for the dimensional measurement of piece parts. The goal of this project is to make the inspection and part verification function, specifically CMM measurements, a more effective production support tool by reducing inspection process definition flowtime, creating consistent and standard inspections, increasing confidence of measurement results, and capturing inspection expertise. This objective is accomplished through importing STEP geometry definitions, applying solid modeling, incorporating explicit tolerance representations, establishing dimensional inspection,techniques, embedding artificial intelligence techniques, and adhering to the Dimensional Measuring Interface Standard (DMIS) national standard.

  14. EUV mask reflectivity measurements with micro-scale spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Barty, Anton; Anderson, Erik; Kearney, Patrick; Han, Hakseung

    2008-02-01

    The effort to produce defect-free mask blanks for EUV lithography relies on increasing the detection sensitivity of advanced mask inspection tools, operating at several wavelengths. They describe the unique measurement capabilities of a prototype actinic (EUV) wavelength microscope that is capable of detecting small defects and reflectivity changes that occur on the scale of microns to nanometers. The defects present in EUV masks can appear in many well-known forms: as particles that cause amplitude or phase variations in the reflected field; as surface contamination that reduces reflectivity and contrast; and as damage from inspection and use that reduces the reflectivity of the multilayer coating. This paper presents an overview of several topics where scanning actinic inspection makes a unique contribution to EUVL research. They describe the role of actinic scanning inspection in defect repair studies, observations of laser damage, actinic inspection following scanning electron microscopy, and the detection of both native and programmed defects.

  15. Shuttle mask floorplanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Tian, Ruiqi; Wong, Martin D.; Reich, Alfred J.

    2003-12-01

    A shuttle mask has different chips on the same mask. The chips are not electrically connected. Alliance and foundry customers can utilize shuttle masks to share the rising cost of mask and wafer manufacturing. This paper studies the shuttle mask floorplan problem, which is formulated as a rectangle-packing problem with constraints of final die sawing strategy and die-to-die mask inspection. For our formulation, we offer a "merging" method that reduces the problem to an unconstrained slicing floorplan problem. Excellent results are obtained from the experiment with real industry data. We also study a "general" method and discuss the reason why it does not work very well.

  16. Inspection of advanced computational lithography logic reticles using a 193-nm inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ching-Fang; Lin, Mei-Chun; Lai, Mei-Tsu; Hsu, Luke T. H.; Chin, Angus; Lee, S. C.; Yen, Anthony; Wang, Jim; Chen, Ellison; Wu, David; Broadbent, William H.; Huang, William; Zhu, Zinggang

    2010-09-01

    We report inspection results of early 22-nm logic reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods. Inspection is performed using a state-of-the-art 193-nm reticle inspection system in the reticleplane inspection mode (RPI) where both rule-based sensitivity control (RSC) and a newer modelbased sensitivity control (MSC) method are tested. The evaluation includes defect detection performance using several special test reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods; the reticles contain a variety of programmed critical defects which are measured based on wafer print impact. Also included are inspection results from several full-field product reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods to determine if low nuisance-defect counts can be achieved. These early reticles are largely single-die and all inspections are performed in the die-to-database inspection mode only.

  17. New advancements in focused ion beam repair of alternating phase-shift masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessing, Joshua; Robinson, Tod; Brannen, Rey A.; Morrison, Troy B.; Holtermann, Theresa

    2003-08-01

    As advanced photolithography extends the ability to print feature sizes below the 100 nm technology node, various reticle enhancement techniques (RET) are being employed to improve resolution. An example of RET is the alternating phase shift mask (APSM), which currently challenges the ability of conventional repair techniques to repair even the most basic reticle defect. The phase shifting quartz bump is one defect type critical to the performance of APSM technology masks. These defects on the APSM reticle are caused by imperfections in the resist image during processing, resulting in a localized under or over etch of the quartz substrate. The integrated application of gas assisted etch (GAE), focused ion beam (FIB) reticle repair, and atomic force microscopy (AFM), provide a comprehensive solution for advanced reticle defect repair and characterization. Ion beam repair offers superior accuracy and precision for removal without significant damage to the underlying or adjacent quartz. The AFM technique provides quantitative measurement of 3D structures, including those associated with alternating phase shifters etched into quartz as well as embedded shifters. In the work presented in this paper, quartz bum defects were pre-scanned on an AFM tool and proprietary software algorithms were used to generate defect image and height map files for transfer to the FIB reticle repair tool via a network connection. The FIB tool then used these files to control selectively the ion dose during the corresponding quartz defect repair. A 193 nm APSM phase shift photomask with programmed defects in 400 nm line and space pattern was repaired using an FEI Stylus NanoProfilometer (SNP) and a FEI Accura 850 focus ion beam (FIB) tool. Using the APSM FIB repair method, the transmittance evaluated from 193 nm AIMS at the repair area was more than 90% without post-processing.

  18. Weijia Zhou Inspects the Advanced Astroculture plant growth unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Weijia Zhou, director of the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, inspects the Advanced Astroculture(tm) plant growth unit before its first flight last spring. Coating technology is used inside the miniature plant greenhouse to remove ethylene, a chemical produced by plant leaves that can cause plants to mature too quickly. This same coating technology is used in a new anthrax-killing device. The Space Station experiment is managed by the Space Product Development Program at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. DuPont is partnering with NASA and the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to grow soybeans aboard the Space Station to find out if they have improved oil, protein, carbohydrates or secondary metabolites that could benefit farmers and consumers. Principal Investigators: Dr. Tom Corbin, Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., a Dupont Company, with headquarters in Des Moines, Iowa, and Dr. Weijia Zhou, Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  19. Accelerating 32nm BEOL technology development by advanced wafer inspection methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, P. R.; Lin, C. L.; Jang, Simon; Liang, M. S.; Chen, Wallas; Tsui, David; Chen, Damian; Chen, Henry; Young, Chris; Chang, Ellis

    2008-11-01

    In the early development stage of 32nm processes, identifying and isolating systematic defects is critical to understanding the issues related to design and process interactions. Conventional inspection methodologies using random review sampling on large defect populations do not provide the information required to take accurate and quick corrective action. This paper demonstrates the successful identification and isolation of systematic defects using a novel methodology that combines Design Based Binning (DBB) and inline Defect Organizer (iDO). This new method of integrating design and defect data produced actionable inspection data, resulting in fewer mask revisions and reduced device development time.

  20. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Crane, C.; Feng, L.; Abidi, M.; Tosunoglu, S.

    1994-06-01

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected.

  1. The E-beam resist test facility: performance testing and benchmarking of E-beam resists for advanced mask writers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Jang, Il Yong; Mellish, Mac; Litt, Lloyd C.; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Hartley, John

    2012-11-01

    With each new generation of e-beam mask writers comes the ability to write leading edge photomasks with improved patterning performance and increased throughput. However, these cutting-edge e-beam tools are often used with older generation resists, preventing the end-user from taking full advantage of the tool's potential. The generation gap between tool and resist will become even more apparent with the commercialization of multi-beam mask writers, which are expected to be available for pilot line use around 2015. The mask industry needs resists capable of meeting the resolution, roughness, and sensitivity requirements of these advanced tools and applications. The E-beam Resist Test Facility (ERTF) has been established to fill the need for consortium-based testing of e-beam resists for mask writing applications on advanced mask writers out to the 11nm half-pitch node and beyond. SEMATECH and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) began establishing the ERTF in early 2012 to test e-beam resist samples from commercial suppliers and university labs against the required performance metrics for each application at the target node. Operations officially began on June 12, 2012, at which time the first e-beam resist samples were tested. The ERTF uses the process and metrology infrastructure available at CNSE, including a Vistec VB300 Vectorscan e-beam tool adjusted to operate at 50kv. Initial testing results show that multiple resists already meet, or are close to meeting, the resolution requirements for mask writing at the 11nm node, but other metrics such as line width roughness still need improvement. An overview of the ERTF and its capabilities is provided here. Tools, baseline processes, and operation strategy details are discussed, and resist testing and benchmarking results are shown. The long-term outlook for the ERTF and plans to expand capability and testing capacity, including resist testing for e-beam direct write lithography, are also

  2. Shadow masked organometallic vapor phase epitaxy for advanced micro-optical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2000-12-01

    This thesis presents novel techniques and applications of nonplanar chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for optoelectronic materials and devices. Specifically, nonplanar organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) employing a shadow mask has been developed for the fabrication of integrated optoelectronic structures. Shadow masked OMVPE (SM-OMVPE) is currently the only technique known to produce thick, nonplanar layers of single crystal material without macroscopic faceting. By the use of SM-OMVPE, various microlenses, micromirrors and novel devices have been designed fabricated and tested. Shadow masked microlenses with record short focal lengths have been produced. High quality microlens arrays with accurate control of lens diameter, sagitta, focal length, astigmatism and position have been designed, fabricated and tested. The author has shown that precise three-dimensional control during crystal growth can be employed to construct useful optoelectronic structures in a reproducible manner. This work also presents novel techniques for the fabrication of shadow masks. A high aluminum- concentration spacer layer and chemical recipes for the removal of epitaxial shadow masks are reported. In addition, the first reusable shadow mask constructed by reactive ion etching has been utilized for the growth of shadow masked structures. Direct fusion wafer bonding of silicon shadow masks was first developed by the author and has proven to be a robust, clean and reliable technique for mask placement. The application of shadow masked growth to vertical cavity semiconductor lasers (VCSELs) was initiated in this work. Microlenses were designed for top-emitting VCSELs to provide focusing of the output beam and these designs are currently being fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, by introducing curvature to the distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirrors, a high power single mode VCSEL has been designed. The author has grown the first concentrically

  3. Mask degradation monitoring with aerial mask inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Wen-Jui; Fu, Yung-Ying; Lu, Shih-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sian; Lin, Jeffrey; Wu, Clare; Lifschitz, Sivan; Tam, Aviram

    2013-06-01

    As design rule continues to shrink, microlithography is becoming more challenging and the photomasks need to comply with high scanner laser energy, low CDU, and ever more aggressive RETs. This give rise to numerous challenges in the semiconductor wafer fabrication plants. Some of these challenges being contamination (mainly haze and particles), mask pattern degradation (MoSi oxidation, chrome migration, etc.) and pellicle degradation. Fabs are constantly working to establish an efficient methodology to manage these challenges mainly using mask inspection, wafer inspection, SEM review and CD SEMs. Aerial technology offers a unique opportunity to address the above mask related challenges using one tool. The Applied Materials Aera3TM system has the inherent ability to inspect for defects (haze, particles, etc.), and track mask degradation (e.g. CDU). This paper focuses on haze monitoring, which is still a significant challenge in semiconductor manufacturing, and mask degradation effects that are starting to emerge as the next challenge for high volume semiconductor manufacturers. The paper describes Aerial inspector (Aera3) early haze methodology and mask degradation tracking related to high volume manufacturing. These will be demonstrated on memory products. At the end of the paper we take a brief look on subsequent work currently conducted on the more general issue of photo mask degradation monitoring by means of an Aerial inspector.

  4. Study of program defects of 22nm nanoimprint template with an advanced e-beam inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Jun; Nakanishi, Yuko; Yusa, Satoshi; Sasaki, Shiho; Kurihara, Masaaki; Toyama, Nobuhito; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Xiao, Hong; Kuan, Chiyan; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Zhao, Yan; Jau, Jack

    2009-10-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a candidate of alternative, low cost of ownership lithography solution for deep nano-meter device manufacturing12. For the NIL template pattern making, we have been developing the processes with 100keV SB EB writer and 50keV VSB EB writer to achieve the fine resolution of near 20nm1-7. However, inspection of nanoimprint template posed a big challenge to inspection system due to the small geometry, 1x comparing to 4x of Optical mask and EUV mask. Previous studies of nanoimprint template inspection were performed indirectly on a stamped wafer and/or on a round quartz wafer13. Electron beam inspection (EBI) systems have been widely used in semiconductor fabs in nanometer technology nodes. Most commonly EBI applications are electrical defects, or voltage contrast (VC) defects detection and monitoring8-11. In this study, we used a mask EBI system developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI) to directly inspect a NIL template with line/space and hole patterns half pitched from 22nm to 90nm and with program defects sized from 4nm to 92nm. Capability of inspection with 10nm pixel size has been demonstrated and capability of capturing program defects sized 12nm and smaller has been shown. This study proved the feasibility of EBI as inspection solution of nanoimprint template for 22nmHP and beyond.

  5. Advances in in situ inspection of automated fiber placement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Peter D.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Seebo, Jeffrey P.

    2016-05-01

    Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) systems have been developed to help take advantage of the tailorability of composite structures in aerospace applications. AFP systems allow the repeatable placement of uncured, spool fed, preimpregnated carbon fiber tape (tows) onto substrates in desired thicknesses and orientations. This automated process can incur defects, such as overlapping tow lines, which can severely undermine the structural integrity of the part. Current defect detection and abatement methods are very labor intensive, and still mostly rely on human manual inspection. Proposed is a thermographic in situ inspection technique which monitors tow placement with an on board thermal camera using the preheated substrate as a through transmission heat source. An investigation of the concept is conducted, and preliminary laboratory results are presented. Also included will be a brief overview of other emerging technologies that tackle the same issue.

  6. Advanced in In Situ Inspection of Automated Fiber Placement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, Peter D.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Seebo, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) systems have been developed to help take advantage of the tailorability of composite structures in aerospace applications. AFP systems allow the repeatable placement of uncured, spool fed, preimpregnated carbon fiber tape (tows) onto substrates in desired thicknesses and orientations. This automated process can incur defects, such as overlapping tow lines, which can severely undermine the structural integrity of the part. Current defect detection and abatement methods are very labor intensive, and still mostly rely on human manual inspection. Proposed is a thermographic in situ inspection technique which monitors tow placement with an on board thermal camera using the preheated substrate as a through transmission heat source. An investigation of the concept is conducted, and preliminary laboratory results are presented. Also included will be a brief overview of other emerging technologies that tackle the same issue. Keywords: Automated Fiber Placement, Manufacturing defects, Thermography

  7. Design of the reactor vessel inspection robot for the advanced liquid metal reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Crane, C.; Feng, L.; Abidi, M.; Tosunoglu, S.

    1994-06-01

    A consortium of four universities and Oak Ridge National Laboratory designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in an advanced nuclear reactor. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a mock non-hostile environment and shown to perform as expected, as detailed in this report.

  8. New critical dimension uniformity measurement concept based reticle inspection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Kangjoon; Kim, MunSik; Kim, Sang Chul; Shin, JaeCheon; Kim, ChangYeol; Miller, John; Dayal, Aditya; Hutchinson, Trent; Park, KiHun

    2010-05-01

    The Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification on photo-mask is getting increasingly tighter which each successive node. The ITRS roadmap for optical masks indicates that, the CDU (3 sigma) for dense lines for binary or attenuated phase shift mask is 3.4nm for 45nm half-pitch (45HP) node and will go down to 2.4nm for 32HP node. The current variability in mask shop processes results in CDU variation across the photo-mask of ~2-3nm. Hence, we are entering in a phase where the mask CDU specification is approaching the limit of the capability of the current POR (process on record). Hence, mask shops have started exploring more active mechanisms to improve or compensate for the CDU of the masks. A typical application is in feeding back the CDU data to adjust the mask writer dose and compensate for non-uniformity in the CDs, resulting in improved quality of subsequent masks. Another option is to feed the CD uniformity information forward into the wafer FAB and adjust the scanner dose to correct for reticle non-uniformity. For these purposes mask makers prefer a dense measurement of CDs across the reticle in a short time. Mask makers are currently using the CD-SEM tool for data collection. While the resolution of SEM data ensures its position as the industry standard, an output map of CDU from a reticle inspection tool has the advantage of denser sampling over larger areas on the mask. High NA reticle inspection systems scan the entire reticle at high throughput, and are ideally suited for collecting CDU data on a dense grid. In this paper, we describe the basic theory of a new, reticle inspection-based CDU tool, and results on advanced memory masks. We discuss possible applications of CDU maps for optimizing the mask manufacturing and wafer production processes.

  9. Advanced algorithms for radiographic material discrimination and inspection system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Deinert, Mark R.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray and neutron radiography are powerful tools for non-invasively inspecting the interior of objects. However, current methods are limited in their ability to differentiate materials when multiple materials are present, especially within large and complex objects. Past work has demonstrated that the spectral shift that X-ray beams undergo in traversing an object can be used to detect and quantify nuclear materials. The technique uses a spectrally sensitive detector and an inverse algorithm that varies the composition of the object until the X-ray spectrum predicted by X-ray transport matches the one measured. Here we show that this approach can be adapted to multi-mode radiography, with energy integrating detectors, and that the Cramér-Rao lower bound can be used to choose an optimal set of inspection modes a priori. We consider multi-endpoint X-ray radiography alone, or in combination with neutron radiography using deuterium-deuterium (DD) or deuterium-tritium (DT) sources. We show that for an optimal mode choice, the algorithm can improve discrimination between high-Z materials, specifically between tungsten and plutonium, and estimate plutonium mass within a simulated nuclear material storage system to within 1%.

  10. Shearography for Non-destructive Inspection with applications to BAT Mask Tile Adhesive Bonding and Specular Surface Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Daniel B.

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of shearography techniques for non-destructive evaluation in two unique application areas is examined. In the first application, shearography is used to evaluate the quality of adhesive bonds holding lead tiles to the B.4T gamma ray mask for the NASA Swift program. Using a vibration excitation, the more poorly bonded tiles are readily identifiable in the shearography image. A quantitative analysis is presented that compares the shearography results with a destructive pull test measuring the force at bond failure. The second application is to evaluate the bonding between the skin and core of a honeycomb structure with a specular (mirror-like) surface. In standard shearography techniques, the object under test must have a diffuse surface to generate the speckle patterns in laser light, which are then sheared. A novel configuration using the specular surface as a mirror to image speckles from a diffuser is presented, opening up the use of shearography to a new class of objects that could not have been examined with the traditional approach. This new technique readily identifies large scale bond failures in the panel, demonstrating the validity of this approach.

  11. New method of 2-dimensional metrology using mask contouring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Yamagata, Yoshikazu; Sugiyama, Akiyuki; Toyoda, Yasutaka

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a new method of accurately profiling and measuring of a mask shape by utilizing a Mask CD-SEM. The method is intended to realize high accuracy, stability and reproducibility of the Mask CD-SEM adopting an edge detection algorithm as the key technology used in CD-SEM for high accuracy CD measurement. In comparison with a conventional image processing method for contour profiling, this edge detection method is possible to create the profiles with much higher accuracy which is comparable with CD-SEM for semiconductor device CD measurement. This method realizes two-dimensional metrology for refined pattern that had been difficult to measure conventionally by utilizing high precision contour profile. In this report, we will introduce the algorithm in general, the experimental results and the application in practice. As shrinkage of design rule for semiconductor device has further advanced, an aggressive OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) is indispensable in RET (Resolution Enhancement Technology). From the view point of DFM (Design for Manufacturability), a dramatic increase of data processing cost for advanced MDP (Mask Data Preparation) for instance and surge of mask making cost have become a big concern to the device manufacturers. This is to say, demands for quality is becoming strenuous because of enormous quantity of data growth with increasing of refined pattern on photo mask manufacture. In the result, massive amount of simulated error occurs on mask inspection that causes lengthening of mask production and inspection period, cost increasing, and long delivery time. In a sense, it is a trade-off between the high accuracy RET and the mask production cost, while it gives a significant impact on the semiconductor market centered around the mask business. To cope with the problem, we propose the best method of a DFM solution using two-dimensional metrology for refined pattern.

  12. Achieving CDU requirement for 90-nm technology node and beyond with advanced mask making process technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzu, San-De; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Wen-Chi; Kliem, Karl-Heinz; Hudek, Peter; Beyer, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    For 90nm node and beyond technology generations, one of the most critical challenges is how to meet the local CD uniformity (proximity) and global CD uniformity (GCDU) requirements within the exposure field. Both of them must be well controlled in the mask making process: (1) proximity effect and, (2) exposure pattern loading effect, or the so-called e-beam "fogging effect". In this paper, we report a method to improve our global CDU by means of a long range fogging compensation together with the Leica SB350 MW. This exposure tool is operated at 50keV and 1nm design grid. The proximity correction is done by the software - package "PROXECCO" from PDF Solutions. We have developed a unique correction method to reduce the fogging effect in dependency of the pattern density of the mask. This allows us to meet our customers" CDU specifications for the 90nm node and beyond.

  13. EUV mask reflectivity measurements with micron-scale spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Rekawa, S.B.; Kemp, C.D.; Barty, A.; Anderson, E.H.; Kearney, Patrick; Han, Hakseung

    2008-05-26

    The effort to produce defect-free mask blanks for EUV lithography relies on increasing the detection sensitivity of advanced mask inspection tools, operating at several wavelengths. We describe the unique measurement capabilities of a prototype actinic (EUV wavelength) microscope that is capable of detecting small defects and reflectivity changes that occur on the scale of microns to nanometers. Types of defects: (a) Buried Substrate Defects: particles & pits (causes amplitude and/or phase variations); (b) Surface Contamination (reduces reflectivity and (possibly) contrast); (c) Damage from Inspection and Use (reduces the reflectivity of the multilayer coating). This paper presents an overview of several topics where scanning actinic inspection makes a unique contribution to EUVL research. We describe the role of actinic scanning inspection in four cases: defect repair studies; observations of laser damage; after scanning electron microscopy; and native and programmed defects.

  14. Recent advances in fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowerby, B. D.; Tickner, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    Fast neutron radiography techniques are attractive for screening cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Neutrons have the required penetration, they interact with matter in a manner complementary to X-rays and they can be used to determine elemental composition. Compared to neutron interrogation techniques that measure secondary radiation (neutron or gamma-rays), neutron radiography systems are much more efficient and rapid and they are much more amenable to imaging. However, for neutron techniques to be successfully applied to cargo screening, they must demonstrate significant advantages over well-established X-ray techniques. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection. These developments include a fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography system that utilizes a 14 MeV neutron generator as well as fast neutron resonance radiography systems that use variable energy quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and pulsed broad energy neutron beams. These systems will be discussed and compared with particular emphasis on user requirements, sources, detector systems, imaging ability and performance.

  15. Advanced process with magnetically enhanced RIE for phase-shifting mask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Satoshi; Kusunose, Haruhiko; Hanazaki, Minoru; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Watakabe, Yaichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Isao, Akihiko; Tokoro, Yasuo

    1993-08-01

    Phase-shifting needs the critical dimension (CD) accuracy to be less than 0.05 micrometers for the metal and shifter pattern on a phase-shifting mask. Thus we have investigated a new etching process using magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE). A magnetic field was provided by two pairs of solenoid coils outside the chamber. By using this MERIE system, the etching characteristics of chromium (Cr) and spin on glass (SOG) were evaluated. A Cl2 and O2 gas mixture was used for Cr etching. The etching selectivity had a maximum when the concentration of O2 was 20%. The etching selectivity increased with an increase in the magnetic field and gas pressure as well as with a decrease in the rf power. High etching selectivity and anisotropic etching features were obtained when the magnetic field was 100 G, the gas pressure 10 - 30 Pa, and the rf power density 0.18 - 0.22 W/cm2. Phase-shifting masks fabricated with this system show a CD accuracy of better than 0.05 micrometers , so 64 MB DRAM phase-shifting masks can be successfully fabricated with this MERIE system.

  16. Advances in maskless and mask-based optical lithography on plastic flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, Ionut; Ivan, Marius G.; Giesen, Peter; Van de Moosdijk, Michel; Meinders, Erwin R.

    2009-12-01

    Organic flexible electronics is an emerging technology with huge potential growth in the future which is likely to open up a complete new series of potential applications such as flexible OLED-based displays, urban commercial signage, and flexible electronic paper. The transistor is the fundamental building block of all these applications. A key challenge in patterning transistors on flexible plastic substrates stems from the in-plane nonlinear deformations as a consequence of foil expansion/shrinkage, moisture uptake, baking etc. during various processing steps. Optical maskless lithography is one of the potential candidates for compensating for these foil distortions by in-situ adjustment prior to exposure of the new layer image with respect to the already patterned layers. Maskless lithography also brings the added value of reducing the cost-of-ownership related to traditional mask-based tools by eliminating the need for expensive masks. For the purpose of this paper, single-layer maskless exposures at 355 nm were performed on gold-coated poly(ethylenenaphthalate) (PEN) flexible substrates temporarily attached to rigid carriers to ensure dimensional stability during processing. Two positive photoresists were employed for this study and the results on plastic foils were benchmarked against maskless as well as mask-based (ASML PAS 5500/100D stepper) exposures on silicon wafers.

  17. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  18. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  19. Design of advanced automatic inspection system for turbine blade FPI analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Xie, W. F.; Viens, M.; Birglen, L.; Mantegh, I.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft engine turbine blade is the most susceptible part to discontinuities as it works in the extremely high pressure and temperature. Among various types of NDT method, Fluorescent Penetrant Inspection (FPI) is comparably cheap and efficient thus suitable for detecting turbine blade surface discontinuities. In this paper, we have developed an Advanced Automatic Inspection System (AAIS) with Image Processing and Pattern Recognition techniques to aid human inspector. The system can automatically detect, measure and classify the discontinuities from turbine blade FPI images. The tests on the sample images provided by industrial partner have been performed to evaluate the system.

  20. Advanced dimensional inspection for the reverse engineering of power plant equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Kotteakos, B.; Ball, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    Forced outages and critical path situations often leave electric utilities with very few options other than the OEM. What does the utility do when faced with the situation of long lead time or obsolete items necessary to bring units back on-line, or off load restrictions. At Southern California Edison Company (SCE), a proactive approach to the reverse engineering and inspection process was undertaken to reduce the effects of similar situations. Advances in dimensional measurement technology have afforded the authors` company a cost effective method for obtaining the necessary inspection data to remanufacture certain items. This paper identifies equipment utilized by SCE for the reverse engineering and inspection of turbine and turbine related components and their typical applications in the power generation industry.

  1. A comparison of conventional and advanced ultrasonic inspection techniques in the characterization of TMC materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Mark R.; Handley, Scott M.; Miller, James G.; Reighard, Mark K.

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained with a conventional ultrasonic inspection technique as well as those obtained with more advanced ultrasonic NDE methods in the characterization of an 8-ply quasi-isotropic titanium matrix composite (TMC) specimen are presented. Images obtained from a conventional ultrasonic inspection of TMC material are compared with those obtained using more sophisticated ultrasonic inspection methods. It is suggested that the latter techniques are able to provide quantitative images of TMC material. They are able to reveal the same potential defect indications while simultaneously providing more quantitative information concerning the material's inherent properties. Band-limited signal loss and slope-of-attenuation images provide quantitative data on the inherent material characteristics and defects in TMC.

  2. Advanced inspection methodologies for detection and classification of killer substrate defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aris; Huang, Victor; Chen, Sophie; Tsai, C. J.; Wu, Kenneth; Zhang, Haiping; Sun, Kevin; Saito, Jason; Chen, Henry; Hu, Debbie; Li, Ming; Shen, William; Mahajan, Uday

    2008-11-01

    The impact of embedded substrate defects on end-of-line die yield has become significant for advanced process technology nodes. Quality control and grading of wafers intended for leading-edge devices thus require effective detection and identification of embedded defects. In this paper, we present the results of a study on incoming prime-grade wafers using a new defect inspection system capable of dark field scattering and bright field differential interference contrast inspection. The wafers were scanned on a KLA-Tencor Surfscan SP2XP inspection tool, and the combined scan signal were real time analyzed to classify the defects of interest from particles. Inspection of the wafers both before and after a resist-coat process showed that all air pockets detected on the bare substrates resulted in coating defects. In the second part of the study, a set of epitaxial (epi) wafers was inspected using oblique- and normal- incidence dark field scattering as well as bright field differential interference contrast. The defects were classified by rules-based binning, and found to contain a large number of killer defects including epi stacking faults and bumps. Classification results were confirmed by SEM review, and showed that this multi-channel methodology successfully identified the killer defects with >95% accuracy and purity.

  3. Critical dimension uniformity using reticle inspection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Mark; Hutchinson, Trent; Pan, Gang; Vavul, Thomas; Miller, John; Dayal, Aditya; Hess, Carl; Green, Mike; Hedges, Shad; Chalom, Dan; Rudzinski, Maciej; Wood, Craig; McMurran, Jeff

    2009-10-01

    The Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification on photomasks continues to decrease with each successive node. The ITRS roadmap for optical masks indicates that the CDU (3 sigma) for dense lines on binary or attenuated phase shift mask is 3.4nm for the 45nm half-pitch (45HP) node and will decrease to 2.4nm for the 32HP node. The current capability of leading-edge mask shop patterning processes results in CDU variation across the photomask of a similar magnitude. Hence, we are entering a phase where the mask CDU specification is approaching the limit of the capability of the current Process of Record (POR). Mask shops have started exploring more active mechanisms to improve the CDU capability of the mask process. A typical application is feeding back the CDU data to adjust the mask writer dose to compensate for non-uniformity in the CDs, resulting in improved quality of subsequent masks. Mask makers are currently using the CD-SEM tool for this application. While the resolution of SEM data ensures its position as the industry standard and continued requirement to establish the photomask CD Mean to Target value, a dense measurement of CDs across the reticle with minimal cycle time impact would have value. In this paper, we describe the basic theory and application of a new, reticle inspection intensity-based CDU approach that has the advantage of dense sampling over larger areas on the mask. The TeraScanHR high NA reticle inspection system is used in this study; it can scan the entire reticle at relatively high throughput, and is ideally suited for collecting dense CDU data. We describe results obtained on advanced memory masks and discuss applications of CDU maps for optimizing the mask manufacturing process. A reticle inspection map of CDU is complementary to CD-SEM data. The dense data set has value for various applications, including feedback to mask writer and engineering analysis within the mask shop.

  4. Gas centrifuge enrichment plants inspection frequency and remote monitoring issues for advanced safeguards implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian David; Erpenbeck, Heather H; Miller, Karen A; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Reimold, Benjamin A; Ward, Steven L; Howell, John

    2010-09-13

    Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect high enriched uranium (BEU) production with adequate probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared cylinders of uranium hexafluoride that are used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of how possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive analysis (DA) of samples could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We have also studied a few advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation and the level of performance needed from these systems to provide more effective safeguards. The analysis also considers how short notice random inspections, unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear material when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems. We also explore the effects of system failures and operator tampering on meeting safeguards goals for quantity and timeliness and the measures needed to recover from such failures and anomalies.

  5. Mask manufacturability improvement by MRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.; Coburn, D.; Buck, P.

    2007-10-01

    Mask data which can not be properly resolved by the mask writing tools, such as sub(resolution (reticle-scale) features or singularities can interfere with design intent or manufacturing capabilities in the absence of design guidelines or formal verification procedures. As a consequence, mask writing tools may introduce defects to device or metrology structures by snapping geometries to grid or misrepresenting process based sizing. To reduce the visibility of these defects by detuning inspection tools to release the mask with non-resolvable data in the production cycle or by waiving minimum CD rules compromises high fidelity of die pattern transfer to wafer. Driven by poor data quality, mask tool would provide degraded resolution without contextual analysis, such as correlations to the overlying and underlying mask layers and without regard to device models. The key reasons for this situation are arbitrary layout of technology structures and design layout-to-mask post-processing for OPC and fill pattern for which design has no intention or knowledge to intervene. The post-processing of mask data to eliminate errors effectively detaches design responsibility from the mask shop actions and may have other detrimental effects on the production cycle such as iterative defect analysis and long write times due to the large polygon count. In this work we propose mask rule check based on the principles to which the masks are being written and inspected. Running this mandatory rule set should reduce the product cycletime, benefit the cost and improve mask quality and reproduction of design intent. It feeds the prospective mask information back to the layout time making it possible to make design adjustments in the interest of pattern fidelity and device parameters.

  6. Evaluating EUV mask pattern imaging with two EUV microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Takase, Kei; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Han, Hakseung; Barty, Anton; Kinoshita, Hiroo; Hamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2008-02-26

    Aerial image measurement plays a key role in the development of patterned reticles for each generation of lithography. Studying the field transmitted (reflected) from EUV masks provides detailed information about potential disruptions caused by mask defects, and the performance of defect repair strategies, without the complications of photoresist imaging. Furthermore, by measuring the continuously varying intensity distribution instead of a thresholded, binary resist image, aerial image measurement can be used as feedback to improve mask and lithography system modeling methods. Interest in EUV, at-wavelength, aerial image measurement lead to the creation of several research tools worldwide. These tools are used in advanced mask development work, and in the evaluation of the need for commercial at-wavelength inspection tools. They describe performance measurements of two such tools, inspecting the same EUV mask in a series of benchmarking tests that includes brightfield and darkfield patterns. One tool is the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) operating on a bending magnet beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. The AIT features an EUV Fresnel zoneplate microscope that emulates the numerical aperture of a 0.25-NA stepper, and projects the aerial image directly onto a CCD camera, with 700x magnification. The second tool is an EUV microscope (EUVM) operating at the NewSUBARU synchrotron in Hyogo, Japan. The NewSUBARU tool projects the aerial image using a reflective, 30x Schwarzschild objective lens, followed by a 10-200x x-ray zooming tube. The illumination conditions and the imaging etendue are different for the two tools. The benchmarking measurements were used to determine many imaging and performance properties of the tools, including resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), aberration magnitude, aberration field-dependence (including focal-plane tilt), illumination uniformity, line-edge roughness, and flare

  7. Mask qualification strategies in a wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaehnert, Carmen; Kunowski, Angela

    2007-02-01

    Having consistent high quality photo masks is one of the key factors in lithography in the wafer fab. Combined with stable exposure- and resist processes, it ensures yield increases in production and fast learning cycles for technology development and design evaluation. Preventive controlling of incoming masks and quality monitoring while using the mask in production is essential for the fab to avoid yield loss or technical problems caused by mask issues, which eventually result in delivery problems to the customer. In this paper an overview of the procedures used for mask qualification and production release, for both logic and DRAM, at Infineon Dresden is presented. Incoming qualification procedures, such as specification checks, incoming inspection, and inline litho process window evaluation, are described here. Pinching and electrical tests, including compatibility tests for mask copies for high volume products on optimized litho processes, are also explained. To avoid mask degradation over lifetime, re-inspection checks are done for re-qualification while using the mask in production. The necessity of mask incoming inspection and re-qualification, due to the repeater printing from either the processing defects of the original mask or degrading defects of being used in the fab (i.e. haze, ESD, and moving particles, etc.), is demonstrated. The need and impact of tight mask specifications, such as CD uniformity signatures and corresponding electrical results, are shown with examples of mask-wafer CD correlation.

  8. Improving inspectability with KLA-Tencor TeraScan thin line de-sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunlin; Kim, David; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, NamWook; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Jin Hyung; Chung, Dong Hoon

    2007-10-01

    In the ever-changing semi-conductor industry, new innovations and technical advances constantly bring new challenges to fabs, mask-shops and vendors. One of such advances is an aggressive optical proximity correction (OPC) method, sub-resolution assist features (SRAF). On one hand, SRAFs bring a leap forward in resolution improvement during wafer printing; on the other hand they bring new challenges to many processes in mask making. KLA-Tencor Corp. working together with Samsung Electronics Co. developed an additional function to the current HiRes 1 detector to increase inspectability and usable sensitivity during the inspection step of the mask making process. SRAFs bring an unique challenge to the mask inspection process, which mask shops had not experienced before. SRAF by nature do not resolve on wafer and thus have a higher tolerance in the CD (critical dimension) uniformity, edge roughness and pattern defects. This new function, Thin-Line De-sense (TLD), increase the inspectability and usable sensitivity by generating different regions of sensitivity and thus will match the defect requirement on a particular photomask with SRAFs better. The value of TLD was proven in a production setting with more than 30 masks inspected, and resulted in higher sensitivity on main features and a sharp decrease in the amount of defects that needed to be classified.

  9. Automatic classification and defect verification based on inspection technology with lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Masaya; Inuzuka, Hideki; Kosuge, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Shingo; Kanno, Kayoko; Imai, Hidemichi; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Vacca, Anthony; Fiekowsky, Peter; Fiekowsky, Dan

    2015-10-01

    Even small defects on the main patterns can create killer defects on the wafer, whereas the same defect on or near the decorative patterns may be completely benign to the wafer functionality. This ambiguity often causes operators and engineers to put a mask "on hold" to be analyzed by an AIMS™ tool which slows the manufacturing time and increases mask cost. In order to streamline the process, mask shops need a reliable way to quickly identify the wafer impact of defects during mask inspection review reducing the number of defects requiring AIMS™ analysis. Source Mask Optimization (SMO) techniques are now common on sub 20nm node critical reticle patterns These techniques create complex reticle patterns which often makes it difficult for inspection tool operators to identify the desired wafer pattern from the surrounding nonprinting patterns in advanced masks such as SMO, Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT), Negative Tone Development (NTD). In this study, we have tested a system that generates aerial simulation images directly from the inspection tool images. The resulting defect dispositions from a program defect test mask along with numerous production mask defects have been compared to the dispositions attained from AIMS™ analysis. The results of our comparisons are presented, as well as the impact to mask shop productivity.

  10. Integration of mask and silicon metrology in DFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Mito, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Akiyuki; Toyoda, Yasutaka

    2009-03-01

    We have developed a highly integrated method of mask and silicon metrology. The method adopts a metrology management system based on DBM (Design Based Metrology). This is the high accurate contouring created by an edge detection algorithm used in mask CD-SEM and silicon CD-SEM. We have inspected the high accuracy, stability and reproducibility in the experiments of integration. The accuracy is comparable with that of the mask and silicon CD-SEM metrology. In this report, we introduce the experimental results and the application. As shrinkage of design rule for semiconductor device advances, OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) goes aggressively dense in RET (Resolution Enhancement Technology). However, from the view point of DFM (Design for Manufacturability), the cost of data process for advanced MDP (Mask Data Preparation) and mask producing is a problem. Such trade-off between RET and mask producing is a big issue in semiconductor market especially in mask business. Seeing silicon device production process, information sharing is not completely organized between design section and production section. Design data created with OPC and MDP should be linked to process control on production. But design data and process control data are optimized independently. Thus, we provided a solution of DFM: advanced integration of mask metrology and silicon metrology. The system we propose here is composed of followings. 1) Design based recipe creation: Specify patterns on the design data for metrology. This step is fully automated since they are interfaced with hot spot coordinate information detected by various verification methods. 2) Design based image acquisition: Acquire the images of mask and silicon automatically by a recipe based on the pattern design of CD-SEM.It is a robust automated step because a wide range of design data is used for the image acquisition. 3) Contour profiling and GDS data generation: An image profiling process is applied to the acquired image based

  11. Initial results from a Leica ZBA31H+ shaped E-beam mask writer located at the Photronics Advanced Mask Shop in Manchester, England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stephen; Marshall, Paul; Osborne, Peter; Doering, Hans-Joachim; Ehrlich, Christian

    1999-04-01

    Since production started at the Photronics site in Manchester, England, mask writing capability had been centered on laser based technology. The Manchester site has now taken delivery of its first e-beam system: the ZBA 31H+, manufactured by Leica Microsystems Lithography GMBH. The ZBA 31H+) system was designed for the production of reticles utilizing 250 nanometer design technology and is expected to play a key role in Photronics' future reticle development. The addition of an e-beam system to the current laser based technology, in this instance, has been driven by increasing customer demand and the requirement for reticles containing high resolution OPC structures. The ZBA 31H+) is a variable shaped spot, vector scan electron beam lithography system operating at 20 keV. Enhancements from the previous generation system include improved deflection systems, stage metrology, pattern data handling, and an address grid down to 10 nanometers. This system's specified performance enablers it to produce reticles designed to support semiconductor fabrication utilizing 250 nanometer design rules, and beyond, with high accuracy and productivity.

  12. [Masked depression].

    PubMed

    Preradović, M; Griva, D; Eror, S

    1991-01-01

    The study comprised 25 patients with masked depression and 30 patients with endogenous depression. According to the general characteristics both groups were homogenous and accordingly, comparable. Together with clinical evaluation of depressive syndrome, psychological management was applied. Rorschach test, Thematic Apperception Test and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory were used in the study. In the clinical picture of masked depressions somatovegetative disorders dominated and depressive behavior in endogenous depression. The frequence of suicid does not differ between patients with masked and endogenous depression.

  13. Advanced mask technique to improve bit line CD uniformity of 90 nm node flash memory in low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-doo; Choi, Jae-young; Kim, Jea-hee; Han, Jae-won

    2008-10-01

    As devices size move toward 90nm technology node or below, defining uniform bit line CD of flash devices is one of the most challenging features to print in KrF lithography. There are two principal difficulties in defining bit line on wafer. One is insufficient process margin besides poor resolution compared with ArF lithography. The other is that asymmetric bit line should be made for OPC(Optical Proximity Correction) modeling. Therefore advanced ArF lithography scanner should be used for define bit line with RETs (Resolution Enhancement Techniques) such as immersion lithography, OPC, PSM(Phase Shift Mask), high NA(Numerical Aperture), OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), SRAF(Sub-resolution Assistant Feature), and mask biasing.. Like this, ArF lithography propose the method of enhancing resolution, however, we must spend an enormous amount of CoC(cost of ownership) to utilize ArF photolithography process than KrF. In this paper, we suggest method to improve of bit line CD uniformity, patterned by KrF lithographic process in 90nm sFlash(stand alone Flash) devices. We applied new scheme of mask manufacturing, which is able to realize 2 different types of mask, binary and phase-shift, into one plate. Finally, we could get the more uniform bit lines and we expect to get more stable properties then before applying this technique.

  14. Impact of mask topography and resist effects on optical proximity correction in advanced alternating phase-shift process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Mosong; Ho, Benjamin C. P.; Guenther, Doug E.

    2003-06-01

    This paper develops and validates a methodology for rigorously modeling the pattern transfer in alternating Phase Shift Mask (altPSM) process by incorporating mask structure, partially coherent illumination, polarization and resist in a full-vector electromagnetic (EM) model. Mask topography is included in EM simulation to solve for the field immediately after the mask. To model the partially coherent illumination, the light source is decomposed into a set of plane waves with different angles of incidence on mask. Each wave requires an EMF simulation over the mask. A perturbation approach is developed in this paper to reduce the EM simulation time by over 50%, thus enabling the vector model of partial coherence. Then the field after mask is decomposed into TE and TM polarized waves so as to calculate the field in resist/BARC/silicon multilayer. At high NA, this full vector model is needed to investigate altPSM because there exists appreciable difference between the images due to TE and TM waves. TM wave degrades more severely in resist, thus TE is more desirable. The experiments were conducted at Tokyo Electron Texas LLC. on a 248nm KrF stepper, NA 0.6, σ 0.3. Both experiments and simulations show that transmission imbalance depends on defocus. When the focal plane is moved towards the lens, the 180° space can be brighter than 0°.The 0° space is more sensitive to defocus and has larger CD variation than 180° does. Finally the simulated patterns are compared with experimental SEM picture.

  15. Mask Blank Defect Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M A; Sommargren, G E

    2000-02-04

    Mask blanks are the substrates that hold the master patterns for integrated circuits. Integrated circuits are semiconductor devices, such as microprocessors (mPs), dynamic random access memory (DRAMs), and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) that are central to the computer, communication, and electronics industries. These devices are fabricated using a set of master patterns that are sequentially imaged onto light-sensitive coated silicon wafers and processed to form thin layers of insulating and conductive materials on top of the wafer. These materials form electrical paths and transistors that control the flow of electricity through the device. For the past forty years the semiconductor industry has made phenomenal improvements in device functionality, compactness, speed, power, and cost. This progress is principally due to the exponential decrease in the minimum feature size of integrated circuits, which has been reduced by a factor of {radical}2 every three years. Since 1992 the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has coordinated the efforts of producing a technology roadmap for semiconductors. In the latest document, ''The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors: 1999'', future technology nodes (minimum feature sizes) and targeted dates were specified and are summarized in Table 1. Lithography is the imaging technology for producing a de-magnified image of the mask on the wafer. A typical de-magnification factor is 4. Mask blank defects as small as one-eighth the equivalent minimum feature size are printable and may cause device failure. Defects might be the result of the surface preparation, such as polishing, or contamination due to handling or the environment. Table 2 shows the maximum tolerable defect sizes on the mask blank for each technology node. This downward trend puts a tremendous burden on mask fabrication, particularly in the area of defect detection and reduction. A new infrastructure for mask inspection will be

  16. Mask strategy at International SEMATECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2002-08-01

    International SEMATECH (ISMT) is a consortium consisting of 13 leading semiconductor manufacturers from around the globe. Its objective is to develop the infrastructure necessary for its member companies to realize the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) through efficiencies of shared development resources and knowledge. The largest area of effort is lithography, recognized as a crucial enabler for microelectronics technology progress. Within the Lithography Division, most of the efforts center on mask-related issues. The development strategy at International SEMATCH will be presented and the interlock of lithography projects clarified. Because of the limited size of the mask production equipment market, the business case is weak for aggressive investment commensurate with the pace of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. With masks becoming the overwhelming component of lithography cost, new ways of reducing or eliminating mask costs are being explored. Will mask technology survive without a strong business case? Will the mask industry limit the growth of the semiconductor industry? Are advanced masks worth their escalating cost? An analysis of mask cost from the perspective of mask value imparted to the user is presented with examples and generic formulas for the reader to apply independently. A key part to the success for both International SEMATECH and the industry globally will be partnerships on both the local level between mask-maker and mask-user, and the macro level where global collaborations will be necessary to resolve technology development cost challenges.

  17. Free-ranging finless porpoises acoustically inspect their frontal area in advance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, Tomonari; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong; Naito, Yasuhiko

    2001-05-01

    Echolocation events, interpulse intervals, and swimming speeds of nine free-ranging finless porpoises in an oxbow of the Yangtze River, China were recorded by datalogger systems attached on the animals. Over 120 h of successful recording indicated that the finless porpoises acoustically inspected their frontal area in advance before swimming silently. The acoustical sensing distance estimated by the interpulse interval was significantly larger than the swimming distance without echolocation beforehand. Terminal phase which was already known in the echolocation behavior of bats could be found in free-ranging finless porpoises. The terminal phase is the decreasing interpulse intervals in an echolocation pulse train that are observed just before the prey capture. During the terminal phase of finless porpoises, linearly decreased interpulse intervals were recognized. In the mean time, the swimming distance and the change of the sensing distance were closely correlated with each other. This suggests that the finless porpoise knew precisely the distance to the approaching target in the time scale of subsecond order. Acoustical sensing effort was considered to be controlled appropriately by free-ranging finless porpoises to obtain underwater information they need. [Research supported by Promotion of Basic Research Activities for Innovative Biosciences, Bio-oriented Technology Research Advancement Institution, Japan.

  18. Advanced non-disruptive manufacturing rule checks (MRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Bill; Do, Tanya; Morgan, Ray E.

    2006-10-01

    New advanced mask rule checking (MRC) solutions are required to ensure cost effective, high yield photomask manufacturing processes at 65nm and below and are needed to provide new verification capabilities for mask makers and data prep engineers alike. Traditional MRC, which implements fundamental geometric data checks on limited data formats, is not sufficient for advanced photomask manufacturing. Like recent advances in design rule checking (DRC) software, which includes extensive "manufacturing-aware" rules (or DFM rules), MRC solutions must evolve to include a more comprehensive and intelligent rule checks for the mask manufacturing process. This paper describes the development and testing of an advanced MRC software solution developed within the CATS TM mask data preparation (MDP) solution from Synopsys Inc. The new MRC solution enables the inspection and analysis of mask layout patterns for simple and advanced data verification checks. Proposed applications for mask data prep applications are discussed and include incoming design verification, fracture data correction, inspection tool data tags, mask manufacturing tool or inspection tool selection, and job deck verification.

  19. Revisiting mask contact hole measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Masaru; Gallagher, Emily; Ceperley, Daniel; Brunner, Timothy; Bowley, Reg; McGuire, Anne

    2006-10-01

    Contact holes represent one of the biggest critical dimension (CD) mask metrology challenges for 45nm technology mask development. The challenge is a consequence of both wafer and mask sensitivities. Large mask error factors and the small process windows found when contact holes are imaged on wafers impose very tight mask specifications for CD uniformity. The resultant CD error budget leaves little room for mask metrology. Current advanced mask metrology deploys a CD-SEM to characterize the mask contact hole CD uniformity. Measuring a contact hole is complex since it is inherently two-dimensional and is not always well-characterized by one-dimensional x- and y-axis measurements. This paper will investigate contact metrics such as line edge roughness (LER), region of interest (ROI) size, area, and CD sampling methods. The relative merits of each will be explored. Ultimately, an understanding of the connection between what is physically measured on the mask and what impacts wafer imaging must be understood. Simulations will be presented to explore the printability of a contact hole's physical attributes. The results will be summarized into a discussion of optimal contact hole metrology for 45nm technology node masks.

  20. Coatings on reflective mask substrates

    DOEpatents

    Tong, William Man-Wai; Taylor, John S.; Hector, Scott D.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Stivers, Alan R.; Kofron, Patrick G.; Thompson, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

  1. A novel mask proximity correction software combining accuracy and reduced writing time for the manufacturing of advanced photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, Patrick; Martin, Luc; Browning, Clyde; Farys, Vincent; Sundermann, Frank; Narukawa, Shogo; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Hayashi, Naoya

    2012-06-01

    The new generations of photomasks are seen to bring more and more challenges to the mask manufacturer. Maskshops face two conflicting requirements, namely improving pattern fidelity and reducing or at least maintaining acceptable writing time. These requirements are getting more and more challenging since pattern size continuously shrinks and data volumes continuously grows. Although the classical dose modulation Proximity Effect Correction is able to provide sufficient process control to the mainstream products, an increased number of published and wafer data show that the mask process is becoming a nonnegligible contributor to the 28nm technology yield. We will show in this paper that a novel approach of mask proximity effect correction is able to meet the dual challenge of the new generation of masks. Unlike the classical approach, the technique presented in this paper is based on a concurrent optimization of the dose and geometry of the fractured shots. Adding one more parameter allows providing the best possible compromise between accuracy and writing time since energy latitude can be taken into account as well. This solution is implemented in the Inscale software package from Aselta Nanographics. We have assessed the capability of this technology on several levels of a 28nm technology. On this set, the writing time has been reduced up to 25% without sacrificing the accuracy which at the same time has been improved significantly compared to the existing process. The experiments presented in the paper confirm that a versatile proximity effect correction strategy, combining dose and geometry modulation helps the users to tradeoff between resolution/accuracy and e-beam write time.

  2. Advanced laser shearography inspection of turbo-fan engine composite fan cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lape, Dale; Newman, John W.; Craig, David

    1995-07-01

    Shearography inspection techniques have been developed and implemented for the inspection of aluminum honeycomb turbofan aircraft engine fan cases for the JT15D-5D. Shearography has yielded improved sensitivity to unbonds and throughput over ultrasonic techniques formerly used in the production inspection. This paper discusses vacuum stress shearography, test method verification on the JT15D-5D fan case and shearography data correlation with destructive evaluation of test parts.

  3. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y

    1998-09-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed.

  4. Mask-LMC: lithographic simulation and defect detection from high-resolution mask images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, George; Wiley, James N.; Wang, Jen-Shiang; Howell, Rafael C.; Bai, Shufeng; Chen, Yi-Fan; Chen, Frank; Cao, Yu; Takigawa, Tadahiro; Kurosawa, Terunobu; Tsuchiya, Hideo; Usuda, Kinya; Tokita, Masakazu; Ozaki, Fumio; Kikuiri, Nobutaka; Tsuji, Yoshitake

    2009-04-01

    We report the development of Mask-LMC for defect printability evaluation from sub-200nm wavelength mask inspection images. Both transmitted and reflected images are utilized, and both die-to-die and die-to-database inspection modes are supported. The first step of the process is to recover the patterns on the mask from high resolution T and R images by de-convolving inspection optical effects. This step uses a mask reconstruction model, which is based on rigorous Hopkins-modeling of the inspection optics, and is pre-determined before the full mask inspection. After mask reconstruction, wafer scanner optics and wafer resist simulations are performed on the reconstructed mask, with a wafer lithography model. This step leverages Brion's industry-proven, hardware-accelerated LMC (Lithography Manufacturability Check) technology1. Existing litho process models that are in use for Brion's OPC+ and verification products may be used for this simulation. In the final step, special detectors are used to compare simulation results on the reference and defect dice. We have developed detectors for contact CD, contact area, line and space CD, and edge placement errors. The detection result has been validated with AIMSTM.

  5. 33 CFR 401.79 - Advance notice of arrival, vessels requiring inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Report”, every 2 navigation seasons and not later than 30 days after “fit out”. (3) Inland domestic... navigation season. (2) Inland self-inspection. Inland domestic vessels which are approved by the Seaway...

  6. Advanced Ultrasonic Inspection Techniques for General Purpose Heat Source Fueled Clad Closure Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, M.W.

    2001-01-11

    A radioisotope thermoelectric generator is used to provide a power source for long-term deep space missions. This General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is fabricated using iridium clad vent sets to contain the plutonium oxide fuel pellets. Integrity of the closure weld is essential to ensure containment of the plutonium. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant took the lead role in developing the ultrasonic inspection for the closure weld and transferring the inspection to Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in fueled clad inspection for the Cassini mission. Initially only amplitude and time-of-flight data were recorded. However, a number of benign geometric conditions produced signals that were larger than the acceptance threshold. To identify these conditions, a B-scan inspection was developed that acquired full ultrasonic waveforms. Using a test protocol the B-scan inspection was able to identify benign conditions such as weld shield fusion and internal mismatch. Tangential radiography was used to confirm the ultrasonic results. All but two of 29 fueled clads for which ultrasonic B-scan data was evaluated appeared to have signals that could be attributed to benign geometric conditions. This report describes the ultrasonic inspection developed at Y-12 for the Cassini mission.

  7. Actinic review of EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Heiko; Ruoff, Johannes; Harnisch, Wolfgang; Kaiser, Winfried

    2010-04-01

    Management of mask defects is a major challenge for the introduction of EUV for HVM production. Once a defect has been detected, its printing impact needs to be predicted. Potentially the defect requires some repair, the success of which needs to be proven. This defect review has to be done with an actinic inspection system that matches the imaging conditions of an EUV scanner. During recent years, several concepts for such an aerial image metrology system (AIMS™) have been proposed. However, until now no commercial solution exists for EUV. Today, advances in EUV optics technology allow envisioning a solution that has been discarded before as unrealistic. We present this concept and its technical cornerstones.While the power requirement for the EUV source is less demanding than for HVM lithography tools, radiance, floor space, and stability are the main criteria for source selection. The requirement to emulate several generations of EUV scanners demands a large flexibility for the ilumination and imaging systems. New critical specifications to the EUV mirrors in the projection microscope can be satisfied using our expertise from lithographic mirrors. In summary, an EUV AIMS™ meeting production requirements seems to be feasible.

  8. Clay Mask Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Masks can represent so many things, such as emotions (happy, sad, fearful) and power. The familiar "comedy and tragedy" masks, derived from ancient Greek theater, are just one example from mask history. Death masks from the ancient Egyptians influenced the ancient Romans into creating similar masks for their departed. Masks can represent many…

  9. Mask registration and wafer overlay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chulseung; Bang, Changjin; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kang, Hyosang; Lee, Dohwa; Jeong, Woonjae; Lim, Ok-Sung; Yoon, Seunghoon; Jung, Jaekang; Laske, Frank; Parisoli, Lidia; Roeth, Klaus-Dieter; Robinson, John C.; Jug, Sven; Izikson, Pavel; Dinu, Berta; Widmann, Amir; Choi, DongSub

    2010-03-01

    Overlay continues to be one of the key challenges for lithography in advanced semiconductor manufacturing. It becomes even more challenging due to the continued shrinking of the device node. Some low k1 techniques, such as Double Exposure and Double Patterning also add additional loss of the overlay margin due to the fact that the single layer pattern is created based on more than 1 exposure. Therefore, the overlay between 2 exposures requires very tight overlay specification. Mask registration is one of the major contributors to wafer overlay, especially field related overlay. We investigated mask registration and wafer overlay by co-analyzing the mask data and the wafer overlay data. To achieve the accurate cohesive results, we introduced the combined metrology mark which can be used for both mask registration measurement as well as for wafer overlay measurement. Coincidence of both metrology marks make it possible to subtract mask signature from wafer overlay without compromising the accuracy due to the physical distance between measurement marks, if we use 2 different marks for both metrologies. Therefore, it is possible to extract pure scanner related signatures, and to analyze the scanner related signatures in details to in order to enable root cause analysis and ultimately drive higher wafer yield. We determined the exact mask registration error in order to decompose wafer overlay into mask, scanner, process and metrology. We also studied the impact of pellicle mounting by comparison of mask registration measurement pre-pellicle mounting and post-pellicle mounting in this investigation.

  10. Smoke Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury from the noxious products of fire combustion accounts for as much as 80 percent of fire-related deaths in the United States. Many of these deaths are preventable. Smoke Mask, Inc. (SMI), of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, is working to decrease these casualties with its line of life safety devices. The SMI personal escape hood and the Guardian Filtration System provide respiratory protection that enables people to escape from hazardous and unsafe conditions. The breathing filter technology utilized in the products is specifically designed to supply breathable air for 20 minutes. In emergencies, 20 minutes can mean the difference between life and death.

  11. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    A blank mask and its preparation stages, such as cleaning or resist coating, play an important role in the eventual yield obtained by using it. Blank mask defects' impact analysis directly depends on the amount of available information such as the number of defects observed, their accurate locations and sizes. Mask usability qualification at the start of the preparation process, is crudely based on number of defects. Similarly, defect information such as size is sought to estimate eventual defect printability on the wafer. Tracking of defect characteristics, specifically size and shape, across multiple stages, can further be indicative of process related information such as cleaning or coating process efficiencies. At the first level, inspection machines address the requirement of defect characterization by detecting and reporting relevant defect information. The analysis of this information though is still largely a manual process. With advancing technology nodes and reducing half-pitch sizes, a large number of defects are observed; and the detailed knowledge associated, make manual defect review process an arduous task, in addition to adding sensitivity to human errors. Cases where defect information reported by inspection machine is not sufficient, mask shops rely on other tools. Use of CDSEM tools is one such option. However, these additional steps translate into increased costs. Calibre NxDAT based MDPAutoClassify tool provides an automated software alternative to the manual defect review process. Working on defect images generated by inspection machines, the tool extracts and reports additional information such as defect location, useful for defect avoidance[4][5]; defect size, useful in estimating defect printability; and, defect nature e.g. particle, scratch, resist void, etc., useful for process monitoring. The tool makes use of smart and elaborate post-processing algorithms to achieve this. Their elaborateness is a consequence of the variety and

  12. Development and field validation of advanced array probes for steam generator inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, C.V.; Pate, J.R.

    1995-04-01

    The aging of the steam generators at the nation`s nuclear power plants has led to the appearance of new forms of degradation in steam generator tubes and an increase in the frequency of forced outages due to major tube leak events. The eddy-current techniques currently being used for the inspection of steam generator tubing are no longer adequate to ensure that flaws will be detected before they lead to a shutdown of the plant. To meet the need for a fast and reliable method of inspection, ORNL has designed a 16-coil eddy-current array probe which combines an inspection speed similar to that of the bobbin coil with a sensitivity to cracks of any orientation similar to the rotating pancake coil. In addition, neural network and least square methods have been developed for the automatic analysis of the data acquired with the new probes. The probes and analysis software have been tested at two working steam generators where we have found an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of a factor of five an increase in the inspection speed of a factor of 75 over the rotating pancake coil which maintaining similar detection and characterization capabilities.

  13. Advanced radiation techniques for inspection of diesel engine combustion chamber materials components. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-09

    Heavy duty truck engines must meet stringent life cycle cost and regulatory requirements. Meeting these requirements has resulted in convergence on 4-stroke 6-in-line, turbocharged, and after-cooled engines with direct-injection combustion systems. These engines provide much higher efficiencies (42%, fuel consumption 200 g/kW-hr) than automotive engines (31%, fuel consumption 270 g/kW-hr), but at higher initial cost. Significant near-term diesel engine improvements are necessary and are spurred by continuing competitive, Middle - East oil problems and Congressional legislation. As a result of these trends and pressures, Caterpillar has been actively pursuing a low-fuel consumption engine research program with emphasis on product quality through process control and product inspection. The goal of this project is to combine the nondestructive evaluation and computational resources and expertise available at LLNL with the diesel engine and manufacturing expertise of the Caterpillar Corporation to develop in-process monitoring and inspection techniques for diesel engine combustion chamber components and materials. Early development of these techniques will assure the optimization of the manufacturing process by design/inspection interface. The transition from the development stage to the manufacturing stage requires a both a thorough understanding of the processes and a way of verifying conformance to process standards. NDE is one of the essential tools in accomplishing both elements and in this project will be integrated with Caterpillar`s technological and manufacturing expertise to accomplish the project goals.

  14. Masks: Interpretations and Variations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basso, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Presents a high school art teacher's views of and experiences with masks. Outlines a maskmaking activity in which students were required to create variations on existing masks. Emphasizes use of experimental materials. Displays examples of student-created masks. (DB)

  15. Advanced Signal Processing Techniques Applied to Terahertz Inspections on Aerospace Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Long Buu

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle's external fuel tank is thermally insulated by the closed cell foams. However, natural voids composed of air and trapped gas are found as by-products when the foams are cured. Detection of foam voids and foam de-bonding is a formidable task owing to the small index of refraction contrast between foam and air (1.04:1). In the presence of a denser binding matrix agent that bonds two different foam materials, time-differentiation of filtered terahertz signals can be employed to magnify information prior to the main substrate reflections. In the absence of a matrix binder, de-convolution of the filtered time differential terahertz signals is performed to reduce the masking effects of antenna ringing. The goal is simply to increase probability of void detection through image enhancement and to determine the depth of the void.

  16. Application of DBM tool for detection of EUV mask defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Gyun; Kim, Jungchan; Park, Chanha; Lee, Taehyeong; Ji, Sunkeun; Yang, Hyunjo; Yim, Donggyu; Park, Byeongjun; Maruyama, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2013-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is one of the most leading lithography technologies for high volume manufacturing. The EUVL is based on reflective optic system therefore critical patterning issues are arisen from the surface of photomask. Defects below and inside of the multilayer or absorber of EUV photomask is one of the most critical issues to implement EUV lithography in mass production. It is very important to pick out and repair printable mask defects. Unfortunately, however, infrastructure for securing the defect free photomask such as inspection tool is still under development furthermore it does not seem to be ready soon. In order to overcome the lack of infrastructures for EUV mask inspection, we will discuss an alternative methodology which is based on wafer inspection results using DBM (Design Based Metrology) tool. It is very challenging for metrology to quantify real mask defect from wafer inspection result since various sources are possible contributor. One of them is random defect comes from poor CD uniformity. It is probable that those random defects are majority of a defect list including real mask defects. It is obvious that CD uniformity should be considered to pick out only a real mask defect. In this paper, the methodology to determine real mask defect from the wafer inspection results will be discussed. Experiments are carried out on contact layer and on metal layer using mask defect inspection tool, Teron(KLA6xx) and DBM (Design Based Metrology) tool, NGR2170™.

  17. Advanced Demonstration of Motion Correction for Ship-to-Ship Passive Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Boehnen, Chris Bensing; Ernst, Joseph

    2013-09-30

    Passive radiation detection is a key tool for detecting illicit nuclear materials. In maritime applications it is most effective against small vessels where attenuation is of less concern. Passive imaging provides: discrimination between localized (threat) and distributed (non-threat) sources, removal of background fluctuations due to nearby shorelines and structures, source localization to an individual craft in crowded waters, and background subtracted spectra. Unfortunately, imaging methods cannot be easily applied in ship-to-ship inspections because relative motion of the vessels blurs the results over many pixels, significantly reducing sensitivity. This is particularly true for the smaller water craft where passive inspections are most valuable. In this project we performed tests and improved the performance of an instrument (developed earlier under, “Motion Correction for Ship-to-Ship Passive Inspections”) that uses automated tracking of a target vessel in visible-light images to generate a 3D radiation map of the target vessel from data obtained using a gamma-ray imager.

  18. New methodology for thoroughly characterizing the performance of advanced reticle inspection platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eynon, Benjamin G., Jr.

    1997-02-01

    For years equipment suppliers have opened their doors to evaluations by potential customers. Unfortunately, the only feedback a supplier received concerning its performance was a purchase order (or the lack of one). Neither was there any benchmarking against other suppliers' results to identify niche areas or spark necessary tool improvement programs. The result was an industry where new tool development projects ran the risk of being dictated by conjecture and assumption rather than a more empirical approach. This paper presents a method by which reticle inspection tools can be characterized more comprehensively. While grounded in common sense, some of the techniques used were considered quite unorthodox. By consulting the equipment supplier as to which test vehicles might best demonstrate its tool capability or might expose a weakness in the competitor's tool, topics that the customer might not otherwise have thought of were covered in the evaluation. Securing permission to feed back comprehensive results to all suppliers also guaranteed future focus on critical issues and limited development activities to only those deemed value-added by the customer. In addition, specific test battery topics were derived from consultations with semiconductor customers. The intent was to understand which reticle patterns and defect types were critical to the end user. The expected outcome after this type of evaluation is a quantified performance benchmark which facilitates industry-wide reticle inspection capability improvement over a shorter period of time.

  19. Subdivisions with infinitely supported mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Pan, Yali

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the convergence of subdivision schemes associated with masks being polynomially decay sequences. Two-scale vector refinement equations are the formwhere the vector of functions [phi]=([phi]1,E..,[phi]r)T is in and is polynomially decay sequence of rxr matrices called refinement mask. Associated with the mask a is a linear operator on given byBy using same methods in [B. Han, R. Q. Jia, Characterization of Riesz bases of wavelets generated from multiresolution analysis, manuscript]; [BE Han, Refinable functions and cascade algorithms in weighted spaces with infinitely supported masks, manuscript]; [R.Q. Jia, Q.T. Jiang, Z.W. Shen, Convergence of cascade algorithms associated with nonhomogeneous refinement equations, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 129 (2001) 415-427]; [R.Q. Jia, Convergence of vector subdivision schemes and construction of biorthogonal multiple wavelets, in: Advances in Wavelet, Hong Kong,1997, Springer, Singapore, 1998, pp. 199-227], a characterization of convergence of the sequences in the L2-norm is given, which extends the main results in [R.Q. Jia, S.D. Riemenschneider, D.X. Zhou, Vector subdivision schemes and multiple wavelets, Math. Comp. 67 (1998) 1533-1563] on convergence of the subdivision schemes associated with a finitely supported mask to the case in which mask a is polynomially decay sequence. As an application, we also obtain a characterization of smoothness of solutions of the refinement equation mentioned above for the case r=1.

  20. Improved mask-based CD uniformity for gridded-design-rule lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faivishevsky, Lev; Khristo, Sergey; Sagiv, Amir; Mangan, Shmoolik

    2009-03-01

    The difficulties encountered during lithography of state-of-the-art 2D patterns are formidable, and originate from the fact that deep sub-wavelength features are being printed. This results in a practical limit of k1 >=0.4 as well as a multitude of complex restrictive design rules, in order to mitigate or minimize lithographic hot spots. An alternative approach, that is gradually attracting the lithographic community's attention, restricts the design of critical layers to straight, dense lines (a 1D grid), that can be relatively easily printed using current lithographic technology. This is then followed by subsequent, less critical trimming stages to obtain circuit functionality. Thus, the 1D gridded approach allows hotspot-free, proximity-effect free lithography of ultra low- k1 features. These advantages must be supported by a stable CD control mechanism. One of the overriding parameters impacting CDU performance is photo mask quality. Previous publications have demonstrated that IntenCDTM - a novel, mask-based CDU mapping technology running on Applied Materials' Aera2TM aerial imaging mask inspection tool - is ideally fit for detecting mask-based CDU issues in 1D (L&S) patterned masks for memory production. Owing to the aerial nature of image formation, IntenCD directly probes the CD as it is printed on the wafer. In this paper we suggest that IntenCD is naturally fit for detecting mask-based CDU issues in 1D GDR masks. We then study a novel method of recovering and quantifying the physical source of printed CDU, using a novel implementation of the IntenCD technology. We demonstrate that additional, simple measurements, which can be readily performed on board the Aera2TM platform with minimal throughput penalty, may complement IntenCD and allow a robust estimation of the specific nature and strength of mask error source, such as pattern width variation or phase variation, which leads to CDU issues on the printed wafer. We finally discuss the roles played by

  1. Extension of optical lithography by mask-litho integration with computational lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigawa, T.; Gronlund, K.; Wiley, J.

    2010-05-01

    Wafer lithography process windows can be enlarged by using source mask co-optimization (SMO). Recently, SMO including freeform wafer scanner illumination sources has been developed. Freeform sources are generated by a programmable illumination system using a micro-mirror array or by custom Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). The combination of freeform sources and complex masks generated by SMO show increased wafer lithography process window and reduced MEEF. Full-chip mask optimization using source optimized by SMO can generate complex masks with small variable feature size sub-resolution assist features (SRAF). These complex masks create challenges for accurate mask pattern writing and low false-defect inspection. The accuracy of the small variable-sized mask SRAF patterns is degraded by short range mask process proximity effects. To address the accuracy needed for these complex masks, we developed a highly accurate mask process correction (MPC) capability. It is also difficult to achieve low false-defect inspections of complex masks with conventional mask defect inspection systems. A printability check system, Mask Lithography Manufacturability Check (M-LMC), is developed and integrated with 199-nm high NA inspection system, NPI. M-LMC successfully identifies printable defects from all of the masses of raw defect images collected during the inspection of a complex mask. Long range mask CD uniformity errors are compensated by scanner dose control. A mask CD uniformity error map obtained by mask metrology system is used as input data to the scanner. Using this method, wafer CD uniformity is improved. As reviewed above, mask-litho integration technology with computational lithography is becoming increasingly important.

  2. Masks and Other Disguises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploghoft, Debra

    Instructions for making simple masks are provided in this guide for teachers of elementary children. Directions with illustrations are given for constructing masks from paper plates, construction paper, plastic milk jugs, and papier-mache. Ideas include a clown mask, a flower mask, a top hat, a paper crown, and "Groucho" glasses. Types of masks…

  3. Comparison of binary mask defect printability analysis using virtual stepper system and aerial image microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Khoi A.; Spence, Chris A.; Dakshina-Murthy, S.; Bala, Vidya; Williams, Alvina M.; Strener, Steve; Eandi, Richard D.; Li, Junling; Karklin, Linard

    1999-12-01

    As advanced process technologies in the wafer fabs push the patterning processes toward lower k1 factor for sub-wavelength resolution printing, reticles are required to use optical proximity correction (OPC) and phase-shifted mask (PSM) for resolution enhancement. For OPC/PSM mask technology, defect printability is one of the major concerns. Current reticle inspection tools available on the market sometimes are not capable of consistently differentiating between an OPC feature and a true random defect. Due to the process complexity and high cost associated with the making of OPC/PSM reticles, it is important for both mask shops and lithography engineers to understand the impact of different defect types and sizes to the printability. Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMS) has been used in the mask shops for a number of years for reticle applications such as aerial image simulation and transmission measurement of repaired defects. The Virtual Stepper System (VSS) provides an alternative method to do defect printability simulation and analysis using reticle images captured by an optical inspection or review system. In this paper, pre- programmed defects and repairs from a Defect Sensitivity Monitor (DSM) reticle with 200 nm minimum features (at 1x) will be studied for printability. The simulated resist lines by AIMS and VSS are both compared to SEM images of resist wafers qualitatively and quantitatively using CD verification.Process window comparison between unrepaired and repaired defects for both good and bad repair cases will be shown. The effect of mask repairs to resist pattern images for the binary mask case will be discussed. AIMS simulation was done at the International Sematech, Virtual stepper simulation at Zygo and resist wafers were processed at AMD-Submicron Development Center using a DUV lithographic process for 0.18 micrometer Logic process technology.

  4. Best-practice evaluation-methods for wafer-fab photomask-requalification inspection tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chan Seob; Mungmode, Ashish; Taylor, Ron; Cho, David; Koh, Hui Peng

    2014-10-01

    Requalifying semiconductor photomasks remains critically important and is increasingly challenging for 20nm and 14nm node logic reticles. Patterns are becoming more complex on the photomask, and defect sensitivity requirements are more stringent than ever before. Reticle inspection tools are equally important for effective process development and the successful ramp and sustained yield for high volume manufacturing. The inspection stages considered were: incoming inspection to match with Mask Shop Outgoing result and to detect defects generated during transport; requalification by routine cycle inspection to detect Haze and any other defects; and inspection by in-house or Mask shop at the post cleaning. There are many critical capability and capacity factors for the decision for best inspection tool and strategy for high volume manufacturing, especially objective Lens NA, wavelength, power, pixel size, throughput, full-automation inspection linked with Overhead Transport, algorithm application, engineering application function, and inspection of PSM and OMOG . These tools are expensive but deliver differentiated value in terms of performance and throughput as well as extendibility. Performing a thorough evaluation and making a technically sound choice which explores these many factors is critical for success of a fab. This paper examines the methodology for evaluating two different photomask inspection tools. The focus is on ensuring production worthiness on real and advanced product photomasks requiring accurate evaluation of sensitivity, throughput, data analysis function and engineering work function on those product photomasks. Photomasks used for data collection are production reticles, PDM(Program defect Mask), SiN spray defect Reticle which is described that evaluates how the tools would perform on a contaminated plate.

  5. Masking the Color Wheel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Charlene

    1982-01-01

    Describes an art activity in which sixth graders made mirror-image masks using only two primary colors and one secondary color. Students discussed the effect of color combinations and the use of masks in folk and modern cultures. (AM)

  6. Characterizing contamination inspection capabilities using programmed defect test reticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhiev, Anthony; Riddick, John; Straub, Joseph; Hutchinson, Trent; Reese, Bryan; Dayal, Aditya

    2007-10-01

    The ORION TM series of test reticles have been used for many years as the photomask industry standard for evaluating contamination inspection algorithms. The deposition of Polystyrene Latex (PSL) spheres on various reticle pattern designs allow STARlight TM tool owners to measure the relative contamination inspection performance in a consistent and quantifiable manner. However, with recent inspection technology advances such as shorter laser (light source) wavelengths and smaller inspection pixels, PSL spheres were observed to physically degrade over relatively short time periods: especially for the smallest sized spheres used to characterize contamination inspection performance at the most advanced technology nodes. Investigations into using alternative materials or methods that address the issue of PSL shrinkage have not yet proven completely successful. Problems such as failure to properly adhere to reticle surfaces or identification of materials that can produce consistent and predictable sphere sizes for the reliable manufacture of these critical test masks are only some of the challenges that must be solved. Even if these and other criteria are met, the final substance must appear to inspection optics as pseudo soft defects which resemble actual contamination that inevitably appears on production reticle surfaces. In the interim, programmed pindot defects present in the quartz region of the SPICA TM test reticle are being used to characterize contamination performance while a suitable long-term solution to address the issue of shrinking PSL spheres on ORION masks can be found. This paper examines the results of a programmed pindot test reticle specifically designed to evaluate contamination algorithms without the deposition of PSL spheres or similar structures. This alternative programmed pindot test reticle uses various background patterns similar to the ORION, however, it also includes multiple defects sizes and locations making it more desirable than the

  7. Attention Attenuates Metacontrast Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Jennifer; Ro, Tony

    2007-01-01

    The influence of attention on perceptual awareness was examined using metacontrast masking. Attention was manipulated with endogenous cues to assess the effects on the temporal and spatial parameters of target visibility. Experiment 1 examined the time course of effective masking when the target and mask set were presented at an attended vs. an…

  8. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  9. IntenCD and mask phase uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Yaron; Mangan, Shmoolik; Attal, Shay; Ben-Yishay, Michael; Englard, Ilan

    2010-09-01

    The allowable wafer Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) budget of the 2x node poses stringent requirements on mask induced errors at wafer level. The total CDU budget of 2 nm which is partially consumed by across wafer and field process and imaging variations, leaves little room for additional mask errors to still comply to the overall CDU budget. The trend of higher mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) for advanced technology nodes aggravates this situation further. Traditionally, the assessment of these variations is based on separate critical dimension and phase/transmission measurements. Metrology measurement tools are typically based on different techniques to independently measure each source of non-uniformity and produce the required uniformity maps. Each technique concentrates on a single physical property (e.g., line-width, phase, transmission, etc.) and requires special calibration for the required accuracy, precision and its transformation from mask to the wafer nanometer domain. An alternative to all these separate measurements is proposed by using the IntenCDTM application based on the aerial image of the mask. This alternative approach provides a map of mask-induced, printed CD variations across the photomask. In this paper, a study is presented to estimate mask-induced printed CDU at wafer level from the aerial image and results are compared to mask- and phase-CD measurements. The work shows that a single aerial IntenCD map can replace the two sets of data based on mask-CD and mask-phase measurements and allows for prediction of the mask contribution to overall printed CDU.

  10. 2013 mask industry survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive survey was sent to merchant and captive mask shops to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. 2013 marks the 12th consecutive year for this process. Historical topics including general mask profile, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, maintenance, and returns were included and new topics were added. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. While each year's survey includes minor updates based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics, the bulk of the survey and reporting structure have remained relatively constant. A series of improvements is being phased in beginning in 2013 to add value to a wider audience, while at the same time retaining the historical content required for trend analyses of the traditional metrics. Additions in 2013 include topics such as top challenges, future concerns, and additional details in key aspects of mask masking, such as the number of masks per mask set per ground rule, minimum mask resolution shipped, and yield by ground rule. These expansions beyond the historical topics are aimed at identifying common issues, gaps, and needs. They will also provide a better understanding of real-life mask requirements and capabilities for comparison to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

  11. Performance and stability of mask process correction for EBM-7000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yasuko; Chen, George; Wang, Jen-Shiang; Bai, Shufeng; Howell, Rafael; Li, Jiangwei; Tao, Jun; VanDenBroeke, Doug; Wiley, Jim; Takigawa, Tadahiro; Ohnishi, Takayuki; Kamikubo, Takashi; Hara, Shigehiro; Anze, Hirohito; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Tamamushi, Shuichi

    2010-05-01

    In order to support complex optical masks today and EUV masks in the near future, it is critical to correct mask patterning errors with a magnitude of up to 20nm over a range of 2000nm at mask scale caused by short range mask process proximity effects. A new mask process correction technology, MPC+, has been developed to achieve the target requirements for the next generation node. In this paper, the accuracy and throughput performance of MPC+ technology is evaluated using the most advanced mask writing tool, the EBM-70001), and high quality mask metrology . The accuracy of MPC+ is achieved by using a new comprehensive mask model. The results of through-pitch and through-linewidth linearity curves and error statistics for multiple pattern layouts (including both 1D and 2D patterns) are demonstrated and show post-correction accuracy of 2.34nm 3σ for through-pitch/through-linewidth linearity. Implementing faster mask model simulation and more efficient correction recipes; full mask area (100cm2) processing run time is less than 7 hours for 32nm half-pitch technology node. From these results, it can be concluded that MPC+ with its higher precision and speed is a practical technology for the 32nm node and future technology generations, including EUV, when used with advance mask writing processes like the EBM-7000.

  12. Increasing inspection equipment productivity by utilizing factory automation SW on TeraScan 5XX systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubski, Thomas; Piechoncinski, Michal; Moses, Raphael; Bugata, Bharathi; Schmalfuss, Heiko; Köhler, Ines; Lisowski, Jan; Klobes, Jens; Fenske, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Especially for advanced masks the reticle inspection operation is a very significant cost factor, since it is a time consuming process and inspection tools are becoming disproportionately expensive. Analyzing and categorizing historical equipment utilization times of the reticle inspection tools however showed a significant amount of time which can be classified as non productive. In order to reduce the inspection costs the equipment utilization needed to be improved. The main contributors to non productive time were analyzed and several use cases identified, where automation utilizing a SECS1 equipment interface was expected to help to reduce these non productive times. The paper demonstrates how real time access to equipment utilization data can be applied to better control manufacturing resources. Scenarios are presented where remote monitoring and control of the inspection equipment can be used to avoid setup errors or save inspection time by faster response to problem situations. Additionally a solution to the second important need, the maximization of tool utilization in cases where not all of the intended functions are available, is explained. Both the models and the software implementation are briefly explained. For automation of the so called inspection strategy a new approach which allows separation of the business rules from the automation infrastructure was chosen. Initial results of inspection equipment performance data tracked through the SECS interface are shown. Furthermore a system integration overview is presented and examples of how the inspection strategy rules are implemented and managed are given.

  13. Thorough characterization of a EUV mask

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, H.; McIntyre, G.; Koay, C.-W.; Burkhardt, M.; He, L.; Hartley, J.; Johnson, C.; Raghunathan, S.; Goldberg, K.; Mochi, I.; La Fontaine, B.; Wood, O.

    2009-06-25

    We reported that we were successful in our 45nm technology node device demonstration in February 2008 and 22nm node technology node device patterning in February 2009 using ASML's Alpha Demo Tool (ADT). In order to insert extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at the 15nm technology node and beyond, we have thoroughly characterized one EUV mask, a so-called NOVACD mask. In this paper, we report on three topics, The first topic is an analysis of line edge roughness (LER) using a mask Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and the Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) to compare resist images printed with the ASML ADT. The results of the analysis show a good correlation between the mask AFM and the mask SEM measurements, However, the resist printing results for the isolated space patterns are slightly different. The cause ofthis discrepancy may be resist blur, image log slope and SEM image quality and so on. The second topic is an analysis of mask topography using an AFM and relative reflectivity of mirror and absorber surface using the AIT, The AFM data show 6 and 7 angstrom rms roughness for mirror and absorber, respectively. The reflectivity measurements show that the mirror reflects EUV light about 20 times higher than absorber. The last topic is an analysis of a 32nm technology node SRAM cell which includes a comparison of mask SEM image, AIT image, resist image and simulation results. The ADT images of the SRAM pattern were of high quality even though the mask patters were not corrected for OPC or any EUV-specific effects. Image simulation results were in good agreement with the printing results.

  14. Removable pellicle for lithographic mask protection and handling

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Hector, Scott D.; Nguyen, Khanh B.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    A removable pellicle for a lithographic mask that provides active and robust particle protection, and which utilizes a traditional pellicle and two deployments of thermophoretic protection to keep particles off the mask. The removable pellicle is removably attached via a retaining structure to the mask substrate by magnetic attraction with either contacting or non-contacting magnetic capture mechanisms. The pellicle retaining structural is composed of an anchor piece secured to the mask substrate and a frame member containing a pellicle. The anchor piece and the frame member are in removable contact or non-contact by the magnetic capture or latching mechanism. In one embodiment, the frame member is retained in a floating (non-contact) relation to the anchor piece by magnetic levitation. The frame member and the anchor piece are provided with thermophoretic fins which are interdigitated to prevent particles from reaching the patterned area of the mask. Also, the anchor piece and mask are maintained at a higher temperature than the frame member and pellicle which also prevents particles from reaching the patterned mask area by thermophoresis. The pellicle can be positioned over the mask to provide particle protection during mask handling, inspection, and pumpdown, but which can be removed manually or robotically for lithographic use of the mask.

  15. Strategy optimization for mask rule check in wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuen Huei; Lin, Shaina; Lin, Roger; Wang, Alice; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin

    2015-07-01

    Photolithography process is getting more and more sophisticated for wafer production following Moore's law. Therefore, for wafer fab, consolidated and close cooperation with mask house is a key to achieve silicon wafer success. However, generally speaking, it is not easy to preserve such partnership because many engineering efforts and frequent communication are indispensable. The inattentive connection is obvious in mask rule check (MRC). Mask houses will do their own MRC at job deck stage, but the checking is only for identification of mask process limitation including writing, etching, inspection, metrology, etc. No further checking in terms of wafer process concerned mask data errors will be implemented after data files of whole mask are composed in mask house. There are still many potential data errors even post-OPC verification has been done for main circuits. What mentioned here are the kinds of errors which will only occur as main circuits combined with frame and dummy patterns to form whole reticle. Therefore, strategy optimization is on-going in UMC to evaluate MRC especially for wafer fab concerned errors. The prerequisite is that no impact on mask delivery cycle time even adding this extra checking. A full-mask checking based on job deck in gds or oasis format is necessary in order to secure acceptable run time. Form of the summarized error report generated by this checking is also crucial because user friendly interface will shorten engineers' judgment time to release mask for writing. This paper will survey the key factors of MRC in wafer fab.

  16. An Advanced Flaw-Response Modelling Approach for Inspection Qualification Using a Multi-Agent System Software Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, James P.; McLean, Neil; Gachagan, Anthony; McArthur, Stephen D. J.; Hayward, Gordon

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the application of a Multi-Agent System used in the design and qualification of ultrasonic NDT inspections using theoretical ultrasonic flaw-response modelling. When a large number of models are available the selection of the most appropriate one for a given inspection scenario becomes time-consuming; the disparate nature of the software models prevents easy integration with other NDT software tools to automate this process. A prototype Inspection Qualification Multi-Agent System has been developed which incorporates a rule-based software system to perform the flaw-response model selection procedure.

  17. Binary mask programmable hologram.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, T-C; Zhou, Changhe; Cheung, K W K

    2012-11-19

    We report, for the first time, the concept and generation of a novel Fresnel hologram called the digital binary mask programmable hologram (BMPH). A BMPH is comprised of a static, high resolution binary grating that is overlaid with a lower resolution binary mask. The reconstructed image of the BMPH can be programmed to approximate a target image (including both intensity and depth information) by configuring the pattern of the binary mask with a simple genetic algorithm (SGA). As the low resolution binary mask can be realized with less stringent display technology, our method enables the development of simple and economical holographic video display.

  18. Object Substitution Masking: When Does Mask Preview Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Stephen Wee Hun; Chua, Fook K.

    2008-01-01

    When a target is enclosed by a 4-dot mask that persists after the target disappears, target identification is worse than it is when the mask terminates with the target. This masking effect is attributed to object substitution masking (OSM). Previewing the mask, however, attenuates OSM. This study investigated specific conditions under which mask…

  19. Defects caused by blank masks and repair solution with nanomachining for 20nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, HyeMi; Kim, ByungJu; Kim, MunSik; Jung, HoYong; Kim, Sang Pyo; Yim, DongGyu

    2014-09-01

    As the number of masks per wafer product set is increasing and low k1 lithography requires tight mask specifications, the patterning process below sub 20nm tech. node for critical layers will be much more expensive compared with previous tech. generations. Besides, the improved resolution and the zero defect level are necessary to meet tighter specifications on a mask and these resulted in the increased the blank mask price as well as the mask fabrication cost. Unfortunately, in spite of expensive price of blank masks, the certain number of defects on the blank mask is transformed into the mask defects and its ratio is increased. But using high quality blank mask is not a good idea to avoid defects on the blank mask because the price of a blank mask is proportional to specifications related to defect level. Furthermore, particular defects generated from the specific process during manufacturing a blank mask are detected as a smaller defect than real size by blank inspection tools because of its physical properties. As a result, it is almost impossible to prevent defects caused by blank masks during the mask manufacturing. In this paper, blank defect types which is evolved into mask defects and its unique characteristics are observed. Also, the repair issues are reviewed such as the pattern damage according to the defect types and the repair solution is suggested to satisfy the AIMS (Arial Image Measurement System) specification using a nanomachining tool.

  20. Achievements and challenges of EUV mask imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, Natalia; van Setten, Eelco; de Kruif, Robert; Connolly, Brid; Fukugami, Norihito; Kodera, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hiroaki; Sakata, Yo; Kotani, Jun; Kondo, Shinpei; Imoto, Tomohiro; Rolff, Haiko; Ullrich, Albrecht; Lammers, Ad; Schiffelers, Guido; van Dijk, Joep

    2014-07-01

    The impact of various mask parameters on CDU combined in a total mask budget is presented, for 22 nm lines, for reticles used for NXE:3300 qualification. Apart from the standard mask CD measurements, actinic spectrometry of multilayer is used to qualify reflectance uniformity over the image field; advanced 3D metrology is applied for absorber profile characterization including absorber height and side wall angle. The predicted mask impact on CDU is verified using actual exposure data collected on multiple NXE:3300 scanners. Mask 3D effects are addressed, manifesting themselves in best focus shifts for different structures exposed with off-axis illumination. Experimental NXE:3300 results for 16 nm dense lines and 20 nm (semi-)isolated spaces are shown: best focus range reaches 24 nm. A mitigation strategy by absorber height optimization is proposed based on experimental results of a special mask with varying absorber heights. Further development of a black image border for EUV mask is considered. The image border is a pattern free area surrounding image field preventing exposure the image field neighborhood on wafer. Normal EUV absorber is not suitable for this purpose as it has 1-3% EUV reflectance. A current solution is etching of ML down to substrate reducing EUV reflectance to <0.05%. A next step in the development of the black border is the reduction of DUV Out-of-Band reflectance (<1.5%) in order to cope with DUV light present in EUV scanners. Promising results achieved in this direction are shown.

  1. Key issues in automatic classification of defects in post-inspection review process of photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Mark; Maji, Manabendra; Pai, Ravi R.; B. V. R., Samir; Seshadri, R.; Patil, Pradeepkumar

    2012-11-01

    The mask inspection and defect classification is a crucial part of mask preparation technology and consumes a significant amount of mask preparation time. As the patterns on a mask become smaller and more complex, the need for a highly precise mask inspection system with high detection sensitivity becomes greater. However, due to the high sensitivity, in addition to the detection of smaller defects on finer geometries, the inspection machine could report large number of false defects. The total number of defects becomes significantly high and the manual classification of these defects, where the operator should review each of the defects and classify them, may take huge amount of time. Apart from false defects, many of the very small real defects may not print on the wafer and user needs to spend time on classifying them as well. Also, sometimes, manual classification done by different operators may not be consistent. So, need for an automatic, consistent and fast classification tool becomes more acute in more advanced nodes. Automatic Defect Classification tool (NxADC) which is in advanced stage of development as part of NxDAT1, can automatically classify defects accurately and consistently in very less amount of time, compared to a human operator. Amongst the prospective defects as detected by the Mask Inspection System, NxADC identifies several types of false defects such as false defects due to registration error, false defects due to problems with CCD, noise, etc. It is also able to automatically classify real defects such as, pin-dot, pin-hole, clear extension, multiple-edges opaque, missing chrome, chrome-over-MoSi, etc. We faced a large set of algorithmic challenges during the course of the development of our NxADC tool. These include selecting the appropriate image alignment algorithm to detect registration errors (especially when there are sub-pixel registration errors or misalignment in repetitive patterns such as line space), differentiating noise from

  2. Enhancement in Informational Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Xiang; Richards, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to detect a tone added to a random masker improves when a preview of the masker is provided. In 2 experiments, the authors explored the role that perceptual organization plays in this release from masking. Method: Detection thresholds were measured in informational masking studies. The maskers were drawn at random prior to…

  3. Lightweight Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, W. E. I.; Baucom, R. M.; Evans, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight face mask originally developed to protect epileptic patients during seizures could have many other medical and nonmedical applications such as muscular distrophy patients, football linesmen and riot-control police. Masks are extremely lightweight, the lightest of the configurations weighing only 136 grams.

  4. Simulation of AIMS measurements using rigorous mask 3D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chih-Shiang; Huang, Hsu-Ting; Chu, Fu-Sheng; Chu, Yuan-Chih; Huang, Wen-Chun; Liu, Ru-Gun; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Aerial image measurement system (AIMSTM) has been widely used for wafer level inspection of mask defects. Reported inspection flows include die-to-die (D2D) and die-to-database (D2DB) methods. For patterns that do not repeat in another die, only the D2DB approach is applicable. The D2DB method requires accurate simulation of AIMS measurements for a mask pattern. An optical vectorial model is needed to depict the mask diffraction effect in this simulation. To accurately simulate the imaging results, a rigorous electro-magnetic field (EMF) model is essential to correctly take account of the EMF scattering induced by the mask topography, which is usually called the mask 3D effect. In this study, the mask 3D model we use is rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), which calculates the diffraction fields from a single plane wave incidence. A hybrid Hopkins-Abbe method with RCWA is used to calculate the EMF diffraction at a desired accuracy level while keeping the computation time practical. We will compare the speed of the hybrid Hopkins-Abbe method to the rigorous Abbe method. The matching between simulation and experiment is more challenging for AIMS than CD-SEM because its measurements provide full intensity information. Parameters in the mask 3D model such as film stack thickness or film optical properties, is optimized during the fitting process. We will report the fitting results of AIMS images for twodimensional structures with various pitches. By accurately simulating the AIMS measurements, it provides a necessary tool to perform the mask inspection using the D2DB approach and to accurately predict the mask defects.

  5. Exploring EUV mask backside defectivity and control methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, Christina; Rankin, Jed; Kindt, Louis; Lawliss, Mark; Bolton, Luke; Collins, Kevin; Cheong, Lin; Bonam, Ravi; Poro, Richard; Isogawa, Takeshi; Narita, Eisuke; Kagawa, Masayuki

    2015-07-01

    The backside of photomasks have been largely ignored during the last several decades of development, with the exception of avoiding gross damage or defects, as almost all problems are far enough out of the focal plane to have minimal effect on imaging. Since EUV masks are reflective, and the column is held in a vacuum, scanners have been designed to utilize electrostatic chucking. With the chucking system for EUV, the requirements for the backside of the mask must be redefined to integrate concerns in substrate design, mask manufacturing, and usage. The two key concerns with respect to an electrostatic chuck are defects and durability. Backside defects can affect imaging, while potentially damaging or contaminating the tool, the mask, or even subsequently used masks. Compromised durability, from either usage or cleaning, can affect the ability of the chuck to hold the mask in place. In this study, these concerns are evaluated in three stages: minimizing defects created during mask fabrication, actions taken upon discovery of defects, and durability of the backside film with continued cleans and chucking. Data incorporated in this study includes: sheet resistance, film thickness, and optical inspection images. Incorporating the data from the three stages of fabrication, disposition, and lifetime will help us define how to structure backside EUV mask handling during mask manufacture and indicate what further solutions are needed as EUV technology transitions into manufacturing.

  6. Extreme ultraviolet mask substrate surface roughness effects on lithography patterning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric; Goldberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Erik

    2010-06-21

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography exposure systems, mask substrate roughness induced scatter contributes to LER at the image plane. In this paper, the impact of mask substrate roughness on image plane speckle is explicitly evaluated. A programmed roughness mask was used to study the correlation between mask roughness metrics and wafer plane aerial image inspection. We find that the roughness measurements by top surface topography profile do not provide complete information on the scatter related speckle that leads to LER at the image plane. We suggest at wavelength characterization by imaging and/or scatter measurements into different frequencies as an alternative for a more comprehensive metrology of the mask substrate/multilayer roughness effects.

  7. 2012 Mask Industry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Litt, Lloyd C.

    2012-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to semiconductor industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. 2012 marks the 11th consecutive year for the mask industry survey. This year's survey and reporting structure are similar to those of the previous years with minor modifications based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics. Categories include general mask information, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, and maintenance and returns. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. Results, initial observations, and key comparisons between the 2011 and 2012 survey responses are shown here, including multiple indications of a shift towards the manufacturing of higher end photomasks.

  8. Introduction of new database reflected tritone algorithm for application in mask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmeyer, Thomas; Schmalfuss, Heiko; Heumann, Jan; Lang, Michael

    2008-04-01

    At Photomask Japan 2007 the new algorithm of Fast Integrated die-to-die T+R (DDTR) for the views of P90 and P72 for the KLA Tencor TeraScanHR mask inspection system was presented. At the same time a new algorithm for P72 in database tritone mode for reflected light (DBRt) was introduced. Both modes can be used together as one combined inspection to detect pattern and contamination defects on production masks. It was shown that these new algorithms allow for creation of a new inspection strategy with improved throughput and a reduced amount of inspections. Currently an inspection strategy has to cover at first a pattern inspection (normally a combination of die-to-die and additional database inspections) for finding hard defects on a mask and then as second step a contamination inspection (STARlight2 TM). The hard defects have to be repaired and the contaminations can be cleaned. The new inspection strategy allows for detection of all critical hard and contamination defects on a mask with one single combined inspection, enhancing productivity. At BACUS 2007 the first evaluation of this new kind of inspection strategy for manufacturing of masks was described for two production plates of different design. At that time only the database reflected tritone algorithm for the view of P72 was available. The changes in inspection strategy could only go together with a change of view from P90 to P72. With view P72 higher overall sensitivity could be reached and smaller secondary features could be inspected. However, these improvements may not be necessary for all plates and may need more time than a comparable P90 inspection. Today the standard contamination inspection for critical masks is the P90 STARlight2 TM (SL2). To do a time effective parallel combo inspection with DDTR and DBRt the same view has to be used. An extension of the database reflected tritone algorithm to the P90 view is now available. This gives the mask manufacturer the flexibility to change the

  9. Protective Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Mask to protect the physically impaired from injuries to the face and head has been developed by Langley Research Center. It is made of composite materials, usually graphite or boron fibers woven into a matrix. Weighs less than three ounces.

  10. EUVL Mask Blank Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Mirkarimi, P; Stearns, D G; Sweeney, D; Chapman, H N; Clift, M; Hector, S; Yi, M

    2002-05-22

    EUV mask blanks are fabricated by depositing a reflective Mo/Si multilayer film onto super-polished substrates. Small defects in this thin film coating can significantly alter the reflected field and introduce defects in the printed image. Ideally one would want to produce defect-free mask blanks; however, this may be very difficult to achieve in practice. One practical way to increase the yield of mask blanks is to effectively repair multilayer defects, and to this effect they present two complementary defect repair strategies for use on multilayer-coated EUVL mask blanks. A defect is any area on the mask which causes unwanted variations in EUV dose in the aerial image obtained in a printing tool, and defect repair is correspondingly defined as any strategy that renders a defect unprintable during exposure. The term defect mitigation can be adopted to describe any strategy which renders a critical defect non-critical when printed, and in this regard a non-critical defect is one that does not adversely affect device function. Defects in the patterned absorber layer consist of regions where metal, typically chrome, is unintentionally added or removed from the pattern leading to errors in the reflected field. There currently exists a mature technology based on ion beam milling and ion beam assisted deposition for repairing defects in the absorber layer of transmission lithography masks, and it is reasonable to expect that this technology will be extended to the repair of absorber defects in EUVL masks. However, techniques designed for the repair of absorber layers can not be directly applied to the repair of defects in the mask blank, and in particular the multilayer film. In this paper they present for the first time a new technique for the repair of amplitude defects as well as recent results on the repair of phase defects.

  11. Mask Industry Assessment: 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. David

    2011-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the tenth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report has been used as one of the baselines to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It continues to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was essentially the same as the 2005 through 2010 surveys. Questions are grouped into following categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  12. Mask Industry Assessment: 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Chan, David Y.

    2010-09-01

    A survey created supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the ninth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was basically the same as the 2005 through 2009 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  13. New mask technology challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2001-09-01

    Mask technology development has accelerated dramatically in recent years from the glacial pace of the last three decades to the rapid and sometimes simultaneous introductions of new wavelengths and mask-based resolution enhancement techniques. The nature of the semiconductor business has also become one driven by time-to-market as an overwhelming factor in capturing market share and profit. These are among the factors that have created enormous stress on the mask industry to produce masks with enhanced capabilities, such as phase-shifting attenuators, sub-resolution assist bars, and optical proximity correction (OPC) features, while maintaining or reducing cost and cycle time. The mask can no longer be considered a commodity item that is purchased form the lowest-cost supplier. Instead, it must now be promoted as an integral part of the technical and business case for a total lithographic solution. Improving partnership between designer, mask-maker, and wafer lithographer will be the harbinger of success in finding a profitable balance of capability, cost, and cycle time. Likewise for equipment infrastructure development, stronger partnership on the international level is necessary to control development cost and mitigate schedule and technical risks.

  14. Advanced X-Ray Inspection of Reinforced Carbon Composite Materials on the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Jose M.; Berry, Robert F.; Osborn, Robin; Bueno, Clifford; Osterlitz, Mark; Mills, Richard; Morris, Philip; Phalen, Robert; McNab, Jim; Thibodeaux, Tahanie; Thompson, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    The post return-to-flight (RTF) inspection methodology for the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) is currently being defined. Numerous NDT modalities and techniques are being explored to perform the flight-to-flight inspections of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite material for impact damage, general loss of mass in the bulk layers, or other anomalous conditions that would pose risk to safe return upon re-entry. It is possible to have an impact upon ascent that is not visually observable on the surface, yet causes internal damage. Radiographic testing may be a useful NDT technique for such occurrences. The authors have performed radiographic tests on full-sized mock samples of LESS hardware with embedded image quality phantoms. Digitized radiographic film, computed radiography and flat panel digital real-time radiography was acquired using a GE Eresco 200 x-ray tube, and Se-75 and Yb-169 radioisotopes.

  15. Masks: The Artist in Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Whether masks are made from cardboard, papier-mache, metal, wood, leather, fabric, clay or any combination of these materials, they bring out the artist in people. Young children like to wear masks when they play to pretend they were another person or animal. Masks let them fantasize and be creative. The author's students made masks representing…

  16. Defect printability analysis by lithographic simulation from high resolution mask images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, George; Wiley, James N.; Wang, Jen-Shiang; Howell, Rafael C.; Bai, Shufeng; Chen, Yi-Fan; Chen, Frank; Cao, Yu; Takigawa, Tadahiro; Saito, Yasuko; Kurosawa, Terunobu; Tsuchiya, Hideo; Usuda, Kinya; Tokita, Masakazu; Ozaki, Fumio; Kikuiri, Nobutaka; Tsuji, Yoshitake

    2009-10-01

    We report the development of Mask-LMC for defect printability evaluation from sub-200nm wavelength mask inspection images. Both transmitted and reflected images are utilized, and both die-to-die and die-to-database inspection modes are supported. The first step of the process is to recover the patterns on the mask from high resolution T and R images by de-convolving inspection optical effects. This step uses a mask reconstruction model, which is based on rigorous Hopkins-modeling of the inspection optics, and is pre-determined before the full mask inspection. After mask reconstruction, wafer scanner optics and wafer resist simulations are performed on the reconstructed mask, with a wafer lithography model. This step leverages Brion's industry-proven, hardware-accelerated LMC (Lithography Manufacturability Check) technology1. Existing litho process models that are in use for Brion's OPC+ and verification products may be used for this simulation. In the final step, special detectors are used to compare simulation results on the reference and defect dice. We have developed detectors for contact CD, contact area, line and space CD, and edge placement errors. The detection results on test and production reticles have been validated with AIMSTM.

  17. Detectability and printability of EUVL mask blank defects for the32 nm HP node

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Wonil; Han, Hak-Seung; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kearney,Patrick A.; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2007-08-01

    The readiness of a defect-free extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask blank infrastructure is one of the main enablers for the insertion of EUVL technology into production. It is essential to have sufficient defect detection capability and understanding of defect printability to develop a defect-free EUVL mask blank infrastructure. The SEMATECH Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC) has been developing EUVL mask blanks with low defect densities with the Lasertec M1350 and M7360, the 1st and 2nd generations, respectively, of visible light EUVL mask blank inspection tools. Although the M7360 represents a significant improvement in our defect detection capability, it is time to start developing a 3rd generation tool for EUVL mask blank inspection. The goal of this tool is to detect all printable defects; therefore, understanding defect printability criteria is critical to this tool development. In this paper, we will investigate the defect detectability of a 2nd generation blank inspection tool and a patterned EUVL mask inspection tool. We will also compare the ability of the inspection tools to detect programmed defects whose printability has been estimated from wafer printing results and actinic aerial images results.

  18. The difficult business model for mask equipment makers and mask infrastructure development support from consortia and governments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Scott

    2005-11-01

    The extension of optical projection lithography through immersion to patterning features with half pitch <=65 nm is placing greater demands on the mask. Strong resolution enhancement techniques (RETs), such as embedded and alternating phase shift masks and complex model-based optical proximity correction, are required to compensate for diffraction and limited depth of focus (DOF). To fabricate these masks, many new or upgraded tools are required to write patterns, measure feature sizes and placement, inspect for defects, review defect printability and repair defects on these masks. Beyond the significant technical challenges, suppliers of mask fabrication equipment face the challenge of being profitable in the small market for mask equipment while encountering significant R&D expenses to bring new generations of mask fabrication equipment to market. The total available market for patterned masks is estimated to be $2.5B to $2.9B per year. The patterned mask market is about 20% of the market size for lithography equipment and materials. The total available market for mask-making equipment is estimated to be about $800M per year. The largest R&D affordability issue arises for the makers of equipment for fabricating masks where total available sales are typically less than ten units per year. SEMATECH has used discounted cash flow models to predict the affordable R&D while maintaining industry accepted internal rates of return. The results have been compared to estimates of the total R&D cost to bring a new generation of mask equipment to market for various types of tools. The analysis revealed that affordability of the required R&D is a significant problem for many suppliers of mask-making equipment. Consortia such as SEMATECH and Selete have played an important role in cost sharing selected mask equipment and material development projects. Governments in the United States, in Europe and in Japan have also helped equipment suppliers with support for R&D. This paper

  19. EUV actinic brightfield mask microscopy for predicting printed defect images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Kenneth; Benk, Markus P.; Wojdyla, Antoine; Verduijn, Erik; Wood, Obert R.; Mangat, Pawitter

    2015-10-01

    Improving our collective understanding of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photomask defects and the imaging properties of available defect imaging tools is essential for improving EUV mask defectivity, defect repair and mitigation, and for high-level strategic decision-making. In this work, we perform a qualitative comparison of twenty-five defects imaged with mask scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EUV actinic mask imaging, and wafer SEM imaging. All but two of the defect locations were first identified by non-actinic mask blank inspection, prior to patterning. The others were identified as repeating defects on the wafer. We find that actinic defect imaging is predictive of the wafer prints, with small-scale features clearly replicated. While some mask defect SEM images match the wafer prints, others print with a larger outline indicating the presence of sub-surface disruptions hidden from the SEM's view. Fourteen other defects were subjected to an aerial image phase measurement method called Fourier Ptychography (FP). Although phase shifts were observed in the larger defects, the smaller defects in the dataset showed no significant phase shifting. We attribute this discrepancy to non-actinic mask blank inspection's limited ability to detect small phase defects under normal operating conditions.

  20. Defectivity and particle reduction for mask life extension, and imprint mask replication for high-volume semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emoto, Keiji; Sakai, Fumio; Sato, Chiaki; Takabayashi, Yukio; Nakano, Hitoshi; Takabayashi, Tsuneo; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Hattori, Tadashi; Hiura, Mitsuru; Ando, Toshiaki; Kawanobe, Yoshio; Azuma, Hisanobu; Iwanaga, Takehiko; Choi, Jin; Aghili, Ali; Jones, Chris; Irving, J. W.; Fletcher, Brian; Ye, Zhengmao

    2016-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash* Imprint Lithography (J-FIL*) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed, leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. Criteria specific to any lithographic process for the semiconductor industry include overlay, throughput and defectivity. The purpose of this paper is to describe the technology advancements made in the reduction of particle adders in an imprint tool and introduce the new mask replication tool that will enable the fabrication of replica masks with added residual image placement errors suitable for memory devices with half pitches smaller than 15nm. Hard particles on a wafer or mask create the possibility of creating a permanent defect on the mask that can impact device yield and mask life. By using material methods to reduce particle shedding and by introducing an air curtain system, test stand results demonstrate the potential for extending mask life to better than 1000 wafers. Additionally, a new replication tool, the FPA-1100 NR2 is introduced. Mask chuck flatness simulation results were also performed and demonstrate that residual image placement errors can be reduced to as little as 1nm.

  1. Orion Emergency Mask Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Graf, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Emergency mask approach on Orion poses a challenge to the traditional Shuttle or Station approaches. Currently, in the case of a fire or toxic spill event, the crew utilizes open loop oxygen masks that provide the crew with oxygen to breath, but also dumps the exhaled oxygen into the cabin. For Orion, with a small cabin volume, the extra oxygen will exceed the flammability limit within a short period of time, unless a nitrogen purge is also provided. Another approach to a fire or toxic spill event is the use of a filtering emergency masks. These masks utilize some form of chemical beds to scrub the air clean of toxic providing the crew safe breathing air for a period without elevating the oxygen level in the cabin. Using the masks and a form of smoke-eater filter, it may be possible to clean the cabin completely or to a level for safe transition to a space suit to perform a cabin purge. Issues with filters in the past have been the reaction time, breakthroughs, and high breathing resistance. Development in a new form of chemical filters has shown promise to make the filtering approach feasible.

  2. Orion Emergency Mask Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George C.; Graf, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Emergency mask approach on Orion poses a challenge to the traditional Shuttle or Station approaches. Currently, in the case of a fire or toxic spill event, the crew utilizes open loop oxygen masks that provide the crew with oxygen to breath, but also dumps the exhaled oxygen into the cabin. For Orion, with a small cabin volume, the extra oxygen will exceed the flammability limit within a short period of time, unless a nitrogen purge is also provided. Another approach to a fire or toxic spill event is the use of a filtering emergency masks. These masks utilize some form of chemical beds to scrub the air clean of toxic providing the crew safe breathing air for a period without elevating the oxygen level in the cabin. Using the masks and a form of smoke-eater filter, it may be possible to clean the cabin completely or to a level for safe transition to a space suit to perform a cabin purge. Issues with filters in the past have been the reaction temperature and high breathing resistance. Development in a new form of chemical filters has shown promise to make the filtering approach feasible.

  3. Actinic defect counting statistics over 1 cm2 area of EUVL mask blank

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Seongtae; Lai, Chih-Wei; Rekawa, Seno; Walton, Chris W.; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2000-02-18

    As a continuation of comparison experiments between EUV inspection and visible inspection of defects on EUVL mask blanks, we report on the result of an experiment where the EUV defect inspection tool is used to perform at-wavelength defect counting over 1 cm{sup 2} of EUVL mask blank. Initial EUV inspection found five defects over the scanned area and the subsequent optical scattering inspection was able to detect all of the five defects. Therefore, if there are any defects that are only detectable by EUV inspection, the density is lower than the order of unity per cm2. An upgrade path to substantially increase the overall throughput of the EUV inspection system is also identified in the manuscript.

  4. [The visual perception of the elements of technical drawings among masking distractions in advanced and nonadvanced students in the building and architectural professions].

    PubMed

    Balichev, Iu

    1997-01-01

    To investigation were submitted the particularities of the process of visual perception of technical drawings and schemes in advanced and backward pupils, who were mastering the specialties of "building and architecture", "hydroconstruction", "transport construction", "geodesy". The time was registered, which was necessary to advanced and backward pupils for unveiling the different elements in the drawing, scheme, and such attributes of the drawing as: orientation, length, curves of the lined, the boundary between them; time for identification of the specific designations, symbols, group of symbols, elements of the sketch from the simple to the complex ones. The results of the investigations revealed that in the advanced pupils the perception (unveiling) of the different elements of the technical drawing proceeded very rapidly, almost automatically. In the backward pupils this process elapsed reliably more slowly. It was demonstrated that the growing up pupils, who were distinguished with more rapid perception of the different elements of the drawing (advanced ones) more rapidly and more exactly dealt with solution of the technical tasks as compared with these, who more slowly unveiled the looked for elements (backwardness). Some other individual particularities were also established with respect to the visual perception of the elements of the technical drawing and its properties in advanced and backward pupils who were mastering the investigated professions.

  5. Overlay improvement by exposure map based mask registration optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Irene; Guo, Eric; Chen, Ming; Lu, Max; Li, Gordon; Li, Rivan; Tian, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Along with the increased miniaturization of semiconductor electronic devices, the design rules of advanced semiconductor devices shrink dramatically. [1] One of the main challenges of lithography step is the layer-to-layer overlay control. Furthermore, DPT (Double Patterning Technology) has been adapted for the advanced technology node like 28nm and 14nm, corresponding overlay budget becomes even tighter. [2][3] After the in-die mask registration (pattern placement) measurement is introduced, with the model analysis of a KLA SOV (sources of variation) tool, it's observed that registration difference between masks is a significant error source of wafer layer-to-layer overlay at 28nm process. [4][5] Mask registration optimization would highly improve wafer overlay performance accordingly. It was reported that a laser based registration control (RegC) process could be applied after the pattern generation or after pellicle mounting and allowed fine tuning of the mask registration. [6] In this paper we propose a novel method of mask registration correction, which can be applied before mask writing based on mask exposure map, considering the factors of mask chip layout, writing sequence, and pattern density distribution. Our experiment data show if pattern density on the mask keeps at a low level, in-die mask registration residue error in 3sigma could be always under 5nm whatever blank type and related writer POSCOR (position correction) file was applied; it proves random error induced by material or equipment would occupy relatively fixed error budget as an error source of mask registration. On the real production, comparing the mask registration difference through critical production layers, it could be revealed that registration residue error of line space layers with higher pattern density is always much larger than the one of contact hole layers with lower pattern density. Additionally, the mask registration difference between layers with similar pattern density

  6. Masked mycotoxins: A review

    PubMed Central

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders. PMID:23047235

  7. Masked mycotoxins: a review.

    PubMed

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders.

  8. COAs: Behind the Masks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birke, Szifra

    1993-01-01

    Provides information on alcoholism and codependency to help teachers identify and respond to children of alcoholics (COAs). Discusses characteristics of alcoholic homes and problems encountered by children and adult COAs. Examines survival "masks" of COAs, including hero, rebel, adjustor, clown, and caretaker. Lists organizational, print, and…

  9. Development of inspection robots for bridge cables.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hae-Bum; Kim, Se-Hoon; Wu, Liuliu; Lee, Jong-Jae

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the bridge cable inspection robot developed in Korea. Two types of the cable inspection robots were developed for cable-suspension bridges and cable-stayed bridge. The design of the robot system and performance of the NDT techniques associated with the cable inspection robot are discussed. A review on recent advances in emerging robot-based inspection technologies for bridge cables and current bridge cable inspection methods is also presented.

  10. Development of inspection robots for bridge cables.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hae-Bum; Kim, Se-Hoon; Wu, Liuliu; Lee, Jong-Jae

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the bridge cable inspection robot developed in Korea. Two types of the cable inspection robots were developed for cable-suspension bridges and cable-stayed bridge. The design of the robot system and performance of the NDT techniques associated with the cable inspection robot are discussed. A review on recent advances in emerging robot-based inspection technologies for bridge cables and current bridge cable inspection methods is also presented. PMID:24459453

  11. Development of Inspection Robots for Bridge Cables

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Jae

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the bridge cable inspection robot developed in Korea. Two types of the cable inspection robots were developed for cable-suspension bridges and cable-stayed bridge. The design of the robot system and performance of the NDT techniques associated with the cable inspection robot are discussed. A review on recent advances in emerging robot-based inspection technologies for bridge cables and current bridge cable inspection methods is also presented. PMID:24459453

  12. CADAT integrated circuit mask analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    CADAT System Mask Analysis Program (MAPS2) is automated software tool for analyzing integrated-circuit mask design. Included in MAPS2 functions are artwork verification, device identification, nodal analysis, capacitance calculation, and logic equation generation.

  13. Advances in transient (pulsed) eddy current for inspection of multi-layer aluminum structures in the presence of ferrous fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, D. R.; Vallières, G.; Whalen, P. P.; Krause, T. W.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental investigation of the electromagnetic processes underlying transient (pulsed) eddy current inspection of aircraft wing structures in the vicinity of ferrous fasteners is performed. The separate effects of transient excitation of ferrous fastener and eddy currents induced in the surrounding aluminum structure are explored using a transmit-receive configuration with transient excitation of a steel rod, an aluminum plate with a bore hole and a steel rod through the bore hole. Observations are used to interpret results from a coupled driving and differential coil sensing unit applied to detect fatigue cracks emanating from bolt holes in aluminum structures with ferrous fasteners present. In particular, it is noted that abrupt magnetization of the fastener, by the probe's central driving unit, can transfer flux and consequently, induce strong eddy current responses deep within the aluminum structure in the vicinity of the bore hole. Rotation of the probe, centered over the fastener, permits detection of subsurface discontinuities, such as cracks, by the pair of differentially connected pickup coils.

  14. Multilayer defects nucleated by substrate pits: a comparison of actinic inspection and non-actinic inspection techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Goldberg, K; Kearney, P; Rekawa, S; LaFontaine, B; Wood, O; Taylor, J S; Han, H

    2006-10-02

    The production of defect-free mask blanks remains a key challenge for EUV lithography. Mask-blank inspection tools must be able to accurately detect all critical defects while simultaneously having the minimum possible false-positive detection rate. We have recently observed and here report the identification of bump-type buried substrate defects, that were below the detection limit of a non-actinic (i.e. non-EUV) in inspection tool. Presently, the occurrence inspection of pit-type defects, their printability, and their detectability with actinic techniques and non-actinic commercial tools, has become a significant concern. We believe that the most successful strategy for the development of effective non-actinic mask inspection tools will involve the careful cross-correlation with actinic inspection and lithographic printing. In this way, the true efficacy of prototype inspection tools now under development can be studied quantitatively against relevant benchmarks. To this end we have developed a dual-mode actinic mask inspection system capable of scanning mask blanks for defects (with simultaneous EUV bright-field and dark-field detection) and imaging those same defects with a zoneplate microscope that matches or exceeds the resolution of EUV steppers.

  15. Near Real-Time Nondestructive Active Inspection Technologies Utilizing Delayed γ-Rays and Neutrons for Advanced Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Alan; Reedy, E. T.E.; Mozin, V.; Tobin, S. J.

    2015-02-12

    In this two year project, the research team investigated how delayed γ-rays from short-lived fission fragments detected in the short interval between irradiating pulses can be exploited for advanced safeguards technologies. This program contained experimental and modeling efforts. The experimental effort measured the emitted spectra, time histories and correlations of the delayed γ-rays from aqueous solutions and solid targets containing fissionable isotopes. The modeling effort first developed and benchmarked a hybrid Monte Carlo simulation technique based on these experiments. The benchmarked simulations were then extended to other safeguards scenarios, allowing comparisons to other advanced safeguards technologies and to investigate combined techniques. Ultimately, the experiments demonstrated the possible utility of actively induced delayed γ-ray spectroscopy for fissionable material assay.

  16. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, A.L.; Kroop, D.C.; McGee, M.K.; Lenkszus, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  17. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, Alan L.; Kroop, David C.; McGee, Marilyn K.; Lenkszus, Frank R.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  18. Defect inspection of imprinted 32 nm half pitch patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; McMackin, Ian; Perez, Joseph; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2008-10-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  19. Electron beam inspection methods for imprint lithography at 32 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  20. The Attentional Dynamics of Masked Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Philip L.; Wolfgang, Bradley J.

    2004-01-01

    A dichoptic masking procedure was used to test whether the mask-dependent cuing effects found in luminance detection by P. L. Smith (2000a) were due to integration masking or interruption masking. Attentional cuing enhanced detection sensitivity (d') when stimuli were backwardly masked with either dichoptic or monoptic masks, whereas no cuing…

  1. Challenges and requirements of mask data processing for multi-beam mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin; Lee, Dong Hyun; Park, Sinjeung; Lee, SookHyun; Tamamushi, Shuichi; Shin, In Kyun; Jeon, Chan Uk

    2015-07-01

    To overcome the resolution and throughput of current mask writer for advanced lithography technologies, the platform of e-beam writer have been evolved by the developments of hardware and software in writer. Especially, aggressive optical proximity correction (OPC) for unprecedented extension of optical lithography and the needs of low sensitivity resist for high resolution result in the limit of variable shaped beam writer which is widely used for mass production. The multi-beam mask writer is attractive candidate for photomask writing of sub-10nm device because of its high speed and the large degree of freedom which enable high dose and dose modulation for each pixel. However, the higher dose and almost unlimited appetite for dose modulation challenge the mask data processing (MDP) in aspects of extreme data volume and correction method. Here, we discuss the requirements of mask data processing for multi-beam mask writer and presents new challenges of the data format, data flow, and correction method for user and supplier MDP tool.

  2. Mask fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2000-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks and reticles useful for projection lithography systems. An absorber layer is conventionally patterned using a pattern and etch process. Following the step of patterning, the entire surface of the remaining top patterning photoresist layer as well as that portion of an underlying protective photoresist layer where absorber material has been etched away is exposed to UV radiation. The UV-exposed regions of the protective photoresist layer and the top patterning photoresist layer are then removed by solution development, thereby eliminating the need for an oxygen plasma etch and strip and chances for damaging the surface of the substrate or coatings.

  3. New method of contour-based mask-shape compiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Akiyuki; Onizawa, Akira; Sato, Hidetoshi; Toyoda, Yasutaka

    2007-10-01

    We have developed a new method of accurately profiling a mask shape by utilizing a Mask CD-SEM. The method is intended to realize high accuracy, stability and reproducibility of the Mask CD-SEM adopting an edge detection algorithm as the key technology used in CD-SEM for high accuracy CD measurement. In comparison with a conventional image processing method for contour profiling, it is possible to create the profiles with much higher accuracy which is comparable with CD-SEM for semiconductor device CD measurement. In this report, we will introduce the algorithm in general, the experimental results and the application in practice. As shrinkage of design rule for semiconductor device has further advanced, an aggressive OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) is indispensable in RET (Resolution Enhancement Technology). From the view point of DFM (Design for Manufacturability), a dramatic increase of data processing cost for advanced MDP (Mask Data Preparation) for instance and surge of mask making cost have become a big concern to the device manufacturers. In a sense, it is a trade-off between the high accuracy RET and the mask production cost, while it gives a significant impact on the semiconductor market centered around the mask business. To cope with the problem, we propose the best method for a DFM solution in which two dimensional data are extracted for an error free practical simulation by precise reproduction of a real mask shape in addition to the mask data simulation. The flow centering around the design data is fully automated and provides an environment where optimization and verification for fully automated model calibration with much less error is available. It also allows complete consolidation of input and output functions with an EDA system by constructing a design data oriented system structure. This method therefore is regarded as a strategic DFM approach in the semiconductor metrology.

  4. Advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0092

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, H.A.; Shelton, J.E.; LaMance, G.M.; Kennedy, C.R.

    1995-02-26

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) and the Lanxide Corporation (Lanxide) negotiated a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites (MMC). The objective of this CRADA was to develop machining parameters to allow manufacturing of automotive components from MMCs. These parts exhibit a range of shapes and dimensional tolerances and require a large number of machining operations. The common characteristic of the components is the use of the light weight MMC materials to replace heavier materials. This allows smaller and lighter moving parts and supporting structural components thereby increasing fuel mileage. The CRADA was divided into three areas: basic investigation of cutting parameters, establishment of a mock production line for components, and optimization of parameters in the mock facility. This report covers the manufacturing of MMCs and preliminary Phase I testing for silicon carbide having various loading percentages and extensive Phase I testing of cutting parameters on 30% alumina loaded aluminum. On January 26, 1995, a letter from the vice president, technology at Lanxide was issued terminating the CRADA due to changes in business. 9 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  6. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; deFromont, F.

    2007-03-01

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  7. A Masked Photocathode in Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-12-14

    In this paper, we propose a masked photocathode inside the photoinjector for generating high brightness election beam. Instead of mounting the photocathode onto an electrode, an electrode with small hole is used as a mask to shield the photocathode from the accelerating vacuum chamber. Using such a masked photocathode will make the replacement of photocathode material easy by rotating the photocathode behind the electrode into the hole. Furthermore, this helps reduce the dark current or secondary electron emission from the photocathode material. The masked photocathode also provides transverse cut-off to a Gaussian laser beam that reduces electron beam emittance growth from nonlinear space-charge effects.

  8. Towards reduced impact of EUV mask defectivity on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, R.; Van den Heuvel, D.; Pacco, A.; Pollentier, I.; Baudemprez, B.; Jehoul, C.; Hermans, J.; Hendrickx, E.

    2014-07-01

    The defectivity challenges of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks, that need to be addressed before production readiness of EUV lithography is assured from the mask perspective, are twofold. First, the EUV-specific defect type relating to the multi-layer (ML) mirror, the so-called ML-defects, require to become more detectable than they are printable. This not only requires proven capability of blank inspection, but also the existence of satisfactory printability mitigation strategies (comprising avoidance, pattern shift methodology, compensation repair). Both these assets need to become available within the mask supply chain, as there is little that can still be done about such residual defects at the wafer fab. In a production phase, finding unexpected printing ML-defects is unacceptable. It is shown how the specific way-of-working in use at imec, starting from the printed wafer, contributes to related learning and identification of remaining gaps, in getting this issue fully dealt with. The second challenge relates to particle contamination during use of the reticle at the wafer fab. Avoiding overlaycritical particles on the backside of NXE3100 reticles is facilitated by the established way-of-working. Minimizing the occurrence of particles "hopping" between reticles via the electrostatic clamp of the scanner (so-called clamp-traveling particles) is a major driver for appropriate mask cleaning. The latter may not have negative impact by frequent use, in view of the highly vulnerable EUV mask stack, and especially for the present "black-border" solution in which the ML is etched away at the image border on the reticle. A lot of effort is spent into monitoring of NXE3100 reticles for particle adders on the pattern side. This is realized by comparing past and present mask defect maps obtained by inspection of printed wafers with subsequent repeater analysis.

  9. What Is Being Masked in Object Substitution Masking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Cole, Geoff; Skarratt, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Object substitution masking (OSM) is said to occur when a perceptual object is hypothesized that is mismatched by subsequent sensory evidence, leading to a new hypothesized object being substituted for the first. For example, when a brief target is accompanied by a longer lasting display of nonoverlapping mask elements, reporting of target…

  10. Achromatic Focal Plane Mask for Exoplanet Imaging Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Kevin Edward; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Wilson, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in coronagraph technologies for exoplanet imaging have achieved contrasts close to 1e10 at 4 lambda/D and 1e-9 at 2 lambda/D in monochromatic light. A remaining technological challenge is to achieve high contrast in broadband light; a challenge that is largely limited by chromaticity of the focal plane mask. The size of a star image scales linearly with wavelength. Focal plane masks are typically the same size at all wavelengths, and must be sized for the longest wavelength in the observational band to avoid starlight leakage. However, this oversized mask blocks useful discovery space from the shorter wavelengths. We present here the design, development, and testing of an achromatic focal plane mask based on the concept of optical filtering by a diffractive optical element (DOE). The mask consists of an array of DOE cells, the combination of which functions as a wavelength filter with any desired amplitude and phase transmission. The effective size of the mask scales nearly linearly with wavelength, and allows significant improvement in the inner working angle of the coronagraph at shorter wavelengths. The design is applicable to almost any coronagraph configuration, and enables operation in a wider band of wavelengths than would otherwise be possible. We include initial results from a laboratory demonstration of the mask with the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph.

  11. Understanding the trade-offs of thinner binary mask absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirapu-Azpiroz, Jaione; McIntyre, Gregory; Faure, Tom; Halle, Scott; Hibbs, Michael; Wagner, Alfred; Lai, Kafai; Gallagher, Emily; Brunner, Timothy

    2010-09-01

    Mask topography is only one of the challenges for extending 193nm immersion lithography to 22nm and beyond. Migration to binary but thinner mask absorbers, from the previously employed attenuated phase-shift mask (attnPSM) technology, traded a tolerable loss in contrast for better mask making performance and reduced electromagnetic field (EMF) impact [1]. The relentless technological advances in 193nm lithography required to enable 22nm technology, however, continue to drive the dimensions of mask features deep into sub-wavelength scale. In this regime, residual mask EMF effects can still degrade the imaging performance of critical mask patterns, often in the form of featuredependent biasing and shifts of the plane of best focus that shrink the common process window and magnify the impact of mask errors. In this paper we investigate the potential benefits in EMF effects mitigation provided by further thinning the mask absorber to the minimum possible while retaining the required opacity. This study was motivated by the narrower process variability bands observed on a 22nm structure with high EMF sensitivity, when computed with rigorous EMF simulations using a thinner absorber. Resist measurements on wafers exposed with the same EMF sensitive structure built on either the standard binary mask or the thinner sample, confirmed the lower sensitivity to mask topography of the latter while also providing a significant process window improvement. We further observed that thinner topography allowed for a smaller topography induced bias, resulting in improved mask manufacturability with less risk for mask corrections to be limited by mask manufacturability rules such as small assist features and small corner to corner gaps. Thinning the absorber, however, is typically accompanied by an increase in reflectivity of the mask blank which may influence the nature of stray light in the imaging system. To understand the consequences of increasing the blank reflectivity, a double

  12. Masked Proportional Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David

    2004-01-01

    Masked proportional routing is an improved procedure for choosing links between adjacent nodes of a network for the purpose of transporting an entity from a source node ("A") to a destination node ("B"). The entity could be, for example, a physical object to be shipped, in which case the nodes would represent waypoints and the links would represent roads or other paths between waypoints. For another example, the entity could be a message or packet of data to be transmitted from A to B, in which case the nodes could be computer-controlled switching stations and the links could be communication channels between the stations. In yet another example, an entity could represent a workpiece while links and nodes could represent, respectively, manufacturing processes and stages in the progress of the workpiece towards a finished product. More generally, the nodes could represent states of an entity and the links could represent allowed transitions of the entity. The purpose of masked proportional routing and of related prior routing procedures is to schedule transitions of entities from their initial states ("A") to their final states ("B") in such a manner as to minimize a cost or to attain some other measure of optimality or efficiency. Masked proportional routing follows a distributed (in the sense of decentralized) approach to probabilistically or deterministically choosing the links. It was developed to satisfy a need for a routing procedure that 1. Does not always choose the same link(s), even for two instances characterized by identical estimated values of associated cost functions; 2. Enables a graceful transition from one set of links to another set of links as the circumstances of operation of the network change over time; 3. Is preferably amenable to separate optimization of different portions of the network; 4. Is preferably usable in a network in which some of the routing decisions are made by one or more other procedure(s); 5. Preferably does not cause an

  13. Masked Repetition Priming Using Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Philip J.; Fiorentino, Robert; Poeppel, David

    2008-01-01

    Masked priming is used in psycholinguistic studies to assess questions about lexical access and representation. We present two masked priming experiments using MEG. If the MEG signal elicited by words reflects specific aspects of lexical retrieval, then one expects to identify specific neural correlates of retrieval that are sensitive to priming.…

  14. Combining Simultaneous with Temporal Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermens, Frouke; Herzog, Michael H.; Francis, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous and temporal masking are two frequently used techniques in psychology and vision science. Although there are many studies and theories related to each masking technique, there are no systematic investigations of their mutual relationship, even though both techniques are often applied together. Here, the authors show that temporal…

  15. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  16. Fabless company mask technology approach: fabless but not fab-careless

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisamura, Toshiyuki; Wu, Xin

    2009-10-01

    There are two different foundry-fabless working models in the aspect of mask. Some foundries have in-house mask facility while others contract with merchant mask vendors. Significant progress has been made in both kinds of situations. Xilinx as one of the pioneers of fabless semiconductor companies has been continually working very closely with both merchant mask vendors and mask facilities of foundries in past many years, contributed well in both technology development and benefited from corporations. Our involvement in manufacturing is driven by the following three elements: The first element is to understand the new fabrication and mask technologies and then find a suitable design / layout style to better utilize these new technologies and avoid potential risks. Because Xilinx has always been involved in early stage of advanced technology nodes, this early understanding and adoption is especially important. The second element is time to market. Reduction in mask and wafer manufacturing cycle-time can ensure faster time to market. The third element is quality. Commitment to quality is our highest priority for our customers. We have enough visibility on any manufacturing issues affecting the device functionality. Good correlation has consistently been observed between FPGA speed uniformity and the poly mask Critical Dimension (CD) uniformity performance. To achieve FPGA speed uniformity requirement, the manufacturing process as well as the mask and wafer CD uniformity has to be monitored. Xilinx works closely with the wafer foundries and mask suppliers to improve productivity and the yield from initial development stage of mask making operations. As an example, defect density reduction is one of the biggest challenges for mask supplier in development stage to meet the yield target satisfying the mask cost and mask turn-around-time (TAT) requirement. Historically, masks were considered to be defect free but at these advanced process nodes, that assumption no longer

  17. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  18. Programmable RET Mask Layout Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Daniel F.; Mayhew, Jeffrey P.; Rieger, Michael L.; Tang, Zongwu

    2002-12-01

    Emerging resolution enhancement techniques (RET) and OPC are dramatically increasing the complexity of mask layouts and, in turn, mask verification. Mask shapes needed to achieve required results on the wafer diverge significantly from corresponding shapes in the physical design, and in some cases a single chip layer may be decomposed into two masks used in multiple exposures. The mask verification challenge is to certify that a RET-synthesized mask layout will produce an acceptable facsimile of the design intent expressed in the design layout. Furthermore costs, tradeoffs between mask-complexity, design intent, targeted process latitude, and other factors are playing a growing role in helping to control rising mask costs. All of these considerations must in turn be incorporated into the mask layout verification strategy needed for data prep sign-off. In this paper we describe a technique for assessing the lithographic quality of mask layouts for diverse RET methods while effectively accommodating various manufacturing objectives and specifications. It leverages the familiar DRC paradigm for identifying errors and producing DRC-like error shapes in its output layout. It integrates a unique concept of "check figures" - layer-based geometries that dictate where and how simulations of shapes on the wafer are to be compared to the original desired layout. We will show how this provides a highly programmable environment that makes it possible to engage in "compound" check strategies that vary based on design intent and adaptive simulation with multiple checks. Verification may be applied at the "go/no go" level or can be used to build a body of data for quantitative analysis of lithographic behavior at multiple process conditions or for specific user-defined critical features. In addition, we will outline automated methods that guide the selection of input parameters controlling specific verification strategies.

  19. Improve the efficiency of the inspection process via a thorough control of the scanning focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Ernesto; Sartelli, Luca; Miyashita, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    Requirements coming from the customer, as well as internal needs of improvements consequent to the increasing complexity of the layout of the newest devices, lead to the necessity of exploring all the potential improvements achievable at the mask manufacturing inspection process. A key point to manage for the better DB inspections is that of being able to achieve a proper matching between the images to be compared, tasks which is accomplished by the tool architecture by means of a pre-swath calibration process on which the quality of the focus is playing a relevant role. From here the decision to focus on this parameter aiming of working out and evaluate a different approach to be used to set the scanning focus on the inspection tool moving from the vendor theory based on the edge speed on a specific test plate to a new one based on intensity measurements into specific features on a purposely designed test vehicle. A matter of relevant importance for mask makers, either for the smoothness of the inspection process or for the homogeneity of the quality of the products being delivered, but on which any tool vendor likes providing official commitments, is that of correlating the overall performance of similar tools. This was accomplished with the new approach with two different tools achieving optical images with similar grey scale distributions into the most critical features. Moreover, the improvement of the matching of the images being compared allows extending the usage of the tool for products for which the complexity of the layout forced the inspection with different pixels or with more advanced tools, with a positive impact either on costs or on the cycle time of the masks being delivered. A careful assessment-verification of the shadowing limitation induced by the frame of the pellicle was another task successfully carried out with the new methodology, with some improvement regarding the inspectable area. The extended its usage the wider the field of

  20. Exploiting Small Leakages in Masks to Turn a Second-Order Attack into a First-Order Attack and Improved Rotating Substitution Box Masking with Linear Code Cosets

    PubMed Central

    DeTrano, Alexander; Karimi, Naghmeh; Karri, Ramesh; Guo, Xiaofei; Carlet, Claude; Guilley, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Masking countermeasures, used to thwart side-channel attacks, have been shown to be vulnerable to mask-extraction attacks. State-of-the-art mask-extraction attacks on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm target S-Box recomputation schemes but have not been applied to scenarios where S-Boxes are precomputed offline. We propose an attack targeting precomputed S-Boxes stored in nonvolatile memory. Our attack targets AES implemented in software protected by a low entropy masking scheme and recovers the masks with 91% success rate. Recovering the secret key requires fewer power traces (in fact, by at least two orders of magnitude) compared to a classical second-order attack. Moreover, we show that this attack remains viable in a noisy environment or with a reduced number of leakage points. Eventually, we specify a method to enhance the countermeasure by selecting a suitable coset of the masks set. PMID:26491717

  1. Exploiting Small Leakages in Masks to Turn a Second-Order Attack into a First-Order Attack and Improved Rotating Substitution Box Masking with Linear Code Cosets.

    PubMed

    DeTrano, Alexander; Karimi, Naghmeh; Karri, Ramesh; Guo, Xiaofei; Carlet, Claude; Guilley, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Masking countermeasures, used to thwart side-channel attacks, have been shown to be vulnerable to mask-extraction attacks. State-of-the-art mask-extraction attacks on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm target S-Box recomputation schemes but have not been applied to scenarios where S-Boxes are precomputed offline. We propose an attack targeting precomputed S-Boxes stored in nonvolatile memory. Our attack targets AES implemented in software protected by a low entropy masking scheme and recovers the masks with 91% success rate. Recovering the secret key requires fewer power traces (in fact, by at least two orders of magnitude) compared to a classical second-order attack. Moreover, we show that this attack remains viable in a noisy environment or with a reduced number of leakage points. Eventually, we specify a method to enhance the countermeasure by selecting a suitable coset of the masks set. PMID:26491717

  2. Process variation monitoring (PVM) by wafer inspection tool as a complementary method to CD-SEM for mapping field CDU on advanced production devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Jong; Yoo, Hyung Won; Kim, Chul Hong; Lee, Hak Kwon; Kim, Sung Su; Bae, Koon Ho; Spielberg, Hedvi; Lee, Yun Ho; Levi, Shimon; Bustan, Yariv; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    As design rules shrink, Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) and Line Edge Roughness (LER) have a dramatic effect on printed final lines and hence the need to control these parameters increases. Sources of CDU and LER variations include scanner auto-focus accuracy and stability, layer stack thickness, composition variations, and exposure variations. Process variations, in advanced VLSI production designs, specifically in memory devices, attributed to CDU and LER affect cell-to-cell parametric variations. These variations significantly impact device performance and die yield. Traditionally, measurements of LER are performed by CD-SEM or OCD metrology tools. Typically, these measurements require a relatively long time to set and cover only selected points of wafer area. In this paper we present the results of a collaborative work of the Process Diagnostic & Control Business Unit of Applied Materials and Hynix Semiconductor Inc. on the implementation of a complementary method to the CDSEM and OCD tools, to monitor defect density and post litho develop CDU and LER on production wafers. The method, referred to as Process Variation Monitoring (PVM) is based on measuring variations in the scattered light from periodic structures. The application is demonstrated using Applied Materials DUV bright field (BF) wafer inspection tool under optimized illumination and collection conditions. The UVisionTM has already passed a successful feasibility study on DRAM products with 66nm and 54nm design rules. The tool has shown high sensitivity to variations across an FEM wafer in both exposure and focus axes. In this article we show how PVM can help detection of Field to Field variations on DRAM wafers with 44nm design rule during normal production run. The complex die layout and the shrink in cell dimensions require high sensitivity to local variations within Dies or Fields. During normal scan of production wafers local Process variations are translated into GL (Grey Level) values

  3. Source mask optimization using 3D mask and compact resist models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sewefy, Omar; Chen, Ao; Lafferty, Neal; Meiring, Jason; Chung, Angeline; Foong, Yee Mei; Adam, Kostas; Sturtevant, John

    2016-03-01

    Source Mask Optimization (SMO) has played an important role in technology setup and ground rule definition since the 2x nm technology node. While improvements in SMO algorithms have produced higher quality and more consistent results, the accuracy of the overall solution is critically linked to how faithfully the entire patterning system is modeled, from mask down to substrate. Fortunately, modeling technology has continued to advance to provide greater accuracy in modeling 3D mask effects, 3D resist behavior, and resist phenomena. Specifically, the Domain Decomposition Method (DDM) approximates the 3D mask response as a superposition of edge-responses.1 The DDM can be applied to a sectorized illumination source based on Hybrid-Hopkins Abbe approximation,2 which provides an accurate and fast solution for the modeling of 3D mask effects and has been widely used in OPC modeling. The implementation of DDM in the SMO flow, however, is more challenging because the shape and intensity of the source, unlike the case in OPC modeling, is evolving along the optimization path. As a result, it gets more complicated. It is accepted that inadequate pupil sectorization results in reduced accuracy in any application, however in SMO the required uniformity and density of pupil sampling is higher than typical OPC and modeling cases. In this paper, we describe a novel method to implement DDM in the SMO flow. The source sectorization is defined by following the universal pixel sizes used in SMO. Fast algorithms are developed to enable computation of edge signals from each fine pixel of the source. In this case, each pixel has accurate information to describe its contribution to imaging and the overall objective function. A more continuous angular spectrum from 3D mask scattering is thus captured, leading to accurate modeling of 3D mask effects throughout source optimization. This method is applied on a 2x nm middle-of-line layer test case. The impact of the 3D mask model accuracy on

  4. Progress in mask replication using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta S.; Brooks, Cynthia B.; Doyle, Gary F.; Brown, Laura; Jones, Chris; Imhof, Joseph; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2011-04-01

    The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. It is anticipated that the lifetime of a single template (for patterned media) or mask (for semiconductor) will be on the order of 104 - 105imprints. This suggests that tens of thousands of templates/masks will be required to satisfy the needs of a manufacturing environment. Electron-beam patterning is too slow to feasibly deliver these volumes, but instead can provide a high quality "master" mask which can be replicated many times with an imprint lithography tool. This strategy has the capability to produce the required supply of "working" templates/masks. In this paper, we review the development of the mask form factor, imprint replication tools and processes specifically for semiconductor applications. The requirements needed for semiconductors dictate the need for a well defined form factor for both master and replica masks which is also compatible with the existing mask infrastructure established for the 6025 semi standard, 6" x 6" x 0.25" photomasks. Complying with this standard provides the necessary tooling needed for mask fabrication processes, cleaning, metrology, and inspection. The replica form factor has additional features specific to imprinting such as a pre-patterned mesa. A PerfectaTM MR5000 mask replication tool has been developed specifically to pattern replica masks from an e-beam written master. The system specifications include a throughput of four replicas per hour with an added image placement component of 5nm, 3sigma and a critical dimension uniformity error of less than 1nm, 3sigma. A new process has been developed to fabricate replicas with high contrast alignment marks so that designs for imprint can fit within current

  5. Automatic pattern localization across layout database and photolithography mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey, Philippe; Brault, Frederic; Beisser, Eric; Ache, Oliver; Röth, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Advanced process photolithography masks require more and more controls for registration versus design and critical dimension uniformity (CDU). The distribution of the measurement points should be distributed all over the whole mask and may be denser in areas critical to wafer overlay requirements. This means that some, if not many, of theses controls should be made inside the customer die and may use non-dedicated patterns. It is then mandatory to access the original layout database to select patterns for the metrology process. Finding hundreds of relevant patterns in a database containing billions of polygons may be possible, but in addition, it is mandatory to create the complete metrology job fast and reliable. Combining, on one hand, a software expertise in mask databases processing and, on the other hand, advanced skills in control and registration equipment, we have developed a Mask Dataprep Station able to select an appropriate number of measurement targets and their positions in a huge database and automatically create measurement jobs on the corresponding area on the mask for the registration metrology system. In addition, the required design clips are generated from the database in order to perform the rendering procedure on the metrology system. This new methodology has been validated on real production line for the most advanced process. This paper presents the main challenges that we have faced, as well as some results on the global performances.

  6. Bringing mask repair to the next level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinger, K.; Wolff, K.; Steigerwald, H.; Auth, N.; Spies, P.; Oster, J.; Schneider, H.; Budach, M.; Hofmann, T.; Waiblinger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Mask repair is an essential step in the mask manufacturing process as the extension of 193nm technology and the insertion of EUV are drivers for mask complexity and cost. The ability to repair all types of defects on all mask blank materials is crucial for the economic success of a mask shop operation. In the future mask repair is facing several challenges. The mask minimum features sizes are shrinking and require a higher resolution repair tool. At the same time mask blanks with different new mask materials are introduced to optimize optical performance and long term durability. For EUV masks new classes of defects like multilayer and phase defects are entering the stage. In order to achieve a high yield, mask repair has to cover etch and deposition capabilities and must not damage the mask. These challenges require sophisticated technologies to bring mask repair to the next level. For high end masks ion-beam based and e-based repair technologies are the obvious choice when it comes to the repair of small features. Both technologies have their pro and cons. The scope of this paper is to review and compare the performance of ion-beam based mask repair to e-beam based mask repair. We will analyze the limits of both technologies theoretically and experimentally and show mask repair related performance data. Based on this data, we will give an outlook to future mask repair tools.

  7. 1D design style implications for mask making and CEBL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.

    2013-09-01

    At advanced nodes, CMOS logic is being designed in a highly regular design style because of the resolution limitations of optical lithography equipment. Logic and memory layouts using 1D Gridded Design Rules (GDR) have been demonstrated to nodes beyond 12nm.[1-4] Smaller nodes will require the same regular layout style but with multiple patterning for critical layers. One of the significant advantages of 1D GDR is the ease of splitting layouts into lines and cuts. A lines and cuts approach has been used to achieve good pattern fidelity and process margin to below 12nm.[4] Line scaling with excellent line-edge roughness (LER) has been demonstrated with self-aligned spacer processing.[5] This change in design style has important implications for mask making: • The complexity of the masks will be greatly reduced from what would be required for 2D designs with very complex OPC or inverse lithography corrections. • The number of masks will initially increase, as for conventional multiple patterning. But in the case of 1D design, there are future options for mask count reduction. • The line masks will remain simple, with little or no OPC, at pitches (1x) above 80nm. This provides an excellent opportunity for continual improvement of line CD and LER. The line pattern will be processed through a self-aligned pitch division sequence to divide pitch by 2 or by 4. • The cut masks can be done with "simple OPC" as demonstrated to beyond 12nm.[6] Multiple simple cut masks may be required at advanced nodes. "Coloring" has been demonstrated to below 12nm for two colors and to 8nm for three colors. • Cut/hole masks will eventually be replaced by e-beam direct write using complementary e-beam lithography (CEBL).[7-11] This transition is gated by the availability of multiple column e-beam systems with throughput adequate for high- volume manufacturing. A brief description of 1D and 2D design styles will be presented, followed by examples of 1D layouts. Mask complexity for 1

  8. EUV actinic defect inspection and defect printability at the sub-32 nm half pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Sungmin; Kearney, Patrick; Wurm, Stefan; Goodwin, Frank; Han, Hakseung; Goldberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopp; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2009-08-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask blanks with embedded phase defects were inspected with a reticle actinic inspection tool (AIT) and the Lasertec M7360. The Lasertec M7360, operated at SEMA TECH's Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC) in Albany, NY, has a sensitivity to multilayer defects down to 40-45 nm, which is not likely sufficient for mask blank development below the 32 nm half-pitch node. Phase defect printability was simulated to calculate the required defect sensitivity for a next generation blank inspection tool to support reticle development for the sub-32 nm half-pitch technology node. Defect mitigation technology is proposed to take advantage of mask blanks with some defects. This technology will reduce the cost of ownership of EUV mask blanks. This paper will also discuss the kind of infrastructure that will be required for the development and mass production stages.

  9. [Masked hypertension: myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Mallion, Jean-Michel; Ormezzano, Olivier; Barone-Rochette, Gilles; Neuder, Yannick; Salvat, Muriel; Baguet, Jean-Philippe

    2008-06-01

    Masked hypertension is also referred as reverse white coat hypertension. Masked hypertension is diagnosed in subjects who have normal clinic blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mmHg and elevated ambulatory BP or home BP, with daytime systolic BP> or = 135 mmHg or daytime diastolic BP > or = 85 mmHg. Its prevalence varies between 10 to at least 47% and differs substantially according to the reference population and the specific criteria.Subjects with masked hypertension have been shown to have more extensive target organ damage, specifically, a higher prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis and of left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy. Longitudinal studies of patients with masked hypertension show higher levels of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than in reference populations. These studies show that ambulatory or home BP measurements predict risk much better than the usual clinical measurements and that those who are found to be hypertensive by ambulatory or home measurements have greater risks than those who are not. Who should be tested for masked hypertension? Our reference study shows that 3 characteristics are most likely to predict masked hypertension: male sex, age over 60 years, and office systolic BP of more than 130 mmHg. Masked hypertension is indeed a reality. Individual patients should be tested and treated, based on the physician's clinical judgment.

  10. The EOS CERES Global Cloud Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, T. A.; Welch, R. M.; Trepte, Q.; Schaaf, C.; Baum, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    To detect long-term climate trends, it is essential to produce long-term and consistent data sets from a variety of different satellite platforms. With current global cloud climatology data sets, such as the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Experiment (ISCCP) or CLAVR (Clouds from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), one of the first processing steps is to determine whether an imager pixel is obstructed between the satellite and the surface, i.e., determine a cloud 'mask.' A cloud mask is essential to studies monitoring changes over ocean, land, or snow-covered surfaces. As part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program, a series of platforms will be flown beginning in 1997 with the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and subsequently the EOS-AM and EOS-PM platforms in following years. The cloud imager on TRMM is the Visible/Infrared Sensor (VIRS), while the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is the imager on the EOS platforms. To be useful for long term studies, a cloud masking algorithm should produce consistent results between existing (AVHRR) data, and future VIRS and MODIS data. The present work outlines both existing and proposed approaches to detecting cloud using multispectral narrowband radiance data. Clouds generally are characterized by higher albedos and lower temperatures than the underlying surface. However, there are numerous conditions when this characterization is inappropriate, most notably over snow and ice of the cloud types, cirrus, stratocumulus and cumulus are the most difficult to detect. Other problems arise when analyzing data from sun-glint areas over oceans or lakes over deserts or over regions containing numerous fires and smoke. The cloud mask effort builds upon operational experience of several groups that will now be discussed.

  11. Mask side wall clamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naaijkens, G. J. P.; Rosielle, P. C. J. N.; Steinbuch, M.

    2013-04-01

    Current state-of-the-art optical lithography scanners using 193nm wavelength lasers and numerical apertures of 1.35 have reached fundamental printing limits. Yet, consumer demands and device trends continue to drive smaller feature sizes, and most IC manufacturers have already navigated beyond the lithographic printing limits by turning to double patterning techniques.1 Requiring an extra lithography step for these techniques, it is essential to keep costs down by e.g. increasing wafer throughput. Currently, leading edge immersion scanners consistently produce over 190 wafers per hour (wph). However, to keep decreasing the cost per transistor, higher throughputs of 250 wph are key targets for the year 20132. Amongst others, higher throughput can be acquired by increasing acceleration of the positioning stages. One of the constraining technologies is the current mask or reticle clamping concept due to its friction based acceleration. While current reticle accelerations amount to 150 m/s2, some research3 has already been performed to reticle stage accelerations of 400 m/s2. In this paper, a novel reticle clamping concept is presented. The concept is shown to be suitable for accelerations larger than 400 m/s2 entirely eliminating reticle slip, whilst meeting specifications for clamping induced error with a pattern deformation of < 0.12 nm on wafer stage level (WS) and comprising high clamp stiffness.

  12. Hg-Mask Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, P.; Veiga, C. H.; Vieira Martins, R.; Assus, P.; Colas, F.

    In order to optimize the occulting process of a Lyot coronagraph and to provide a high dynamic range imaging, a new kind of occulting disk has been developed at the National Observatory of Rio de Janeiro. A mercury (Hg) drop glued onto an optical window by molecular cohesion and compressed by a pellicle film is used as the occulting disk. The minimum of the superficial tension potential function provides an optical precision (lambda/100) of the toric free surface of the mercury. This process provides a size control for the adaptation to the seeing conditions and to the apparent diameter of a resolved object, and in the case of adaptive optics, to the Airy diameter fraction needed. The occultation is a three dimensional process near the focal plane on the toric free surface that provides an apodization of the occultation. The Hg-Mask coronagraph has been projected for astrometric observations of faint satellites near to Jovian planets and works since 2000 at the 1.6 m telescope of the Pico dos Dias Observatory (OPD - Brazil).

  13. Ofsted Inspected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffield, Frank

    2009-01-01

    One of the most radical actions one can take is to describe, without exaggeration or bias, exactly what is happening. The author has been reading the "Handbook for the inspection of further education and skills from September 2009." The Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills' (Ofsted's) new handbook promises a "fresh…

  14. From nightmares to sweet dreams: inspection of aggressive OPC on 14nm reticles (and beyond) using a novel high-NA and low-NA dual method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen D.; Hibbs, Michael; Seki, Kazunori; Broadbent, William; Hutchinson, Trent; Redding, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    To prevent catastrophic failures in wafer manufacturing lines from reticle defects, mask manufacturers employ sophisticated reticle inspection systems to examine every shape on every reticle for defects. The predominant inspection systems in use today compare the reticle directly with the design database using high-NA optics (typically 3x higher resolution at the reticle plane than advanced wafer scanners). High-NA optical inspection with its high signal to noise ratio (SNR) can readily detect small defects before they have lithographic impact, thus ensuring reticle quality. However, when inspecting certain aggressive OPC, high-NA inspection can overload on small OPC defects which do not have lithographic impact and thus, should generally be ignored. Whereas, inspecting a reticle as imaged in the wafer plane (low-NA in the reticle plane) will generally ignore such small OPC defects; however, the SNR is often too low for certain defect types to provide the needed defect detection sensitivity to ensure reticle quality. This paper discusses the design and performance of a novel reticle inspection method using high-NA and low-NA dual optical imaging and processing. This method offers the high defect sensitivity of high-NA inspection with the OPC tolerance of low-NA inspection. These two imaging methods are blended together into a seamless inspection mode suitable for aggressive OPC of the 14nm generation and beyond. The test reticles include 14nm logic designs containing aggressive OPC and native defects, as well as a 14 nm test reticle containing relevant programmed defects. Defect lithographic significance is judged using a Zeiss AIMS™ system.

  15. Robot Mounted Laser Scanner For Paint Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. N.; Baker, L. R.; Atkinson, R. M.; Claridge, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The final inspection of manufactured goods is a labour intensive activity. The use of human inspectors has a number of potential disadvantages; it can be expensive, the inspection standard applied is subjective and the inspection process can be slow compared with the production process. The use of automatic optical and electronic systems to perform the inspection task is now a growing practice but, in general, such systems have been applied to small components which are accurately presented. Recent advances in vision systems and robot control technology have made possible the installation of an automated paint inspection system at the Austin Rover Group's plant at Cowley, Oxford.

  16. Measuring the Cold Mask Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roye, E.; Krist, J.; Schultz, A. B.; Wiklind, T.

    2003-04-01

    An unexpected increase in measured thermal background during the Cycle 11 early calibration program caused speculation that the cold mask position could have shifted since Cycle 7. To address this concern, a single orbit NICMOS program was executed (Program ID: 9704) to obtain deep PSF images of the star LHS1846 in all three cameras. Analysis of this data using the Phase Retrieval software package revealed a minimal amount of cold mask shift since Cycle 7 and provided new, more accurate cold mask values for the Tiny Tim PSF modeling software. It was concluded that the cold mask position was not the cause of increased thermal background observed during the Cycle 11 early calibration program. Increased thermal background has since been determined to be the result of increased thermal load on the HST aft shroud due to the addition of ACS and NCS during SM3b.

  17. EUVL mask performance and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, Natalia; de Kruif, Robert; van Setten, Eelco; Connolly, Brid; Mehagnoul, Karolien; Zimmerman, John; Harned, Noreen; Kalk, Franklin

    2012-02-01

    EUV lithography requires an exposure system with complex reflective optics and an equally complex EUV dedicated reflective mask. The required high level of reflectivity is obtained by using multilayers. The multilayer of the system optics and the mask are tuned to each other. The mask is equipped with an additional patterned absorber layer. The EUV mask is an optical element with many parameters that contribute to the final image and overlay quality on the wafer and the productivity of the system. Several of these parameters can be tuned for optimal overlay, imaging and productivity results. This should be done with care because of possible interaction between parameters. We will present an overview of the EUV mask contributors to the imaging, overlay and productivity performance for the 27 nm node and below, such as multilayer and absorber stack composition, reflectivity and reflectivity uniformity. These parameters will be reviewed in the context of real-life scanner parameters for the ASML NXE:3100 and NXE:3300 system configurations. The predictions will be compared to actual exposure results on NXE:3100 systems (NA=0.25) for various masks and extrapolated to the NXE:3300 (NA=0.33). In particular, we will present extensive multilayer and absorber actinic spectral reflectance measurements of a state-ofthe art EUV mask over a range of incidence angles corresponding to an NA of 0.33 at multiple positions within the image field. The ML measurements allow calibrating ML stack for imaging simulations. It allows also the estimation of mask-induced apodization effects having impact on overlay. In general, the reflectivity measurements will give detailed variations over the image field of mask parameters such as ML centroid wavelength and absorber reflectivity which contribute to CD uniformity. Such a relation will be established by means of rigorous full stack imaging simulations taking into account optical properties of the coming NXE:3300 system. Based on this

  18. Low-defect reflective mask blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, S C; Cerjarn, C; Kearney, P; Mirkarimi, P; Walton, C; Ray-Chaudhuri, A

    1999-03-11

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithgraphy (EUVL) is an emerging technology for fabrication of sub-100 nm feature sizes on silicon, following the SIA roadmap well into the 21st century. The specific EUVL system described is a scanned, projection lithography system with a 4:1 reduction, using a laser plasma EUV source. The mask and all of the system optics are reflective, multilayer mirrors which function in the extreme ultraviolet at 13.4 nm wavelength. Since the masks are imaged to the wafer exposure plane, mask defects greater than 80% of the exposure plane CD (for 4:1 reduction) will in many cases render the mask useless, whereas intervening optics can have defects which are not a printing problem. For the 100 nm node, we must reduce defects to less than 0.01/cm² @ 80nm or larger to obtain acceptable mask production yields. We have succeeded in reducing the defects to less than 0.1/cm² for defects larger than 130 nm detected by visible light inspection tools, however our program goal is to achieve 0.01/cm² in the near future. More importantly though, we plan to have a detailed understanding of defect origination and the effect on multilayer growth in order to mitigate defects below the 10-2/cm² level on the next generation of mask blank deposition systems. In this paper we will discuss issues and results from the ion-beam multilayer deposition tool, details of the defect detection and characterization facility, and progress on defect printability modeling.

  19. Impact of topographic mask models on scanner matching solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminski, Jacek K.; Pomplun, Jan; Renwick, Stephen P.

    2014-03-01

    Of keen interest to the IC industry are advanced computational lithography applications such as Optical Proximity Correction of IC layouts (OPC), scanner matching by optical proximity effect matching (OPEM), and Source Optimization (SO) and Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) used as advanced reticle enhancement techniques. The success of these tasks is strongly dependent on the integrity of the lithographic simulators used in computational lithography (CL) optimizers. Lithographic mask models used by these simulators are key drivers impacting the accuracy of the image predications, and as a consequence, determine the validity of these CL solutions. Much of the CL work involves Kirchhoff mask models, a.k.a. thin masks approximation, simplifying the treatment of the mask near-field images. On the other hand, imaging models for hyper-NA scanner require that the interactions of the illumination fields with the mask topography be rigorously accounted for, by numerically solving Maxwell's Equations. The simulators used to predict the image formation in the hyper-NA scanners must rigorously treat the masks topography and its interaction with the scanner illuminators. Such imaging models come at a high computational cost and pose challenging accuracy vs. compute time tradeoffs. Additional complication comes from the fact that the performance metrics used in computational lithography tasks show highly non-linear response to the optimization parameters. Finally, the number of patterns used for tasks such as OPC, OPEM, SO, or SMO range from tens to hundreds. These requirements determine the complexity and the workload of the lithography optimization tasks. The tools to build rigorous imaging optimizers based on first-principles governing imaging in scanners are available, but the quantifiable benefits they might provide are not very well understood. To quantify the performance of OPE matching solutions, we have compared the results of various imaging optimization trials obtained

  20. Visual Masking During Pursuit Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles W.

    1976-01-01

    Visual masking occurs when one stimulus interferes with the perception of another stimulus. Investigates which matters more for visual masking--that the target and masking stimuli are flashed on the same part of the retina, or, that the target and mask appear in the same place. (Author/RK)

  1. The Meaning behind the Mask. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    In this lesson plan, students explore the cultural significance of masks. After exploring the world of African masks and storytelling, they create masks that tell stories of their own. In these six lessons, students first recall contexts in which masks are worn in the United States, and then discuss their use in stories. Students then investigate…

  2. IPPEX (Inspection Process Planning EXpert): An automated planning system for dimensional inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.W.

    1990-04-01

    This paper discusses recent accomplishments obtained from development efforts of a generative dimensional inspection planning system. This system, APEX (Inspection Process Planning EXpert), is a knowledge-based system, currently being developed for the dimensional inspection of piece parts. This prototype system applies artificial intelligence techniques and implements an advanced product definition modeling system. The APEX framework is based on a functional architecture designed for the purpose of producing CMM inspection plans, inspection part programs, and support information. The current APEX prototype system selects the appropriate CMM, identifies the measurable surfaces, suggests probing point determination, performs inspection work element planning, and creates an initial DMIS (Dimensional Measurement Interface Specification) part program, all for a specific workpiece. The following describes the APEX system, its functional activities, system architecture, product definition and tolerance representation, inspection features, inspection work elements, hierarchical inspection task planning approach, dimensional inspection techniques, part program creation, user interfaces formats, and other issues related to integrated inspection planning and part programming for CMMs. Finally, this paper describes a system that advances the development of automated inspection planning, product modelling systems with application accessible dimensions and tolerances, and standard dimensional inspection techniques and methodologies.

  3. RET masks for patterning 45nm node contact hole using ArF immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Michael; Chen, J. Fung; Van Den Broeke, Doug; En Tszng, Shih; Shieh, Jason; Hsu, Stephen; Shi, Xuelong

    2006-05-01

    Immersion exposure system with the numerical aperture (NA) greater than unity effectively extends the printing resolution limit without the need of shrinking the exposure wavelength. From the perspective of imaging contact hole mask, we are convinced that a mature ArF immersion exposure system will be able to meet 45nm node manufacturing requirement. However, from a full-chip mask data processing point of view, a more challenging question could be: how to ensure the intended RET mask to best achieve a production worthy solution? At 45nm, we are using one-fourth of the exposure wavelength for the patterning; there is very little room for error. For full-chip, especially for contact hole mask, we need a robust RET mask strategy to ensure sufficient CD control. A production-worthy RET mask technology should have good imaging performance with advanced exposure system; and, it should base on currently available mask blank material and be compatible with the existing mask making process. In this work, we propose a new type of contact hole RET masks that is capable of 45nm node full-chip manufacturing. Three types of potential RET masks are studied. The 1st type is the conventional 6% attenuated PSM (attPSM) with 0-phase Scattering Bars (SB). The 2nd type is to use CPL mask with both 0- and π-phase SB, and their relative placements are based on interference mapping lithography (IML) under optimized illumination. The 3rd type, here named as 6% CPL, can be thought of as a CPL mask type with 6% transmission on the background but with π-phase SB only. Of those three RET masks, 6% CPL mask has the best performance for printing 45nm contact and via masks. To implement 6% CPL for contact and via mask design, we study several critical process steps starting from the illumination optimization, model-based SB OPC, 3D mask effect, quartz etch depth optimization, side-lobe printability verification, and then to the mask making flow. Additionally, we investigate printability for

  4. Automated SEM metrology of wafers printed using a SCAA mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Sunil; Ebihara, Takeaki; Levenson, David; White, Sylvia

    2002-07-01

    The massive amount of data necessary to qualify a new 100nm generation technology can be efficiency collected using a CD-SEM and analyzed using Klarity ProData. By comparing the linewidths, space widths, and pitches printed in resists with different focus, exposure does, and numerical aperture with the measured reticle parameters, one can be determine optimal processing conditions and the required biasing rules for the new technology. The Sidewall Chrome Alternating Aperture Mask, a next generation alternating phase shift mask structure, is especially suitable for this as all relevant mask features are visible from the top surface which, however, is not planar and thus can confuse optical mask inspection tools. Resist patterns with line-space pitches from 220nm to 800nm and isolated lines - as well as the reticle - were measured sing a KLA-Tencor 8250 CD-SEM and analyzed with ProData. At the isofocal dose, the 70nm line - 150nm space reticle pattern printed with equal 110 nm lines and spaces at NA equals 0.63 on a Canon FPA-5000 ES3 248 nm step and scan tool, with a process window that overlapped those of less dense approximately 100 nm features.

  5. [Costicartilage analysis inspection technology in the application of forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Meng, Hang; Xiao, Bi; Yan, Jian-Jun; Ma, Kai-Jun

    2011-10-01

    The traditional costicartilage analysis inspection is limited to morphological inspection. In recent years, with the development of forensic radiology and molecular genetics, the costicartilage analysis inspection technology has been further enriched and developed. At present, the costicartilage analysis inspection technology have been able to be used in the practice of forensic medicine. This paper reviews the research advances about the costicartilage analysis inspection technology in the identification of human gender, age and so on in order to provide the references for forensic appraisers.

  6. The mask of psychotic diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Garfield, David

    2003-01-01

    Chronic mental illness results in the patient becoming adhered to a DSM-IV diagnostic label. Over time, this diagnosis can expand and become a "mask" that invisibly covers over the true person of the patient. Most commonly, two things then occur. First, the outside world forgets that the patient is a person and family, friends, staff, and doctors begin to treat the patient according to the superficial aspects of what the mask of the diagnosis connotes, rather than connecting with the person struggling with the illness. Second and, perhaps, more insidious, is that the patient, who has been vulnerable and shattered by his or her experience and battle with the illness, adopts the mask as a kind of invisible protective shield. The task of making contact with the patient behind the mask of the diagnosis is therefore a formidable one for psychoanalysts and therapists and staff who work with seriously ill patients. Treatment must focus on the dual process of interfering with the patient's use of the diagnostic mask while, at the same time, making safe contact with the person of the patient behind the mask. A focus on affect can help achieve these dual goals. By utilizing Semrad's (Semrad and van Buskirk, 1969) method of noticing and asking about "feelings" as conveyed by hallucinations, delusions, or bodily sensations, a reliable relationship can evolve and the clinician can come to have an important "selfobject" (Kohut, 1971) meaning for the patient. By attuning to the patient's "vitality" affects (Stern, 1985), great stability and a new sense of "aliveness" is made possible to help the patient emerge from the deadening effects of the illness and the mask of the diagnosis. PMID:12722887

  7. Planarization of topography with spin-on carbon hard mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noya, Go; Hama, Yusuke; Ishii, Maki; Nakasugi, Shigemasa; Kudo, Takanori; Padmanaban, Munirathna

    2016-03-01

    Spin-on-carbon hard mask (SOC HM) has been used in semiconductor manufacturing since 45nm node as an alternative carbon hard mask process to chemical vapor deposition (CVD). As advancement of semiconductor to 2X nm nodes and beyond, multiple patterning technology is used and planarization of topography become more important and challenging ever before. In order to develop next generation SOC, one of focuses is planarization of topography. SOC with different concepts for improved planarization and the influence of thermal flow temperature, crosslink, film shrinkage, baking conditions on planarization and filling performance are described in this paper.

  8. Carbon contamination of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask and its effect on imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yu-Jen; Yankulin, Leonid; Antohe, Alin; Garg, Rashi; Thomas, Petros; Mbanaso, Chimaobi; Wuest, Andreas; Goodwin, Frank; Huh, Sungmin; Naulleau, Patrick; Goldlberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopo; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2009-02-02

    Carbon contamination of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks and its effect on imaging is a significant issue due to lowered throughput and potential effects on imaging performance. In this work, a series of carbon contamination experiments were performed on a patterned EUV mask. Contaminated features were then inspected with a reticle scanning electron microscope (SEM) and printed with the SEMA TECH Berkeley Microfield-Exposure tool (MET) [1]. In addition, the mask was analyzed using the SEMA TECH Berkeley Actinic-Inspection tool (AIT) [2] to determine the effect of carbon contamination on the absorbing features and printing performance. To understand the contamination topography, simulations were performed based on calculated aerial images and resist parameters. With the knowledge of the topography, simulations were then used to predict the effect of other thicknesses of the contamination layer, as well as the imaging performance on printed features.

  9. Generative inspection process planner for integrated production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.W. . Kansas City Div.); Gyorog, D.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-04-01

    This work describes the design prototype development of a generative process planning system for dimensional inspection. The system, IPPEX (Inspection Process Planning EXpert), is a rule-based expert system for integrated production. Using as advanced product modeler, relational databases, and artificial intelligence techniques, IPPEX generates the process plan and part program for the dimensional inspection of products using CMMs. Through an application interface, the IPPEX system software accesses product definition from the product modeler. The modeler is a solid geometric modeler coupled with a dimension and tolerance modeler. Resource data regarding the machines, probes, and fixtures are queried from databases. IPPEX represents inspection process knowledge as production rules and incorporates an embedded inference engine to perform decision making. The IPPEX system, its functional architecture, system architecture, system approach, product modeling environment, inspection features, inspection knowledge, hierarchical planning strategy, user interface formats, and other fundamental issues related to inspection planning and part programming for CMMs are described. 27 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. An operator interface design for a telerobotic inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.; Tso, Kam S.; Hayati, Samad

    1993-01-01

    The operator interface has recently emerged as an important element for efficient and safe interactions between human operators and telerobotics. Advances in graphical user interface and graphics technologies enable us to produce very efficient operator interface designs. This paper describes an efficient graphical operator interface design newly developed for remote surface inspection at NASA-JPL. The interface, designed so that remote surface inspection can be performed by a single operator with an integrated robot control and image inspection capability, supports three inspection strategies of teleoperated human visual inspection, human visual inspection with automated scanning, and machine-vision-based automated inspection.

  11. Cloud and Cloud Shadow Masking Using Multi-Temporal Cloud Masking Algorithm in Tropical Environmental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candra, D. S.; Phinn, S.; Scarth, P.

    2016-06-01

    A cloud masking approach based on multi-temporal satellite images is proposed. The basic idea of this approach is to detect cloud and cloud shadow by using the difference reflectance values between clear pixels and cloud and cloud shadow contaminated pixels. Several bands of satellite image which have big difference values are selected for developing Multi-temporal Cloud Masking (MCM) algorithm. Some experimental analyses are conducted by using Landsat-8 images. Band 3 and band 4 are selected because they can distinguish between cloud and non cloud. Afterwards, band 5 and band 6 are used to distinguish between cloud shadow and clear. The results show that the MCM algorithm can detect cloud and cloud shadow appropriately. Moreover, qualitative and quantitative assessments are conducted using visual inspections and confusion matrix, respectively, to evaluate the reliability of this algorithm. Comparison between this algorithm and QA band are conducted to prove the reliability of the approach. The results show that MCM better than QA band and the accuracy of the results are very high.

  12. Optical inspection system for cylindrical objects

    DOEpatents

    Brenden, Byron B.; Peters, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    In the inspection of cylindrical objects, particularly O-rings, the object is translated through a field of view and a linear light trace is projected on its surface. An image of the light trace is projected on a mask, which has a size and shape corresponding to the size and shape which the image would have if the surface of the object were perfect. If there is a defect, light will pass the mask and be sensed by a detector positioned behind the mask. Preferably, two masks and associated detectors are used, one mask being convex to pass light when the light trace falls on a projection from the surface and the other concave, to pass light when the light trace falls on a depression in the surface. The light trace may be either dynamic, formed by a scanned laser beam, or static, formed by such a beam focussed by a cylindrical lens. Means are provided to automatically keep the illuminating receiving systems properly aligned.

  13. EUV mask particle adders during scanner exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Yoonsuk; Kim, Jinsoo; Kim, Kyuyoung; Koo, Sunyoung; Kim, SeoMin; Kim, Youngsik; Lim, Changmoon; Kwak, Nohjung

    2015-03-01

    As EUV reaches high volume manufacturing, scanner source power and reticle defectivity attract a lot of attention. Keeping a EUV mask clean after mask production is as essential as producing a clean EUV mask. Even though EUV pellicle is actively investigated, we might expose EUV masks without EUV pellicle for some time. To keep clean EUV mask under pellicle-less lithography, EUV scanner cleanliness needs to meet the requirement of high volume manufacturing. In this paper, we will show the cleanliness of EUV scanners in view of mask particle adders during scanner exposure. From this we will find several tendencies of mask particle adders depending on mask environment in scanner. Further we can categorize mask particle adders, which could show the possible causes of particle adders during exposure in scanners.

  14. Informational masking and musical training.

    PubMed

    Oxenham, Andrew J; Fligor, Brian J; Mason, Christine R; Kidd, Gerald

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between musical training and informational masking was studied for 24 young adult listeners with normal hearing. The listeners were divided into two groups based on musical training. In one group, the listeners had little or no musical training; the other group was comprised of highly trained, currently active musicians. The hypothesis was that musicians may be less susceptible to informational masking, which is thought to reflect central, rather than peripheral, limitations on the processing of sound. Masked thresholds were measured in two conditions, similar to those used by Kidd et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 3475-3480 (1994)]. In both conditions the signal was comprised of a series of repeated tone bursts at 1 kHz. The masker was comprised of a series of multitone bursts, gated with the signal. In one condition the frequencies of the masker were selected randomly for each burst; in the other condition the masker frequencies were selected randomly for the first burst of each interval and then remained constant throughout the interval. The difference in thresholds between the two conditions was taken as a measure of informational masking. Frequency selectivity, using the notched-noise method, was also estimated in the two groups. The results showed no difference in frequency selectivity between the two groups, but showed a large and significant difference in the amount of informational masking between musically trained and untrained listeners. This informational masking task, which requires no knowledge specific to musical training (such as note or interval names) and is generally not susceptible to systematic short- or medium-term training effects, may provide a basis for further studies of analytic listening abilities in different populations.

  15. Informational masking and musical training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxenham, Andrew J.; Fligor, Brian J.; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between musical training and informational masking was studied for 24 young adult listeners with normal hearing. The listeners were divided into two groups based on musical training. In one group, the listeners had little or no musical training; the other group was comprised of highly trained, currently active musicians. The hypothesis was that musicians may be less susceptible to informational masking, which is thought to reflect central, rather than peripheral, limitations on the processing of sound. Masked thresholds were measured in two conditions, similar to those used by Kidd et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 3475-3480 (1994)]. In both conditions the signal was comprised of a series of repeated tone bursts at 1 kHz. The masker was comprised of a series of multitone bursts, gated with the signal. In one condition the frequencies of the masker were selected randomly for each burst; in the other condition the masker frequencies were selected randomly for the first burst of each interval and then remained constant throughout the interval. The difference in thresholds between the two conditions was taken as a measure of informational masking. Frequency selectivity, using the notched-noise method, was also estimated in the two groups. The results showed no difference in frequency selectivity between the two groups, but showed a large and significant difference in the amount of informational masking between musically trained and untrained listeners. This informational masking task, which requires no knowledge specific to musical training (such as note or interval names) and is generally not susceptible to systematic short- or medium-term training effects, may provide a basis for further studies of analytic listening abilities in different populations.

  16. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2003-12-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener's task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model's interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed changes

  17. Production mask composition checking flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shou-Yuan; Yang, Chuen-Huei; Tsai, Joe; Wang, Alice; Lin, Roger; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin; Lin, Ling-Chieh; Liao, Hung-Yueh; Tsai, Jenny; Bowhill, Amanda; Vu, Hien; Russell, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The mask composition checking flow is an evolution of the traditional mask rule check (MRC). In order to differentiate the flow from MRC, we call it Mask Data Correctness Check (MDCC). The mask house does MRC only to identify process limitations including writing, etching, metrology, etc. There still exist many potential errors that could occur when the frame, main circuit and dummies all together form a whole reticle. The MDCC flow combines the design rule check (DRC) and MRC concepts to adapt to the complex patterns in today's wafer production technologies. Although photomask data has unique characteristics, the MRC tool in Calibre® MDP can easily achieve mask composition by using the Extended MEBES job deck (EJB) format. In EJB format, we can customize the combination of any input layers in an IC design layout format, such as OASIS. Calibre MDP provides section-based processing for many standard verification rule format (SVRF) commands that support DRC-like checks on mask data. Integrating DRC-like checking with EJB for layer composition, we actually perform reticle-level DRC, which is the essence of MDCC. The flow also provides an early review environment before the photomask pattern files are available. Furthermore, to incorporate the MDCC in our production flow, runtime is one of the most important indexes we consider. When the MDCC is included in the tape-out flow, the runtime impact is very limited. Calibre, with its multi-threaded processes and good scalability, is the key to achieving acceptable runtime. In this paper, we present real case runtime data for 28nm and 14nm technology nodes, and prove the practicability of placing MDCC into mass production.

  18. Mask roughness induced LER: geometric model at long correlation lengths

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-02-11

    Collective understanding of how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER has made significant advances. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which mask surface roughness couples to image plane LER as a function of illumination conditions, NA, and defocus. Recently, progress has been made in formulating a simplified solution for mask roughness induced LER. Here, we investigate the LER behavior at long correlation lengths of surface roughness on the mask. We find that for correlation lengths greater than 3/NA in wafer dimensions and CDs greater than approximately 0.75/NA, the previously described simplified model, which remains based on physical optics, converges to a 'geometric regime' which is based on ray optics and is independent of partial coherence. In this 'geometric regime', the LER is proportional to the mask slope error as it propagates through focus, and provides a faster alternative to calculating LER in contrast to either full 2D aerial image simulation modeling or the newly proposed physical optics model. Data is presented for both an NA = 0.32 and an NA = 0.5 imaging system for CDs of 22-nm and 50-nm horizontal-line-dense structures.

  19. Inspection and repair for imprint lithography at 32 nm and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Pritschow, Marcus; Butschke, Joerg; Irmscher, Mathias; Sailer, Holger; Dobberstein, Harald

    2009-04-01

    Step and Flash Imprint involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the progress made in inspection and repair of 1X imprint masks A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. These defects were then inspected using three different electron beam inspection systems. Defect sizes as small as 8 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type. Both subtractive and additive repairs were attempted on SRAM Metal 1 cells. Repairs as small as 32nm were demonstrated, and the repair process was successfully tested for several hundreds of imprints.

  20. Rigorous diffraction analysis using geometrical theory of diffraction for future mask technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Gek S.; Tay, Cho J.; Quan, Chenggen; Lin, Qunying

    2004-05-01

    Advanced lithographic techniques such as phase shift masks (PSM) and optical proximity correction (OPC) result in a more complex mask design and technology. In contrast to the binary masks, which have only transparent and nontransparent regions, phase shift masks also take into consideration transparent features with a different optical thickness and a modified phase of the transmitted light. PSM are well-known to show prominent diffraction effects, which cannot be described by the assumption of an infinitely thin mask (Kirchhoff approach) that is used in many commercial photolithography simulators. A correct prediction of sidelobe printability, process windows and linearity of OPC masks require the application of rigorous diffraction theory. The problem of aerial image intensity imbalance through focus with alternating Phase Shift Masks (altPSMs) is performed and compared between a time-domain finite-difference (TDFD) algorithm (TEMPEST) and Geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Using GTD, with the solution to the canonical problems, we obtained a relationship between the edge on the mask and the disturbance in image space. The main interest is to develop useful formulations that can be readily applied to solve rigorous diffraction for future mask technology. Analysis of rigorous diffraction effects for altPSMs using GTD approach will be discussed.

  1. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J

    1994-01-01

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  2. Multiple beam mask writers: an industry solution to the write time crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Lloyd C.

    2010-09-01

    The semiconductor industry is under constant pressure to reduce production costs even as technology complexity increases. Lithography represents the most expensive process due to its high capital equipment costs and the implementation of low-k1 lithographic processes, which has added to the complexity of making masks through the greater use of optical proximity correction, pixelated masks, and double or triple patterning. Each of these mask technologies allows the production of semiconductors at future nodes while extending the utility of current immersion tools. Low k1 patterning complexity combined with increased data due to smaller feature sizes is driving extremely long mask write times. While a majority of the industry is willing to accept mask write times of up to 24 hours, evidence suggests that the write times for many masks at the 22 nm node and beyond will be significantly longer. It has been estimated that $50M+ in non-recurring engineering (NRE) costs will be required to develop a multiple beam mask writer system, yet the business case to recover this kind of investment is not strong. Moreover, funding such a development is a high risk for an individual supplier. The problem is compounded by a disconnect between the tool customer (the mask supplier) and the final mask customer that will bear the increased costs if a high speed writer is not available. Since no individual company will likely risk entering this market, some type of industry-wide funding model will be needed. Because SEMATECH's member companies strongly support a multiple beam technology for mask writers to reduce the write time and cost of 193 nm and EUV masks, SEMATECH plans to pursue an advanced mask writer program in 2011 and 2012. In 2010, efforts will focus on identifying a funding model to address the investment to develop such a technology.

  3. Multiple-mask chemical etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, D. L.

    1969-01-01

    Multiple masking techniques use lateral etching to reduce the total area of the high etch-rate oxide exposed to the chemical etchant. One method uses a short-term etch to remove the top layer from the silicon oxide surface, another acts before the top layer is grown.

  4. Process optimization for mask fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hideaki; Itoh, Masamitsu; Kumagae, Akitoshi; Anze, Hirohito; Abe, Takayuki; Higashikawa, Iwao

    1998-09-01

    Recently, next-generation mask fabrication processes have been actively examined for application with Electron Beam writing tools and chemically amplified resists. In this study, we used a variable shaped electron beam writing system with an accelerating voltage and chemically amplified resist to investigate the dependence of the CD error in a localized area of a 6025 mask on the process factors, with the goal of fabricating more accurate masks with improving sensitivity. Our results indicated that CD error in a localized area did not depend on the resist thickness. Higher sensitivity and CD uniformity were achieved simultaneously. Moreover, we could isolate the CD error caused by the resist heating effect is more apparent for higher doses than lower doses. However, a higher dose gives rise to a small CD change rate. In this experiment, the effect of the lower CD change rate at a higher dose counterbalances the resist heating effect. By decreasing CD error in a localized area, we obtained a CD uniformity of 14 nm in a 100 mm area on the mask.

  5. "The Mask Who Wasn't There": Visual Masking Effect with the Perceptual Absence of the Mask

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Amandine Eve; Riou, Benoit; Muller, Dominique; Dabic, Stéphanie; Versace, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Does a visual mask need to be perceptually present to disrupt processing? In the present research, we proposed to explore the link between perceptual and memory mechanisms by demonstrating that a typical sensory phenomenon (visual masking) can be replicated at a memory level. Experiment 1 highlighted an interference effect of a visual mask on the…

  6. Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-28

      Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction This routine demonstrates extraction of the ... in a CALIPSO Lidar Level 2 Vertical Feature Mask feature classification flag value. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) ...

  7. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  8. Method for mask repair using defect compensation

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Donald W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    A method for repair of amplitude and/or phase defects in lithographic masks. The method involves modifying or altering a portion of the absorber pattern on the surface of the mask blank proximate to the mask defect to compensate for the local disturbance (amplitude or phase) of the optical field due to the defect.

  9. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a...

  19. Object Substitution Masking Induced by Illusory Masks: Evidence for Higher Object-Level Locus of Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Nobuyuki; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    A briefly presented target can be rendered invisible by a lingering sparse mask that does not even touch it. This form of visual backward masking, called object substitution masking, is thought to occur at the object level of processing. However, it remains unclear whether object-level interference alone produces substitution masking because…

  20. A Robot Based Automatic Paint Inspection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, R. M.; Claridge, J. F.

    1988-06-01

    The final inspection of manufactured goods is a labour intensive activity. The use of human inspectors has a number of potential disadvantages; it can be expensive, the inspection standard applied is subjective and the inspection process can be slow compared with the production process. The use of automatic optical and electronic systems to perform the inspection task is now a growing practice but, in general, such systems have been applied to small components which are accurately presented. Recent advances in vision systems and robot control technology have made possible the installation of an automated paint inspection system at the Austin Rover Group's plant at Cowley, Oxford. The automatic inspection of painted car bodies is a particularly difficult problem, but one which has major benefits. The pass line of the car bodies is ill-determined, the surface to be inspected is of varying surface geometry and only a short time is available to inspect a large surface area. The benefits, however, are due to the consistent standard of inspection which should lead to lower levels of customer complaints and improved process feedback. The Austin Rover Group initiated the development of a system to fulfil this requirement. Three companies collaborated on the project; Austin Rover itself undertook the production line modifications required for body presentation, Sira Ltd developed the inspection cameras and signal processing system and Unimation (Europe) Ltd designed, supplied and programmed the robot system. Sira's development was supported by a grant from the Department of Trade and Industry.

  1. Performance of actinic EUVL mask imaging using a zoneplate microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K; Naulleau, P; Barty, A; Rekawa, S; Kemp, C; Gunion, R; Salmassi, F; Gullikson, E; Anderson, E; Han, H

    2007-09-25

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a dual-mode, scanning and imaging extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope designed for pre-commercial EUV mask research. Dramatic improvements in image quality have been made by the replacement of several critical optical elements, and the introduction of scanning illumination to improve uniformity and contrast. We report high quality actinic EUV mask imaging with resolutions as low as 100-nm half-pitch, (20-nm, 5x wafer equivalent size), and an assessment of the imaging performance based on several metrics. Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements show high contrast imaging for features sizes close to the diffraction-limit. An investigation of the illumination coherence shows that AIT imaging is much more coherent than previously anticipated, with {sigma} below 0.2. Flare measurements with several line-widths show a flare contribution on the order of 2-3% relative intensity in dark regions above the 1.3% absorber reflectivity on the test mask used for these experiments. Astigmatism coupled with focal plane tilt are the dominant aberrations we have observed. The AIT routinely records 250-350 high-quality images in numerous through-focus series per 8-hour shift. Typical exposure times range from 0.5 seconds during alignment, to approximately 20 seconds for high-resolution images.

  2. Performance of actinic EUVL mask imaging using a zoneplatemicroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Barty, Anton; Rekawa,Senajith B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Gunion, Robert F.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Anderson, Erik H.; Han, Hak-Seung

    2007-08-20

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a dual-mode, scanning and imaging extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope designed for pre-commercial EUV mask research. Dramatic improvements in image quality have been made by the replacement of several critical optical elements, and the introduction of scanning illumination to improve uniformity and contrast. We report high quality actinic EUV mask imaging with resolutions as low as 100-nm half-pitch, (20-nm, 5x wafer equivalent size), and an assessment of the imaging performance based on several metrics. Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements show high contrast imaging for features sizes close to the diffraction-limit. An investigation of the illumination coherence shows that AIT imaging is much more coherent than previously anticipated, with {sigma} below 0.2. Flare measurements with several line-widths show a flare contribution on the order of 2-3% relative intensity in dark regions above the 1.3% absorber reflectivity on the test mask used for these experiments. Astigmatism coupled with focal plane tilt are the dominant aberrations we have observed. The AIT routinely records 250-350 high-quality images in numerous through-focus series per 8-hour shift. Typical exposure times range from 0.5 seconds during alignment, to approximately 20 seconds for high-resolution images.

  3. Inspection of imprint lithography patterns for semiconductor and patterned media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Douglas J.; Haase, Gaddi; Singh, Lovejeet; Curran, David; Schmid, Gerard M.; Luo, Kang; Brooks, Cindy; Selinidis, Kosta; Fretwell, John; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2010-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Acceptance of imprint lithography for manufacturing will require demonstration that it can attain defect levels commensurate with the requirements of cost-effective device production. This work summarizes the results of defect inspections of semiconductor masks, wafers and hard disks patterned using Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM). Inspections were performed with optical and e-beam based automated inspection tools. For the semiconductor market, a test mask was designed which included dense features (with half pitches ranging between 32 nm and 48 nm) containing an extensive array of programmed defects. For this work, both e-beam inspection and optical inspection were used to detect both random defects and the programmed defects. Analytical SEMs were then used to review the defects detected by the inspection. Defect trends over the course of many wafers were observed with another test mask using a KLA-T 2132 optical inspection tool. The primary source of defects over 2000 imprints were particle related. For the hard drive market, it is important to understand the defectivity of both the template and the imprinted disk. This work presents a methodology for automated pattern inspection and defect classification for imprint-patterned media. Candela CS20 and 6120 tools from KLA-Tencor map the optical properties of the disk surface, producing highresolution grayscale images of surface reflectivity, scattered light, phase shift, etc. Defects that have been identified in this manner are further characterized according to the morphology

  4. Actinic imaging of native and programmed defects on a full-field mask

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.; Fontaine, B. La; Tchikoulaeva, A.; Holfeld, C.

    2010-03-12

    We describe the imaging and characterization of native defects on a full field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask, using several reticle and wafer inspection modes. Mask defect images recorded with the SEMA TECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), an EUV-wavelength (13.4 nm) actinic microscope, are compared with mask and printed-wafer images collected with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and deep ultraviolet (DUV) inspection tools. We observed that defects that appear to be opaque in the SEM can be highly transparent to EUV light, and inversely, defects that are mostly transparent to the SEM can be highly opaque to EUV. The nature and composition of these defects, whether they appear on the top surface, within the multilayer coating, or on the substrate as buried bumps or pits, influences both their significance when printed, and their detectability with the available techniques. Actinic inspection quantitatively predicts the characteristics of printed defect images in ways that may not be possible with non-EUV techniques. As a quantitative example, we investigate the main structural characteristics of a buried pit defect based on EUV through-focus imaging.

  5. Improving vision by pupil masking.

    PubMed

    Bonaque-González, Sergio; Ríos-Rodríguez, Susana; López-Gil, Norberto

    2016-07-01

    We propose an alternative solution to improve visual quality by spatially modulating the amplitude of light passing into the eye (related to the eye's transmittance), in contrast to traditional correction of the wavefront phase (related to the local refractive power). Numerical simulations show that masking the aberrated areas at the pupil plane should enhance visual function, especially in highly aberrated eyes. This correction could be implemented in practice using customized contact or intraocular lenses. PMID:27446688

  6. Improving vision by pupil masking

    PubMed Central

    Bonaque-González, Sergio; Ríos-Rodríguez, Susana; López-Gil, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    We propose an alternative solution to improve visual quality by spatially modulating the amplitude of light passing into the eye (related to the eye's transmittance), in contrast to traditional correction of the wavefront phase (related to the local refractive power). Numerical simulations show that masking the aberrated areas at the pupil plane should enhance visual function, especially in highly aberrated eyes. This correction could be implemented in practice using customized contact or intraocular lenses. PMID:27446688

  7. Mask CD uniformity improvement by electron scanning exposure based Global Loading Effect Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rivan; Tian, Eric; Shi, Irene; Guo, Eric; Lu, Max

    2015-07-01

    Critical Dimension (CD) Uniformity is one of the necessary parameters to assure good performance and reliable functionality of any integrated circuit (IC), and towards the advanced technology node 28nm and beyond, corresponding CD Uniformity becomes more and more crucial. It is found that bad mask CD Uniformity is a significant error source at 28nm process. The CD Uniformity on mask, if not controlled well, will badly impact wafer CD performance, and it has been well-studied that CD Uniformity issue from gate line-width in transistors would affect the device performance directly. In this paper we present a novel solution for mask global CD uniformity error correction, which is called as global loading effect correction (GLEC) method and applied nesting in the mask exposure map during the electron beam exposure. There are factors such as global chip layout, writing sequence and chip pattern density distribution (Global Loading), that work on the whole mask CD Uniformity, especially Global Loading is the key factor related to mask global CD error. From our experimental results, different pattern density distribution on mask significantly influenced the final mask CD Uniformity: the mask with undulating pattern density distribution provides much worse CD Uniformity than that with uniform one. Therefore, a GLEC model based on pattern density has been created to compensate the global error during the electron beam exposure, which has been proved to be efficacious to improve mask global CD Uniformity performance. Furthermore, it 's also revealed that pattern type is another important impact factor, and GLEC coefficient need be modified due to the specific pattern type (e.g. dense line-space only, iso-space only or an average of them) to improve the corresponding mask CD uniformity.

  8. History and future of mask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Ken L.

    1996-12-01

    The history of the mask industry has three main periods, which I call the Classical Period, the Dark Ages, and the Renaissance, by analogy with those periods in the history of Western Europe. During the Classical Period, people developed 1X masks and the technology to make them. In the Dark Ages, people exploited the equipment developed during the Classical Period to make 5X reduction reticle, ending the nobility of mask making. In today's Renaissance of mask making, a proliferation of mask types is requiring a rebirth of innovation and creativity. The Renaissance resembles the Classical Period: masks are once again strategic, and technological capability is once again the driver. Meanwhile, the mask industry is carrying forward the productivity and efficiency gains it achieved during the Dark Ages. We must create a new business and economic model to support these changes in the characteristics of the marketplace.

  9. Cortical correlate of pattern backward masking.

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, G; Vogels, R; Orban, G A

    1995-01-01

    The perception of a briefly presented shape is strongly impaired when it is followed by another pattern, a phenomenon called backward masking. We found that the vast majority of a sample of shape-selective neurons in the macaque inferior temporal cortex respond selectively to backward-masked shapes, although these shapes could not be discriminated by human and monkey subjects. However, this selective response was brief, since it was either interrupted by the mask or overridden by a response to the mask itself. We show that reliable discrimination of briefly presented shapes by single neurons depends on the temporal integration of the response. Presentation of the mask, however, reduces the number of spikes available for integration, explaining backward masking. These results also provide direct neurophysiological evidence for the "interruption theory" of backward masking. PMID:7777553

  10. Reflective Occultation Mask for Evaluation of Occulter Designs for Planet Finding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Lyon, Richard; Shiri, Shahram; Roman, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Advanced formation flying occulter designs utilize a large occulter mask flying in formation with an imaging telescope to block and null starlight to allow imaging of faint planets in exosolar systems. A paper describes the utilization of subscale reflective occultation masks to evaluate formation flying occulter designs. The use of a reflective mask allows mounting of the occulter by conventional means and simplifies the test configuration. The innovation alters the test set-up to allow mounting of the mask using standard techniques to eliminate the problems associated with a standard configuration. The modified configuration uses a reflective set-up whereby the star simulator reflects off of a reflective occulting mask and into an evaluation telescope. Since the mask is sized to capture all rays required for the imaging test, it can be mounted directly to a supporting fixture without interfering with the beam. Functionally, the reflective occultation mask reflects light from the star simulator instead of transmitting it, with a highly absorptive carbon nanotube layer simulating the occulter blocking mask. A subscale telescope images the star source and companion dim source that represents a planet. The primary advantage of this is that the occulter can be mounted conventionally instead of using diffractive wires or magnetic levitation.

  11. E-beam data compaction method for large-capacity mask ROM production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemaru, Toyomi; Nakajima, Takashi; Igarashi, Tadanao; Masuda, Rika; Orita, Nobuyuki

    1991-03-01

    Mask ROMs are one of the most advanced devices commercially available today. 4 Mbit DRAMs are just coming to the market, where 32 Mbit and 64 Mbit Mask ROM products also are entering the market. The code mask of Mask ROM consists, of a random distribution of repeated cells on a constant grid, so it is difficult to use conventional e-beam data compaction techniques for the code mask level of a Mask ROM. As mask ROM capacity and their mask exposure data volumes increase, the e-beam data processing time for these devices also has increased even with enhanced computational speeds of new mainframe computers. To overcome this problem, we have adopted a new e-beam data compaction technique. With this ne technique of a data compaction, data conversion times on a mainframe computer (ACOS) are substantially shorted and data volume is reduced by as much as a factor of one hundred. Using this new data format, the data volume of a variable shaped vector scan e-beam exposure system became far smaller compared with a spot beam raster scan e-beam system.

  12. Comparative Study of Manufacturing Techniques for Coronagraphic Binary Pupil Masks: Masks on Substrates and Free-Standing Masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, Keigo; Haze, Kanae; Kotani, Takayuki; Abe, Lyu

    2012-12-01

    We present a comparative study of the manufacture of binary pupil masks for coronagraphic observations of exoplanets. A checkerboard mask design, a type of binary pupil mask design, was adopted, and identical patterns of the same size were used for all masks in order that we could compare the differences resulting from the different manufacturing methods. The masks on substrates had aluminum checkerboard patterns with thicknesses of 0.1/0.2/0.4/0.8/1.6μm, constructed on substrates of BK7 glass, silicon, and germanium using photolithography and chemical processes. Free-standing masks made of copper and nickel with thicknesses of 2/5/10/20μm were also realized using photolithography and chemical processes, which included careful release from the substrate used as an intermediate step in the manufacture. Coronagraphic experiments using a visible laser were carried out for all masks on BK7 glass substrate and the free-standing masks. The average contrasts were 8.4 × 10-8, 1.2 × 10-7, and 1.2 × 10-7 for the masks on BK7 substrates, the free-standing copper masks, and the free-standing nickel masks, respectively. No significant correlation was concluded between the contrast and the mask properties. The high-contrast masks have the potential to cover the needs of coronagraphs for both ground-based and space-borne telescopes over a wide wavelength range. Especially, their application to the infrared space telescope, SPICA, is appropriate.

  13. Antireflective surface patterned by rolling mask lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Oliver; Geddes, Joseph B.; Aryal, Mukti; Perez, Joseph; Wassei, Jonathan; McMackin, Ian; Kobrin, Boris

    2014-03-01

    A growing number of commercial products such as displays, solar panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs), automotive and architectural glass are driving demand for glass with high performance surfaces that offer anti-reflective, self-cleaning, and other advanced functions. State-of-the-art coatings do not meet the desired performance characteristics or cannot be applied over large areas in a cost-effective manner. "Rolling Mask Lithography" (RML™) enables highresolution lithographic nano-patterning over large-areas at low-cost and high-throughput. RML is a photolithographic process performed using ultraviolet (UV) illumination transmitted through a soft cylindrical mask as it rolls across a substrate. Subsequent transfer of photoresist patterns into the substrate is achieved using an etching process, which creates a nanostructured surface. The current generation exposure tool is capable of patterning one-meter long substrates with a width of 300 mm. High-throughput and low-cost are achieved using continuous exposure of the resist by the cylindrical photomask. Here, we report on significant improvements in the application of RML™ to fabricate anti-reflective surfaces. Briefly, an optical surface can be made antireflective by "texturing" it with a nano-scale pattern to reduce the discontinuity in the index of refraction between the air and the bulk optical material. An array of cones, similar to the structure of a moth's eye, performs this way. Substrates are patterned using RML™ and etched to produce an array of cones with an aspect ratio of 3:1, which decreases the reflectivity below 0.1%.

  14. High-resolution defect inspection of step-and-flash imprint lithography for 32-nm half-pitch patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; McMackin, Ian; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-03-01

    Step and Flash Imprint involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using KLA-T eS35 and NGR2100 electron beam wafer inspection systems. Defect sizes as small as 8 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  15. Actinic imaging and evaluation of phase structures on EUV lithography masks

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth; Huh, Sungmin

    2010-09-28

    The authors describe the implementation of a phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct phase and complex amplitude of structures on EUV lithography masks. Many native defects commonly found on EUV reticles are difficult to detect and review accurately because they have a strong phase component. Understanding the complex amplitude of mask features is essential for predictive modeling of defect printability and defect repair. Besides printing in a stepper, the most accurate way to characterize such defects is with actinic inspection, performed at the design, EUV wavelength. Phase defect and phase structures show a distinct through-focus behavior that enables qualitative evaluation of the object phase from two or more high-resolution intensity measurements. For the first time, phase of structures and defects on EUV masks were quantitatively reconstructed based on aerial image measurements, using a modified version of a phase-retrieval algorithm developed to test optical phase shifting reticles.

  16. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  17. Polarization masks: concept and initial assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2002-07-01

    Polarization from photomasks can be used as a new lever to improve lithographic performance in both binary and phase-shifting masks (PSMs). While PSMs manipulate the phase of light to control the temporal addition of electric field vectors, polarization masks manipulate the vector direction of electric field vectors to control the spatial addition of electric field components. This paper explores the theoretical possibilities of polarization masks, showing that it is possible to use bar structures within openings on the mask itself to polarize incident radiation. Rigorous electromagnetic scattering simulations using TEMPEST and imaging with SPLAT are used to give an initial assessment on the functionality of polarization masks, discussing the polarization quality and throughputs achieved with the masks. Openings between 1/8 and 1/3 of a wavelength provide both a low polarization ratio and good transmission. A final overall throughput of 33% - 40% is achievable, corresponding to a dose hit of 2.5x - 3x.

  18. Repairing native defects on EUV mask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawliss, Mark; Gallagher, Emily; Hibbs, Michael; Seki, Kazunori; Isogawa, Takeshi; Robinson, Tod; LeClaire, Jeff

    2014-10-01

    Mask defectivity is a serious problem for all lithographic masks, but especially for EUV masks. Defects in the EUV blank are particularly challenging because their elimination is beyond control of the mask fab. If defects have been identified on a mask blank, patterns can be shifted to place as many blank defects as possible in regions where printing impact will be eliminated or become unimportant. For those defects that cannot be mitigated through pattern shift, repair strategies must be developed. Repairing defects that occur naturally in the EUV blank is challenging because the printability of these defects varies widely. This paper describes some types of native defects commonly found and begins to outline a triage strategy for defects that are identified on the blank. Sample defects best suited to nanomachining repair are treated in detail: repairs are attempted, characterized using mask metrology and then tested for printability. Based on the initial results, the viability of repairing EUV blank native defects is discussed.

  19. Semiconductor technology trend and requirements for masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Hiroyoshi

    1999-08-01

    The fabrication cost of the semiconductor device is increasing because the fabrication cost per wafer unit area and the mask cost are increasing rapidly with the design rule decreased. The rapid increase in the mask cost will influence the semiconductor industry growth. The progress in the lithography, including the mask, is the key issue for the progress in the entire semiconductor technology beyond 180 nm design rule, because the mask is indispensable for any types of lithography, and is regarded as one of the most critical technologies, both in resolution and productivity. To continue the progress in the entire semiconductor technology and the growth of the semiconductor business, it is indispensable to make challenges in the low cost and high precision mask technology under the cooperation with related industries and academia. It is especially important to develop the cost optimum solution for the total lithography technology including masks.

  20. Initial testing of advanced ground-penetrating radar technology for the inspection of bridge decks: the HERMES and PERES Bridge Inspectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Nigel C.; Chase, Steven B.

    1999-02-01

    Since early 1995 the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has been sponsoring the development of ground-penetrating radar technology to produce a tool for the non-destructive evaluation of bridge decks. Under contract with the FHWA, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory designed and built a system capable of recording data over a 2 meter width during normal traffic flow. The derived system is called `The HERMES Bridge Inspector' (High-speed Electromagnetic Roadway Measurement and Evaluation System) and includes a 64 channel antenna array within a 30 ft trailer. For detailed investigation of portions of a bridge deck, a robotic cart mounted radar has been developed. This cart system is named `The PERES Bridge Inspector' (Precision Electromagnetic Roadway Evaluation System). PERES records data over the chosen area by rastering a single transceiver over the road. Images of the deck interior are reconstructed from the original synthetic aperture data using diffraction tomography. The work presented herein describes the findings of initial experiments conducted to determine the inspection capabilities of these systems. Internal defects such as delaminations, voids and disbonds; and construction details including deck thickness, asphalt overlay thickness and reinforcement layout were the features targeted. The final goal is for these systems, and other non-destructive technologies, to provide information on the condition of the nation's bridges for input to bridge management systems.

  1. Polyurethane Masks Large Areas in Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Polyurethane foam provides effective mask in electroplating of copper or nickel. Thin layer of Turco maskant painted on area to be masked: Layer ensures polyurethane foam removed easily after served its purpose. Component A, isocyanate, and component B, polyol, mixed together and brushed or sprayed on mask area. Mixture reacts, yielding polyurethane foam. Foam prevents deposition of nickel or copper on covered area. New method saves time, increases productivity and uses less material than older procedures.

  2. VIIRS Cloud Mask Validation Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, R.; Heidinger, A. K.; Hutchison, K.; Dutcher, S.

    2011-12-01

    The NPP Satellite is scheduled for launch October 25, 2011. Included on the platform is the VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Suite) instrument which features 16 bands at about 0.75 m spatial resolution and 5 imager bands at roughly 0.375 m resolution. The basic VIIRS cloud mask (VCM) output is a flag that indicates one of four possible cloudy vs. clear conditions for each 0.75 m pixel: confident clear, probably clear, probably cloudy, and confident cloudy. Pre-launch assessment of the VCM algorithm has been performed with use of MODIS observations as proxy input. Several comparisons are shown between VCM results and cloud detection from other instruments and/or algorithms: MODIS cloud mask (MOD35) at the five-minute granule level (L2), global and regional monthly average cloud amounts from MODIS (MOD35) and MODIS-CERES, ISCCP, PATMOS-x (AVHRR), and CALIOP (lidar). In addition to overall results, collocated MODIS observations, CALIOP and VCM cloud determinations are used to evaluate VCM cloud test thresholds and other tunable parameters. The methods shown will be among those used during the Intensive Calibration and Validation period and beyond.

  3. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  4. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  5. Evaluation of a native vegetation masking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsler, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A crop masking technique based on Ashburn's vegetative index (AVI) was used to evaluate native vegetation as an indicator of crop moisture condition. A mask of the range areas (native vegetation) was generated for each of thirteen Great Plains LANDSAT MSS sample segments. These masks were compared to the digitized ground truth and accuracies were computed. An analysis of the types of errors indicates a consistency in errors among the segments. The mask represents a simple quick-look technique for evaluating vegetative cover.

  6. A cluster randomised trial of cloth masks compared with medical masks in healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, C Raina; Seale, Holly; Dung, Tham Chi; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Nga, Phan Thi; Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Rahman, Bayzidur; Dwyer, Dominic E; Wang, Quanyi

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of cloth masks to medical masks in hospital healthcare workers (HCWs). The null hypothesis is that there is no difference between medical masks and cloth masks. Setting 14 secondary-level/tertiary-level hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam. Participants 1607 hospital HCWs aged ≥18 years working full-time in selected high-risk wards. Intervention Hospital wards were randomised to: medical masks, cloth masks or a control group (usual practice, which included mask wearing). Participants used the mask on every shift for 4 consecutive weeks. Main outcome measure Clinical respiratory illness (CRI), influenza-like illness (ILI) and laboratory-confirmed respiratory virus infection. Results The rates of all infection outcomes were highest in the cloth mask arm, with the rate of ILI statistically significantly higher in the cloth mask arm (relative risk (RR)=13.00, 95% CI 1.69 to 100.07) compared with the medical mask arm. Cloth masks also had significantly higher rates of ILI compared with the control arm. An analysis by mask use showed ILI (RR=6.64, 95% CI 1.45 to 28.65) and laboratory-confirmed virus (RR=1.72, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.94) were significantly higher in the cloth masks group compared with the medical masks group. Penetration of cloth masks by particles was almost 97% and medical masks 44%. Conclusions This study is the first RCT of cloth masks, and the results caution against the use of cloth masks. This is an important finding to inform occupational health and safety. Moisture retention, reuse of cloth masks and poor filtration may result in increased risk of infection. Further research is needed to inform the widespread use of cloth masks globally. However, as a precautionary measure, cloth masks should not be recommended for HCWs, particularly in high-risk situations, and guidelines need to be updated. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000887077. PMID

  7. Improving the performance of the actinic inspection tool with an optimized alignment procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K.A.; Naulleau, P.; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-03-04

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy is an important tool for the investigation of the performance of EUV masks, for detecting the presence and the characteristics of defects, and for evaluating the effectiveness of defect repair techniques. Aerial image measurement bypasses the difficulties inherent to photoresist imaging and enables high data collection speed and flexibility. It provides reliable and quick feedback for the development of masks and lithography system modeling methods. We operate the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), a EUV microscope installed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The AIT is equipped with several high-magnification Fresnel zoneplate lenses, with various numerical aperture values, that enable it image the reflective mask surface with various resolution and magnification settings. Although the AIT has undergone significant recent improvements in terms of imaging resolution and illumination uniformity, there is still room for improvement. In the AIT, an off-axis zoneplate lens collects the light coming from the sample and an image of the sample is projected onto an EUV-sensitive CCD camera. The simplicity of the optical system is particularly helpful considering that the AIT alignment has to be performed every time that a sample or a zoneplate is replaced. The alignment is sensitive to several parameters such as the lens position and orientation, the illumination direction and the sample characteristics. Since the AIT works in high vacuum, there is no direct access to the optics or to the sample during the alignment and the measurements. For all these reasons the alignment procedures and feedback can be complex, and in some cases can reduce the overall data throughput of the system. In this paper we review the main strategies and procedures that have been developed for quick and reliable alignments, and we describe the performance improvements we have achieved, in terms of aberration

  8. Optimization of mask manufacturing rule check constraint for model based assist feature generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Seongbo; Kim, Young-chang; Chun, Yong-jin; Lee, Seong-Woo; Lee, Suk-joo; Choi, Seong-woon; Han, Woo-sung; Chang, Seong-hoon; Yoon, Seok-chan; Kim, Hee-bom; Ki, Won-tai; Woo, Sang-gyun; Cho, Han-gu

    2008-11-01

    SRAF (sub-resolution assist feature) generation technology has been a popular resolution enhancement technique in photo-lithography past sub-65nm node. It helps to increase the process window, and these are some times called ILT(inverse lithography technology). Also, many studies have been presented on how to determine the best positions of SRAFs, and optimize its size. According to these reports, the generation of SRAF can be formulated as a constrained optimization problem. The constraints are the side lobe suppression and allowable minimum feature size or MRC (mask manufacturing rule check). As we know, bigger SRAF gives better contribution to main feature but susceptible to SRAF side lobe issue. Thus, we finally have no choice but to trade-off the advantages of the ideally optimized mask that contains very complicated SRAF patterns to the layout that has been MRC imposed applied to it. The above dilemma can be resolved by simultaneously using lower dose (high threshold) and cleaning up by smaller MRC. This solution makes the room between threshold (side lobe limitation) and MRC constraint (minimum feature limitation) wider. In order to use smaller MRC restriction without considering the mask writing and inspection issue, it is also appropriate to identify the exact mask writing limitation and find the smart mask constraints that well reflect the mask manufacturability and the e-beam lithography characteristics. In this article, we discuss two main topics on mask optimizations with SRAF. The first topic is on the experimental work to find what behavior of the mask writing ability is in term of several MRC parameters, and we propose more effective MRC constraint for aggressive generation of SRAF. The next topic is on finding the optimum MRC condition in practical case, 3X nm node DRAM contact layer. In fact, it is not easy to encompass the mask writing capability for very complicate real SRAF pattern by using the current MRC constraint based on the only width and

  9. Set Size and Mask Duration Do Not Interact in Object-Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyropoulos, Ioannis; Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Carter, Wakefield

    2013-01-01

    Object-substitution masking (OSM) occurs when a mask, such as four dots that surround a brief target item, onsets simultaneously with the target and offsets a short time after the target, rather than simultaneously with it. OSM is a reduction in accuracy of reporting the target with the temporally trailing mask, compared with the simultaneously…

  10. Fast mask writers: technology options and considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Lloyd C.; Groves, Timothy; Hughes, Greg

    2011-04-01

    The semiconductor industry is under constant pressure to reduce production costs even as the complexity of technology increases. Lithography represents the most expensive process due to its high capital equipment costs and the implementation of low-k1 lithographic processes, which have added to the complexity of making masks because of the greater use of optical proximity correction, pixelated masks, and double or triple patterning. Each of these mask technologies allows the production of semiconductors at future nodes while extending the utility of current immersion tools. Low-k1 patterning complexity combined with increased data due to smaller feature sizes is driving extremely long mask write times. While a majority of the industry is willing to accept times of up to 24 hours, evidence suggests that the write times for many masks at the 22 nm node and beyond will be significantly longer. It has been estimated that funding on the order of 50M to 90M for non-recurring engineering (NRE) costs will be required to develop a multiple beam mask writer system, yet the business case to recover this kind of investment is not strong. Moreover, funding such a development poses a high risk for an individual supplier. The structure of the mask fabrication marketplace separates the mask writer equipment customer (the mask supplier) from the final customer (wafer manufacturer) that will be most effected by the increase in mask cost that will result if a high speed mask writer is not available. Since no individual company will likely risk entering this market, some type of industry-wide funding model will be needed.

  11. Shadows Alter Facial Expressions of Noh Masks

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyata, Hiromitsu; Nishimura, Ritsuko; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Background A Noh mask, worn by expert actors during performance on the Japanese traditional Noh drama, conveys various emotional expressions despite its fixed physical properties. How does the mask change its expressions? Shadows change subtly during the actual Noh drama, which plays a key role in creating elusive artistic enchantment. We here describe evidence from two experiments regarding how attached shadows of the Noh masks influence the observers’ recognition of the emotional expressions. Methodology/Principal Findings In Experiment 1, neutral-faced Noh masks having the attached shadows of the happy/sad masks were recognized as bearing happy/sad expressions, respectively. This was true for all four types of masks each of which represented a character differing in sex and age, even though the original characteristics of the masks also greatly influenced the evaluation of emotions. Experiment 2 further revealed that frontal Noh mask images having shadows of upward/downward tilted masks were evaluated as sad/happy, respectively. This was consistent with outcomes from preceding studies using actually tilted Noh mask images. Conclusions/Significance Results from the two experiments concur that purely manipulating attached shadows of the different types of Noh masks significantly alters the emotion recognition. These findings go in line with the mysterious facial expressions observed in Western paintings, such as the elusive qualities of Mona Lisa’s smile. They also agree with the aesthetic principle of Japanese traditional art “yugen (profound grace and subtlety)”, which highly appreciates subtle emotional expressions in the darkness. PMID:23940748

  12. Mask process correction (MPC) modeling and its application to EUV mask for electron beam mask writer EBM-7000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamikubo, Takashi; Ohnishi, Takayuki; Hara, Shigehiro; Anze, Hirohito; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Tamamushi, Shuichi; Bai, Shufeng; Wang, Jen-Shiang; Howell, Rafael; Chen, George; Li, Jiangwei; Tao, Jun; Wiley, Jim; Kurosawa, Terunobu; Saito, Yasuko; Takigawa, Tadahiro

    2010-09-01

    In electron beam writing on EUV mask, it has been reported that CD linearity does not show simple signatures as observed with conventional COG (Cr on Glass) masks because they are caused by scattered electrons form EUV mask itself which comprises stacked heavy metals and thick multi-layers. To resolve this issue, Mask Process Correction (MPC) will be ideally applicable. Every pattern is reshaped in MPC. Therefore, the number of shots would not increase and writing time will be kept within reasonable range. In this paper, MPC is extended to modeling for correction of CD linearity errors on EUV mask. And its effectiveness is verified with simulations and experiments through actual writing test.

  13. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial... mask it contains and all appropriate approval labels. (b) Containers for gas masks shall be...

  14. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial... mask it contains and all appropriate approval labels. (b) Containers for gas masks shall be...

  15. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial... mask it contains and all appropriate approval labels. (b) Containers for gas masks shall be...

  16. 42 CFR 84.110 - Gas masks; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas masks; description. 84.110 Section 84.110... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.110 Gas masks; description. (a) Gas masks including all completely assembled air purifying masks designed...

  17. 42 CFR 84.110 - Gas masks; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas masks; description. 84.110 Section 84.110... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.110 Gas masks; description. (a) Gas masks including all completely assembled air purifying masks designed...

  18. 42 CFR 84.110 - Gas masks; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas masks; description. 84.110 Section 84.110... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.110 Gas masks; description. (a) Gas masks including all completely assembled air purifying masks designed...

  19. A new approach in dry technology for non-degrading optical and EUV mask cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Ivin; Smith, Ben; Balooch, Mehdi; Bowers, Chuck

    2012-11-01

    The Eco-Snow Systems group of RAVE N.P., Inc. has developed a new cleaning technique to target several of the advanced and next generation mask clean challenges. This new technique, especially when combined with Eco-Snow Systems cryogenic CO2 cleaning technology, provides several advantages over existing methods because it: 1) is solely based on dry technique without requiring additional complementary aggressive wet chemistries that degrade the mask, 2) operates at atmospheric pressure and therefore avoids expensive and complicated equipment associated with vacuum systems, 3) generates ultra-clean reactants eliminating possible byproduct adders, 4) can be applied locally for site specific cleaning without exposing the rest of the mask or can be used to clean the entire mask, 5) removes organic as well as inorganic particulates and film contaminations, and 6) complements current techniques utilized for cleaning of advanced masks such as reduced chemistry wet cleans. In this paper, we shall present examples demonstrating the capability of this new technique for removal of pellicle glue residues and for critical removal of carbon contamination on EUV masks.

  20. Electronic Inspection of Beef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, Victor J.; Gammell, Paul M.; Clark, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Two proposed methods for grading beef quality based on inspection by electronic equipment: one method uses television camera to generate image of a cut of beef as customer sees it; other uses ultrasonics to inspect live animal or unsliced carcasses. Both methods show promise for automated meat inspection.

  1. Software Formal Inspections Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Software Formal Inspections Guidebook is designed to support the inspection process of software developed by and for NASA. This document provides information on how to implement a recommended and proven method for conducting formal inspections of NASA software. This Guidebook is a companion document to NASA Standard 2202-93, Software Formal Inspections Standard, approved April 1993, which provides the rules, procedures, and specific requirements for conducting software formal inspections. Application of the Formal Inspections Standard is optional to NASA program or project management. In cases where program or project management decide to use the formal inspections method, this Guidebook provides additional information on how to establish and implement the process. The goal of the formal inspections process as documented in the above-mentioned Standard and this Guidebook is to provide a framework and model for an inspection process that will enable the detection and elimination of defects as early as possible in the software life cycle. An ancillary aspect of the formal inspection process incorporates the collection and analysis of inspection data to effect continual improvement in the inspection process and the quality of the software subjected to the process.

  2. Cost effective machining and inspection of structural ceramic components for advanced high temperature application. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0151

    SciTech Connect

    Abbatiello, L.A.; Haselkorn, M.

    1996-11-29

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was a mutual research and development (R and D) effort among the participants to investigate a range of advanced manufacturing technologies for two silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic materials. The general objective was to identify the most cost-effective part manufacturing processes for the ceramic materials of interest. The focus was determining the relationship between material removal rates, surface quality, and the structural characteristics of each ceramic resulting from three innovative processes. These innovated machining processes were studied using silicon nitride advanced materials. The particular (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) materials of interest were sintered GS-44 from the Norton Company, and reaction-bonded Ceraloy 147-3. The processes studied included the following activities: (1) direct laser machining; (2) rotary ultrasonic machining; and (3) diamond abrasive grinding, including both resinoid and vitreous-bonded grinding wheels. Both friable and non-friable diamond types were included within the abrasive grinding study. The task also conducted a comprehensive survey of European experience in use of ceramic materials, principally aluminum oxide. Originally, the effort of this task was to extend through a prototype manufacturing demonstration of selected engine components. During the execution of this program, however changes were made to the scope of the project, altering the goals. The Program goal became only the development of assessment of their impacts on product strength and surface condition.

  3. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  5. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  8. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  9. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  10. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  11. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  12. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  13. Implicit Semantic Perception in Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research on visual perception has uncovered many phenomena, such as binocular rivalry, backward masking, and the attentional blink, that reflect "failures of consciousness". Although stimuli do not reach awareness in these paradigms, there is evidence that they nevertheless undergo semantic processing. Object substitution masking (OSM),…

  14. Computing Challenges in Coded Mask Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This slide presaentation reviews the complications and challenges in developing computer systems for Coded Mask Imaging telescopes. The coded mask technique is used when there is no other way to create the telescope, (i.e., when there are wide fields of view, high energies for focusing or low energies for the Compton/Tracker Techniques and very good angular resolution.) The coded mask telescope is described, and the mask is reviewed. The coded Masks for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) instruments are shown, and a chart showing the types of position sensitive detectors used for the coded mask telescopes is also reviewed. Slides describe the mechanism of recovering an image from the masked pattern. The correlation with the mask pattern is described. The Matrix approach is reviewed, and other approaches to image reconstruction are described. Included in the presentation is a review of the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) / High Energy Telescope (HET), with information about the mission, the operation of the telescope, comparison of the EXIST/HET with the SWIFT/BAT and details of the design of the EXIST/HET.

  15. Protein contamination of the Laryngeal Mask Airway and its relationship to re-use.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, J; Green, N; Power, G

    2006-06-01

    The Laryngeal Mask Airway is a reusable device for maintaining the patency of a patient's airway during general anaesthesia. The device can be reused after it has been cleaned and sterilized. Protein contamination of medical instruments is a concern and has been found to occur despite standard sterilization techniques. The reason for the concern relates to the possibility of the transmission of prions and the risk of developing a neurodegenerative disorder such as Creutzveldt-Jacob disease. The purpose of this study was to quantify the amount of protein contamination that occurs, and to relate this to the number of times the Laryngeal Mask Airway has been used. Fifty previously used Classic Laryngeal Masks were collected after routine sterilization and packaging. The devices were immersed in protein detecting stain and then visual inspection performed to assess the degree and distribution of the staining. The researcher was blinded to the number of times the Laryngeal Mask Airway had been used. Linear regression analysis of the degrees of staining of the airway revealed that protein contamination occurs after the first use of the device and this increases with each subsequent use. This finding highlights the concern that the currently used cleaning and sterilization methods do not prevent the accumulation of proteinaceous material on Laryngeal Mask Airways. Consideration should be given to the search for more efficient cleaning and sterilization techniques or the use of disposable devices. PMID:16802488

  16. EUV mask defect mitigation through pattern placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, John; Abbas, Mansoor

    2010-09-01

    One of the challenges of EUVL is to bring EUV mask blank defect levels to zero. With uncertainty on when defect free masks may be routinely available, we explore a possibility for effectively using defective EUV mask blanks in production with a defect avoidance strategy. The key idea is to position the pattern/layout on the blank where the defects do not impact the final wafer image. Assuming that layout designs contain some non-critical areas in which defects can be safely positioned, it may be possible to align these regions with a given, small set of defect positions mapped from an imperfect mask blank. Using a few representative assortment of current-node, full-chip layout patterns we run multiple trials against real blank defect maps with various defect counts successfully. Our goal is to assess the probabilities that defect avoidance will work as a function of mask blank defect count, and by lithography layer.

  17. EUVL mask substrate specifications (wafer-type)

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W

    1999-07-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) program currently is constructing an alpha-class exposure tool known as the Engineering Test Stand (ETS) that will employ 200mm wafer format masks. This report lists and explains the current specifications for the EUVL mask substrates suitable for use on the ETS. The shape and size of the mask are the same as those of a standard 200mm Si wafer. The flatness requirements are driven by the potential image placement distortion caused by the non-telecentric illumination of EUVL. The defect requirements are driven by the printable-defect size and desired yield for mask blank fabrication. Surface roughness can cause both a loss of light throughput and image speckle. The EUVL mask substrate must be made of low-thermal-expansion material because 40% of the light is absorbed by the multilayers and causes some uncorrectable thermal distortion during printing.

  18. Evaluating Printability of Buried Native EUV Mask Phase Defects through a Modeling and Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, Mihir; Jindal, Vibhu; Basavalingappa, Adarsh; Herbol, Henry; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Jang, Il-Yong; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Marokkey, Sajan; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Pistor, Thomas V.; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2015-03-16

    The availability of defect-free masks is considered to be a critical issue for enabling extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) as the next generation technology. Since completely defect-free masks will be hard to achieve, it is essential to have a good understanding of the printability of the native EUV mask defects. In this work, we performed a systematic study of native mask defects to understand the defect printability caused by them. The multilayer growth over native substrate mask blank defects was correlated to the multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects having similar profiles in terms of their width and height. To model the multilayer growth over the defects, a novel level-set multilayer growth model was used that took into account the tool deposition conditions of the Veeco Nexus ion beam deposition tool. The same tool was used for performing the actual deposition of the multilayer stack over the characterized native defects, thus ensuring a fair comparison between the actual multilayer growth over native defects, and modeled multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects. Further, the printability of the characterized native defects was studied with the SEMATECH-Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), an EUV mask-imaging microscope at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Printability of the modeled regular-shaped defects, which were propagated up the multilayer stack using level-set growth model was studied using defect printability simulations implementing the waveguide algorithm. Good comparison was observed between AIT and the simulation results, thus demonstrating that multilayer growth over a defect is primarily a function of a defect’s width and height, irrespective of its shape. This would allow us to predict printability of the arbitrarily-shaped native EUV mask defects in a systematic and robust manner.

  19. New method of detection and classification of yield-impacting EUV mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graur, Ioana; Vengertsev, Dmitry; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Stobert, Ian; Rankin, Jed

    2015-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) advances printability of small size features for both memory and logic semiconductor devices. It promises to bring relief to the semiconductor manufacturing industry, removing the need for multiple masks in rendering a single design layer on wafer. However, EUV also brings new challenges, one of which is of mask defectivity. For this purpose, much of the focus in recent years has been in finding ways to adequately detect, characterize, and reduce defects on both EUV blanks and patterned masks. In this paper we will present an efficient way to classify and disposition EUV mask defects through a new algorithm developed to classify defects located on EUV photomasks. By processing scanning electronmicroscopy images (SEM) of small regions of a photomask, we extract highdimensional local features Histograms of Oriented Gradients (HOG). Local features represent image contents compactly for detection or classification, without requiring image segmentation. Using these HOGs, a supervised classification method is applied which allows differentiating between nondefective and defective images. In the new approach we have developed a superior method of detection and classification of defects, using mask and supporting mask printed data from several metallization masks. We will demonstrate that use of the HOG method allows realtime identification of defects on EUV masks regardless of geometry or construct. The defects identified by this classifier are further divided into subclasses for mask defect disposition: foreign material, foreign material from previous step, and topological defects. The goal of disposition is to categorize on the images into subcategories and provide recommendation of prescriptive actions to avoid impact on the wafer yield.

  20. Software Formal Inspections Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Software Formal Inspections Standard (hereinafter referred to as Standard) is applicable to NASA software. This Standard defines the requirements that shall be fulfilled by the software formal inspections process whenever this process is specified for NASA software. The objective of this Standard is to define the requirements for a process that inspects software products to detect and eliminate defects as early as possible in the software life cycle. The process also provides for the collection and analysis of inspection data to improve the inspection process as well as the quality of the software.

  1. Actinic Inspection of EUV Programmed Multilayer Defects and Cross-Comparison Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K; Barty, A; Liu, Y; Kearney, P; Tezuka, Y; Terasawa, T; Taylor, J S; Han, H; Wood, O

    2006-06-19

    The production of defect-free mask blanks remains a key challenge for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Integral to this effort is the development and characterization of mask inspection tools that are sensitive enough to detect critical defects with high confidence. Using a single programmed-defect mask with a range of buried bump-type defects, we report a comparison of measurements made in four different mask-inspection tools: one commercial tool using 488-nm wavelength illumination, one prototype tool that uses 266-nm illumination, and two non-commercial EUV ''actinic'' inspection tools. The EUV tools include a darkfield imaging microscope and a scanning microscope. Our measurements show improving sensitivity with the shorter wavelength non-EUV tool, down to 33-nm spherical-equivalent-volume diameter, for defects of this type. Measurements conditions were unique to each tool, with the EUV tools operating at a much slower inspection rate. Several defects observed with EUV inspection were below the detection threshold of the non-EUV tools.

  2. Cheap Face Masks Little Help Against Air Pollutants

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) -- Inexpensive cloth masks offer little protection against air pollution, a new study suggests. Many people in Asia ... or washable cloth masks to protect against small air pollution particles. But tests on different types of masks ...

  3. Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT) - an interactive training tool for {open_quotes}challenge inspections{close_quotes} under the chemical weapons convention

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, P.R.

    1997-08-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspection Teams and the Inspected Parties. Current training techniques include lectures, table-top inspections, and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. Under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) challenge inspections are short-notice inspections that may occur anywhere, anytime, and with no right of refusal. The time interval between notice of intent to inspect a facility and the arrival of inspectors at the facility may be as short as 72 hours. Therefore, advance training is important. ACE-IT is used for training both the Inspection Team (inspector) and the Inspected Party (host) to conduct a hypothetical challenge inspection under the CWC. An exercise moderator controls the exercise. The training covers all of the events in the challenge inspection regime, from initial notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities. But the primary emphasis of the training tool is on conducting the inspection itself, and in particular, the concept of managed access. Managed access is used to assure the inspectors that the facility is in compliance with the CWC, while protecting sensitive information that is not related to the CWC.

  4. Nasal mask ventilation is better than face mask ventilation in edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra; Rana, Sandeep; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Vishal, Vindhya; Sikdar, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Face mask ventilation of the edentulous patient is often difficult as ineffective seating of the standard mask to the face prevents attainment of an adequate air seal. The efficacy of nasal ventilation in edentulous patients has been cited in case reports but has never been investigated. Material and Methods: Consecutive edentulous adult patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, during a 17-month period, were prospectively evaluated. After induction of anesthesia and administration of neuromuscular blocker, lungs were ventilated with a standard anatomical face mask of appropriate size, using a volume controlled anesthesia ventilator with tidal volume set at 10 ml/kg. In case of inadequate ventilation, the mask position was adjusted to achieve best-fit. Inspired and expired tidal volumes were measured. Thereafter, the face mask was replaced by a nasal mask and after achieving best-fit, the inspired and expired tidal volumes were recorded. The difference in expired tidal volumes and airway pressures at best-fit with the use of the two masks and number of patients with inadequate ventilation with use of the masks were statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 79 edentulous patients were recruited for the study. The difference in expiratory tidal volumes with the use of the two masks at best-fit was statistically significant (P = 0.0017). Despite the best-fit mask placement, adequacy of ventilation could not be achieved in 24.1% patients during face mask ventilation, and 12.7% patients during nasal mask ventilation and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Nasal mask ventilation is more efficient than standard face mask ventilation in edentulous patients. PMID:27625477

  5. Nasal mask ventilation is better than face mask ventilation in edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra; Rana, Sandeep; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Vishal, Vindhya; Sikdar, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Face mask ventilation of the edentulous patient is often difficult as ineffective seating of the standard mask to the face prevents attainment of an adequate air seal. The efficacy of nasal ventilation in edentulous patients has been cited in case reports but has never been investigated. Material and Methods: Consecutive edentulous adult patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, during a 17-month period, were prospectively evaluated. After induction of anesthesia and administration of neuromuscular blocker, lungs were ventilated with a standard anatomical face mask of appropriate size, using a volume controlled anesthesia ventilator with tidal volume set at 10 ml/kg. In case of inadequate ventilation, the mask position was adjusted to achieve best-fit. Inspired and expired tidal volumes were measured. Thereafter, the face mask was replaced by a nasal mask and after achieving best-fit, the inspired and expired tidal volumes were recorded. The difference in expired tidal volumes and airway pressures at best-fit with the use of the two masks and number of patients with inadequate ventilation with use of the masks were statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 79 edentulous patients were recruited for the study. The difference in expiratory tidal volumes with the use of the two masks at best-fit was statistically significant (P = 0.0017). Despite the best-fit mask placement, adequacy of ventilation could not be achieved in 24.1% patients during face mask ventilation, and 12.7% patients during nasal mask ventilation and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Nasal mask ventilation is more efficient than standard face mask ventilation in edentulous patients.

  6. Masking property of quantum random cipher with phase mask encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohma, Masaki; Hirota, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    The security analysis of physical encryption protocol based on coherent pulse position modulation (CPPM) originated by Yuen is one of the most interesting topics in the study of cryptosystem with a security level beyond the Shannon limit. Although the implementation of CPPM scheme has certain difficulty, several methods have been proposed recently. This paper deals with the CPPM encryption in terms of symplectic transformation, which includes a phase mask encryption as a special example, and formulates a unified security analysis for such encryption schemes. Specifically, we give a lower bound of Eve's symbol error probability using reliability function theory to ensure that our proposed system exceeds the Shannon limit. Then we assume the secret key is given to Eve after her heterodyne measurement. Since this assumption means that Eve has a great advantage in the sense of the conventional cryptography, the lower bound of her error indeed ensures the security level beyond the Shannon limit. In addition, we show some numerical examples of the security performance.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of mask phase defects from through-focus EUV aerial images

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Yamazoe, Kenji; Neureuther, Andrew; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-02-21

    Mask defects inspection and imaging is one of the most important issues for any pattern transfer lithography technology. This is especially true for EUV lithography where the wavelength-specific properties of masks and defects necessitate actinic inspection for a faithful prediction of defect printability and repair performance. In this paper we will present a technique to obtain a quantitative characterization of mask phase defects from EUV aerial images. We apply this technique to measure the aerial image phase of native defects on a blank mask, measured with the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) an EUV zoneplate microscope that operates at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measured phase is compared with predictions made from AFM top-surface measurements of those defects. While amplitude defects are usually easy to recognize and quantify with standard inspection techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), defects or structures that have a phase component can be much more challenging to inspect. A phase defect can originate from the substrate or from any level of the multilayer. In both cases its effect on the reflected field is not directly related to the local topography of the mask surface, but depends on the deformation of the multilayer structure. Using the AIT, we have previously showed that EUV inspection provides a faithful and reliable way to predict the appearance of mask defect on the printed wafer; but to obtain a complete characterization of the defect we need to evaluate quantitatively its phase component. While aerial imaging doesn't provide a direct measurement of the phase of the object, this information is encoded in the through focus evolution of the image intensity distribution. Recently we developed a technique that allows us to extract the complex amplitude of EUV mask defects using two aerial images from different focal planes. The method for the phase reconstruction is derived from the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS

  8. 9 CFR 354.144 - Advance information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance information. 354.144 Section 354.144 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION...

  9. Mask process matching using a model based data preparation solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Brian; Saib, Mohamed; Figueiro, Thiago; Petroni, Paolo; Progler, Chris; Schiavone, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Process matching is the ability to precisely reproduce the signature of a given fabrication process while using a different one. A process signature is typically described as systematic CD variation driven by feature geometry as a function of feature size, local density or distance to neighboring structures. The interest of performing process matching is usually to address differences in the mask fabrication process without altering the signature of the mask, which is already validated by OPC models and already used in production. The need for such process matching typically arises from the expansion of the production capacity within the same or different mask fabrication facilities, from the introduction of new, perhaps more advanced, equipment to deliver same process of record masks and/or from the re-alignment of processes which have altered over time. For state-of-the-art logic and memory mask processes, such matching requirements can be well below 2nm and are expected to reduce below 1nm in near future. In this paper, a data preparation solution for process matching is presented and discussed. Instead of adapting the physical process itself, a calibrated model is used to modify the data to be exposed by the source process in order to induce the results to match the one obtained while running the target process. This strategy consists in using the differences among measurements from the source and target processes, in the calibration of a single differential model. In this approach, no information other than the metrology results is required from either process. Experimental results were obtained by matching two different processes at Photronics. The standard deviation between both processes was of 2.4nm. After applying the process matching technique, the average absolute difference between the processes was reduced to 1.0nm with a standard deviation of 1.3nm. The methods used to achieve the result will be described along with implementation considerations, to

  10. LCD masks for spatial augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithwick, Quinn Y. J.; Reetz, Daniel; Smoot, Lanny

    2014-03-01

    One aim of Spatial Augmented Reality is to visually integrate synthetic objects into real-world spaces amongst physical objects, viewable by many observers without 3D glasses, head-mounted displays or mobile screens. In common implementations, using beam-combiners, scrim projection, or transparent self-emissive displays, the synthetic object's and real-world scene's light combine additively. As a result, synthetic objects appear low-contrast and semitransparent against well-lit backgrounds, and do not cast shadows. These limitations prevent synthetic objects from appearing solid and visually integrated into the real-world space. We use a transparent LCD panel as a programmable dynamic mask. The LCD panel displaying the synthetic object's silhouette mask is colocated with the object's color image, both staying aligned for all points-of-view. The mask blocks the background providing occlusion, presents a black level for high-contrast images, blocks scene illumination thus casting true shadows, and prevents blow-by in projection scrim arrangements. We have several implementations of SAR with LCD masks: 1) beam-combiner with an LCD mask, 2) scrim projection with an LCD mask, and 3) transparent OLED display with an LCD mask. Large format (80" diagonal) and dual layer volumetric variations are also implemented.

  11. The Sensitivity of Coded Mask Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2008-01-01

    Simple formulae are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask X-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but t,hese are strictly only applicable if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given which allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimisation of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  12. An interactive tool for gamut masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ying; Lau, Cheryl; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    Artists often want to change the colors of an image to achieve a particular aesthetic goal. For example, they might limit colors to a warm or cool color scheme to create an image with a certain mood or feeling. Gamut masking is a technique that artists use to limit the set of colors they can paint with. They draw a mask over a color wheel and only use the hues within the mask. However, creating the color palette from the mask and applying the colors to the image requires skill. We propose an interactive tool for gamut masking that allows amateur artists to create an image with a desired mood or feeling. Our system extracts a 3D color gamut from the 2D user-drawn mask and maps the image to this gamut. The user can draw a different gamut mask or locally refine the image colors. Our voxel grid gamut representation allows us to represent gamuts of any shape, and our cluster-based image representation allows the user to change colors locally.

  13. Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh Bao

    1994-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 {mu}m wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

  14. Intact crowding and temporal masking in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Doron, Adi; Manassi, Mauro; Herzog, Michael H; Ahissar, Merav

    2015-01-01

    Phonological deficits in dyslexia are well documented. However, there is an ongoing discussion about whether visual deficits limit the reading skills of people with dyslexia. Here, we investigated visual crowding and backward masking. We presented a Vernier (i.e., two vertical bars slightly offset to the left or right) and asked observers to indicate the offset direction. Vernier stimuli are visually similar to letters and are strongly affected by crowding, even in the fovea. To increase task difficulty, Verniers are often followed by a mask (i.e., backward masking). We measured Vernier offset discrimination thresholds for the basic Vernier task, under crowding, and under backward masking, in students with dyslexia (n = 19) and age and intelligence matched students (n = 27). We found no group differences in any of these conditions. Controls with fast visual processing (good backward masking performance), were faster readers. By contrast, no such correlation was found among the students with dyslexia, suggesting that backward masking does not limit their reading efficiency. These findings indicate that neither elevated crowding nor elevated backward masking pose a bottleneck to reading skills of people with dyslexia. PMID:26505966

  15. Space and time in masking and crowding.

    PubMed

    Lev, Maria; Polat, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Masking and crowding are major phenomena associated with contextual modulations, but the relationship between them remains unclear. We have recently shown that crowding is apparent in the fovea when the time available for processing is limited, pointing to the strong relationship between crowding in the spatial and temporal domains. Models of crowding emphasize the size (acuity) of the target and the spacing between the target and flankers as the main determinants that predict crowding. Our model, which is based on lateral interactions, posits that masking and crowding are related in the spatial and temporal domains at the fovea and periphery and that both can be explained by the increasing size of the human perceptive field (PF) with increasing eccentricity. We explored the relations between masking and crowding using letter identification and contrast detection by correlating the crowding effect with the estimated size of the PF and with masking under different spatiotemporal conditions. We found that there is a large variability in PF size and crowding effects across observers. Nevertheless, masking and crowding were both correlated with the estimated size of the PF in the fovea and periphery under a specific range of spatiotemporal parameters. Our results suggest that under certain conditions, crowding and masking share common neural mechanisms that underlie the spatiotemporal properties of these phenomena in both the fovea and periphery. These results could explain the transfer of training gains from spatiotemporal Gabor masking to letter acuity, reading, and reduced crowding.

  16. Intact crowding and temporal masking in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Doron, Adi; Manassi, Mauro; Herzog, Michael H; Ahissar, Merav

    2015-01-01

    Phonological deficits in dyslexia are well documented. However, there is an ongoing discussion about whether visual deficits limit the reading skills of people with dyslexia. Here, we investigated visual crowding and backward masking. We presented a Vernier (i.e., two vertical bars slightly offset to the left or right) and asked observers to indicate the offset direction. Vernier stimuli are visually similar to letters and are strongly affected by crowding, even in the fovea. To increase task difficulty, Verniers are often followed by a mask (i.e., backward masking). We measured Vernier offset discrimination thresholds for the basic Vernier task, under crowding, and under backward masking, in students with dyslexia (n = 19) and age and intelligence matched students (n = 27). We found no group differences in any of these conditions. Controls with fast visual processing (good backward masking performance), were faster readers. By contrast, no such correlation was found among the students with dyslexia, suggesting that backward masking does not limit their reading efficiency. These findings indicate that neither elevated crowding nor elevated backward masking pose a bottleneck to reading skills of people with dyslexia.

  17. A binary masking technique for isolating energetic masking in speech perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brungart, Douglas S.; Simpson, Brian D.; Chang, Peter S.; Wang, Deliang

    2005-04-01

    When a target speech signal is obscured by interfering speech, two distinct types of masking contribute to the resulting degradation in the intelligibility of the target talker: energetic masking caused by overlap in the time-frequency distribution of energy in the two voices, and informational masking caused by the listener's inability to correctly segregate the acoustic elements of the two voices into distinct streams. This study attempted to isolate the effects of energetic masking on multitalker speech perception with ideal time-frequency binary masks that retained those spectro-temporal regions of the acoustic mixture that were dominated by the target speech but eliminated those regions that were dominated by the interfering speech. This procedure removed the same phonetic information from the target speech that would ordinarily be lost due to energetic masking, but eliminated the possibility for the kinds of target-masker confusions that are thought to produce informational masking. The results suggest that energetic masking may play a surprisingly small role in the overall masking that occurs in certain types of multitalker speech signals. They also indicate that the number of competing talkers has a much greater influence than target-masker similarity on the amount of energetic masking that occurs in a multitalker stimulus.

  18. Printed shadow masks for organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Yoshiaki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2007-09-01

    We have manufactured organic field-effect transistors by using shadow masks that are patterned by a screen printing system. The 50-nm-thick pentacene layer is sublimed as a channel in the vacuum system through the shadow mask on the base film with a multilayer patterned by ink-jet. After the deposition of the pentacene layer, the shadow mask is peeled off from the base film without any mechanical damages to the lower structures. The mobility in the saturation regime is 0.4cm2/Vs and the on-off ratio exceeds 105.

  19. Evaluation and implementation of TeraScan reflected light die-to-database inspection mode for 65nm design node process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Luke T. H.; Ho, C. H.; Lin, C. C.; Hsu, Vincent; Chen, Ellison; Yu, Paul; Son, Kong

    2005-11-01

    The standard inspection flow typically consists of transmitted light pattern inspection (die-to-die or die-to-database) and STARlightTM (Simultaneous Transmitted And Reflective Light) contamination inspection. The initial introduction of TeraScan (DUV) inspection system was limited to transmitted pattern inspection modes. Hence, complete inspections of critical mask layers required utilizing TeraScan for maximized pattern defect sensitivity and the previous generation TeraStar (UV) for STARlightTM contamination inspection. Recently, the reflective light die-to-database (dbR) inspection mode was introduced on the DUV tool to compliment transmitted light die-to-database (dbT) inspection. The dbR inspection mode provides not only pattern inspection but also contamination inspection capabilities. The intent of this evaluation is to characterize the dbR inspection capability on pattern defects and contaminations. A series of standard programmed defect test plates will be used to evaluate pattern inspection capability and a PSL test plate will be used to determine the contamination performance. Inspection results will be compared to the current inspection process of record (dbT + STARlightTM). Lastly, the learning will be used to develop and implement an optimal dbR inspection flow for selected critical layers of the 65-nm node to meet the inspection criteria and minimize the cycle time.

  20. When Bad Masks Turn Good

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Roberto G.

    In keeping with the spirit of a meeting on ‘masks,' this talk presents two short stories on the theme of dust. In the first, dust plays the familiar role of the evil obscurer, the enemy to bedefeated by the cunning observer in order to allow a key future technology (adaptive optics) to be exploited fully by heroic astronomers. In the second story, dust itself emerges as the improbable hero, in the form of a circumstellar debris disks. I will present evidence of a puzzling near-infrared excess in the continuum of high-redshift galaxies and will argue that the seemingly improbable origin of this IR excess is a population of young circumstellar disks formed around high-mass stars in distant galaxies. Assuming circumstellar disks extend down to lower masses,as they do in our own Galaxy, the excess emission presents us with an exciting opportunity to measure the formation rate of planetary systems in distant galaxies at cosmic epochs before our own solar system formed.

  1. High temperature reactive ion etching of iridium thin films with aluminum mask in CF4/O2/Ar plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Pin; Lisker, Marco; Kalkofen, Bodo; Burte, Edmund P.

    2016-08-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) technology for iridium with CF4/O2/Ar gas mixtures and aluminum mask at high temperatures up to 350 °C was developed. The influence of various process parameters such as gas mixing ratio and substrate temperature on the etch rate was studied in order to find optimal process conditions. The surface of the samples after etching was found to be clean under SEM inspection. It was also shown that the etch rate of iridium could be enhanced at higher process temperature and, at the same time, very high etching selectivity between aluminum etching mask and iridium could be achieved.

  2. Investigation of EUV haze defect: molecular behaviors of mask cleaning chemicals on EUV mask surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaehyuck; Novak, Steve; Kandel, Yudhishthir; Denbeaux, Greg; Lee, Han-shin; Ma, Andy; Goodwin, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Photo-induced defects (or haze defects) on 193nm optic masks (haze defects) have been a serious problem not only to reticle engineers working for mask manufacturing and handling but also to photo-lithography engineers. The most widely accepted explanation of the root causes of haze defects is the cleaning chemical residues remaining on the mask surface and unavoidable outgassed molecules that outgas from pellicle materials when exposed to 193nm radiation. These have been significant challenges for reticle cleaning engineers who need to use cleaning chemicals whose residues do not lead to progressive defect formation on the mask and to find improved materials to minimize pellicle outgassing. It is assumed that contamination generation on EUV masks would have a higher probability than on optic masks, primarily since EUV masks are not protected by a pellicle and amorphous carbon films can accumulate during exposure to EUV light. While there is potential to mitigate the generation of carbon contamination by improving the exposure tool environment and removing carbon films using in-situ atomic hydrogen cleaning, it is not yet clear whether the reaction of mask cleaning chemicals to EUV radiation will lead to creation of progressive defects on EUV mask surfaces. With the work to being done it has been observed that carbon contamination on EUV masks dominates any effects of solvent chemicals under normal environmental or exposure conditions (from atmospheric pressure up to a vacuum level of 10-6 Torr) during EUV exposure. However, it is still unknown whether residual cleaning chemicals will provide a nucleus for progressive defect formation during exposure. This lack of understanding needs to be addressed by the industry as EUV masks are expected to undergo more frequent cleaning cycles. In this work, we will report on an investigation of the molecular behavior of cleaning chemicals on EUV mask surfaces during EUV exposure. Movement (e.g., migration or aggregation) of

  3. Wafer scale fabrication of submicron chessboard gratings using phase masks in proximity lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuerzebecher, Lorenz; Harzendorf, Torsten; Fuchs, Frank; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2012-03-01

    One and two dimensional grating structures with submicron period have a huge number of applications in optics and photonics. Such structures are conventionally fabricated using interference or e-beam lithography. However, both technologies have significant drawbacks. Interference lithography is limited to rather simple geometries and the sequential writing scheme of e-beam lithography leads to time consuming exposures for each grating. We present a novel fabrication technique for this class of microstructures which is based on proximity lithography in a mask aligner. The technology is capable to pattern a complete wafer within less than one minute of exposure time and offers thereby high lateral resolution and a reliable process. Our advancements compared to standard mask aligner lithography are twofold: First of all, we are using periodic binary phase masks instead of chromium masks to generate an aerial image of high resolution and exceptional light efficiency at certain distances behind the mask. Second, a special mask aligner illumination set-up is employed which allows to precisely control the incidence angles of the exposure light. This degree of freedom allows both, to shape the aerial image (e. g. transformation of a periodic spot pattern into a chessboard pattern) and to increase its depth of focus considerably. That way, our technology enables the fabrication of high quality gratings with arbitrary geometry in a fast and stable wafer scale process.

  4. Inverse lithography using sparse mask representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Radu C.; Hurley, Paul; Apostol, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel optimisation algorithm for inverse lithography, based on optimization of the mask derivative, a domain inherently sparse, and for rectilinear polygons, invertible. The method is first developed assuming a point light source, and then extended to general incoherent sources. What results is a fast algorithm, producing manufacturable masks (the search space is constrained to rectilinear polygons), and flexible (specific constraints such as minimal line widths can be imposed). One inherent trick is to treat polygons as continuous entities, thus making aerial image calculation extremely fast and accurate. Requirements for mask manufacturability can be integrated in the optimization without too much added complexity. We also explain how to extend the scheme for phase-changing mask optimization.

  5. Shadow-masked growth and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeester, Piet M. A.; Coudenys, G.; Vermeire, Gerrit; Moerman, Ingrid; Zhu, Youcai; Buydens, Luc; Eeckhout, C.; Van Daele, Peter

    1993-02-01

    In this paper we will review the shadow masked growth technique and its applications. The technique enables us to change the layer thicknesses over a substrate by the variation in dimensions of windows in the shadow mask. One of the major application areas is the realization of photonic integrated circuits where materials with a different bandgap have to be integrated on the same substrate. The combination of thickness variations with the use of quantum wells results in the required bandgap changes. In the paper we will first start with an overview of the basic technology of shadow masked growth and in a second part we will discuss some of the important applications. Note that we will limit ourselves to the shadow masked growth technique and no review will be given on other technologies such as selective growth.

  6. Simplified models for mask roughness induced LER

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-02-21

    The ITRS requires < 1.2nm line-edge roughness (LER) for the 22nm half-pitch node. Currently, we can consistently achieve only about 3nm LER. Further progress requires understanding the principle causes of LER. Much work has already been done on how both the resist and LER on the mask effect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and factor into LER limits. Presently, mask-roughness induced LER is studied via full 2D aerial image modeling and subsequent analysis of the resulting image. This method is time consuming and cumbersome. It is, therefore, the goal of this research to develop a useful 'rule-of-thumb' analytic model for mask roughness induced LER to expedite learning and understanding.

  7. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Moore, F.W.

    1985-04-05

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

  8. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Francis W.

    1987-01-01

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected.

  9. Model-based assist feature placement for 32nm and 22nm technology nodes using inverse mask technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonawala, Amyn; Painter, Benjamin; Kerchner, Chip

    2009-10-01

    Inverse imaging has been long known to provide a true mathematical solution to the mask design problem. However, it is often times marred by problems like high run-time, mask manufacturability costs, and non-invertible models. In this paper, we propose a mask synthesis flow for advanced lithography nodes, which capitalizes on the inverse mask solution while still overcoming all the above problems. Our technique uses inverse mask technology (IMT) to calculate an inverse mask field containing all the useful information about the AF solution. This field is fed to a polygon placement algorithm to obtain initial AF placements, which are then cooptimized with the main features during an OPC/AF print-fix routine to obtain the final mask solution. The proposed flow enables process window maximization via IMT while guaranteeing fully MRC compliant masks. We present several results demonstrating the superiority of this approach. We also compare our IMT-AFs with the best AF solution obtained using extensive brute-force search (via a first principles simulator, S-litho), and prove that our solution is optimum.

  10. Lighting Studies for Fuelling Machine Deployed Visual Inspection Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, Carl; Griffith, George

    2015-04-01

    Under subcontract to James Fisher Nuclear, Ltd., INL has been reviewing advanced vision systems for inspection of graphite in high radiation, high temperature, and high pressure environments. INL has performed calculations and proof-of-principle measurements of optics and lighting techniques to be considered for visual inspection of graphite fuel channels in AGR reactors in UK.

  11. A systematic approach for extracting verification patterns from an OPC test mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Mohammad K. A.; Al-Imam, Mohamed

    2012-06-01

    Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) is a crucial step in Semiconductor manufacturing for technology of dimensions below the exposure wavelength. Light from the exposure source is diffracted when passing through mask dimensions below the exposure wavelength causing patterns on wafer to differ from the intent patterns. During OPC the design intent layout patterns are modified to compensate for light diffractions so that the final wafer patterns match the design intent patterns. OPC achieves this by using OPC models that model the optical conditions, resist, and etch behavior; and an OPC recipe that controls the patterns modification process. The OPC models are calibrated from test mask structures that are developed, exposed and measured when starting to set up the manufacturing process. Structures chosen to be placed on the test mask have a great impact on the capability to predict future layout patterns that were not present in the original test mask, referred to as model coverage. Test masks are usually composed of patterns used in model calibration and others used for verifying the calibrated model. In advanced technology nodes, both the feature size and the error budget are being shrunk. Hence to reach the best model coverage with acceptable accuracy, we need to ensure that the test mask contains all the possible structures in the real designs, while maintaining that the number of patterns does not consume long metrology tools time, cause extra overhead cost to the process, or delay the development cycle. This paper presents a systematic approach to optimize the number of patterns to be included in the test mask and split test patterns into calibration and verification patterns. Results from using the proposed method are compared to other methods of splitting that are based either on geometrical or random methods. The approach provided a significant reduction in model calibration time, the number of needed patterns in the test mask, and the total development

  12. The neural processing of masked speech.

    PubMed

    Scott, Sophie K; McGettigan, Carolyn

    2013-09-01

    Spoken language is rarely heard in silence, and a great deal of interest in psychoacoustics has focused on the ways that the perception of speech is affected by properties of masking noise. In this review we first briefly outline the neuroanatomy of speech perception. We then summarise the neurobiological aspects of the perception of masked speech, and investigate this as a function of masker type, masker level and task. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Annual Reviews 2013". PMID:23685149

  13. Computational techniques for determining printability of real defects in EUV mask pilot line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Li, Ying; Peng, Daniel; Chen, Dongxue; Hu, Peter; Corcoran, Noel; Son, Donghwan; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram

    2014-04-01

    With EUV lithography on the ITRS roadmap for sub-2X half-pitch patterning, it has become increasingly essential to ramp up efforts in being able to manufacture defect-free reticles or at least ones with minimal defects initially. For this purpose, much of the focus in recent years has been in finding ways to adequately detect, characterize, and reduce defects on both EUV blanks and patterned masks. For detection purposes, the current high-resolution DUV or e-beam inspection platforms are being extended to inspect EUV blanks and patterned masks but being non-actinic, make it very challenging to assess the real impact of the detected defects on EUV plane. Even with the realization of the EUV beta AIMS™ aerial-image based metrology in 2014-2015, the exact nature of each critical defect needs to be determined in order to be able to come up with an appropriate repair strategy. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of computational techniques to non-actinic supplemental metrology data collected on EUV mask defects to effectively determine the nature and also predict printability of these defects. The fundamental EUV simulation engine used in this approach is the EUV Defect Printability Simulator (DPS), which uses simulation and modeling methods designed specifically for the individual EUV mask components, and achieves runtimes several orders of magnitude faster than rigorous FDTD and RCWA methods while maintaining adequate accuracy. The EUV DPS simulator is then coupled with supplemental inspection and metrology measurements of real defects to effectively predict wafer printability of these defects. Several sources of such supplementary data are explored here, and may sometimes be dependent on the actual nature of defect. These sources include AFM height-profile data, SEM top-down images, and 193nm high-NA inspection images of single or multiple focus plane capture. From each of these supplemental data sources, the mask pattern and defect information is first

  14. VSP wave separation by adaptive masking filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ying; Wang, Yanghua

    2016-06-01

    In vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data processing, the first step might be to separate the down-going wavefield from the up-going wavefield. When using a masking filter for VSP wave separation, there are difficulties associated with two termination ends of the up-going waves. A critical challenge is how the masking filter can restore the energy tails, the edge effect associated with these terminations uniquely exist in VSP data. An effective strategy is to implement masking filters in both τ-p and f-k domain sequentially. Meanwhile it uses a median filter, producing a clean but smooth version of the down-going wavefield, used as a reference data set for designing the masking filter. The masking filter is implemented adaptively and iteratively, gradually restoring the energy tails cut-out by any surgical mute. While the τ-p and the f-k domain masking filters target different depth ranges of VSP, this combination strategy can accurately perform in wave separation from field VSP data.

  15. 75 FR 42643 - National Tunnel Inspection Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) The FHWA issued an ANPRM on November 18, 2008, at 73 FR..., urban or rural location) should be included in a risk- based frequency inspection system. Commenters...--Steel; ANSI/AWS D1.5 Bridge Welding Code; American Railway Engineering and...

  16. GDS-based Mask Data Preparation Flow: Data Volume Containment by Hierarchical Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Steffen F.; LaCour, Pat; Buck, Peter D.

    2002-12-01

    As the industry enters the development of the 65nm node the pressure on the data path and tapeout flow is growing. Design complexity and increased deployment of resolution enhancement techniques (RET) result in rapidly growing file sizes, which turns what used to be the relatively simple task of mask data preparation into a real bottleneck. This discussion introduces the data preparation scheme in the mask house and analyzes its evolution. Mask data preparation (MDP) has evolved from a flow that only needed to support a single mask lithography tool data format (MEBES) with minimal data alteration steps to one which requires the support of many mask lithography tool data formats and at the same time requires significant data alteration to support the increased precision necessary for today"s advanced masks.. However, the MDP flow developed around the MEBES format and it"s derivatives still exists. The design community has migrated towards the use of hierarchical data formats and processes to control file size and processing time. MDP, which from a file size and process complexity point of view is beginning to look more and more like the advanced RET operations performed on the data prior to mask manufacturing, is still standardized on a flat data format that is poorly optimized for a growing number of mask lithography tools. Based on examples it will be shown how this complicates the data handling further. An alternate data preparation flow accommodating the larger files and re-gaining flexibility for turnaround time (TAT) and throughput management is suggested. This flow utilizes the hierarchical GDS-II format as the exchange format for mask data preparation. It complements the existing flow for the most complex designs. The introduction of a hierarchical exchange format enables the transfer of a number of necessary data preparation steps into the hierarchical domain. Data processing strategies are discussed. The paper illustrates the benefit of hierarchical

  17. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  20. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84... AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.111 Gas masks; required components. (a) Each gas mask described in § 84.110 shall, where its...

  1. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84... AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.111 Gas masks; required components. (a) Each gas mask described in § 84.110 shall, where its...

  2. 42 CFR 84.111 - Gas masks; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas masks; required components. 84.111 Section 84... AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.111 Gas masks; required components. (a) Each gas mask described in § 84.110 shall, where its...

  3. Ceramic Masks--A Multi-Cultural Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Elizabeth E.

    1978-01-01

    The creation of ceramic masks in reaction to the film, Roots, focused on the functions of the masks themselves within a particular society, the materials and techniques used to create these masks, and the identification of typical shapes of heads and facial features on the masks in each culture. (Author/RK)

  4. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask works. (b)...

  5. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask works. (b)...

  6. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask works. (b)...

  7. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... AND PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask...

  8. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask works. (b)...

  9. The Effect of a Diving Mask on Intraocular Pressure in a Healthy Population

    PubMed Central

    Goenadi, Catherina Josephine; Law, David Zhiwei; Lee, Jia Wen; Ong, Ee Lin; Chee, Wai Kitt; Cheng, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Swimming goggles increase the intraocular pressure (IOP) via the periorbital frame pressure and suction effect. In comparison, diving masks have a larger frame rim and incorporate the nose. The exact effect(s) of diving masks on IOP is unknown. This study evaluates the influence of diving masks on IOP in normal, healthy subjects. Methods Tonometry was performed in both eyes of all subjects with an AVIA®Tono-Pen by a single investigator. Measurements were taken at baseline without the diving mask and with the subjects wearing a small-volume, double-window diving mask, but with the mask lenses removed. Two IOP readings in each eye were measured, and an additional reading was measured if the difference between the initial 2 was ≥2 mm Hg. Central corneal thickness (CCT) was also measured in each eye, using a contact pachymeter (OcuScan®Alcon). Results Forty eyes of 20 healthy volunteers (age 29.7 ± 9.3 years; range 21–52) were included. The mean CCT was 544.4 ± 43.5 µm. The mean IOP before the diving mask was worn had been 17.23 ± 2.18 mm Hg (n = 40). The IOP decreased by 0.43 mm Hg (p $1003c; 0.05) to 16.80 ± 2.57 mm Hg after the diving mask had been put on. There was no correlation between IOP change and age (r = 0.143, p = 0.337), gender (r = −0.174, p = 0.283) or CCT (r = −0.123, p = 0.445). Conclusion There was no increase in IOP after the diving mask had been worn. A small but statistically significant decrease in IOP was observed. This study demonstrates that unlike swimming goggles, the strap tension and frame pressure on the periorbital tissue from a diving mask does not increase IOP. Diving masks may be a suitable alternative to swimming goggles for patients with advanced glaucoma or glaucoma filtration surgery. PMID:27462262

  10. Source mask optimization study based on latest Nikon immersion scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fang; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Chenming; Zhang, Wei; Nishinaga, Hisashi; El-Sewefy, Omar; Gao, Gen-Sheng; Lafferty, Neal; Meiring, Jason; Zhang, Recoo; Zhu, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    The 2x nm logic foundry node has many challenges since critical levels are pushed close to the limits of low k1 ArF water immersion lithography. For these levels, improvements in lithographic performance can translate to decreased rework and increased yield. Source Mask Optimization (SMO) is one such route to realize these image fidelity improvements. During SMO, critical layout constructs are intensively optimized in both the mask and source domain, resulting in a solution for maximum lithographic entitlement. From the hardware side, advances in source technology have enabled free-form illumination. The approach allows highly customized illumination, enabling the practical application of SMO sources. The customized illumination sources can be adjusted for maximum versatility. In this paper, we present a study on a critical layer of an advanced foundry logic node using the latest ILT based SMO software, paired with state-of-the-art scanner hardware and intelligent illuminator. Performance of the layer's existing POR source is compared with the ideal SMO result and the installed source as realized on the intelligent illuminator of an NSR-S630D scanner. Both simulation and on-silicon measurements are used to confirm that the performance of the studied layer meets established specifications.

  11. Accurate defect die placement and nuisance defect reduction for reticle die-to-die inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Vincent; Huang, L. R.; Lin, C. J.; Tseng, Y. N.; Huang, W. H.; Tuo, Laurent C.; Wylie, Mark; Chen, Ellison; Wang, Elvik; Glasser, Joshua; Kelkar, Amrish; Wu, David

    2015-10-01

    Die-to-die reticle inspections are among the simplest and most sensitive reticle inspections because of the use of an identical-design neighboring-die for the reference image. However, this inspection mode can have two key disadvantages: (1) The location of the defect is indeterminate because it is unclear to the inspector whether the test or reference image is defective; and (2) nuisance and false defects from mask manufacturing noise and tool optical variation can limit the usable sensitivity. The use of a new sequencing approach for a die-to-die inspection can resolve these issues without any additional scan time, without sacrifice in sensitivity requirement, and with a manageable increase in computation load. In this paper we explore another approach for die-to-die inspections using a new method of defect processing and sequencing. Utilizing die-to-die double arbitration during defect detection has been proven through extensive testing to generate accurate placement of the defect in the correct die to ensure efficient defect disposition at the AIMS step. The use of this method maintained the required inspection sensitivity for mask quality as verified with programmed-defectmask qualification and then further validated with production masks comparing the current inspection approach to the new method. Furthermore, this approach can significantly reduce the total number of defects that need to be reviewed by essentially eliminating the nuisance and false defects that can result from a die-to-die inspection. This "double-win" will significantly reduce the effort in classifying a die-to-die inspection result and will lead to improved cycle times.

  12. Mask topography effect in chromeless phase lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipsen, Vicky; Bekaert, Joost; Vandenberghe, Geert; Jonckheere, Rik; Van Den Broeke, Douglas; Socha, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Different types of phase-shift masks (PSM) in combination with the proper illumination condition are widely used to allow 193nm lithography to print ever-decreasing pitches with a sufficient process window. A viable option for the 65nm node is Chromeless Phase Lithography (CPL), which combines a chromeless phase shift mask and 193nm off-axis illumination. It has been demonstrated that CPL has a high flexibility for through pitch imaging. Also concerning mask making CPL masks showed advantages over alternating and attenuated PSM [1]. This paper discusses how the mask quality and its topography influence the imaging performance of CPL. It is shown that mask topography is an important factor for CPL, as the imaging relies also on the quartz depth differences in the mask. The wafer image is sensitive to phase variations induced by the quartz etch depth and the sidewall profile. Their impact is separately studied using rigorous 3D mask electro-magnetic field simulations (Sigma-C Solid-CM). Correlation of experimental results to simulation explains that the observed pitch-dependent tilt in the Bossung curves is mainly related to the 3D character of the mask. In search for a global compensation valid through pitch, the simulation study also evaluates the effect of other contributors such as lens aberrations in the optical system, assist features and half-toning Cr zebra lines in the design. However, as the tilt is inherent to the CPL mask fabrication, a compensation of the Bossung tilt effect can only be obtained for specific combinations of all sources, as will be shown. We concentrate on the imaging of 70nm lines and 100nm contact holes in pitches ranging from dense up to isolated. The wafers are exposed on an ASML PAS5500/1100 ArF scanner working with a 0.75NA projection lens and various types of off-axis illumination. The wafers are evaluated on a top-down CD SEM (KLA-Tencor 8250XR).

  13. Fire Prevention Inspection Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Paul F.

    Lesson plans are provided for a fire prevention inspection course of the Wisconsin Fire Service Training program. Objectives for the course are to enable students to describe and conduct fire prevention inspections, to identify and correct hazards common to most occupancies, to understand the types of building construction and occupancy, and to…

  14. Inspection information model

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, J.

    1989-12-01

    This document establishes information structures and semantics used for the electronic communication of Product Definition Data (PDD) which supports dimensional inspection using contact Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM). Included are attributes of CMMs for support of generative process planning functions for dimensional inspection.

  15. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Janet A.; Byron, Adam; Takada, Yoshikazu; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing ligand-mimetic inhibitors of integrins are unable to dissociate pre-formed integrin-fibronectin complexes (IFCs). These observations suggested that amino acid residues involved in integrin-fibronectin binding become obscured in the ligand-occupied state. Because the epitopes of some function-blocking anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) lie near the ligand-binding pocket, it follows that the epitopes of these mAbs may become shielded in the ligand-occupied state. Here, we tested whether function-blocking mAbs directed against α5β1 can interact with the integrin after it forms a complex with an RGD-containing fragment of fibronectin. We showed that the anti-α5 subunit mAbs JBS5, SNAKA52, 16, and P1D6 failed to disrupt IFCs and hence appeared unable to bind to the ligand-occupied state. In contrast, the allosteric anti-β1 subunit mAbs 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 could dissociate IFCs and therefore were able to interact with the ligand-bound state. However, another class of function-blocking anti-β1 mAbs, exemplified by Lia1/2, could not disrupt IFCs. This second class of mAbs was also distinguished from 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 by their ability to induce homotypic cell aggregation. Although the epitope of Lia1/2 was closely overlapping with those of 13, 4B4, and AIIB2, it appeared to lie closer to the ligand-binding pocket. A new model of the α5β1-fibronectin complex supports our hypothesis that the epitopes of mAbs that fail to bind to the ligand-occupied state lie within, or very close to, the integrin-fibronectin interface. Importantly, our findings imply that the efficacy of some therapeutic anti-integrin mAbs could be limited by epitope masking. PMID:27484800

  16. Automated multiple view inspection of metal castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mery, Domingo; Carrasco, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Automated visual inspection of metal castings is defined as a quality control task that determines automatically if a casting deviates from a given set of specifications using visual data. Many research directions in this field have been exploited, some very different principles have been adopted and a wide variety of algorithms have been appeared in the literature. However, the developed approaches are tailored to the inspection task, i.e., there is no common approach applicable to all cases because the development is an ad hoc process. Additionally, detection accuracy should be improved, because there is a fundamental trade off between false alarms and miss detections. For these reasons, we proposed a novel methodology, called Automated Multiple View Inspection, that uses redundant views of the test object to perform the inspection task. The method is opening up new possibilities in inspection field by taking into account the useful information about the correspondence between the different views. It is very robust because in first step it identifies potential defects in each view and in second step it finds correspondences between potential defects, and only those that are matched in different views are detected as real defects. In this paper, we review the advances done in this field giving an overview of the multiple view inspection and showing experimental results obtained on metal castings.

  17. Phase analysis of amplitude binary mask structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthankovilakam, Krishnaparvathy; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-03-01

    Shaping of light behind masks using different techniques is the milestone of the printing industry. The aerial image distribution or the intensity distribution at the printing distances defines the resolution of the structure after printing. Contrast and phase are the two parameters that play a major role in shaping of light to get the desired intensity pattern. Here, in contrast to many other contributions that focus on intensity, we discuss the phase evolution for different structures. The amplitude or intensity characteristics of the structures in a binary mask at different proximity gaps have been analyzed extensively for many industrial applications. But the phase evolution from the binary mask having OPC structures is not considered so far. The mask we consider here is the normal amplitude binary mask but having high resolution Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) structures for corners. The corner structures represent a two dimensional problem which is difficult to handle with simple rules of phase masks design and therefore of particular interest. The evolution of light from small amplitude structures might lead to high contrast by creating sharp phase changes or phase singularities which are points of zero intensity. We show the phase modulation at different proximity gaps and can visualize the shaping of light according to the phase changes. The analysis is done with an instrument called High Resolution Interference Microscopy (HRIM), a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that gives access to three-dimensional phase and amplitude images. The current paper emphasizes on the phase measurement of different optical proximity correction structures, and especially on corners of a binary mask.

  18. Unconscious processing of dichoptically masked words.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, A G; Klinger, M R; Liu, T J

    1989-01-01

    In three experiments, the subjects' task was to decide whether each of a series of words connoted something good (e.g., fame, comedy, rescue) or bad (stress, detest, malaria). One-half second before the presentation of each such target word, an evaluatively polarized priming word was presented briefly to the nondominant eye and was masked dichoptically by either the rapidly following (Experiment 1) or simultaneous (Experiments 2 and 3) presentation of a random letter-fragment pattern to the dominant eye. (The effectiveness of the masking procedure was demonstrated by the subjects' inability to discriminate the left vs. right position of a test series of words.) In all experiments, significant masked priming effects were obtained; evaluative decisions to congruent masked prime-target combinations (such as a positive masked prime followed by a positive target) were significantly faster than those to incongruent (e.g., negative prime/positive target) or noncongruent (e.g., neutral prime/positive target) combinations. Also, in two of the three experiments, when subjects were at chance accuracy in discriminating word position, their position judgments were nevertheless significantly influenced by the irrelevant semantic content (LEFT vs. RIGHT) of the masked position-varying words. The series of experiments demonstrated that two very different tasks--speeded judgment of evaluative meaning and nonspeeded judgment of word position--yielded statistically significant and replicable influences of the semantic content of apparently undetectable words. Coupled with previous research by others using the lexical decision task, these findings converge in establishing the reliability of the empirical phenomenon of semantic processing of words that are rendered undetectable by dichoptic pattern masking.

  19. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-03-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity DefectTM data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  20. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2008-10-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity DefecTM data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  1. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-04-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity Defect(R) data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  2. The Intervenor Effect in Masked Priming: How Does Masked Priming Survive across an Intervening Word?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Kenneth I.

    2009-01-01

    Four masked priming experiments are reported investigating the effect of inserting an unrelated word between the masked prime and the target. When the intervening word is visible, identity priming is reduced to the level of one-letter-different form priming, but form priming is largely unaffected. However, when the intervening word is itself…

  3. Recent modelling advances for ultrasonic TOFD inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Michel; Ferrand, Adrien; Dorval, Vincent; Chatillon, Sylvain; Lonné, Sébastien

    2015-03-31

    The ultrasonic TOFD (Time of Flight Diffraction) Technique is commonly used to detect and characterize disoriented cracks using their edge diffraction echoes. An overview of the models integrated in the CIVA software platform and devoted to TOFD simulation is presented. CIVA allows to predict diffraction echoes from complex 3D flaws using a PTD (Physical Theory of Diffraction) based model. Other dedicated developments have been added to simulate lateral waves in 3D on planar entry surfaces and in 2D on irregular surfaces by a ray approach. Calibration echoes from Side Drilled Holes (SDHs), specimen echoes and shadowing effects from flaws can also been modelled. Some examples of theoretical validation of the models are presented. In addition, experimental validations have been performed both on planar blocks containing calibration holes and various notches and also on a specimen with an irregular entry surface and allow to draw conclusions on the validity of all the developed models.

  4. Engineering near-field focusing of a microsphere lens with pupil masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Yue, Liyang; Wang, Zengbo

    2016-07-01

    Recent researches have shown small dielectric microspheres can perform as super-resolution lens to break optical diffraction limit for super-resolution applications. In this paper, we show for the first time that by combining a microsphere lens with a pupil mask, it is possible to precisely control the focusing properties of the lens, including the focusing spot size and focal length. Generally, the pupil mask can significantly reduce the spot size which means an improved resolution. The work is important for advancing microsphere-based super-resolution technologies, including fabrication and imaging.

  5. EUV reticle inspection with a 193nm reticle inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, William; Inderhees, Gregg; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lee, Isaac; Lim, Phillip

    2013-06-01

    The prevailing industry opinion is that EUV Lithography (EUVL) will enter High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) in the 2015 - 2017 timeframe at the 16nm HP node. Every year the industry assesses the key risk factors for introducing EUVL into HVM - blank and reticle defects are among the top items. To reduce EUV blank and reticle defect levels, high sensitivity inspection is needed. To address this EUV inspection need, KLA-Tencor first developed EUV blank inspection and EUV reticle inspection capability for their 193nm wavelength reticle inspection system - the Teron 610 Series (2010). This system has become the industry standard for 22nm / 3xhp optical reticle HVM along with 14nm / 2xhp optical pilot production; it is further widely used for EUV blank and reticle inspection in R and D. To prepare for the upcoming 10nm / 1xhp generation, KLA-Tencor has developed the Teron 630 Series reticle inspection system which includes many technical advances; these advances can be applied to both EUV and optical reticles. The advanced capabilities are described in this paper with application to EUV die-to-database and die-to-die inspection for currently available 14nm / 2xhp generation EUV reticles. As 10nm / 1xhp generation optical and EUV reticles become available later in 2013, the system will be tested to identify areas for further improvement with the goal to be ready for pilot lines in early 2015.

  6. Characterization and possible repair of defects in Soft X-ray Projection Lithography masks

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, A.M.

    1993-07-01

    Soft X-ray Projection Lithography (SXPL) is one promising technique for the mass production of integrated circuits with minimum features sizes below 100 nm. Mask fabrication, inspection and repair processes are critically important to all forms of lithography, including SXPL which requires a reflection mask (a substrate coated with a x-ray multilayer coating and patterned with thin metallization layer). Processes for the repair of defects in the metallization patterns have been developed, but at present, there exist no processes for the repair of defects in the multilayer coatings deposited in LLNL`s magnetron sputter deposition facility, which produces state of the art x-ray multilayer mirrors. We also propose one possible process for the repair of defects in these multilayer coatings.

  7. Advanced manufacturing rules check (MRC) for fully automated assessment of complex reticle designs: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, J. A.; Aguilar, D.; Buck, P. D.; Dawkins, D.; Gladhill, R.; Nolke, S.; Riddick, J.

    2006-10-01

    Advanced electronic design automation (EDA) tools, with their simulation, modeling, design rule checking, and optical proximity correction capabilities, have facilitated the improvement of first pass wafer yields. While the data produced by these tools may have been processed for optimal wafer manufacturing, it is possible for the same data to be far from ideal for photomask manufacturing, particularly at lithography and inspection stages, resulting in production delays and increased costs. The same EDA tools used to produce the data can be used to detect potential problems for photomask manufacturing in the data. In the previous paper, it was shown how photomask MRC is used to uncover data related problems prior to automated defect inspection. It was demonstrated how jobs which are likely to have problems at inspection could be identified and separated from those which are not. The use of photomask MRC in production was shown to reduce time lost to aborted runs and troubleshooting due to data issues. In this paper, the effectiveness of this photomask MRC program in a high volume photomask factory over the course of a year as applied to more than ten thousand jobs will be shown. Statistics on the results of the MRC runs will be presented along with the associated impact to the automated defect inspection process. Common design problems will be shown as well as their impact to mask manufacturing throughput and productivity. Finally, solutions to the most common and most severe problems will be offered and discussed.

  8. Mask and lithography techniques for FPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Wahlsten, M.; Sundelin, E.; Hansson, G.; Svensson, A.

    2015-09-01

    Large-field projection lithography for FPDs has developed gradually since the 90s. The LCD screen technology has remained largely unchanged and incremental development has given us better image quality, larger screen sizes, and above all lower cost per area. Recently new types of mobile devices with very high pixel density and/or OLED displays have given rise to dramatically higher requirem ents on photomask technology. Devices with 600 ppi or m ore need lithography with higher optical resolution and better linewidth control. OLED di splays pose new challenges with high sensitivity to transistor parameters and to capacitive cross-talk. New mask requirements leads to new maskwriter requirements and Mycronic has developed a new generation of large -area mask writers with significantly improved properties. This paper discusses and shows data for the improved writers. Mask production to high er quality stan dards also need metrology to verify the quality and Mycronic has introduced a 2D metrology tool with accuracy adequate for current and future masks. New printing or additive methods of producing disp lays on plastic or metal foil will make low-cost disp lays available. This inexpensive type of disp lays will exist side by side with the photographic quality displays of TVs and mobile devices, which will continue to be a challenge in terms of mask and production quality.

  9. Calculating aerial images from EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistor, Thomas V.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1999-06-01

    Aerial images for line/space patterns, arrays of posts and an arbitrary layout pattern are calculated for EUV masks in a 4X EUV imaging system. Both mask parameters and illumination parameters are varied to investigate their effects on the aerial image. To facilitate this study, a parallel version of TEMPEST with a Fourier transform boundary condition was developed and run on a network of 24 microprocessors. Line width variations are observed when absorber thickness or sidewall angle changes. As the line/space pattern scales to smaller dimensions, the aspect ratios of the absorber features increase, introducing geometric shadowing and reducing aerial image intensity and contrast. 100nm square posts have circular images of diameter close to 100nm, but decreasing in diameter significantly when the corner round radius at the mask becomes greater than 50 nm. Exterior mask posts image slightly smaller and with higher ellipticity than interior mask posts. The aerial image of the arbitrary test pattern gives insight into the effects of the off-axis incidence employed in EUV lithography systems.

  10. Metrology on phase-shift masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeth, Klaus-Dieter; Maurer, Wilhelm; Blaesing-Bangert, Carola

    1992-06-01

    In the evaluation of new manufacturing processes, metrology is a key function, beginning with the first step of process development through the final step of everyday mass production at the fabrication floor level. RIM-type phase shift masks are expected to be the first application of phase shift masks in high volume production, since they provide improved lithography process capability at the expense of only moderate complexity in their manufacturing. Measurements of critical dimension (CD) and pattern position (overlay) on experimental rim-type and chromeless phase shift masks are reported. Pattern placement (registration) was measured using the Leitz LMS 2000. The overall design and important components were already described. The pattern placement of the RIM type phase shift structures on the photomask described above was determined within a tolerance of 25 nm (3s); nominal accuracy was within 45 nm (3s). On the chromeless phase shift mask the measurement results were easily obtained using a wafer intensity algorithm available with the system. The measurement uncertainties were less than 25 nm and 50 nm for precision and nominal accuracy respectively. The measurement results from the Leitz CD 200 using transmitted light were: a CD- distribution of 135 nm (3s) on a typical 6 micrometers structure all over the mask; the 0.9 micrometers RIM structure had a distribution of 43 nm (3s). Typical long term precision performance values for the CD 200 on both chrome and phase shift structures have been less than 15 nm.

  11. EUV mask process specifics and development challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesladek, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    EUV lithography is currently the favorite and most promising candidate among the next generation lithography (NGL) technologies. Decade ago the NGL was supposed to be used for 45 nm technology node. Due to introduction of immersion 193nm lithography, double/triple patterning and further techniques, the 193 nm lithography capabilities was greatly improved, so it is expected to be used successfully depending on business decision of the end user down to 10 nm logic. Subsequent technology node will require EUV or DSA alternative technology. Manufacturing and especially process development for EUV technology requires significant number of unique processes, in several cases performed at dedicated tools. Currently several of these tools as e.g. EUV AIMS or actinic reflectometer are not available on site yet. The process development is done using external services /tools with impact on the single unit process development timeline and the uncertainty of the process performance estimation, therefore compromises in process development, caused by assumption about similarities between optical and EUV mask made in experiment planning and omitting of tests are further reasons for challenges to unit process development. Increased defect risk and uncertainty in process qualification are just two examples, which can impact mask quality / process development. The aim of this paper is to identify critical aspects of the EUV mask manufacturing with respect to defects on the mask with focus on mask cleaning and defect repair and discuss the impact of the EUV specific requirements on the experiments needed.

  12. Temperature rise of the mask-resist assembly during LIGA exposure.

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Aili

    2004-11-01

    Deep X-ray lithography on PMMA resist is used in the LIGA process. The resist is exposed to synchrotron X-rays through a patterned mask and then is developed in a liquid developer to make high aspect ratio microstructures. The limitations in dimensional accuracies of the LIGA generated microstructure originate from many sources, including synchrotron and X-ray physics, thermal and mechanical properties of mask and resist, and from the kinetics of the developer. This work addresses the thermal analysis and temperature rise of the mask-resist assembly during exposure in air at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron. The concern is that dimensional errors generated at the mask and the resist due to thermal expansion will lower the accuracy of the lithography. We have developed a three-dimensional finite-element model of the mask and resist assembly that includes a mask with absorber, a resist with substrate, three metal holders, and a water-cooling block. We employed the LIGA exposure-development software LEX-D to calculate volumetric heat sources generated in the assembly by X-ray absorption and the commercial software ABAQUS to calculate heat transfer including thermal conduction inside the assembly, natural and forced convection, and thermal radiation. at assembly outer and/or inner surfaces. The calculations of assembly maximum temperature. have been compared with temperature measurements conducted at ALS. In some of these experiments, additional cooling of the assembly was produced by forced nitrogen flow ('nitrogen jets') directed at the mask surface. The temperature rise in the silicon mask and the mask holder comes directly from the X-ray absorption, but nitrogen jets carry away a significant portion of heat energy from the mask surface, while natural convection carries away negligibly small amounts energy from the holder. The temperature rise in PMMA resist is mainly from heat conducted from the silicon substrate backward to the resist and from the inner

  13. Communication masking in marine mammals: A review and research strategy.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Christine; Reichmuth, Colleen; Cunningham, Kane; Lucke, Klaus; Dooling, Robert

    2016-02-15

    Underwater noise, whether of natural or anthropogenic origin, has the ability to interfere with the way in which marine mammals receive acoustic signals (i.e., for communication, social interaction, foraging, navigation, etc.). This phenomenon, termed auditory masking, has been well studied in humans and terrestrial vertebrates (in particular birds), but less so in marine mammals. Anthropogenic underwater noise seems to be increasing in parts of the world's oceans and concerns about associated bioacoustic effects, including masking, are growing. In this article, we review our understanding of masking in marine mammals, summarise data on marine mammal hearing as they relate to masking (including audiograms, critical ratios, critical bandwidths, and auditory integration times), discuss masking release processes of receivers (including comodulation masking release and spatial release from masking) and anti-masking strategies of signalers (e.g. Lombard effect), and set a research framework for improved assessment of potential masking in marine mammals.

  14. Comparison of OPC job prioritization schemes to generate data for mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Travis; Veeraraghavan, Vijay; Jantzen, Kenneth; Kim, Stephen; Park, Minyoung; Russell, Gordon; Simmons, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Delivering mask ready OPC corrected data to the mask shop on-time is critical for a foundry to meet the cycle time commitment for a new product. With current OPC compute resource sharing technology, different job scheduling algorithms are possible, such as, priority based resource allocation and fair share resource allocation. In order to maximize computer cluster efficiency, minimize the cost of the data processing and deliver data on schedule, the trade-offs of each scheduling algorithm need to be understood. Using actual production jobs, each of the scheduling algorithms will be tested in a production tape-out environment. Each scheduling algorithm will be judged on its ability to deliver data on schedule and the trade-offs associated with each method will be analyzed. It is now possible to introduce advance scheduling algorithms to the OPC data processing environment to meet the goals of on-time delivery of mask ready OPC data while maximizing efficiency and reducing cost.

  15. Dry etched SiO2 Mask for HgCdTe Etching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Deng, L. G.; Zhang, S.; Xing, W.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-09-01

    A highly anisotropic etching process with low etch-induced damage is indispensable for advanced HgCdTe (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) detectors. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) enhanced reactive ion etching technique has been widely adopted in manufacturing HgCdTe IRFPA devices. An accurately patterned mask with sharp edges is decisive to accomplish pattern duplication. It has been reported by our group that the SiO2 mask functions well in etching HgCdTe with high selectivity. However, the wet process in defining the SiO2 mask is limited by ambiguous edges and nonuniform patterns. In this report, we patterned SiO2 with a mature ICP etching technique, prior to which a thin ZnS film was deposited by thermal evaporation. The SiO2 film etching can be terminated at the auto-stopping point of the ZnS layer thanks to the high selectivity of SiO2/ZnS in SF6 based etchant. Consequently, MCT etching was directly performed without any other treatment. This mask showed acceptable profile due to the maturity of the SiO2 etching process. The well-defined SiO2 pattern and the etched smooth surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. This new mask process could transfer the patterns exactly with very small etch-bias. A cavity with aspect-ratio (AR) of 1.2 and root mean square roughness of 1.77 nm was achieved first, slightly higher AR of 1.67 was also get with better mask profile. This masking process ensures good uniformity and surely benefits the delineation of shrinking pixels with its high resolution.

  16. Metacontrast masking is processed before grapheme-color synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Michael Patrick; Bridgeman, Bruce; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the physiological mechanism of grapheme-color synesthesia using metacontrast masking. A metacontrast target is rendered invisible by a mask that is delayed by about 60 ms; the target and mask do not overlap in space or time. Little masking occurs, however, if the target and mask are simultaneous. This effect must be cortical, because it can be obtained dichoptically. To compare the data for synesthetes and controls, we developed a metacontrast design in which nonsynesthete controls showed weaker dichromatic masking (i.e., the target and mask were in different colors) than monochromatic masking. We accomplished this with an equiluminant target, mask, and background for each observer. If synesthetic color affected metacontrast, synesthetes should show monochromatic masking more similar to the weak dichromatic masking among controls, because synesthetes could add their synesthetic color to the monochromatic condition. The target-mask pairs used for each synesthete were graphemes that elicited strong synesthetic colors. We found stronger monochromatic than dichromatic U-shaped metacontrast for both synesthetes and controls, with optimal masking at an asynchrony of 66 ms. The difference in performance between the monochromatic and dichromatic conditions in the synesthetes indicates that synesthesia occurs at a later processing stage than does metacontrast masking.

  17. Carbon contamination topography analysis of EUV masks

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.-J.; Yankulin, L.; Thomas, P.; Mbanaso, C.; Antohe, A.; Garg, R.; Wang, Y.; Murray, T.; Wuest, A.; Goodwin, F.; Huh, S.; Cordes, A.; Naulleau, P.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Gullikson, E.; Denbeaux, G.

    2010-03-12

    The impact of carbon contamination on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks is significant due to throughput loss and potential effects on imaging performance. Current carbon contamination research primarily focuses on the lifetime of the multilayer surfaces, determined by reflectivity loss and reduced throughput in EUV exposure tools. However, contamination on patterned EUV masks can cause additional effects on absorbing features and the printed images, as well as impacting the efficiency of cleaning process. In this work, several different techniques were used to determine possible contamination topography. Lithographic simulations were also performed and the results compared with the experimental data.

  18. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  19. Remote surface inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, S.; Balaram, J.; Seraji, H.; Kim, W. S.; Tso, K.; Prasad, V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on an on-going research and development effort in remote surface inspection of space platforms such as the Space Station Freedom (SSF). It describes the space environment and identifies the types of damage for which to search. This paper provides an overview of the Remote Surface Inspection System that was developed to conduct proof-of-concept demonstrations and to perform experiments in a laboratory environment. Specifically, the paper describes three technology areas: (1) manipulator control for sensor placement; (2) automated non-contact inspection to detect and classify flaws; and (3) an operator interface to command the system interactively and receive raw or processed sensor data. Initial findings for the automated and human visual inspection tests are reported.

  20. Apparatus for inspecting piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollingger, W. Thor; Appel, D. Keith; Park, Larry R.

    1995-01-01

    An inspection rabbit for inspecting piping systems having severe bends therein. The rabbit consists of a flexible, modular body containing a miniaturized eddy current inspection probe, a self-contained power supply for proper operation of the rabbit, an outer surface that allows ease of movement through piping systems and means for transmitting data generated by the inspection device. The body is preferably made of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing or, alternatively, silicone rubber with a shrink wrapping of polytetrafluoroethylene (TEFLON.RTM.). The body is formed to contain the power supply, preferably a plurality of batteries, and a spool of communication wire that connects to a data processing computer external to the piping system.

  1. Guidelines for software inspections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Quality control inspections are software problem finding procedures which provide defect removal as well as improvements in software functionality, maintenance, quality, and development and testing methodology is discussed. The many side benefits include education, documentation, training, and scheduling.

  2. Green inspection station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Chen-Ko; Jacubasch, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    As an effect of globalization, product parts are manufactured more and more in different places. Due to the manufacturing processes, (sub-) products are being transported back and forth and rearranged until they can finally reach the consumer. Not only the environment is increasingly burdened, but also the natural resources are wasted increasingly thoughtless. One reason is certainly because for decades the industry has had only an inflexible concept for the inspection of (sub-) products, which cannot be easily adapted to changes in product layout, for example one robot with one sensor or one rigid structure with a fixed number of sensors for one specific inspection task. This rigid approach is unsuitable for the inspection of variant products. For these reasons, a new concept for 2D and 3D metric and logical quality monitoring with a more accurate, flexible, economical and efficient inspection station has been developed and tested in IOSB.

  3. Apparatus for inspecting piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollingger, W.T.; Appel, D.K.; Park, L.R.

    1995-03-21

    An inspection rabbit is described for inspecting piping systems having severe bends therein. The rabbit consists of a flexible, modular body containing a miniaturized eddy current inspection probe, a self-contained power supply for proper operation of the rabbit, an outer surface that allows ease of movement through piping systems and means for transmitting data generated by the inspection device. The body is preferably made of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing or, alternatively, silicone rubber with a shrink wrapping of polytetrafluoroethylene (TEFLON{trademark}). The body is formed to contain the power supply, preferably a plurality of batteries, and a spool of communication wire that connects to a data processing computer external to the piping system. 6 figures.

  4. Peak oxygen consumption and lactate threshold in full mask versus mouth mask conditions during incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Dooly, C R; Johnson, A T; Dotson, C O; Vaccaro, P; Soong, P

    1996-01-01

    Respirator masks vary in inhalation and exhalation resistance, and in dead volume. It is believed that these factors may contribute significantly to an early anaerobic threshold in mask wearers during maximal exercise. Very little is known concerning the effect of respirator masks on maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) and the lactate threshold (LT). The purpose of the present study was to assess peak VO2 (VO2peak), LT and the ventilatory threshold (VT) of 14 experienced cyclists performing two maximal cycle exercise protocols while wearing a full respirator mask (FM) (M17 type) and a mouth mask (MM). VO2peak was 10% lower under FM conditions. Peak values for ventilation (VEpeak), respiratory rate (fbpeak) and tidal volume (VTpeak) were all significantly lower under with FM versus MM conditions. Performance time and maximal heart rate (fcpeak) were not different between mask conditions. The LT and VT when expressed in %VO2peak, and the lactate concentration (mmol.l-1) at LT and VT were not significantly different across mask conditions. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated longer inhalation times, decreased Fr values and greater oxygen extraction under FM conditions. Thus, perhaps due to the increased inhalation resistance of the FM condition, subjects were unable to attain their "normal" VO2 despite similar performance times and maximal fc. Furthermore, despite a diminished VO2peak with FM, LT and VT appeared to be the same as with a MM.

  5. Wedges for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer device is provided which is used in ultrasonic inspection of the material surrounding a threaded hole and which comprises a wedge of plastic or the like including a curved threaded surface adapted to be screwed into the threaded hole and a generally planar surface on which a conventional ultrasonic transducer is mounted. The plastic wedge can be rotated within the threaded hole to inspect for flaws in the material surrounding the threaded hole.

  6. Nuclear Plant Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-01-01

    Engineers from the Power Authority of the State of New York use a Crack Growth Analysis Program supplied by COSMIC (Computer Software Management and Information Center) in one stage of nuclear plant inspection. Welds of the nuclear steam supply system are checked for cracks; radiographs, dye penetration and visual inspections are performed to locate cracks in the metal structure and welds. The software package includes three separate crack growth analysis models and enables necessary repairs to be planned before serious problems develop.

  7. Cosmic Ballet or Devil's Mask?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-04-01

    Stars like our Sun are members of galaxies, and most galaxies are themselves members of clusters of galaxies. In these, they move around among each other in a mostly slow and graceful ballet. But every now and then, two or more of the members may get too close for comfort - the movements become hectic, sometimes indeed dramatic, as when galaxies end up colliding. ESO PR Photo 12/04 shows an example of such a cosmic tango. This is the superb triple system NGC 6769-71, located in the southern Pavo constellation (the Peacock) at a distance of 190 million light-years. This composite image was obtained on April 1, 2004, the day of the Fifth Anniversary of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It was taken in the imaging mode of the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on Melipal, one of the four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of the VLT at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). The two upper galaxies, NGC 6769 (upper right) and NGC 6770 (upper left), are of equal brightness and size, while NGC 6771 (below) is about half as bright and slightly smaller. All three galaxies possess a central bulge of similar brightness. They consist of elderly, reddish stars and that of NGC 6771 is remarkable for its "boxy" shape, a rare occurrence among galaxies. Gravitational interaction in a small galaxy group NGC 6769 is a spiral galaxy with very tightly wound spiral arms, while NGC 6770 has two major spiral arms, one of which is rather straight and points towards the outer disc of NGC 6769. NGC 6770 is also peculiar in that it presents two comparatively straight dark lanes and a fainter arc that curves towards the third galaxy, NGC 6771 (below). It is also obvious from this new VLT photo that stars and gas have been stripped off NGC 6769 and NGC 6770, starting to form a common envelope around them, in the shape of a Devil's Mask. There is also a weak hint of a tenuous bridge between NGC 6769 and NGC 6771. All of these features testify to strong gravitational interaction between the three galaxies

  8. Are Masking-Based Models of Risk Useful?

    PubMed

    Gisiner, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    As our understanding of directly observable effects from anthropogenic sound exposure has improved, concern about "unobservable" effects such as stress and masking have received greater attention. Equal energy models of masking such as power spectrum models have the appeal of simplicity, but do they offer biologically realistic assessments of the risk of masking? Data relevant to masking such as critical ratios, critical bandwidths, temporal resolution, and directional resolution along with what is known about general mammalian antimasking mechanisms all argue for a much more complicated view of masking when making decisions about the risk of masking inherent in a given anthropogenic sound exposure scenario. PMID:26610979

  9. Influence of auditory fatigue on masked pure-tone thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Tubbs, R. L.; Johnston, P. A.; Johnston, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of four related experiments involving conditions of 3-kHz low-intensity masking, a replication of experiment I with slight variations, 3-kHz high-intensity masking, and 6-kHz low-intensity masking. The frequencies of the tones which the observers detected were 3 and 6 kHz. The observed change in masked-tone threshold as a function of fatigue is discussed. It is found that masked-tone-detection thresholds remain essentially unchanged following fatigue if the masking-noise intensity is sufficiently great.

  10. Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili

    2012-01-01

    An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

  11. Surface inspection operator interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creek, Russell C.

    1992-03-01

    Surface inspection systems are widely used in many industries including steel, tin, aluminum, and paper. These systems generally use machine vision technology to detect defective surface regions and can generate very high data output rates which can be difficult for line operators to absorb and use. A graphical, windowing interface is described which provides the operators with an overview of the surface quality of the inspected web while still allowing them to select individual defective regions for display. A touch screen is used as the only operator input. This required alterations to some screen widgets due to subtle ergonomic differences of touch screen input over mouse input. The interface, although developed for inspecting coated steel, has been designed to be adaptable to other surface inspection applications. Facility is provided to allow the detection, classification, and display functions of the inspection system to be readily changed. Modifications can be implemented on two main levels; changes that reflect the configuration of the hardware system and control the detection and classification components of the surface inspection system are accessible only to authorized staff while those affecting the display and alarm settings of defect types may be changed by operators and this can generally be done dynamically.

  12. Particle removal challenges with EUV patterned mask for the sub-22nm HP node

    SciTech Connect

    Rastegar, A.; Eichenlaub, S.; Kadaksham, A. J.; Lee, B.; House, M.; Huh, S.; Cha, B.; Yun, H.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    The particle removal efficiency (PRE) of cleaning processes diminishes whenever the minimum defect size for a specific technology node becomes smaller. For the sub-22 nm half-pitch (HP) node, it was demonstrated that exposure to high power megasonic up to 200 W/cm{sup 2} did not damage 60 nm wide TaBN absorber lines corresponding to the 16 nm HP node on wafer. An ammonium hydroxide mixture and megasonics removes {ge}50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a very high PRE, A sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) in addition to ammonium hydroxide mixture (APM) and megasonic is required to remove {ge}28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a high PRE. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOFSIMS) studies show that the presence of O{sub 2} during a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ({lambda} = 172 nm) surface conditioning step will result in both surface oxidation and Ru removal, which drastically reduce extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask life time under multiple cleanings. New EUV mask cleaning processes show negligible or no EUV reflectivity loss and no increase in surface roughness after up to 15 cleaning cycles. Reviewing of defect with a high current density scanning electron microscope (SEM) drastically reduces PRE and deforms SiO{sub 2} particles. 28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on EUV masks age very fast and will deform over time, Care must be taken when reviewing EUV mask defects by SEM. Potentially new particles should be identified to calibrate short wavelength inspection tools, Based on actinic image review, 50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on top of the EUV mask will be printed on the wafer.

  13. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Matos; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed. PMID:24068269

  14. Parallel, miniaturized scanning probe microscope for defect inspection and review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghian, H.; van den Dool, T. C.; Crowcombe, W. E.; Herfst, R. W.; Winters, J.; Kramer, G. F. I. J.; Koster, N. B.

    2014-04-01

    With the device dimensions moving towards the 1X node, the semiconductor industry is rapidly approaching the point where 10 nm defects become critical. Therefore, new methods for improving the yield are emerging, including inspection and review methods with sufficient resolution and throughput. Existing industrial tools cannot anymore fulfill these requirements for upcoming smaller and 3D features, since they are performing at the edge of their performance. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has the ability to accurately measure dimensions in the micrometer to nanometer scale. Examples of applications are surface roughness, channel height and width measurement, defect inspection in wafers, masks and flat panel displays. In most of these applications, the target area is very large, and, therefore, the throughput of the measurement plays an important role in the final production cost. Single SPM has never been able to compete with other inspection systems in terms of measurement speed, thus has not fulfilled the industry needs in throughput and cost. Further increase of the speed of the single SPM helps, but it still is far from the required throughput and, therefore, insufficient for high-volume manufacturing. Over the past three years, we have developed a revolutionary concept for a multiple miniaturized SPM heads system, which can inspect and measure many sites in parallel. The very high speed of each miniaturized SPM unit allow the user to scan many areas, each with the size of tens of micrometers, in a few seconds. This paper presents an overview of the technical developments and experimental results of the parallel SPM system for wafer and mask inspection.

  15. Clean induced feature CD shift of EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesládek, Pavel; Schedel, Thorsten; Bender, Markus

    2016-05-01

    EUV developed in the last decade to the most promising <7nm technology candidate. Defects are considered to be one of the most critical issues of the EUV mask. There are several contributors which make the EUV mask so different from the optical one. First one is the significantly more complicated mask stack consisting currently of 40 Mo/Si double layers, covered by Ru capping layer and TaN/TaO absorber/anti-reflective coating on top of the front face of the mask. Backside is in contrary to optical mask covered as well by conductive layer consisting of Cr or CrN. Second contributor is the fact that EUV mask is currently in contrary to optical mask not yet equipped with sealed pellicle, leading to much higher risk of mask contamination. Third reason is use of EUV mask in vacuum, possibly leading to deposition of vacuum contaminants on the EUV mask surface. Latter reason in combination with tight requirements on backside cleanliness lead to the request of frequent recleaning of the EUV mask, in order to sustain mask lifetime similar to that of optical mask. Mask cleaning process alters slightly the surface of any mask - binary COG mask, as well as phase shift mask of any type and naturally also of the EUV mask as well. In case of optical masks the changes are almost negligible, as the mask is exposed to max. 10-20 re-cleans within its life time. These modifications can be expressed in terms of different specified parameters, e.g. CD shift, phase/trans shift, change of the surface roughness etc. The CD shift, expressed as thinning (or exceptionally thickening) of the dark features on the mask is typically in order of magnitude 0.1nm per process run, which is completely acceptable for optical mask. Projected on the lifetime of EUV mask, assuming 100 clean process cycles, this will lead to CD change of about 10nm. For this reason the requirements for EUV mask cleaning are significantly tighter, << 0.1 nm per process run. This task will look even more challenging, when

  16. Masked object registration in the Fourier domain.

    PubMed

    Padfield, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    Registration is one of the most common tasks of image analysis and computer vision applications. The requirements of most registration algorithms include large capture range and fast computation so that the algorithms are robust to different scenarios and can be computed in a reasonable amount of time. For these purposes, registration in the Fourier domain using normalized cross-correlation is well suited and has been extensively studied in the literature. Another common requirement is masking, which is necessary for applications where certain regions of the image that would adversely affect the registration result should be ignored. To address these requirements, we have derived a mathematical model that describes an exact form for embedding the masking step fully into the Fourier domain so that all steps of translation registration can be computed efficiently using Fast Fourier Transforms. We provide algorithms and implementation details that demonstrate the correctness of our derivations. We also demonstrate how this masked FFT registration approach can be applied to improve the Fourier-Mellin algorithm that calculates translation, rotation, and scale in the Fourier domain. We demonstrate the computational efficiency, advantages, and correctness of our algorithm on a number of images from real-world applications. Our framework enables fast, global, parameter-free registration of images with masked regions.

  17. A new mask exposure and analysis facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    te Sligte, Edwin; Koster, Norbert; Deutz, Alex; Staring, Wilbert

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of ever higher source powers in EUV systems causes increased risks for contamination and degradation of EUV masks and pellicles. Appropriate testing can help to inventory and mitigate these risks. To this end, we propose EBL2: a laboratory EUV exposure system capable of operating at high EUV powers and intensities, and capable of exposing and analyzing EUV masks. The proposed system architecture is similar to the EBL system which has been operated jointly by TNO and Carl Zeiss SMT since 2005. EBL2 contains an EUV Beam Line, in which samples can be exposed to EUV irradiation in a controlled environment. Attached to this Beam Line is an XPS system, which can be reached from the Beam Line via an in-vacuum transfer system. This enables surface analysis of exposed masks without breaking vacuum. Automated handling with dual pods is foreseen so that exposed EUV masks will still be usable in EUV lithography tools to assess the imaging impact of the exposure. Compared to the existing system, large improvements in EUV power, intensity, reliability, and flexibility are proposed. Also, in-situ measurements by e.g. ellipsometry is foreseen for real time monitoring of the sample condition. The system shall be equipped with additional ports for EUVR or other analysis tools. This unique facility will be open for external customers and other research groups.

  18. Testing Tactile Masking between the Forearms.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2016-01-01

    Masking, in which one stimulus affects the detection of another, is a classic technique that has been used in visual, auditory, and tactile research, usually using stimuli that are close together to reveal local interactions. Masking effects have also been demonstrated in which a tactile stimulus alters the perception of a touch at a distant location. Such effects can provide insight into how components of the body's representations in the brain may be linked. Occasional reports have indicated that touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at corresponding contralateral locations. To explore the matching of corresponding points across the body, we can measure the spatial tuning and effect of posture on contralateral masking. Careful controls are required to rule out direct effects of the remote stimulus, for example by mechanical transmission, and also attention effects in which thresholds may be altered by the participant's attention being drawn away from the stimulus of interest. The use of this technique is beneficial as a behavioural measure for exploring which parts of the body are functionally connected and whether the two sides of the body interact in a somatotopic representation. This manuscript describes a behavioural protocol that can be used for studying contralateral tactile masking. PMID:26889736

  19. The laryngeal mask airway in obstetrical anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gataure, P S; Hughes, J A

    1995-02-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been used extensively to provide a safe airway in spontaneously breathing patients who are not at risk from aspiration of gastric contents. The role of the LMA in the event of a failed intubation in an obstetrical patient, and its place in a failed intubation drill remains unclear. Two hundred and fifty consultant obstetric anaesthetists in the United Kingdom were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire regarding their views about using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in obstetrical anaesthesia. The LMA was available in 91.4% of obstetric units. Seventy-two per cent of anaesthetists were in favour of using the LMA to maintain oxygenation when tracheal intubation had failed and ventilation using a face mask was inadequate. Twenty-four respondents had had personal experience with the LMA in obstetrical anaesthesia, eight of whom stated that the LMA had proved to be a lifesaver. We believe that the LMA has a role in obstetrical anaesthesia when tracheal intubation has failed and ventilation using a face mask proves to be impossible, and it should be inserted before attempting cricothyroidectomy. PMID:7720155

  20. Associative Learning of Discrimination with Masked Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos, Jose L.

    2007-01-01

    Great controversy exists on whether associative learning occurs without awareness. In Experiment 1, 31 participants received discrimination training by repeated presentations of two stimulus sequences (S1[subscript A] right arrow S2[subscript A], and S1[subscript B] right arrow S2[subscript B]), S1 being a masked stimulus. S2 were imperative…

  1. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  2. Sensitivity to masked conditioned stimuli predicts conditioned response magnitude under masked conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Brian R.; Echiverri, Aileen M.; Grillon, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Expression of conditioned fear has been reported to be independent of perceptual awareness of conditioned stimuli (CSs). Previous studies have been criticized, however, for not adequately assessing perceptual awareness. We fear-conditioned participants to one of two symbols and measured skin conductance responses to dichoptically masked and unmasked CSs. Participants also performed a target detection task and sensitivity (d′) to the masked conditioned stimuli (CS+, CS−) was measured. Results showed that sensitivity under masking conditions was related to conditioned responses to masked CSs but not unmasked CSs. Thus, a strong relationship between expression of conditioned fear and awareness of the CS+ emerges when the latter is assessed by signal detection methods. Without consensus on how awareness should be defined, these findings bring balance to previous studies that have typically used less sensitive assessments of awareness. PMID:17433097

  3. Lithographic performance evaluation of a contaminated EUV mask after cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Dittmar, Kornelia; Holfeld, Christian; Wuest, Andrea

    2009-11-16

    The effect of surface contamination and subsequent mask surface cleaning on the lithographic performance of a EUV mask is investigated. SEMATECH's Berkeley micro-field exposure tool (MET) printed 40 nm and 50 nm line and space (L/S) patterns are evaluated to compare the performance of a contaminated and cleaned mask to an uncontaminated mask. Since the two EUV masks have distinct absorber architectures, optical imaging models and aerial image calculations were completed to determine any expected differences in performance. Measured and calculated Bossung curves, process windows, and exposure latitudes for the two sets of L/S patterns are compared to determine how the contamination and cleaning impacts the lithographic performance of EUV masks. The observed differences in mask performance are shown to be insignificant, indicating that the cleaning process did not appreciably affect mask performance.

  4. Disentangling neural processing of masked and masking stimulus by means of event-related contralateral - ipsilateral differences of EEG potentials.

    PubMed

    Verleger, Rolf; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the excellent temporal resolution of event-related EEG potentials (ERPs), the overlapping potentials evoked by masked and masking stimuli are hard to disentangle. However, when both masked and masking stimuli consist of pairs of relevant and irrelevant stimuli, one left and one right from fixation, with the side of the relevant element varying between pairs, effects of masked and masking stimuli can be distinguished by means of the contralateral preponderance of the potentials evoked by the relevant elements, because the relevant elements may independently change sides in masked and masking stimuli. Based on a reanalysis of data from which only selected contralateral-ipsilateral effects had been previously published, the present contribution will provide a more complete picture of the ERP effects in a masked-priming task. Indeed, effects evoked by masked primes and masking targets heavily overlapped in conventional ERPs and could be disentangled to a certain degree by contralateral-ipsilateral differences. Their major component, the N2pc, is interpreted as indicating preferential processing of stimuli matching the target template, which process can neither be identified with conscious perception nor with shifts of spatial attention. The measurements showed that the triggering of response preparation by the masked stimuli did not depend on their discriminability, and their priming effects on the processing of the following target stimuli were qualitatively different for stimulus identification and for response preparation. These results provide another piece of evidence for the independence of motor-related and perception-related effects of masked stimuli.

  5. Piping inspection round robin

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, P.G.; Doctor, S.R.

    1996-04-01

    The piping inspection round robin was conducted in 1981 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify the capability of ultrasonics for inservice inspection and to address some aspects of reliability for this type of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The round robin measured the crack detection capabilities of seven field inspection teams who employed procedures that met or exceeded the 1977 edition through the 1978 addenda of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section 11 Code requirements. Three different types of materials were employed in the study (cast stainless steel, clad ferritic, and wrought stainless steel), and two different types of flaws were implanted into the specimens (intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) and thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs)). When considering near-side inspection, far-side inspection, and false call rate, the overall performance was found to be best in clad ferritic, less effective in wrought stainless steel and the worst in cast stainless steel. Depth sizing performance showed little correlation with the true crack depths.

  6. Ocular barotrauma caused by mask squeeze during a scuba dive.

    PubMed

    Rudge, F W

    1994-07-01

    I describe the case of a 25-year-old man who, after a scuba dive, had ocular barotrauma caused by mask squeeze. As in most cases, the condition occurred because the patient failed to exhale into the mask during descent to equalize the pressure within the mask. Although alarming in appearance, the condition is generally mild and self-limited. Patients should be instructed in the proper technique of mask clearing before they return to diving to prevent a recurrence.

  7. Automated mask creation from a 3D model using Faethm.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2007-11-01

    We have developed and implemented a method which given a three-dimensional object can infer from topology the two-dimensional masks needed to produce that object with surface micro-machining. The masks produced by this design tool can be generic, process independent masks, or if given process constraints, specific for a target process. This design tool calculates the two-dimensional mask set required to produce a given three-dimensional model by investigating the vertical topology of the model.

  8. On the Nature of Phonological Assembly: Evidence from Backward Masking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Conrad; Ziegler, Johannes C.

    2002-01-01

    Used backward masking paradigm to investigate nature and time course of phonological assembly. Two experiments examined to what extent phonological assembly is a serial process. One showed recognition rates in a backward masking task varied as a function of the serial position of phonemes that were shared between backward masks and target words;…

  9. Attributes of tinnitus and the acceptance of masking.

    PubMed

    Vernon, J; Griest, S; Press, L

    1990-01-01

    Various characteristics of tinnitus were surveyed to determine whether they were associated with the acceptance of masking, which is used as a relief procedure for tinnitus. The characteristics considered were duration, loudness match, minimum masking level, and residual inhibition. Data for the characteristics of tinnitus were obtained from the Tinnitus Data Registry at the Oregon Hearing Research Center, which contains information on 784 tinnitus patients. The acceptance of masking was determined by each individual patient based on actual tests with wearable masking units. Variations in the individual characteristics listed above were not found to be significantly associated with the acceptance of masking and thus should not be used a priori to deny patients the opportunity for possible relief of their tinnitus. A masking indicator was found to be significantly (P = .03) associated with the acceptance of masking. This masking indicator is obtained by subtracting the loudness match of the tinnitus from the minimum masking level. When the masking indicator was 10 dB or less, the acceptance of masking was in excess of 50%. The data presented may help to dispel some current misconceptions about the masking of tinnitus. PMID:2181884

  10. How color, regularity, and good Gestalt determine backward masking.

    PubMed

    Sayim, Bilge; Manassi, Mauro; Herzog, Michael

    2014-06-18

    The strength of visual backward masking depends on the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between target and mask. Recently, it was shown that the conjoint spatial layout of target and mask is as crucial as SOA. Particularly, masking strength depends on whether target and mask group with each other. The same is true in crowding where the global spatial layout of the flankers and target-flanker grouping determine crowding strength. Here, we presented a vernier target followed by different flanker configurations at varying SOAs. Similar to crowding, masking of a red vernier target was strongly reduced for arrays of 10 green compared with 10 red flanking lines. Unlike crowding, single green lines flanking the red vernier showed strong masking. Irregularly arranged flanking lines yielded stronger masking than did regularly arranged lines, again similar to crowding. While cuboid flankers reduced crowding compared with single lines, this was not the case in masking. We propose that, first, masking is reduced when the flankers are part of a larger spatial structure. Second, spatial factors counteract color differences between the target and the flankers. Third, complex Gestalts, such as cuboids, seem to need longer processing times to show ungrouping effects as observed in crowding. Strong parallels between masking and crowding suggest similar underlying mechanism; however, temporal factors in masking additionally modulate performance, acting as an additional grouping cue.

  11. How Does Target Duration Affect Object Substitution Masking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Carter, Wakefield; Guest, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Object substitution masking (OSM) is typically studied using a brief search display. The target item may be indicated by a cue/mask surrounding but not overlapping it. Report of the target is reduced when mask offset trails target offset rather than being simultaneous with it. We report 5 experiments investigating whether OSM can be obtained if…

  12. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  15. Does "Darkness" Lead to "Happiness"? Masked Suffix Priming Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunabeitia, Jon Andoni; Perea, Manuel; Carreiras, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Masked affix priming effects have usually been obtained for words sharing the initial affix (e.g., "reaction"-"REFORM"). However, prior evidence on masked suffix priming effects (e.g., "baker"-"WALKER") is inconclusive. In the present series of masked priming lexical decision experiments, a target word was briefly preceded by a morphologically or…

  16. Homophone Dominance Modulates the Phonemic-Masking Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berent, Iris; Van Orden, Guy C.

    2000-01-01

    Finds (1) positive phonemic-masking effects occurred for dominant homophones; (2) null phonemic-masking effects occurred for subordinate homophones; and (3) subordinate homophones were much more likely to be falsely identified as their dominant mate. Suggests the source of these null phonemic-masking is itself a phonology effect. Concludes…

  17. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, datamore » analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.« less

  18. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  19. Lighted, Folding Inspection Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roepe, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    Compact, inexpensive tool used in place of expensive borescopes. Shortens inspection/photographing process. Includes two small metal or glass mirrors hinged together. Two 3-V light bulbs attached along edges of one mirror and connected to battery of two cells. Inserted into narrow opening of clevis or tand, and surface viewed and photographed in opposite mirror. Useful in assembly of segments of solid rocket motors as well as in postflight assessment, engineering evaluation, and refurbishment. Also applied in general to inspection and photographing of inner sealing surfaces to which access difficult.

  20. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  1. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  2. Super diffraction lithography (SDL): fine random line pattern formation by single-exposure with binary mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Abe, J.; Nakae, A.; Imai, A.; Narimatsu, K.; Suko, K.

    2005-05-01

    A novel RET named Super Diffraction Lithography (SDL), which enables 90~80 nm random line by single exposure in KrF wavelength, has been developed. A pair of bright lines, which sandwiches binary or Atten-PSM line and is surrounded by attenuating non-phase-shifting (Atten-NPS) area, is formed on a mask. The Atten-NPS area of the mask is composed with a small pad array whose pitch is finer than the resolution limit of projection optics. Then, this mask can be fabricated with a single layer patterning. When this mask is illuminated by an obliquely incident light with a specific incident angle, very sharp dark line image is formed at center of the bright lines. Because the outside of the pair is Atten-NPS area, image intensity for this area can become much higher than a slice level of the central dark line image, resulting in no resist pattern at the outside of the pair. By application of a sub-resolution assist feature (SRAF) for semi-dense pattern, fine line can be imaged throughout pattern pitch. Then, utilizing SDL, very fine random line can be formed by SINGLE EXPOSURE of SIMPLE STRUCTURE MASK. In KrF exposure at NA=0.82, 90 nm line with pitch of down to 240 nm can be achieved by a binary mask. Using 6% transmission Atten-PSM, 80 nm becomes possible. Moreover, 50 nm isolated line becomes feasible in KrF exposure by application of high transmission Atten-PSM. We believe that SDL is the most cost-effective and easily applicable RET for gate pattern formation in advanced logic devices.

  3. Imaging performance of attenuated phase-shift mask using coherent scattering microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Uk; Jeong, SeeJun; Hong, Seong Chul; Lee, Seung Min; Ahn, Jinho

    2014-03-01

    The half-tone phase shift mask (PSM) has been suggested for better imaging performances like image contrast, NILS and H-V bias compared to the binary mask (BIM) in EUV lithography. In this paper, we measured imaging performance of a fabricated half-tone attenuated PSM with Coherent Scattering Microscopy (CSM) and the results were compared with simulation data obtained by EM-suite tool. We prepared a half-tone attenuated PSM which has 12.7% reflectivity and 180° phase shift with absorber stack of 16.5mn-thick TaN absorber and 24nm-thick Mo phase shifter. With CSM, an actinic inspection tool, we measured the imaging properties of PSM. The diffraction efficiencies of BIM were measured as 31%, 36%, and 44% for 88 nm, 100 nm, and 128 nm mask CD, respectively, while those of PSM were measured as 45%, 62%, and 81%. Also the aerial image at wafer level obtained by CSM with high volume manufacturing tool's (HVM) illumination condition (NA=0.33, σ=0.9) showed higher image contrast and NILS with phase shift effect. And the measured data were consistent with the simulation data.

  4. [Difficult intubation due to facial malformations in a child. The laryngeal mask as an aid].

    PubMed

    Golisch, W; Hönig, J F; Lange, H; Braun, U

    1994-11-01

    Variations in anatomy of the bony and soft-tissue structures of the neck and facial cranium due to trauma, disease, or dysmorphic syndromes may lead to severe intubation problems. These patients are admitted for mandibulofacial and otolaryngologic surgery. It is important to inspect the patient's outer and inner pharyngeal structures carefully during preoperative assessment, as suggested by Mallampati. The observer estimates the facility of intubation by inspection of the faucial pillars, soft palate, and uvula. Unfortunately, even careful examination does not predict every case of difficult intubation, so that unexpected problems may occur. There may also be difficulties in ventilating these patients with a face mask. Safe intubation is possible in these cases using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), laryngoscopy with a rigid optical aid, and the fibreoptic bronchoscope. Case report. We report a 14-month-old girl with Goldenhar's syndrome (oculo-auricular dysplasia) who presented for soft-palate surgery. This syndrome belongs to the group of cranio-mandibular-facial malformations; the main symptoms are congenital unilateral malformations in the area of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches. The patient's jaw was hypoplastic with aplasia of the temporo-mandibular joint, which led to asymmetry of the lower face and an extremely short mandible. Additionally, we observed a large tongue in relation to the small jaw. Macrostomia is part of the syndrome, and may lead to underestimation of intubation problems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Mask CD measurement approach by diffraction intensity for lithography equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Takaharu; Mesuda, Kei; Sutou, Takanori; Inazuki, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Toyama, Nobuhito; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2008-04-01

    In 45nm node and beyond with hyper NA lithography, mask topography effect is not ignorable and mask CD bias impacts printing performance such as MEEF or exposure latitude. In that situation, 3D simulation is required for precise evaluation of printing performance and the accuracy of 3D mask model on simulation is a key issue. Verification of 3D mask model by diffraction intensity measurement with AIMS TM45-193i was discussed in our previous works. Through the verification, though real mask successfully creates effective or simulated diffractions, CD on 3D mask model on simulation was different to that on AIMS TM result which was measured by CD-SEM. Therefore, purpose of this work is to analyze the cause of CD differences through AIMS TM diffraction intensity evaluation in various conditions (mask material, pattern pitch, mask CD bias and mask CD-SEM system). Furthermore, lithography equivalent CD is proposed as width of "ideal" mask shape. As a result achieved from the experiments, constant CD shift was successfully observed at hp40-70nm L/S pattern with varied bias for both 6% EAPSM and Binary masks. It can be said that mask topography difference related to mask material and pattern dimensions has not been observed. On the other hand, the value of CD shift was smaller on the condition of newer generation CD-SEM measurement. Other result achieved from further discussion and analysis, cause of the CD difference was explained using simple SEM image simulation. The CD difference was mainly changed by electron beam size factor, and it was stable with side wall angle in the range of 80 to 90 degree if the middle CD, which is the width of 3D model defined at the half height of the mask film's thickness, is constant. Since side wall angles on actual masks are nearly 90 degree, lithography equivalent CD could be measured by CD-SEM with constant offset.

  6. Multi-part mask for implanting workpieces

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.

    2016-05-10

    A multi-part mask has a pattern plate, which includes a planar portion that has the desired aperture pattern to be used during workpiece processing. The multi-part mask also has a mounting frame, which is used to hold the pattern plate. Prior to assembly, the pattern plate has an aligning portion, which has one or more holes through which reusable alignment pins are inserted. These alignment pins enter kinematic joints disposed on the mounting frame, which serve to precisely align the pattern plate to the mounting frame. After the pattern plate has been secured to the mounting frame, the aligning portion can be detached from the pattern plate. The alignment pins can be reused at a later time. In some embodiments, the pattern plate can later be removed from the mounting frame, so that the mounting frame may be reused.

  7. Tunable lithography masks using chiral nematic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeon Su; Srinivasarao, Mohan; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-03-01

    We present a facile route for pattern formation using chiral nematic fluids as tunable masks in lithography process. The chiral nematic phase prepared by adding a chiral dopant (CB15) to 5CB acted as a set of parallel cylindrical lenses and as a polarization selective photomask for the preparation of periodic line patterns. The pitch of the helical twist was easily controlled by the concentration of chiral agent and the feature size of the resulting pattern was easily tuned. Because of the high mobility of the small liquid crystalline compound, the preparation of chiral nematic fluids based lithography masks requires only a few seconds. This approach has significant advantages including facility, range of surface ordering, and rate of forming periodic arrays. Current affiliation: SK Innovation, Daejeon, Korea

  8. Informational masking of speech in dyslexic children.

    PubMed

    Calcus, Axelle; Colin, Cécile; Deltenre, Paul; Kolinsky, Régine

    2015-06-01

    Studies evaluating speech perception in noise have reported inconsistent results regarding a potential deficit in dyslexic children. So far, most of them investigated energetic masking. The present study evaluated situations inducing mostly informational masking, which reflects cognitive interference induced by the masker. Dyslexic children were asked to identify a female target syllable presented in quiet, babble, unmodulated, and modulated speech-shaped noise. Whereas their performance was comparable to normal-reading children in quiet, it dropped significantly in all noisy conditions compared to age-, but not reading level-matched controls. Interestingly, noise affected similarly the reception of voicing, place, and manner of articulation in dyslexic and normal-reading children. PMID:26093461

  9. Masking mediated print defect visibility predictor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaochen; Nachlieli, Hila; Shaked, Doron; Shiffman, Smadar; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Banding is a well-known artifact produced by printing systems. It usually appears as lines perpendicular to the process direction of the print. Therefore, banding is an important print quality issue which has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers. However, little literature has focused on the study of the masking effect of content for this kind of print quality issue. Compared with other image and print quality research, our work is focused on the print quality of typical documents printed on a digital commercial printing press. In this paper, we propose a Masking Mediated Print Defect Visibility Predictor (MMPDVP) to predict the visibility of defects in the presence of customer content. The parameters of the algorithm are trained from ground-truth images that have been marked by subjects. The MMPDVP could help the press operator decide whether the print quality is acceptable for specific customer requirements. Ultimately, this model can be used to optimize the print-shop workflow.

  10. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    DOE PAGES

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than themore » conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.« less

  11. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than the conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.

  12. Masking in three-dimensional auditory displays.

    PubMed

    Doll, T J; Hanna, T E; Russotti, J S

    1992-06-01

    The extent to which simultaneous inputs in a three-dimensional (3D) auditory display mask one another was studied in a simulated sonar task. The minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to detect an amplitude-modulated 500-Hz tone in a background of broadband noise was measured using a loudspeaker array in a free field. Three aspects of the 3D array were varied: angular separation of the sources, degree of correlation of the background noises, and listener head movement. Masking was substantially reduced when the sources were uncorrelated. The SNR needed for detection decreased with source separation, and the rate of decrease was significantly greater with uncorrelated sources than with partially or fully correlated sources. Head movement had no effect on the SNR required for detection. Implications for the design and application of 3D auditory displays are discussed.

  13. Contrast Gain Control Model Fits Masking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Solomon, Joshua A.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We studied the fit of a contrast gain control model to data of Foley (JOSA 1994), consisting of thresholds for a Gabor patch masked by gratings of various orientations, or by compounds of two orientations. Our general model includes models of Foley and Teo & Heeger (IEEE 1994). Our specific model used a bank of Gabor filters with octave bandwidths at 8 orientations. Excitatory and inhibitory nonlinearities were power functions with exponents of 2.4 and 2. Inhibitory pooling was broad in orientation, but narrow in spatial frequency and space. Minkowski pooling used an exponent of 4. All of the data for observer KMF were well fit by the model. We have developed a contrast gain control model that fits masking data. Unlike Foley's, our model accepts images as inputs. Unlike Teo & Heeger's, our model did not require multiple channels for different dynamic ranges.

  14. Partitioning mechanisms of masking: contrast transducer versus divisive inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghout-Stein, Lauren; Tyler, Christopher W.; Klein, Stanley A.

    1997-06-01

    The properties of spatial vision mechanisms are often explored psychophysically with simultaneous masking paradigms. A variety of hypotheses have been proposed to explain how the mask pattern utilized in these paradigms increases threshold. Numerous studies have investigated the properties of a particular origin of masking hypothesis but few have attempted to compare the properties of masking at several points in the process. Our study isolates masking due to lateral divisive inhibition at a point where mechanism responses are combined, and compares it with masking of the same target due to a nonlinearity either intrinsic to a mechanism or directly operating on the response of a single mechanism. We also measure the slopes of psychometric functions to examine the relationship between uncertainty and mask contrast. Studies of simultaneous masking utilizing a pedestal mask (an identical test and mask pattern) have measured facilitation for low contrast masks. This decrease in threshold from the solo target threshold is commonly referred to as the 'dipper' effect and has been explained as an increase in signal-to- noise ratio from the high unmasked level occurring as the visual system becomes more certain of target location. The level of uncertainty is indicated by the slope of sensitivity to the target as a function of target contrast in the threshold region. In these studies, high contrast masks have evoked an increase in target threshold. There have been many theories explaining this threshold increase. Some suggest that masking is the result of an intrinsic nonlinearity within a mechanism or of a contrast nonlinearity that operates directly on the output of a single mechanism. Others put the source of masking at a gain control operation which occurs when a surrounding set of mechanisms divide the response of a single mechanism by their summed response. Still others attribute the masking to noise that is multiplicative relative to the neural response signal, or

  15. Masked hypertension: A common but insidious presentation of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Donald W; Myers, Martin G; Bolli, Peter; Chockalingam, Arun

    2006-01-01

    A patient has masked hypertension when his office blood pressure is less than 140/90 mmHg but his ambulatory or home blood pressure readings are in the hypertensive range. Several recent studies have demonstrated that cardiovascular risk is similar between those with masked hypertension and those with sustained hypertension. The prevalence of masked hypertension in Canada is not known, but data from other countries suggest rates greater than 8%. Physicians need to use careful clinical judgment to identify and treat subjects with masked hypertension. The present review discusses masked hypertension, its importance to clinical practice and some aspects of patient management. PMID:16755318

  16. Numerically designed phase-mask for stellar coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Naoshi; Murakami, Naoshi; Miura, Noriaki; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-09-01

    Phase-mask coronagraph holds the ability to detect exoplanets very close to their parent star. We report a new kind of phase mask that performs the contrast ratio of more than the tenth power of 10 for a circular aperture with shades of a secondary mirror and spiders. The phase distribution of the phase mask is numerically obtained by making the leaked light distribute outside the transparent part of the pupil. We applied the hybrid input-output algorithm, one of phase retrieval methods, to find the phase distribution of the phase mask. We show the characteristics of thus obtained phase mask.

  17. Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography - Reflective Mask Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C.C.; Kearney, P.A.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; Bowers, J.M.; Cerjan, C.; Warrick, A.L.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Fought, E.; Moore, C.; Larson, C.; Baker, S.; Burkhart, S.C.; Hector, S.D.

    2000-05-09

    EUVL mask blanks consist of a distributed Bragg reflector made of 6.7nm-pitch bi-layers of MO and Si deposited upon a precision Si or glass substrate. The layer deposition process has been optimized for low defects, by application of a vendor-supplied but highly modified ion-beam sputter deposition system. This system is fully automated using SMIF technology to obtain the lowest possible environmental- and handling-added defect levels. Originally designed to coat 150mm substrates, it was upgraded in July, 1999 to 200 mm and has coated runs of over 50 substrates at a time with median added defects >100nm below 0.05/cm{sup 2}. These improvements have resulted from a number of ion-beam sputter deposition system modifications, upgrades, and operational changes, which will be discussed. Success in defect reduction is highly dependent upon defect detection, characterization, and cross-platform positional registration. We have made significant progress in adapting and extending commercial tools to this purpose, and have identified the surface scanner detection limits for different defect classes, and the signatures of false counts and non-printable scattering anomalies on the mask blank. We will present key results and how they have helped reduce added defects. The physics of defect reduction and mitigation is being investigated by a program on multilayer growth over deliberately placed perturbations (defects) of varying size. This program includes modeling of multilayer growth and modeling of defect printability. We developed a technique for depositing uniformly sized gold spheres on EUVL substrates, and have studied the suppression of the perturbations during multilayer growth under varying conditions. This work is key to determining the lower limit of critical defect size for EUV Lithography. We present key aspects of this work. We will summarize progress in all aspects of EUVL mask blank development, and present detailed results on defect reduction and mask blank

  18. Mask Analysis Program (MAP) reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A document intended to serve as a User's Manual and a Programmer's Manual for the Mask Analysis Program is presented. The first portion of the document is devoted to the user. It contains all of the information required to execute MAP. The remainder of the document describes the details of MAP software logic. Although the information in this portion is not required to run the program, it is recommended that every user review it to gain an appreciation for the program functions.

  19. Automatic Inspection During Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Clyde L.

    1988-01-01

    In experimental manufacturing process, numerically-controlled machine tool temporarily converts into inspection machine by installing electronic touch probes and specially-developed numerical-control software. Software drives probes in paths to and on newly machined parts and collects data on dimensions of parts.

  20. Remote Inspection Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to remotely inspect equipment of an aging infrastructure is becoming of major interest to many industries. Often the ability to just get a look at a piece of critical equipment can yield very important information. With millions of miles of piping installed throughout the United States, this vast network is critical to oil, natural…