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Sample records for advanced mask inspection

  1. Take a byte out of MEEF: VAMPIRE: Vehicle for Advanced Mask Pattern Inspection Readiness Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen D.; Rankin, Jed; Turley, Christina; Seki, Kazunori; Dechene, Dan J.; Abdelghany, Hesham

    2016-09-01

    MEEF, or Mask Error Enhancement Factor, is simply defined as the ratio of the change in printed wafer feature width to the change in mask feature width scaled to wafer level. It is important in chip manufacturing that leads to the amplification of mask errors, creating challenges with both achieving dimensional control tolerances and ensuring defect free masks, as measured by on-wafer image quality. As lithographic imaging continues to be stressed, using lower and lower k1 factor resolution enhancement techniques, the high MEEF areas present on advanced optical masks creates an environment where the need for increased mask defect sensitivity in high-MEEF areas becomes more and more critical. There are multiple approaches to mask inspection that may or may not provide enough sensitivity to detect all wafer-printable defects; the challenge in the application of these techniques is simultaneously maintaining an acceptable level of mask inspectability. The higher the MEEF, the harder the challenge will be to achieve and appropriate level of sensitivity while maintaining inspectability…and to do so on the geometries that matter. The predominant photomask fabrication inspection approach in use today compares the features on the reticle directly with the design database using high-NA optics. This approach has the ability to detect small defects, however, when inspecting aggressive OPC, it can lead to the over-detection of inconsequential, or nuisance defects. To minimize these nuisance detections, changing the sensitivity of the inspection can improve the inspectability of a mask inspected in high-NA mode, however, it leads to the inability to detect subtle, yet wafer-printable defects in High-MEEF geometry, due to the fact that this `desense' must be applied globally. There are also `lithography-emulating' approaches to inspection that use various means to provide high defect sensitivity and the ability to tolerate inconsequential, non-printing defects by using scanner

  2. EUV mask pattern inspection with an advanced electron beam inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeya; Inazuki, Yuichi; Tsukasa, Abe; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Zhao, Yan; Kuan, Chiyan; Xiao, Hong; Jau, Jack

    2009-12-01

    Readiness of defect-free mask is one of the biggest challenges to insert extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography into semiconductor high volume manufacturing for 22nm half pitch (HP) node and beyond. According to ITRS roadmap updated in 2008, minimum size of defect needed to be removed is 25nm for 22nm HP node in 2013 [1]. It is necessary, therefore, to develop EUV mask pattern inspection tool being capable of detecting 25nm defect. Electron beam inspection (EBI) is one of promising tools which will be able to meet such a tight defect requirement. In this paper, we evaluated defect detection sensitivity of electron beam inspection (EBI) system developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI) using 88nm half-pitch (HP) line-and-space (L/S) pattern and 128nm HP contact-hole (C/H) pattern EUV mask. We found the EBI system can detect 25nm defects. We, furthermore, fabricated 4 types of EUV mask structures: 1) w/ anti-reflective (AR) layer and w/ buffer layer, 2) w/ AR layer and w/o buffer layer, 3) w/o AR layer and w/ buffer layer, 4) w/o AR layer and w/o buffer layer. And the sensitivity and inspectability for the EBI were compared. It was observed that w/o AR layer structure introduce higher image contrast and lead to better inspectability, although there is no significant different in sensitivity.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet patterned mask inspection performance of advanced projection electron microscope system for 11nm half-pitch generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Novel projection electron microscope optics have been developed and integrated into a new inspection system named EBEYE-V30 ("Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) , and the resulting system shows promise for application to half-pitch (hp) 16-nm node extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask inspection. To improve the system's inspection throughput for 11-nm hp generation defect detection, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and an image capture area deflector that operates simultaneously with the mask scanning motion have been developed. A learning system has been used for the mask inspection tool to meet the requirements of hp 11-nm node EUV patterned mask inspection. Defects are identified by the projection electron microscope system using the "defectivity" from the characteristics of the acquired image. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and costs associated with adjustment of the detection capability to cope with newly-defined mask defects. We describe the integration of the developed elements into the inspection tool and the verification of the designed specification. We have also verified the effectiveness of the learning system, which shows enhanced detection capability for the hp 11-nm node.

  4. A study of defects on EUV mask using blank inspection, patterned mask inspection, and wafer inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, S.; Ren, L.; Chan, D.; Wurm, S.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Nakajima, T.; Kishimoto, M.; Ahn, B.; Kang, I.; Park, J.-O.; Cho, K.; Han, S.-I.; Laursen, T.

    2010-03-12

    The availability of defect-free masks remains one of the key challenges for inserting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into high volume manufacturing. yet link data is available for understanding native defects on real masks. In this paper, a full-field EUV mask is fabricated to investigate the printability of various defects on the mask. The printability of defects and identification of their source from mask fabrication to handling were studied using wafer inspection. The printable blank defect density excluding particles and patterns is 0.63 cm{sup 2}. Mask inspection is shown to have better sensitivity than wafer inspection. The sensitivity of wafer inspection must be improved using through-focus analysis and a different wafer stack.

  5. A novel approach to mask defect inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiv, Amir; Shirman, Yuri; Mangan, Shmoolik

    2008-10-01

    Memory chips, now constituting a major part of semiconductor market, posit a special challenge for inspection, as they are generally produced with the smallest half-pitch available with today's technology. This is true, in particular, to photomasks of advanced memory devices, which are at the forefront of the "low-k1" regime. In this paper we present a novel photomask inspection approach, that is particularly suitable for low-k1 layers of advanced memory chips, owing to their typical dense and periodic structure. The method we present can produce a very strong signal for small mask defects, by suppression of the modulation of the pattern's image. Unlike dark-field detection, however, here a single diffraction order associated with the pattern generates a constant "gray" background image, that is used for signal enhancement. We define the theoretical basis for the new detection technique, and show, both analytically and numerically, that it can easily achieve a detection line past the printability spec, and that in cases it is at least as sensitive as high-resolution based detection. We also demonstrate this claim experimentally on a customer mask, using the platform of Applied Material's newly released Aera2TM mask inspection tool. The high sensitivity demonstrates the important and often overlooked concept that resolution is not synonymous with sensitivity. The novel detection method is advantageous in several other aspects, such as the very simple implementation, the high throughput, and the relatively simple pre- and post-processing algorithms required for signal extraction. These features, and in particular the very high sensitivity, make this novel detection method an attractive inspection option for advanced memory devices.

  6. Practical mask inspection system with printability and pattern priority verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Hideo; Ozaki, Fumio; Takahara, Kenichi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kikuiri, Nobutaka

    2011-05-01

    Through the four years of study in Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) on reducing mask manufacturing Turn Around Time (TAT) and cost, we have been able to establish a technology to improve the efficiency of the review process by applying a printability verification function that utilizes computational lithography simulations to analyze defects detected by a high-resolution mask inspection system. With the advent of Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) and other technologies that extend the life of existing optical lithography, it is becoming extremely difficult to judge a defect only by the shape of a mask pattern, while avoiding pseudo-defects. Thus, printability verification is indispensable for filtering out nuisance defects from high-resolution mask inspection results. When using computational lithography simulations to verify printability with high precision, the image captured by the inspection system must be prepared with extensive care. However, for practical applications, this preparation process needs to be simplified. In addition, utilizing Mask Data Rank (MDR) to vary the defect detection sensitivity according to the patterns is also useful for simultaneously inspecting minute patterns and avoiding pseudo-defects. Combining these two technologies, we believe practical mask inspection for next generation lithography is achievable. We have been improving the estimation accuracy of the printability verification function through discussion with several customers and evaluation of their masks. In this report, we will describe the progress of these practical mask verification functions developed through customers' evaluations.

  7. Optical inspection of EPL stencil masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, James; McCallum, Martin; Okada, Masashi

    2003-06-01

    We are now at a major junction in lithography where non-optical lithographies, such as Electron Projection Lithography (EPL) [1], are being introduced. The mask used in EPL is a non-transparent silicon substrate with a thin silicon (~2μm) membrane with openings for electrons to pass through acting as a scatterer. This must be inspected as defects may cause printable defects. Initial mask inspection work has used SEM inspection to find these defects. However, we have historically used optical mask inspection tools, utilising wavelengths at or above what we are using for imaging, to qualify masks. This technology has been increasingly difficult to sustain as we have moved from imaging using mercury lamp based sources to pulsed excimer laser based sources that are not very suited to the inspection imaging. Indeed, review of defects found has moved from optical microscopes to SEM based tools. Inspection tools have also evolved, with the first SEM based mask inspection tools being developed to find the smallest defects, however these have the penalty of very low throughput. We will show the potential of using optical systems for the transmissive inspection of these EPL masks. The high potential of existing tools will be shown together with the need for a next generation of inspection tools. We will show that simulations indicate that an inspection source with 193nm wavelength would be required for the detection of 50nm defects on a mask used to print 70nm dense lines. It will also be shown how the position of the defect within the membrane greatly influences detection as well as the implications of moving to a thinner silicon membrane.

  8. Inspection of lithographic mask blanks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2001-01-01

    A visible light method for detecting sub-100 nm size defects on mask blanks used for lithography. By using optical heterodyne techniques, detection of the scattered light can be significantly enhanced as compared to standard intensity detection methods. The invention is useful in the inspection of super-polished surfaces for isolated surface defects or particulate contamination and in the inspection of lithographic mask or reticle blanks for surface defects or bulk defects or for surface particulate contamination.

  9. Computational mask defect review for contamination and haze inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Corcoran, Noel; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram; Wolf, Yulian; Shah, Pinkesh

    2013-09-01

    As optical lithography continues to extend into sub-0.35 k1 regime, mask defect inspection and subsequent review has become tremendously challenging, and indeed the largest component to mask manufacturing cost. The routine use of various resolution enhancement techniques (RET) have resulted in complex mask patterns, which together with the need to detect even smaller defects due to higher MEEFs, now requires an inspection engineer to use combination of inspection modes. This is achieved in 193nm AeraTM mask inspection systems wherein masks are not only inspected at their scanner equivalent aerial exposure conditions, but also at higher Numerical Aperture resolution, and special reflected-light, and single-die contamination modes, providing better coverage over all available patterns, and defect types. Once the required defects are detected by the inspection system, comprehensively reviewing and dispositioning each defect then becomes the Achilles heel of the overall mask inspection process. Traditionally, defects have been reviewed manually by an operator, which makes the process error-prone especially given the low-contrast in the convoluted aerial images. Such manual review also limits the quality and quantity of classifications in terms of the different types of characterization and number of defects that can practically be reviewed by a person. In some ways, such manual classification limits the capability of the inspection tool itself from being setup to detect smaller defects since it often results in many more defects that need to be then manually reviewed. Paper 8681-109 at SPIE Advanced Lithography 2013 discussed an innovative approach to actinic mask defect review using computational technology, and focused on Die-to-Die transmitted aerial and high-resolution inspections. In this approach, every defect is characterized in two different ways, viz., quantitatively in terms of its print impact on wafer, and qualitatively in terms of its nature and origin in

  10. EUV mask inspection study for sub-20nm device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Inkyun; Yoon, Gisung; Na, Ji Hoon; Chung, Paul D. H.; Jeon, Chan-Uk

    2012-11-01

    Reflected light inspection has been used to inspect EUVL mask which consists of multi layers and metal absorber. However, sub-wavelength half pitch patterns and reflected inspection make unprecedented phenomenon like tone inversion. These lead EUV inspection more difficult in detectability and inspectability for separating out defects and false. In this study, we report the evaluation result of inspection dependency of illumination conditions like OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), sigma and polarization for sub-20nm EUVL PDM(programmed defect mask). With inspection of sub- 20nm device mask, we finally address the inspection feasibility for sub-20nm device and the future direction of inspection technology.

  11. Mask requirements for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trybula, Walter J.; Engelstad, Roxann L.

    1998-06-01

    Within the n ext 10 years, sub-100 nm features will be required for state-of-the-industry devices. The tolerances for errors at 100 nm or less are substantially smaller than can be achieved today. A critical element of the error budget is the mask. For the 100 nm generation, the 4x mask image placement requirement is 20 nm with CD requirements as low as 9 nm. The challenge would be significant if the only improvement were to develop superior optical masks. There are multiple advanced technologies that are vying to be the successor to optical lithography. Each of these has a unique mask requirement. The leading contenders for the next generation are 1x x-ray, projection e-beam, ion beam, EUV and cell projection e-beam. The x-ray design is a proximity system that employs a 1x membrane mask. Projection e-beam uses a membrane mask with stabilizing struts. Ion beam lithography employs a stencil membrane mask with a carbon coating. EUV employs a 13 nm radiation source that requires a reflective mask. Cell projection e-beam has 25x or greater image masks that are stitched on the wafer. All the technologies indicated above. Once a total error budget for the mask is known, it is necessary to divide the total into the constituent parts. The major sources of distortion can be categorized into eight areas: mask blank processing, e- beam writing, pattern transfer, pellicle effects, mounting, thermal loadings, dynamic effects during exposure and radiation damage. The distortions introduced by each of these depend upon the type of mask; so, individual mask calculations must be made. The purpose of this paper is to review the modeling requirements of each of the categories and to highlight some results from each of the mask configurations.

  12. Development of an advanced mask and its fabrication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takigawa, Tadahiro; Tojo, Toru; Ogawa, Yoji; Koyama, Kiyomi; Ono, Akira; Inoue, Soichi; Ito, Shinichi; Goto, Mineo

    1995-07-01

    Masks and their fabrication technologies are keys to the further advancement of optical lithography. A stable SiNx single layer attenuated masks for DUV have been developed. A 0.2 micrometers contact hole pattern was fabricated using a KrF stepper with the SiNx attenuated mask. Toshiba mask fabrication system, including an electron beam writing system, a data base inspection system, and a data conversion system, has been developed for 64 Mbit DRAM class. Required mask improvements for increasing optical lithography resolution include better critical dimension (CD) uniformity, higher mask writing system resolution, and automatic shifter patten generation of alternating phase shifting masks. In addition, improved mask pattern positioning accuracy is also required. In this paper, experimental CD uniformity and resolution improvements, automatic phase shifter assignment method, and improvement in positioning accuracy, are described. The future development of masks will incorporate these key technologies.

  13. Method and apparatus for inspecting an EUV mask blank

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2005-11-08

    An apparatus and method for at-wavelength EUV mask-blank characterization for inspection of moderate and low spatial frequency coating uniformity using a synchrotron or other source of EUV light. The apparatus provides for rapid, non-destruction, non-contact, at-wavelength qualification of large mask areas, and can be self-calibrating or be calibrated to well-characterized reference samples. It can further check for spatial variation of mask reflectivity or for global differences among masks. The apparatus and method is particularly suited for inspection of coating uniformity and quality and can detect defects in the order of 50 .mu.m and above.

  14. Electron beam inspection of 16nm HP node EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeya; Narukawa, Shogo; Abe, Tsukasa; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Hayashi, Naoya; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Lin, Chia-Wen; Zhao, Yan; Kuan, Chiyan; Jau, Jack

    2012-11-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is the most promising solution for 16nm HP node semiconductor device manufacturing and beyond. The fabrication of defect free EUV mask is one of the most challenging roadblocks to insert EUVL into high volume manufacturing (HVM). To fabricate and assure the defect free EUV masks, electron beam inspection (EBI) tool will be likely the necessary tool since optical mask inspection systems using 193nm and 199nm light are reaching a practical resolution limit around 16nm HP node EUV mask. For production use of EBI, several challenges and potential issues are expected. Firstly, required defect detection sensitivity is quite high. According to ITRS roadmap updated in 2011, the smallest defect size needed to detect is about 18nm for 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Secondly, small pixel size is likely required to obtain the high sensitivity. Thus, it might damage Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer due to accumulated high density electron beam bombardments. It also has potential of elevation of nuisance defects and reduction of throughput. These challenges must be solved before inserting EBI system into EUV mask HVM line. In this paper, we share our initial inspection results for 16nm HP node EUV mask (64nm HP absorber pattern on the EUV mask) using an EBI system eXplore® 5400 developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI). In particularly, defect detection sensitivity, inspectability and damage to EUV mask were assessed. As conclusions, we found that the EBI system has capability to capture 16nm defects on 64nm absorber pattern EUV mask, satisfying the sensitivity requirement of 15nm NAND Flash HP node EUV mask. Furthermore, we confirmed there is no significant damage to susceptible Ru capped Mo/Si multilayer. We also identified that low throughput and high nuisance defect rate are critical challenges needed to address for the 16nm HP node EUV mask inspection. The high nuisance defect rate could be generated by poor LWR and stitching errors during EB writing

  15. Applicability of e-beam mask inspection to EUV mask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoval, Lior; Mangan, Shmoolik; Schwarzband, Ishai; Khristo, Sergey; Balasubramanian, Vivek; Goldstein, Shay; Brikman, Ran; Shoshani, Nir

    2012-03-01

    Ever since the 180nm technology node the semiconductor industry has been battling the sub-wavelength regime in optical lithography. During the same time development for a 13.5nm Extreme Ultraviolet [EUV] solution has been in development, which would take us back from a λ/10 to a >λ regime again - at least for one node. Add to this the potential to increase the wafer size as well, and we are at a major crossroads. The introduction of EUV has been marred by many delays, but we are finally seeing the hardware development efforts converge and multiple customers around the world embarking on this adventure. As it becomes clear that this preproduction phase will occur at or below 20nmHP, it also becomes clear that this will happen at the limiting edge of existing 19x-based patterned mask inspection technology, reaching the practical resolution limits at around 20nm HP mask densities. Resolution is coupled with sensitivity and throughput such that the extended sensitivity may come at an unreasonable throughput. Loss of resolution also badly impacts defect dispositioning, or classification, which becomes impractical. As resolution is especially critical for die to database inspection, single die masks and masks with high flare bias are at risk of not being inspectable with 19xnm based inspectors. E-Beam based mask inspection has been proposed and demonstrated as a viable technology for patterned EUV mask inspection. In this paper, we study the key questions of sensitivity and throughput, in both die-to-die and die-to-database applications. We present new results, based on a new generation of E-Beam inspection technology, which has a higher data rate at smaller spot sizes. We will demonstrate the feasibility of acceptable inspection time with EBMI. We also will discuss die-to-data-base inspection and the advantage of using E-Beam imaging for meeting future requirements of single- die EUV masks.

  16. An open-architecture approach to defect analysis software for mask inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Mark; Pai, Ravi R.; Reddy, Murali Mohan; Krishna, Ravi M.

    2009-04-01

    possible for the end-users to make use of their collected knowledge through the years of experience in mask inspection process by encapsulating the knowledge into software utilities and plugging them into NxDAT. The plug-in interface is designed with the intent of enabling the pro-active mask defect analysis teams to build competitive differentiation into their defect analysis process while protecting their knowledge internally within their company. By providing interface with all major standard layout and mask data formats, NxDAT enables correlation of defect data on reticles with design and mask databases, further extending the effectiveness of defect analysis for D2DB inspection. NxDAT also includes many other advanced features for easy and fast navigation, visual display of defects, defect selection, multi-tier classification, defect clustering and gridding, sophisticated CD and contact measurement analysis, repeatability analysis such as adder analysis, defect trend, capture rate etc.

  17. Through-pellicle defect inspection of EUV masks using an ArF-based inspection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Dario L.; Broadbent, William; Wylie, Mark; Felix, Nelson; Corliss, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The use of EUV photomasks in a semiconductor manufacturing environment requires their periodic inspection to ensure they are continually free of defects that could impact device yield. Defects typically occur from fall-on particles or from surface degradation such as "haze". The proposed use of a polycrystalline-based EUV pellicle to prevent fall-on particles would preclude periodic through-pellicle mask defect inspection using e-beam, as well as, DUV inspection tools (the pellicle is opaque at DUV wavelengths). Thus, to use these types of defect inspection tools would require removal of the EUV pellicle before inspection. After inspection, the pellicle would need to be re-attached and the mask re-qualified using a test wafer, thus causing expense and delays. While EUV-wavelength inspection tools could inspect through such a pellicle precluding the need to remove the pellicle, these tools are not likely to be available in the commercial marketplace for many years. An alternate EUV pellicle material has been developed that is semi-transparent to 193nm wavelengths, thus allowing through-pellicle inspection using existing ArF-based, or other 193nm wavelength mask inspection tools. This eliminates the requirement to remove the pellicle for defect inspection and the associated time and expense. In this work, we will conduct an initial evaluation of through-pellicle EUV mask defect inspection using an existing 193nm mask inspection tool. This initial evaluation will include durability of the pellicle to defect inspection, and impact of the pellicle on inspection tool performance.

  18. Pattern inspection of etched multilayer extreme ultraviolet mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Patterned mask inspection for an etched multilayer (ML) extreme ultraviolet mask was investigated. In order to optimize the mask structure from the standpoint of a pattern inspection the mask structure not only from the standpoint of a pattern inspection by using a projection electron microscope but also by using a projection electron microscope but also by considering the other fabrication processes using electron beam techniques such as critical dimension metrology and mask repair, we employed a conductive layer between the ML and substrate. By measuring the secondary electron emission coefficients of the candidate materials for the conductive layer, we evaluated the image contrast and the influence of the charging effect. In the cases of 40-pair ML, 16-nm-sized extrusion and intrusion defects were found to be detectable more than 10 sigma in half pitch 44, 40, and 32 nm line-and-space patterns. Reducing 40-pair ML to 20-pair ML degraded the image contrast and the defect detectability. However, by selecting B4C as a conductive layer, 16-nm-sized defects and etching residues remained detectable. The 16-nm-sized defects were also detected after the etched part was refilled with Si. A double-layer structure with 2.5-nm-thick B4C on metal film used as a conductive layer was found to have sufficient conductivity and also was found to be free from the surface charging effect and influence of native oxide.

  19. Actinic Mask Inspection at the ALS Initial Design Review

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Chapman, H; Sweeney, D; Levesque, R; Bokor, J; Gullikson, E; Jong, S; Liu, Y; Yi, M; Denbeaux, G; Goldberg, K; Naulleau, P; Denham, P; Rekawa, S; Baston, P; Tackaberry, R; Barale, P

    2003-03-05

    This report is the first milestone report for the actinic mask blank inspection project conducted at the VNL, which forms sub-section 3 of the Q1 2003 mask blank technology transfer program at the VNL. Specifically this report addresses deliverable 3.1.1--design review and preliminary tool design. The goal of this project is to design an actinic mask inspection tool capable of operating in two modes: high-speed scanning for the detection of multilayer defects (inspection mode), and a high-resolution aerial image mode in which the image emulates the imaging illumination conditions of a stepper system (aerial image or AIM mode). The purpose and objective of these two modes is as follows: (1) Defect inspection mode--This imaging mode is designed to scan large areas of the mask for defects EUV multilayer coatings. The goal is to detect the presence of multilayer defects on a mask blank and to store the co-ordinates for subsequent review in AIM mode, thus it is not essential that the illumination and imaging conditions match that of a production stepper. Potential uses for this imaging mode include: (a) Correlating the results obtained using actinic inspection with results obtained using other non-EUV defect inspection systems to verify that the non-EUV scanning systems are detecting all critical defects; (b) Gaining sufficient information to associate defects with particular processes, such as various stages of the multilayer deposition or different modes of operation of the deposition tool; and (c) Assessing the density and EUV impact of surface and multilayer anomalies. Because of the low defect density achieved using current multilayer coating technology it is necessary to be able to efficiently scan large areas of the mask in order to obtain sufficient statistics for use in cross-correlation experiments. Speed of operation as well as sensitivity is therefore key to operation in defect inspection mode. (2) Aerial Image Microscope (AIM) mode--In AIM mode the tool is

  20. Scanning coherent scattering methods for actinic EUV mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Y.; Helfenstein, P.; Rajeev, R.; Mochi, I.; Mohacsi, I.; Gobrecht, J.; Yoshitake, S.

    2016-10-01

    Actinic mask inspection for EUV lithography with targeted specifications of resolution, sensitivity, and throughput remains a big hurdle for the successful insertion of EUVL into high volume manufacturing and effective solutions are needed to address this. We present a method for actinic mask inspection based on scanning coherent scattering microscopy. In this method, the mask is scanned with an EUV beam of relatively small spot size and the scattered light is recorded with a pixel detector. Customized algorithms reconstruct the aerial image by iteratively solving the phaseproblem using over-determined diffraction data gathered by scanning across the specimen with a finite illumination. This approach provides both phase and amplitude of actinic aerial images of the mask with high resolution without the need to use high NA (numerical aperture) lenses. Futher, we describe a reflective mode EUV mask scanning lensless imaging tool (RESCAN), which was installed at the XIL-II beamline and later at the SIM beamline of the Swiss Light Source and show reconstructed aerial images down to 10 nm (on-wafer) resolution. As a complementary method, the a-priori knowledge of the sample is employed to identify potential defect sites by analyzing the diffraction patterns. In this method, the recorded diffraction patterns are compared with the die or database data (i.e. previously measured or calculated diffraction data from the defect-free mask layout respectively) and their difference is interpreted as the defect signal. Dynamic software filtering helps to suppress the strong diffraction from defect-free structures and allows registration of faint defects with high sensitivity. Here, we discuss the basic principles of these Fourier domain techniques and its potential for actinic mask inspection with high signal-to-noise ratio and high throughput.

  1. Method and apparatus for inspecting reflection masks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Bokor, Jeffrey; Lin, Yun

    2003-04-29

    An at-wavelength system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank defect detection is provided. When a focused beam of wavelength 13 nm is incident on a defective region of a mask blank, three possible phenomena can occur. The defect will induce an intensity reduction in the specularly reflected beam, scatter incoming photons into an off-specular direction, and change the amplitude and phase of the electric field at the surface which can be monitored through the change in the photoemission current. The magnitude of these changes will depend on the incident beam size, and the nature, extent and size of the defect. Inspection of the mask blank is performed by scanning the mask blank with 13 nm light focused to a spot a few .mu.m in diameter, while measuring the reflected beam intensity (bright field detection), the scattered beam intensity (dark-field detection) and/or the change in the photoemission current.

  2. ILT based defect simulation of inspection images accurately predicts mask defect printability on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Prakash; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    At advanced technology nodes mask complexity has been increased because of large-scale use of resolution enhancement technologies (RET) which includes Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and Source Mask Optimization (SMO). The number of defects detected during inspection of such mask increased drastically and differentiation of critical and non-critical defects are more challenging, complex and time consuming. Because of significant defectivity of EUVL masks and non-availability of actinic inspection, it is important and also challenging to predict the criticality of defects for printability on wafer. This is one of the significant barriers for the adoption of EUVL for semiconductor manufacturing. Techniques to decide criticality of defects from images captured using non actinic inspection images is desired till actinic inspection is not available. High resolution inspection of photomask images detects many defects which are used for process and mask qualification. Repairing all defects is not practical and probably not required, however it's imperative to know which defects are severe enough to impact wafer before repair. Additionally, wafer printability check is always desired after repairing a defect. AIMSTM review is the industry standard for this, however doing AIMSTM review for all defects is expensive and very time consuming. Fast, accurate and an economical mechanism is desired which can predict defect printability on wafer accurately and quickly from images captured using high resolution inspection machine. Predicting defect printability from such images is challenging due to the fact that the high resolution images do not correlate with actual mask contours. The challenge is increased due to use of different optical condition during inspection other than actual scanner condition, and defects found in such images do not have correlation with actual impact on wafer. Our automated defect simulation tool predicts

  3. Mask cost of ownership for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzio, Edward G.; Seidel, Philip K.

    2000-07-01

    As technology advances, becoming more difficult and more expensive, the cost of ownership (CoO) metric becomes increasingly important in evaluating technical strategies. The International SEMATECH CoC analysis has steadily gained visibility over the past year, as it attempts to level the playing field between technology choices, and create a fair relative comparison. In order to predict mask cots for advanced lithography, mask process flows are modeled using bets-known processing strategies, equipment cost, and yields. Using a newly revised yield mode, and updated mask manufacture flows, representative mask flows can be built. These flows are then used to calculate mask costs for advanced lithography down to the 50 nm node. It is never the goal of this type of work to provide absolute cost estimates for business planning purposes. However, the combination of a quantifiable yield model with a clearly defined set of mask processing flows and a cost model based upon them serves as an excellent starting point for cost driver analysis and process flow discussion.

  4. Benchmarking EUV mask inspection beyond 0.25 NA

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Anderson, Erik H.; Rekawa, Seno B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Huh, S.; Han, H.-S.; Naulleau, P.; Gunion, R.F.

    2008-09-18

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is an EUV-wavelength mask inspection microscope designed for direct aerial image measurements, and pre-commercial EUV mask research. Operating on a synchrotron bending magnet beamline, the AIT uses an off-axis Fresnel zoneplate lens to project a high-magnification EUV image directly onto a CCD camera. We present the results of recent system upgrades that have improved the imaging resolution, illumination uniformity, and partial coherence. Benchmarking tests show image contrast above 75% for 100-nm mask features, and significant improvements and across the full range of measured sizes. The zoneplate lens has been replaced by an array of user-selectable zoneplates with higher magnification and NA values up to 0.0875, emulating the spatial resolution of a 0.35-NA 4 x EUV stepper. Illumination uniformity is above 90% for mask areas 2-{micro}m-wide and smaller. An angle-scanning mirror reduces the high coherence of the synchrotron beamline light source giving measured {sigma} values of approximately 0.125 at 0.0875 NA.

  5. Actinic EUV mask inspection beyond 0.25 NA

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Anderson, Erik H.; Rekawa, Seno. B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Huh, S.; Han, H.-S.; Naulleau, P.; Huh, S.

    2008-03-24

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is an EUV-wavelength mask inspection microscope designed for direct aerial image measurements, and pre-commercial EUV mask research. Operating on a synchrotron bending magnet beamline, the AIT uses an off-axis Fresnel zoneplate lens to project a high-magnification EUV image directly onto a CCD camera. We present the results of recent system upgrades that have improved the imaging resolution, illumination uniformity, and partial coherence. Benchmarking tests show image contrast above 75% for 100-nm mask features, and significant improvements and across the full range of measured sizes. The zoneplate lens has been replaced by an array of user-selectable zoneplates with higher magnification and NA values up to 0.0875, emulating the spatial resolution of a 0.35-NA 4x EUV stepper. Illumination uniformity is above 90% for mask areas 2-{micro}m-wide and smaller. An angle-scanning mirror reduces the high coherence of the synchrotron beamline light source giving measured {sigma} values of approximately 0.125 at 0.0875 NA.

  6. Yield, metrology, and inspection characteristics of SCALPEL masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peabody, Milton L., Jr.; Blakey, Myrtle I.; Farrow, Reginald C.; Kasica, Richard J.; Liddle, James A.; Novembre, Anthony E.; Saunders, Thomas E.; Tennant, Donald M.; Windt, David L.

    1997-02-01

    SCALPEL (scattering with angular limitation in projection electron beam lithography) masks have been fabricated for use in the SCALPEL proof-of-concept (SPOC) and the recently built SCALPEL proof-of-lithography (SPOL) tool. To date over 300 mask blanks have been formed and yield data as a function of the thickness of the silicon nitride membrane has been quantified. For thickness ranging from 100 - 1500 angstrom, the yield, defined as having all membranes and struts intact and flat (film is tensile), is in excess of 90%. The mask scatterer (W/Cr) film thickness investigated were 500 angstrom/100 angstrom and 250 angstrom/50 angstrom. Mask blanks, coated with 0.32 micrometer thick ZEP-520 resist, are patterned on a JEOL JBX6000FS e-beam exposure tool operating at 50 KeV. For the 500 angstrom thick W films, pattern transfer into the scatterer layer is accomplished using a SF6/O2 plasma etch process. Metrology on dry etched tungsten features have been obtained using an Hitachi 4160 SEM and indicates that CD linearity can be achieved over a 0.4 - 4.0 micrometer range. The SCALPEL tool prints at a 4X reduction, the above ranges corresponds to imaging 0.1 - 1.0 micrometer size features on the wafer. Additional mask metrology data has been obtained and an approximately 1% difference is measured between equivalent size features present in an isolated and dense array and oriented in the horizontal and vertical direction. W line-edge roughness using the plasma etch process is approximately 15 nm. Minimum contact hole geometries of 0.32 micrometer (0.08 micrometer at the wafer) and minimum isolated trenches of 0.24 micrometer (0.06 micrometer at the wafer) have been fabricated. SCALPEL masks have been inspected using a KLA SEMSpec in a die-to-die mode on features as small as 0.24 micrometer on the mask. For a patterned mask structure consisting of 500 angstrom W/100 angstrom Cr on 1500 Angstrom SiNx, all defect types could be identified and no modifications to either the mask

  7. Advances in inspection automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Walter H.; Mair, H. Douglas; Jansen, Dion; Lombardi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    This new session at QNDE reflects the growing interest in inspection automation. Our paper describes a newly developed platform that makes the complex NDE automation possible without the need for software programmers. Inspection tasks that are tedious, error-prone or impossible for humans to perform can now be automated using a form of drag and drop visual scripting. Our work attempts to rectify the problem that NDE is not keeping pace with the rest of factory automation. Outside of NDE, robots routinely and autonomously machine parts, assemble components, weld structures and report progress to corporate databases. By contrast, components arriving in the NDT department typically require manual part handling, calibrations and analysis. The automation examples in this paper cover the development of robotic thickness gauging and the use of adaptive contour following on the NRU reactor inspection at Chalk River.

  8. Evaluation of the Capability of a Multibeam Confocal Inspection System for Inspection of EUVL Mask Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stivers, Alan R.; Liang, Ted; Penn, Michael J.; Lieberman, Barry; Shelden, Gilbert V.; Folta, James A.; Larson, Cindy C.; Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Walton, Christopher C.; Gulliksong, Eric M.; Yi, Moonsuk

    2002-12-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer defects (phase defects) are a defect type unique to extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) masks. A manufacturable inspection capability for these defects is key to the success of EUV lithography. Simulations of EUV scattering from multilayer defects suggest that defect printability is related to the phase error induced by the defect, which is in turn strongly coupled to the size of a multilayer surface protrusion or intrusion. We can adopt a strategy of measuring the multilayer surface to detect phase defects. During the past year a working group composed of members of Intel Corporation, Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and International Sematech searched for a commercial tool for EUVL mask substrate and blank inspection. This working group established the tool requirements, methodologies for tool evaluation, collected data and recommended a supplier for further development with International Sematech. We collected data from several vendors and found that a multibeam confocal inspection (MCI) system had a capability significantly better than the tools used today. We will present our strategy, requirements, methodologies and results. We will discuss in detail our unique programmed substrate and multilayer defect masks used to support the tool selection, including their actinic characterization. We will present data that quantifies the inspection capability of the MCI system.

  9. Evaluating practical vs. theoretical inspection system capability with a new programmed defect test mask designed for 3X and 4X technology nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, Joshua; Pratt, Tim

    2008-10-01

    Programmed defect test masks serve the useful purpose of evaluating inspection system sensitivity and capability. It is widely recognized that when evaluating inspection system capability, it is important to understand the actual sensitivity of the inspection system in production; yet unfortunately we have observed that many test masks are a more accurate judge of theoretical sensitivity rather than real-world usable capability. Use of ineffective test masks leave the purchaser of inspection equipment open to the risks of over-estimating the capability of their inspection solution and overspecifying defect sensitivity to their customers. This can result in catastrophic yield loss for device makers. In this paper we examine some of the lithography-related technology advances which place an increasing burden on mask inspection complexity, such as MEEF, defect printability estimation, aggressive OPC, double patterning, and OPC jogs. We evaluate the key inspection system component contributors to successful mask inspection, including what can "go wrong" with these components. We designed and fabricated a test mask which both (a) more faithfully represents actual production use cases; and (b) stresses the key components of the inspection system. This mask's patterns represent 32nm, 36nm, and 45nm logic and memory technology including metal and poly like background patterns with programmed defects. This test mask takes into consideration requirements of advanced lithography, such as MEEF, defect printability, assist features, nearly-repetitive patterns, and data preparation. This mask uses patterns representative of 32nm, 36nm, and 45nm logic, flash, and DRAM technology. It is specifically designed to have metal and poly like background patterns with programmed defects. The mask is complex tritone and was designed for annular immersion lithography.

  10. High quality mask storage in an advanced Logic-Fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähnert, Carmen; Fritsche, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    High efficient mask logistics as well as safe and high quality mask storage are essential requirements within an advanced lithography area of a modern logic waferfab. Fast operational availability of the required masks at the exposure tool with excellent mask condition requires a safe mask handling, safeguarding of high mask quality over the whole mask usage time without any quality degradation and an intelligent mask logistics. One big challenge is the prevention of haze on high advanced phase shift masks used in a high volume production line for some thousands of 248nm or 193nm exposures. In 2008 Infineon Dresden qualified a customer specific developed semi-bare mask storage system from DMSDynamic Micro Systems in combination with a high advanced mask handling and an interconnected complex logistic system. This high-capacity mask storage system DMS M1900.22 for more than 3000 masks with fully automated mask and box handling as well as full-blown XCDA purge has been developed and adapted to the Infineon Lithotoollandscape using Nikon and SMIF reticle cases. Advanced features for ESD safety and mask security, mask tracking via RFID and interactions with the exposure tools were developed and implemented. The stocker is remote controlled by the iCADA-RSM system, ordering of the requested mask directly from the affected exposure tool allows fast access. This paper discusses the advantages and challenges for this approach as well as the practical experience gained during the implementation of the new system which improves the fab performance with respect to mask quality, security and throughput. Especially the realization of an extremely low and stable humidity level in addition with a well controlled air flow at each mask surface, preventing masks from haze degradation and particle contamination, turns out to be a notable technical achievement. The longterm stability of haze critical masks has been improved significantly. Relevant environmental parameters like

  11. Mask pattern recovery by level set method based inverse inspection technology (IIT) and its application on defect auto disposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Hyung; Chung, Paul D. H.; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Cho, Han Ku; Pang, Linyong; Peng, Danping; Tolani, Vikram; Cecil, Tom; Kim, David; Baik, KiHo

    2009-10-01

    At the most advanced technology nodes, such as 32nm and 22nm, aggressive OPC and Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) are required. However, their use results in significantly increased mask complexity, making mask defect disposition more challenging than ever. This paper describes how mask patterns can first be recovered from the inspection images by applying patented algorithms using Level Set Methods. The mask pattern recovery step is then followed by aerial/wafer image simulation, the results of which can be plugged into an automated mask defect disposition system based on aerial/wafer image. The disposition criteria are primarily based on wafer-plane CD variance. The system also connects to a post-OPC lithography verification tool that can provide gauges and CD specs, thereby enabling them to be used in mask defect disposition as well. Results on both programmed defects and production defects collected at Samsung mask shop are presented to show the accuracy and consistency of using the Level Set Methods and aerial/wafer image based automated mask disposition.

  12. Enabling inspection solutions for future mask technologies through the development of massively parallel E-Beam inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Wurm, Stefan; Jindal, Vibhu; Mukhtar, Maseeh; Quoi, Kathy; Kemen, Thomas; Zeidler, Dirk; Eberle, Anna Lena; Garbowski, Tomasz; Dellemann, Gregor; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    The new device architectures and materials being introduced for sub-10nm manufacturing, combined with the complexity of multiple patterning and the need for improved hotspot detection strategies, have pushed current wafer inspection technologies to their limits. In parallel, gaps in mask inspection capability are growing as new generations of mask technologies are developed to support these sub-10nm wafer manufacturing requirements. In particular, the challenges associated with nanoimprint and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask inspection require new strategies that enable fast inspection at high sensitivity. The tradeoffs between sensitivity and throughput for optical and e-beam inspection are well understood. Optical inspection offers the highest throughput and is the current workhorse of the industry for both wafer and mask inspection. E-beam inspection offers the highest sensitivity but has historically lacked the throughput required for widespread adoption in the manufacturing environment. It is unlikely that continued incremental improvements to either technology will meet tomorrow's requirements, and therefore a new inspection technology approach is required; one that combines the high-throughput performance of optical with the high-sensitivity capabilities of e-beam inspection. To support the industry in meeting these challenges SUNY Poly SEMATECH has evaluated disruptive technologies that can meet the requirements for high volume manufacturing (HVM), for both the wafer fab [1] and the mask shop. Highspeed massively parallel e-beam defect inspection has been identified as the leading candidate for addressing the key gaps limiting today's patterned defect inspection techniques. As of late 2014 SUNY Poly SEMATECH completed a review, system analysis, and proof of concept evaluation of multiple e-beam technologies for defect inspection. A champion approach has been identified based on a multibeam technology from Carl Zeiss. This paper includes a discussion on the

  13. Detection capability enhancement with a learning system for PEM mask inspection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Terao, Kenji; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2015-10-01

    A learning system has been exploited for the mask inspection tool with the Projection Electron Microscope (PEM). The defect is identified by the PEM system using the "defectivity". The detection capability for hp11nm EUV masks is demonstrated. The learning system for PEM consists of the library of the registered defects. The learning system totally optimizes detection capability reconciling the previously registered defects and the newly registered defect. We have verified the effectiveness of the learning system. We can provide a user-friendly mask inspection system with the higher throughput by PEM and with the smaller cost of ownership by the development.

  14. Improving inspectability of sub-2x-nm node masks with complex SRAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, In Yong; Yoon, Gisung; Lee, Jonghee; Chung, Donghoon Paul; Kim, Byung-Gook; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Inderhees, Gregg; Hutchinson, Trent; Cho, Wonil; Hur, Jiuk

    2013-10-01

    As Moore's Law continues its relentless march toward ever smaller geometries on wafer, lithographers who had been relying on the implementation of a solution using EUV lithography are faced with increasing challenges to meet requirements for printing sub-2x nm half-pitch (HP). The available choices rely on 193 nm DUV immersion lithography, but with decreasing k1 values and thus shrinking process windows. To overcome these limitations, two techniques such as inverse lithography technology (ILT) and source mask optimization (SMO) were introduced by computational OPC scheme. From a mask inspection viewpoint, the impact of both ILT and SMO is similar - both result in photomasks that have a large quantity of sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs). These SRAFs are challenging for mask-makers to pattern with high fidelity and accuracy across a full-field mask, and thus mask inspection is challenged to maintain a high sensitivity level on primary mask features while not suffering from a high nuisance detection rate on the SRAF features. To solve this particular issue, new inspection approach was developed by using computational image calibration based wafer scanner simulation. This paper will be described the new capabilities, which analyzes the aerial image to differentiate between printing and non-printing features, and applying the appropriate sensitivity threshold. All analysis will be shown comparing results with and without the new capabilities, with an emphasis on inspectability improvements and nuisance defect reduction to improve mask cycle time.

  15. Dependence of defect size and shape on detectability for EUV patterned mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Susumu; Hirano, Ryoichi; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2015-03-01

    Defect detectability using electron beam (EB) inspection for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask was investigated by comparing a projection electron microscope (PEM) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) inspection system. The detectability with EB does not coincide with the printability data because the contrasts of EUV aerial image and EB image for EUV mask are reversed. The detectability for 16 nm sized defect on a half pitch 64 nm line and space pattern is acceptable under 2-nm-line edge roughness (LER) (3 sigma) in both PEM and SEM inspections by applying a special algorithm for image processing. The required and robust inspection conditions such as the number of electrons per pixel and pixel size (resolution) are examined for SEM inspection system. Throughput of a PEM inspection system corresponds to that of a multi-beam SEM one with 250 - 1000 beams.

  16. Wavelength-specific reflections: A decade of EUV actinic mask inspection research

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopo

    2010-12-31

    Mask inspection is essential for the success of any pattern-transfer lithography technology, and EUV Lithography in particular faces unique challenges. EUV masks resonant-reflective multilayer coatings have a narrow, wavelength-specific response that dramatically affects the way that defects appear, or disappear, at various illuminating wavelengths. Furthermore, the ever-shrinking size of 'critical' defects limits the potential effectiveness of DUV inspection techniques over time. Researchers pursuing numerous ways of finding and characterizing defects on EUV masks and have met with varying degrees of success. Their lessons inform the current, urgent exploration to select the most effective techniques for high-volume manufacturing. Ranging from basic research and demonstration experiments to commercial inspection tool prototypes, we survey the recent history of work in this area, including sixteen projects in Europe, Asia, and America. Solutions range from scanning beams to microscopy, dark field imaging to pattern transfer.

  17. Comparison of critical dimension measurements of a mask inspection system with a CD-SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Jan P.; Ullrich, Albrecht; Utzny, Clemens S.; Meusemann, Stefan; Kromer, Frank; Whittey, John M.; Garcia, Edgardo; Wagner, Mark; Schmidt, Norbert J.

    2012-11-01

    Critical dimension uniformity (CDU) is an important parameter for photomask and wafer manufacturing. In order to reduce long-range CD variation, compensation techniques for mask writers and scanners have been developed. Both techniques require mask CD measurements with high spatial sampling. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), which provide CD measurements at very high precision, cannot in practice provide the required spatial sampling due to their low speed. In contrast mask inspection systems, some of which have the ability to perform optical CD measurements with very high sampling frequencies, are an interesting alternative. In this paper we evaluate the CDU measurement results with those of a CD-SEM.

  18. Defect inspection and printability of deep-UV halftone phase-shifting mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoungjoon; Hong, Jin; Kye, Jongwook; Cha, DongHo; Kang, Hoyoung; Moon, Joo-Tae

    1997-02-01

    As feature size goes down to a quarter micron, halftone phase- shifting mask (HT PSM) has been studied to extend photo lithography capabilities especially in contact hole patterns. However, defect problem of HT PSM is more serous than that of conventional chrome mask because of added reticle fabrication process steps in which unexpected defects can be generated. In this paper, test HT PSMs which have different transmittance at 488 nm and same background contact patterns with programmed defects having various types are investigated for 250 nm contact hole patterns. The programmed defect are used for the sensitivity evaluation of reticle inspection systems, i.e. detectability and exposed by 4X reduction DUV exposure tool to determine printability and water defect detectability. Direct reticle inspection results show that the detectability depends on transmittance at the inspection wavelength 488 nm. The printability from the wafer exposure results is proportional to defect area strongly. Indirect reticle inspection results using an imaged wafer and wafer inspection tool of SEMSpec show that direct reticle inspection is better than indirect inspection.

  19. Your worst nightmare: inspection of aggressive OPC on 14nm masks with emphasis on defect sensitivity and wafer defect print predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen D.; Hibbs, Michael; Rankin, Jed; Seki, Kazunori; Stobert, Ian; Dechene, Daniel J.; Bleiman, Ben; Ghosal, Mini; Broadbent, William; Redding, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    To prevent catastrophic failures during wafer manufacturing, mask manufacturers employ sophisticated reticle inspection systems to examine every image on every reticle to identify defects. These advanced systems inspect at resolutions typically 3x higher at the reticle-plane than advanced wafer scanners; thus enabling them to detect the small defects necessary to ensure reticle quality. The most thorough inspection is done using a reticle-to-database comparison that ensures the reticle pattern matches the design pattern. For high defect sensitivity, the database must be carefully modeled to exactly match the reticle pattern. Further, sub-resolution OPC shapes are often at the limit of the mask manufacturing process, which adds subtle variations on such shapes across the reticle. These modeling errors and process variations can cause high numbers of unwanted detections, thereby limiting inspection system defect detection sensitivity.[1] OPC designs are expected to become more aggressive for future generations and may stress the performance of current reticle inspection systems. To systematically assess the capability of various inspection approaches and identify needed areas for improvement, a new "Nightmare" test reticle has been designed by IBM. The test reticle contains various sizes and shapes of sub-resolution features that might appear on reticle generations from today's 22nm to future 7nm. It also contains programmed defects to assess defect detection capability of current and future generation inspection systems. This paper will discuss the design of the "Nightmare" test reticle, and the inspection results of the current generation reticle inspection methods with emphasis on both inspectability and defect sensitivity. The subresolution features will be ranked according to importance for advanced OPC design. The reticle will also be evaluated using wafer print simulation so lithographic impact of features and defects can be measured and compared against

  20. Technique for rapid at-wavelength inspection of extreme ultraviolet mask blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, S. J.; White, D. L.; Tennant, D. M.; Ocola, L. E.; Novembre, A. E.; Peabody, M. L.; Wood, O. R. II

    1999-11-01

    We have developed two new methods for at-wavelength inspection of mask blanks for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In one method an EUV photoresist is applied directly to a mask blank which is then flood exposed with EUV light and partially developed. In the second method, the photoresist is applied to an EUV transparent membrane that is placed in close proximity to the mask and then exposed and developed. Both reflectivity defects and phase defects alter the exposure of the resist, resulting in mounds of resist at defect sites that can then be located by visual inspection. In the direct application method, a higher contrast resist was shown to increase the height of the mounds, thereby improving the sensitivity of the technique. In the membrane method, a holographic technique was used to reconstruct an image of the mask, revealing the presence of very small defects, approximately 0.2 {mu}m in size. The demonstrated clean transfer of phase and amplitude defects to resist features on a membrane will be important when flagging defects in an automatic inspection tool. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  1. Sensitivity-Limiting Factors of at-Wavelength Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Blank Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Tomie, Toshihisa

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity-limiting factors of at-wavelength inspection for extreme UV lithography (EUVL) mask blanks have been analyzed. The sensitivity of the inspection tool is modeled on the basis of the inspection image of programmed multilayer defects and the characterized attributes of the tool components. The characterization includes point spread function (PSF) analysis of the imaging optics and the back-illuminated charge-coupled-device (BI-CCD) sensor as well as power spectral density (PSD) analysis of the mask blank surface. The statistical scaling of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in conjunction with the variables of optics, sensors, and mask blanks has predicted effective improvement paths of its sensitivity. Increasing the magnification of optics, reducing the total PSF, and improving the roughness of mask blanks will address the needs for its application in future generations. Signal intensity dependency on the geometrical attributes of defects is also studied by both experiment and electromagnetic simulation. It is revealed that the bottom height of defects and defect smoothing throughout the multilayer deposition significantly influence defect signal intensity. Comprehensive measures to accommodate a variety of defects and to mitigate associated risks are also discussed.

  2. Toward defect guard-banding of EUV exposures by full chip optical wafer inspection of EUV mask defect adders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halle, Scott D.; Meli, Luciana; Delancey, Robert; Vemareddy, Kaushik; Crispo, Gary; Bonam, Ravi; Burkhardt, Martin; Corliss, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The detection of EUV mask adder defects has been investigated with an optical wafer defect inspection system employing a methodology termed Die-to-"golden" Virtual Reference Die (D2VRD). Both opaque and clear type mask absorber programmed defects were inspected and characterized over a range of defect sizes, down to (4x mask) 40 nm. The D2VRD inspection system was capable of identifying the corresponding wafer print defects down to the limit of the defect printability threshold at approximately 30 nm (1x wafer). The efficacy of the D2VRD scheme on full chip wafer inspection to suppress random process defects and identify real mask defects is demonstrated. Using defect repeater analysis and patch image classification of both the reference die and the scanned die enables the unambiguous identification of mask adder defects.

  3. Massively parallel E-beam inspection: enabling next-generation patterned defect inspection for wafer and mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Wurm, Stefan; Mukhtar, Maseeh; Quoi, Kathy; Kemen, Thomas; Zeidler, Dirk; Eberle, Anna Lena; Garbowski, Tomasz; Dellemann, Gregor; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    SEMATECH aims to identify and enable disruptive technologies to meet the ever-increasing demands of semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM). As such, a program was initiated in 2012 focused on high-speed e-beam defect inspection as a complement, and eventual successor, to bright field optical patterned defect inspection [1]. The primary goal is to enable a new technology to overcome the key gaps that are limiting modern day inspection in the fab; primarily, throughput and sensitivity to detect ultra-small critical defects. The program specifically targets revolutionary solutions based on massively parallel e-beam technologies, as opposed to incremental improvements to existing e-beam and optical inspection platforms. Wafer inspection is the primary target, but attention is also being paid to next generation mask inspection. During the first phase of the multi-year program multiple technologies were reviewed, a down-selection was made to the top candidates, and evaluations began on proof of concept systems. A champion technology has been selected and as of late 2014 the program has begun to move into the core technology maturation phase in order to enable eventual commercialization of an HVM system. Performance data from early proof of concept systems will be shown along with roadmaps to achieving HVM performance. SEMATECH's vision for moving from early-stage development to commercialization will be shown, including plans for development with industry leading technology providers.

  4. ACTINIC MASK INSPECTION AT THE ALS: RISK REDUCTION ACTIVITIES FOR 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Levesque, R; Ayers, J; Liu, Y; Gullikson, E; Barale, P

    2004-01-05

    This document reports on risk reduction activities performed at the VNL during CY2003 as a part of the Lith-343 actinic inspection project funded by International SEMATECH. The risk reduction activities described in this document comprise deliverable items 3.1.3, 3.1.4, 3.1.5 and 3.1.6 of Amendment 6 to the VNL EUV mask blank technology transfer contract.

  5. Aerial Image Microscopes for the Inspection of Defects in EUV Masks

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Taylor, J S; Hudyma, R; Spiller, E; Sweeney, D W; Shelden, G; Urbach, J-P

    2002-10-22

    The high volume inspection equipment currently available to support development of EUV blanks is non-actinic. The same is anticipated for patterned EUV mask inspection. Once potential defects are identified and located by such non-actinic inspection techniques, it is essential to have instrumentation to perform detailed characterization, and if repairs are performed, re-evaluation. The ultimate metric for the acceptance or rejection of a mask due to a defect, is the wafer level impact. Thus measuring the aerial image for the site under question is required. An EUV Aerial Image Microscope (''AIM'') similar to the current AIM tools for 248nm and 193nm exposure wavelength is the natural solution for this task. Due to the complicated manufacturing process of EUV blanks, AIM measurements might also be beneficial to accurately assessing the severity of a blank defect. This is an additional application for an EUV AIM as compared to today's use In recognition of the critical role of an EUV AIM for the successful implementation of EUV blank and mask supply, International SEMATECH initiated this design study with the purpose to define the technical requirements for accurately simulating EUV scanner performance, demonstrating the feasibility to meet these requirements and to explore various technical approaches to building an EUV AIM tool.

  6. Recent advances in SEMATECH's mask blank development program, the remaining technical challenges, and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Frank; Kearney, Patrick; Kadaksham, Arun J.; Wurm, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    film for the device. In addition to the increase in complexity of the mask, introduction of EUVL requires infrastructure development of new substrate, mask blank, and finished reticle inspection tools and techniques for handling and storage of a mask without a pellicle. This paper will highlight recent advances in the ability to produce pilot line quality EUV mask blanks to meet the near-term requirements and review the existing technology gaps which must be closed to extend the current capability to meet HVM needs. A special focus will be put on substrate and mask blank defect densities; other process and infrastructure challenges will also be discussed.

  7. Enhanced defect detection capability using learning system for extreme ultraviolet lithography mask inspection tool with projection electron microscope optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Terao, Kenji; Watanabe, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask defect detection is a major issue that must be addressed to realize EUVL-based device fabrication. We have designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics for integration into a mask inspection system, and the resulting PEM system performs well in half-pitch (hp) 16-nm-node EUVL patterned mask inspection applications. A learning system has been used in this PEM patterned mask inspection tool. The PEM identifies defects using the "defectivity" parameter that is derived from the acquired image characteristics. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and the costs associated with adjustment of the PEM's detection capabilities to cope with newly defined mask defects. The concepts behind this learning system and the parameter optimization flow are presented here. The learning system for the PEM is based on a library of registered defects. The learning system then optimizes the detection capability by reconciling previously registered defects with newly registered defects. Functional verification of the learning system is also described, and the system's detection capability is demonstrated by applying it to the inspection of hp 11-nm EUV masks. We can thus provide a user-friendly mask inspection system with reduced cost of ownership.

  8. Mask characterization for CDU budget breakdown in advanced EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2012-11-01

    As the ITRS Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and a high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. In this paper we will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for an advanced EUV lithography with 1D and 2D feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CD's and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples in this paper. Also mask stack reflectivity variations should be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We observed also MEEF-through-field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may also play a role for the total intrafield CDU and may be taken into account for EUV Lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, the results to be discussed in our paper, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to characterization of the mask part of EUV CDU characterization delivers an accurate and integral CDU Budget

  9. Printability and inspectability of programmed pit defects on teh masks in EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, I.-Y.; Seo, H.-S.; Ahn, B.-S.; Lee, D.-G.; Kim, D.; Huh, S.; Koh, C.-W.; Cha, B.; Kim, S.-S.; Cho, H.-K.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    Printability and inspectability of phase defects in ELlVL mask originated from substrate pit were investigated. For this purpose, PDMs with programmed pits on substrate were fabricated using different ML sources from several suppliers. Simulations with 32-nm HP L/S show that substrate pits with below {approx}20 nm in depth would not be printed on the wafer if they could be smoothed by ML process down to {approx}1 nm in depth on ML surface. Through the investigation of inspectability for programmed pits, minimum pit sizes detected by KLA6xx, AIT, and M7360 depend on ML smoothing performance. Furthermore, printability results for pit defects also correlate with smoothed pit sizes. AIT results for pattemed mask with 32-nm HP L/S represents that minimum printable size of pits could be {approx}28.3 nm of SEVD. In addition, printability of pits became more printable as defocus moves to (-) directions. Consequently, printability of phase defects strongly depends on their locations with respect to those of absorber patterns. This indicates that defect compensation by pattern shift could be a key technique to realize zero printable phase defects in EUVL masks.

  10. Robotic NDE inspection of advanced solid rocket motor casings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneelege, Glenn E.; Sarantos, Chris

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor program determined the need to inspect ASRM forgings and segments for potentially catastrophic defects. To minimize costs, an automated eddy current inspection system was designed and manufactured for inspection of ASRM forgings in the initial phases of production. This system utilizes custom manipulators and motion control algorithms and integrated six channel eddy current data acquisition and analysis hardware and software. Total system integration is through a personal computer based workcell controller. Segment inspection demands the use of a gantry robot for the EMAT/ET inspection system. The EMAT/ET system utilized similar mechanical compliancy and software logic to accommodate complex part geometries. EMAT provides volumetric inspection capability while eddy current is limited to surface and near surface inspection. Each aspect of the systems are applicable to other industries, such as, inspection of pressure vessels, weld inspection, and traditional ultrasonic inspection applications.

  11. A study on the factors that affect the advanced mask defect verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sungha; Jang, Heeyeon; Lee, Youngmo; Kim, Sangpyo; Yim, Donggyu

    2015-10-01

    Defect verification has become significantly difficult to higher technology nodes over the years. Traditional primary method of defect (include repair point) control consists of inspection, AIMS and repair steps. Among them, AIMS process needs various wafer lithography conditions, such as NA, inner/outer sigma, illumination shape and etc. It has a limit to analyze for every layer accurately because AIMS tool uses the physical aperture system. And it requires meticulous management of exposure condition and CD target value which change frequently in advanced mask. We report on the influence of several AIMS parameters on the defect analysis including repair point. Under various illumination conditions with different patterns, it showed the significant correlation in defect analysis results. It is able to analyze defect under certain error budget based on the management specification required for each layer. In addition, it provided us with one of the clues in the analysis of wafer repeating defect. Finally we will present 'optimal specification' for defect management with common AIMS recipe and suggest advanced mask process flow.

  12. Mask manufacturing of advanced technology designs using multi-beam lithography (part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael; Ham, Young; Dillon, Brian; Kasprowicz, Bryan; Hur, Ik Boum; Park, Joong Hee; Choi, Yohan; McMurran, Jeff; Kamberian, Henry; Chalom, Daniel; Klikovits, Jan; Jurkovic, Michal; Hudek, Peter

    2016-09-01

    As optical lithography is extended into 10nm and below nodes, advanced designs are becoming a key challenge for mask manufacturers. Techniques including advanced optical proximity correction (OPC) and Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) result in structures that pose a range of issues across the mask manufacturing process. Among the new challenges are continued shrinking sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs), curvilinear SRAFs, and other complex mask geometries that are counter-intuitive relative to the desired wafer pattern. Considerable capability improvements over current mask making methods are necessary to meet the new requirements particularly regarding minimum feature resolution and pattern fidelity. Advanced processes using the IMS Multi-beam Mask Writer (MBMW) are feasible solutions to these coming challenges. In this paper, Part 2 of our study, we further characterize an MBMW process for 10nm and below logic node mask manufacturing including advanced pattern analysis and write time demonstration.

  13. Mask manufacturing of advanced technology designs using multi-beam lithography (Part 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael; Ham, Young; Dillon, Brian; Kasprowicz, Bryan; Hur, Ik Boum; Park, Joong Hee; Choi, Yohan; McMurran, Jeff; Kamberian, Henry; Chalom, Daniel; Klikovits, Jan; Jurkovic, Michal; Hudek, Peter

    2016-10-01

    As optical lithography is extended into 10nm and below nodes, advanced designs are becoming a key challenge for mask manufacturers. Techniques including advanced Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) and Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) result in structures that pose a range of issues across the mask manufacturing process. Among the new challenges are continued shrinking Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs), curvilinear SRAFs, and other complex mask geometries that are counter-intuitive relative to the desired wafer pattern. Considerable capability improvements over current mask making methods are necessary to meet the new requirements particularly regarding minimum feature resolution and pattern fidelity. Advanced processes using the IMS Multi-beam Mask Writer (MBMW) are feasible solutions to these coming challenges. In this paper, we study one such process, characterizing mask manufacturing capability of 10nm and below structures with particular focus on minimum resolution and pattern fidelity.

  14. Demonstration of defect free EUV mask for 22nm NAND flash contact layer using electron beam inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeya; Kawashima, Satoshi; Inazuki, Yuichi; Abe, Tsukasa; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long Eric; Zhao, Yan; Kuan, Chiyan; Xiao, Hong; Jau, Jack

    2011-04-01

    Fabrication of defect free EUV masks including their inspection is the most critical challenge for implementing EUV lithography into semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM) beyond 22nm half-pitch (HP) node. The contact to bit-line (CB) layers of NAND flash devices are the most likely the first lithography layers that EUV will be employed for manufacturing due to the aggressive scaling and the difficulty for making the pattern with the current ArF lithography. To assure the defect free EUV mask, we have evaluated electron beam inspection (EBI) system eXplore™ 5200 developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI) [1]. As one knows, the main issue of EBI system is the low throughput. To solve this challenge, a function called Lightning Scan™ mode has been recently developed and installed in the system, which allows the system to only inspect the pattern areas while ignoring blanket areas, thus dramatically reduced the overhead time and enable us to inspect CB layers of NAND Flash device with much higher throughput. In this present work, we compared the Lightning scan mode with Normal scan mode on sensitivity and throughput. We found out the Lightning scan mode can improve throughput by a factor of 10 without any sacrifices of sensitivity. Furthermore, using the Lightning scan mode, we demonstrated the possibility to fabricate the defect free EUV masks with moderate inspection time.

  15. Advances in mask fabrication and alignment for masked ion-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumbo, David P.; Damm, George A.; Engler, D. W.; Fong, F. O.; Sen, S.; Wolfe, John C.; Randall, John N.; Mauger, Phillip E.; Shimkunas, Alex R.; Loeschne, Hans

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes recent developments in three areas ofmasked ion beam lithography (MIBL). These are 1) fabrication oflarge area, low distortion, silicon stencilmasks for demagnifying ion projection lithography, 2) fabrication ofstencil masks with nanometer scale resolution for 1:1 proximity printing, and 3) development of a direct method of alignment using the ion beam induced fluorescence of Si02. These topics are discussed below. Demagnifying ion projection masks: We describe the fabrication of stencil masks in large area, low stress (10 MPa), n-type silicon membranes. The projection masks have a silicon foil area 95 mm in diameter, thicknesses between 1.5-5 and resolution of0.6um. Measured distortion (3a) in the IPL masks ranges between 0.23gm and 0.65,um, with an experimental error of 0.20 1um. Proximity printing masks: A process is described for fabricating stencil masks with 50 nm resolution in low stress, n-type silicon membranes. Membranes less than 0.5 ,ttm thick are shown to be free of the sidewall taper that limits resolution in thicker masks. These thin membranes show a slightly flared profile due to the imperfectly collimated etching ions. Alignment: A direct method of alignment is being developed which uses the ion beam induced fluorescence of Si02 marks. Fluorescence yield is characterized as a function of ion energy and resist coating thickness. The yield for Si02 is in the range between 0.1-1.0 photons/proton, while the yields for Si, Al, and photoresist are negligibly small. Thus, a simple alignment technique can be implemented where registration of a grating in the mask with a corresponding oxide pattern is detected as a fluorescence maximum. A simple model predicts that 50 nm alignment can be accomplished, following a 1 im prealignment, in 2 seconds.

  16. Recent advances in CZT strip detectors and coded mask imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Gruber, D. E.; Heindl, W. A.; Pelling, M. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Rothschild, R. E.; Skelton, R. T.; Hink, P. L.; Slavis, K. R.; Binns, W. R.; Tumer, T.; Visser, G.

    1999-09-01

    The UCSD, WU, UCR and Nova collaboration has made significant progress on the necessary techniques for coded mask imaging of gamma-ray bursts: position sensitive CZT detectors with good energy resolution, ASIC readout, coded mask imaging, and background properties at balloon altitudes. Results on coded mask imaging techniques appropriate for wide field imaging and localization of gamma-ray bursts are presented, including a shadowgram and deconvolved image taken with a prototype detector/ASIC and MURA mask. This research was supported by NASA Grants NAG5-5111, NAG5-5114, and NGT5-50170.

  17. Recent results from extreme ultraviolet lithography patterned mask inspection for 11 nm half-pitch generation using projection electron microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is a promising technique for 1X nm half-pitch (hp) generation lithography. The inspection of patterned EUVL masks is one of the main issues that must be addressed during mask fabrication for manufacture of devices with 11 nm hp feature sizes. We have already designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics that have been integrated into a new inspection system called Model EBEYE-V30 (where "Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) and this system seems quite promising for 16 nm hp generation EUVL patterned mask inspection. The defect inspection sensitivity of this system was evaluated via capture of an electron image that was generated at the mask by focusing the image through the projection optics onto a time-delay integration (TDI) image sensor. For increased throughput and higher defect detection sensitivity, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and a simultaneous deflector for the image capture area that follows the mask scanning motion have been developed. Using a combination of synchronous deflection and mask scanning, the image can be integrated into both the fixed area image sensor and the TDI image sensor. We describe our experimental results for EUV patterned mask inspection using the above system. Elements have been developed for inspection tool integration and the designed specification has been verified. The system performance demonstrates the defect detectability required for 11 nm hp generation EUVL masks.

  18. Advanced ground-penetrating, imaging radar for bridge inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Warhus, J.P.; Mast, J.E.; Johansson, E.M.; Nelson, S.E.; Lee, Hua

    1993-08-01

    Inspecting high-value structures, like bridges and buildings using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is an application of the technology that is growing in importance. In a typical inspection application, inspectors use GPR to locate structural components, like reinforcing bars embedded in concrete, to avoid weakening the structure while collecting core samples for detailed inspection. Advanced GPR, integrated with imaging technologies for use as an NDE tool, can provide the capability to locate and characterize construction flaws and wear- or age-induced damage in these structures without the need for destructive techniques like coring. In the following sections, we discuss an important inspection application, namely, concrete bridge deck inspection. We describe an advanced bridge deck inspection system concept and provide an overview of a program aimed at developing such a system. Examples of modeling, image reconstruction, and experimental results are presented.

  19. Advances in Low-Defect Multilayers for EUVL Mask Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, J A; Davidson, J C; Larson, C C; Walton, C C; Kearney, P A

    2002-04-15

    Low-defect multilayer coatings are required to fabricate mask blanks for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL). The mask blanks consist of high reflectance E W multilayers on low thermal expansion substrates. A defect density of 0.0025 printable defects/cm{sup 2} for both the mask substrate and the multilayer is required to provide a mask blank yield of 60%. Current low defect multilayer coating technology allows repeated coating-added defect levels of 0.05/cm{sup 2} for defects greater than 90 nm polystyrene latex sphere (PSL) equivalent size for lots of 20 substrates. Extended clean operation of the coating system at levels below 0.08/cm{sup 2} for 3 months of operation has also been achieved. Two substrates with zero added defects in the quality area have been fabricated, providing an existence proof that ultra low defect coatings are possible. Increasing the ion source-to-target distance from 410 to 560 mm to reduce undesired coating of the ion source caused the defect density to increase to 0.2/cm{sup 2}. Deposition and etching diagnostic witness substrates and deposition pinhole cameras showed a much higher level of ion beam spillover (ions missing the sputter target) than expected. Future work will quantify beam spillover, and test designs to reduce spillover, if it is confirmed to be the cause of the increased defect level. The LDD system will also be upgraded to allow clean coating of standard format mask substrates. The upgrade will confirm that the low defect process developed on Si wafers is compatible with the standard mask format 152 mm square substrates, and will provide a clean supply of EUVL mask blanks needed to support development of EUVL mask patterning processes and clean mask handling technologies.

  20. Industrial Inspection with Open Eyes: Advance with Machine Vision Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng; Ukida, H.; Niel, Kurt; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2015-10-01

    Machine vision systems have evolved significantly with the technology advances to tackle the challenges from modern manufacturing industry. A wide range of industrial inspection applications for quality control are benefiting from visual information captured by different types of cameras variously configured in a machine vision system. This chapter screens the state of the art in machine vision technologies in the light of hardware, software tools, and major algorithm advances for industrial inspection. The inspection beyond visual spectrum offers a significant complementary to the visual inspection. The combination with multiple technologies makes it possible for the inspection to achieve a better performance and efficiency in varied applications. The diversity of the applications demonstrates the great potential of machine vision systems for industry.

  1. High-radiance LDP source: clean, reliable, and stable EUV source for mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Yusuke; Santos, Bárbara; Mertens, Guido; Kops, Ralf; Kops, Margarete; von Wezyk, Alexander; Bergmann, Klaus; Yabuta, Hironobu; Nagano, Akihisa; Ashizawa, Noritaka; Taniguchi, Yuta; Shirai, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kazuya; Kasama, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    High-throughput and -resolution actinic mask inspection tools are needed as EUVL begins to enter into volume production phase. To realize such inspection tools, a high-radiance EUV source is necessary. Ushio's laser-assisted discharge-produced plasma (LDP) source is able to meet industry's requirements in radiance, cleanliness, stability and reliability. Ushio's LDP source has shown the peak radiance at plasma of 180 W/mm2/sr and the area-averaged radiance in a 200-μm-diameter circle behind the debris mitigation system of 120 W/mm2/sr. A new version of the debris mitigation system is in testing phase. Its optical transmission was confirmed to be 73 %, which is 4 % lower than that of the previous version and therefore will be improved. Cleanliness of the system is evaluated by exposing Ru mirrors placed behind the debris mitigation system. Ru sputter rate was proven to be sufficiently low as 3~5 nm/Gpulse at 7 kHz, whereas frequency-dependent sputter rate was 1~3 nm/Gpulse at 5~9 kHz as previously reported. Sn deposition remained very low (< 0.05 nm) and did not grow over time. A new technique to suppress debris was tested and preliminary results were promising. Time-of-flight signal of fast ions was completely suppressed and Ru sputter rate of exposed mirrors at 3 kHz was approximately 1.3 nm/Gpulse, whereas the conventional mitigation system (new version) resulted in Ru sputter rate of 0.7 nm/Gpulse. This new technique also allows increasing the radiance efficiency by 30 %. Stability tests were done at several different discharge frequencies. Pulse energy stability was approximately 10 %. Dose energy stability dropped from approximately 2 % to 0.1 % when feedback control was activated. EUV emission position stability was studied at 3 kHz. Deviation of the plasma center of gravity was 6 μm, which is 3 % of plasma diameter and therefore considered to be negligible. Reliability tests were performed on both R and D and prototype machines and up to 200 hours of non

  2. Vision Based Autonomous Robotic Control for Advanced Inspection and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, Walter S.

    2014-01-01

    The advanced inspection system is an autonomous control and analysis system that improves the inspection and remediation operations for ground and surface systems. It uses optical imaging technology with intelligent computer vision algorithms to analyze physical features of the real-world environment to make decisions and learn from experience. The advanced inspection system plans to control a robotic manipulator arm, an unmanned ground vehicle and cameras remotely, automatically and autonomously. There are many computer vision, image processing and machine learning techniques available as open source for using vision as a sensory feedback in decision-making and autonomous robotic movement. My responsibilities for the advanced inspection system are to create a software architecture that integrates and provides a framework for all the different subsystem components; identify open-source algorithms and techniques; and integrate robot hardware.

  3. Mask cost and specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hisashi; Higashikawa, Iwao

    2003-12-01

    At the panel discussion of Photomask Japan 2003, we discussed about Mask cost and specification. The topics are (1) Mask price trend and its impact, (2) How to reduce the mask costs; solutions from a mask shop, mask writing tool and mask inspection tool 3) Partnering mask suppliers with mask users; reasonable mask specification and OPC strategies. The choice of DUV laser writer instead of e-beam writer is one solution for reduction of mask cost. The continuous improvement of e-beam writer and resist sensitivity for high throughput is another solution. The partnership between designer, EDA vender, mask maker and wafer lithographer becomes more important.

  4. Advanced photomask fabrication by e-beam lithography for mask aligner applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichelt, T.; Bourgin, Y.; Banasch, M.; Zeitner, U. D.

    2016-10-01

    Photomasks contain geometric information that will be transferred to substrates or pre-structured surfaces. Conventional mask aligner lithography in the sense of shadow printing of the photomask suffers from limited achievable resolution. Photomask and substrate are typically separated by an air gap causing diffraction effects and hence affecting the minimum structure size. Even though contact lithography offers a resolution in the wavelengthscale, yield problems and contamination of the photomask are its drawbacks. Using proximity lithography, these problems can be avoided since it profits from a contact-free exposure process. To overcome the resolution limitation of the shadow printing mode more advanced diffraction based photo masks need to be used.

  5. Mask characterization for critical dimension uniformity budget breakdown in advanced extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolsky, Peter; Strolenberg, Chris; Nielsen, Rasmus; Nooitgedacht, Tjitte; Davydova, Natalia; Yang, Greg; Lee, Shawn; Park, Chang-Min; Kim, Insung; Yeo, Jeong-Ho

    2013-04-01

    As the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors critical dimension uniformity (CDU) specification shrinks, semiconductor companies need to maintain a high yield of good wafers per day and high performance (and hence market value) of finished products. This cannot be achieved without continuous analysis and improvement of on-product CDU as one of the main drivers for process control and optimization with better understanding of main contributors from the litho cluster: mask, process, metrology and scanner. We will demonstrate a study of mask CDU characterization and its impact on CDU Budget Breakdown (CDU BB) performed for advanced extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography with 1D (dense lines) and 2D (dense contacts) feature cases. We will show that this CDU contributor is one of the main differentiators between well-known ArFi and new EUV CDU budgeting principles. We found that reticle contribution to intrafield CDU should be characterized in a specific way: mask absorber thickness fingerprints play a role comparable with reticle CDU in the total reticle part of the CDU budget. Wafer CD fingerprints, introduced by this contributor, may or may not compensate variations of mask CDs and hence influence on total mask impact on intrafield CDU at the wafer level. This will be shown on 1D and 2D feature examples. Mask stack reflectivity variations should also be taken into account: these fingerprints have visible impact on intrafield CDs at the wafer level and should be considered as another contributor to the reticle part of EUV CDU budget. We also observed mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) through field fingerprints in the studied EUV cases. Variations of MEEF may play a role towards the total intrafield CDU and may need to be taken into account for EUV lithography. We characterized MEEF-through-field for the reviewed features, with results herein, but further analysis of this phenomenon is required. This comprehensive approach to quantifying the mask part of

  6. Overview of Mask Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Bryan J.; Jindal, Vibhu; Lin, C. C.; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Kwon, Hyuk Joo; Ma, Hsing-Chien; Goldstein, Michael; Chan, Yau-Wai; Goodwin, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the successor to optical lithography and will enable advanced patterning in semiconductor manufacturing processes down to the 8 nm half pitch technology node and beyond. However, before EUV can successfully be inserted into high volume manufacturing a few challenges must be overcome. Central among these remaining challenges is the requirement to produce "defect free" EUV masks. Mask blank defects have been one of the top challenges in the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. To determine defect sources and devise mitigation solutions, detailed characterization of defects is critical. However, small defects pose challenges in metrology scale-up. SEMATECH has a comprehensive metrology strategy to address any defect larger than a 20 nm core size to obtain solutions for defect-free EUV mask blanks. SEMATECH's Mask Blank Development Center has been working since 2003 to develop the technology to support defect free EUV mask blanks. Since 2003, EUV mask blank defects have been reduced from 10000 of size greater than 100 nm to about a few tens at size 70 nm. Unfortunately, today's state of the art defect levels are still about 10 to 100 times higher than needed. Closing this gap requires progress in the various processes associated with glass substrate creation and multilayer deposition. That process development improvement in turn relies upon the availability of metrology equipment that can resolve and chemically characterize defects as small as 30 nm. The current defect reduction efforts at SEMATECH have intensively included a focus on inspection and characterization. The facility boasts nearly 100M of metrology hardware, including an FEI Titan TEM, Lasertec M1350 and M7360 tools, an actinic inspection tool, AFM, SPM, and scanning auger capabilities. The newly established Auger tool at SEMATECH can run a standard 6-inch mask blank and is already providing important information on sub-100 nm defects on EUV

  7. SEM-contour shape analysis based on circuit structure for advanced systematic defect inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yasutaka; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Hojo, Yutaka; Fuchimoto, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a practicable measurement technique that can help to achieve reliable inspections for systematic defects in advanced semiconductor devices. Systematic defects occurring in the design and mask processes are a dominant component of integrated circuit yield loss in nano-scaled technologies. Therefore, it is essential to ensure systematic defects are detected at an early stage of wafer fabrication. In the past, printed pattern shapes have been evaluated by human eyes or by taking manual critical dimension (CD) measurements. However, these operations are sometimes unstable and inaccurate. Last year, we proposed a new technique for taking measurements by using a SEM contour [1]. This technique enables a highly precise quantification of various complex 2D shaped patterns by comparing a contour extracted from a SEM image using a CD measurement algorithm and an ideal pattern. We improved this technique to enable the carrying out of inspections suitable for every pattern structure required for minimizing the process margin. This technique quantifies a pattern shape of a target-layer pattern using information on a multi-layered circuit structure. This enabled it to confirm the existence of a critical defect in a circuit connecting upper/lower-layers. This paper describes the improved technique and the evaluation results obtained in evaluating it in detail.

  8. Fully-Non-Contact Masking-Based Holography Inspection on Dimensionally Responsive Artwork Materials.

    PubMed

    Tornari, Vivi; Bernikola, Eirini; Nevin, Austin; Kouloumpi, Eleni; Doulgeridis, Michalis; Fotakis, Costas

    2008-12-18

    Environmental control in galleries and museums is a necessity and is informed by the knowledge of ongoing processes of deterioration which can threaten the integrity and stability of artworks. Invisible dimensional changes in many works of art occur following environmental fluctuations as materials respond to the changes in humidity and temperature. The constant influence of dimensional changes usually remains invisible until displacement generates visible deterioration and irreversible damage. This paper exploits fully non contact coherent interferometry in a sequential masking procedure for visualising and studying surface deformation which is the direct effect of dimensional alterations induced by humidity changes. Surface deformation during dimensional displacements of constituent materials may occur on any artwork within an unstable environment. In this context, the presented research study explores the diagnostic potential of fully non contact sensors for the direct structural assessment of environmental effects as they occur in real time on works of art. The method is employed to characterise material responses, complementing and improving understanding of material behaviour in unstable environments.

  9. Comparison of fast 3D simulation and actinic inspection for EUV masks with buries defects

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, C. H.; Wiraatmadja, S.; Chan, T. T.; Neureuther, A. R.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Liang, T.

    2009-02-23

    Aerial images for isolated defects and the interactions of defects with features are compared between the Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the fast EUV simulation program RADICAL. Comparisons between AIT images from August 2007 and RADICAL simulations are used to extract aberrations. At this time astigmatism was the dominant aberration with a value of 0.55 waves RMS. Significant improvements in the imaging performance of the AIT were made between August 2007 and December 2008. A good match will be shown between the most recent AIT images and RADICAL simulations without aberrations. These comparisons will demonstrate that a large defect, in this case 7nm tall on the surface, is still printable even if it is centered under the absorber line. These comparisons also suggest that the minimum defect size is between 1.5nm and 0.8nm surface height because a 1.5nm defect was printable but a 0.8nm was not. Finally, the image of a buried defect near an absorber line through focus will demonstrate an inversion in the effect of the defect from a protrusion of the dark line into the space to a protrusion of the space into the line.

  10. Advanced maintenance, inspection & repair technology for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, B.M.

    1994-12-31

    Maintenance, inspection, and repair technology for nuclear power plants is outlined. The following topics are discussed: technology for reactor systems, reactor refueling bridge, fuel inspection system, fuel shuffling software, fuel reconstitution, CEA/RCCA/CRA inspection, vessel inspection capabilities, CRDM inspection and repair, reactor internals inspection and repair, stud tensioning system, stud/nut cleaning system, EDM machining technology, MI Cable systems, core exit T/C nozzle assemblies, technology for steam generators, genesis manipulator systems, ECT, UT penetrant inspections, steam generator repair and cleaning systems, technology for balance of plant, heat exchangers, piping and weld inspections, and turbogenerators.

  11. Development and characterization of advanced phase-shift mask blanks for 14nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Jun; Jang, Kyu-Jin; Choi, Min-Ki; Yang, Chul-Kyu; Lee, Jae-Chul; Lee, Jong-Keun; Kang, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Shin, Cheol; Nam, Kee-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the development of semiconductor process for 14nm node and beyond is in progress. The mask-making process demands higher resolution and CD accuracy to meet requirements. Current conventional ArF PSM has several problems such as higher 3D effect and higher loading effect due to the thicker film. These problems cause the CD performance degradation. This study is about the manufacturing of advance ArF PSM, which has thinner phase shift layer and higher etch rate Cr absorber film. The thickness of phase shift film is less than 60nm and the total etch-time for the Cr absorber film is reduced more than 30%. The mask CD performance of this new blank was evaluated in terms of CD uniformity, CD linearity, pattern resolution, and loading effect and so on. Adapting to this new blank, we can achieve better CD performance by reducing the loading effect. In addition, the chemical durability and ArF exposure durability were also improved. In conclusion, the mask-making process margin was extended by using this new blank, and it is expected that we can achieve the required specifications for 14nm node and beyond.

  12. Advanced antireflective nanostructures etched down from nanosilver colloid-transformed island mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seong-Je; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hye; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Lee, Eung-Sug; Choi, Jun-Hyuk

    2012-11-01

    Advanced fabrication methods for antireflective nanostructures are presented via the formation of thermally grown nanosilver islands from continuously deposited colloidal multilayers, followed by a multi-step reactive ion etch (RIE) with optimized gas mixture rate. This process allows the formation of a random array of nanostructures of diameter 150 nm or less and height greater than 200 nm. The reflectance falls to around 0.7% in the visible region, with reasonably enhanced broadband stability and reduced incidence angle dependence. The tunability of antireflection was investigated with respect to several parameters associated with the nanosilver etch mask fabrication and RIE conditions.

  13. SEMATECH EUVL mask program status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Henry; Goodwin, Frank; Huh, Sungmin; Orvek, Kevin; Cha, Brian; Rastegar, Abbas; Kearney, Patrick

    2009-04-01

    As we approach the 22nm half-pitch (hp) technology node, the industry is rapidly running out of patterning options. Of the several lithography techniques highlighted in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), the leading contender for the 22nm hp insertion is extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). Despite recent advances with EUV resist and improvements in source power, achieving defect free EUV mask blank and enabling the EUV mask infrastructure still remain critical issues. To meet the desired EUV high volume manufacturing (HVM) insertion target date of 2013, these obstacles must be resolved on a timely bases. Many of the EUV mask related challenges remain in the pre-competitive stage and a collaborative industry based consortia, such as SEMATECH can play an important role to enable the EUVL landscape. SEMATECH based in Albany, NY is an international consortium representing several of the largest manufacturers in the semiconductor market. Full members include Intel, Samsung, AMD, IBM, Panasonic, HP, TI, UMC, CNSE (College of Nanoscience and Engineering), and Fuller Road Management. Within the SEMATECH lithography division a major thrust is centered on enabling the EUVL ecosystem from mask development, EUV resist development and addressing EUV manufacturability concerns. An important area of focus for the SEMATECH mask program has been the Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC). At the MBDC key issues in EUV blank development such as defect reduction and inspection capabilities are actively pursued together with research partners, key suppliers and member companies. In addition the mask program continues a successful track record of working with the mask community to manage and fund critical mask tools programs. This paper will highlight recent status of mask projects and longer term strategic direction at the MBDC. It is important that mask technology be ready to support pilot line development HVM by 2013. In several areas progress has been

  14. Inspection of advanced computational lithography logic reticles using a 193-nm inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ching-Fang; Lin, Mei-Chun; Lai, Mei-Tsu; Hsu, Luke T. H.; Chin, Angus; Lee, S. C.; Yen, Anthony; Wang, Jim; Chen, Ellison; Wu, David; Broadbent, William H.; Huang, William; Zhu, Zinggang

    2010-09-01

    We report inspection results of early 22-nm logic reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods. Inspection is performed using a state-of-the-art 193-nm reticle inspection system in the reticleplane inspection mode (RPI) where both rule-based sensitivity control (RSC) and a newer modelbased sensitivity control (MSC) method are tested. The evaluation includes defect detection performance using several special test reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods; the reticles contain a variety of programmed critical defects which are measured based on wafer print impact. Also included are inspection results from several full-field product reticles designed with both conventional and computational lithography methods to determine if low nuisance-defect counts can be achieved. These early reticles are largely single-die and all inspections are performed in the die-to-database inspection mode only.

  15. EUV mask reflectivity measurements with micro-scale spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Barty, Anton; Anderson, Erik; Kearney, Patrick; Han, Hakseung

    2008-02-01

    The effort to produce defect-free mask blanks for EUV lithography relies on increasing the detection sensitivity of advanced mask inspection tools, operating at several wavelengths. They describe the unique measurement capabilities of a prototype actinic (EUV) wavelength microscope that is capable of detecting small defects and reflectivity changes that occur on the scale of microns to nanometers. The defects present in EUV masks can appear in many well-known forms: as particles that cause amplitude or phase variations in the reflected field; as surface contamination that reduces reflectivity and contrast; and as damage from inspection and use that reduces the reflectivity of the multilayer coating. This paper presents an overview of several topics where scanning actinic inspection makes a unique contribution to EUVL research. They describe the role of actinic scanning inspection in defect repair studies, observations of laser damage, actinic inspection following scanning electron microscopy, and the detection of both native and programmed defects.

  16. Assessment of silicon carbide x-ray mask overlay performance in the IBM Advanced Lithography Facility x-ray stepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.; Chen, Alek C.; Powers, Lynn A.; Vampatella, Ben R.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a study to explicitly assess the performance of silicon carbide masks by directly measuring overlay accuracy and precision of exposures made on a state-of-the-art commercially available x-ray stepper, the Suss XRS200/3. The work was done using a mask fabricated at IBM from silicon carbide coated wafers obtained from HOYA Electronics Corp. with exposures completed at IBM's Advanced Lithography Facility (ALF) using synchrotron-generated radiation. The mask pattern design contains many overlay measurement fiducials, resolution patterns, and alignment verniers, and two sets of three alignment marks: one set inboard (kerf) and one set outboard. The performance of an imaging-based alignment system, such as the ALX system on the Suss XRS200/3 steppers, varies depending upon the optical characteristics of the alignment marks on the mask and wafer.

  17. Weijia Zhou Inspects the Advanced Astroculture plant growth unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Weijia Zhou, director of the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, inspects the Advanced Astroculture(tm) plant growth unit before its first flight last spring. Coating technology is used inside the miniature plant greenhouse to remove ethylene, a chemical produced by plant leaves that can cause plants to mature too quickly. This same coating technology is used in a new anthrax-killing device. The Space Station experiment is managed by the Space Product Development Program at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. DuPont is partnering with NASA and the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to grow soybeans aboard the Space Station to find out if they have improved oil, protein, carbohydrates or secondary metabolites that could benefit farmers and consumers. Principal Investigators: Dr. Tom Corbin, Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., a Dupont Company, with headquarters in Des Moines, Iowa, and Dr. Weijia Zhou, Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  18. Efficient Boolean and multi-input flow techniques for advanced mask data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Daniel; Moore, Bill; Valadez, John

    2012-11-01

    Mask data preparation (MDP) typically involves multiple flows, sometimes consisting of many steps to ensure that the data is properly written on the mask. This may include multiple inputs, transformations (scaling, orientation, etc.), and processing (layer extraction, sizing, Boolean operations, data filtering). Many MDP techniques currently in practice require multiple passes through the input data and/or multiple file I/O steps to achieve these goals. This paper details an approach which efficiently process the data, resulting in minimal I/O and greatly improved turnaround times (TAT). This approach takes advanced processing algorithms and adapts them to produce efficient and reliable data flow. In tandem with this processing flow, an internal jobdeck mapping approach, transparent to the user, allows an essentially unlimited number of pattern inputs to be handled in a single pass, resulting in increased flexibility and ease of use. Transformations and processing operations are critical to MDP. Transformations such as scaling, reverse tone and orientation, along with processing including sizing, Boolean operations and data filtering are key parts of this. These techniques are often employed in sequence and/or in parallel in a complex functional chain. While transformations typically are done "up front" when the data is input, processing is less straightforward, involving multiple reads and writes to handle the more intricate functionality and also the collection of input patterns which may be required to produce the data that comprises a single mask. The approach detailed in this paper consists of two complementary techniques: efficient MDP flow and jobdeck mapping. Efficient MDP flow is achieved by pipelining the output of each step to the input of the subsequent step. Rather than writing the output of a particular processing step to file and then reading it in to the following step, the pipelining or chaining of the steps results in an efficient flow with

  19. Multi column cell (MCC) e-beam exposure system for mask writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Yamada, Akio; Yamabe, Masaki

    2008-05-01

    Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) Mask Design, Drawing, and Inspection Technology Research Department (Mask D2I) started a 4-year development program for the total optimization of mask design, drawing, and inspection technologies to reduce photomask manufacturing costs in 2006. At the Mask Writing Equipment Technology Research Laboratory, we are developing an e-beam exposure system introducing concepts of MCC (multi column cell), CP (character projection), and VSB (variable shaped beam), which has several times higher throughput than currently commercially available e-beam writing systems.

  20. Alignment mask design and image processing for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul; Cohen, Simon; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Roberts, Randy; Salmon, Thad; Smauley, David; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2015-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short pulses that generate X-rays which backlight high-density inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. ARC is designed to produce multiple, sequential X-ray images by using up to eight back lighters. The images will be used to examine the compression and ignition of a cryogenic deuterium-tritium target with tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of an ICF shot. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. As in the NIF system, ARC requires an optical alignment mask that can be inserted and removed as needed for precise positioning of the beam. Due to ARC's split beam design, inserting the nominal NIF main laser alignment mask in ARC produced a partial blockage of the mask pattern. Requirements for a new mask design were needed. In this paper we describe the ARC mask requirements, the resulting mask design pattern, and the image analysis algorithms used to detect and identify the beam and reference centers required for ARC alignment.

  1. Advances in the Use of Thermography to Inspect Composite Tanks for Liquid Fuel Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Matthew D.; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Jones, Clyde S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of advances in the use of thermography to inspect composite tanks for liquid fuel propulsion systems. Details are given on the thermographic inspection system, thermographic analysis method (includes scan and defect map, method of inspection, and inclusions, ply wrinkle, and delamination defects), graphite composite cryogenic feedline (including method, image map, and deep/shallow inclusions and resin rich area defects), and material degradation nondestructive evaluation.

  2. Inspection results of advanced (sub-50nm design rule) reticles using the TeraScanHR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sier, Jean-Paul; Broadbent, William; Yu, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Results from the recently available TeraScanHR reticle inspection system were published in early 2007. These results showed excellent inspection capability for 45nm logic and 5xnm half-pitch memory advanced production reticles, thus meeting the industry need for the mid-2007 start of production. The system has been in production use since that time. In early 2007, some evidence was shown of capability to inspect reticles for 32nm logic and sub-50nm half-pitch memory, but the results were incomplete due to the limited availability of such reticles. However, more of these advanced reticles have become available since that time. In this paper, inspection results of these advanced reticles from various leading-edge reticle manufacturers using the TeraScanHR are shown. These results indicate that the system has the capability to provide the needed inspection sensitivity for continued development work to support the industry roadmap.

  3. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Crane, C.; Feng, L.; Abidi, M.; Tosunoglu, S.

    1994-06-01

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected.

  4. Robotics application for in-service inspection of the ALMR. [Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Kwant, W.; Ramsour, N.L. . Nuclear Energy Div.); Sweeney, F.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) Program is developing and licensing a reactor system that is compact for factory fabrication and modular construction. The design includes provisions for in-service inspection to verify performance and safety capabilities throughout the life of the plant. A DOE sponsored robotics team, comprised of members from the universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas and from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is developing advanced inspection equipment using robotics for nuclear application. This equipment is compact and remotely operated and particularly suited for inspection of the ALMR. Extensive 3D simulations are used to refine and demonstrate the inspection methods. This paper focuses on inspection methods for the reactor vessel and the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS). Inspection capabilities are included for visual inspection of the reactor vessel outer surface and volumetric inspection of the welds. The robotics team is devising a compact crawler design with the capabilities to perform these inspections. Similarly, various robot concepts are being evaluated for accomplishing the RVACS visual inspection and cleaning procedures.

  5. Inspecting Composite Ceramic Armor Using Advanced Signal Processing Together with Phased Array Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-08

    processing techniques have been developed to help improve phased array ultrasonic inspection and analysis of multi-layered ceramic armor panels. The...INSPECTING COMPOSITE CERAMIC ARMOR USING ADVANCED SIGNAL PROCESSING TOGETHER WITH PHASED ARRAY ULTRASOUND J. S. Steckenrider Illinois College...immersion phased array ultrasound system. Some of these specimens had intentional design defects inserted interior to the specimens. Because of the very

  6. The E-beam resist test facility: performance testing and benchmarking of E-beam resists for advanced mask writers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Jang, Il Yong; Mellish, Mac; Litt, Lloyd C.; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Hartley, John

    2012-11-01

    With each new generation of e-beam mask writers comes the ability to write leading edge photomasks with improved patterning performance and increased throughput. However, these cutting-edge e-beam tools are often used with older generation resists, preventing the end-user from taking full advantage of the tool's potential. The generation gap between tool and resist will become even more apparent with the commercialization of multi-beam mask writers, which are expected to be available for pilot line use around 2015. The mask industry needs resists capable of meeting the resolution, roughness, and sensitivity requirements of these advanced tools and applications. The E-beam Resist Test Facility (ERTF) has been established to fill the need for consortium-based testing of e-beam resists for mask writing applications on advanced mask writers out to the 11nm half-pitch node and beyond. SEMATECH and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) began establishing the ERTF in early 2012 to test e-beam resist samples from commercial suppliers and university labs against the required performance metrics for each application at the target node. Operations officially began on June 12, 2012, at which time the first e-beam resist samples were tested. The ERTF uses the process and metrology infrastructure available at CNSE, including a Vistec VB300 Vectorscan e-beam tool adjusted to operate at 50kv. Initial testing results show that multiple resists already meet, or are close to meeting, the resolution requirements for mask writing at the 11nm node, but other metrics such as line width roughness still need improvement. An overview of the ERTF and its capabilities is provided here. Tools, baseline processes, and operation strategy details are discussed, and resist testing and benchmarking results are shown. The long-term outlook for the ERTF and plans to expand capability and testing capacity, including resist testing for e-beam direct write lithography, are also

  7. Study of program defects of 22nm nanoimprint template with an advanced e-beam inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Jun; Nakanishi, Yuko; Yusa, Satoshi; Sasaki, Shiho; Kurihara, Masaaki; Toyama, Nobuhito; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Xiao, Hong; Kuan, Chiyan; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long; Zhao, Yan; Jau, Jack

    2009-10-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a candidate of alternative, low cost of ownership lithography solution for deep nano-meter device manufacturing12. For the NIL template pattern making, we have been developing the processes with 100keV SB EB writer and 50keV VSB EB writer to achieve the fine resolution of near 20nm1-7. However, inspection of nanoimprint template posed a big challenge to inspection system due to the small geometry, 1x comparing to 4x of Optical mask and EUV mask. Previous studies of nanoimprint template inspection were performed indirectly on a stamped wafer and/or on a round quartz wafer13. Electron beam inspection (EBI) systems have been widely used in semiconductor fabs in nanometer technology nodes. Most commonly EBI applications are electrical defects, or voltage contrast (VC) defects detection and monitoring8-11. In this study, we used a mask EBI system developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI) to directly inspect a NIL template with line/space and hole patterns half pitched from 22nm to 90nm and with program defects sized from 4nm to 92nm. Capability of inspection with 10nm pixel size has been demonstrated and capability of capturing program defects sized 12nm and smaller has been shown. This study proved the feasibility of EBI as inspection solution of nanoimprint template for 22nmHP and beyond.

  8. Shadow masked organometallic vapor phase epitaxy for advanced micro-optical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2000-12-01

    This thesis presents novel techniques and applications of nonplanar chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for optoelectronic materials and devices. Specifically, nonplanar organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) employing a shadow mask has been developed for the fabrication of integrated optoelectronic structures. Shadow masked OMVPE (SM-OMVPE) is currently the only technique known to produce thick, nonplanar layers of single crystal material without macroscopic faceting. By the use of SM-OMVPE, various microlenses, micromirrors and novel devices have been designed fabricated and tested. Shadow masked microlenses with record short focal lengths have been produced. High quality microlens arrays with accurate control of lens diameter, sagitta, focal length, astigmatism and position have been designed, fabricated and tested. The author has shown that precise three-dimensional control during crystal growth can be employed to construct useful optoelectronic structures in a reproducible manner. This work also presents novel techniques for the fabrication of shadow masks. A high aluminum- concentration spacer layer and chemical recipes for the removal of epitaxial shadow masks are reported. In addition, the first reusable shadow mask constructed by reactive ion etching has been utilized for the growth of shadow masked structures. Direct fusion wafer bonding of silicon shadow masks was first developed by the author and has proven to be a robust, clean and reliable technique for mask placement. The application of shadow masked growth to vertical cavity semiconductor lasers (VCSELs) was initiated in this work. Microlenses were designed for top-emitting VCSELs to provide focusing of the output beam and these designs are currently being fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, by introducing curvature to the distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirrors, a high power single mode VCSEL has been designed. The author has grown the first concentrically

  9. Advanced algorithms for radiographic material discrimination and inspection system design

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Deinert, Mark R.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray and neutron radiography are powerful tools for non-invasively inspecting the interior of objects. Materials can be discriminated by noting how the radiographic signal changes with variations in the input spectrum or inspection mode. However, current methods are limited in their ability to differentiate when multiple materials are present, especially within large and complex objects. With X-ray radiography, the inability to distinguish materials of a similar atomic number is especially problematic. To overcome these critical limitations, we augmented our existing inverse problem framework with two important expansions: 1) adapting the previous methodology for use with multi-modal radiography and energy-integrating detectors, and 2) applying the Cramer-Rao lower bound to select an optimal set of inspection modes for a given application a priori. Adding these expanded capabilities to our algorithmic framework with adaptive regularization, we observed improved discrimination between high-Z materials, specifically plutonium and tungsten. The combined system can estimate plutonium mass within our simulated system to within 1%. Three types of inspection modes were modeled: multi-endpoint X-ray radiography alone; in combination with neutron radiography using deuterium-deuterium (DD); or in combination with neutron radiography using deuterium-tritium (DT) sources.

  10. Mask degradation monitoring with aerial mask inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Wen-Jui; Fu, Yung-Ying; Lu, Shih-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sian; Lin, Jeffrey; Wu, Clare; Lifschitz, Sivan; Tam, Aviram

    2013-06-01

    As design rule continues to shrink, microlithography is becoming more challenging and the photomasks need to comply with high scanner laser energy, low CDU, and ever more aggressive RETs. This give rise to numerous challenges in the semiconductor wafer fabrication plants. Some of these challenges being contamination (mainly haze and particles), mask pattern degradation (MoSi oxidation, chrome migration, etc.) and pellicle degradation. Fabs are constantly working to establish an efficient methodology to manage these challenges mainly using mask inspection, wafer inspection, SEM review and CD SEMs. Aerial technology offers a unique opportunity to address the above mask related challenges using one tool. The Applied Materials Aera3TM system has the inherent ability to inspect for defects (haze, particles, etc.), and track mask degradation (e.g. CDU). This paper focuses on haze monitoring, which is still a significant challenge in semiconductor manufacturing, and mask degradation effects that are starting to emerge as the next challenge for high volume semiconductor manufacturers. The paper describes Aerial inspector (Aera3) early haze methodology and mask degradation tracking related to high volume manufacturing. These will be demonstrated on memory products. At the end of the paper we take a brief look on subsequent work currently conducted on the more general issue of photo mask degradation monitoring by means of an Aerial inspector.

  11. Advanced ultrasonic inspection system for the ID-inspection of reactor pressure vessels of BWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, E.; Wuestenberg, H.; Tagliamonte, M.; Dalichow, M.

    1994-12-31

    A newly-developed, modular ultrasonic examination system has been developed by Siemens for the ID inspection of BWR RPV`S. It is based on the phased-array technique with hybrid probes using the latest in manipulator and control equipment technology to allow the often hard-to-access weld areas of older reactor pressure vessels in US BWR plants to be examined within a very short time and with minimal radiation exposure of the examination personnel. New NRC stipulations requiring almost complete ultrasonic examination of all RPV welds can be fully satisfied using this system for the ID inspection of all longitudinal and circumferential welds above the jet pump baffle plate.

  12. Practical use of the repeating patterns in mask writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Masahiro; Inoue, Tadao; Yamabe, Masaki

    2010-03-01

    In May 2006, the Mask Design, Drawing, and Inspection Technology Research Department (Mask D2I) at the Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) launched a 4-year program for reducing mask manufacturing cost and TAT by concurrent optimization of MDP, mask writing, and mask inspection. As one of the tasks being pursued at the Mask Design Data Technology Research Laboratory, we have evaluated the effect of reducing the drawing shot counts by utilizing the repeating patterns, and showed positive impact on mask making by using CP drawing. During the past four years, we have developed a software to extract repeating patterns from fractured OPCed mask data which can be used to minimize the shot counts. In this evaluation, we have used an actual device production data obtained from the member companies of MaskD2I. To the extraction software we added new functions for extracting common repeating patterns from a set of multiple masks, and studied how this step can reduce the counts in comparison to the shot counts required during the conventional mask writing techniques. We have also developed software that uses the extraction result of repeating patterns and prepares drawing-data for the MCC/CP drawing system, which has been developed at the Mask Writing Equipment Technology Research Laboratory. With this software, we have simulated EB proximity effect on CP writing and examined how it affect the shot count reduction where CP shots with large CD errors are to be divided into VSB shots. In this paper, we will report the evaluation result of the practical application of repeating patterns in mask writing with this software.

  13. Advances in in situ inspection of automated fiber placement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Peter D.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Seebo, Jeffrey P.

    2016-05-01

    Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) systems have been developed to help take advantage of the tailorability of composite structures in aerospace applications. AFP systems allow the repeatable placement of uncured, spool fed, preimpregnated carbon fiber tape (tows) onto substrates in desired thicknesses and orientations. This automated process can incur defects, such as overlapping tow lines, which can severely undermine the structural integrity of the part. Current defect detection and abatement methods are very labor intensive, and still mostly rely on human manual inspection. Proposed is a thermographic in situ inspection technique which monitors tow placement with an on board thermal camera using the preheated substrate as a through transmission heat source. An investigation of the concept is conducted, and preliminary laboratory results are presented. Also included will be a brief overview of other emerging technologies that tackle the same issue.

  14. Advanced in In Situ Inspection of Automated Fiber Placement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, Peter D.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Seebo, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Automated Fiber Placement (AFP) systems have been developed to help take advantage of the tailorability of composite structures in aerospace applications. AFP systems allow the repeatable placement of uncured, spool fed, preimpregnated carbon fiber tape (tows) onto substrates in desired thicknesses and orientations. This automated process can incur defects, such as overlapping tow lines, which can severely undermine the structural integrity of the part. Current defect detection and abatement methods are very labor intensive, and still mostly rely on human manual inspection. Proposed is a thermographic in situ inspection technique which monitors tow placement with an on board thermal camera using the preheated substrate as a through transmission heat source. An investigation of the concept is conducted, and preliminary laboratory results are presented. Also included will be a brief overview of other emerging technologies that tackle the same issue. Keywords: Automated Fiber Placement, Manufacturing defects, Thermography

  15. Advanced Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Sensor Modeling For Multisite Inspection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    element method is not well suited for open region problems[12] encountered in wave regimes. In the area of antenna and electromagnetic wave...26 Z. Zeng, B. Shanker, and L. Udpa, "Modeling microwave NDE using the element-free Galerkin method ," Electromagnetic Nondestructive Evaluation (IX...applied conventional eddy current method . This result provided a quantitative evaluation of the MR sensor inspection method and validated the

  16. Design of the reactor vessel inspection robot for the advanced liquid metal reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.F.; Crane, C.; Feng, L.; Abidi, M.; Tosunoglu, S.

    1994-06-01

    A consortium of four universities and Oak Ridge National Laboratory designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in an advanced nuclear reactor. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a mock non-hostile environment and shown to perform as expected, as detailed in this report.

  17. Advanced algorithms for radiographic material discrimination and inspection system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Deinert, Mark R.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray and neutron radiography are powerful tools for non-invasively inspecting the interior of objects. However, current methods are limited in their ability to differentiate materials when multiple materials are present, especially within large and complex objects. Past work has demonstrated that the spectral shift that X-ray beams undergo in traversing an object can be used to detect and quantify nuclear materials. The technique uses a spectrally sensitive detector and an inverse algorithm that varies the composition of the object until the X-ray spectrum predicted by X-ray transport matches the one measured. Here we show that this approach can be adapted to multi-mode radiography, with energy integrating detectors, and that the Cramér-Rao lower bound can be used to choose an optimal set of inspection modes a priori. We consider multi-endpoint X-ray radiography alone, or in combination with neutron radiography using deuterium-deuterium (DD) or deuterium-tritium (DT) sources. We show that for an optimal mode choice, the algorithm can improve discrimination between high-Z materials, specifically between tungsten and plutonium, and estimate plutonium mass within a simulated nuclear material storage system to within 1%.

  18. Development of advanced multi-tone mask by using two different transmittance modulation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sei-Min; Choi, Min-Ki; Seo, Seong-Min; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Shin, Cheol; Jeong, Woo-Gun; Jung, Sung-Mo; Nam, Kee-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Multi-tone mask (MTM) consists of more than two layers having different transmittance modulation layers. A novel method is proposed to manufacture a MTM based on two kinds of transmittance modulation materials such as chromium and molybdenum. Different modulation materials cannot be only act as etch-stopper to each other, but also they play a role as a separator between the layers consisted of MTM. Furthermore, clearly classified modulation layers contribute to define one of the targeted transmittance according to different etching process. Especially, a conventional MTM requires three mask writing processes to form three patterns whereas the proposed MTM structure makes it possible to form three patterns by using only two mask writing processes. It is found that the turnaround time of proposed MTM is remarkably decreased as value of 30% compared to that of conventional MTM. MoSi-/Cr-based tri-tone mask configuration having 37, 15, and 0% of transmittance had been demonstrated based on the optimized thin-film conditions. Optical uniformity characteristics were also carried out to evaluate the photomask performance. Consequently, the proposed MTM is not only expected to extend the variation of objective transmittance, but also it is a very promise method for achieving a high performance photo-mask by reducing its fabrication cost.

  19. Optimal mask characterization by Surrogate Wafer Print (SWaP) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.; Hoellein, Ingo; Peters, Jan Hendrick; Ackmann, Paul; Connolly, Brid; West, Craig

    2008-10-01

    Traditionally, definition of mask specifications is done completely by the mask user, while characterization of the mask relative to the specifications is done completely by the mask maker. As the challenges of low-k1 imaging continue to grow in scope of designs and in absolute complexity, the inevitable partnership between wafer lithographers and mask makers has strengthened as well. This is reflected in the jointly owned mask facilities and device manufacturers' continued maintenance of fully captive mask shops which foster the closer mask-litho relationships. However, while some device manufacturers have leveraged this to optimize mask specifications before the mask is built and, therefore, improve mask yield and cost, the opportunity for post-fabrication partnering on mask characterization is more apparent and compelling. The Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) has been investigating the concept of assessing how a mask images, rather than the mask's physical attributes, as a technically superior and lower-cost method to characterize a mask. The idea of printing a mask under its intended imaging conditions, then characterizing the imaged wafer as a surrogate for traditional mask inspections and measurements represents the ultimate method to characterize a mask's performance, which is most meaningful to the user. Surrogate wafer print (SWaP) is already done as part of leading-edge wafer fab mask qualification to validate defect and dimensional performance. In the past, the prospect of executing this concept has generally been summarily discarded as technically untenable and logistically intractable. The AMTC published a paper at BACUS 2007 successfully demonstrating the performance of SWaP for the characterization of defects as an alternative to traditional mask inspection [1]. It showed that this concept is not only feasible, but, in some cases, desirable. This paper expands on last year's work at AMTC to assess the full implementation of SWaP as an

  20. Analyzing EUV mask costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lercel, Michael; Kasprowicz, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUV) as a replacement for multiple patterning is based on improvements of cycle time, yield, and cost. Earlier cost studies have assumed a simple assumption that EUV masks (being more complex with the multilayer coated blank) are not more than three times as expensive as advanced ArFi (ArF immersion) masks. EUV masks are expected to be more expensive during the ramp of the technology because of the added cost of the complex mask blank, the use of EUV specific mask tools, and a ramp of yield learning relative to the more mature technologies. This study concludes that, within a range of scenarios, the hypothesis that EUV mask costs are not more than three times that of advanced ArFi masks is valid and conservative.

  1. Recent advances in fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowerby, B. D.; Tickner, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    Fast neutron radiography techniques are attractive for screening cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Neutrons have the required penetration, they interact with matter in a manner complementary to X-rays and they can be used to determine elemental composition. Compared to neutron interrogation techniques that measure secondary radiation (neutron or gamma-rays), neutron radiography systems are much more efficient and rapid and they are much more amenable to imaging. However, for neutron techniques to be successfully applied to cargo screening, they must demonstrate significant advantages over well-established X-ray techniques. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection. These developments include a fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography system that utilizes a 14 MeV neutron generator as well as fast neutron resonance radiography systems that use variable energy quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and pulsed broad energy neutron beams. These systems will be discussed and compared with particular emphasis on user requirements, sources, detector systems, imaging ability and performance.

  2. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  3. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  4. Shearography for Non-destructive Inspection with applications to BAT Mask Tile Adhesive Bonding and Specular Surface Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Daniel B.

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of shearography techniques for non-destructive evaluation in two unique application areas is examined. In the first application, shearography is used to evaluate the quality of adhesive bonds holding lead tiles to the B.4T gamma ray mask for the NASA Swift program. Using a vibration excitation, the more poorly bonded tiles are readily identifiable in the shearography image. A quantitative analysis is presented that compares the shearography results with a destructive pull test measuring the force at bond failure. The second application is to evaluate the bonding between the skin and core of a honeycomb structure with a specular (mirror-like) surface. In standard shearography techniques, the object under test must have a diffuse surface to generate the speckle patterns in laser light, which are then sheared. A novel configuration using the specular surface as a mirror to image speckles from a diffuser is presented, opening up the use of shearography to a new class of objects that could not have been examined with the traditional approach. This new technique readily identifies large scale bond failures in the panel, demonstrating the validity of this approach.

  5. EUV mask reflectivity measurements with micron-scale spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Rekawa, S.B.; Kemp, C.D.; Barty, A.; Anderson, E.H.; Kearney, Patrick; Han, Hakseung

    2008-05-26

    The effort to produce defect-free mask blanks for EUV lithography relies on increasing the detection sensitivity of advanced mask inspection tools, operating at several wavelengths. We describe the unique measurement capabilities of a prototype actinic (EUV wavelength) microscope that is capable of detecting small defects and reflectivity changes that occur on the scale of microns to nanometers. Types of defects: (a) Buried Substrate Defects: particles & pits (causes amplitude and/or phase variations); (b) Surface Contamination (reduces reflectivity and (possibly) contrast); (c) Damage from Inspection and Use (reduces the reflectivity of the multilayer coating). This paper presents an overview of several topics where scanning actinic inspection makes a unique contribution to EUVL research. We describe the role of actinic scanning inspection in four cases: defect repair studies; observations of laser damage; after scanning electron microscopy; and native and programmed defects.

  6. Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS): An overview of the technology and its application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hediger, Lisa H.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS) was developed by NASA Marshall to support solid propulsion test programs. ACTIS represents a significant advance in state-of-the-art inspection systems. Its flexibility and superior technical performance have made ACTIS very popular, both within and outside the aerospace community. Through technology utilization efforts, ACTIS has been applied to inspection problems in commercial aerospace, lumber, automotive, and nuclear waste disposal industries. ACTIS has been used to inspect items of historical interest. ACTIS has consistently produced valuable results, providing information which was unattainable through conventional inspection methods. Although many successes have already been shown, the full potential of ACTIS has not yet been realized. It is currently being applied in the commercial aerospace industry by Boeing. Smaller systems, based on ACTIS technology, are becoming increasingly available. This technology has much to offer the small business and industry, especially in identifying design and process problems early in the product development cycle to prevent defects. Several options are available to businesses interested in this technology.

  7. Advanced computed tomography inspection system (ACTIS): an overview of the technology and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.; Hediger, Lisa H.

    1994-10-01

    The Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS) was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center to support in-house solid propulsion test programs. ACTIS represents a significant advance in state-of-the-art inspection systems. Its flexibility and superior technical performance have made ACTIS very popular, both within and outside the aerospace community. Through Technology Utilization efforts, ACTIS has been applied to inspection problems in commercial aerospace, lumber, automotive, and nuclear waste disposal industries. ACTIS has even been used to inspect items of historical interest. ACTIS has consistently produced valuable results, providing information which was unattainable through conventional inspection methods. Although many successes have already been demonstrated, the full potential of ACTIS has not yet been realized. It is currently being applied in the commercial aerospace industry by Boeing Aerospace Company. Smaller systems, based on ACTIS technology are becoming increasingly available. This technology has much to offer small businesses and industry, especially in identifying design and process problems early in the product development cycle to prevent defects. Several options are available to businesses interested in pursuing this technology.

  8. Evaluation of mask manufacturing efficiency using mask data rank information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kokoro; Endo, Masakazu; Inoue, Tadao; Yamabe, Masaki; Nakatake, Shigetoshi

    2010-05-01

    The photomask cost is becoming one of the challenging issues in the semiconductor industry, as the cost of photomasks has been rising year by year. ASET started Mask D2I (Mask Design, Drawing and Inspection Technology) project with the sponsorship from the NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) in 2006 for the purpose of the mask cost reduction. In earlier papers[1-5], we introduced the idea of photomask data prioritization method which is referred to as Mask Data Rank (MDR). We have built our software system to convert Design Intent (DI) to MDR with cooperation of STARC. Then we showed the results of experiments with mask data provided by semiconductor companies. In this paper we show the additional report of mask inspection experiments using real photomasks. Then we show the evaluation results about mask drawing time reduction using MDR flow. Finally we introduce detailed algorithm to extract design intent from analog circuits.

  9. Simulation-based mask quality control in a production environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Linyong; Chen, Jiunn-Hung; Cai, Lynn; Lee, Don; Chu, Brian; Huang, Vinsent; Fang, Te-Yang

    2004-05-01

    Traditionally, mask defect analysis has been done through a visual inspection review. As the semiconductor industry moves into smaller process generations and the complexity of mask exponentially increases, "Mask" issues have emerged as one of the main production problems due to their rising cost and long turn-around time. Mask-making specifications related to defects found on advanced masks also becomes more difficult to define due to the complex features involved [e.g. OPC (Optical Proximity Correction), SRAF (Sub Resolution Assist Features), etc.]. The Automatic Defect Severity Scoring (ADSS) module of i-Virtual Stepper System from Synopsys offers a fast and highly accurate software solution for defect printability analysis of advanced masks in a real production environment. In this paper, we present our case study of production pilot run in which the ADSS is used to automatically quantify the impact of a given defect on the surrounding features, basically filtering out killer defects and nuisance defects in terms of production viewpoints to reduce operators" intervention. In addition, an automation workflow is also tested, in which the production issues, such as the communication feasibility of mask quality control between mask house and wafer fab, are also considered.

  10. Extraction and utilization of the repeating patterns for CP writing in mask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Masahiro; Inoue, Tadao; Yamabe, Masaki

    2010-05-01

    In May 2006, the Mask Design, Drawing, and Inspection Technology Research Department (Mask D2I) at the Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) launched a 4-year program for reducing mask manufacturing cost and TAT by concurrent optimization of Mask Data Preparation (MDP), mask writing, and mask inspection [1]. Figure 1 shows an outline of the project at Mask D2I at ASET. As one of the tasks being pursued at the Mask Design Data Technology Research Laboratory we have evaluated the effect of reducing the writing shot counts by utilizing the repeating patterns, and that showed positive impact on mask making by using CP writing. During the past four years, we have developed a software to extract repeating patterns from fractured OPCed mask data and have evaluated the efficiency of reducing the writing shot counts using the repeating patterns with this software. In this evaluation, we have used many actual device production data obtained from the member companies of Mask D2I. To the extraction software, we added new functions for extracting common repeating patterns from a set of multiple masks, and studied how this step affects the ratio of reducing the shot counts in comparison to the case of utilization of the repeating patterns for single mask. We have also developed a software that uses the result of extracting repeating patterns and prepares writing-data for the MCC/CP writing system which has been developed at the Mask Writing Equipment Technology Research Laboratory. With this software, we have examined how EB proximity effect on CP writing affects in reducing the shot count where CP shots with large CD errors have to be divided into VSB shots. In this paper we will report on making common CP mask from a set of multiple actual device data by using these software, and will also report on the results of CP writing and calculation of writing-TAT by MCC/CP writing system.

  11. Advanced dimensional inspection for the reverse engineering of power plant equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Kotteakos, B.; Ball, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    Forced outages and critical path situations often leave electric utilities with very few options other than the OEM. What does the utility do when faced with the situation of long lead time or obsolete items necessary to bring units back on-line, or off load restrictions. At Southern California Edison Company (SCE), a proactive approach to the reverse engineering and inspection process was undertaken to reduce the effects of similar situations. Advances in dimensional measurement technology have afforded the authors` company a cost effective method for obtaining the necessary inspection data to remanufacture certain items. This paper identifies equipment utilized by SCE for the reverse engineering and inspection of turbine and turbine related components and their typical applications in the power generation industry.

  12. Advances in nondestructive evaluation methods for inspection of refractory concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    Refractory concrete linings are essential to protect steel pressure boundaries from high-temperature agressive erosive/corrosive environments. Castable refractory concretes have been gaining more acceptance as information about their performance increases. Economic factors, however, have begun to impose high demands on the reliability of refractory materials. Advanced nondestructive evaluation methods are being developed to assist the refractory user. Radiographic techniques, thermography, acoustic-emission detection, and interferometry have been shown to yield information on the structural status of refractory concrete. Methods using /sup 60/Co radiation sources are capable of yielding measurements of refractory wear rate as well as images of cracks and/or voids in pre- and post-fired refractory linings up to 60 cm thick. Thermographic (infrared) images serve as a qualitative indicator of refractory spalling, but quantitative measurements are difficult to obtain from surface-temperature mapping. Acoustic emission has been shown to be a qualitative indicator of thermomechanical degradation of thick panels of 50 and 95% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ during initial heating and cooling at rates of 100 to 220/sup 0/C/h. Laser interferometry methods have been shown to be capable of complete mappings of refractory lining thicknesses. This paper will present results obtained from laboratory and field applications of these methods in petrochemical, steel, and coal-conversion plants.

  13. Advanced electron-beam pattern generation technology for 180-nm masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Frank E.; Sauer, Charles A.; Wang, William; Vernon, Matthew; Prior, Richard; Pearce-Percy, Henry T.; Cole, Damon M.; Mankos, Marian

    1997-02-01

    Optical lithography will be the dominant technique used for 180 nm generation production devices. With a reduced feature size on the wafer, 4X optical reduction, optical proximity correction (OPC), and phase shift lithography techniques, mask-related errors become even more critical to wafer yield. In addition, small feature sizes and lithography enhancement techniques require finer edge resolution. Clearly, new patten generation tools are needed for this generation of maskmaking requirements. Multipass gray (MPG) writing strategy was introduced with the MEBESR 4500S. The ability to deliver a 4X improvement in dose while improving throughput is a significant advantage over previous MEBES systems. Since MPG is used in conjunction with offset scan voting, reduction in butting of over 50% has been demonstrated with MPG. Higher doses are now possible with use of a multipass writing strategy and a brighter source. As a result, resists with higher contrast and process robustness can be used. A significant improvement in uniformity is noted with the new process, an essential step needed in meeting 180 nm requirements. Dry etch is essential to meet these new requirements and with sufficient process margin to be manufacturable. This paper describes the key electron-beam pattern generation technology necessary to meet the requirement of 180 nm masks, including a high dose field- emission gun and column capable of delivering 800 A/cm2; complete dynamic beam correction; a digital stage servo to provide stable, reproducible stage control under high acceleration conditions; a high speed data path to support 320 MHz beam blanking and a 10 nm data address. This paper also examines the improvements made to the MEBES platform and documents the resulting improvements and compares these results to the requirements for 180 nm masks.

  14. Gas centrifuge enrichment plants inspection frequency and remote monitoring issues for advanced safeguards implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian David; Erpenbeck, Heather H; Miller, Karen A; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Reimold, Benjamin A; Ward, Steven L; Howell, John

    2010-09-13

    Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to verify declared low enriched uranium (LEU) production, detect undeclared LEU production and detect high enriched uranium (BEU) production with adequate probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of declared cylinders of uranium hexafluoride that are used in the process of enrichment at GCEPs. This paper contains an analysis of how possible improvements in unattended and attended NDA systems including process monitoring and possible on-site destructive analysis (DA) of samples could reduce the uncertainty of the inspector's measurements providing more effective and efficient IAEA GCEPs safeguards. We have also studied a few advanced safeguards systems that could be assembled for unattended operation and the level of performance needed from these systems to provide more effective safeguards. The analysis also considers how short notice random inspections, unannounced inspections (UIs), and the concept of information-driven inspections can affect probability of detection of the diversion of nuclear material when coupled to new GCEPs safeguards regimes augmented with unattended systems. We also explore the effects of system failures and operator tampering on meeting safeguards goals for quantity and timeliness and the measures needed to recover from such failures and anomalies.

  15. Additive Manufacturing of Advanced High Temperature Masking Fixtures for EBPVD TBC Coating

    SciTech Connect

    List, III, Frederick Alyious; Feuerstein, Albert; Dehoff, Ryan; Kirka, Michael; Carver, Keith

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project between Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc. (PST) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to develop an additive manufacturing process to fabricate next generation high temperature masking fixtures for coating of turbine airfoils with ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) by the Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) process. Typical masking fixtures are sophisticated designs and require complex part manipulation in order to achieve the desired coating distribution. Fixtures are typically fabricated from high temperature nickel (Ni) based superalloys. The fixtures are fabricated from conventional processes by welding of thin sheet material into a complex geometry, to decrease the weight load for the manipulator and to reduce the thermal mass of the fixture. Recent attempts have been made in order to fabricate the fixtures through casting, but thin walled sections are difficult to cast and have high scrap rates. This project focused on understanding the potential for fabricating high temperature Ni based superalloy fixtures through additive manufacturing. Two different deposition processes; electron beam melting (EBM) and laser powder bed fusion were evaluated to determine the ideal processing route of these materials. Two different high temperature materials were evaluated. The high temperature materials evaluated were Inconel 718 and another Ni base alloy, designated throughout the remainder of this document as Alloy X, as the alloy composition is sensitive. Inconel 718 is a more widely utilized material for additive manufacturing although it is not currently the material utilized for current fixtures. Alloy X is the alloy currently used for the fixtures, but is not a commercially available alloy for additive manufacturing. Praxair determined it was possible to build the fixture using laser powder bed technology from Inconel 718. ORNL fabricated the fixture

  16. Aircraft corrosion and crack inspection using advanced magneto-optic imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, David K.; Fitzpatrick, Gerald L.; Skaugset, Richard L.; Shih, William C.

    1996-11-01

    A next generation magneto-optic imaging system, the MOI 303, has recently been introduced with the ability to generate real-time, complete, 2D eddy current images of cracks and corrosion in aircraft. The new imaging system described features advanced, digital remote control operation and on- screen display of setup parameters for ease of use. This instrument gives the inspector the capability to more rapidly scan large surfaces areas. The magneto-optic/eddy current imaging technology has already been formally approved for inspection of surface cracking on an aircraft fuselage. The improved magneto-optic imager is now poised to aid rapid inspection for corrosion and subsurface cracking. Previous magneto-optic imaging systems required the inspector to scan the surface twice for complete inspection coverage: a second scan was necessary with the imager rotated about 90 degrees from the orientation of the first pass. However, by providing eddy current excitation simultaneously from two orthogonal directions, complete, filled-in magneto-optic images are now generated regardless of the orientation of the imager. THese images are considerably easier to interpret and evaluate. In addition, there is a synergism obtained in applying eddy current excitation simultaneously in multiple directions: better penetration is obtained and the resulting images have better signal to noise levels compared to those produced with eddy current excitation applied only in one direction. Examples of these improved images are presented.

  17. Improving inspectability with KLA-Tencor TeraScan thin line de-sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunlin; Kim, David; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, NamWook; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Jin Hyung; Chung, Dong Hoon

    2007-10-01

    In the ever-changing semi-conductor industry, new innovations and technical advances constantly bring new challenges to fabs, mask-shops and vendors. One of such advances is an aggressive optical proximity correction (OPC) method, sub-resolution assist features (SRAF). On one hand, SRAFs bring a leap forward in resolution improvement during wafer printing; on the other hand they bring new challenges to many processes in mask making. KLA-Tencor Corp. working together with Samsung Electronics Co. developed an additional function to the current HiRes 1 detector to increase inspectability and usable sensitivity during the inspection step of the mask making process. SRAFs bring an unique challenge to the mask inspection process, which mask shops had not experienced before. SRAF by nature do not resolve on wafer and thus have a higher tolerance in the CD (critical dimension) uniformity, edge roughness and pattern defects. This new function, Thin-Line De-sense (TLD), increase the inspectability and usable sensitivity by generating different regions of sensitivity and thus will match the defect requirement on a particular photomask with SRAFs better. The value of TLD was proven in a production setting with more than 30 masks inspected, and resulted in higher sensitivity on main features and a sharp decrease in the amount of defects that needed to be classified.

  18. Integration of mask and silicon metrology in DFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Mito, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Akiyuki; Toyoda, Yasutaka

    2009-03-01

    We have developed a highly integrated method of mask and silicon metrology. The method adopts a metrology management system based on DBM (Design Based Metrology). This is the high accurate contouring created by an edge detection algorithm used in mask CD-SEM and silicon CD-SEM. We have inspected the high accuracy, stability and reproducibility in the experiments of integration. The accuracy is comparable with that of the mask and silicon CD-SEM metrology. In this report, we introduce the experimental results and the application. As shrinkage of design rule for semiconductor device advances, OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) goes aggressively dense in RET (Resolution Enhancement Technology). However, from the view point of DFM (Design for Manufacturability), the cost of data process for advanced MDP (Mask Data Preparation) and mask producing is a problem. Such trade-off between RET and mask producing is a big issue in semiconductor market especially in mask business. Seeing silicon device production process, information sharing is not completely organized between design section and production section. Design data created with OPC and MDP should be linked to process control on production. But design data and process control data are optimized independently. Thus, we provided a solution of DFM: advanced integration of mask metrology and silicon metrology. The system we propose here is composed of followings. 1) Design based recipe creation: Specify patterns on the design data for metrology. This step is fully automated since they are interfaced with hot spot coordinate information detected by various verification methods. 2) Design based image acquisition: Acquire the images of mask and silicon automatically by a recipe based on the pattern design of CD-SEM.It is a robust automated step because a wide range of design data is used for the image acquisition. 3) Contour profiling and GDS data generation: An image profiling process is applied to the acquired image based

  19. Advanced x-ray systems for nondestructive inspection and contraband detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armistead, Robert A.

    1999-10-01

    High-energy X rays provide the capability for examining the interior of large, complex objects, measuring densities and dimensions, finding flaws, and detecting contraband. Although various types of X-ray imaging systems have been in use for some time, recent developments have greatly extended the envelope of capabilities. Two ARACOR X-ray vision systems will be discussed that offer new and advanced capabilities for contraband detection and nondestructive evaluation. The Eagle is a new mobile, transportable, high- efficiency X-ray imaging system designed for inspection cargo and detecting drugs, explosives and weapons at seaports, airports and border crossings. ARACOR's line of industrial computed tomography systems provide quantitative 3D X-ray images for such applications as the inspection of Minuteman and Peacekeeper solid rocket motors, the safety and security of nuclear weapons, and metrology and failure studies of automobile components and castings. Newly developed software enables the accurate reverse engineering of complex parts to form CAD descriptions and the direct input of image data into rapid prototyping systems for the production of replacement parts.

  20. State of the art in focused ion-beam mask repair systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Diane K.; Doherty, John A.; Doyle, Andrew F.; Morgan, John C.

    1995-07-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) systems are commonly used to repair lithographic masks with features below one micron. We will summarize the development of focused ion beam mask repair systems starting from the original tools developed for photomasks approximately 10 years ago. The present state of the art in FIB mask repair systems is incorporated in two types of tools-one for repair of proximity print X-ray masks, and the other for repair of photomasks and some phase shift masks. Similarities of the two styles of systems include the gallium ion optics, the lithographic stage for accurate positioning, a thermal enclosure to minimize system drift, deflection and scanning electronics, and an interface to inspection data. The differences include the process chemistries, repair strategies, and imaging techniques. Examples of a variety of repaired defects on both X-ray and phase shift masks will be shown. Advanced masks such as those for EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet), DUV (Deep Ultraviolet), and SCALPEL (Scattering with Angular Limitation in Projection Electron Lithography) will have to be repaired should those technologies mature, and presumably with FIB tools. Preliminary research and development of advanced mask repair problems will be described and possible approaches will be suggested.

  1. 76 FR 9984 - Airworthiness Directives; B/E Aerospace, Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ..., Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part Numbers 174006-(), 174080-(), 174085-(), 174095... manufacturer and part number of the oxygen mask assemblies installed, an inspection to determine the manufacturing date and modification status if certain oxygen mask assemblies are installed, and...

  2. 76 FR 41669 - Airworthiness Directives; B/E Aerospace, Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ..., Continuous Flow Passenger Oxygen Mask Assembly, Part Numbers 174006-( ), 174080-( ), 174085-( ), 174095... oxygen mask assemblies installed, an inspection to determine the manufacturing date and modification status if certain oxygen mask assemblies are installed, and corrective action for certain oxygen...

  3. Advanced mask technique to improve bit line CD uniformity of 90 nm node flash memory in low-k1 lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-doo; Choi, Jae-young; Kim, Jea-hee; Han, Jae-won

    2008-10-01

    As devices size move toward 90nm technology node or below, defining uniform bit line CD of flash devices is one of the most challenging features to print in KrF lithography. There are two principal difficulties in defining bit line on wafer. One is insufficient process margin besides poor resolution compared with ArF lithography. The other is that asymmetric bit line should be made for OPC(Optical Proximity Correction) modeling. Therefore advanced ArF lithography scanner should be used for define bit line with RETs (Resolution Enhancement Techniques) such as immersion lithography, OPC, PSM(Phase Shift Mask), high NA(Numerical Aperture), OAI(Off-Axis Illumination), SRAF(Sub-resolution Assistant Feature), and mask biasing.. Like this, ArF lithography propose the method of enhancing resolution, however, we must spend an enormous amount of CoC(cost of ownership) to utilize ArF photolithography process than KrF. In this paper, we suggest method to improve of bit line CD uniformity, patterned by KrF lithographic process in 90nm sFlash(stand alone Flash) devices. We applied new scheme of mask manufacturing, which is able to realize 2 different types of mask, binary and phase-shift, into one plate. Finally, we could get the more uniform bit lines and we expect to get more stable properties then before applying this technique.

  4. Thermo-mechanical analysis of fixed mask 1 for the Advanced Photon Source insertion device front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, H.L.T.; Shu, D.; Sheng, I.C.A.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-10-01

    The first fixed mask (FM1) is one of the critical elements on the insertion device front ends of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The heat flux from the APS undulators is enormous. For example, FM1 placed at a distance of 16 m from the Undulator A source will be subjected to 519 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence with a total power of 3.8 kW. Due to a high localized thermal gradient on this component, inclined geometry (1.5{degree}) is used in the design to spread the footprint of the x-ray beam. A box-cone-shape geometry was designed due to the limited space available in the front end. The box shape is a highly constrained geometry, which induces larger stress levels than would occur in a plate or a tube. In order to handle the expected higher stress and the stress concentration at the corners, a single Glidcop block (rather than copper) was used in the construction. The FM1 uses an enhanced heat transfer mechanism developed at Argonne National Laboratory, which increases the convective heat transfer coefficient to about 3 W/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}C with single-phase water as the coolant. The authors simulated the location of the x-ray beam in several places to cover the worst possible case. The maximum temperature (about 180{degree}C) occurs when the beam hits the center of horizontal surface. The maximum effective stress (about 313 MPa) occurs when the x-ray beam hits about the corners.

  5. Mask strategy at International SEMATECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2002-08-01

    International SEMATECH (ISMT) is a consortium consisting of 13 leading semiconductor manufacturers from around the globe. Its objective is to develop the infrastructure necessary for its member companies to realize the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) through efficiencies of shared development resources and knowledge. The largest area of effort is lithography, recognized as a crucial enabler for microelectronics technology progress. Within the Lithography Division, most of the efforts center on mask-related issues. The development strategy at International SEMATCH will be presented and the interlock of lithography projects clarified. Because of the limited size of the mask production equipment market, the business case is weak for aggressive investment commensurate with the pace of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. With masks becoming the overwhelming component of lithography cost, new ways of reducing or eliminating mask costs are being explored. Will mask technology survive without a strong business case? Will the mask industry limit the growth of the semiconductor industry? Are advanced masks worth their escalating cost? An analysis of mask cost from the perspective of mask value imparted to the user is presented with examples and generic formulas for the reader to apply independently. A key part to the success for both International SEMATECH and the industry globally will be partnerships on both the local level between mask-maker and mask-user, and the macro level where global collaborations will be necessary to resolve technology development cost challenges.

  6. Semi-transparent isolated defect detection by die-to-database mask inspection using virtual scanning algorithms for sub-pixel resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakaw, Syarhei M.

    2004-06-01

    The paper presents the description of the new Virtual Scanning Algorithms (VSA), providing sub-pixel resolution. VSA are the algorithms developed specially for EM-6029B (Fig. 1) and EM-6329 (Fig. 2) die-to-database reticle and photomask inspection systems of "Planar" concern (KBTEM-OMO). For the providing of the effective building in of these algorithms to the inspection system, has being created the special two-levels dynamic model of optical image. The paper presents also the building principles of this model. This model allows, on the one hand, to perform the precise alignment of optical image (collected from the reticle) wit a reference image (generated from the design data), and on the other hand -- to perform the analysis of optical image to get optimum mutual position of the digitization grid of the inspection system and detected defects position. VSA calculate the second level of this model. Both the VSA and the second level of dynamic model of optical image are presented the Virtual Scanning sub-System (VSS). VSS allows to increase the detection capability of automatic reticle inspection system by means of achievement sub-pixel resolution. The paper shows, that during the detection of semi-transparent defects, VSA allow, in particular, to get maximum available amplitude contrast of the CCD-signals on the image model. Accordingly, VSA allow also the inspection system to work without using maximum sensitivity settings with the same detection capability. As a result is the reduction of the risk of false or nuisance defects detection, while keeping maximum sensitivity to printable defects. The VSS design and in-house test results are discussed.

  7. Coatings on reflective mask substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, William Man-Wai; Taylor, John S.; Hector, Scott D.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Stivers, Alan R.; Kofron, Patrick G.; Thompson, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

  8. A novel mask proximity correction software combining accuracy and reduced writing time for the manufacturing of advanced photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, Patrick; Martin, Luc; Browning, Clyde; Farys, Vincent; Sundermann, Frank; Narukawa, Shogo; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Hayashi, Naoya

    2012-06-01

    The new generations of photomasks are seen to bring more and more challenges to the mask manufacturer. Maskshops face two conflicting requirements, namely improving pattern fidelity and reducing or at least maintaining acceptable writing time. These requirements are getting more and more challenging since pattern size continuously shrinks and data volumes continuously grows. Although the classical dose modulation Proximity Effect Correction is able to provide sufficient process control to the mainstream products, an increased number of published and wafer data show that the mask process is becoming a nonnegligible contributor to the 28nm technology yield. We will show in this paper that a novel approach of mask proximity effect correction is able to meet the dual challenge of the new generation of masks. Unlike the classical approach, the technique presented in this paper is based on a concurrent optimization of the dose and geometry of the fractured shots. Adding one more parameter allows providing the best possible compromise between accuracy and writing time since energy latitude can be taken into account as well. This solution is implemented in the Inscale software package from Aselta Nanographics. We have assessed the capability of this technology on several levels of a 28nm technology. On this set, the writing time has been reduced up to 25% without sacrificing the accuracy which at the same time has been improved significantly compared to the existing process. The experiments presented in the paper confirm that a versatile proximity effect correction strategy, combining dose and geometry modulation helps the users to tradeoff between resolution/accuracy and e-beam write time.

  9. Advanced In-Service Inspection Approaches Applied to the Phenix Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Guidez, J.; Martin, L.; Dupraz, R.

    2006-07-01

    The safety upgrading of the Phenix plant undertaken between 1994 and 1997 involved a vast inspection programme of the reactor, the external storage drum and the secondary sodium circuits in order to meet the requirements of the defence-in-depth safety approach. The three lines of defence were analysed for every safety related component: demonstration of the quality of design and construction, appropriate in-service inspection and controlling the consequences of an accident. The in-service reactor block inspection programme consisted in controlling the core support structures and the high-temperature elements. Despite the fact that limited consideration had been given to inspection constraints during the design stage of the reactor in the 1960's, as compared to more recent reactor projects such as the European Fast Reactor (EFR), all the core support line elements were able to be inspected. The three following main operations are described: Ultrasonic inspection of the upper hangers of the main vessel, using small transducers able to withstand temperatures of 130 deg. C, Inspection of the conical shell supporting the core dia-grid. A specific ultrasonic method and a special implementation technique were used to control the under sodium structure welds, located up to several meters away from the scan surface. Remote inspection of the hot pool structures, particularly the core cover plug after partial sodium drainage of the reactor vessel. Other inspections are also summarized: control of secondary sodium circuit piping, intermediate heat exchangers, primary sodium pumps, steam generator units and external storage drum. The pool type reactor concept, developed in France since the 1960's, presents several favourable safety and operational features. The feedback from the Phenix plant also shows real potential for in-service inspection. The design of future generation IV sodium fast reactors will benefit from the experience acquired from the Phenix plant. (authors)

  10. Alternating phase-shifted mask for logic gate levels, design, and mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebmann, Lars W.; Graur, Ioana C.; Leipold, William C.; Oberschmidt, James M.; O'Grady, David S.; Regaill, Denis

    1999-07-01

    While the benefits of alternating phase shifted masks in improving lithographic process windows at increased resolution are well known throughout the lithography community, broad implementation of this potentially powerful technique has been slow due to the inherent complexity of the layout design and mask manufacturing process. This paper will review a project undertaken at IBM's Semiconductor Research and Development Center and Mask Manufacturing and Development facility to understand the technical and logistical issues associated with the application of alternating phase shifted mask technology to the gate level of a full microprocessor chip. The work presented here depicts an important milestone toward integration of alternating phase shifted masks into the manufacturing process by demonstrating an automated design solution and yielding a functional alternating phase shifted mask. The design conversion of the microprocessor gate level to a conjugate twin shifter alternating phase shift layout was accomplished with IBM's internal design system that automatically scaled the design, added required phase regions, and resolved phase conflicts. The subsequent fabrication of a nearly defect free phase shifted mask, as verified by SEM based die to die inspection, highlights the maturity of the alternating phase shifted mask manufacturing process in IBM's internal mask facility. Well defined and recognized challenges in mask inspection and repair remain and the layout of alternating phase shifted masks present a design and data preparation overhead, but the data presented here demonstrate the feasibility of designing and building manufacturing quality alternating phase shifted masks for the gate level of a microprocessor.

  11. Fabrication and commercialization of scalpel masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novembre, Anthony E.; Peabody, Milton L., Jr.; Blakey, Myrtle I.; Farrow, Reginald C.; Kasica, Richard J.; Liddle, James A.; Saunders, Thomas E.; Tennant, Donald M.

    1998-09-01

    SCALPEL masks have been fabricated for use in the Proof-of- Lithography system and to demonstrate the feasibility of having them produced by a commercial blank manufacturer and optical mask shops. Masks blanks are formed from 100 mm diameter silicon wafers. A 100-150 nm thick SiNx layer is LPCVD deposited onto the wafers followed by magnetron sputter deposition of a thin Cr/W metal layer which is used as the scatterer layer for the mask>the mask is supported by an underlying network of struts which are arranged to be compatible with the step and scan writing strategy of the exposure tool and to provide robustness to the mask. Crystallographic wet etching of the silicon wafer forms membranes and struts. To date over 300 mask blanks have been formed and yield data as a function of the thickness of the silicon nitride membrane has been quantified. Recent developments in the mask blank formation process include the production of blanks by MCNC who serve as a commercial source of SCALPEL mask blanks. They have successfully delivered 36 blanks that exhibit equivalent properties to those produced at Lucent. Mask patterning has been performed at the commercial optical mask shops of PHOTRONICS and DUPONT. In this investigation a MEBES exposure system has been used to write patterns. The resist used is ZEP-520 and development and pattern transfer processes are performed in the STEAG-Hammatech spray/spin processing tool. Metrology is performed using a KMS 310 RT optical microscope. Pattern placement accuracy is measured on the LMS 2020 system without modification. The masks are inspected for defects using the optical based KLA 300 series inspection system in a die to die mode and in transmission. Results to date suggest feasibility of producing SCALPEL masks by a commercial blank supplier and by merchant optical mask shops.

  12. Advanced Ultrasonic Inspection Techniques for General Purpose Heat Source Fueled Clad Closure Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, M.W.

    2001-01-11

    A radioisotope thermoelectric generator is used to provide a power source for long-term deep space missions. This General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is fabricated using iridium clad vent sets to contain the plutonium oxide fuel pellets. Integrity of the closure weld is essential to ensure containment of the plutonium. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant took the lead role in developing the ultrasonic inspection for the closure weld and transferring the inspection to Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in fueled clad inspection for the Cassini mission. Initially only amplitude and time-of-flight data were recorded. However, a number of benign geometric conditions produced signals that were larger than the acceptance threshold. To identify these conditions, a B-scan inspection was developed that acquired full ultrasonic waveforms. Using a test protocol the B-scan inspection was able to identify benign conditions such as weld shield fusion and internal mismatch. Tangential radiography was used to confirm the ultrasonic results. All but two of 29 fueled clads for which ultrasonic B-scan data was evaluated appeared to have signals that could be attributed to benign geometric conditions. This report describes the ultrasonic inspection developed at Y-12 for the Cassini mission.

  13. Mask pattern generator employing EPL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Yamabe, Masaki; Wakamiya, Wataru; Endo, Nobuhiro

    2003-08-01

    Mask cost is one of crucial issues in device fabrication, especially in SoC (System on a Chip) with small-volume production. The cost mainly depends on productivity of mask manufacturing tools such as mask writers and defect inspection tools. EPL (Electron Projection Lithography) has been developing as a high-throughput electron beam exposure technology that will succeed optical lithography. The application of EPL technology to mask writing will result in high productivity and contribute to decrease the mask cost. The concept of a mask pattern generator employing EPL technology is proposed in this paper. It is very similar to EPL technology used for pattern printing on a wafer. The mask patterns on the glass substrate are exposed by projecting the basic circuit patterns formed on the mother EPL mask. One example of the mother EPL mask is a stencil type made with 200-mm Si wafer. The basic circuit patterns are IP patterns and logical primitive patterns such as cell libraries (AND, OR, Inverter, Flip-Flop and etc.) to express the SoC device patterns. Since the SoC patterns are exposed with its collective units such as IP and logical primitive patterns by using this method, the high throughput will be expected comparing with conventional mask E-beam writers. In this paper, the mask pattern generator with the EPL technology is proposed. The concept, its advantages and issues to be solved are discussed.

  14. Clay Mask Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Masks can represent so many things, such as emotions (happy, sad, fearful) and power. The familiar "comedy and tragedy" masks, derived from ancient Greek theater, are just one example from mask history. Death masks from the ancient Egyptians influenced the ancient Romans into creating similar masks for their departed. Masks can represent many…

  15. Development and field validation of advanced array probes for steam generator inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, C.V.; Pate, J.R.

    1995-04-01

    The aging of the steam generators at the nation`s nuclear power plants has led to the appearance of new forms of degradation in steam generator tubes and an increase in the frequency of forced outages due to major tube leak events. The eddy-current techniques currently being used for the inspection of steam generator tubing are no longer adequate to ensure that flaws will be detected before they lead to a shutdown of the plant. To meet the need for a fast and reliable method of inspection, ORNL has designed a 16-coil eddy-current array probe which combines an inspection speed similar to that of the bobbin coil with a sensitivity to cracks of any orientation similar to the rotating pancake coil. In addition, neural network and least square methods have been developed for the automatic analysis of the data acquired with the new probes. The probes and analysis software have been tested at two working steam generators where we have found an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of a factor of five an increase in the inspection speed of a factor of 75 over the rotating pancake coil which maintaining similar detection and characterization capabilities.

  16. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    A blank mask and its preparation stages, such as cleaning or resist coating, play an important role in the eventual yield obtained by using it. Blank mask defects' impact analysis directly depends on the amount of available information such as the number of defects observed, their accurate locations and sizes. Mask usability qualification at the start of the preparation process, is crudely based on number of defects. Similarly, defect information such as size is sought to estimate eventual defect printability on the wafer. Tracking of defect characteristics, specifically size and shape, across multiple stages, can further be indicative of process related information such as cleaning or coating process efficiencies. At the first level, inspection machines address the requirement of defect characterization by detecting and reporting relevant defect information. The analysis of this information though is still largely a manual process. With advancing technology nodes and reducing half-pitch sizes, a large number of defects are observed; and the detailed knowledge associated, make manual defect review process an arduous task, in addition to adding sensitivity to human errors. Cases where defect information reported by inspection machine is not sufficient, mask shops rely on other tools. Use of CDSEM tools is one such option. However, these additional steps translate into increased costs. Calibre NxDAT based MDPAutoClassify tool provides an automated software alternative to the manual defect review process. Working on defect images generated by inspection machines, the tool extracts and reports additional information such as defect location, useful for defect avoidance[4][5]; defect size, useful in estimating defect printability; and, defect nature e.g. particle, scratch, resist void, etc., useful for process monitoring. The tool makes use of smart and elaborate post-processing algorithms to achieve this. Their elaborateness is a consequence of the variety and

  17. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  18. Advanced radiation techniques for inspection of diesel engine combustion chamber materials components. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-09

    Heavy duty truck engines must meet stringent life cycle cost and regulatory requirements. Meeting these requirements has resulted in convergence on 4-stroke 6-in-line, turbocharged, and after-cooled engines with direct-injection combustion systems. These engines provide much higher efficiencies (42%, fuel consumption 200 g/kW-hr) than automotive engines (31%, fuel consumption 270 g/kW-hr), but at higher initial cost. Significant near-term diesel engine improvements are necessary and are spurred by continuing competitive, Middle - East oil problems and Congressional legislation. As a result of these trends and pressures, Caterpillar has been actively pursuing a low-fuel consumption engine research program with emphasis on product quality through process control and product inspection. The goal of this project is to combine the nondestructive evaluation and computational resources and expertise available at LLNL with the diesel engine and manufacturing expertise of the Caterpillar Corporation to develop in-process monitoring and inspection techniques for diesel engine combustion chamber components and materials. Early development of these techniques will assure the optimization of the manufacturing process by design/inspection interface. The transition from the development stage to the manufacturing stage requires a both a thorough understanding of the processes and a way of verifying conformance to process standards. NDE is one of the essential tools in accomplishing both elements and in this project will be integrated with Caterpillar`s technological and manufacturing expertise to accomplish the project goals.

  19. 193-nm radiation durability study of MoSi binary mask and resulting lithographic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servin, Isabelle; Belledent, Jérôme; Pain, Laurent; Connolly, Brid; Sczyrba, Martin; Lamantia, Matt

    2011-05-01

    Dimensions on mask continue to shrink to keep up with the ITRS roadmap. This has implications on the material of choice for the blanks. For example, the new binary OMOG stack (Opaque MOSi on Glass) was successfully introduced to meet the mask specifications at the 32nm technology node. Obviously 193-nm optical lithography will be further used in production at even higher NA and lower k1 emphasizing, for example, the impact on wafer of any electromagnetic field migration effects. Indeed, long term radiation damage inducing CD growth and consequently, device yield loss, has already been reported [1, 2]. This mechanism, known as Electric Field induced Migration of chrome (EMF) often shortens the mask's lifetime. Here, a study was conducted to investigate the impact of intensive ArF scanner exposure both on final wafer and mask performances. The Si printed wafers measured with top-down CD-SEM were characterized with respect to CD uniformity, linearity, Sub Resolution Assist Feature (SRAF) printability through process window, MEEF, DOF, and OPC accuracy. The data was also correlated to advanced mask inspection results (e.g. AIMSTM) taken at the same location. More precisely, this work follows a preliminary study [1] which pointed out that OMOG is less sensitive to radiation than standard COG (Chrome On Glass). And, in this paper, we report on results obtained at higher energy to determine the ultimate lifetime of OMOG masks.

  20. Advanced Signal Processing Techniques Applied to Terahertz Inspections on Aerospace Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Long Buu

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle's external fuel tank is thermally insulated by the closed cell foams. However, natural voids composed of air and trapped gas are found as by-products when the foams are cured. Detection of foam voids and foam de-bonding is a formidable task owing to the small index of refraction contrast between foam and air (1.04:1). In the presence of a denser binding matrix agent that bonds two different foam materials, time-differentiation of filtered terahertz signals can be employed to magnify information prior to the main substrate reflections. In the absence of a matrix binder, de-convolution of the filtered time differential terahertz signals is performed to reduce the masking effects of antenna ringing. The goal is simply to increase probability of void detection through image enhancement and to determine the depth of the void.

  1. Advanced Demonstration of Motion Correction for Ship-to-Ship Passive Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Boehnen, Chris Bensing; Ernst, Joseph

    2013-09-30

    Passive radiation detection is a key tool for detecting illicit nuclear materials. In maritime applications it is most effective against small vessels where attenuation is of less concern. Passive imaging provides: discrimination between localized (threat) and distributed (non-threat) sources, removal of background fluctuations due to nearby shorelines and structures, source localization to an individual craft in crowded waters, and background subtracted spectra. Unfortunately, imaging methods cannot be easily applied in ship-to-ship inspections because relative motion of the vessels blurs the results over many pixels, significantly reducing sensitivity. This is particularly true for the smaller water craft where passive inspections are most valuable. In this project we performed tests and improved the performance of an instrument (developed earlier under, “Motion Correction for Ship-to-Ship Passive Inspections”) that uses automated tracking of a target vessel in visible-light images to generate a 3D radiation map of the target vessel from data obtained using a gamma-ray imager.

  2. New methodology for thoroughly characterizing the performance of advanced reticle inspection platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eynon, Benjamin G., Jr.

    1997-02-01

    For years equipment suppliers have opened their doors to evaluations by potential customers. Unfortunately, the only feedback a supplier received concerning its performance was a purchase order (or the lack of one). Neither was there any benchmarking against other suppliers' results to identify niche areas or spark necessary tool improvement programs. The result was an industry where new tool development projects ran the risk of being dictated by conjecture and assumption rather than a more empirical approach. This paper presents a method by which reticle inspection tools can be characterized more comprehensively. While grounded in common sense, some of the techniques used were considered quite unorthodox. By consulting the equipment supplier as to which test vehicles might best demonstrate its tool capability or might expose a weakness in the competitor's tool, topics that the customer might not otherwise have thought of were covered in the evaluation. Securing permission to feed back comprehensive results to all suppliers also guaranteed future focus on critical issues and limited development activities to only those deemed value-added by the customer. In addition, specific test battery topics were derived from consultations with semiconductor customers. The intent was to understand which reticle patterns and defect types were critical to the end user. The expected outcome after this type of evaluation is a quantified performance benchmark which facilitates industry-wide reticle inspection capability improvement over a shorter period of time.

  3. Masks: Interpretations and Variations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basso, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Presents a high school art teacher's views of and experiences with masks. Outlines a maskmaking activity in which students were required to create variations on existing masks. Emphasizes use of experimental materials. Displays examples of student-created masks. (DB)

  4. Development of the CLIOS G821 system for inspection of LSPM for high-definition FPDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Makoto; Hamakawa, Mitsuru; Toriguchi, Masahiro; Kuroda, Shinya; Tajima, Atsushi

    2013-06-01

    Lasertec has developed CLIOS G821, a new inspection system designed to inspect finely-patterned large-size photomasks used for production of high-definition FPDs. CLIOS G821 is a highly advanced successor to 51MD, which has been acclaimed as a de facto industry standard of inspection tools for the 8th generation large-size photomasks. Photomasks are becoming more and more finely patterned due to the high demand for higher quality displays driven by strong sales in smartphones as well as the introduction of the latest 4K2K HDTV format. They are also becoming more complex and advanced by the use of half-toned masks and grey-toned masks. At the frontline of production, there is a strong need for a high-sensitivity inspection tool that is capable of detecting defects on the finely-patterned and highly-advanced photomasks. In order to meet such a need, Lasertec has redesigned optics, stage mechanism and detection circuit for CLIOS G821, offering high-sensitivity and high-throughput inspection for finely-patterned and highly-advanced photomasks. The presentation will describe the superior performance and functions of CLIOS G821 in comparison to our previous model, 51MD.

  5. Subdivisions with infinitely supported mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Pan, Yali

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the convergence of subdivision schemes associated with masks being polynomially decay sequences. Two-scale vector refinement equations are the formwhere the vector of functions [phi]=([phi]1,E..,[phi]r)T is in and is polynomially decay sequence of rxr matrices called refinement mask. Associated with the mask a is a linear operator on given byBy using same methods in [B. Han, R. Q. Jia, Characterization of Riesz bases of wavelets generated from multiresolution analysis, manuscript]; [BE Han, Refinable functions and cascade algorithms in weighted spaces with infinitely supported masks, manuscript]; [R.Q. Jia, Q.T. Jiang, Z.W. Shen, Convergence of cascade algorithms associated with nonhomogeneous refinement equations, Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 129 (2001) 415-427]; [R.Q. Jia, Convergence of vector subdivision schemes and construction of biorthogonal multiple wavelets, in: Advances in Wavelet, Hong Kong,1997, Springer, Singapore, 1998, pp. 199-227], a characterization of convergence of the sequences in the L2-norm is given, which extends the main results in [R.Q. Jia, S.D. Riemenschneider, D.X. Zhou, Vector subdivision schemes and multiple wavelets, Math. Comp. 67 (1998) 1533-1563] on convergence of the subdivision schemes associated with a finitely supported mask to the case in which mask a is polynomially decay sequence. As an application, we also obtain a characterization of smoothness of solutions of the refinement equation mentioned above for the case r=1.

  6. Comparison of binary mask defect printability analysis using virtual stepper system and aerial image microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Khoi A.; Spence, Chris A.; Dakshina-Murthy, S.; Bala, Vidya; Williams, Alvina M.; Strener, Steve; Eandi, Richard D.; Li, Junling; Karklin, Linard

    1999-12-01

    As advanced process technologies in the wafer fabs push the patterning processes toward lower k1 factor for sub-wavelength resolution printing, reticles are required to use optical proximity correction (OPC) and phase-shifted mask (PSM) for resolution enhancement. For OPC/PSM mask technology, defect printability is one of the major concerns. Current reticle inspection tools available on the market sometimes are not capable of consistently differentiating between an OPC feature and a true random defect. Due to the process complexity and high cost associated with the making of OPC/PSM reticles, it is important for both mask shops and lithography engineers to understand the impact of different defect types and sizes to the printability. Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMS) has been used in the mask shops for a number of years for reticle applications such as aerial image simulation and transmission measurement of repaired defects. The Virtual Stepper System (VSS) provides an alternative method to do defect printability simulation and analysis using reticle images captured by an optical inspection or review system. In this paper, pre- programmed defects and repairs from a Defect Sensitivity Monitor (DSM) reticle with 200 nm minimum features (at 1x) will be studied for printability. The simulated resist lines by AIMS and VSS are both compared to SEM images of resist wafers qualitatively and quantitatively using CD verification.Process window comparison between unrepaired and repaired defects for both good and bad repair cases will be shown. The effect of mask repairs to resist pattern images for the binary mask case will be discussed. AIMS simulation was done at the International Sematech, Virtual stepper simulation at Zygo and resist wafers were processed at AMD-Submicron Development Center using a DUV lithographic process for 0.18 micrometer Logic process technology.

  7. Best-practice evaluation-methods for wafer-fab photomask-requalification inspection tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chan Seob; Mungmode, Ashish; Taylor, Ron; Cho, David; Koh, Hui Peng

    2014-10-01

    Requalifying semiconductor photomasks remains critically important and is increasingly challenging for 20nm and 14nm node logic reticles. Patterns are becoming more complex on the photomask, and defect sensitivity requirements are more stringent than ever before. Reticle inspection tools are equally important for effective process development and the successful ramp and sustained yield for high volume manufacturing. The inspection stages considered were: incoming inspection to match with Mask Shop Outgoing result and to detect defects generated during transport; requalification by routine cycle inspection to detect Haze and any other defects; and inspection by in-house or Mask shop at the post cleaning. There are many critical capability and capacity factors for the decision for best inspection tool and strategy for high volume manufacturing, especially objective Lens NA, wavelength, power, pixel size, throughput, full-automation inspection linked with Overhead Transport, algorithm application, engineering application function, and inspection of PSM and OMOG . These tools are expensive but deliver differentiated value in terms of performance and throughput as well as extendibility. Performing a thorough evaluation and making a technically sound choice which explores these many factors is critical for success of a fab. This paper examines the methodology for evaluating two different photomask inspection tools. The focus is on ensuring production worthiness on real and advanced product photomasks requiring accurate evaluation of sensitivity, throughput, data analysis function and engineering work function on those product photomasks. Photomasks used for data collection are production reticles, PDM(Program defect Mask), SiN spray defect Reticle which is described that evaluates how the tools would perform on a contaminated plate.

  8. Masks and Other Disguises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploghoft, Debra

    Instructions for making simple masks are provided in this guide for teachers of elementary children. Directions with illustrations are given for constructing masks from paper plates, construction paper, plastic milk jugs, and papier-mache. Ideas include a clown mask, a flower mask, a top hat, a paper crown, and "Groucho" glasses. Types…

  9. A novel approach: high resolution inspection with wafer plane defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Wihl, Mark; Shi, Rui-fang; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    High Resolution reticle inspection is well-established as a proven, effective, and efficient means of detecting yield-limiting mask defects as well as defects which are not immediately yield-limiting yet can enable manufacturing process improvements. Historically, RAPID products have enabled detection of both classes of these defects. The newly-developed Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) detector technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. Wafer Plane Inspection accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. This has the effect of reducing sensitivity to non-printing defects while enabling higher sensitivity focused in high MEEF areas where small reticle defects still yield significant printing defects on wafers. WPI is a new inspection mode that has been developed by KLA-Tencor and is currently under test with multiple customers. It employs the same transmitted and reflected-light high-resolution images as the industry-standard high-resolution inspections, but with much more sophisticated processing involved. A rigorous mask pattern recovery algorithm is used to convert the transmitted and reflected light images into a modeled representation of the reticle. Lithographic modeling of the scanner is then used to generate an aerial image of the mask. This is followed by resist modeling to determine the exposure of the photoresist. The defect detectors are then applied on this photoresist plane so that only printing defects are detected. Note that no hardware modifications to the inspection system are required to enable this detector. The same tool will be able to perform both our standard High Resolution inspections and the Wafer Plane Inspection detector. This approach has several important features. The ability to ignore non

  10. EUVL masks: paving the path for commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Hector, Scott D.

    2001-09-01

    Optical projection lithography has been the principal vehicle of semiconductor manufacturing for more than 20 years and is marching aggressively to satisfy the needs of semiconductor manufacturers for 100nm devices. However, the complexity of optical lithography continues to increase as wavelength reduction continues to 157nm. Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL), with wavelength from 13-14 nm, is evolving as a leading next generation lithography option for semiconductor industry to stay on the path laid by Moore's Law. Masks are a critical part of the success of any technology and are considered to be high risk both for optical lithography and NGL technologies for sub-100nm lithography. Two key areas of EUV mask fabrication are reflective multilayer deposition and absorber patterning. In the case of reflective multilayers, delivering defect free multilayers for mask blanks is the biggest challenge. Defect mitigation is being explored as a possible option to smooth the multilayer defects in addition to optimization of the deposition process to reduce defect density. The mask patterning process needs focus on the defect-free absorber stack patterning process, mask cleaning, inspection and repair. In addition, there is considerable effort to understand by simulations, the defect printability, thermal and mechanical distortions, and non-telecentric illumination, to mention a few. To protect the finished mask from defects added during use, a removable pellicle strategy combined with thermophoretic protection during exposure is being developed. Recent migration to square form factor using low thermal expansion material (LTEM) is advantageous as historical developments in optical masks can be applied to EUV mask patterning. This paper addresses recent developments in the EUV mask patterning and highlights critical manufacturing process controls needed to fabricate defect-free full field masks with CD and image placement specifications for sub-70nm node lithography. No

  11. Correction of deflection under mask's own weight by bending mask technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagami, Takashi; Kambayashi, Takashi; Azumi, Minako

    2016-10-01

    It is known that the photomask substrate deflects when the mask is set on the frame and the deflection is an obstacle to light exposure. In this study, we introduce "the bending mask" to cancel out the deflection. The surface of the bending mask has the height distribution in advance to cancel out the deflection, owing to Nikon's accurate polishing technology and Nikon's accurate measurement machine.

  12. Studies of a suitable mask error enhancement factor for 2D patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chih I.; Cheng, Yung Feng; Chen, Ming Jui

    2013-04-01

    In advanced 20nm and below technology nodes, the mask enhanced error factor (MEEF) plays an important rule due to the request of stable process control and quality of mask manufacture. It provides us an effective parameter to analyze the process window for lithography. In advanced nodes, MEEF criterion becomes more important than previous nodes because very tight process tolerance is requested, especially in OPC and mask capability control. Therefore, we have to do further studies on this topic. In the simple line/trench design layers (for example: Active and poly), the MEEF is easy to be defined because mask bias is isotropic. However, in the complicated two-dimensional (2D) design layers (for example: Contact and Mvia), they are hard to be defined a suitable definition of MEEF. In the first part, we used the global bias to calculate the MEEF on all patterns. It makes calculation easier to compare with other patterns which are different shapes. However, when we inspected the 2D line-end patterns on the wafer, we found the significant differences between the MEEF of wafer data and aerial simulation. In order to clarify this issue, we perform series simulation studies of the line-end MEEF. Then we knew that it came from the different bias strategies. Furthermore, the simulation studies show that the line-end MEEF of non-preferable orientation is very sensitive to mask X/Y ratio bias due to strong OAI optical behavior by the SMO source. As a result, a new point of view of 2D MEEF is suggested according to physical mask CD error measurement data. In this study, we would find a better description of the MEEF than traditional one for lithographic process development on 2D region.

  13. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... requirements approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 0583-0015)...

  14. Accelerating litho technology development for advanced design node flash memory FEOL by next-generation wafer inspection and SEM review platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung Ho; Ahn, Jeongho; Ihm, Dongchul; Chin, Soobok; Lee, Dong-Ryul; Choi, Seongchae; Lee, Junbum; Kang, Ho-Kyu; Sivaraman, Gangadharan; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lakhawat, Rahul; Sanapala, Ravikumar; Lee, Chang Ho; Lobo, Arun

    2012-03-01

    Development of an advanced design node for NAND flash memory devices in semiconductor manufacturing requires accelerated identification and characterization of yield-limiting defect types at critical front-end of line (FEOL) process steps. This enables a shorter development cycle time and a faster production ramp to meet market demand. This paper presents a methodology for detecting defects that have a substantial yield impact on a FEOL after-develop inspection (ADI) layer using an advanced broadband optical wafer defect inspector and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) review tool. In addition, this paper presents experimental data that demonstrates defect migration from an ADI layer to an after-clean inspection (ACI) layer, and provides clear differentiation between yield-impacting critical defects and noncritical defects on the layers. The goal of these studies is to determine the feasibility of implementing an inspection point at ADI. The advantage of capturing yield-limiting defects on an ADI layer is that wafers can be reworked when an excursion occurs, an option that is not always possible for ACI layers. Our investigation is divided into two parts: (1) Inspection of an ADI layer with high sensitivity to find an accurate representation of the defect population and to gain understanding on the propagation of defects from the ADI layer to the ACI layer; and, (2) Inspection of an ACI layer to develop an understanding of unique defects generated by the ACI process step. Overall, this paper discusses the advantages of baselining defectivity at ADI process levels for accelerated development of advanced design node memory devices.

  15. Lithographic plane review (LPR) for sub-32nm mask defect disposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolani, Vikram; Peng, Danping; He, Lin; Hwa, George; Chang, Hsien-Min; Dai, Grace; Corcoran, Noel; Dam, Thuc; Pang, Linyong; Tuo, Laurent C.; Chen, C. J.; Lai, Rick

    2010-09-01

    As optical lithography continues to extend into low-k1 regime, resolution of mask patterns under mask inspection optical conditions continues to diminish. Furthermore, as mask complexity and MEEF has also increased, it requires detecting even smaller defects in the already narrower pitch mask patterns. This leaves the mask inspection engineer with the option to either purchase a higher resolution mask inspection tool or increase the detector sensitivity on the existing inspection system or maybe even both. In order to meet defect sensitivity requirements in critical features of sub-32nm node designs, increasing sensitivity typically results in increased nuisance (i.e., small sub-specification) defect detection by 5-20X defects making post-inspection defect review non-manufacturable. As a solution for automatically dispositioning the increased number of nuisance and real defects detected at higher inspection sensitivity, Luminescent has successfully extended Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and its patented level-set methods to reconstruct the defective mask from its inspection image, and then perform simulated AIMS dispositioning on the reconstructed mask. In this technique, named Lithographic Plane Review (LPR), inspection transmitted and reflected light images of the test (i.e. defect) and reference (i.e., corresponding defect-free) regions are provided to the "inversion" engine which then computes the corresponding test and reference mask patterns. An essential input to this engine is a well calibrated model incorporating inspection tool optics, mask processing and 3D effects, and also the subsequent AIMS tool optics to be able to then simulate the aerial image impact of the defects. This flow is equivalent to doing an actual AIMS tool measurement of every defect detected during mask inspection, while at the same time maintaining inspection at high enough resolution. What makes this product usable in mask volume production is the high degree of accuracy of

  16. Masks in Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, David

    2016-01-01

    In Drama Education mask work is undertaken and presented as both a methodology and knowledge base. There are numerous workshops and journal articles available for teachers that offer knowledge or implementation of mask work. However, empirical examination of the context or potential implementation of masks as a pedagogical tool remains…

  17. Keeping African Masks Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  18. 2013 mask industry survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive survey was sent to merchant and captive mask shops to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. 2013 marks the 12th consecutive year for this process. Historical topics including general mask profile, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, maintenance, and returns were included and new topics were added. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. While each year's survey includes minor updates based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics, the bulk of the survey and reporting structure have remained relatively constant. A series of improvements is being phased in beginning in 2013 to add value to a wider audience, while at the same time retaining the historical content required for trend analyses of the traditional metrics. Additions in 2013 include topics such as top challenges, future concerns, and additional details in key aspects of mask masking, such as the number of masks per mask set per ground rule, minimum mask resolution shipped, and yield by ground rule. These expansions beyond the historical topics are aimed at identifying common issues, gaps, and needs. They will also provide a better understanding of real-life mask requirements and capabilities for comparison to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

  19. Immersion and dry lithography monitoring for flash memories (after develop inspection and photo cell monitor) using a darkfield imaging inspector with advanced binning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, P.; Mani, A.; Perry-Sullivan, C.; Kopp, J.; Simpson, G.; Renis, M.; Padovani, M.; Severgnini, C.; Piacentini, P.; Piazza, P.; Beccalli, A.

    2009-12-01

    After-develop inspection (ADI) and photo-cell monitoring (PM) are part of a comprehensive lithography process monitoring strategy. Capturing defects of interest (DOI) in the lithography cell rather than at later process steps shortens the cycle time and allows for wafer re-work, reducing overall cost and improving yield. Low contrast DOI and multiple noise sources make litho inspection challenging. Broadband brightfield inspectors provide the highest sensitivity to litho DOI and are traditionally used for ADI and PM. However, a darkfield imaging inspector has shown sufficient sensitivity to litho DOI, providing a high-throughput option for litho defect monitoring. On the darkfield imaging inspector, a very high sensitivity inspection is used in conjunction with advanced defect binning to detect pattern issues and other DOI and minimize nuisance defects. For ADI, this darkfield inspection methodology enables the separation and tracking of 'color variation' defects that correlate directly to CD variations allowing a high-sampling monitor for focus excursions, thereby reducing scanner re-qualification time. For PM, the darkfield imaging inspector provides sensitivity to critical immersion litho defects at a lower cost-of-ownership. This paper describes litho monitoring methodologies developed and implemented for flash devices for 65nm production and 45nm development using the darkfield imaging inspector.

  20. Strategy optimization for mask rule check in wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuen Huei; Lin, Shaina; Lin, Roger; Wang, Alice; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin

    2015-07-01

    Photolithography process is getting more and more sophisticated for wafer production following Moore's law. Therefore, for wafer fab, consolidated and close cooperation with mask house is a key to achieve silicon wafer success. However, generally speaking, it is not easy to preserve such partnership because many engineering efforts and frequent communication are indispensable. The inattentive connection is obvious in mask rule check (MRC). Mask houses will do their own MRC at job deck stage, but the checking is only for identification of mask process limitation including writing, etching, inspection, metrology, etc. No further checking in terms of wafer process concerned mask data errors will be implemented after data files of whole mask are composed in mask house. There are still many potential data errors even post-OPC verification has been done for main circuits. What mentioned here are the kinds of errors which will only occur as main circuits combined with frame and dummy patterns to form whole reticle. Therefore, strategy optimization is on-going in UMC to evaluate MRC especially for wafer fab concerned errors. The prerequisite is that no impact on mask delivery cycle time even adding this extra checking. A full-mask checking based on job deck in gds or oasis format is necessary in order to secure acceptable run time. Form of the summarized error report generated by this checking is also crucial because user friendly interface will shorten engineers' judgment time to release mask for writing. This paper will survey the key factors of MRC in wafer fab.

  1. Removable pellicle for lithographic mask protection and handling

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Hector, Scott D.; Nguyen, Khanh B.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    A removable pellicle for a lithographic mask that provides active and robust particle protection, and which utilizes a traditional pellicle and two deployments of thermophoretic protection to keep particles off the mask. The removable pellicle is removably attached via a retaining structure to the mask substrate by magnetic attraction with either contacting or non-contacting magnetic capture mechanisms. The pellicle retaining structural is composed of an anchor piece secured to the mask substrate and a frame member containing a pellicle. The anchor piece and the frame member are in removable contact or non-contact by the magnetic capture or latching mechanism. In one embodiment, the frame member is retained in a floating (non-contact) relation to the anchor piece by magnetic levitation. The frame member and the anchor piece are provided with thermophoretic fins which are interdigitated to prevent particles from reaching the patterned area of the mask. Also, the anchor piece and mask are maintained at a higher temperature than the frame member and pellicle which also prevents particles from reaching the patterned mask area by thermophoresis. The pellicle can be positioned over the mask to provide particle protection during mask handling, inspection, and pumpdown, but which can be removed manually or robotically for lithographic use of the mask.

  2. Optical testing and metrology III: Recent advances in industrial optical inspection; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 8-13, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on recent advances in industrial optical inspection are presented. Individual topics addressed include: high-precision interferometric testing of spherical mirrors with long radius of curvature, aspheric surface testing techniques, apsheric testing using null mirrors, TV holography and image processing in practical use, holographic instrumentation for monitoring crystal growth in space, holography with a single picosecond pulse, phase-conjugate interferometry using dye-doped polymer films, phase-conjugate Twyman-Green interferometer for testing conicoidal surfaces. Also discussed are: new stereo laser triangulation device for specular surface inspection, fiber optical smart structures, near real-time operation of a centimeter-scale distributed fiber sensing sytem, interferometric fiber optic sensors for use with composite materials, fiber optic damage detection for an aircraft leading edge, low-cost fiber optic sensing systems using spatial division multiplexing, laser ultrasonics generation and detection considerations for improved SNR.

  3. Defect inspection and printability study for 14 nm node and beyond photomask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazunori; Yonetani, Masashi; Badger, Karen; Dechene, Dan J.; Akima, Shinji

    2016-10-01

    Two different mask inspection techniques are developed and compared for 14 nm node and beyond photomasks, High resolution and Litho-based inspection. High resolution inspection is the general inspection method in which a 19x nm wavelength laser is used with the High NA inspection optics. Litho-based inspection is a new inspection technology. This inspection uses the wafer lithography information, and as such, this method has automatic defect classification capability which is based on wafer printability. Both High resolution and Litho-based inspection methods are compared using 14 nm and 7 nm node programmed defect and production design masks. The defect sensitivity and mask inspectability is compared, in addition to comparing the defect classification and throughput. Additionally, the Cost / Infrastructure comparison is analyzed and the impact of each inspection method is discussed.

  4. Mask industry assessment: 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2003-12-01

    Microelectronics industry leaders routinely name mask technology and mask supply issues of cost and cycle time as top issues of concern. A survey was initiated in 2002 with support from International SEMATECH (ISMT) and administered by SEMI North America to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition.1 This paper presents the results of the second annual survey which is an enhanced version of the inaugural survey building upon its strengths and improving the weak points. The original survey was designed with the input of member company mask technologists, merchant mask suppliers, and industry equipment makers. The assessment is intended to be used as a baseline for the mask industry and the microelectronics industry to gain a perspective on the technical and business status of the critical mask industry. An objective is to create a valuable reference to identify strengths and opportunities and to guide investments on critical-path issues. As subsequent years are added, historical profiles can also be created. This assessment includes inputs from ten major global merchant and captive mask manufacturers representing approximately 80% of the global mask market (using revenue as the measure) and making this the most comprehensive mask industry survey ever. The participating companies are: Compugraphics, Dai Nippon Printing, Dupont Photomask, Hoya, IBM, Infineon, Intel, Taiwan Mask Company, Toppan, and TSMC. Questions are grouped into five categories: General Business Profile Information; Data Processing; Yields and Yield loss Mechanisms; Delivery Time; and Returns and Services. Within each category are a multitude of questions that create a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry.

  5. Scatterometry on pelliclized masks: an option for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Emily; Benson, Craig; Higuchi, Masaru; Okumoto, Yasuhiro; Kwon, Michael; Yedur, Sanjay; Li, Shifang; Lee, Sangbong; Tabet, Milad

    2007-03-01

    Optical scatterometry-based metrology is now widely used in wafer fabs for lithography, etch, and CMP applications. This acceptance of a new metrology method occurred despite the abundance of wellestablished CD-SEM and AFM methods. It was driven by the desire to make measurements faster and with a lower cost of ownership. Over the last year, scatterometry has also been introduced in advanced mask shops for mask measurements. Binary and phase shift masks have been successfully measured at all desired points during photomask production before the pellicle is mounted. There is a significant benefit to measuring masks with the pellicle in place. From the wafer fab's perspective, through-pellicle metrology would verify mask effects on the same features that are characterized on wafer. On-site mask verification would enable quality control and trouble-shooting without returning the mask to a mask house. Another potential application is monitoring changes to mask films once the mask has been delivered to the fab (haze, oxide growth, etc.). Similar opportunities apply to the mask metrologist receiving line returns from a wafer fab. The ability to make line-return measurements without risking defect introduction is clearly attractive. This paper will evaluate the feasibility of collecting scatterometry data on pelliclized masks. We explore the effects of several different pellicle types on scatterometry measurements made with broadband light in the range of 320-780 nm. The complexity introduced by the pellicles' optical behavior will be studied.

  6. Object Substitution Masking: When Does Mask Preview Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Stephen Wee Hun; Chua, Fook K.

    2008-01-01

    When a target is enclosed by a 4-dot mask that persists after the target disappears, target identification is worse than it is when the mask terminates with the target. This masking effect is attributed to object substitution masking (OSM). Previewing the mask, however, attenuates OSM. This study investigated specific conditions under which mask…

  7. Results from prototype die-to-database reticle inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Bo; Dayal, Aditya; Broadbent, Bill; Lim, Phillip; Goonesekera, Arosha; Chen, Chunlin; Yeung, Kevin; Pinto, Becky

    2009-03-01

    A prototype die-to-database high-resolution reticle defect inspection system has been developed for 32nm and below logic reticles, and 4X Half Pitch (HP) production and 3X HP development memory reticles. These nodes will use predominantly 193nm immersion lithography (with some layers double patterned), although EUV may also be used. Many different reticle types may be used for these generations including: binary (COG, EAPSM), simple tritone, complex tritone, high transmission, dark field alternating (APSM), mask enhancer, CPL, and EUV. Finally, aggressive model based OPC is typically used, which includes many small structures such as jogs, serifs, and SRAF (sub-resolution assist features), accompanied by very small gaps between adjacent structures. The architecture and performance of the prototype inspection system is described. This system is designed to inspect the aforementioned reticle types in die-todatabase mode. Die-to-database inspection results are shown on standard programmed defect test reticles, as well as advanced 32nm logic, and 4X HP and 3X HP memory reticles from industry sources. Direct comparisons with currentgeneration inspection systems show measurable sensitivity improvement and a reduction in false detections.

  8. Achievements and challenges of EUV mask imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, Natalia; van Setten, Eelco; de Kruif, Robert; Connolly, Brid; Fukugami, Norihito; Kodera, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hiroaki; Sakata, Yo; Kotani, Jun; Kondo, Shinpei; Imoto, Tomohiro; Rolff, Haiko; Ullrich, Albrecht; Lammers, Ad; Schiffelers, Guido; van Dijk, Joep

    2014-07-01

    The impact of various mask parameters on CDU combined in a total mask budget is presented, for 22 nm lines, for reticles used for NXE:3300 qualification. Apart from the standard mask CD measurements, actinic spectrometry of multilayer is used to qualify reflectance uniformity over the image field; advanced 3D metrology is applied for absorber profile characterization including absorber height and side wall angle. The predicted mask impact on CDU is verified using actual exposure data collected on multiple NXE:3300 scanners. Mask 3D effects are addressed, manifesting themselves in best focus shifts for different structures exposed with off-axis illumination. Experimental NXE:3300 results for 16 nm dense lines and 20 nm (semi-)isolated spaces are shown: best focus range reaches 24 nm. A mitigation strategy by absorber height optimization is proposed based on experimental results of a special mask with varying absorber heights. Further development of a black image border for EUV mask is considered. The image border is a pattern free area surrounding image field preventing exposure the image field neighborhood on wafer. Normal EUV absorber is not suitable for this purpose as it has 1-3% EUV reflectance. A current solution is etching of ML down to substrate reducing EUV reflectance to <0.05%. A next step in the development of the black border is the reduction of DUV Out-of-Band reflectance (<1.5%) in order to cope with DUV light present in EUV scanners. Promising results achieved in this direction are shown.

  9. Enhancement in Informational Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Xiang; Richards, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to detect a tone added to a random masker improves when a preview of the masker is provided. In 2 experiments, the authors explored the role that perceptual organization plays in this release from masking. Method: Detection thresholds were measured in informational masking studies. The maskers were drawn at random prior to…

  10. Lightweight Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, W. E. I.; Baucom, R. M.; Evans, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight face mask originally developed to protect epileptic patients during seizures could have many other medical and nonmedical applications such as muscular distrophy patients, football linesmen and riot-control police. Masks are extremely lightweight, the lightest of the configurations weighing only 136 grams.

  11. Mask manufacturing rules checking (MRC) as a DFM strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Peter; Gladhill, Richard; Straub, Joseph

    2007-03-01

    Mask Manufacturing Rules Checking (MRC) has been established as an automated process to detect mask pattern data that will cause mask inspection problems. This methodology is unique from the Design Rule Checking (DRC) or Design for Manufacturing (DFM) checks typically performed before sending pattern data to the mask manufacturer in that it examines the entire mask layout and the spatial relationship between multiple patterns in their final orientation, scale, and tone. In contrast, DRC and DFM checks are usually performed on individual pattern files. Also, DRC and DFM checks are not always performed after all pattern transformations are complete, and errors can be introduced that are not caught until the mask is eventually printed on wafers. Therefore, MRC can often be the only comprehensive geometric integrity test performed before the mask is manufactured and the last opportunity to catch critical errors that might have disastrous consequences to yield and consequently to product schedules. In this paper we review the concepts and implementation of MRC in a merchant mask manufacturing enterprise and introduce methods to empower DFM decisions by mask customers based on MRC results.

  12. Study of critical dimension uniformity (CDU) using a mask inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mei-Chun; Yu, Ching-Fang; Lai, Mei-Tsu; Hsu, Luke T. H.; Chin, Angus; Yen, Anthony

    2012-11-01

    This paper studies the repeatability and the reliability of CDUs from a mask inspector and their correlation with CD SEM measurements on various pattern attributes such as feature sizes, tones, and orientations. Full-mask image analysis with a mask inspector is one of potential solutions for overcoming the sampling rate limitation of a mask CD SEM. By comparing the design database with the inspected dimension, the complete CDU behavior of specific patterns can be obtained without extra work and tool time. These measurements can be mapped and averaged over various spatial lengths to determine changes in relative CDU across the mask. Eventually, success of this methodology relies on the optical system of the inspector being highly stable.

  13. Extreme ultraviolet mask substrate surface roughness effects on lithography patterning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric; Goldberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Erik

    2010-06-21

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography exposure systems, mask substrate roughness induced scatter contributes to LER at the image plane. In this paper, the impact of mask substrate roughness on image plane speckle is explicitly evaluated. A programmed roughness mask was used to study the correlation between mask roughness metrics and wafer plane aerial image inspection. We find that the roughness measurements by top surface topography profile do not provide complete information on the scatter related speckle that leads to LER at the image plane. We suggest at wavelength characterization by imaging and/or scatter measurements into different frequencies as an alternative for a more comprehensive metrology of the mask substrate/multilayer roughness effects.

  14. Green binary and phase shifting mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shy, S. L.; Hong, Chao-Sin; Wu, Cheng-San; Chen, S. J.; Wu, Hung-Yu; Ting, Yung-Chiang

    2009-12-01

    SixNy/Ni thin film green mask blanks were developed , and are now going to be used to replace general chromium film used for binary mask as well as to replace molydium silicide embedded material for AttPSM for I-line (365 nm), KrF (248 nm), ArF (193 nm) and Contact/Proximity lithography. A bilayer structure of a 1 nm thick opaque, conductive nickel layer and a SixNy layer is proposed for binary and phase-shifting mask. With the good controlling of plasma CVD of SixNy under silane (50 sccm), ammonia (5 sccm) and nitrogen (100 sccm), the pressure is 250 mTorr. and RF frequency 13.56 MHz and power 50 W. SixNy has enough deposition latitude to meet the requirements as an embedded layer for required phase shift 180 degree, and the T% in 193, 248 and 365 nm can be adjusted between 2% to 20% for binary and phase shifting mask usage. Ni can be deposited by E-gun, its sheet resistance Rs is less than 1.435 kΩ/square. Jeol e-beam system and I-line stepper are used to evaluate these thin film green mask blanks, feature size less than 200 nm half pitch pattern and 0.558 μm pitch contact hole can be printed. Transmission spectrums of various thickness of SixNy film are inspected by using UV spectrometer and FTIR. Optical constants of the SixNy film are measured by n & k meter and surface roughness is inspected by using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

  15. Advanced X-Ray Inspection of Reinforced Carbon Composite Materials on the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Jose M.; Berry, Robert F.; Osborn, Robin; Bueno, Clifford; Osterlitz, Mark; Mills, Richard; Morris, Philip; Phalen, Robert; McNab, Jim; Thibodeaux, Tahanie; Thompson, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    The post return-to-flight (RTF) inspection methodology for the Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) is currently being defined. Numerous NDT modalities and techniques are being explored to perform the flight-to-flight inspections of the reinforced carbon/carbon (RCC) composite material for impact damage, general loss of mass in the bulk layers, or other anomalous conditions that would pose risk to safe return upon re-entry. It is possible to have an impact upon ascent that is not visually observable on the surface, yet causes internal damage. Radiographic testing may be a useful NDT technique for such occurrences. The authors have performed radiographic tests on full-sized mock samples of LESS hardware with embedded image quality phantoms. Digitized radiographic film, computed radiography and flat panel digital real-time radiography was acquired using a GE Eresco 200 x-ray tube, and Se-75 and Yb-169 radioisotopes.

  16. 2012 Mask Industry Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Litt, Lloyd C.

    2012-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to semiconductor industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. 2012 marks the 11th consecutive year for the mask industry survey. This year's survey and reporting structure are similar to those of the previous years with minor modifications based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics. Categories include general mask information, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, and maintenance and returns. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. Results, initial observations, and key comparisons between the 2011 and 2012 survey responses are shown here, including multiple indications of a shift towards the manufacturing of higher end photomasks.

  17. Mask design rules (45 nm): time for standardization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Mark; Progler, Christopher J.; Martin, Patrick; Ham, Young-Mog; Dillon, Brian; Pack, Robert; Heins, Mitch; Gookassian, John; Garcia, John; Boksha, Victor

    2005-11-01

    Time-to-mask (ttm) has been growing exponentially in the subwavelength era with the increased application of advanced RET's (Resolution Enhancement Technology). Not only are a greater number of design/mask layers impacted but more-and-more layers also have more severe restrictions on critical dimension uniformity (CDU) despite operating at a very low k1 factors necessitating rigorous but practical tolerancing. Furthermore, designs are also more complex, may be built up from blocks spanning different design styles, and occupy increasingly-large Rayleigh field areas. Given these factors and scales, it's no wonder that the cycle time for verification of a design following RET, is growing however it is doing so exponentially and that this is a critical factor impeding ttm. Until an unambiguously interprable and standard Mask Design Rule (MaskDR) set is created, neither the designer nor the mask supplier can reliably verify manufacturability of the mask for the simple reason that ambiguity and inter-rule conflict are at the source of the problem and that the problem increasingly requires cooperation spanning a large ecosystem of tool, IP, and mask suppliers all needing to essentially speak the same language. Since the 130 nm node, Texas Instruments has enforced a strict set of mask rule checks (MRCs) in their mask data preparation (MDP) flow based on MaskDRs negotiated with their mask suppliers. The purpose of this effort has been to provide an a-priori guarantee that the data shipped to the mask shop can be used to manufacture a mask reliably and with high yield both from a mask standpoint and from the silicon standpoint. As has been reported earlier, mask manufacturing rules are usually determined from assumed or experimentally acquired/validated mask-manufacturing limits. These rules are then applied during RET/MDP data treatment to guide and/or limit pattern correction strategies. With increasing RET and low-k1 lithography challenges, the importance of MRCs

  18. Partial airway obstruction following manufacturing defect in laryngeal mask airway (Laryngeal Mask Silken™).

    PubMed

    Jangra, Kiran; Malhotra, Surender Kumar; Saini, Vikas

    2014-10-01

    Laryngeal mask (LM) airway is commonly used for securing airway in day-care surgeries. Various problems have been described while using LM airway. Out of those, mechanical obstruction causing airway compromise is most common. Here, we describe a case report of 4-year-old child who had partial upper airway obstruction due to LM manufacturer's defect. There was a silicon band in upper one-third of shaft of LM airway. This band was made up of the same material as that of LM airway so it was not identifiable on external inspection of transparent shaft. We suggest that such as non-transparent laryngeal mask, a transparent LM airway should also be inspected looking inside the lumen with naked eyes or by using a probe to rule out any manufacturing defect before its insertion.

  19. Development of a new high transmission phase shift mask technology for 10 nm logic node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Thomas; Sakamoto, Yoshifumi; Toda, Yusuke; Badger, Karen; Seki, Kazunori; Lawliss, Mark; Isogawa, Takeshi; Zweber, Amy; Kagawa, Masayuki; Wistrom, Richard; Xu, Yongan; Lobb, Granger; Viswanathan, Ramya; Hu, Lin; Inazuki, Yukio; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we will describe the development of a new 12% high transmission phase shift mask technology for use with the 10 nm logic node. The primary motivation for this work was to improve the lithographic process window for 10 nm node via hole patterning by reducing the MEEF and improving the depth of focus (DOF). First, the simulated MEEF and DOF data will be compared between the 6% and high T PSM masks with the transmission of high T mask blank varying from 12% to 20%. This resulted in selection of a 12% transmission phase shift mask. As part of this work a new 12% attenuated phase shift mask blank was developed. A detailed description and results of the key performance metrics of the new mask blank including radiation durability, dry etch properties, film thickness, defect repair, and defect inspection will be shared. In addition, typical mask critical dimension uniformity and mask minimum feature size performance for 10 nm logic node via level mask patterns will be shown. Furthermore, the results of work to optimize the chrome hard mask film properties to meet the final mask minimum feature size requirements will be shared. Lastly, the key results of detailed lithographic performance comparisons of the process of record 6% and new 12% phase shift masks on wafer will be described. The 12% High T blank shows significantly better MEEF and larger DOF than those of 6% PSM mask blank, which is consistent with our simulation data.

  20. New mask technology challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.

    2001-09-01

    Mask technology development has accelerated dramatically in recent years from the glacial pace of the last three decades to the rapid and sometimes simultaneous introductions of new wavelengths and mask-based resolution enhancement techniques. The nature of the semiconductor business has also become one driven by time-to-market as an overwhelming factor in capturing market share and profit. These are among the factors that have created enormous stress on the mask industry to produce masks with enhanced capabilities, such as phase-shifting attenuators, sub-resolution assist bars, and optical proximity correction (OPC) features, while maintaining or reducing cost and cycle time. The mask can no longer be considered a commodity item that is purchased form the lowest-cost supplier. Instead, it must now be promoted as an integral part of the technical and business case for a total lithographic solution. Improving partnership between designer, mask-maker, and wafer lithographer will be the harbinger of success in finding a profitable balance of capability, cost, and cycle time. Likewise for equipment infrastructure development, stronger partnership on the international level is necessary to control development cost and mitigate schedule and technical risks.

  1. Mask Industry Assessment: 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. David

    2011-11-01

    A survey supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the tenth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report has been used as one of the baselines to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It continues to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was essentially the same as the 2005 through 2010 surveys. Questions are grouped into following categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  2. Mask Industry Assessment: 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Chan, David Y.

    2010-09-01

    A survey created supported by SEMATECH and administered by David Powell Consulting was sent to microelectronics industry leaders to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. The survey was designed with the input of semiconductor company mask technologists and merchant mask suppliers. This year's assessment is the ninth in the current series of annual reports. With ongoing industry support, the report can be used as a baseline to gain perspective on the technical and business status of the mask and microelectronics industries. It will continue to serve as a valuable reference to identify the strengths and opportunities of the mask industry. The results will be used to guide future investments pertaining to critical path issues. This year's survey was basically the same as the 2005 through 2009 surveys. Questions are grouped into categories: General Business Profile Information, Data Processing, Yields and Yield Loss Mechanisms, Delivery Times, Returns, and Services. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the critical mask industry. This profile combined with the responses to past surveys represents a comprehensive view of changes in the industry.

  3. Masks: The Artist in Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Whether masks are made from cardboard, papier-mache, metal, wood, leather, fabric, clay or any combination of these materials, they bring out the artist in people. Young children like to wear masks when they play to pretend they were another person or animal. Masks let them fantasize and be creative. The author's students made masks representing…

  4. Robust source and mask optimization compensating for mask topography effects in computational lithography.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Lam, Edmund Y

    2014-04-21

    Mask topography effects need to be taken into consideration for a more accurate solution of source mask optimization (SMO) in advanced optical lithography. However, rigorous 3D mask models generally involve intensive computation and conventional SMO fails to manipulate the mask-induced undesired phase errors that degrade the usable depth of focus (uDOF) and process yield. In this work, an optimization approach incorporating pupil wavefront aberrations into SMO procedure is developed as an alternative to maximize the uDOF. We first design the pupil wavefront function by adding primary and secondary spherical aberrations through the coefficients of the Zernike polynomials, and then apply the conjugate gradient method to achieve an optimal source-mask pair under the condition of aberrated pupil. We also use a statistical model to determine the Zernike coefficients for the phase control and adjustment. Rigorous simulations of thick masks show that this approach provides compensation for mask topography effects by improving the pattern fidelity and increasing uDOF.

  5. The difficult business model for mask equipment makers and mask infrastructure development support from consortia and governments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Scott

    2005-11-01

    The extension of optical projection lithography through immersion to patterning features with half pitch <=65 nm is placing greater demands on the mask. Strong resolution enhancement techniques (RETs), such as embedded and alternating phase shift masks and complex model-based optical proximity correction, are required to compensate for diffraction and limited depth of focus (DOF). To fabricate these masks, many new or upgraded tools are required to write patterns, measure feature sizes and placement, inspect for defects, review defect printability and repair defects on these masks. Beyond the significant technical challenges, suppliers of mask fabrication equipment face the challenge of being profitable in the small market for mask equipment while encountering significant R&D expenses to bring new generations of mask fabrication equipment to market. The total available market for patterned masks is estimated to be $2.5B to $2.9B per year. The patterned mask market is about 20% of the market size for lithography equipment and materials. The total available market for mask-making equipment is estimated to be about $800M per year. The largest R&D affordability issue arises for the makers of equipment for fabricating masks where total available sales are typically less than ten units per year. SEMATECH has used discounted cash flow models to predict the affordable R&D while maintaining industry accepted internal rates of return. The results have been compared to estimates of the total R&D cost to bring a new generation of mask equipment to market for various types of tools. The analysis revealed that affordability of the required R&D is a significant problem for many suppliers of mask-making equipment. Consortia such as SEMATECH and Selete have played an important role in cost sharing selected mask equipment and material development projects. Governments in the United States, in Europe and in Japan have also helped equipment suppliers with support for R&D. This paper

  6. [The visual perception of the elements of technical drawings among masking distractions in advanced and nonadvanced students in the building and architectural professions].

    PubMed

    Balichev, Iu

    1997-01-01

    To investigation were submitted the particularities of the process of visual perception of technical drawings and schemes in advanced and backward pupils, who were mastering the specialties of "building and architecture", "hydroconstruction", "transport construction", "geodesy". The time was registered, which was necessary to advanced and backward pupils for unveiling the different elements in the drawing, scheme, and such attributes of the drawing as: orientation, length, curves of the lined, the boundary between them; time for identification of the specific designations, symbols, group of symbols, elements of the sketch from the simple to the complex ones. The results of the investigations revealed that in the advanced pupils the perception (unveiling) of the different elements of the technical drawing proceeded very rapidly, almost automatically. In the backward pupils this process elapsed reliably more slowly. It was demonstrated that the growing up pupils, who were distinguished with more rapid perception of the different elements of the drawing (advanced ones) more rapidly and more exactly dealt with solution of the technical tasks as compared with these, who more slowly unveiled the looked for elements (backwardness). Some other individual particularities were also established with respect to the visual perception of the elements of the technical drawing and its properties in advanced and backward pupils who were mastering the investigated professions.

  7. Development of Inspection Robots for Bridge Cables

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Jae

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the bridge cable inspection robot developed in Korea. Two types of the cable inspection robots were developed for cable-suspension bridges and cable-stayed bridge. The design of the robot system and performance of the NDT techniques associated with the cable inspection robot are discussed. A review on recent advances in emerging robot-based inspection technologies for bridge cables and current bridge cable inspection methods is also presented. PMID:24459453

  8. Field results from a new die-to-database reticle inspection platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, William; Yokoyama, Ichiro; Yu, Paul; Seki, Kazunori; Nomura, Ryohei; Schmalfuss, Heiko; Heumann, Jan; Sier, Jean-Paul

    2007-05-01

    A new die-to-database high-resolution reticle defect inspection platform, TeraScanHR, has been developed for advanced production use with the 45nm logic node, and extendable for development use with the 32nm node (also the comparable memory nodes). These nodes will use predominantly ArF immersion lithography although EUV may also be used. According to recent surveys, the predominant reticle types for the 45nm node are 6% simple tri-tone and COG. Other advanced reticle types may also be used for these nodes including: dark field alternating, Mask Enhancer, complex tri-tone, high transmission, CPL, etc. Finally, aggressive model based OPC will typically be used which will include many small structures such as jogs, serifs, and SRAF (sub-resolution assist features) with accompanying very small gaps between adjacent structures. The current generation of inspection systems is inadequate to meet these requirements. The architecture and performance of the new TeraScanHR reticle inspection platform is described. This new platform is designed to inspect the aforementioned reticle types in die-to-database and die-to-die modes using both transmitted and reflected illumination. Recent results from field testing at two of the three beta sites are shown (Toppan Printing in Japan and the Advanced Mask Technology Center in Germany). The results include applicable programmed defect test reticles and advanced 45nm product reticles (also comparable memory reticles). The results show high sensitivity and low false detections being achieved. The platform can also be configured for the current 65nm, 90nm, and 130nm nodes.

  9. MSB for ILT masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramss, Juergen; Weidenmueller, Ulf; Stoeckel, Arnd; Jaritz, Renate; Doering, Hans-Joachim; Boettcher, Monika

    2011-03-01

    Multi Shaped Beam (MSB) throughput simulation results have already been published in the past. An IC mask set of a 32nm node logic device was one of the applications that had been analyzed in more detail. In this paper we want to highlight results of shot count and write time evaluations done for Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) masks targeting the 22nm technology node. The test pattern data we used for these practice-oriented analyses was designed by DNP / Japan and created by Luminescent Technologies, Inc. / USA. To achieve reliable evaluation results, the influence of different MSB configurations on shot count and mask write time has been taken into account and will be discussed here. Exposure results of pattern details are presented and compared with the fracturing result. The MSB engineering tool we used for our investigations covers such major components like an electron-optical column, a precision x/y stage and the MSB data path.

  10. Advances in transient (pulsed) eddy current for inspection of multi-layer aluminum structures in the presence of ferrous fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, D. R.; Vallières, G.; Whalen, P. P.; Krause, T. W.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental investigation of the electromagnetic processes underlying transient (pulsed) eddy current inspection of aircraft wing structures in the vicinity of ferrous fasteners is performed. The separate effects of transient excitation of ferrous fastener and eddy currents induced in the surrounding aluminum structure are explored using a transmit-receive configuration with transient excitation of a steel rod, an aluminum plate with a bore hole and a steel rod through the bore hole. Observations are used to interpret results from a coupled driving and differential coil sensing unit applied to detect fatigue cracks emanating from bolt holes in aluminum structures with ferrous fasteners present. In particular, it is noted that abrupt magnetization of the fastener, by the probe's central driving unit, can transfer flux and consequently, induce strong eddy current responses deep within the aluminum structure in the vicinity of the bore hole. Rotation of the probe, centered over the fastener, permits detection of subsurface discontinuities, such as cracks, by the pair of differentially connected pickup coils.

  11. Near Real-Time Nondestructive Active Inspection Technologies Utilizing Delayed γ-Rays and Neutrons for Advanced Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Alan; Reedy, E. T.E.; Mozin, V.; Tobin, S. J.

    2015-02-12

    In this two year project, the research team investigated how delayed γ-rays from short-lived fission fragments detected in the short interval between irradiating pulses can be exploited for advanced safeguards technologies. This program contained experimental and modeling efforts. The experimental effort measured the emitted spectra, time histories and correlations of the delayed γ-rays from aqueous solutions and solid targets containing fissionable isotopes. The modeling effort first developed and benchmarked a hybrid Monte Carlo simulation technique based on these experiments. The benchmarked simulations were then extended to other safeguards scenarios, allowing comparisons to other advanced safeguards technologies and to investigate combined techniques. Ultimately, the experiments demonstrated the possible utility of actively induced delayed γ-ray spectroscopy for fissionable material assay.

  12. Masked mycotoxins: A review

    PubMed Central

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders. PMID:23047235

  13. COAs: Behind the Masks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birke, Szifra

    1993-01-01

    Provides information on alcoholism and codependency to help teachers identify and respond to children of alcoholics (COAs). Discusses characteristics of alcoholic homes and problems encountered by children and adult COAs. Examines survival "masks" of COAs, including hero, rebel, adjustor, clown, and caretaker. Lists organizational,…

  14. Apodized Phase Mask Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Among the optical instruments proposed to detect and characterize exoplanets, phase masks coronagraphs offer very small inner working angles. Designed for off-axis telescopes, their performance is greatly reduced when used with centrally obstructed apertures such as those of the Palomar telescope, the very large telescope, or the James Webb space telescope. However, a clear circular aperture is not the only pupil shape for which a phase mask coronagraph can work properly. In fact, for a given centrally obstructed aperture, we show that it is possible to compute optimal apodizers that help achieve stellar extinction levels similar to those obtained in the ideal case of an off-axis telescope. Trade-offs exist between these levels, the transmission of the apodizer, and the area covered by the Lyot stop. We detail the Fourier optics formalism that makes these optimizations possible, as well as a few examples of shaped pupils. Some are designed for a four-quadrants phase mask, and some others for a vortex phase mask. We also offer a comparison with a coronagraph solely composed of a shaped pupil.

  15. Masked mycotoxins: a review.

    PubMed

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders.

  16. Competing for Consciousness: Prolonged Mask Exposure Reduces Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    In object substitution masking (OSM) a sparse, temporally trailing 4-dot mask impairs target identification, even though it has different contours from, and does not spatially overlap with the target. Here, we demonstrate a previously unknown characteristic of OSM: Observers show reduced masking at prolonged (e.g., 640 ms) relative to intermediate…

  17. Intelligent inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Jeniece; Dale, Ken; Holloway, Mike; Gaby, Willard

    1997-01-01

    The intelligent inspection system is an advanced controller and analysis system for dimensional measuring machines dedicated to measuring surface of revolution mechanical parts. IIS was developed by the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Oak Ridge Y-12 plant because no commercial product was available to replace the obsolete computing systems on these important machines.

  18. Innovative Inspection Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Typical Headlamps ...................................... 23 Table 5 Typical Personal Flashlights ................................ 24 Table 6 Characteristics...increasingly large volume of constantly changing regulatory and reference materials are among the examples of administrative workload which inspectors referred...and reference materials would provide more benefits than the use of advanced NDT technology in inspections. As a general rule, inspectors felt that

  19. Information-Driven Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Laughter, Mark D; Whitaker, J Michael; Lockwood, Dunbar

    2010-01-01

    New uranium enrichment capacity is being built worldwide in response to perceived shortfalls in future supply. To meet increasing safeguards responsibilities with limited resources, the nonproliferation community is exploring next-generation concepts to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of safeguards, such as advanced technologies to enable unattended monitoring of nuclear material. These include attribute measurement technologies, data authentication tools, and transmission and security methods. However, there are several conceptual issues with how such data would be used to improve the ability of a safeguards inspectorate such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to reach better safeguards conclusions regarding the activities of a State. The IAEA is pursuing the implementation of information-driven safeguards, whereby all available sources of information are used to make the application of safeguards more effective and efficient. Data from continuous, unattended monitoring systems can be used to optimize on-site inspection scheduling and activities at declared facilities, resulting in fewer, better inspections. Such information-driven inspections are the logical evolution of inspection planning - making use of all available information to enhance scheduled and randomized inspections. Data collection and analysis approaches for unattended monitoring systems can be designed to protect sensitive information while enabling information-driven inspections. A number of such inspections within a predetermined range could reduce inspection frequency while providing an equal or greater level of deterrence against illicit activity, all while meeting operator and technology holder requirements and reducing inspector and operator burden. Three options for using unattended monitoring data to determine an information-driven inspection schedule are to (1) send all unattended monitoring data off-site, which will require advances in data analysis techniques to

  20. Actinic EUV-mask metrology: tools, concepts, components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebert, Rainer; Farahzadi, Azadeh; Diete, Wolfgang; Schäfer, David; Phiesel, Christoph; Wilhein, Thomas; Herbert, Stefan; Maryasov, Aleksey; Juschkin, Larissa; Esser, Dominik; Hoefer, Marco; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    There is a strong demand for standalone actinic tools for mask blank and mask metrology. We expect to deliver contributions to key issues for the infrastructure tools such as actinic reflectometer, actinic defect inspection and components like high brightness sources together with our partners. With our EUV-reflectometer EUV-MBR we are ready to fulfill HVM requirements in accurate and sensitive spectral metrology. Migrating from mask blanks to masks is supported with integrated fiducial mark detection and small spot sizes of down to < 0.03 mm2. Hence, the EUV-MBR is able to detect minimal variations on mask blank and can support process monitoring for our partners in European EXEPT project. For actinic blank inspection a proof of concept experiment based on an EUV microscope at BASC's EUV-Lamp allows for comparing actinic signatures with AFM scans. Results allow for extrapolation to sub 30 nm sensitivity and fast full blank scan. For LPP sources we demonstrated a new concept utilizing a laser, with parameters optimized for high brightness EUV generation and a new regenerative target concept for high position stability, gain, repetition rate operation and efficiency in the first proof of concept experiment. Up to 350 W/(mm2 sr) from < 20 μm source size have been demonstrated.

  1. Trade-off between inverse lithography mask complexity and lithographic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung-Gook; Suh, Sung Soo; Kim, Byung-Sung; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Cho, Han-Ku; Tolani, Vikram; Dai, Grace; Irby, Dave; Wang, Kechang; Xiao, Guangming; Kim, David; Baik, Ki-Ho; Gleason, Bob

    2009-04-01

    Improvements in resolution of exposure systems have not kept pace with increasing density of semiconductor products. In order to keep shrinking circuits using equipment with the same basic resolution, lithographers have turned to options such as double-patterning, and have moved beyond model-based OPC in the search for optimal mask patterns. Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) is becoming one of the strong candidates in 32nm & below single patterning, low-k1 lithography regime. It enables computation of optimum mask patterns to minimize deviations of images from their targets not only at nominal but also over a range of process variations, such as dose, defocus, and mask CD errors. When optimizing for a factor, such as process window, more complex mask patterns are often necessary to achieve the desired depth of focus. Complex mask patterns require more shots when written with VSB systems, increasing the component of mask cost associated with writing time. It can also be more difficult to inspect or repair certain types of complex patterns. Inspection and repair may take more time, or require more expensive equipment compared to the case with simpler masks. For these reasons, we desire to determine the simplest mask patterns that meet necessary lithographic manufacturing objectives. Luminescent ILT provides means to constrain complexity of mask solutions, each of which is optimized to meet lithographic objectives within the bounds of the constraints. Results presented here show trade-offs to process window performance with varying degrees of mask complexity. The paper details ILT mask simplification schemes on contact arrays and random logic, comparing process window trade-offs in each case. Ultimately this method enables litho and mask engineers balance lithographic requirements with mask manufacturing complexity and related cost.

  2. Electron beam inspection methods for imprint lithography at 32 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  3. Defect inspection of imprinted 32 nm half pitch patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; McMackin, Ian; Perez, Joseph; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2008-10-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  4. Progress on EUV mask fabrication for 32-nm technology node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojing; Yan, Pei-Yang; Liang, Ted; Park, Seh-jin; Sanchez, Peter; Shu, Emily Y.; Ultanir, Erdem A.; Henrichs, Sven; Stivers, Alan; Vandentop, Gilroy; Lieberman, Barry; Qu, Ping

    2007-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) tool development achieved a big milestone last year as two full-field Alpha Demo Tools (ADT) were shipped to customers by ASML. In the future horizon, a full field "EUV1" exposure tool from Nikon will be available by the end of 20071 and the pre-production EUV exposure tools from ASML are targeted for 20092. It is essential that high quality EUVL masks can be made and delivered to the EUVL tool users to support the technology development. In the past year, we have demonstrated mask fabrication with low stress absorber deposition and good etch process control yielding a vertical etch profile and a mask CD control of 5.7 nm for 32 nm (1x) space and 7.4 nm for 32 nm (1x) lines. Mask pattern resolution of 15 nm (1x) dense lines was achieved. Full field reflective mask die-to-die inspection at a 125nm pixel size was demonstrated after low defect multilayer blanks became available. In this paper, we will present details of the Intel EUVL Mask Pilot Line progress in EUVL mask defect reduction, pattern CD performance, program defect mask design and inspection, in-house absorber film development and its performance, and EUVL metrology tool development. We will demonstrate an overall improvement in EUV mask manufacturing readiness due to our Pilot Line activities.

  5. RHIC Prefire Protection Masks

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.; Biscardi, C.; Curcio, T.; Gassner, D.; DeMonte, V.; DeSanto, L.; Fu, W.; Liaw, C. J.; Montag, C.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2015-01-07

    The protection of the RHIC experimental detectors from damage due to beam hitting close upstream elements in cases of abort kicker prefires requires some dedicated precautionary measures with two general options: to bring the beam close to a limiting aperture (i.e. the beam pipe wall), as far upstream of the detector components as possible or, alternatively, to bring a limiting aperture close to the circulating beam. During the FY 2014 RHIC Heavy Ion run the first option was chosen because of the limited time available for preparation before the start of the run. For future runs the second option, in this case the installation of dual-sided movable masks, is preferred. The installation of the masks, one per ring, is planned before the start of the FY 2015 run.

  6. On Masking Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    solution will perform better than the others and present experimental data supportive of the analysis. This investigation is based on simulated robot...solution will perform better than the agent’s task is to catch the evasion agent. Both agents others, and present experimental data supportive of the...Masking interception, and the resultant time lost from hiding and The previous section ruled out refinement stratgies replanning. Without the learned rule

  7. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, Alan L.; Kroop, David C.; McGee, Marilyn K.; Lenkszus, Frank R.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  8. Masked multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Winiecki, A.L.; Kroop, D.C.; McGee, M.K.; Lenkszus, F.R.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical instrument and particularly a time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for processing a large number of analog signals irregularly spaced over a spectrum, with programmable masking of portions of the spectrum where signals are unlikely in order to reduce memory requirements and/or with a signal capturing assembly having a plurality of signal capturing devices fewer in number than the analog signals for use in repeated cycles within the data processing time period.

  9. Masks: Culture and Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, MaryEllen; And Others

    This guide describes a 7-day lesson plan to be used with bilingual 3rd and 4th graders and 6th, 7th, and 8th graders in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) classes. The guide shows how mask making can be tied into each class, and then how to pull the classes together for the older students to become peer tutors to the younger ones in the…

  10. The Attentional Dynamics of Masked Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Philip L.; Wolfgang, Bradley J.

    2004-01-01

    A dichoptic masking procedure was used to test whether the mask-dependent cuing effects found in luminance detection by P. L. Smith (2000a) were due to integration masking or interruption masking. Attentional cuing enhanced detection sensitivity (d') when stimuli were backwardly masked with either dichoptic or monoptic masks, whereas no cuing…

  11. EUV mask black border evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, Christina; Bonam, Ravi; Gallagher, Emily; Grohs, Jonathan; Kagawa, Masayuki; Kindt, Louis; Narita, Eisuke; Nash, Steven; Sakamoto, Yoshifumi

    2014-10-01

    The black border is a frame created by removing all the multilayers on the EUV mask in the region around the chip. It is created to prevent exposure of adjacent fields when printing an EUV mask on a wafer. Papers have documented its effectiveness. As the technology transitions into manufacturing, the black border must be optimized from the initial mask making process through its life. In this work, the black border is evaluated in three stages: the black border during fabrication, the final sidewall profile, and extended lifetime studies. This work evaluates the black border through simulations and physical experiments. The simulations address concerns for defects and sidewall profiles. The physical experiments test the current black border process. Three masks are used: one mask to test how black border affects the image placement of features on mask and two masks to test how the multilayers change through extended cleans. Data incorporated in this study includes: registration, reflectivity, multilayer structure images and simulated wafer effects. By evaluating the black border from both a mask making perspective and a lifetime perspective, we are able to characterize how the structure evolves. The mask data and simulations together predict the performance of the black border and its ability to maintain critical dimensions on wafer. In this paper we explore what mask changes occur and how they will affect mask use.

  12. Masks in imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Dominical, Venina; Samsel, Leigh; McCoy, J Philip

    2017-01-01

    Data analysis in imaging flow cytometry incorporates elements of flow cytometry together with other aspects of morphological analysis of images. A crucial early step in this analysis is the creation of a mask to distinguish the portion of the image upon which further examination of specified features can be performed. Default masks are provided by the manufacturer of the imaging flow cytometer but additional custom masks can be created by the individual user for specific applications. Flawed or inaccurate masks can have a substantial negative impact on the overall analysis of a sample, thus great care must be taken to ensure the accuracy of masks. Here we discuss various types of masks and cite examples of their use. Furthermore we provide our insight for how to approach selecting and assessing the optimal mask for a specific analysis.

  13. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  14. Results from a new die-to-database reticle inspection platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, William; Xiong, Yalin; Giusti, Michael; Walsh, Robert; Dayal, Aditya

    2007-03-01

    A new die-to-database high-resolution reticle defect inspection system has been developed for the 45nm logic node and extendable to the 32nm node (also the comparable memory nodes). These nodes will use predominantly 193nm immersion lithography although EUV may also be used. According to recent surveys, the predominant reticle types for the 45nm node are 6% simple tri-tone and COG. Other advanced reticle types may also be used for these nodes including: dark field alternating, Mask Enhancer, complex tri-tone, high transmission, CPL, EUV, etc. Finally, aggressive model based OPC will typically be used which will include many small structures such as jogs, serifs, and SRAF (sub-resolution assist features) with accompanying very small gaps between adjacent structures. The current generation of inspection systems is inadequate to meet these requirements. The architecture and performance of a new die-to-database inspection system is described. This new system is designed to inspect the aforementioned reticle types in die-to-database and die-to-die modes. Recent results from internal testing of the prototype systems are shown. The results include standard programmed defect test reticles and advanced 45nm and 32nm node reticles from industry sources. The results show high sensitivity and low false detections being achieved.

  15. Advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0092

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, H.A.; Shelton, J.E.; LaMance, G.M.; Kennedy, C.R.

    1995-02-26

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) and the Lanxide Corporation (Lanxide) negotiated a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites (MMC). The objective of this CRADA was to develop machining parameters to allow manufacturing of automotive components from MMCs. These parts exhibit a range of shapes and dimensional tolerances and require a large number of machining operations. The common characteristic of the components is the use of the light weight MMC materials to replace heavier materials. This allows smaller and lighter moving parts and supporting structural components thereby increasing fuel mileage. The CRADA was divided into three areas: basic investigation of cutting parameters, establishment of a mock production line for components, and optimization of parameters in the mock facility. This report covers the manufacturing of MMCs and preliminary Phase I testing for silicon carbide having various loading percentages and extensive Phase I testing of cutting parameters on 30% alumina loaded aluminum. On January 26, 1995, a letter from the vice president, technology at Lanxide was issued terminating the CRADA due to changes in business. 9 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Challenges and requirements of mask data processing for multi-beam mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin; Lee, Dong Hyun; Park, Sinjeung; Lee, SookHyun; Tamamushi, Shuichi; Shin, In Kyun; Jeon, Chan Uk

    2015-07-01

    To overcome the resolution and throughput of current mask writer for advanced lithography technologies, the platform of e-beam writer have been evolved by the developments of hardware and software in writer. Especially, aggressive optical proximity correction (OPC) for unprecedented extension of optical lithography and the needs of low sensitivity resist for high resolution result in the limit of variable shaped beam writer which is widely used for mass production. The multi-beam mask writer is attractive candidate for photomask writing of sub-10nm device because of its high speed and the large degree of freedom which enable high dose and dose modulation for each pixel. However, the higher dose and almost unlimited appetite for dose modulation challenge the mask data processing (MDP) in aspects of extreme data volume and correction method. Here, we discuss the requirements of mask data processing for multi-beam mask writer and presents new challenges of the data format, data flow, and correction method for user and supplier MDP tool.

  17. New method of contour-based mask-shape compiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Ryoichi; Sugiyama, Akiyuki; Onizawa, Akira; Sato, Hidetoshi; Toyoda, Yasutaka

    2007-10-01

    We have developed a new method of accurately profiling a mask shape by utilizing a Mask CD-SEM. The method is intended to realize high accuracy, stability and reproducibility of the Mask CD-SEM adopting an edge detection algorithm as the key technology used in CD-SEM for high accuracy CD measurement. In comparison with a conventional image processing method for contour profiling, it is possible to create the profiles with much higher accuracy which is comparable with CD-SEM for semiconductor device CD measurement. In this report, we will introduce the algorithm in general, the experimental results and the application in practice. As shrinkage of design rule for semiconductor device has further advanced, an aggressive OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) is indispensable in RET (Resolution Enhancement Technology). From the view point of DFM (Design for Manufacturability), a dramatic increase of data processing cost for advanced MDP (Mask Data Preparation) for instance and surge of mask making cost have become a big concern to the device manufacturers. In a sense, it is a trade-off between the high accuracy RET and the mask production cost, while it gives a significant impact on the semiconductor market centered around the mask business. To cope with the problem, we propose the best method for a DFM solution in which two dimensional data are extracted for an error free practical simulation by precise reproduction of a real mask shape in addition to the mask data simulation. The flow centering around the design data is fully automated and provides an environment where optimization and verification for fully automated model calibration with much less error is available. It also allows complete consolidation of input and output functions with an EDA system by constructing a design data oriented system structure. This method therefore is regarded as a strategic DFM approach in the semiconductor metrology.

  18. Mask alignment system for semiconductor processing

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.; Weaver, William T.; Grant, Christopher N.

    2017-02-14

    A mask alignment system for providing precise and repeatable alignment between ion implantation masks and workpieces. The system includes a mask frame having a plurality of ion implantation masks loosely connected thereto. The mask frame is provided with a plurality of frame alignment cavities, and each mask is provided with a plurality of mask alignment cavities. The system further includes a platen for holding workpieces. The platen may be provided with a plurality of mask alignment pins and frame alignment pins configured to engage the mask alignment cavities and frame alignment cavities, respectively. The mask frame can be lowered onto the platen, with the frame alignment cavities moving into registration with the frame alignment pins to provide rough alignment between the masks and workpieces. The mask alignment cavities are then moved into registration with the mask alignment pins, thereby shifting each individual mask into precise alignment with a respective workpiece.

  19. Mask fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2000-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks and reticles useful for projection lithography systems. An absorber layer is conventionally patterned using a pattern and etch process. Following the step of patterning, the entire surface of the remaining top patterning photoresist layer as well as that portion of an underlying protective photoresist layer where absorber material has been etched away is exposed to UV radiation. The UV-exposed regions of the protective photoresist layer and the top patterning photoresist layer are then removed by solution development, thereby eliminating the need for an oxygen plasma etch and strip and chances for damaging the surface of the substrate or coatings.

  20. Masks of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Edward

    2003-05-01

    Preface; Introducing the masks; Part I. Worlds in the Making: 1. The magic Universe; 2. The mythic Universe; 3. The geometric Universe; 4. The medieval Universe; 5. The infinite Universe; 6. The mechanistic Universe; Part II. The Heart Divine: 7. Dance of the atoms and waves; 8. Fabric of space and time; 9. Nearer to the heart's desire; 10. The cosmic tide; 11. Do dreams ever come true?; Part III. The Cloud of Unknowing: 12. The witch universe; 13. The spear of Archytas; 14. All that is made; 15. The cloud of unknowing; 16. Learned ignorance.

  1. Towards reduced impact of EUV mask defectivity on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, R.; Van den Heuvel, D.; Pacco, A.; Pollentier, I.; Baudemprez, B.; Jehoul, C.; Hermans, J.; Hendrickx, E.

    2014-07-01

    The defectivity challenges of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks, that need to be addressed before production readiness of EUV lithography is assured from the mask perspective, are twofold. First, the EUV-specific defect type relating to the multi-layer (ML) mirror, the so-called ML-defects, require to become more detectable than they are printable. This not only requires proven capability of blank inspection, but also the existence of satisfactory printability mitigation strategies (comprising avoidance, pattern shift methodology, compensation repair). Both these assets need to become available within the mask supply chain, as there is little that can still be done about such residual defects at the wafer fab. In a production phase, finding unexpected printing ML-defects is unacceptable. It is shown how the specific way-of-working in use at imec, starting from the printed wafer, contributes to related learning and identification of remaining gaps, in getting this issue fully dealt with. The second challenge relates to particle contamination during use of the reticle at the wafer fab. Avoiding overlaycritical particles on the backside of NXE3100 reticles is facilitated by the established way-of-working. Minimizing the occurrence of particles "hopping" between reticles via the electrostatic clamp of the scanner (so-called clamp-traveling particles) is a major driver for appropriate mask cleaning. The latter may not have negative impact by frequent use, in view of the highly vulnerable EUV mask stack, and especially for the present "black-border" solution in which the ML is etched away at the image border on the reticle. A lot of effort is spent into monitoring of NXE3100 reticles for particle adders on the pattern side. This is realized by comparing past and present mask defect maps obtained by inspection of printed wafers with subsequent repeater analysis.

  2. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  3. A Graphical Operator Interface for a Telerobotic Inspection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Tso, K. S.; Hayati, S.

    1993-01-01

    Operator interface has recently emerged as an important element for efficient and safe operatorinteractions with the telerobotic system. Recent advances in graphical user interface (GUI) andgraphics/video merging technologies enable development of more efficient, flexible operatorinterfaces. This paper describes an advanced graphical operator interface newly developed for aremote surface inspection system at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The interface has been designed sothat remote surface inspection can be performed by a single operator with an integrated robot controland image inspection capability. It supports three inspection strategies of teleoperated human visual inspection, human visual inspection with automated scanning, and machine-vision-based automated inspection.

  4. Trends in mask data preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Aki; Pang, Liyong; Su, Bo; Choi, Yohan

    2014-10-01

    Whether for VSB mask writing or for multibeam mask writing, the shapes we need to write on masks are increasingly complex, increasingly curvilinear, and smaller in minimum width and space. The overwhelming trend in mask data preparation (MDP) is the shift from deterministic, rule-based, geometric, context-independent, shape-modulated, rectangular processing to statistical, simulation-based, context-dependent, dose- and shape-modulated any-shape processing. The paper briefly surveys the history of MDP, and explains through a simulation-based study that 50nm line and space is the tipping point where rule-based processing gives away to simulation-based processing.

  5. A Masked Photocathode in Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-12-14

    In this paper, we propose a masked photocathode inside the photoinjector for generating high brightness election beam. Instead of mounting the photocathode onto an electrode, an electrode with small hole is used as a mask to shield the photocathode from the accelerating vacuum chamber. Using such a masked photocathode will make the replacement of photocathode material easy by rotating the photocathode behind the electrode into the hole. Furthermore, this helps reduce the dark current or secondary electron emission from the photocathode material. The masked photocathode also provides transverse cut-off to a Gaussian laser beam that reduces electron beam emittance growth from nonlinear space-charge effects.

  6. Masked hypertension: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bobrie, Guillaume; Clerson, Pierre; Ménard, Joël; Postel-Vinay, Nicolas; Chatellier, Gilles; Plouin, Pierre-François

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to review the literature on masked hypertension. Studies, reviews and editorials on masked hypertension were identified by PubMed, Pascal BioMed and Cochrane literature systematic searches. Then, we carried out a meta-analysis of the six cohort studies reporting quantitative data for masked hypertension prognosis. There is still no clear consensus definition of masked hypertension and the reproducibility of the phenomenon is unknown. Nevertheless, the prevalence of masked hypertension seems to lie between 8 and 20%, and can be up to 50% in treated hypertensive patients. Subjects with masked hypertension have a higher risk of cardiovascular accidents [hazard ratios: 1.92 (1.51-2.44)] than normotensive subjects. This is due to a possible failure to recognize and appropriately manage this particular form of hypertension, the frequent association with other risk factors and coexisting target organ damage. The remaining unresolved questions are as follows: is masked hypertension a clinical entity that requires identification and characterization or a statistical phenomenon linked to the variability of blood pressure measurements?; because screening of the entire population is not feasible, how to identify individuals with masked hypertension?; and, in the absence of randomized trial, how to treat masked hypertension?

  7. Akathisia masked by hypokinesia.

    PubMed

    Tuisku, K; Lauerma, H; Holi, M M; Honkonen, T; Rimon, R

    2000-07-01

    Here, we will discuss the concept of subjective akathisia and present a patient case. Our patient was suffering from neuroleptic-induced hypokinesia and akathisia at the same time. The typical motor manifestations of akathisia were masked by hypokinesia, which made the diagnosis difficult. However, the subjective symptoms of akathisia were evident and distressing. Although not observable to bare eye, the pathognomonic pattern of motor activity detected in akathisia was demonstrated by actometric recording. Changing the conventional neuroleptic to an atypical one brought relief to the subjective symptoms of akathisia and hypokinesia, while the motor activity was clearly diminished in actometric recording. Actometric recording may be useful in diagnosing akathisia masked by hypokinesia, but the typical subjective symptoms of akathisia should not be ignored, even when actometry is not available to demonstrate the missing motor component of akathisia. Not only akathisia defined by DSM-IV but also subjective akathisia should be adequately treated to relieve the subjective distress, and to diminish the unfavorable effects on psychotic symptoms, behavior, and drug compliance.

  8. Mask pattern correction for an advanced device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Minemura, Masahiko; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Okada, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Kojiro

    2000-07-01

    By generating supplementary patterns for EB data and using a system that corrects patten line widths, we improved the shape of a pattern formed on a photomask and the CD linearity. For the EB lithography system, trapezoidal and hammerhead supplementary patterns were applied in order to suppress the increase in EB data volume. As a result, it became possible to reduce the supplementary patterns generated to about 60 percent of the existing serif supplementary patterns. The formed pattern shapes were also equivalent. Since the laser lithography system requires bigger correction pattern shapes than the EB lithography system, triangle supplementary patterns were used. As a result, the corner round was improved with the number of patterns equivalent to that of existing rectangle supplementary patterns. For the CD-linearity, the CD correction amount was set for each line width from the experiment result. For 5 micrometers to 0.7 micrometers patterns on a photomask, a CD-linearity could be achieved within 40nm. We developed the system with above method, when the system is applied to 0.18 micrometers logic contact holes, the elapse time is 1.4 hours and the EB data file size is for 2.5 to 10.8 times the number of original patterns. We judged that it was in the practical level.

  9. Improve the efficiency of the inspection process via a thorough control of the scanning focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Ernesto; Sartelli, Luca; Miyashita, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    Requirements coming from the customer, as well as internal needs of improvements consequent to the increasing complexity of the layout of the newest devices, lead to the necessity of exploring all the potential improvements achievable at the mask manufacturing inspection process. A key point to manage for the better DB inspections is that of being able to achieve a proper matching between the images to be compared, tasks which is accomplished by the tool architecture by means of a pre-swath calibration process on which the quality of the focus is playing a relevant role. From here the decision to focus on this parameter aiming of working out and evaluate a different approach to be used to set the scanning focus on the inspection tool moving from the vendor theory based on the edge speed on a specific test plate to a new one based on intensity measurements into specific features on a purposely designed test vehicle. A matter of relevant importance for mask makers, either for the smoothness of the inspection process or for the homogeneity of the quality of the products being delivered, but on which any tool vendor likes providing official commitments, is that of correlating the overall performance of similar tools. This was accomplished with the new approach with two different tools achieving optical images with similar grey scale distributions into the most critical features. Moreover, the improvement of the matching of the images being compared allows extending the usage of the tool for products for which the complexity of the layout forced the inspection with different pixels or with more advanced tools, with a positive impact either on costs or on the cycle time of the masks being delivered. A careful assessment-verification of the shadowing limitation induced by the frame of the pellicle was another task successfully carried out with the new methodology, with some improvement regarding the inspectable area. The extended its usage the wider the field of

  10. Process variation monitoring (PVM) by wafer inspection tool as a complementary method to CD-SEM for mapping field CDU on advanced production devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Jong; Yoo, Hyung Won; Kim, Chul Hong; Lee, Hak Kwon; Kim, Sung Su; Bae, Koon Ho; Spielberg, Hedvi; Lee, Yun Ho; Levi, Shimon; Bustan, Yariv; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    As design rules shrink, Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) and Line Edge Roughness (LER) have a dramatic effect on printed final lines and hence the need to control these parameters increases. Sources of CDU and LER variations include scanner auto-focus accuracy and stability, layer stack thickness, composition variations, and exposure variations. Process variations, in advanced VLSI production designs, specifically in memory devices, attributed to CDU and LER affect cell-to-cell parametric variations. These variations significantly impact device performance and die yield. Traditionally, measurements of LER are performed by CD-SEM or OCD metrology tools. Typically, these measurements require a relatively long time to set and cover only selected points of wafer area. In this paper we present the results of a collaborative work of the Process Diagnostic & Control Business Unit of Applied Materials and Hynix Semiconductor Inc. on the implementation of a complementary method to the CDSEM and OCD tools, to monitor defect density and post litho develop CDU and LER on production wafers. The method, referred to as Process Variation Monitoring (PVM) is based on measuring variations in the scattered light from periodic structures. The application is demonstrated using Applied Materials DUV bright field (BF) wafer inspection tool under optimized illumination and collection conditions. The UVisionTM has already passed a successful feasibility study on DRAM products with 66nm and 54nm design rules. The tool has shown high sensitivity to variations across an FEM wafer in both exposure and focus axes. In this article we show how PVM can help detection of Field to Field variations on DRAM wafers with 44nm design rule during normal production run. The complex die layout and the shrink in cell dimensions require high sensitivity to local variations within Dies or Fields. During normal scan of production wafers local Process variations are translated into GL (Grey Level) values

  11. Achromatic Focal Plane Mask for Exoplanet Imaging Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Kevin Edward; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Wilson, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in coronagraph technologies for exoplanet imaging have achieved contrasts close to 1e10 at 4 lambda/D and 1e-9 at 2 lambda/D in monochromatic light. A remaining technological challenge is to achieve high contrast in broadband light; a challenge that is largely limited by chromaticity of the focal plane mask. The size of a star image scales linearly with wavelength. Focal plane masks are typically the same size at all wavelengths, and must be sized for the longest wavelength in the observational band to avoid starlight leakage. However, this oversized mask blocks useful discovery space from the shorter wavelengths. We present here the design, development, and testing of an achromatic focal plane mask based on the concept of optical filtering by a diffractive optical element (DOE). The mask consists of an array of DOE cells, the combination of which functions as a wavelength filter with any desired amplitude and phase transmission. The effective size of the mask scales nearly linearly with wavelength, and allows significant improvement in the inner working angle of the coronagraph at shorter wavelengths. The design is applicable to almost any coronagraph configuration, and enables operation in a wider band of wavelengths than would otherwise be possible. We include initial results from a laboratory demonstration of the mask with the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization coronagraph.

  12. EUVL alternating phase shift mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Myers, Alan; Shroff, Yashesh; Chandhok, Manish; Zhang, Guojing; Gullikson, Eric; Salmassi, Farhad

    2011-04-01

    Extreme ultra-violet Lithography (EUVL) alternating phase shift mask (APSM) or other optical enhancement techniques are likely needed for 16nm (half pitch) technology generation and beyond. One possible option is the combination of EUVL and APSM. The fabrication of EUVL APSM is more difficult than either the fabrication of an EUVL binary mask or a conventional optical APSM mask. In the case of EUVL APSM, the phase difference in the two regions (0 and 180-degree phase regions) is created by a phase step in the substrate prior to the multilayer (ML) coating. The step height that induces 180-degree phase mismatch in the ML is determined by [λ/(4cosθ)](2m+1), where m are integers (0, 1, 2,...). In this experiment, we targeted for a step height with m=1. The same mask design also contains the standard binary structures so that the comparison between the EUVL APSM and the EUVL binary mask can be performed under the same illumination and wafer process conditions. The EUVL APSM mask was exposed using Nikon's EUV1 scanner in Kumagaya Japan. The wafer level results showed higher dense line resolution for EUVL APSM as compared to that of EUVL binary mask. APSM also showed improved line width roughness (LWR) and depth of focus (DoF) as compared to the best EUVL binary results obtained with C-dipole off-axis illumination (OAI). The wafer CD resolution improvement obtained by APSM in this experiment is partially limited by the resist resolution and the mask phase edge spread during ML deposition. We believe that wafer CD resolution and can further be improved with imaging imbalance compensation mask design and improvements in resist resolution and the phase generation portion of the mask fabrication process. In this paper, we will discuss in detail the mask fabrication process, wafer level data analysis, and our understanding of EUVL APSM related issues.

  13. Fabless company mask technology approach: fabless but not fab-careless

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisamura, Toshiyuki; Wu, Xin

    2009-10-01

    There are two different foundry-fabless working models in the aspect of mask. Some foundries have in-house mask facility while others contract with merchant mask vendors. Significant progress has been made in both kinds of situations. Xilinx as one of the pioneers of fabless semiconductor companies has been continually working very closely with both merchant mask vendors and mask facilities of foundries in past many years, contributed well in both technology development and benefited from corporations. Our involvement in manufacturing is driven by the following three elements: The first element is to understand the new fabrication and mask technologies and then find a suitable design / layout style to better utilize these new technologies and avoid potential risks. Because Xilinx has always been involved in early stage of advanced technology nodes, this early understanding and adoption is especially important. The second element is time to market. Reduction in mask and wafer manufacturing cycle-time can ensure faster time to market. The third element is quality. Commitment to quality is our highest priority for our customers. We have enough visibility on any manufacturing issues affecting the device functionality. Good correlation has consistently been observed between FPGA speed uniformity and the poly mask Critical Dimension (CD) uniformity performance. To achieve FPGA speed uniformity requirement, the manufacturing process as well as the mask and wafer CD uniformity has to be monitored. Xilinx works closely with the wafer foundries and mask suppliers to improve productivity and the yield from initial development stage of mask making operations. As an example, defect density reduction is one of the biggest challenges for mask supplier in development stage to meet the yield target satisfying the mask cost and mask turn-around-time (TAT) requirement. Historically, masks were considered to be defect free but at these advanced process nodes, that assumption no longer

  14. EUV actinic defect inspection and defect printability at the sub-32 nm half pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Sungmin; Kearney, Patrick; Wurm, Stefan; Goodwin, Frank; Han, Hakseung; Goldberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopp; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2009-08-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask blanks with embedded phase defects were inspected with a reticle actinic inspection tool (AIT) and the Lasertec M7360. The Lasertec M7360, operated at SEMA TECH's Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC) in Albany, NY, has a sensitivity to multilayer defects down to 40-45 nm, which is not likely sufficient for mask blank development below the 32 nm half-pitch node. Phase defect printability was simulated to calculate the required defect sensitivity for a next generation blank inspection tool to support reticle development for the sub-32 nm half-pitch technology node. Defect mitigation technology is proposed to take advantage of mask blanks with some defects. This technology will reduce the cost of ownership of EUV mask blanks. This paper will also discuss the kind of infrastructure that will be required for the development and mass production stages.

  15. Masked Repetition Priming Using Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Philip J.; Fiorentino, Robert; Poeppel, David

    2008-01-01

    Masked priming is used in psycholinguistic studies to assess questions about lexical access and representation. We present two masked priming experiments using MEG. If the MEG signal elicited by words reflects specific aspects of lexical retrieval, then one expects to identify specific neural correlates of retrieval that are sensitive to priming.…

  16. Simplified tooling for spray masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinbar, B. J.; Hammons, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Tooling technique involves positioning tiles within acrylic plastic masking frames that attach magnetically to holding fixture. Plastics are "magnetized" with adhesive mangetic-rubber strips. Technique is simpler and less expensive than conventional methods. L-shaped masks are easily cut and altered.

  17. From nightmares to sweet dreams: inspection of aggressive OPC on 14nm reticles (and beyond) using a novel high-NA and low-NA dual method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, Karen D.; Hibbs, Michael; Seki, Kazunori; Broadbent, William; Hutchinson, Trent; Redding, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    To prevent catastrophic failures in wafer manufacturing lines from reticle defects, mask manufacturers employ sophisticated reticle inspection systems to examine every shape on every reticle for defects. The predominant inspection systems in use today compare the reticle directly with the design database using high-NA optics (typically 3x higher resolution at the reticle plane than advanced wafer scanners). High-NA optical inspection with its high signal to noise ratio (SNR) can readily detect small defects before they have lithographic impact, thus ensuring reticle quality. However, when inspecting certain aggressive OPC, high-NA inspection can overload on small OPC defects which do not have lithographic impact and thus, should generally be ignored. Whereas, inspecting a reticle as imaged in the wafer plane (low-NA in the reticle plane) will generally ignore such small OPC defects; however, the SNR is often too low for certain defect types to provide the needed defect detection sensitivity to ensure reticle quality. This paper discusses the design and performance of a novel reticle inspection method using high-NA and low-NA dual optical imaging and processing. This method offers the high defect sensitivity of high-NA inspection with the OPC tolerance of low-NA inspection. These two imaging methods are blended together into a seamless inspection mode suitable for aggressive OPC of the 14nm generation and beyond. The test reticles include 14nm logic designs containing aggressive OPC and native defects, as well as a 14 nm test reticle containing relevant programmed defects. Defect lithographic significance is judged using a Zeiss AIMS™ system.

  18. Simultaneous source-mask optimization: a numerical combining method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mülders, Thomas; Domnenko, Vitaliy; Küchler, Bernd; Klimpel, Thomas; Stock, Hans-Jürgen; Poonawala, Amyn A.; Taravade, Kunal N.; Stanton, William A.

    2010-09-01

    A new method for simultaneous Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) is presented. In order to produce optimum imaging fidelity with respect to exposure lattitude, depth of focus (DoF) and mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) the presented method aims to leverage both, the available degrees of freedom of a pixelated source and those available for the mask layout. The approach described in this paper is designed as to work with dissected mask polygons. The dissection of the mask patterns is to be performed in advance (before SMO) with the Synopsys Proteus OPC engine, providing the available degrees of freedom for mask pattern optimization. This is similar to mask optimization done for optical proximity correction (OPC). Additionally, however, the illumination source will be simultaneously optimized. The SMO approach borrows many of the performance enhancement methods of OPC software for mask correction, but is especially designed as to simultaneously optimize a pixelated source shape as nowadays available in production environments. Designed as a numerical optimization approach the method is able to assess in acceptable times several hundreds of thousands source-mask combinations for small, critical layout snippets. This allows a global optimization scheme to be applied to the SMO problem which is expected to better explore the optimization space and thus to yield an improved solution quality compared to local optimizations methods. The method is applied to an example system for investigating the impact of source constraints on the SMO results. Also, it is investigated how well possibly conflicting goals of low MEEF and large DoF can be balanced.

  19. Exploiting Small Leakages in Masks to Turn a Second-Order Attack into a First-Order Attack and Improved Rotating Substitution Box Masking with Linear Code Cosets

    PubMed Central

    DeTrano, Alexander; Karimi, Naghmeh; Karri, Ramesh; Guo, Xiaofei; Carlet, Claude; Guilley, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Masking countermeasures, used to thwart side-channel attacks, have been shown to be vulnerable to mask-extraction attacks. State-of-the-art mask-extraction attacks on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm target S-Box recomputation schemes but have not been applied to scenarios where S-Boxes are precomputed offline. We propose an attack targeting precomputed S-Boxes stored in nonvolatile memory. Our attack targets AES implemented in software protected by a low entropy masking scheme and recovers the masks with 91% success rate. Recovering the secret key requires fewer power traces (in fact, by at least two orders of magnitude) compared to a classical second-order attack. Moreover, we show that this attack remains viable in a noisy environment or with a reduced number of leakage points. Eventually, we specify a method to enhance the countermeasure by selecting a suitable coset of the masks set. PMID:26491717

  20. OSHA Inspections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (the Act), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is authorized to conduct... occupational safety and health field and who are trained in OSHA standards and in the recognition of safety and health hazards. Similarly, states with...their own occupational safety and health programs conduct inspection using qualified state compliance safety and health officers.

  1. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  2. Source mask optimization using 3D mask and compact resist models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sewefy, Omar; Chen, Ao; Lafferty, Neal; Meiring, Jason; Chung, Angeline; Foong, Yee Mei; Adam, Kostas; Sturtevant, John

    2016-03-01

    Source Mask Optimization (SMO) has played an important role in technology setup and ground rule definition since the 2x nm technology node. While improvements in SMO algorithms have produced higher quality and more consistent results, the accuracy of the overall solution is critically linked to how faithfully the entire patterning system is modeled, from mask down to substrate. Fortunately, modeling technology has continued to advance to provide greater accuracy in modeling 3D mask effects, 3D resist behavior, and resist phenomena. Specifically, the Domain Decomposition Method (DDM) approximates the 3D mask response as a superposition of edge-responses.1 The DDM can be applied to a sectorized illumination source based on Hybrid-Hopkins Abbe approximation,2 which provides an accurate and fast solution for the modeling of 3D mask effects and has been widely used in OPC modeling. The implementation of DDM in the SMO flow, however, is more challenging because the shape and intensity of the source, unlike the case in OPC modeling, is evolving along the optimization path. As a result, it gets more complicated. It is accepted that inadequate pupil sectorization results in reduced accuracy in any application, however in SMO the required uniformity and density of pupil sampling is higher than typical OPC and modeling cases. In this paper, we describe a novel method to implement DDM in the SMO flow. The source sectorization is defined by following the universal pixel sizes used in SMO. Fast algorithms are developed to enable computation of edge signals from each fine pixel of the source. In this case, each pixel has accurate information to describe its contribution to imaging and the overall objective function. A more continuous angular spectrum from 3D mask scattering is thus captured, leading to accurate modeling of 3D mask effects throughout source optimization. This method is applied on a 2x nm middle-of-line layer test case. The impact of the 3D mask model accuracy on

  3. Automatic pattern localization across layout database and photolithography mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morey, Philippe; Brault, Frederic; Beisser, Eric; Ache, Oliver; Röth, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Advanced process photolithography masks require more and more controls for registration versus design and critical dimension uniformity (CDU). The distribution of the measurement points should be distributed all over the whole mask and may be denser in areas critical to wafer overlay requirements. This means that some, if not many, of theses controls should be made inside the customer die and may use non-dedicated patterns. It is then mandatory to access the original layout database to select patterns for the metrology process. Finding hundreds of relevant patterns in a database containing billions of polygons may be possible, but in addition, it is mandatory to create the complete metrology job fast and reliable. Combining, on one hand, a software expertise in mask databases processing and, on the other hand, advanced skills in control and registration equipment, we have developed a Mask Dataprep Station able to select an appropriate number of measurement targets and their positions in a huge database and automatically create measurement jobs on the corresponding area on the mask for the registration metrology system. In addition, the required design clips are generated from the database in order to perform the rendering procedure on the metrology system. This new methodology has been validated on real production line for the most advanced process. This paper presents the main challenges that we have faced, as well as some results on the global performances.

  4. Smart mask ship to control for enhanced on wafer CD performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utzny, Clemens; Schumacher, Karl; Seltmann, Rolf

    2016-10-01

    In the process of semicondutcor fabrication the translation of the final product requirements into specific targets for each component of the manufacturing process is one of the most demanding tasks. This involves the careful assessment of the error budgets of each component as well as the sensible balancing of the costs implied by the requirements. Photolithographic masks play a pivotal role in the semiconductor fabrication. This attributes a crucial role to mask error budgeting within the overall wafer production process. Masks with borderline performance with respect to the wafer fabrication requirements have a detrimental effect on the wafer process window thus inducing delays and costs. However, prohibitively strict mask specifications will induce large costs and delays in the mask manufacturing process. Thus setting smart control mechanisms for mask quality assessment is highly relevant for an efficient production flow. To this end GLOBALFOUNDRIES and the AMTC have set up a new mask specification check to enable a smart ship to control process for mask manufacturing. Within this process the mask CD distribution is checked as to whether it is commensurable with the advanced dose control capabilities of the stepper in the wafer factory. If this is the case, masks with borderline CD performance will be usable within the manufacturing process as the signatures can be compensated. In this paper we give a detailed explanation of the smart ship control approach with its implications for mask quality.

  5. 30 CFR 842.12 - Requests for Federal inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... section, the person shall be notified as far in advance as practicable when the inspection is to occur and... control of the building or without a search warrant. (d) Within ten days of the Federal inspection or,...

  6. 30 CFR 842.12 - Requests for Federal inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... section, the person shall be notified as far in advance as practicable when the inspection is to occur and... control of the building or without a search warrant. (d) Within ten days of the Federal inspection or,...

  7. 30 CFR 842.12 - Requests for Federal inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section, the person shall be notified as far in advance as practicable when the inspection is to occur and... control of the building or without a search warrant. (d) Within ten days of the Federal inspection or,...

  8. Sensitivity of coded mask telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2008-05-20

    Simple formulas are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask x-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but these are strictly applicable only if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask, or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given that allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimization of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  9. Biological Activity of Masked Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Harald; Gornicec, Jan; Neuper, Theresa; Parigiani, Maria Alejandra; Wallner, Michael; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2017-01-01

    Low endotoxin recovery (LER) is a recently discovered phenomenon describing the inability of limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-based assays to detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) because of a “masking effect” caused by chelators or detergents commonly used in buffer formulations for medical products and recombinant proteins. This study investigates the masking capacities of different buffer formulations and whether masked endotoxin is biologically active. We show that both naturally occurring endotoxin as well as control standard endotoxin can be affected by LER. Furthermore, whereas masked endotoxin cannot be detected in Factor C based assays, it is still detectable in a cell-based TLR4-NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene assay. Moreover, in primary human monocytes, masked LPS induces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and surface activation markers even at very low concentrations. We therefore conclude that masked LPS is a potent trigger of immune responses, which emphasizes the potential danger of masked LPS, as it may pose a health threat in pharmaceutical products or compromise experimental results. PMID:28317862

  10. Sensitivity of coded mask telescopes.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Gerald K

    2008-05-20

    Simple formulas are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask x-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but these are strictly applicable only if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask, or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given that allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimization of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  11. The EOS CERES Global Cloud Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, T. A.; Welch, R. M.; Trepte, Q.; Schaaf, C.; Baum, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    To detect long-term climate trends, it is essential to produce long-term and consistent data sets from a variety of different satellite platforms. With current global cloud climatology data sets, such as the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Experiment (ISCCP) or CLAVR (Clouds from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), one of the first processing steps is to determine whether an imager pixel is obstructed between the satellite and the surface, i.e., determine a cloud 'mask.' A cloud mask is essential to studies monitoring changes over ocean, land, or snow-covered surfaces. As part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program, a series of platforms will be flown beginning in 1997 with the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and subsequently the EOS-AM and EOS-PM platforms in following years. The cloud imager on TRMM is the Visible/Infrared Sensor (VIRS), while the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is the imager on the EOS platforms. To be useful for long term studies, a cloud masking algorithm should produce consistent results between existing (AVHRR) data, and future VIRS and MODIS data. The present work outlines both existing and proposed approaches to detecting cloud using multispectral narrowband radiance data. Clouds generally are characterized by higher albedos and lower temperatures than the underlying surface. However, there are numerous conditions when this characterization is inappropriate, most notably over snow and ice of the cloud types, cirrus, stratocumulus and cumulus are the most difficult to detect. Other problems arise when analyzing data from sun-glint areas over oceans or lakes over deserts or over regions containing numerous fires and smoke. The cloud mask effort builds upon operational experience of several groups that will now be discussed.

  12. [Costicartilage analysis inspection technology in the application of forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Meng, Hang; Xiao, Bi; Yan, Jian-Jun; Ma, Kai-Jun

    2011-10-01

    The traditional costicartilage analysis inspection is limited to morphological inspection. In recent years, with the development of forensic radiology and molecular genetics, the costicartilage analysis inspection technology has been further enriched and developed. At present, the costicartilage analysis inspection technology have been able to be used in the practice of forensic medicine. This paper reviews the research advances about the costicartilage analysis inspection technology in the identification of human gender, age and so on in order to provide the references for forensic appraisers.

  13. Hg-Mask Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, P.; Veiga, C. H.; Vieira Martins, R.; Assus, P.; Colas, F.

    In order to optimize the occulting process of a Lyot coronagraph and to provide a high dynamic range imaging, a new kind of occulting disk has been developed at the National Observatory of Rio de Janeiro. A mercury (Hg) drop glued onto an optical window by molecular cohesion and compressed by a pellicle film is used as the occulting disk. The minimum of the superficial tension potential function provides an optical precision (lambda/100) of the toric free surface of the mercury. This process provides a size control for the adaptation to the seeing conditions and to the apparent diameter of a resolved object, and in the case of adaptive optics, to the Airy diameter fraction needed. The occultation is a three dimensional process near the focal plane on the toric free surface that provides an apodization of the occultation. The Hg-Mask coronagraph has been projected for astrometric observations of faint satellites near to Jovian planets and works since 2000 at the 1.6 m telescope of the Pico dos Dias Observatory (OPD - Brazil).

  14. Mechanical alignment of substrates to a mask

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.; Honan, Michael; Amato, Luigi G.; Grant, Christopher Neil; Strassner, James D.

    2016-11-08

    A plurality of masks is attached to the underside of a mask frame. This attachment is made such that each mask can independently move relative to the mask frame in three directions. This relative movement allows each mask to adjust its position to align with respective alignment pins disposed on a working surface. In one embodiment, each mask is attached to the mask frame using fasteners, where the fasteners have a shaft with a diameter smaller than the diameter of the mounting hole disposed on the mask. A bias element may be used to allow relative movement between the mask and the mask frame in the vertical direction. Each mask may also have kinematic features to mate with the respective alignment pins on the working surface.

  15. 9 CFR 317.3 - Approval of abbreviations of marks of inspection; preparation of marking devices bearing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... inspection; preparation of marking devices bearing inspection legend without advance approval prohibited... abbreviations of marks of inspection; preparation of marking devices bearing inspection legend without advance... marking devices, bearing or containing an official inspection legend shown in § 312.2(b), § 312.3(a)...

  16. An operator interface design for a telerobotic inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.; Tso, Kam S.; Hayati, Samad

    1993-01-01

    The operator interface has recently emerged as an important element for efficient and safe interactions between human operators and telerobotics. Advances in graphical user interface and graphics technologies enable us to produce very efficient operator interface designs. This paper describes an efficient graphical operator interface design newly developed for remote surface inspection at NASA-JPL. The interface, designed so that remote surface inspection can be performed by a single operator with an integrated robot control and image inspection capability, supports three inspection strategies of teleoperated human visual inspection, human visual inspection with automated scanning, and machine-vision-based automated inspection.

  17. Extreme ultraviolet lithography mask etch study and overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Banqiu; Kumar, Ajay; Chandrachood, Madhavi; Sabharwal, Amitabh

    2013-04-01

    An overview of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask etch is presented and a EUVL mask etch study was carried out. Today, EUVL implementation has three critical challenges that hinder its adoption: extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source power, resist resolution-line width roughness-sensitivity, and a qualified EUVL mask. The EUVL mask defect challenges result from defects generated during blank preparation, absorber and multilayer deposition processes, as well as patterning, etching and wet clean processes. Stringent control on several performance criteria including critical dimension (CD) uniformity, etch bias, micro-loading, profile control, defect control, and high etch selectivity requirement to capping layer is required during the resist pattern duplication on the underlying absorber layer. EUVL mask absorbers comprise of mainly tantalum-based materials rather than chrome- or MoSi-based materials used in standard optical masks. Compared to the conventional chrome-based absorbers and phase shift materials, tantalum-based absorbers need high ion energy to obtain moderate etch rates. However, high ion energy may lower resist selectivity, and could introduce defects. Current EUVL mask consists of an anti-reflective layer on top of the bulk absorber. Recent studies indicate that a native oxide layer would suffice as an anti-reflective coating layer during the electron beam inspection. The absorber thickness and the material properties are optimized based on optical density targets for the mask as well as electromagnetic field effects and optics requirements of the patterning tools. EUVL mask etch processes are modified according to the structure of the absorber, its material, and thickness. However, etch product volatility is the fundamental requirement. Overlapping lithographic exposure near chip border may require etching through the multilayer, resulting in challenges in profile control and etch selectivity. Optical proximity correction is applied to further

  18. Vibrotactile masking through the body.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2014-09-01

    Touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at contralateral locations on the opposite side of the body. These interactions suggest an intimate connection between the two sides of the body. Here, we explore the effect of masking not across the body but through the body by measuring the effect of a masking stimulus on the back on the tactile sensitivity of the corresponding point on the front. Tactile sensitivity was measured on each side of the stomach, while vibrotactile masking stimulation was applied to one side of the front and to points on the back including the point directly behind the test point on the front. Results were compared to sensitivity, while vibrotactile stimulation was applied to a control site on the shoulder. A reduction in sensitivity of about .8 dB was found that required the masking stimulus to be within about 2 cm of the corresponding point on the back.

  19. EUV mask making: an approach based on the direct patterning of the EUV reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chovino, Christian; Dieu, Laurent; Johnstone, Eric; Reyes, Julio; La Fontaine, Bruno M.; Levinson, Harry J.; Pawloski, Adam R.

    2003-12-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is the leading candidate for manufacturing integrated circuits beyond the 45-nm technology node. The masks for EUVL are reflective and significantly different from current transmission masks for deep UV lithography. Many authors have demonstrated the patterning of EUVL masks using different types of absorber stacks that were deposited on top of the multilayer reflector. More recently, a new approach based on the etching of the multilayer reflector in order to define the mask pattern was proposed [2]. Using rigorous electro-magnetic simulations, it was shown that this subtractive approach could provide better process latitude, less H-V bias and smaller image-placement errors compared to the traditional masks based on the additive method. Even though the mask processing shows interesting challenges, this approach might offer immediate advantages over the more traditional patterning technique using the absorber stack, beyond those predicted for lithography imaging. These include the possibility to use optical inspection in transmission mode, which can provide the high-contrast images that are essential for high-sensitivity detection of small defects. In this paper, we present the first results on the patterning of EUVL masks using the direct etching the EUVL multilayer reflector (Mo/Si type) to produce EUV binary masks. In particular, we show how the process parameters can be adjusted to control the pattern sidewall angle. We also present an analysis of the influence of this sidewall angle on lithography imaging, based on lithography simulations. Finally, we show results from the optical inspection of these etched-multilayer binary masks (EMBM).

  20. Combining mask and OPC process verification for improved wafer patterning and yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouda, Ayman; Abdelghany, Hesham

    2016-10-01

    As technology advances into deep submicron nodes, the mask manufacturing process accuracy become more important. Mask Process Correction (MPC) has been transitioning from Rules-Based Mask Process correction to Model-Based Mask Process Correction mode. MPC is a subsequent step to OPC, where additional perturbation is applied to the mask shapes to correct for the mask manufacturing process. Shifting towards full model-based MPC is driven mainly by the accuracy requirements in advanced technology nodes, both for DUV and EUV processes. In the current state-of-the-art MPC process, MPC is completely decoupled from OPC, where each of them assumes that the other is executing perfectly. However, this decoupling is not suitable anymore due to the limited tolerance in the mask CDU budget and the increased wafer CDU requirements required from OPC. It is becoming more important to reduce any systematic mask errors, especially where they matter the most. In this work, we present a new combined-verification methodology that allows testing the combined effect of mask process and lithography process together and judging the final wafer patterning quality. This has the potential to intercept risks due to superposition of OPC and MPC correction residual errors, and capturing and correcting such a previously hidden source of patterning degradation.

  1. Visual Masking During Pursuit Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles W.

    1976-01-01

    Visual masking occurs when one stimulus interferes with the perception of another stimulus. Investigates which matters more for visual masking--that the target and masking stimuli are flashed on the same part of the retina, or, that the target and mask appear in the same place. (Author/RK)

  2. Optical inspection system for cylindrical objects

    DOEpatents

    Brenden, Byron B.; Peters, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    In the inspection of cylindrical objects, particularly O-rings, the object is translated through a field of view and a linear light trace is projected on its surface. An image of the light trace is projected on a mask, which has a size and shape corresponding to the size and shape which the image would have if the surface of the object were perfect. If there is a defect, light will pass the mask and be sensed by a detector positioned behind the mask. Preferably, two masks and associated detectors are used, one mask being convex to pass light when the light trace falls on a projection from the surface and the other concave, to pass light when the light trace falls on a depression in the surface. The light trace may be either dynamic, formed by a scanned laser beam, or static, formed by such a beam focussed by a cylindrical lens. Means are provided to automatically keep the illuminating receiving systems properly aligned.

  3. Planarization of topography with spin-on carbon hard mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noya, Go; Hama, Yusuke; Ishii, Maki; Nakasugi, Shigemasa; Kudo, Takanori; Padmanaban, Munirathna

    2016-03-01

    Spin-on-carbon hard mask (SOC HM) has been used in semiconductor manufacturing since 45nm node as an alternative carbon hard mask process to chemical vapor deposition (CVD). As advancement of semiconductor to 2X nm nodes and beyond, multiple patterning technology is used and planarization of topography become more important and challenging ever before. In order to develop next generation SOC, one of focuses is planarization of topography. SOC with different concepts for improved planarization and the influence of thermal flow temperature, crosslink, film shrinkage, baking conditions on planarization and filling performance are described in this paper.

  4. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J

    1994-01-01

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  5. 43 CFR 3465.2-1 - Inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... enter lands under a lease or license to mine to inspect without advance notice or a search warrant, upon... with the applicable laws, regulations, notices and orders, terms and conditions of leases, licenses...

  6. 43 CFR 3465.2-1 - Inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... enter lands under a lease or license to mine to inspect without advance notice or a search warrant, upon... with the applicable laws, regulations, notices and orders, terms and conditions of leases, licenses...

  7. 43 CFR 3465.2-1 - Inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... enter lands under a lease or license to mine to inspect without advance notice or a search warrant, upon... with the applicable laws, regulations, notices and orders, terms and conditions of leases, licenses...

  8. 43 CFR 3465.2-1 - Inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... enter lands under a lease or license to mine to inspect without advance notice or a search warrant, upon... with the applicable laws, regulations, notices and orders, terms and conditions of leases, licenses...

  9. Contralateral tactile masking between forearms.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2014-03-01

    Masking effects have been demonstrated in which tactile sensitivity is affected when one touch is close to another on the body surface. Such effects are likely a result of local lateral inhibitory circuits that sharpen the spatial tuning of a given tactile receptor. Mutually inhibitory pathways have also been demonstrated between cortical tactile maps of the two halves of the body. Occasional reports have indicated that touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at contralateral locations. Here, we measure the spatial tuning and effect of posture on this contralateral masking effect. Tactile sensitivity was measured on one forearm, while vibrotactile masking stimulation was applied to the opposite arm. Results were compared to sensitivity while vibrotactile stimulation was applied to a control site on the right shoulder. Sensitivity on the forearm was reduced by over 3 dB when the arms were touching and by 0.52 dB when they were held parallel. The masking effect depended on the position of the masking stimulus. Its effectiveness fell off by 1 STD when the stimulus was 29 % of arm length from the corresponding contralateral point. This long-range inhibitory effect in the tactile system suggests a surprisingly intimate relationship between the two sides of the body.

  10. DIVAS: an integrated networked system for mask defect dispositioning and defect management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Saghir; Bald, Dan; Tolani, Vikram; Ghadiali, Firoz

    2003-06-01

    Mask quality is a prime concern to the Intel Mask Operation (IMO) and the Intel wafer fabrication customers. Extreme concern is taken to inspect and repair all defects before shipment. Given that the classification and repair of defects detected by inspection systems is labor intensive, the procedure is prone to human error. Futhermore, since operators manually disposition hundreds of defects each day, it is virtually impossible to eliminate all misclassifications. Due to diffraction effects, not all defects resolve on a wafer. Hence, a defect that an operator may classify as 'real' may indeed be 'lithographically insignifincant'. Conversely an operator may miss a defect that prints, causing a serious reduction in product yield. The DIVAS (Defect, Inspection, Viewing, Archiving and Simulation) system has been described previously and was developed to address these manual classification issues. This paper outlines the fully automated system deployed in a production environment.

  11. The price of information: Increased inspection costs reduce the confirmation bias in visual search.

    PubMed

    Rajsic, Jason; Wilson, Daryl E; Pratt, Jay

    2017-01-31

    In visual search, there is a confirmation bias such that attention is biased towards stimuli that match a target template, which has been attributed to covert costs of updating the templates that guide search [Rajsic, Wilson, & Pratt, 2015. Confirmation bias in visual search. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1037/xhp0000090 ]. In order to provide direct evidence for this speculation, the present study increased the cost of inspections in search by using gaze- and mouse-contingent searches, which restrict the manner in which information in search displays can be accrued, and incur additional motor costs (in the case of mouse-contingent searches). In a fourth experiment, we rhythmically mask elements in the search display to induce temporal inspection costs. Our results indicated that confirmation bias is indeed attenuated when inspection costs are increased. We conclude that confirmation bias results from the low-cost strategy of matching information to a single, concrete visual template, and that more sophisticated guidance strategies will be used when sufficiently beneficial. This demonstrates that search guidance itself comes at a cost, and that the form of guidance adopted in a given search depends on a comparison between guidance costs and the expected benefits of their implementation.

  12. Informational masking and musical training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxenham, Andrew J.; Fligor, Brian J.; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald

    2003-09-01

    The relationship between musical training and informational masking was studied for 24 young adult listeners with normal hearing. The listeners were divided into two groups based on musical training. In one group, the listeners had little or no musical training; the other group was comprised of highly trained, currently active musicians. The hypothesis was that musicians may be less susceptible to informational masking, which is thought to reflect central, rather than peripheral, limitations on the processing of sound. Masked thresholds were measured in two conditions, similar to those used by Kidd et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 3475-3480 (1994)]. In both conditions the signal was comprised of a series of repeated tone bursts at 1 kHz. The masker was comprised of a series of multitone bursts, gated with the signal. In one condition the frequencies of the masker were selected randomly for each burst; in the other condition the masker frequencies were selected randomly for the first burst of each interval and then remained constant throughout the interval. The difference in thresholds between the two conditions was taken as a measure of informational masking. Frequency selectivity, using the notched-noise method, was also estimated in the two groups. The results showed no difference in frequency selectivity between the two groups, but showed a large and significant difference in the amount of informational masking between musically trained and untrained listeners. This informational masking task, which requires no knowledge specific to musical training (such as note or interval names) and is generally not susceptible to systematic short- or medium-term training effects, may provide a basis for further studies of analytic listening abilities in different populations.

  13. Production mask composition checking flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shou-Yuan; Yang, Chuen-Huei; Tsai, Joe; Wang, Alice; Lin, Roger; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin; Lin, Ling-Chieh; Liao, Hung-Yueh; Tsai, Jenny; Bowhill, Amanda; Vu, Hien; Russell, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The mask composition checking flow is an evolution of the traditional mask rule check (MRC). In order to differentiate the flow from MRC, we call it Mask Data Correctness Check (MDCC). The mask house does MRC only to identify process limitations including writing, etching, metrology, etc. There still exist many potential errors that could occur when the frame, main circuit and dummies all together form a whole reticle. The MDCC flow combines the design rule check (DRC) and MRC concepts to adapt to the complex patterns in today's wafer production technologies. Although photomask data has unique characteristics, the MRC tool in Calibre® MDP can easily achieve mask composition by using the Extended MEBES job deck (EJB) format. In EJB format, we can customize the combination of any input layers in an IC design layout format, such as OASIS. Calibre MDP provides section-based processing for many standard verification rule format (SVRF) commands that support DRC-like checks on mask data. Integrating DRC-like checking with EJB for layer composition, we actually perform reticle-level DRC, which is the essence of MDCC. The flow also provides an early review environment before the photomask pattern files are available. Furthermore, to incorporate the MDCC in our production flow, runtime is one of the most important indexes we consider. When the MDCC is included in the tape-out flow, the runtime impact is very limited. Calibre, with its multi-threaded processes and good scalability, is the key to achieving acceptable runtime. In this paper, we present real case runtime data for 28nm and 14nm technology nodes, and prove the practicability of placing MDCC into mass production.

  14. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2003-12-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener's task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model's interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed changes

  15. Psychometric functions for informational masking

    PubMed Central

    Lutfi, Robert A.; Kistler, Doris J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Wightman, Frederic L.

    2010-01-01

    The term informational masking has traditionally been used to refer to elevations in signal threshold resulting from masker uncertainty. In the present study, the method of constant stimuli was used to obtain complete psychometric functions (PFs) from 44 normal-hearing listeners in conditions known to produce varying amounts of informational masking. The listener’s task was to detect a pure-tone signal in the presence of a broadband noise masker (low masker uncertainty) and in the presence of multitone maskers with frequencies and amplitudes that varied at random from one presentation to the next (high masker uncertainty). Relative to the broadband noise condition, significant reductions were observed in both the slope and the upper asymptote of the PF for multitone maskers producing large amounts of informational masking. Slope was affected more for some listeners and conditions while asymptote was affected more for others; consequently, neither parameter alone was highly predictive of individual thresholds or the amount of informational masking. Mean slopes and asymptotes varied nonmonotonically with the number of masker components in a manner similar to mean thresholds, particularly when the estimated effect of energetic masking on thresholds was subtracted out. As in past studies, the threshold data were well described by a model in which trial-by-trial judgments are based on a weighted sum of levels in dB at the output of independent auditory filters. The psychometric data, however, complicated the model’s interpretation in two ways: First, they suggested that, depending on the listener and condition, the weights can either reflect a fixed influence of masker components on each trial or the effect of occasionally mistaking a masker component for the signal from trial to trial. Second, they indicated that in either case the variance of the underlying decision variable as estimated from PF slope is not by itself great enough to account for the observed

  16. 9 CFR 590.128 - Holiday inspection service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Performance... service on a holiday or a day designated in lieu of a holiday, such service is considered holiday work. The official plant must, in advance of such holiday work, request that the inspector in charge...

  17. 9 CFR 590.128 - Holiday inspection service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Performance... service on a holiday or a day designated in lieu of a holiday, such service is considered holiday work. The official plant must, in advance of such holiday work, request that the inspector in charge...

  18. Economics of automation for the design-to-mask interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erck, Wesley

    2009-04-01

    Mask order automation has increased steadily over the years through a variety of individual mask customer implementations. These have been supported by customer-specific software at the mask suppliers to support the variety of customer output formats. Some customers use the SEMI P10 1 standard, some use supplier-specific formats, and some use customer-specific formats. Some customers use little automation and depend instead on close customer-supplier relationships. Implementations are varied in quality and effectiveness. A major factor which has prolonged the adoption of more advanced and effective solutions has been a lack of understanding of the economic benefits. Some customers think standardized automation mainly benefits the mask supplier in order entry automation, but this ignores a number of other significant benefits which differ dramatically for each party in the supply chain. This paper discusses the nature of those differing advantages and presents simple models suited to four business cases: integrated device manufacturers (IDM), fabless companies, foundries and mask suppliers. Examples and estimates of the financial advantages for these business types will be shown.

  19. UV-NIL mask making and imprint evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Akiko; Sakai, Yuko; Mizuochi, Jun; Hiraka, Takaaki; Yusa, Satoshi; Kuriyama, Koki; Sakaki, Masashi; Sutou, Takanori; Sasaki, Shiho; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2008-05-01

    UV NIL shows excellent resolution capability with remarkable low line edge roughness, and has been attracting pioneers in the industry who were searching for the finest patterns. We have been focused on the resolution improvement in mask making, and with a 100kV acceleration voltage EB writer process, we have achieved down to 18nm resolution, and have established a mask making process to meet the requirements of the pioneers. Usually such masks needed just a small field (several hundred microns square or so). Now, UV NIL exploration seems to have reached the step of feasibility study for mass production. Here, instead of a small field, a full chip field mask is required, though the resolution demand is not as tough as for the extremely advanced usage. The 100kV EB writers are adopting spot beams to generate the pattern and have a fatally low throughput if we need full chip writing. In this work, we focused on the 50keV variable shaped beam (VSB) EB writers, which are used in current 4X photomask manufacturing. The 50kV VSB writers can generate full chip pattern in a reasonable time, and by choosing the right patterning material and process, we could achieve resolution down to 32nm. Our initial results of 32nm class NIL masks with full chip field size will be shown and resolution improvement plan to further technology nodes will be discussed.

  20. A novel method to quantify the complex mask patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yu-Lung; Sun, Che-Yuan; Chuang, Shu-Chuan; Luo, Woei-Bin; Hu, Jia-Rui; Chen, Hsiang-Lin; Lin, Hua-Tai; Ke, Chih-Ming; Gau, Tsai-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Immersion technology has successfully extends the application of ArF lithography in the semiconductor. However, as we further push the k1 factor below 0.3, the patterning fidelities degrade significantly. In this paper, a novel method to quantify the mask fidelity of complex 2D patterns is proposed. With this method, the critical dimension (CD) error of both edge placement error (EPE) and corner rounding can be well described by using 2 indices "bias" and "blur" respectively. The "bias" is defined as the CD offset between the mask and the targets, and the "blur" is a derived term that can well represent the mask rounding. These 2 indices are not only able to describe the mask quality but also able to link with model parameters that are used in optical proximity correction (OPC) and some other applications. In this paper, we demonstrate the methodology and quantify the actual mask quality on the complex and critical 2D patterning in the advanced nodes.

  1. The man in the mask.

    PubMed

    Zugibe, F T; Costello, J T; Breithaupt, M K

    1987-05-01

    A skeletonized body, wearing a black leather bondage mask, was found in a Revolutionary War smokehouse cave with two bullet holes in the back of the head. The body was skeletonized up to the maxillary area but the head region under the mask was well preserved and permitted a positive visual identification. There was evidence that the body had been eaten by small animals and subsequently burned. Investigations into this brutal murder revealed a tale of a bizarre sadomasochistic ritual that attained national prominence.

  2. Aperture masking interferometry research simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Luo, Qiufeng; Fan, Weijun; Zhang, Xian Ling; Tao, Chunkan; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhou, Bifang; Chen, Hanliang

    2004-10-01

    Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) is one of the high-resolution astronomical image observation technologies. It is also an important research way to the Optical Aperture Synthesis (OAS). The theory of OAS is simply introduced and AMI simulation method is raised. The mathematics model is built and the interferogram fringes are got. The aperture mask u-v coverage is discussed and one image reconstruction method is done. The reconstructed image result is got with CLEAN method. Shortcoming of this work is also referred and the future research work is mentioned at last.

  3. Federal Aviation Administration aircraft inspection research and develoment programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christopher D.

    1996-11-01

    A substantial and coordinated program in inspection system research was initiated at the FAA Technical Center in 1990 as part of the National Aging Aircraft Research Program. the primary objectives of the inspection systems initiative are to develop improved inspection techniques to address specific aging airframe and engine inspection problems and to evaluate and validate existing and emerging inspection systems. Advanced conventional technologies, emerging technologies, or combinations of technologies are investigated for their ability to accurately and reliably detect cracks, disbonds, corrosion, and other damage. This paper will present an overview of FAA inspection system research initiatives, but will focus primarily on the technical issues which have defined and prioritized those initiatives.

  4. Multiple beam mask writers: an industry solution to the write time crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Lloyd C.

    2010-09-01

    The semiconductor industry is under constant pressure to reduce production costs even as technology complexity increases. Lithography represents the most expensive process due to its high capital equipment costs and the implementation of low-k1 lithographic processes, which has added to the complexity of making masks through the greater use of optical proximity correction, pixelated masks, and double or triple patterning. Each of these mask technologies allows the production of semiconductors at future nodes while extending the utility of current immersion tools. Low k1 patterning complexity combined with increased data due to smaller feature sizes is driving extremely long mask write times. While a majority of the industry is willing to accept mask write times of up to 24 hours, evidence suggests that the write times for many masks at the 22 nm node and beyond will be significantly longer. It has been estimated that $50M+ in non-recurring engineering (NRE) costs will be required to develop a multiple beam mask writer system, yet the business case to recover this kind of investment is not strong. Moreover, funding such a development is a high risk for an individual supplier. The problem is compounded by a disconnect between the tool customer (the mask supplier) and the final mask customer that will bear the increased costs if a high speed writer is not available. Since no individual company will likely risk entering this market, some type of industry-wide funding model will be needed. Because SEMATECH's member companies strongly support a multiple beam technology for mask writers to reduce the write time and cost of 193 nm and EUV masks, SEMATECH plans to pursue an advanced mask writer program in 2011 and 2012. In 2010, efforts will focus on identifying a funding model to address the investment to develop such a technology.

  5. The Marine Mask of War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-10

    America’s Army. To the Marines, it is teamwork and the subordination of the individual to the common good of the unit. First person pronouns are shunned...As demonstrated over the last decade, this versatility and cost effectiveness is a good deal for the American taxpayer. Having examined the Mask

  6. Imaging With the IBIS Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berná, J. A.; Torrejón, J. M.; Bernabeu, G.

    2001-03-01

    We present very preliminary results on the imaging capabilities of the IBIS instrument, the gamma ray imager on board ESA's INTEGRAL satellite, regarding the coded mask subsystem. For this purpose we perform a simulation of a pointed observation to the Galactic Centre region and investigate the detection of the most prominent sources.

  7. Masked Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Hansen, Tine W.; Boggia, José; Liu, Yanping; Asayama, Kei; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Filipovský, Jan; Imai, Yutaka; Wang, Jiguang; Ibsen, Hans; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. Prevalence of masked hypertension in untreated normotensive participants was higher (P<0.0001) among 229 diabetics (29.3%, n=67) than among 5486 nondiabetics (18.8%, n=1031). Over a median of 11.0 years of follow-up, the adjusted risk for a composite cardiovascular end point in untreated diabetic-masked hypertensives tended to be higher than in normotensives (hazard rate [HR], 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97–3.97; P=0.059), similar to untreated stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 1.07; CI, 0.58–1.98; P=0.82), but less than stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.53; CI, 0.29–0.99; P=0.048). In contrast, cardiovascular risk was not significantly different in antihypertensive-treated diabetic-masked hypertensives, as compared with the normotensive comparator group (HR, 1.13; CI, 0.54–2.35; P=0.75), stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 0.91; CI, 0.49–1.69; P=0.76), and stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.65; CI, 0.35–1.20; P=0.17). In the untreated diabetic-masked hypertensive population, mean conventional systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 129.2±8.0/76.0±7.3 mm Hg, and mean daytime systolic/diastolic blood pressure 141.5±9.1/83.7±6.5 mm Hg. In conclusion, masked hypertension occurred in 29% of untreated diabetics, had comparable cardiovascular risk as stage 1 hypertension, and would require considerable reduction in conventional blood pressure to reach daytime ambulatory treatment goal. Importantly, many hypertensive diabetics when receiving antihypertensive therapy can present with normalized conventional and elevated ambulatory blood pressure that mimics masked hypertension. PMID:23478096

  8. "The Mask Who Wasn't There": Visual Masking Effect with the Perceptual Absence of the Mask

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Amandine Eve; Riou, Benoit; Muller, Dominique; Dabic, Stéphanie; Versace, Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Does a visual mask need to be perceptually present to disrupt processing? In the present research, we proposed to explore the link between perceptual and memory mechanisms by demonstrating that a typical sensory phenomenon (visual masking) can be replicated at a memory level. Experiment 1 highlighted an interference effect of a visual mask on the…

  9. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  10. Method for mask repair using defect compensation

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Donald W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    A method for repair of amplitude and/or phase defects in lithographic masks. The method involves modifying or altering a portion of the absorber pattern on the surface of the mask blank proximate to the mask defect to compensate for the local disturbance (amplitude or phase) of the optical field due to the defect.

  11. 21 CFR 868.5600 - Venturi mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venturi mask. 868.5600 Section 868.5600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5600 Venturi mask. (a) Identification. A venturi mask is...

  12. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere... emission masks outlined in this section. Unless otherwise stated, per paragraphs (d)(4), (e)(4), and (m)...

  13. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere... emission masks outlined in this section. Unless otherwise stated, per paragraphs (d)(4), (e)(4), and (o)...

  14. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere... emission masks outlined in this section. Unless otherwise stated, per paragraphs (d)(4), (e)(4), and (o)...

  15. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere... emission masks outlined in this section. Unless otherwise stated, per paragraphs (d)(4), (e)(4), and (m)...

  16. 47 CFR 90.210 - Emission masks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emission masks. 90.210 Section 90.210... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES General Technical Standards § 90.210 Emission masks. Except as indicated elsewhere... emission masks outlined in this section. Unless otherwise stated, per paragraphs (d)(4), (e)(4), and (m)...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5580 - Oxygen mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxygen mask. 868.5580 Section 868.5580 Food and... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5580 Oxygen mask. (a) Identification. An oxygen mask is a device placed over a patient's nose, mouth, or tracheostomy to administer oxygen or aerosols. (b)...

  2. Object Substitution Masking Induced by Illusory Masks: Evidence for Higher Object-Level Locus of Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Nobuyuki; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    A briefly presented target can be rendered invisible by a lingering sparse mask that does not even touch it. This form of visual backward masking, called object substitution masking, is thought to occur at the object level of processing. However, it remains unclear whether object-level interference alone produces substitution masking because…

  3. Performance of actinic EUVL mask imaging using a zoneplate microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K; Naulleau, P; Barty, A; Rekawa, S; Kemp, C; Gunion, R; Salmassi, F; Gullikson, E; Anderson, E; Han, H

    2007-09-25

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a dual-mode, scanning and imaging extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope designed for pre-commercial EUV mask research. Dramatic improvements in image quality have been made by the replacement of several critical optical elements, and the introduction of scanning illumination to improve uniformity and contrast. We report high quality actinic EUV mask imaging with resolutions as low as 100-nm half-pitch, (20-nm, 5x wafer equivalent size), and an assessment of the imaging performance based on several metrics. Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements show high contrast imaging for features sizes close to the diffraction-limit. An investigation of the illumination coherence shows that AIT imaging is much more coherent than previously anticipated, with {sigma} below 0.2. Flare measurements with several line-widths show a flare contribution on the order of 2-3% relative intensity in dark regions above the 1.3% absorber reflectivity on the test mask used for these experiments. Astigmatism coupled with focal plane tilt are the dominant aberrations we have observed. The AIT routinely records 250-350 high-quality images in numerous through-focus series per 8-hour shift. Typical exposure times range from 0.5 seconds during alignment, to approximately 20 seconds for high-resolution images.

  4. Performance of actinic EUVL mask imaging using a zoneplatemicroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Barty, Anton; Rekawa,Senajith B.; Kemp, Charles D.; Gunion, Robert F.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Anderson, Erik H.; Han, Hak-Seung

    2007-08-20

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a dual-mode, scanning and imaging extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope designed for pre-commercial EUV mask research. Dramatic improvements in image quality have been made by the replacement of several critical optical elements, and the introduction of scanning illumination to improve uniformity and contrast. We report high quality actinic EUV mask imaging with resolutions as low as 100-nm half-pitch, (20-nm, 5x wafer equivalent size), and an assessment of the imaging performance based on several metrics. Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements show high contrast imaging for features sizes close to the diffraction-limit. An investigation of the illumination coherence shows that AIT imaging is much more coherent than previously anticipated, with {sigma} below 0.2. Flare measurements with several line-widths show a flare contribution on the order of 2-3% relative intensity in dark regions above the 1.3% absorber reflectivity on the test mask used for these experiments. Astigmatism coupled with focal plane tilt are the dominant aberrations we have observed. The AIT routinely records 250-350 high-quality images in numerous through-focus series per 8-hour shift. Typical exposure times range from 0.5 seconds during alignment, to approximately 20 seconds for high-resolution images.

  5. Actinic imaging of native and programmed defects on a full-field mask

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.; Fontaine, B. La; Tchikoulaeva, A.; Holfeld, C.

    2010-03-12

    We describe the imaging and characterization of native defects on a full field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask, using several reticle and wafer inspection modes. Mask defect images recorded with the SEMA TECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), an EUV-wavelength (13.4 nm) actinic microscope, are compared with mask and printed-wafer images collected with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and deep ultraviolet (DUV) inspection tools. We observed that defects that appear to be opaque in the SEM can be highly transparent to EUV light, and inversely, defects that are mostly transparent to the SEM can be highly opaque to EUV. The nature and composition of these defects, whether they appear on the top surface, within the multilayer coating, or on the substrate as buried bumps or pits, influences both their significance when printed, and their detectability with the available techniques. Actinic inspection quantitatively predicts the characteristics of printed defect images in ways that may not be possible with non-EUV techniques. As a quantitative example, we investigate the main structural characteristics of a buried pit defect based on EUV through-focus imaging.

  6. Performance of GFIS mask repair system for various mask materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Fumio; Kozakai, Tomokazu; Matsuda, Osamu; Yasaka, Anto; Yoshikawa, Shingo; Kanno, Koichi; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Naoya

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a new focused ion beam (FIB) technology using a gas field ion source (GFIS) for mask repair. Meanwhile, since current high-end photomasks do not have high durability in exposure nor cleaning, some new photomask materials are proposed. In 2012, we reported that our GFIS system had repaired a representative new material "A6L2". It is currently expected to extend the application range of GFIS technology for various new materials and various defect shapes. In this study, we repaired a single bridge, a triple bridge and a missing hole on a phase shift mask (PSM) of "A6L2", and also repaired single bridges on a binary mask of molybdenum silicide (MoSi) material "W4G" and a PSM of high transmittance material "SDC1". The etching selectivity between those new materials and quartz were over 4:1. There were no significant differences of pattern shapes on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images between repair and non-repair regions. All the critical dimensions (CD) at repair regions were less than +/-3% of those at normal ones on an aerial image metrology system (AIMS). Those results demonstrated that GFIS technology is a reliable solution of repairing new material photomasks that are candidates for 1X nm generation.

  7. Protection of extreme ultraviolet lithography masks. II. Showerhead flow mitigation of nanoscale particulate contamination [Protection of EUV lithography masks II: Showerhead flow mitigation of nanoscale particulate contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Torczynski, John R.; Geller, Anthony S.; Gallis, Michael A.; Rader, Daniel J.; Chilese, Frank C.; Garcia, Rudy F.; Delgado, Gil

    2015-03-27

    An analysis is presented of a method to protect the reticle (mask) in an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask inspection tool using a showerhead plenum to provide a continuous flow of clean gas over the surface of a reticle. The reticle is suspended in an inverted fashion (face down) within a stage/holder that moves back and forth over the showerhead plenum as the reticle is inspected. It is essential that no particles of 10-nm diameter or larger be deposited on the reticle during inspection. Particles can originate from multiple sources in the system, and mask protection from each source is explicitly analyzed. The showerhead plate has an internal plenum with a solid conical wall isolating the aperture. The upper and lower surfaces of the plate are thin flat sheets of porous-metal material. These porous sheets form the top and bottom showerheads that supply the region between the showerhead plate and the reticle and the region between the conical aperture and the Optics Zone box with continuous flows of clean gas. The model studies show that the top showerhead provides robust reticle protection from particles of 10-nm diameter or larger originating from the Reticle Zone and from plenum surfaces contaminated by exposure to the Reticle Zone. Protection is achieved with negligible effect on EUV transmission. Furthermore, the bottom showerhead efficiently protects the reticle from nanoscale particles originating from the Optics Zone.

  8. Protection of extreme ultraviolet lithography masks. II. Showerhead flow mitigation of nanoscale particulate contamination [Protection of EUV lithography masks II: Showerhead flow mitigation of nanoscale particulate contamination

    DOE PAGES

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Torczynski, John R.; Geller, Anthony S.; ...

    2015-03-27

    An analysis is presented of a method to protect the reticle (mask) in an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask inspection tool using a showerhead plenum to provide a continuous flow of clean gas over the surface of a reticle. The reticle is suspended in an inverted fashion (face down) within a stage/holder that moves back and forth over the showerhead plenum as the reticle is inspected. It is essential that no particles of 10-nm diameter or larger be deposited on the reticle during inspection. Particles can originate from multiple sources in the system, and mask protection from each source is explicitlymore » analyzed. The showerhead plate has an internal plenum with a solid conical wall isolating the aperture. The upper and lower surfaces of the plate are thin flat sheets of porous-metal material. These porous sheets form the top and bottom showerheads that supply the region between the showerhead plate and the reticle and the region between the conical aperture and the Optics Zone box with continuous flows of clean gas. The model studies show that the top showerhead provides robust reticle protection from particles of 10-nm diameter or larger originating from the Reticle Zone and from plenum surfaces contaminated by exposure to the Reticle Zone. Protection is achieved with negligible effect on EUV transmission. Furthermore, the bottom showerhead efficiently protects the reticle from nanoscale particles originating from the Optics Zone.« less

  9. Impact of mask CDU and local CD variation on intra-field CDU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Junji; Mouraille, Orion; Finders, Jo; Higuchi, Masaru; Kojima, Yosuke; Sato, Shunsuke; Morimoto, Hiroaki

    2012-11-01

    The control of critical dimension uniformity (CDU), especially intra-field CDU, is an important aspect for advanced lithography, and this property must be controlled very tightly since it affects all of the exposure fields. It is well known that the influence of the mask CDU on the wafer intra-field CDU is becoming dominant because the mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) is quite high for low-k1 lithography. Additionally, the abovementioned factors impact the CDU through global (field-level) and local (grating-level) variations. In this paper, we analyze in detail CDU budgets by clarifying the impact of local CD variation. The 50-nm staggered hole features using Att-PSM showed a mask global CDU of 1.64 nm (3sigma at the mask level) and a wafer intra-field CDU of 2.30 nm, indicating that the mask global CDU was a major part of the intra-field CDU. By compensating for the contribution of the mask CD, the wafer intra-field CDU can be reduced to 0.986 nm. We analyzed the budgets of wafer intra-field CDU, which is caused by local CD variation (mask and process) and measurement noise. We determined that a primary cause of the wafer intra-field CDU after applying a mask CD correction was these local CD variations, which might disturb the proper use of dose correction for the mask CD. We demonstrated that the impact of mask local CD variation on the correction flow can be greatly reduced by averaging multiple point measurements within a small area, and therefore discuss the optimum conditions allowing for an accurate intra-field CDU determination. We also consider optimization of the CD sampling scheme in order to apply a dose correction on an exposure system to compensate for the mask CDU.

  10. Spin-on-carbon hard masks utilising fullerene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alan G.; Frommhold, Andreas; Lada, Tom; Bowen, J.; el Otell, Z.; Robinson, Alex P. G.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a range of fullerene containing materials for use as organic hard masks. Recent advances in material development are reported together with some results from external evaluations of the original HM100 series. Initial results for the new HM340-383-010 formulation show it to have a high thermal stability (~5.5 % mass loss at 400°C) and a very high carbon content (at 95.3%), offering high etch durability.

  11. Improving vision by pupil masking

    PubMed Central

    Bonaque-González, Sergio; Ríos-Rodríguez, Susana; López-Gil, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    We propose an alternative solution to improve visual quality by spatially modulating the amplitude of light passing into the eye (related to the eye's transmittance), in contrast to traditional correction of the wavefront phase (related to the local refractive power). Numerical simulations show that masking the aberrated areas at the pupil plane should enhance visual function, especially in highly aberrated eyes. This correction could be implemented in practice using customized contact or intraocular lenses. PMID:27446688

  12. Reflective Occultation Mask for Evaluation of Occulter Designs for Planet Finding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Lyon, Richard; Shiri, Shahram; Roman, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Advanced formation flying occulter designs utilize a large occulter mask flying in formation with an imaging telescope to block and null starlight to allow imaging of faint planets in exosolar systems. A paper describes the utilization of subscale reflective occultation masks to evaluate formation flying occulter designs. The use of a reflective mask allows mounting of the occulter by conventional means and simplifies the test configuration. The innovation alters the test set-up to allow mounting of the mask using standard techniques to eliminate the problems associated with a standard configuration. The modified configuration uses a reflective set-up whereby the star simulator reflects off of a reflective occulting mask and into an evaluation telescope. Since the mask is sized to capture all rays required for the imaging test, it can be mounted directly to a supporting fixture without interfering with the beam. Functionally, the reflective occultation mask reflects light from the star simulator instead of transmitting it, with a highly absorptive carbon nanotube layer simulating the occulter blocking mask. A subscale telescope images the star source and companion dim source that represents a planet. The primary advantage of this is that the occulter can be mounted conventionally instead of using diffractive wires or magnetic levitation.

  13. Spatial release from informational masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakerd, Brad; Aaronson, Neil L.

    2001-05-01

    A new method for investigating spatial release from informational masking was developed and employed in two experiments. The new method is computer controlled and efficient. It employs the versatile coordinate response measure speech stimulus set [Bolia et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107, 1065 (2000)]. The experiments were conducted in an anechoic room, with a primary loudspeaker in front of the listener and a secondary loudspeaker at 60 deg to the right. Target messages were presented from the primary speaker only. For a standard, distractor messages, simultaneous with the target, were also presented from the primary speaker only. Spatial release was measured by presenting the distractors from both primary and secondary speakers with a temporal offset. Experiment 1 fixed the offset (secondary leading, +4 ms) and varied the number of distractors (1 to 3) and the target-to-distractor ratio (-12 to +4 dB). Masking release, sometimes as large as 10 dB, was found for all combinations of these variables. Experiment 2 varied the offset over a wide range of values. Substantial release from masking was found for both positive and negative offsets, but only in the range in which speech echoes are suppressed (<50 ms). [Work supported by NIDCD grant DC 00181.

  14. History and future of mask making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Ken L.

    1996-12-01

    The history of the mask industry has three main periods, which I call the Classical Period, the Dark Ages, and the Renaissance, by analogy with those periods in the history of Western Europe. During the Classical Period, people developed 1X masks and the technology to make them. In the Dark Ages, people exploited the equipment developed during the Classical Period to make 5X reduction reticle, ending the nobility of mask making. In today's Renaissance of mask making, a proliferation of mask types is requiring a rebirth of innovation and creativity. The Renaissance resembles the Classical Period: masks are once again strategic, and technological capability is once again the driver. Meanwhile, the mask industry is carrying forward the productivity and efficiency gains it achieved during the Dark Ages. We must create a new business and economic model to support these changes in the characteristics of the marketplace.

  15. Evaluating Texture Compression Masking Effects Using Objective Image Quality Assessment Metrics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Wesley; Olano, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Texture compression is widely used in real-time rendering to reduce storage and bandwidth requirements. Recent research in compression algorithms has explored both reduced fixed bit rate and variable bit rate algorithms. The results are evaluated at the individual texture level using mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, or visual image inspection. We argue this is the wrong evaluation approach. Compression artifacts in individual textures are likely visually masked in final rendered images and this masking is not accounted for when evaluating individual textures. This masking comes from both geometric mapping of textures onto models and the effects of combining different textures on the same model such as diffuse, gloss, and bump maps. We evaluate final rendered images using rigorous perceptual error metrics. Our method samples the space of viewpoints in a scene, renders the scene from each viewpoint using variations of compressed textures, and then compares each to a ground truth using uncompressed textures from the same viewpoint. We show that masking has a significant effect on final rendered image quality, masking effects and perceptual sensitivity to masking varies by the type of texture, graphics hardware compression algorithms are too conservative, and reduced bit rates are possible while maintaining final rendered image quality.

  16. Initial testing of advanced ground-penetrating radar technology for the inspection of bridge decks: the HERMES and PERES Bridge Inspectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Nigel C.; Chase, Steven B.

    1999-02-01

    Since early 1995 the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has been sponsoring the development of ground-penetrating radar technology to produce a tool for the non-destructive evaluation of bridge decks. Under contract with the FHWA, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory designed and built a system capable of recording data over a 2 meter width during normal traffic flow. The derived system is called `The HERMES Bridge Inspector' (High-speed Electromagnetic Roadway Measurement and Evaluation System) and includes a 64 channel antenna array within a 30 ft trailer. For detailed investigation of portions of a bridge deck, a robotic cart mounted radar has been developed. This cart system is named `The PERES Bridge Inspector' (Precision Electromagnetic Roadway Evaluation System). PERES records data over the chosen area by rastering a single transceiver over the road. Images of the deck interior are reconstructed from the original synthetic aperture data using diffraction tomography. The work presented herein describes the findings of initial experiments conducted to determine the inspection capabilities of these systems. Internal defects such as delaminations, voids and disbonds; and construction details including deck thickness, asphalt overlay thickness and reinforcement layout were the features targeted. The final goal is for these systems, and other non-destructive technologies, to provide information on the condition of the nation's bridges for input to bridge management systems.

  17. High-resolution defect inspection of step-and-flash imprint lithography for 32-nm half-pitch patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; McMackin, Ian; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-03-01

    Step and Flash Imprint involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using KLA-T eS35 and NGR2100 electron beam wafer inspection systems. Defect sizes as small as 8 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  18. High performance mask fabrication process for the next-generation mask production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagawa, Keisuke; Ugajin, Kunihiro; Suenaga, Machiko; Kobayashi, Yoshihito; Motokawa, Takeharu; Hagihara, Kazuki; Saito, Masato; Itoh, Masamitsu

    2014-07-01

    ArF immersion lithography combined with double patterning has been used for fabricating below half pitch 40nm devices. However, when pattern size shrinks below 20nm, we must use new technology like quadruple patterning process or next generation lithography (NGL) solutions. Moreover, with change in lithography tool, next generation mask production will be needed. According to ITRS 2013, fabrication of finer patterns less than 15nm will be required on mask plate in NGL mask production 5 years later [1]. In order to fabricate finer patterns on mask, higher resolution EB mask writer and high performance fabrication process will be required. In a previous study, we investigated a potential of mask fabrication process for finer patterning and achieved 17nm dense line pattern on mask plate by using VSB (Variable Shaped Beam) type EB mask writer and chemically amplified resist [2][3]. After a further investigation, we constructed higher performance mask process by using new EB mask writer EBM9000. EBM9000 is the equipment supporting hp16nm generation's photomask production and has high accuracy and high throughput. As a result, we achieved 15.5nm pattern on mask with high productivity. Moreover, from evaluation of isolated pattern, we proved that current mask process has the capability for sub-10nm pattern. These results show that the performance of current mask fabrication process have the potential to fabricate the next-generation mask.

  19. Antireflective surface patterned by rolling mask lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Oliver; Geddes, Joseph B.; Aryal, Mukti; Perez, Joseph; Wassei, Jonathan; McMackin, Ian; Kobrin, Boris

    2014-03-01

    A growing number of commercial products such as displays, solar panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs), automotive and architectural glass are driving demand for glass with high performance surfaces that offer anti-reflective, self-cleaning, and other advanced functions. State-of-the-art coatings do not meet the desired performance characteristics or cannot be applied over large areas in a cost-effective manner. "Rolling Mask Lithography" (RML™) enables highresolution lithographic nano-patterning over large-areas at low-cost and high-throughput. RML is a photolithographic process performed using ultraviolet (UV) illumination transmitted through a soft cylindrical mask as it rolls across a substrate. Subsequent transfer of photoresist patterns into the substrate is achieved using an etching process, which creates a nanostructured surface. The current generation exposure tool is capable of patterning one-meter long substrates with a width of 300 mm. High-throughput and low-cost are achieved using continuous exposure of the resist by the cylindrical photomask. Here, we report on significant improvements in the application of RML™ to fabricate anti-reflective surfaces. Briefly, an optical surface can be made antireflective by "texturing" it with a nano-scale pattern to reduce the discontinuity in the index of refraction between the air and the bulk optical material. An array of cones, similar to the structure of a moth's eye, performs this way. Substrates are patterned using RML™ and etched to produce an array of cones with an aspect ratio of 3:1, which decreases the reflectivity below 0.1%.

  20. EUV mask cleans comparison of frontside and dual-sided concurrent cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Lin Lee; Kindt, Louis; Turley, Christina; Leonhard, Dusty; Boyle, John; Robinson, Chris; Rankin, Jed; Corliss, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The cleaning requirements for EUV masks are more complex than optical masks due to the absence of available EUVcompatible pellicles. EUV masks must therefore be capable of undergoing more than 100 cleaning cycles with minimum impact to lithographic performance. EUV masks are created on substrates with 40 multilayers of silicon and molybdenum to form a Bragg reflector, capped with a 2.5nm-thick ruthenium layer and a tantalum-based absorber; during usage, both ruthenium and absorber are exposed to the cleaning process. The CrN layer on the backside is used to enable electrostatic clamping. This clamp side must also be free of particles that could impact printing and overlay, and particles could also potentially migrate to the frontside and create defects. Thus, the cleaning process must provide decent particle removal efficiencies on both front- and backside while maintaining reflectivity with minimal surface roughness change. In this paper, we report progress developing a concurrent patterned-side and clamped-side cleaning process that achieves minimal reflectivity change over 120 cleaning cycles, with XPS and EDS indicating the presence of ruthenium after 125 cleaning cycles. The change in surface roughness over 100 cleaning cycles is within the noise (0.0086nm) on a mask blank, and SEM inspection of 100nm and 200nm features on patterned masks after undergoing 100 cleaning cycles show no indications of ruthenium pitting or significant surface damage. This process was used on test masks to remove particles from both sides that would otherwise inhibit these masks from being used in the scanner.

  1. Fast mask CD uniformity measurement using zero order diffraction from memory array pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jinseok; Park, Jinhong; Yeo, Jeongho; Choi, Seongwoon; Han, Woosung

    2009-03-01

    CD Uniformity (CDU) control is getting more concerning in lithographic process and required to control tighter as design rule shrinkage. Traditionally CDU is measured through discrete spatial sampling based data and interpolated data map represents uniformity trends within shot and wafer. There is growing requirement on more high sampling resolution for the CDU mapping from wafer. However, it requires huge time consumption for CD measurements with traditional methods like CD-SEM and OCD. To overcome the throughput limitation, there was an approach with inspection tool to measure CD trends on array area which showed good correlation to the traditional CD measurement. In this paper, we suggest a fast mask CD error estimation method using 0th order of diffraction. To accomplish fast measurement, simple macro inspection tool was adopted to cover full wafer area and scan result gives good correlation with mask uniformity data.

  2. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  3. Actinic imaging and evaluation of phase structures on EUV lithography masks

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth; Huh, Sungmin

    2010-09-28

    The authors describe the implementation of a phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct phase and complex amplitude of structures on EUV lithography masks. Many native defects commonly found on EUV reticles are difficult to detect and review accurately because they have a strong phase component. Understanding the complex amplitude of mask features is essential for predictive modeling of defect printability and defect repair. Besides printing in a stepper, the most accurate way to characterize such defects is with actinic inspection, performed at the design, EUV wavelength. Phase defect and phase structures show a distinct through-focus behavior that enables qualitative evaluation of the object phase from two or more high-resolution intensity measurements. For the first time, phase of structures and defects on EUV masks were quantitatively reconstructed based on aerial image measurements, using a modified version of a phase-retrieval algorithm developed to test optical phase shifting reticles.

  4. Improving the performance of the actinic inspection tool with an optimized alignment procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K.A.; Naulleau, P.; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-03-04

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy is an important tool for the investigation of the performance of EUV masks, for detecting the presence and the characteristics of defects, and for evaluating the effectiveness of defect repair techniques. Aerial image measurement bypasses the difficulties inherent to photoresist imaging and enables high data collection speed and flexibility. It provides reliable and quick feedback for the development of masks and lithography system modeling methods. We operate the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), a EUV microscope installed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The AIT is equipped with several high-magnification Fresnel zoneplate lenses, with various numerical aperture values, that enable it image the reflective mask surface with various resolution and magnification settings. Although the AIT has undergone significant recent improvements in terms of imaging resolution and illumination uniformity, there is still room for improvement. In the AIT, an off-axis zoneplate lens collects the light coming from the sample and an image of the sample is projected onto an EUV-sensitive CCD camera. The simplicity of the optical system is particularly helpful considering that the AIT alignment has to be performed every time that a sample or a zoneplate is replaced. The alignment is sensitive to several parameters such as the lens position and orientation, the illumination direction and the sample characteristics. Since the AIT works in high vacuum, there is no direct access to the optics or to the sample during the alignment and the measurements. For all these reasons the alignment procedures and feedback can be complex, and in some cases can reduce the overall data throughput of the system. In this paper we review the main strategies and procedures that have been developed for quick and reliable alignments, and we describe the performance improvements we have achieved, in terms of aberration

  5. Holographically Encoded Volume Phase Masks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-13

    experiments have been performed using an HPM recorded in a 1.97-mm thick photo -thermo-refractive (PTR) glass sample as illustrated in Fig. 1. PTR glass is a...spiral phase plate,” Appl. Opt. 43(12), 2397–2399 (2004). 19. K. Peithmann et al., “Low-spatial-frequency refractive-index changes in iron- doped ...Binary volume phase masks in photo -thermo-refrac- tive glass,” Opt. Lett. 37(7), 1190–1192 (2012). 21. M. Bass, Handbook of Optics, 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill

  6. Software Formal Inspections Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Software Formal Inspections Guidebook is designed to support the inspection process of software developed by and for NASA. This document provides information on how to implement a recommended and proven method for conducting formal inspections of NASA software. This Guidebook is a companion document to NASA Standard 2202-93, Software Formal Inspections Standard, approved April 1993, which provides the rules, procedures, and specific requirements for conducting software formal inspections. Application of the Formal Inspections Standard is optional to NASA program or project management. In cases where program or project management decide to use the formal inspections method, this Guidebook provides additional information on how to establish and implement the process. The goal of the formal inspections process as documented in the above-mentioned Standard and this Guidebook is to provide a framework and model for an inspection process that will enable the detection and elimination of defects as early as possible in the software life cycle. An ancillary aspect of the formal inspection process incorporates the collection and analysis of inspection data to effect continual improvement in the inspection process and the quality of the software subjected to the process.

  7. Electronic Inspection of Beef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, Victor J.; Gammell, Paul M.; Clark, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Two proposed methods for grading beef quality based on inspection by electronic equipment: one method uses television camera to generate image of a cut of beef as customer sees it; other uses ultrasonics to inspect live animal or unsliced carcasses. Both methods show promise for automated meat inspection.

  8. Cost effective machining and inspection of structural ceramic components for advanced high temperature application. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0151

    SciTech Connect

    Abbatiello, L.A.; Haselkorn, M.

    1996-11-29

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was a mutual research and development (R and D) effort among the participants to investigate a range of advanced manufacturing technologies for two silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic materials. The general objective was to identify the most cost-effective part manufacturing processes for the ceramic materials of interest. The focus was determining the relationship between material removal rates, surface quality, and the structural characteristics of each ceramic resulting from three innovative processes. These innovated machining processes were studied using silicon nitride advanced materials. The particular (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) materials of interest were sintered GS-44 from the Norton Company, and reaction-bonded Ceraloy 147-3. The processes studied included the following activities: (1) direct laser machining; (2) rotary ultrasonic machining; and (3) diamond abrasive grinding, including both resinoid and vitreous-bonded grinding wheels. Both friable and non-friable diamond types were included within the abrasive grinding study. The task also conducted a comprehensive survey of European experience in use of ceramic materials, principally aluminum oxide. Originally, the effort of this task was to extend through a prototype manufacturing demonstration of selected engine components. During the execution of this program, however changes were made to the scope of the project, altering the goals. The Program goal became only the development of assessment of their impacts on product strength and surface condition.

  9. Polyurethane Masks Large Areas in Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Polyurethane foam provides effective mask in electroplating of copper or nickel. Thin layer of Turco maskant painted on area to be masked: Layer ensures polyurethane foam removed easily after served its purpose. Component A, isocyanate, and component B, polyol, mixed together and brushed or sprayed on mask area. Mixture reacts, yielding polyurethane foam. Foam prevents deposition of nickel or copper on covered area. New method saves time, increases productivity and uses less material than older procedures.

  10. [A new bite block for laryngeal mask].

    PubMed

    Ohe, Y; Ota, M; Tachibana, C; Aoyama, Y

    2001-05-01

    We devised a new bite block made of a used connector of anesthesia machine (ACOMA medical industry CO., LTD.) for laryngeal mask. Fitness for laryngeal mask and strength against patient's biting are the key for its use. Cutting lengthwise the connector (the outside diameter 22 mm, inside diameter 15-19 mm, 55 mm in length) we made a bite block for laryngeal mask. We studied the strength of a new bite block experimentally and recognized its ability to bear the human biting. We conclude a new bite block for laryngeal mask is clinically useful and can be used during anesthesia for its fitness and safety.

  11. Temporal masking of multidimensional tactual stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hong Z.; Reed, Charlotte M.; Delhorne, Lorraine A.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.; Wan, Natasha

    2003-12-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the temporal masking properties of multidimensional tactual stimulation patterns delivered to the left index finger. The stimuli consisted of fixed-frequency sinusoidal motions in the kinesthetic (2 or 4 Hz), midfrequency (30 Hz), and cutaneous (300 Hz) frequency ranges. Seven stimuli composed of one, two, or three spectral components were constructed at each of two signal durations (125 or 250 ms). Subjects identified target signals under three different masking paradigms: forward masking, backward masking, and sandwiched masking (in which the target is presented between two maskers). Target identification was studied as a function of interstimulus interval (ISI) in the range 0 to 640 ms. For both signal durations, percent-correct scores increased with ISI for each of the three masking paradigms. Scores with forward and backward masking were similar and significantly higher than scores obtained with sandwiched masking. Analyses of error trials revealed that subjects showed a tendency to respond, more often than chance, with the masker, the composite of the masker and target, or the combination of the target and a component of the masker. The current results are compared to those obtained in previous studies of tactual recognition masking with brief cutaneous spatial patterns. The results are also discussed in terms of estimates of information transfer (IT) and IT rate, are compared to previous studies with multidimensional tactual signals, and are related to research on the development of tactual aids for the deaf.

  12. Evaluation of a native vegetation masking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsler, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A crop masking technique based on Ashburn's vegetative index (AVI) was used to evaluate native vegetation as an indicator of crop moisture condition. A mask of the range areas (native vegetation) was generated for each of thirteen Great Plains LANDSAT MSS sample segments. These masks were compared to the digitized ground truth and accuracies were computed. An analysis of the types of errors indicates a consistency in errors among the segments. The mask represents a simple quick-look technique for evaluating vegetative cover.

  13. Study on overlay AEI-ADI shift on contact layer of advanced technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guogui; Hao, Jingan; Xiao, Lihong; Xing, Bin; Jiang, Yuntao; He, Kaiting; Zhang, Qiang; He, Weiming; Liu, Chang; Lin, Yi-Shih; Wu, Qiang; Shi, Xuelong

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a study on the overlay (OVL) shift issue in contact (CT) layer aligned to poly-silicon (short as poly) layer (prior layer) in an advanced technology node [1, 2]. We have showed the wafer level OVL AEI-ADI shift (AEI: After Etch Inspection; ADI: After Developing Inspection; AEI-ADI: AEI minus ADI). Within the shot level map, there exists a center-edge difference. The OVL focus subtraction map can well match the OVL AEI-ADI shift map. Investigation into this interesting correlation finally leads to the conclusion of PR tilt. The film stress of the thick hard mask is responsible for the PR tilt. The method of OVL focus subtraction can therefore be a powerful and convenient tool to represent the OVL mark profile. It is also important to take into account the film deposition when investigating OVL AEI-ADI shift.

  14. Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT) - an interactive training tool for {open_quotes}challenge inspections{close_quotes} under the chemical weapons convention

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, P.R.

    1997-08-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspection Teams and the Inspected Parties. Current training techniques include lectures, table-top inspections, and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. Under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) challenge inspections are short-notice inspections that may occur anywhere, anytime, and with no right of refusal. The time interval between notice of intent to inspect a facility and the arrival of inspectors at the facility may be as short as 72 hours. Therefore, advance training is important. ACE-IT is used for training both the Inspection Team (inspector) and the Inspected Party (host) to conduct a hypothetical challenge inspection under the CWC. An exercise moderator controls the exercise. The training covers all of the events in the challenge inspection regime, from initial notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities. But the primary emphasis of the training tool is on conducting the inspection itself, and in particular, the concept of managed access. Managed access is used to assure the inspectors that the facility is in compliance with the CWC, while protecting sensitive information that is not related to the CWC.

  15. Mask lithography for display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, T.; Ekberg, P.

    2010-05-01

    The last ten years have seen flat displays conquer our briefcases, desktops, and living rooms. There has been an enormous development in production technology, not least in lithography and photomasks. Current masks for large displays are more than 2 m2 and make 4-6 1X prints on glass substrates that are 9 m2. One of the most challenging aspects of photomasks for displays is the so called mura, stripes or blemishes which cause visible defects in the finished display. For the future new and even tighter maskwriter specifications are driven by faster transistors and more complex pixel layouts made necessary by the market's wish for still better image quality, multi-touch panels, 3D TVs, and the next wave of e-book readers. Large OLED screens will pose new challenges. Many new types of displays will be lowcost and use simple lithography, but anything which can show video and high quality photographic images needs a transistor backplane and sophisticated masks for its production.

  16. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  17. Software Formal Inspections Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Software Formal Inspections Standard (hereinafter referred to as Standard) is applicable to NASA software. This Standard defines the requirements that shall be fulfilled by the software formal inspections process whenever this process is specified for NASA software. The objective of this Standard is to define the requirements for a process that inspects software products to detect and eliminate defects as early as possible in the software life cycle. The process also provides for the collection and analysis of inspection data to improve the inspection process as well as the quality of the software.

  18. In-service pressure vessel inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Marvin

    1998-03-01

    Eliminate any doubt that the vessel condition is suitable for continued operation through a planned inspection program that can mitigate or avoid failure of a pressure vessel due to corrosion or erosion. Proper inspection and documentation help you in identifying the problem and confirming the actual thickness leading to properly correcting deficiencies. Proper inspection is the antidote for any inspection program. Vessel life can be extended, risk can be minimized and unscheduled downtime can be prevented by implementing and managing your inspection program. A successful program includes maintaining accurate records, conducting inspections in regular intervals, and taking proper action on deficiencies. Therefore, you will know what you have and the condition of your equipment. Pressure vessel inspections can be classified into two general categories: surface inspection and volumetric inspection. Surface techniques for vessels include two of the commonest types: dye-penetrant and magnetic particle testing. Board qualified inspectors are required to perform these two tests. Volumetric techniques for vessels include three common types: ultrasonic testing, eddy current testing, and radiography. At Abbott the use of advanced NDE (non destructive examination) techniques, ultrasonic b-scan, has provided us with the proper tools to obtain the above objectives. We have been applying ultrasonic b-scan utilizing a pulse echo pitch catch technique to provide us with essential data on each of our pressure vessels. This reduces equipment downtime because the nondestructive examination usually takes place while our vessels are in service. As inspections take place we are able to view a real time image of the defective discontinuities on a video monitor. This ultrasonic b-scan technique is allowing us to perform fast accurate examinations covering up to 96% of the surface area of each pressure vessel.

  19. Set Size and Mask Duration Do Not Interact in Object-Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyropoulos, Ioannis; Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Carter, Wakefield

    2013-01-01

    Object-substitution masking (OSM) occurs when a mask, such as four dots that surround a brief target item, onsets simultaneously with the target and offsets a short time after the target, rather than simultaneously with it. OSM is a reduction in accuracy of reporting the target with the temporally trailing mask, compared with the simultaneously…

  20. Variations in backward masking with different masking stimuli: I. Local interaction versus attentional switch.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Talis; Luiga, Iiris; Põder, Endel

    2005-01-01

    The types of stimuli used as targets and masks considerably change the masking functions in a way that requires us to abandon any single mechanism of masking as the sole explanation of backward masking. In the first of two reports in which the problem of the mask-dependence of masking is addressed, we explore the role of the relative spatial positioning of targets and masks in order to differentiate between local interaction and attentional models. If single letters were masked by double-letter masks then the relative spatial arrangement of the letters, which was changed in order to vary the involvement of metacontrast-like processes, had an effect at shorter SOAs, but not at longer SOAs where strong masking still persisted. This poses difficulties for proposing local contour interaction as the main mechanism of masking. Similarly, crowding effects alone cannot explain the results. Backward masking also involves attention being directed to working-memory processing of the succeeding object while abandoning the preceding object.

  1. AST inspection methods and equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.C.; Acosta, N.J.; Lim, R.

    1995-12-31

    Changes in the regulatory climate regarding Aboveground Storage Tanks (ASTs) and the costs of properly operating and maintaining these structures across the country are resulting in an ever-increasing need for more refined inspection techniques to detect leaks in tanks. The growing maze of new rules and regulations being imposed on tank owners and operators makes the early detection of leaks in storage tanks a desirable goal in order to minimize the results of any unwanted release of stored product to the environment. The costs of removing tanks from service and making repairs to fix problems or to avoid future problems also makes detection of possible leak paths for storage tanks a desirable goal. Much attention is currently being brought by many different parties to the issue of advancing methods of leak detection for storage tanks. A review of the current state of AST inspection methods and equipment may prove informative.

  2. Use of robotics in nondestructive inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Sartell, R.J.; Richards, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Until very recently, nondestructive inspection of aircraft components at McClellan Air Force Base had been done in the traditional way. Ultrasonic inspections have been performed using hand-held equipment. X-ray inspections were performed using film radiography with the x-ray tubes being held on cradles, tripods, or suspended from pendant-operated or manual overhead crane-type fixtures. Implementation of advanced ultrasonic and real-time x-ray systems required that new equipment handling and parts handling methods be devised. Aircraft flight safety considerations demanded that neutron radiography be implemented as an inspection technique in order to find low levels of moisture and corrosion in the F-111 aircraft structure and aerodynamic surfaces. Traditional nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods require removal of suspect panels from the aircraft, including some panels that were not designed to be removed. The solution to these problems was to implement NDI systems that would allow inspection of intact aircraft. A new NDI facility especially designed for the latest in technology is under construction. It will house two large maneuverable x- and n-ray systems. The approx. 90-ft-span gantry robots will scan intact aircraft with real-time x-ray and near real-time n-ray systems. A unique floor/rail-mounted n-ray system will automatically inspect the F-111 aircraft engine bays.

  3. Evaluating Printability of Buried Native EUV Mask Phase Defects through a Modeling and Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, Mihir; Jindal, Vibhu; Basavalingappa, Adarsh; Herbol, Henry; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Jang, Il-Yong; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Marokkey, Sajan; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Pistor, Thomas V.; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2015-03-16

    The availability of defect-free masks is considered to be a critical issue for enabling extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) as the next generation technology. Since completely defect-free masks will be hard to achieve, it is essential to have a good understanding of the printability of the native EUV mask defects. In this work, we performed a systematic study of native mask defects to understand the defect printability caused by them. The multilayer growth over native substrate mask blank defects was correlated to the multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects having similar profiles in terms of their width and height. To model the multilayer growth over the defects, a novel level-set multilayer growth model was used that took into account the tool deposition conditions of the Veeco Nexus ion beam deposition tool. The same tool was used for performing the actual deposition of the multilayer stack over the characterized native defects, thus ensuring a fair comparison between the actual multilayer growth over native defects, and modeled multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects. Further, the printability of the characterized native defects was studied with the SEMATECH-Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), an EUV mask-imaging microscope at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Printability of the modeled regular-shaped defects, which were propagated up the multilayer stack using level-set growth model was studied using defect printability simulations implementing the waveguide algorithm. Good comparison was observed between AIT and the simulation results, thus demonstrating that multilayer growth over a defect is primarily a function of a defect’s width and height, irrespective of its shape. This would allow us to predict printability of the arbitrarily-shaped native EUV mask defects in a systematic and robust manner.

  4. A facial mask comprising Dead Sea mud.

    PubMed

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Mohameed, Hazim A

    2006-01-01

    Many investigators have proved that Dead Sea salt and mud are useful in treating skin disorders and skin diseases. Therefore, the black mud has been extensively used as a base for the preparation of soaps, creams, and unguents for skin care. This study concerns a facial mask made mainly of Dead Sea mud. The effects of temperature and shearing conditions on the rheological behavior of the facial mask were investigated. The mud facial mask exhibited a shear thinning behavior with a yield stress. It was found that the apparent viscosity of the mask has a strong dependence on the shear rate as well as on the temperature. The facial mask exhibited a maximum yield stress and very shear thinning behavior at 40 degrees C, which is attributed to the gelatinization of the polysaccharide used to stabilize the mud particles. On the other hand, the mud mask exhibited a time-independent behavior at low temperatures and shear rates and changed to a thixotropic behavior upon increasing both the temperature and the shear rate. The shear thinning and thixotropic behaviors have a significant importance in the ability of the facial mask to spread on the skin: the Dead Sea mud mask can break down for easy spreading, and the applied film can gain viscosity instantaneously to resist running. Moreover, particle sedimentation, which in this case would negatively affect consumer acceptance of the product, occurs slowly due to high viscosity at rest conditions.

  5. 21 CFR 868.5590 - Scavenging mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scavenging mask. 868.5590 Section 868.5590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5590 Scavenging mask. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 868.5570 - Nonrebreathing mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonrebreathing mask. 868.5570 Section 868.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5570 Nonrebreathing mask....

  7. Spatial processing and visual backward masking.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Michael H

    2008-07-15

    Most theories of visual masking focus prima-rily on the temporal aspects of visual information processing, strongly neglecting spatial factors. In recent years, however, we have shown that this position is not tenable. Spatial aspects cannot be neglected in metacontrast, pattern and un-masking. Here, we review these results.

  8. Spatial processing and visual backward masking

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Most theories of visual masking focus prima-rily on the temporal aspects of visual information processing, strongly neglecting spatial factors. In recent years, however, we have shown that this position is not tenable. Spatial aspects cannot be neglected in metacontrast, pattern and un-masking. Here, we review these results. PMID:20517500

  9. Masking the Feeling of Being Stupid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sally L.

    1988-01-01

    Teaching experience at The Lab School of Washington has shown that learning-disabled children and adults cope with their lack of self-esteem and feelings of stupidity by developing masks to hide their hurt. These include masks of super-competence, helplessness, invisibility, clowning, injustice collecting, indifference, boredom, outrageousness,…

  10. Implicit Semantic Perception in Object Substitution Masking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhew, Stephanie C.; Visser, Troy A. W.; Lipp, Ottmar V.; Dux, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    Decades of research on visual perception has uncovered many phenomena, such as binocular rivalry, backward masking, and the attentional blink, that reflect "failures of consciousness". Although stimuli do not reach awareness in these paradigms, there is evidence that they nevertheless undergo semantic processing. Object substitution masking (OSM),…

  11. Computing Challenges in Coded Mask Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This slide presaentation reviews the complications and challenges in developing computer systems for Coded Mask Imaging telescopes. The coded mask technique is used when there is no other way to create the telescope, (i.e., when there are wide fields of view, high energies for focusing or low energies for the Compton/Tracker Techniques and very good angular resolution.) The coded mask telescope is described, and the mask is reviewed. The coded Masks for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) instruments are shown, and a chart showing the types of position sensitive detectors used for the coded mask telescopes is also reviewed. Slides describe the mechanism of recovering an image from the masked pattern. The correlation with the mask pattern is described. The Matrix approach is reviewed, and other approaches to image reconstruction are described. Included in the presentation is a review of the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) / High Energy Telescope (HET), with information about the mission, the operation of the telescope, comparison of the EXIST/HET with the SWIFT/BAT and details of the design of the EXIST/HET.

  12. Robotics application for in-service inspection of the ALMR

    SciTech Connect

    Kwant, W.; Ramsour, N.L.; Sweeney, F.J.

    1993-06-01

    The US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) Program is developing and licensing a reactor system that is compact for factory fabrication and modular construction. The design includes provisions for in-service inspection to verify performance and safety capabilities throughout the life of the plant. A DOE sponsored robotics team, comprised of members from the universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas and from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is developing advanced inspection equipment using robotics for nuclear application. This equipment is compact and remotely operated and particularly suited for inspection of the ALMR. Extensive 3D simulations are used to refine and demonstrate the inspection methods. This paper focuses on inspection methods for the reactor vessel and the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS). Inspection capabilities are included for visual inspection of the reactor vessel outer surface and volumetric inspection of the welds. The robotics team is devising a compact crawler design with the capabilities to perform these inspections. Similarly, various robot concepts are being evaluated for accomplishing the RVACS visual inspection and cleaning procedures.

  13. Nasal mask ventilation is better than face mask ventilation in edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Mukul Chandra; Rana, Sandeep; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Vishal, Vindhya; Sikdar, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Face mask ventilation of the edentulous patient is often difficult as ineffective seating of the standard mask to the face prevents attainment of an adequate air seal. The efficacy of nasal ventilation in edentulous patients has been cited in case reports but has never been investigated. Material and Methods: Consecutive edentulous adult patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, during a 17-month period, were prospectively evaluated. After induction of anesthesia and administration of neuromuscular blocker, lungs were ventilated with a standard anatomical face mask of appropriate size, using a volume controlled anesthesia ventilator with tidal volume set at 10 ml/kg. In case of inadequate ventilation, the mask position was adjusted to achieve best-fit. Inspired and expired tidal volumes were measured. Thereafter, the face mask was replaced by a nasal mask and after achieving best-fit, the inspired and expired tidal volumes were recorded. The difference in expired tidal volumes and airway pressures at best-fit with the use of the two masks and number of patients with inadequate ventilation with use of the masks were statistically analyzed. Results: A total of 79 edentulous patients were recruited for the study. The difference in expiratory tidal volumes with the use of the two masks at best-fit was statistically significant (P = 0.0017). Despite the best-fit mask placement, adequacy of ventilation could not be achieved in 24.1% patients during face mask ventilation, and 12.7% patients during nasal mask ventilation and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Nasal mask ventilation is more efficient than standard face mask ventilation in edentulous patients. PMID:27625477

  14. Lighting Studies for Fuelling Machine Deployed Visual Inspection Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, Carl; Griffith, George

    2015-04-01

    Under subcontract to James Fisher Nuclear, Ltd., INL has been reviewing advanced vision systems for inspection of graphite in high radiation, high temperature, and high pressure environments. INL has performed calculations and proof-of-principle measurements of optics and lighting techniques to be considered for visual inspection of graphite fuel channels in AGR reactors in UK.

  15. 8 CFR 235.7 - Automated inspection services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 235.7 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS INSPECTION OF... inspected, identified, and screened in advance of approval for participation in the program by an... application for entry by the alien program participants on the date PORTPASS is used. United States...

  16. Mask process matching using a model based data preparation solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Brian; Saib, Mohamed; Figueiro, Thiago; Petroni, Paolo; Progler, Chris; Schiavone, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Process matching is the ability to precisely reproduce the signature of a given fabrication process while using a different one. A process signature is typically described as systematic CD variation driven by feature geometry as a function of feature size, local density or distance to neighboring structures. The interest of performing process matching is usually to address differences in the mask fabrication process without altering the signature of the mask, which is already validated by OPC models and already used in production. The need for such process matching typically arises from the expansion of the production capacity within the same or different mask fabrication facilities, from the introduction of new, perhaps more advanced, equipment to deliver same process of record masks and/or from the re-alignment of processes which have altered over time. For state-of-the-art logic and memory mask processes, such matching requirements can be well below 2nm and are expected to reduce below 1nm in near future. In this paper, a data preparation solution for process matching is presented and discussed. Instead of adapting the physical process itself, a calibrated model is used to modify the data to be exposed by the source process in order to induce the results to match the one obtained while running the target process. This strategy consists in using the differences among measurements from the source and target processes, in the calibration of a single differential model. In this approach, no information other than the metrology results is required from either process. Experimental results were obtained by matching two different processes at Photronics. The standard deviation between both processes was of 2.4nm. After applying the process matching technique, the average absolute difference between the processes was reduced to 1.0nm with a standard deviation of 1.3nm. The methods used to achieve the result will be described along with implementation considerations, to

  17. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Moore, F.W.

    1985-04-05

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

  18. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Francis W.

    1987-01-01

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected.

  19. Masking property of quantum random cipher with phase mask encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohma, Masaki; Hirota, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    The security analysis of physical encryption protocol based on coherent pulse position modulation (CPPM) originated by Yuen is one of the most interesting topics in the study of cryptosystem with a security level beyond the Shannon limit. Although the implementation of CPPM scheme has certain difficulty, several methods have been proposed recently. This paper deals with the CPPM encryption in terms of symplectic transformation, which includes a phase mask encryption as a special example, and formulates a unified security analysis for such encryption schemes. Specifically, we give a lower bound of Eve's symbol error probability using reliability function theory to ensure that our proposed system exceeds the Shannon limit. Then we assume the secret key is given to Eve after her heterodyne measurement. Since this assumption means that Eve has a great advantage in the sense of the conventional cryptography, the lower bound of her error indeed ensures the security level beyond the Shannon limit. In addition, we show some numerical examples of the security performance.

  20. Wafer hot spot identification through advanced photomask characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yohan; Green, Michael; McMurran, Jeff; Ham, Young; Lin, Howard; Lan, Andy; Yang, Richer; Lung, Mike

    2016-10-01

    As device manufacturers progress through advanced technology nodes, limitations in standard 1-dimensional (1D) mask Critical Dimension (CD) metrics are becoming apparent. Historically, 1D metrics such as Mean to Target (MTT) and CD Uniformity (CDU) have been adequate for end users to evaluate and predict the mask impact on the wafer process. However, the wafer lithographer's process margin is shrinking at advanced nodes to a point that the classical mask CD metrics are no longer adequate to gauge the mask contribution to wafer process error. For example, wafer CDU error at advanced nodes is impacted by mask factors such as 3-dimensional (3D) effects and mask pattern fidelity on subresolution assist features (SRAFs) used in Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) models of ever-increasing complexity. These items are not quantifiable with the 1D metrology techniques of today. Likewise, the mask maker needs advanced characterization methods in order to optimize the mask process to meet the wafer lithographer's needs. These advanced characterization metrics are what is needed to harmonize mask and wafer processes for enhanced wafer hot spot analysis. In this paper, we study advanced mask pattern characterization techniques and their correlation with modeled wafer performance.

  1. The Sensitivity of Coded Mask Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2008-01-01

    Simple formulae are often used to estimate the sensitivity of coded mask X-ray or gamma-ray telescopes, but t,hese are strictly only applicable if a number of basic assumptions are met. Complications arise, for example, if a grid structure is used to support the mask elements, if the detector spatial resolution is not good enough to completely resolve all the detail in the shadow of the mask or if any of a number of other simplifying conditions are not fulfilled. We derive more general expressions for the Poisson-noise-limited sensitivity of astronomical telescopes using the coded mask technique, noting explicitly in what circumstances they are applicable. The emphasis is on using nomenclature and techniques that result in simple and revealing results. Where no convenient expression is available a procedure is given which allows the calculation of the sensitivity. We consider certain aspects of the optimisation of the design of a coded mask telescope and show that when the detector spatial resolution and the mask to detector separation are fixed, the best source location accuracy is obtained when the mask elements are equal in size to the detector pixels.

  2. Mask Fabrication Using Electron Beam Exposure System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watakabe, Y.; Shigetomi, A.; Morimoto, H.; Kato, T.

    1981-07-01

    This study describes the results of feature size distribution, pattern location accuracy and level to level registration error on chrominum master masks fabricated by EeBES-40. This system has the capability of high speed electron beam blanking at 40MHz, the capacity for large size masks (with 6 inch mask cassette), and the automatic cassette handling system. OEBR-100(PGMA), as the electron beam negative resist, is used for 5 inch and 6 inch chrominum masks. The chrominum etching process is used for both wet and dry plasma technology. Test patterns and 64 K bit memory TEG, as the practical pattern, are used in this study. More than 40 measurements are taken, uniformly distributed over 96 to 112mm square, and the feature size distribution is measured by a laser interferometer X-Y measuring system. Pattern location accuracy and level to level registration error are obtained using EeBES-40 quality assurance programs called MARKET/PLOTMARKET. This program operates by scanning over the resist image of the test pattern, utilizing the normal fiducial mark location hardware. The followinc results are obtained; (1) Feature size distribution within 6 inch mask : -/+0.1 μm (2) Level-to-level registration error2 : less than 0.1 pm High quality masks with about 0.02 defects/cm2 , and rapid throughput of 6 hr./10 masks using the auto-matic 10-cassette handling system are obtained.

  3. Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh Bao

    1994-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 μm wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

  4. Intact crowding and temporal masking in dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Doron, Adi; Manassi, Mauro; Herzog, Michael H; Ahissar, Merav

    2015-01-01

    Phonological deficits in dyslexia are well documented. However, there is an ongoing discussion about whether visual deficits limit the reading skills of people with dyslexia. Here, we investigated visual crowding and backward masking. We presented a Vernier (i.e., two vertical bars slightly offset to the left or right) and asked observers to indicate the offset direction. Vernier stimuli are visually similar to letters and are strongly affected by crowding, even in the fovea. To increase task difficulty, Verniers are often followed by a mask (i.e., backward masking). We measured Vernier offset discrimination thresholds for the basic Vernier task, under crowding, and under backward masking, in students with dyslexia (n = 19) and age and intelligence matched students (n = 27). We found no group differences in any of these conditions. Controls with fast visual processing (good backward masking performance), were faster readers. By contrast, no such correlation was found among the students with dyslexia, suggesting that backward masking does not limit their reading efficiency. These findings indicate that neither elevated crowding nor elevated backward masking pose a bottleneck to reading skills of people with dyslexia.

  5. High temperature reactive ion etching of iridium thin films with aluminum mask in CF4/O2/Ar plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Pin; Lisker, Marco; Kalkofen, Bodo; Burte, Edmund P.

    2016-08-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) technology for iridium with CF4/O2/Ar gas mixtures and aluminum mask at high temperatures up to 350 °C was developed. The influence of various process parameters such as gas mixing ratio and substrate temperature on the etch rate was studied in order to find optimal process conditions. The surface of the samples after etching was found to be clean under SEM inspection. It was also shown that the etch rate of iridium could be enhanced at higher process temperature and, at the same time, very high etching selectivity between aluminum etching mask and iridium could be achieved.

  6. 30 CFR 740.17 - Inspection, enforcement and civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agency to inspect the operations, without advance notice or a search warrant and upon presentation of... accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (3) No search warrant shall be required with respect to...

  7. 30 CFR 740.17 - Inspection, enforcement and civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... agency to inspect the operations, without advance notice or a search warrant and upon presentation of... accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (3) No search warrant shall be required with respect to...

  8. 30 CFR 740.17 - Inspection, enforcement and civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agency to inspect the operations, without advance notice or a search warrant and upon presentation of... accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (3) No search warrant shall be required with respect to...

  9. When Bad Masks Turn Good

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Roberto G.

    In keeping with the spirit of a meeting on ‘masks,' this talk presents two short stories on the theme of dust. In the first, dust plays the familiar role of the evil obscurer, the enemy to bedefeated by the cunning observer in order to allow a key future technology (adaptive optics) to be exploited fully by heroic astronomers. In the second story, dust itself emerges as the improbable hero, in the form of a circumstellar debris disks. I will present evidence of a puzzling near-infrared excess in the continuum of high-redshift galaxies and will argue that the seemingly improbable origin of this IR excess is a population of young circumstellar disks formed around high-mass stars in distant galaxies. Assuming circumstellar disks extend down to lower masses,as they do in our own Galaxy, the excess emission presents us with an exciting opportunity to measure the formation rate of planetary systems in distant galaxies at cosmic epochs before our own solar system formed.

  10. Accurate defect die placement and nuisance defect reduction for reticle die-to-die inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Vincent; Huang, L. R.; Lin, C. J.; Tseng, Y. N.; Huang, W. H.; Tuo, Laurent C.; Wylie, Mark; Chen, Ellison; Wang, Elvik; Glasser, Joshua; Kelkar, Amrish; Wu, David

    2015-10-01

    Die-to-die reticle inspections are among the simplest and most sensitive reticle inspections because of the use of an identical-design neighboring-die for the reference image. However, this inspection mode can have two key disadvantages: (1) The location of the defect is indeterminate because it is unclear to the inspector whether the test or reference image is defective; and (2) nuisance and false defects from mask manufacturing noise and tool optical variation can limit the usable sensitivity. The use of a new sequencing approach for a die-to-die inspection can resolve these issues without any additional scan time, without sacrifice in sensitivity requirement, and with a manageable increase in computation load. In this paper we explore another approach for die-to-die inspections using a new method of defect processing and sequencing. Utilizing die-to-die double arbitration during defect detection has been proven through extensive testing to generate accurate placement of the defect in the correct die to ensure efficient defect disposition at the AIMS step. The use of this method maintained the required inspection sensitivity for mask quality as verified with programmed-defectmask qualification and then further validated with production masks comparing the current inspection approach to the new method. Furthermore, this approach can significantly reduce the total number of defects that need to be reviewed by essentially eliminating the nuisance and false defects that can result from a die-to-die inspection. This "double-win" will significantly reduce the effort in classifying a die-to-die inspection result and will lead to improved cycle times.

  11. Fire Prevention Inspection Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Paul F.

    Lesson plans are provided for a fire prevention inspection course of the Wisconsin Fire Service Training program. Objectives for the course are to enable students to describe and conduct fire prevention inspections, to identify and correct hazards common to most occupancies, to understand the types of building construction and occupancy, and to…

  12. Investigation of EUV haze defect: molecular behaviors of mask cleaning chemicals on EUV mask surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaehyuck; Novak, Steve; Kandel, Yudhishthir; Denbeaux, Greg; Lee, Han-shin; Ma, Andy; Goodwin, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Photo-induced defects (or haze defects) on 193nm optic masks (haze defects) have been a serious problem not only to reticle engineers working for mask manufacturing and handling but also to photo-lithography engineers. The most widely accepted explanation of the root causes of haze defects is the cleaning chemical residues remaining on the mask surface and unavoidable outgassed molecules that outgas from pellicle materials when exposed to 193nm radiation. These have been significant challenges for reticle cleaning engineers who need to use cleaning chemicals whose residues do not lead to progressive defect formation on the mask and to find improved materials to minimize pellicle outgassing. It is assumed that contamination generation on EUV masks would have a higher probability than on optic masks, primarily since EUV masks are not protected by a pellicle and amorphous carbon films can accumulate during exposure to EUV light. While there is potential to mitigate the generation of carbon contamination by improving the exposure tool environment and removing carbon films using in-situ atomic hydrogen cleaning, it is not yet clear whether the reaction of mask cleaning chemicals to EUV radiation will lead to creation of progressive defects on EUV mask surfaces. With the work to being done it has been observed that carbon contamination on EUV masks dominates any effects of solvent chemicals under normal environmental or exposure conditions (from atmospheric pressure up to a vacuum level of 10-6 Torr) during EUV exposure. However, it is still unknown whether residual cleaning chemicals will provide a nucleus for progressive defect formation during exposure. This lack of understanding needs to be addressed by the industry as EUV masks are expected to undergo more frequent cleaning cycles. In this work, we will report on an investigation of the molecular behavior of cleaning chemicals on EUV mask surfaces during EUV exposure. Movement (e.g., migration or aggregation) of

  13. Computational techniques for determining printability of real defects in EUV mask pilot line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Li, Ying; Peng, Daniel; Chen, Dongxue; Hu, Peter; Corcoran, Noel; Son, Donghwan; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram

    2014-04-01

    With EUV lithography on the ITRS roadmap for sub-2X half-pitch patterning, it has become increasingly essential to ramp up efforts in being able to manufacture defect-free reticles or at least ones with minimal defects initially. For this purpose, much of the focus in recent years has been in finding ways to adequately detect, characterize, and reduce defects on both EUV blanks and patterned masks. For detection purposes, the current high-resolution DUV or e-beam inspection platforms are being extended to inspect EUV blanks and patterned masks but being non-actinic, make it very challenging to assess the real impact of the detected defects on EUV plane. Even with the realization of the EUV beta AIMS™ aerial-image based metrology in 2014-2015, the exact nature of each critical defect needs to be determined in order to be able to come up with an appropriate repair strategy. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of computational techniques to non-actinic supplemental metrology data collected on EUV mask defects to effectively determine the nature and also predict printability of these defects. The fundamental EUV simulation engine used in this approach is the EUV Defect Printability Simulator (DPS), which uses simulation and modeling methods designed specifically for the individual EUV mask components, and achieves runtimes several orders of magnitude faster than rigorous FDTD and RCWA methods while maintaining adequate accuracy. The EUV DPS simulator is then coupled with supplemental inspection and metrology measurements of real defects to effectively predict wafer printability of these defects. Several sources of such supplementary data are explored here, and may sometimes be dependent on the actual nature of defect. These sources include AFM height-profile data, SEM top-down images, and 193nm high-NA inspection images of single or multiple focus plane capture. From each of these supplemental data sources, the mask pattern and defect information is first

  14. A systematic approach to the determination of SRAF capabilities in high end mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürgel, Christian; Sczyrba, Martin; Cantrell, G. R.

    2010-09-01

    The continued shrink of integrated circuit patterns increases the demand for reticle enhancement techniques (RET). The application of Sub Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) is pushing mask processes to the resolution limit. Many Chemically Amplified Resists (CAR) used in current photomask processes do not have the capability to fully meet the current demand for SRAF resolution. Often the resulting quality of small SRAFs suffers from pattern fidelity limitations like Line End Shorting (LES) and corner rounding. While small SRAFs might physically resolve on the mask, these limitations cause massive nuisance detections at defect inspections. In a productive environment, high levels of nuisance detections are not acceptable due to the cycle time impact from classification and review. The AMTC systematically investigated the SRAF capability of different mask processes in order to better understand the process limitations as well as to predict the manufacturability of customer patterns. This investigation uses high sensitivity inspections of a specially designed test pattern to determine the SRAF capability limits. An overview of the predicted SRAF capabilities for different resists and blank substrates is provided along with verification on customer layouts.

  15. EUV reticle inspection with a 193nm reticle inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, William; Inderhees, Gregg; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lee, Isaac; Lim, Phillip

    2013-06-01

    The prevailing industry opinion is that EUV Lithography (EUVL) will enter High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) in the 2015 - 2017 timeframe at the 16nm HP node. Every year the industry assesses the key risk factors for introducing EUVL into HVM - blank and reticle defects are among the top items. To reduce EUV blank and reticle defect levels, high sensitivity inspection is needed. To address this EUV inspection need, KLA-Tencor first developed EUV blank inspection and EUV reticle inspection capability for their 193nm wavelength reticle inspection system - the Teron 610 Series (2010). This system has become the industry standard for 22nm / 3xhp optical reticle HVM along with 14nm / 2xhp optical pilot production; it is further widely used for EUV blank and reticle inspection in R and D. To prepare for the upcoming 10nm / 1xhp generation, KLA-Tencor has developed the Teron 630 Series reticle inspection system which includes many technical advances; these advances can be applied to both EUV and optical reticles. The advanced capabilities are described in this paper with application to EUV die-to-database and die-to-die inspection for currently available 14nm / 2xhp generation EUV reticles. As 10nm / 1xhp generation optical and EUV reticles become available later in 2013, the system will be tested to identify areas for further improvement with the goal to be ready for pilot lines in early 2015.

  16. Active Mask Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscope Images

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Gowri; Fickus, Matthew C.; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D.; Kovačević, Jelena

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new active mask algorithm for the segmentation of fluorescence microscope images of punctate patterns. It combines the (a) flexibility offered by active-contour methods, (b) speed offered by multiresolution methods, (c) smoothing offered by multiscale methods, and (d) statistical modeling offered by region-growing methods into a fast and accurate segmentation tool. The framework moves from the idea of the “contour” to that of “inside and outside”, or, masks, allowing for easy multidimensional segmentation. It adapts to the topology of the image through the use of multiple masks. The algorithm is almost invariant under initialization, allowing for random initialization, and uses a few easily tunable parameters. Experiments show that the active mask algorithm matches the ground truth well, and outperforms the algorithm widely used in fluorescence microscopy, seeded watershed, both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. PMID:19380268

  17. Masking properties of APD communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J. G.; Larrondo, H. A.; Slavin, H. A.; Levin, D. G.; Hidalgo, R. M.; Rivera, R. R.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we explore the ability of wavelet multilevel analysis to unmask the information hidden in a chaotic mask. This digital filtering technique has been recently reported as particularly well suited for the detection of coherent structures. In a recent paper the capability of wavelets to unmask a message, in cases where a chaotic signal is just added to the information, has also been demonstrated. The case of an active passive decomposition scheme, where message is mixed with the chaotic signal, is studied here. A representative case employing Daubechies wavelets and a typical Rossler-oscillator-based communication system is reported. Using a time scaling parameter modifies the spectrum of the mask. The results show that wavelets are effective only in particular cases with poor masking. The fast Fourier transform analysis demonstrates that the spectrum of the chaotic mask shows no holes and then other digital filtering techniques such as Wiener filters or comb filters must also been disregarded.

  18. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-03-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity DefectTM data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  19. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-04-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity Defect(R) data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  20. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2008-10-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity DefecTM data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  1. 15 CFR 716.5 - Notification, duration and frequency of inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... names and titles of the Inspection Team members. (ii) Consent to inspection. In addition to appropriate... team is available to assist the site in preparation for the inspection. If an advance team is available...) Schedule 2 plant sites. For declared Schedule 2 plant sites, the Technical Secretariat will notify the...

  2. Advanced manufacturing rules check (MRC) for fully automated assessment of complex reticle designs: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, J. A.; Aguilar, D.; Buck, P. D.; Dawkins, D.; Gladhill, R.; Nolke, S.; Riddick, J.

    2006-10-01

    Advanced electronic design automation (EDA) tools, with their simulation, modeling, design rule checking, and optical proximity correction capabilities, have facilitated the improvement of first pass wafer yields. While the data produced by these tools may have been processed for optimal wafer manufacturing, it is possible for the same data to be far from ideal for photomask manufacturing, particularly at lithography and inspection stages, resulting in production delays and increased costs. The same EDA tools used to produce the data can be used to detect potential problems for photomask manufacturing in the data. In the previous paper, it was shown how photomask MRC is used to uncover data related problems prior to automated defect inspection. It was demonstrated how jobs which are likely to have problems at inspection could be identified and separated from those which are not. The use of photomask MRC in production was shown to reduce time lost to aborted runs and troubleshooting due to data issues. In this paper, the effectiveness of this photomask MRC program in a high volume photomask factory over the course of a year as applied to more than ten thousand jobs will be shown. Statistics on the results of the MRC runs will be presented along with the associated impact to the automated defect inspection process. Common design problems will be shown as well as their impact to mask manufacturing throughput and productivity. Finally, solutions to the most common and most severe problems will be offered and discussed.

  3. Achromatic phase shifting focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kevin

    The search for life on other worlds is an exciting scientific endeavor that could change the way we perceive our place in the universe. Thousands of extrasolar planets have been discovered using indirect detection techniques. One of the most promising methods for discovering new exoplanets and searching for life is direct imaging with a coronagraph. Exoplanet coronagraphy of Earth-like planets is a challenging task, but we have developed many of the tools necessary to make it feasible. The Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph is one of the highest-performing architectures for direct exoplanet imaging. With a complex phase-shifting focal plane mask, the PIAA Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) can approach the theoretical performance limit for any direct detection technique. The architecture design is flexible enough to be applied to any arbitrary aperture shape, including segmented and obscured apertures. This is an important feature for compatibility with next-generation ground and space-based telescopes. PIAA and PIAACMC focal plane masks have been demonstrated in monochromatic light. An important next step for high-performance coronagraphy is the development of broadband phase-shifting focal plane masks. In this dissertation, we present an algorithm for designing the PIAA and PIAACMC focal plane masks to operate in broadband. We also demonstrate manufacturing of the focal plane masks, and show laboratory results. We use simulations to show the potential performance of the coronagraph system, and the use of wavefront control to correct for mask manufacturing errors. Given the laboratory results and simulations, we show new areas of exoplanet science that can potentially be explored using coronagraph technology. The main conclusion of this dissertation is that we now have the tools required to design and manufacture PIAA and PIAACMC achromatic focal plane masks. These tools can be applied to current and future telescope systems to enable new

  4. Incomplete figure perception and invisible masking.

    PubMed

    Chikhman, Valery; Shelepin, Yuri; Foreman, Nigel; Merkuljev, Aleksey; Pronin, Sergey

    2006-01-01

    The Gollin test (measuring recognition thresholds for fragmented line drawings of everyday objects and animals) has traditionally been regarded as a test of incomplete figure perception or 'closure', though there is a debate about how such closure is achieved. Here, figural incompleteness is considered to be the result of masking, such that absence of contour elements of a fragmented figure is the result of the influence of an 'invisible' mask. It is as though the figure is partly obscured by a mask having parameters identical to those of the background. This mask is 'invisible' only consciously, but for the early stages of visual processing it is real and has properties of multiplicative noise. Incomplete Gollin figures were modeled as the figure covered by the mask with randomly distributed transparent and opaque patches. We adjusted the statistical characteristics of the contour image and empty noise patches and processed those using spatial and spatial-frequency measures. Across 73 figures, despite inter-subject variability, mean recognition threshold was always approximately 15% of total contour in naive observers. Recognition worsened with increasing spectral similarity between the figure and the 'invisible' mask. Near threshold, the spectrum of the fragmented image was equally similar to that of the 'invisible' mask and complete image. The correlation between spectral parameters of figures at threshold and complete figures was greatest for figures that were most easily recognised. Across test sessions, thresholds reduced when either figure or mask parameters were familiar. We argue that recognition thresholds for Gollin stimuli in part reflect the extraction of signal from noise.

  5. Recent modelling advances for ultrasonic TOFD inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Michel; Ferrand, Adrien; Dorval, Vincent; Chatillon, Sylvain; Lonné, Sébastien

    2015-03-31

    The ultrasonic TOFD (Time of Flight Diffraction) Technique is commonly used to detect and characterize disoriented cracks using their edge diffraction echoes. An overview of the models integrated in the CIVA software platform and devoted to TOFD simulation is presented. CIVA allows to predict diffraction echoes from complex 3D flaws using a PTD (Physical Theory of Diffraction) based model. Other dedicated developments have been added to simulate lateral waves in 3D on planar entry surfaces and in 2D on irregular surfaces by a ray approach. Calibration echoes from Side Drilled Holes (SDHs), specimen echoes and shadowing effects from flaws can also been modelled. Some examples of theoretical validation of the models are presented. In addition, experimental validations have been performed both on planar blocks containing calibration holes and various notches and also on a specimen with an irregular entry surface and allow to draw conclusions on the validity of all the developed models.

  6. Advanced High Speed Roller Bearing Inspection Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    Parametrics New York, New York S. Orange, Connecticut Modern Controls, Inc. Peerless Nuclear Corporation Minneapolis, Minnesota Stamford, Connecticut Monitor...California Reticon Slocomb, J. T., Co. Sunnyvale, California So. Glastonbury, Connecticut A6 Solid State Electronics Corporation Texas Instruments Inc

  7. Recent modelling advances for ultrasonic TOFD inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmon, Michel; Ferrand, Adrien; Dorval, Vincent; Chatillon, Sylvain; Lonné, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    The ultrasonic TOFD (Time of Flight Diffraction) Technique is commonly used to detect and characterize disoriented cracks using their edge diffraction echoes. An overview of the models integrated in the CIVA software platform and devoted to TOFD simulation is presented. CIVA allows to predict diffraction echoes from complex 3D flaws using a PTD (Physical Theory of Diffraction) based model. Other dedicated developments have been added to simulate lateral waves in 3D on planar entry surfaces and in 2D on irregular surfaces by a ray approach. Calibration echoes from Side Drilled Holes (SDHs), specimen echoes and shadowing effects from flaws can also been modelled. Some examples of theoretical validation of the models are presented. In addition, experimental validations have been performed both on planar blocks containing calibration holes and various notches and also on a specimen with an irregular entry surface and allow to draw conclusions on the validity of all the developed models.

  8. Software-based data path for raster-scanned multi-beam mask lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, Archana; Agarwal, Ankita; Buck, Peter; Geller, Paul; Hamaker, H. Christopher; Rao, Nagswara

    2016-10-01

    According to the 2013 SEMATECH Mask Industry Survey,i roughly half of all photomasks are produced using laser mask pattern generator ("LMPG") lithography. LMPG lithography can be used for all layers at mature technology nodes, and for many non-critical and semi-critical masks at advanced nodes. The extensive use of multi-patterning at the 14-nm node significantly increases the number of critical mask layers, and the transition in wafer lithography from positive tone resist to negative tone resist at the 14-nm design node enables the switch from advanced binary masks back to attenuated phase shifting masks that require second level writes to remove unwanted chrome. LMPG lithography is typically used for second level writes due to its high productivity, absence of charging effects, and versatile non-actinic alignment capability. As multi-patterning use expands from double to triple patterning and beyond, the number of LMPG second level writes increases correspondingly. The desire to reserve the limited capacity of advanced electron beam writers for use when essential is another factor driving the demand for LMPG capacity. The increasing demand for cost-effective productivity has kept most of the laser mask writers ever manufactured running in production, sometimes long past their projected lifespan, and new writers continue to be built based on hardware developed some years ago.ii The data path is a case in point. While state-ofthe- art when first introduced, hardware-based data path systems are difficult to modify or add new features to meet the changing requirements of the market. As data volumes increase, design styles change, and new uses are found for laser writers, it is useful to consider a replacement for this critical subsystem. The availability of low-cost, high-performance, distributed computer systems combined with highly scalable EDA software lends itself well to creating an advanced data path system. EDA software, in routine production today, scales

  9. No masking between test and mask components in perceptually different depth planes.

    PubMed

    Hibbeler, Patrick J; Olzak, Lynn A

    2011-01-01

    2-D cues to perceived depth organization have been used to segregate test and mask stimulus components in a discrimination task. Observers made either spatial-frequency or orientation judgments on a rectangular test component by itself or in the presence of constant rectangular masks. There were two basic masking conditions: same-plane or different-plane. In the same-plane conditions, the test components and masks are perceived as existing in the same depth plane. In the different-plane conditions, the test and mask components are perceived to exist in different depth planes. The perception of different depth planes was achieved by using perceived occlusion, which could place either component closer or further from the observer. The results suggest that when test and mask components are separated into different depth planes they no longer influence one another. This effect could be observed in either depth organization, test components in front of the masks or mask components in front of the test. These results indicate that the figure-ground organization of components is not important. Only the designation as existing in the same or different depth planes affects whether or not a mask is effective.

  10. VSP wave separation by adaptive masking filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ying; Wang, Yanghua

    2016-06-01

    In vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data processing, the first step might be to separate the down-going wavefield from the up-going wavefield. When using a masking filter for VSP wave separation, there are difficulties associated with two termination ends of the up-going waves. A critical challenge is how the masking filter can restore the energy tails, the edge effect associated with these terminations uniquely exist in VSP data. An effective strategy is to implement masking filters in both τ-p and f-k domain sequentially. Meanwhile it uses a median filter, producing a clean but smooth version of the down-going wavefield, used as a reference data set for designing the masking filter. The masking filter is implemented adaptively and iteratively, gradually restoring the energy tails cut-out by any surgical mute. While the τ-p and the f-k domain masking filters target different depth ranges of VSP, this combination strategy can accurately perform in wave separation from field VSP data.

  11. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a...

  12. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a...

  13. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a...

  14. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a...

  15. Out of Their Heads: Developing the Character behind the Mask.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lecure, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Discusses mask building as a theatrical exercise. Provides a simple method for building masks. Outlines a format for the classes that follow mask construction, in which a character is gradually built to suit the finished mask, including the birthing process, physical character and voice development, getting to know the character, and what happens…

  16. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  1. 37 CFR 211.3 - Mask work fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mask work fees. 211.3 Section... PROCEDURES MASK WORK PROTECTION § 211.3 Mask work fees. (a) Section 201.3 of this chapter prescribes the fees or charges established by the Register of Copyrights for services relating to mask works. (b)...

  2. Source mask optimization study based on latest Nikon immersion scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fang; Chen, Lijun; Zhang, Chenming; Zhang, Wei; Nishinaga, Hisashi; El-Sewefy, Omar; Gao, Gen-Sheng; Lafferty, Neal; Meiring, Jason; Zhang, Recoo; Zhu, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    The 2x nm logic foundry node has many challenges since critical levels are pushed close to the limits of low k1 ArF water immersion lithography. For these levels, improvements in lithographic performance can translate to decreased rework and increased yield. Source Mask Optimization (SMO) is one such route to realize these image fidelity improvements. During SMO, critical layout constructs are intensively optimized in both the mask and source domain, resulting in a solution for maximum lithographic entitlement. From the hardware side, advances in source technology have enabled free-form illumination. The approach allows highly customized illumination, enabling the practical application of SMO sources. The customized illumination sources can be adjusted for maximum versatility. In this paper, we present a study on a critical layer of an advanced foundry logic node using the latest ILT based SMO software, paired with state-of-the-art scanner hardware and intelligent illuminator. Performance of the layer's existing POR source is compared with the ideal SMO result and the installed source as realized on the intelligent illuminator of an NSR-S630D scanner. Both simulation and on-silicon measurements are used to confirm that the performance of the studied layer meets established specifications.

  3. UDOF direct improvement by modulating mask absorber thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tuan-Yen; Lio, En Chuan; Chen, Po Tsang; Wei, Chih I.; Chen, Yi Ting; Peng, Ming Chun; Chou, William; Yu, Chun Chi

    2016-10-01

    As the process generation migrate to advanced and smaller dimension or pitch, the mask and resist 3D effects will impact the lithography focus common window severely because of both individual depth-of-focus (iDOF) range decrease and center mismatch. Furthermore, some chemical or thermal factors, such as PEB (Post Exposure Bake) also worsen the usable depth-of-focus (uDOF) performance. So the mismatch of thru-pitch iDOF center should be considered as a lithography process integration issue, and more complicated to partition the 3D effects induced by optical or chemical factors. In order to reduce the impact of 3D effects induced by both optical and chemical issues, and improve iDOF center mismatch, we would like to propose a mask absorber thickness offset approach, which is directly to compensate the iDOF center bias by adjusting mask absorber thickness, for iso, semi-iso or dense characteristics in line, space or via patterns to enlarge common process window, i.e uDOF, which intends to provide similar application as Flexwave[1] (ASML trademark). By the way, since mask absorber thickness offset approach is similar to focus tuning or change on wafer lithography process, it could be acted as the process tuning method of photoresist (PR) profile optimization locally, PR scum improvement in specific patterns or to modulate etching bias to meet process integration request. For mass production consideration, and available material, current att-PSM blank, quartz, MoSi with chrome layer as hard-mask in reticle process, will be implemented in this experiment, i.e. chrome will be kept remaining above partial thru-pitch patterns, and act as the absorber thickness bias in different patterns. And then, from the best focus offset of thru-pitch patterns, the iDOF center shifts could be directly corrected and to enlarge uDOF by increasing the overlap of iDOF. Finally, some negative tone development (NTD) result in line patterns will be demonstrated as well.

  4. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Janet A.; Byron, Adam; Takada, Yoshikazu; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing ligand-mimetic inhibitors of integrins are unable to dissociate pre-formed integrin-fibronectin complexes (IFCs). These observations suggested that amino acid residues involved in integrin-fibronectin binding become obscured in the ligand-occupied state. Because the epitopes of some function-blocking anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) lie near the ligand-binding pocket, it follows that the epitopes of these mAbs may become shielded in the ligand-occupied state. Here, we tested whether function-blocking mAbs directed against α5β1 can interact with the integrin after it forms a complex with an RGD-containing fragment of fibronectin. We showed that the anti-α5 subunit mAbs JBS5, SNAKA52, 16, and P1D6 failed to disrupt IFCs and hence appeared unable to bind to the ligand-occupied state. In contrast, the allosteric anti-β1 subunit mAbs 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 could dissociate IFCs and therefore were able to interact with the ligand-bound state. However, another class of function-blocking anti-β1 mAbs, exemplified by Lia1/2, could not disrupt IFCs. This second class of mAbs was also distinguished from 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 by their ability to induce homotypic cell aggregation. Although the epitope of Lia1/2 was closely overlapping with those of 13, 4B4, and AIIB2, it appeared to lie closer to the ligand-binding pocket. A new model of the α5β1-fibronectin complex supports our hypothesis that the epitopes of mAbs that fail to bind to the ligand-occupied state lie within, or very close to, the integrin-fibronectin interface. Importantly, our findings imply that the efficacy of some therapeutic anti-integrin mAbs could be limited by epitope masking. PMID:27484800

  5. Guidelines for software inspections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Quality control inspections are software problem finding procedures which provide defect removal as well as improvements in software functionality, maintenance, quality, and development and testing methodology is discussed. The many side benefits include education, documentation, training, and scheduling.

  6. Apparatus for inspecting piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollingger, W.T.; Appel, D.K.; Park, L.R.

    1995-03-21

    An inspection rabbit is described for inspecting piping systems having severe bends therein. The rabbit consists of a flexible, modular body containing a miniaturized eddy current inspection probe, a self-contained power supply for proper operation of the rabbit, an outer surface that allows ease of movement through piping systems and means for transmitting data generated by the inspection device. The body is preferably made of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing or, alternatively, silicone rubber with a shrink wrapping of polytetrafluoroethylene (TEFLON{trademark}). The body is formed to contain the power supply, preferably a plurality of batteries, and a spool of communication wire that connects to a data processing computer external to the piping system. 6 figures.

  7. Remote surface inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, S.; Balaram, J.; Seraji, H.; Kim, W. S.; Tso, K.; Prasad, V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on an on-going research and development effort in remote surface inspection of space platforms such as the Space Station Freedom (SSF). It describes the space environment and identifies the types of damage for which to search. This paper provides an overview of the Remote Surface Inspection System that was developed to conduct proof-of-concept demonstrations and to perform experiments in a laboratory environment. Specifically, the paper describes three technology areas: (1) manipulator control for sensor placement; (2) automated non-contact inspection to detect and classify flaws; and (3) an operator interface to command the system interactively and receive raw or processed sensor data. Initial findings for the automated and human visual inspection tests are reported.

  8. Apparatus for inspecting piping

    DOEpatents

    Zollingger, W. Thor; Appel, D. Keith; Park, Larry R.

    1995-01-01

    An inspection rabbit for inspecting piping systems having severe bends therein. The rabbit consists of a flexible, modular body containing a miniaturized eddy current inspection probe, a self-contained power supply for proper operation of the rabbit, an outer surface that allows ease of movement through piping systems and means for transmitting data generated by the inspection device. The body is preferably made of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing or, alternatively, silicone rubber with a shrink wrapping of polytetrafluoroethylene (TEFLON.RTM.). The body is formed to contain the power supply, preferably a plurality of batteries, and a spool of communication wire that connects to a data processing computer external to the piping system.

  9. Automated Spot Weld Inspection using Infrared Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili

    2012-01-01

    An automated non-contact and non-destructive resistance spot weld inspection system based on infrared (IR) thermography was developed for post-weld applications. During inspection, a weld coupon was heated up by an auxiliary induction heating device from one side of the weld, while the resulting thermal waves on the other side were observed by an IR camera. The IR images were analyzed to extract a thermal signature based on normalized heating time, which was then quantitatively correlated to the spot weld nugget size. The use of normalized instead of absolute IR intensity was found to be useful in minimizing the sensitivity to the unknown surface conditions and environment interference. Application of the IR-based inspection system to different advanced high strength steels, thickness gauges and coatings were discussed.

  10. Nuclear Plant Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Engineers from the Power Authority of the State of New York use a Crack Growth Analysis Program supplied by COSMIC (Computer Software Management and Information Center) in one stage of nuclear plant inspection. Welds of the nuclear steam supply system are checked for cracks; radiographs, dye penetration and visual inspections are performed to locate cracks in the metal structure and welds. The software package includes three separate crack growth analysis models and enables necessary repairs to be planned before serious problems develop.

  11. Wedges for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer device is provided which is used in ultrasonic inspection of the material surrounding a threaded hole and which comprises a wedge of plastic or the like including a curved threaded surface adapted to be screwed into the threaded hole and a generally planar surface on which a conventional ultrasonic transducer is mounted. The plastic wedge can be rotated within the threaded hole to inspect for flaws in the material surrounding the threaded hole.

  12. Source Inspection Scheduling Calendar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brayden

    2011-01-01

    Quality is an essential component for creating flight hardware travelling through space since the hardware is extremely expensive and cannot be reworked or repaired once launched. An important step in this process is ensuring the quality of hardware procured from Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) suppliers. An important element of determining supplier quality is source inspection. Source inspections are performed at suppliers' facilities by JPL employeesto ensure that hardware characteristics are acceptable before being covered up and/or delivered to JPL.

  13. The Intervenor Effect in Masked Priming: How Does Masked Priming Survive across an Intervening Word?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Kenneth I.

    2009-01-01

    Four masked priming experiments are reported investigating the effect of inserting an unrelated word between the masked prime and the target. When the intervening word is visible, identity priming is reduced to the level of one-letter-different form priming, but form priming is largely unaffected. However, when the intervening word is itself…

  14. Fast adaptive unsharp masking with programmable mediaprocessors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Unmin; Shamdasani, Vijay; Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2003-06-01

    Unsharp masking is a widely used image-enhancement method in medical imaging. Hardware-based solutions can be developed to support high computational demand for unsharp masking, but they suffer from limited flexibility. Software solutions can easily incorporate new features and modify key parameters, such as filtering kernel size, but they have not been able to meet the fast computing requirement. Modern programmable mediaprocessors can meet both fast computing and flexibility requirements, which will benefit medical image computing. In this article, we present fast adaptive unsharp masking on two leading mediaprocessors or high-end digital signal processors, Hitachi/Equator Technologies MAP-CA and Texas Instruments TMS320C64x. For a 2k x 2k 16-bit image, our adaptive unsharp masking with a 201 x 201 boxcar kernel takes 225 ms on a 300-MHz MAP-CA and 74 ms on a 600-MHz TMS320C64x. This fast unsharp masking enables technologists and/or physicians to adjust parameters interactively for optimal quality assurance and image viewing.

  15. Efficient adaptive thresholding with image masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Young-Taek; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Kim, Jung-Bae; Bang, Won-Chul

    2014-03-01

    Adaptive thresholding is a useful technique for document analysis. In medical image processing, it is also helpful for segmenting structures, such as diaphragms or blood vessels. This technique sets a threshold using local information around a pixel, then binarizes the pixel according to the value. Although this technique is robust to changes in illumination, it takes a significant amount of time to compute thresholds because it requires adding all of the neighboring pixels. Integral images can alleviate this overhead; however, medical images, such as ultrasound, often come with image masks, and ordinary algorithms often cause artifacts. The main problem is that the shape of the summing area is not rectangular near the boundaries of the image mask. For example, the threshold at the boundary of the mask is incorrect because pixels on the mask image are also counted. Our key idea to cope with this problem is computing the integral image for the image mask to count the valid number of pixels. Our method is implemented on a GPU using CUDA, and experimental results show that our algorithm is 164 times faster than a naïve CPU algorithm for averaging.

  16. Unique Interchangeable Shadow Mask Technology for Advanced High Definition Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-30

    R /B GREEN R /B GREEN R /B GREEN H» V H* V H * V H* V H* V H* V 200uA 5...3 ^OOMO N . r . aa- r -TM ner A 1 »- 3 E V Al_ rtLIB ^DOMQ E.F. aa"rTM «EF . A] a- 1 1 ■4E50MS...1 a o t "^ORTwDDCUMENrnTlON PAGE mmfmm744 E form Approved OMB «EL C764-016S »*rtmi» ’ nour pc mpa» ■ »■., muudln; t»» Wire fer rtvw««« tai» r

  17. Temperature rise of the mask-resist assembly during LIGA exposure.

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Aili

    2004-11-01

    Deep X-ray lithography on PMMA resist is used in the LIGA process. The resist is exposed to synchrotron X-rays through a patterned mask and then is developed in a liquid developer to make high aspect ratio microstructures. The limitations in dimensional accuracies of the LIGA generated microstructure originate from many sources, including synchrotron and X-ray physics, thermal and mechanical properties of mask and resist, and from the kinetics of the developer. This work addresses the thermal analysis and temperature rise of the mask-resist assembly during exposure in air at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron. The concern is that dimensional errors generated at the mask and the resist due to thermal expansion will lower the accuracy of the lithography. We have developed a three-dimensional finite-element model of the mask and resist assembly that includes a mask with absorber, a resist with substrate, three metal holders, and a water-cooling block. We employed the LIGA exposure-development software LEX-D to calculate volumetric heat sources generated in the assembly by X-ray absorption and the commercial software ABAQUS to calculate heat transfer including thermal conduction inside the assembly, natural and forced convection, and thermal radiation. at assembly outer and/or inner surfaces. The calculations of assembly maximum temperature. have been compared with temperature measurements conducted at ALS. In some of these experiments, additional cooling of the assembly was produced by forced nitrogen flow ('nitrogen jets') directed at the mask surface. The temperature rise in the silicon mask and the mask holder comes directly from the X-ray absorption, but nitrogen jets carry away a significant portion of heat energy from the mask surface, while natural convection carries away negligibly small amounts energy from the holder. The temperature rise in PMMA resist is mainly from heat conducted from the silicon substrate backward to the resist and from the inner

  18. Comparison of OPC job prioritization schemes to generate data for mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Travis; Veeraraghavan, Vijay; Jantzen, Kenneth; Kim, Stephen; Park, Minyoung; Russell, Gordon; Simmons, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Delivering mask ready OPC corrected data to the mask shop on-time is critical for a foundry to meet the cycle time commitment for a new product. With current OPC compute resource sharing technology, different job scheduling algorithms are possible, such as, priority based resource allocation and fair share resource allocation. In order to maximize computer cluster efficiency, minimize the cost of the data processing and deliver data on schedule, the trade-offs of each scheduling algorithm need to be understood. Using actual production jobs, each of the scheduling algorithms will be tested in a production tape-out environment. Each scheduling algorithm will be judged on its ability to deliver data on schedule and the trade-offs associated with each method will be analyzed. It is now possible to introduce advance scheduling algorithms to the OPC data processing environment to meet the goals of on-time delivery of mask ready OPC data while maximizing efficiency and reducing cost.

  19. Dry etched SiO2 Mask for HgCdTe Etching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Deng, L. G.; Zhang, S.; Xing, W.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-09-01

    A highly anisotropic etching process with low etch-induced damage is indispensable for advanced HgCdTe (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) detectors. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) enhanced reactive ion etching technique has been widely adopted in manufacturing HgCdTe IRFPA devices. An accurately patterned mask with sharp edges is decisive to accomplish pattern duplication. It has been reported by our group that the SiO2 mask functions well in etching HgCdTe with high selectivity. However, the wet process in defining the SiO2 mask is limited by ambiguous edges and nonuniform patterns. In this report, we patterned SiO2 with a mature ICP etching technique, prior to which a thin ZnS film was deposited by thermal evaporation. The SiO2 film etching can be terminated at the auto-stopping point of the ZnS layer thanks to the high selectivity of SiO2/ZnS in SF6 based etchant. Consequently, MCT etching was directly performed without any other treatment. This mask showed acceptable profile due to the maturity of the SiO2 etching process. The well-defined SiO2 pattern and the etched smooth surfaces were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. This new mask process could transfer the patterns exactly with very small etch-bias. A cavity with aspect-ratio (AR) of 1.2 and root mean square roughness of 1.77 nm was achieved first, slightly higher AR of 1.67 was also get with better mask profile. This masking process ensures good uniformity and surely benefits the delineation of shrinking pixels with its high resolution.

  20. Temperature rise of the silicon mask-PMMA resist assembly during LIGA exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Aili

    2005-01-01

    Deep X-ray lithography on PMMA resist is used in the LIGA process. The resist is exposed to synchrotron X-rays through a patterned mask and then is developed in a liquid developer to make high aspect ratio microstructures. This work addresses the thermal analysis and temperature rise of the mask-resist assembly during exposure at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron. The concern is that the thermal expansion will lower the accuracy of the lithography. We have developed a three-dimensional finite-element model of the mask and resist assembly. We employed the LIGA exposure-development software LEX-D and the commercial software ABAQUS to calculate heat transfer of the assembly during exposure. The calculations of assembly maximum temperature have been compared with temperature measurements conducted at ALS. The temperature rise in the silicon mask and the mask holder comes directly from the X-ray absorption, but forced convection of nitrogen jets carry away a significant portion of heat energy from the mask surface, while natural convection plays a negligible role. The temperature rise in PMMA resist is mainly from heat conducted from the silicon substrate backward to the resist and from the mask plate through inner cavity air forward to the resist, while the X-ray absorption is only secondary. Therefore, reduction of heat flow conducted from both substrate and cavity air to the resist is essential. An improved water-cooling block is expected to carry away most heat energy along the main heat conductive path, leaving the resist at a favorable working temperature.

  1. Communication masking in marine mammals: A review and research strategy.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Christine; Reichmuth, Colleen; Cunningham, Kane; Lucke, Klaus; Dooling, Robert

    2016-02-15

    Underwater noise, whether of natural or anthropogenic origin, has the ability to interfere with the way in which marine mammals receive acoustic signals (i.e., for communication, social interaction, foraging, navigation, etc.). This phenomenon, termed auditory masking, has been well studied in humans and terrestrial vertebrates (in particular birds), but less so in marine mammals. Anthropogenic underwater noise seems to be increasing in parts of the world's oceans and concerns about associated bioacoustic effects, including masking, are growing. In this article, we review our understanding of masking in marine mammals, summarise data on marine mammal hearing as they relate to masking (including audiograms, critical ratios, critical bandwidths, and auditory integration times), discuss masking release processes of receivers (including comodulation masking release and spatial release from masking) and anti-masking strategies of signalers (e.g. Lombard effect), and set a research framework for improved assessment of potential masking in marine mammals.

  2. Protective mask for airborne toxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, C.J.; Scavnicky, J.A.; Little, M.E.; Hagy, E.M.; Bloom, A.

    1983-10-21

    A protective mask is described which includes a one-piece face piece molded of a transparent elastomer. A visor in the face piece provides panoramic visibility and is resilient enough to deform under applied force to permit improved use of optical devices. Identical left and right cheek fittings permit installation of a canister on either side so that the same mask can be used by right-handed and left-handed wearers voice for use with a telephone and the like. Air deflectors inside the mask adjacent the left and right cheek fittings deflect de-foging air along the inside surface of the visor when either left or right or both cheek fittings are used for attachment of a canister. A sealing adapter permits sealing around earpiece shafts of eyeglasses.

  3. Layer aware source mask target optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ao; Foong, Yee Mei; Schramm, Jessy; Ji, Liang; Hsu, Stephen; Guerrero, James; Li, Xiaoyang; Shaw, Joe; Wang, Joe

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present the approach and results of layer-aware source mask target optimization. In this approach, the design target is co-optimized during source mask optimization (SMO) by considering inter-layer constraints. We tested the method on a 2x nm node metal layer by using both standard and customized cost functions for source optimization. Variable targets were defined for two process window limiting critical pattern cells, with contact-to-metal and metal-tovia coverage rules taken into consideration. The results indicate that layer-aware source mask target optimization gives consistent process window improvement over conventional SMO. The optimized targets prove to be a good balance between lithography process window and post-etch inter-layer coverage margin.

  4. Metacontrast masking is processed before grapheme-color synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Michael Patrick; Bridgeman, Bruce; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the physiological mechanism of grapheme-color synesthesia using metacontrast masking. A metacontrast target is rendered invisible by a mask that is delayed by about 60 ms; the target and mask do not overlap in space or time. Little masking occurs, however, if the target and mask are simultaneous. This effect must be cortical, because it can be obtained dichoptically. To compare the data for synesthetes and controls, we developed a metacontrast design in which nonsynesthete controls showed weaker dichromatic masking (i.e., the target and mask were in different colors) than monochromatic masking. We accomplished this with an equiluminant target, mask, and background for each observer. If synesthetic color affected metacontrast, synesthetes should show monochromatic masking more similar to the weak dichromatic masking among controls, because synesthetes could add their synesthetic color to the monochromatic condition. The target-mask pairs used for each synesthete were graphemes that elicited strong synesthetic colors. We found stronger monochromatic than dichromatic U-shaped metacontrast for both synesthetes and controls, with optimal masking at an asynchrony of 66 ms. The difference in performance between the monochromatic and dichromatic conditions in the synesthetes indicates that synesthesia occurs at a later processing stage than does metacontrast masking.

  5. 9 CFR 592.390 - Advance information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance information. 592.390 Section 592.390 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF EGG PRODUCTS Identifying and Marking Products § 592.390...

  6. 9 CFR 592.390 - Advance information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advance information. 592.390 Section 592.390 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF EGG PRODUCTS Identifying and Marking Products § 592.390...

  7. 9 CFR 592.390 - Advance information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advance information. 592.390 Section 592.390 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF EGG PRODUCTS Identifying and Marking Products § 592.390...

  8. 9 CFR 592.390 - Advance information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advance information. 592.390 Section 592.390 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF EGG PRODUCTS Identifying and Marking Products § 592.390...

  9. 9 CFR 592.390 - Advance information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advance information. 592.390 Section 592.390 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF EGG PRODUCTS Identifying and Marking Products § 592.390...

  10. Electron beam mask writer EBM-9500 for logic 7nm node generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Hideki; Kamikubo, Takashi; Nakahashi, Satoshi; Nomura, Haruyuki; Nakayamada, Noriaki; Suganuma, Mizuna; Kato, Yasuo; Yashima, Jun; Katsap, Victor; Saito, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Ryoei; Miyamoto, Nobuo; Ogasawara, Munehiro

    2016-10-01

    Semiconductor scaling is slowing down because of difficulties of device manufacturing below logic 7nm node generation. Various lithography candidates which include ArF immersion with resolution enhancement technology (like Inversed Lithography technology), Extreme Ultra Violet lithography and Nano Imprint lithography are being developed to address the situation. In such advanced lithography, shot counts of mask patterns are estimated to increase explosively in critical layers, and then it is hoped that multi beam mask writer (MBMW) is released to handle them within realistic write time. However, ArF immersion technology with multiple patterning will continue to be a mainstream lithography solution for most of the layers. Then, the shot counts in less critical layers are estimated to be stable because of the limitation of resolution in ArF immersion technology. Therefore, single beam mask writer (SBMW) can play an important role for mask production still, relative to MBMW. Also the demand of SBMW seems actually strong for the logic 7nm node. To realize this, we have developed a new SBMW, EBM-9500 for mask fabrication in this generation. A newly introduced electron beam source enables higher current density of 1200A/cm2. Heating effect correction function has also been newly introduced to satisfy the requirements for both pattern accuracy and throughput. In this paper, we will report the configuration and performance of EBM-9500.

  11. Carbon contamination topography analysis of EUV masks

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.-J.; Yankulin, L.; Thomas, P.; Mbanaso, C.; Antohe, A.; Garg, R.; Wang, Y.; Murray, T.; Wuest, A.; Goodwin, F.; Huh, S.; Cordes, A.; Naulleau, P.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Gullikson, E.; Denbeaux, G.

    2010-03-12

    The impact of carbon contamination on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks is significant due to throughput loss and potential effects on imaging performance. Current carbon contamination research primarily focuses on the lifetime of the multilayer surfaces, determined by reflectivity loss and reduced throughput in EUV exposure tools. However, contamination on patterned EUV masks can cause additional effects on absorbing features and the printed images, as well as impacting the efficiency of cleaning process. In this work, several different techniques were used to determine possible contamination topography. Lithographic simulations were also performed and the results compared with the experimental data.

  12. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Visual Masking and Visibility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    the 2AFC task. Harmonically Pure Stimuli and the Method of Adjustment The evidence presented so far supports our two-criterion 0 hypothesis for masking...the subject can still recognize this repetitive beat pattern. Figure 7 sh3ws 2AFC thresholds in the presence of a 2 c/deg mask for several tests...at all 4 rr 1.2- 1.0 W S08 N."- 0.6 b L0 12 14 16 REPLICATIONS Figlure 4 ilope of the 2AFC mssinq function with a continuall coanginq ai$& 1solid lines

  14. Particle removal challenges with EUV patterned mask for the sub-22nm HP node

    SciTech Connect

    Rastegar, A.; Eichenlaub, S.; Kadaksham, A. J.; Lee, B.; House, M.; Huh, S.; Cha, B.; Yun, H.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    The particle removal efficiency (PRE) of cleaning processes diminishes whenever the minimum defect size for a specific technology node becomes smaller. For the sub-22 nm half-pitch (HP) node, it was demonstrated that exposure to high power megasonic up to 200 W/cm{sup 2} did not damage 60 nm wide TaBN absorber lines corresponding to the 16 nm HP node on wafer. An ammonium hydroxide mixture and megasonics removes {ge}50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a very high PRE, A sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) in addition to ammonium hydroxide mixture (APM) and megasonic is required to remove {ge}28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a high PRE. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOFSIMS) studies show that the presence of O{sub 2} during a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ({lambda} = 172 nm) surface conditioning step will result in both surface oxidation and Ru removal, which drastically reduce extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask life time under multiple cleanings. New EUV mask cleaning processes show negligible or no EUV reflectivity loss and no increase in surface roughness after up to 15 cleaning cycles. Reviewing of defect with a high current density scanning electron microscope (SEM) drastically reduces PRE and deforms SiO{sub 2} particles. 28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on EUV masks age very fast and will deform over time, Care must be taken when reviewing EUV mask defects by SEM. Potentially new particles should be identified to calibrate short wavelength inspection tools, Based on actinic image review, 50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on top of the EUV mask will be printed on the wafer.

  15. Compensation of overlay errors due to mask bending and non-flatness for EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandhok, Manish; Goyal, Sanjay; Carson, Steven; Park, Seh-Jin; Zhang, Guojing; Myers, Alan M.; Leeson, Michael L.; Kamna, Marilyn; Martinez, Fabian C.; Stivers, Alan R.; Lorusso, Gian F.; Hermans, Jan; Hendrickx, Eric; Govindjee, Sanjay; Brandstetter, Gerd; Laursen, Tod

    2009-03-01

    EUV blank non-flatness results in both out of plane distortion (OPD) and in-plane distortion (IPD) [3-5]. Even for extremely flat masks (~50 nm peak to valley (PV)), the overlay error is estimated to be greater than the allocation in the overlay budget. In addition, due to multilayer and other thin film induced stresses, EUV masks have severe bow (~1 um PV). Since there is no electrostatic chuck to flatten the mask during the e-beam write step, EUV masks are written in a bent state that can result in ~15 nm of overlay error. In this article we present the use of physically-based models of mask bending and non-flatness induced overlay errors, to compensate for pattern placement of EUV masks during the e-beam write step in a process we refer to as E-beam Writer based Overlay error Correction (EWOC). This work could result in less restrictive tolerances for the mask blank non-flatness specs which in turn would result in less blank defects.

  16. Extinction controlled adaptive mask coronagraph Lyot and phase mask dual concept for wide extinction area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, P.; Schuhler, N.; Mawet, D.; Haguenauer, P.; Girard, J.; Gonte, Frederic

    2012-09-01

    A dual coronagraph based on the Adaptive Mask concept is presented in this paper. ALyot coronagraph with a variable diameter occulting disk anda nulling stellar coronagraph based on the Adaptive Phase Mask concept using polarization interferometry are presented in this work. Observations on sky and numerical simulations show the usefulness of the proposed method to optimize the nulling efficiency of the coronagraphs. In the case of the phase mask, the active control system will correct for the detrimental effects of image instabilities on the destructive interference (low-order aberrations such as tip-tilt and focus). The phase mask adaptability both in size, phase and amplitude also compensate for manufacturing errors of the mask itself, and potentially for chromatic effects. Liquid-crystal properties are used to provide variable transmission of an annulus around the phase mask, but also to achieve the achromatic π phase shift in the core of the PSF by rotating the polarization by 180°.A compressed mercury (Hg) drop is used as an occulting disk for the Lyot mask, its size control offers an adaptation to the seeing conditions and provides an optimization of the Tip-tilt correction.

  17. Piping inspection round robin

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, P.G.; Doctor, S.R.

    1996-04-01

    The piping inspection round robin was conducted in 1981 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify the capability of ultrasonics for inservice inspection and to address some aspects of reliability for this type of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The round robin measured the crack detection capabilities of seven field inspection teams who employed procedures that met or exceeded the 1977 edition through the 1978 addenda of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section 11 Code requirements. Three different types of materials were employed in the study (cast stainless steel, clad ferritic, and wrought stainless steel), and two different types of flaws were implanted into the specimens (intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) and thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs)). When considering near-side inspection, far-side inspection, and false call rate, the overall performance was found to be best in clad ferritic, less effective in wrought stainless steel and the worst in cast stainless steel. Depth sizing performance showed little correlation with the true crack depths.

  18. Cosmic Ballet or Devil's Mask?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-04-01

    Stars like our Sun are members of galaxies, and most galaxies are themselves members of clusters of galaxies. In these, they move around among each other in a mostly slow and graceful ballet. But every now and then, two or more of the members may get too close for comfort - the movements become hectic, sometimes indeed dramatic, as when galaxies end up colliding. ESO PR Photo 12/04 shows an example of such a cosmic tango. This is the superb triple system NGC 6769-71, located in the southern Pavo constellation (the Peacock) at a distance of 190 million light-years. This composite image was obtained on April 1, 2004, the day of the Fifth Anniversary of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It was taken in the imaging mode of the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on Melipal, one of the four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of the VLT at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). The two upper galaxies, NGC 6769 (upper right) and NGC 6770 (upper left), are of equal brightness and size, while NGC 6771 (below) is about half as bright and slightly smaller. All three galaxies possess a central bulge of similar brightness. They consist of elderly, reddish stars and that of NGC 6771 is remarkable for its "boxy" shape, a rare occurrence among galaxies. Gravitational interaction in a small galaxy group NGC 6769 is a spiral galaxy with very tightly wound spiral arms, while NGC 6770 has two major spiral arms, one of which is rather straight and points towards the outer disc of NGC 6769. NGC 6770 is also peculiar in that it presents two comparatively straight dark lanes and a fainter arc that curves towards the third galaxy, NGC 6771 (below). It is also obvious from this new VLT photo that stars and gas have been stripped off NGC 6769 and NGC 6770, starting to form a common envelope around them, in the shape of a Devil's Mask. There is also a weak hint of a tenuous bridge between NGC 6769 and NGC 6771. All of these features testify to strong gravitational interaction between the three galaxies

  19. Optimal Phase Masks for High Contrast Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, Garreth J.

    2016-05-01

    Phase-only optical elements can provide a number of important functions for high-contrast imaging. This thesis presents analytical and numerical optical design methods for accomplishing specific tasks, the most significant of which is the precise suppression of light from a distant point source. Instruments designed for this purpose are known as coronagraphs. Here, advanced coronagraph designs are presented that offer improved theoretical performance in comparison to the current state-of-the-art. Applications of these systems include the direct imaging and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with high sensitivity. Several new coronagraph designs are introduced and, in some cases, experimental support is provided. In addition, two novel high-contrast imaging applications are discussed: the measurement of sub-resolution information using coronagraphic optics and the protection of sensors from laser damage. The former is based on experimental measurements of the sensitivity of a coronagraph to source displacement. The latter discussion presents the current state of ongoing theoretical work. Beyond the mentioned applications, the main outcome of this thesis is a generalized theory for the design of optical systems with one of more phase masks that provide precise control of radiation over a large dynamic range, which is relevant in various high-contrast imaging scenarios. The optimal phase masks depend on the necessary tasks, the maximum number of optics, and application specific performance measures. The challenges and future prospects of this work are discussed in detail.

  20. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Matos; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed. PMID:24068269

  1. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  2. Laboratory accreditation and inspection.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Carol A; Nichols, James H

    2007-12-01

    Clinical laboratories perform diagnostic testing in a highly regulated environment in which federal, state, and private accreditation agencies monitor the quality of testing processes. These agencies vary in the focus and stringency of their requirements, and differences exist among states. Continued accreditation requires regular inspection to assure quality of test results for physicians, insurers, and, ultimately, the patients being tested. Preparation for inspection requires understanding of the unique accreditation requirements for each institution, establishment of quality assurance and quality improvement oversight, and communication of each staff member's role in delivering quality test results for patient care.

  3. Clean induced feature CD shift of EUV mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesládek, Pavel; Schedel, Thorsten; Bender, Markus

    2016-05-01

    EUV developed in the last decade to the most promising <7nm technology candidate. Defects are considered to be one of the most critical issues of the EUV mask. There are several contributors which make the EUV mask so different from the optical one. First one is the significantly more complicated mask stack consisting currently of 40 Mo/Si double layers, covered by Ru capping layer and TaN/TaO absorber/anti-reflective coating on top of the front face of the mask. Backside is in contrary to optical mask covered as well by conductive layer consisting of Cr or CrN. Second contributor is the fact that EUV mask is currently in contrary to optical mask not yet equipped with sealed pellicle, leading to much higher risk of mask contamination. Third reason is use of EUV mask in vacuum, possibly leading to deposition of vacuum contaminants on the EUV mask surface. Latter reason in combination with tight requirements on backside cleanliness lead to the request of frequent recleaning of the EUV mask, in order to sustain mask lifetime similar to that of optical mask. Mask cleaning process alters slightly the surface of any mask - binary COG mask, as well as phase shift mask of any type and naturally also of the EUV mask as well. In case of optical masks the changes are almost negligible, as the mask is exposed to max. 10-20 re-cleans within its life time. These modifications can be expressed in terms of different specified parameters, e.g. CD shift, phase/trans shift, change of the surface roughness etc. The CD shift, expressed as thinning (or exceptionally thickening) of the dark features on the mask is typically in order of magnitude 0.1nm per process run, which is completely acceptable for optical mask. Projected on the lifetime of EUV mask, assuming 100 clean process cycles, this will lead to CD change of about 10nm. For this reason the requirements for EUV mask cleaning are significantly tighter, << 0.1 nm per process run. This task will look even more challenging, when

  4. Masked object registration in the Fourier domain.

    PubMed

    Padfield, Dirk

    2012-05-01

    Registration is one of the most common tasks of image analysis and computer vision applications. The requirements of most registration algorithms include large capture range and fast computation so that the algorithms are robust to different scenarios and can be computed in a reasonable amount of time. For these purposes, registration in the Fourier domain using normalized cross-correlation is well suited and has been extensively studied in the literature. Another common requirement is masking, which is necessary for applications where certain regions of the image that would adversely affect the registration result should be ignored. To address these requirements, we have derived a mathematical model that describes an exact form for embedding the masking step fully into the Fourier domain so that all steps of translation registration can be computed efficiently using Fast Fourier Transforms. We provide algorithms and implementation details that demonstrate the correctness of our derivations. We also demonstrate how this masked FFT registration approach can be applied to improve the Fourier-Mellin algorithm that calculates translation, rotation, and scale in the Fourier domain. We demonstrate the computational efficiency, advantages, and correctness of our algorithm on a number of images from real-world applications. Our framework enables fast, global, parameter-free registration of images with masked regions.

  5. Mask cycle time reduction for foundry projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.

    2011-11-01

    One of key deliverables of foundry based manufacturing is low cycletime. Building new and enhancing existing products by mask changes involves significant logistical effort, which could be reduced by standardizing data management and communication procedures among design house, mask shop, and foundry (fab) [1]. As an example, a typical process of taping out can take up to two weeks in addition to technical effort, for database handling, mask form completion, management approval, PO signoff and JDV review, translating into loss of revenue. In order to reduce this delay, we are proposing to develop a unified online system which should assist with the following functions: database edits, final verifications, document approvals, mask order entries, and JDV review with engineering signoff as required. This would help a growing number of semiconductor products to be flexibly manufactured at different manufacturing sites. We discuss how the data architecture based on a non-relational database management system (NRDMBS) extracted into a relational one (RDMBS) should provide quality information [2], to reduce cycle time significantly beyond 70% for an example 2 week tapeout schedule.

  6. Associative Learning of Discrimination with Masked Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcos, Jose L.

    2007-01-01

    Great controversy exists on whether associative learning occurs without awareness. In Experiment 1, 31 participants received discrimination training by repeated presentations of two stimulus sequences (S1[subscript A] right arrow S2[subscript A], and S1[subscript B] right arrow S2[subscript B]), S1 being a masked stimulus. S2 were imperative…

  7. Testing Tactile Masking between the Forearms.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2016-02-10

    Masking, in which one stimulus affects the detection of another, is a classic technique that has been used in visual, auditory, and tactile research, usually using stimuli that are close together to reveal local interactions. Masking effects have also been demonstrated in which a tactile stimulus alters the perception of a touch at a distant location. Such effects can provide insight into how components of the body's representations in the brain may be linked. Occasional reports have indicated that touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at corresponding contralateral locations. To explore the matching of corresponding points across the body, we can measure the spatial tuning and effect of posture on contralateral masking. Careful controls are required to rule out direct effects of the remote stimulus, for example by mechanical transmission, and also attention effects in which thresholds may be altered by the participant's attention being drawn away from the stimulus of interest. The use of this technique is beneficial as a behavioural measure for exploring which parts of the body are functionally connected and whether the two sides of the body interact in a somatotopic representation. This manuscript describes a behavioural protocol that can be used for studying contralateral tactile masking.

  8. STS-103 MS Clervoy tries on oxygen mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the bunker at Launch Pad 39B, STS-103 Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA), tries on an oxygen mask during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. Other crew members taking part are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), plus Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, who is also with ESA. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  9. STS-99 crew try on oxygen masks during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the bunker at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew try on oxygen masks. From left are Pilot Dominic Gorie, Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri, Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Gerhard Thiele. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST.

  10. EUVL mask manufacturing: technologies and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letzkus, Florian; Butschke, Joerg; Irmscher, Mathias; Sailer, Holger; Dersch, Uwe; Holfeld, Christian

    2005-11-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is the favourite next generation lithography candidate for IC device manufacturing with feature sizes beyond 32nm. Different stacks and manufacturing concepts have been published for the fabrication of the reflective EUVL masks. Patterning processes for two different absorber-buffer combinations on top of the reflective multi layer mirror have been developed. A TaN/SiO2 absorber-buffer stack was provided by supplier A and TaBN/Cr by supplier B. In addition both absorbers were covered by an anti reflective coating (ARC) layer. An e-beam patterned 300nm thick film of Fuji FEP171 was used as resist mask. We optimized the etching processes for maximum selectivities between absorber, buffer and capping layers on the one hand and rectangular profiles and low etch bias on the other hand. While both TaN based absorbers have been dry etched in an UNAXIS mask etcher III, wet and dry etch steps have been evaluated for the two different buffer layers. The minimum feature size of lines and holes in our test designs was 100nm. After freezing the processes a proximity correction was determined considering both, the influence of electron scattering due to e-beam exposure and the influence of the patterning steps. Due to the correction an outstanding linearity and iso/dense bias on different test designs was achieved. Various masks for printing experiments at the small-field Micro Exposure Tool (MET) in Berkeley and the fabrication of the ASML α-tool setup mask within the European MEDEA+ EXTUMASK project were done using the developed processes. Finally, we will compare and discuss the results of the two stack approaches.

  11. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  12. Sensorimotor supremacy: Investigating conscious and unconscious vision by masked priming

    PubMed Central

    Ansorge, Ulrich; Neumann, Odmar; Becker, Stefanie I.; Kälberer, Holger; Cruse, Holk

    2008-01-01

    According to the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis, conscious perception draws on motor action. In the present report, we will sketch two lines of potential development in the field of masking research based on the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis. In the first part of the report, evidence is reviewed that masked, invisible stimuli can affect motor responses, attention shifts, and semantic processes. After the review of the corresponding evidence – so-called masked priming effects – an approach based on the sensorimotor supremacy hypothesis is detailed as to how the question of a unitary mechanism of unconscious vision can be pursued by masked priming studies. In the second part of the report, different models and theories of backward masking and masked priming are reviewed. Types of models based on the sensorimotor hypothesis are discussed that can take into account ways in which sensorimotor processes (reflected in masked priming effects) can affect conscious vision under backward masking conditions. PMID:20517513

  13. Lithographic performance evaluation of a contaminated EUV mask after cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Dittmar, Kornelia; Holfeld, Christian; Wuest, Andrea

    2009-11-16

    The effect of surface contamination and subsequent mask surface cleaning on the lithographic performance of a EUV mask is investigated. SEMATECH's Berkeley micro-field exposure tool (MET) printed 40 nm and 50 nm line and space (L/S) patterns are evaluated to compare the performance of a contaminated and cleaned mask to an uncontaminated mask. Since the two EUV masks have distinct absorber architectures, optical imaging models and aerial image calculations were completed to determine any expected differences in performance. Measured and calculated Bossung curves, process windows, and exposure latitudes for the two sets of L/S patterns are compared to determine how the contamination and cleaning impacts the lithographic performance of EUV masks. The observed differences in mask performance are shown to be insignificant, indicating that the cleaning process did not appreciably affect mask performance.

  14. Phased array ultrasonic inspection of Friction Stir Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarre, André; Moles, Michael; Lupien, Vincent

    2000-05-01

    Phased array ultrasonic inspection methods have been developed for the rapid inspection of Friction Stir Weldments (FSW) on Delta rocket cryogenic tanks. A comprehensive review was performed to identify NDE methods that are suitable for the detection of defects in this new welding process. The search included a review of traditional and advanced NDE methods that were capable of demonstrating both the sensitivity and inspection rates required for this examination. This paper will discuss the theory behind phased array techniques, fundamentals of several probe designs for FSW configurations, and the advantages of using phased arrays over conventional NDE methods for this applications.

  15. Systematic study of source mask optimization and verification flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Yu; Latypov, Azat; Chua, Gek Soon; Zou, Yi

    2012-06-01

    Source mask optimization (SMO) emerged as powerful resolution enhancement technique (RET) for advanced technology nodes. However, there is a plethora of flow and verification metrics in the field, confounding the end user of the technique. Systemic study of different flows and the possible unification thereof is missing. This contribution is intended to reveal the pros and cons of different SMO approaches and verification metrics, understand the commonality and difference, and provide a generic guideline for RET selection via SMO. The paper discusses 3 different type of variations commonly arise in SMO, namely pattern preparation & selection, availability of relevant OPC recipe for freeform source and finally the metrics used in source verification. Several pattern selection algorithms are compared and advantages of systematic pattern selection algorithms are discussed. In the absence of a full resist model for SMO, alternative SMO flow without full resist model is reviewed. Preferred verification flow with quality metrics of DOF and MEEF is examined.

  16. Variations in backward masking with different masking stimuli: II. The effects of spatially quantised masks in the light of local contour interaction, interchannel inhibition, perceptual retouch, and substitution theories.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Talis; Luiga, Iiris; Põder, Endel

    2005-01-01

    In part I we showed that with spatially non-overlapping targets and masks both local metacontrast-like interactions and attentional processes are involved in backward masking. In this second part we extend the strategy of varying the contents of masks to pattern masking where targets and masks overlap in space, in order to compare different masking theories. Images of human faces were backward-masked by three types of spatially quantised masks (the same faces as targets, faces different from targets, and Gaussian noise with power spectra typical for faces). Configural characteristics, rather than the spectral content of the mask, predicted the extent of masking at relatively long stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). This poses difficulties for the theory of transient-on-sustained inhibition as the principal mechanism of masking and also for local contour interaction being a decisive factor in pattern masking. The scale of quantisation had no effect on the masking capacity of noise masks and a strong effect on the capacity of different-face masks. Also, the decrease of configural masking with an increase in the coarseness of the quantisation of the mask highlights ambiguities inherent in the re-entrance-based substitution theory of masking. Different masking theories cannot solve the problems of masking separately. They should be combined in order to create a complex, yet comprehensible mode of interaction for the different mechanisms involved in visual backward masking.

  17. Automated mask creation from a 3D model using Faethm.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon

    2007-11-01

    We have developed and implemented a method which given a three-dimensional object can infer from topology the two-dimensional masks needed to produce that object with surface micro-machining. The masks produced by this design tool can be generic, process independent masks, or if given process constraints, specific for a target process. This design tool calculates the two-dimensional mask set required to produce a given three-dimensional model by investigating the vertical topology of the model.

  18. Pre-Demolition Inspections

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A pre-demolition inspection may be one of the most helpful and cost-efficient steps you can take to identify materials that should (or must) be removed from buildings prior to demolition. In some cases it may be required by regulation.

  19. Playground Inspection & Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeds, Gerard

    People today demand a safer work environment and a safer play environment for children. Accidents such as broken arms are no longer accepted as an inevitable part of growing up. This paper presents recommendations for the maintenance of safe playground areas and equipment, covering three main areas: (1) inspections, which should follow a specified…

  20. Inspecting Playgrounds for Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Seymour M.

    1991-01-01

    Safe playgrounds are an essential mission for public park, recreation, education, and child care agencies. The article describes how to create safety programs and offers lists of safety program components, safety inspection steps, and preventive maintenance schedules. It also presents playground safety checklists and notes three available…

  1. Inspecting Magic Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John Howell

    1998-01-01

    Considers neopragmatism's use-value for art educators as they inspect the magic words, images, and practices that influence curriculum and instruction. Explains that neopragmatism offers art educators three concepts (contingency, demystification, and recontextualization) as tools to interpret educational beliefs and classroom practices. (CMK)

  2. Ofsted Re-Inspected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffield, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The author never thought he would have to thank Ofsted for a change in its approach that may result in a major improvement in provision; and yet, with the introduction of the revised Common Inspection Framework (CIF), it has made teaching and learning (T&L) the first priority throughout the learning and skills sector. While he wishes to…

  3. Remote Inspection Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to remotely inspect equipment of an aging infrastructure is becoming of major interest to many industries. Often the ability to just get a look at a piece of critical equipment can yield very important information. With millions of miles of piping installed throughout the United States, this vast network is critical to oil, natural…

  4. How Does Target Duration Affect Object Substitution Masking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Carter, Wakefield; Guest, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Object substitution masking (OSM) is typically studied using a brief search display. The target item may be indicated by a cue/mask surrounding but not overlapping it. Report of the target is reduced when mask offset trails target offset rather than being simultaneous with it. We report 5 experiments investigating whether OSM can be obtained if…

  5. How color, regularity, and good Gestalt determine backward masking.

    PubMed

    Sayim, Bilge; Manassi, Mauro; Herzog, Michael

    2014-06-18

    The strength of visual backward masking depends on the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between target and mask. Recently, it was shown that the conjoint spatial layout of target and mask is as crucial as SOA. Particularly, masking strength depends on whether target and mask group with each other. The same is true in crowding where the global spatial layout of the flankers and target-flanker grouping determine crowding strength. Here, we presented a vernier target followed by different flanker configurations at varying SOAs. Similar to crowding, masking of a red vernier target was strongly reduced for arrays of 10 green compared with 10 red flanking lines. Unlike crowding, single green lines flanking the red vernier showed strong masking. Irregularly arranged flanking lines yielded stronger masking than did regularly arranged lines, again similar to crowding. While cuboid flankers reduced crowding compared with single lines, this was not the case in masking. We propose that, first, masking is reduced when the flankers are part of a larger spatial structure. Second, spatial factors counteract color differences between the target and the flankers. Third, complex Gestalts, such as cuboids, seem to need longer processing times to show ungrouping effects as observed in crowding. Strong parallels between masking and crowding suggest similar underlying mechanism; however, temporal factors in masking additionally modulate performance, acting as an additional grouping cue.

  6. Homophone Dominance Modulates the Phonemic-Masking Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berent, Iris; Van Orden, Guy C.

    2000-01-01

    Finds (1) positive phonemic-masking effects occurred for dominant homophones; (2) null phonemic-masking effects occurred for subordinate homophones; and (3) subordinate homophones were much more likely to be falsely identified as their dominant mate. Suggests the source of these null phonemic-masking is itself a phonology effect. Concludes…

  7. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  12. An unattended mask makes an attended target disappear.

    PubMed

    Veenemans, Arielle A; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In pattern masking, the target and mask are presented at the same location and follow one another very closely in time. When the observer attends to the target, he or she must also attend to the mask, as the switching time for attention is quite slow. In a series of experiments, we present mask-target-mask sequences staggered in time and location (Cavanagh, Holcombe, & Chou, 2008) that allow participants to attentively track the target location without attending to the masks. The results show that the strength of masking is on average unaffected by the removal of attention from the masks. Moreover, after isolating the target location perceptually with moving attention, it is clear that the target, when at threshold, has not been degraded or integrated with a persisting mask but it has vanished. We also show that the strength of masking is unaffected by the lateral spacing between adjacent target and mask sequences until the spacing is so large that the apparent motion driving the attentive tracking breaks down. Finally, we compare the effect of the pre- and postmask and find that the premask is responsible for the larger part of the masking.

  13. Nondestructive evaluation inspection of the Arlington Memorial Bridge using a robotic assisted bridge inspection tool (RABIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucunski, Nenad; Boone, Shane D.; Zobel, Rob; Ghasemi, Hamid; Parvardeh, Hooman; Kee, Seong-Hoon

    2014-04-01

    The information presented in this report provides a detailed assessment of the condition of the Arlington Memorial Bridge (AMB) deck. The field-data collection was obtained by both the RABIT™ Bridge Inspection Tool and a number of semi-automated non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. The deployment of the semi-automated NDE tools was performed to inspect the AMB deck condition and also to validate data obtained by the RABIT™ Bridge Inspection Tool. Data mining and analysis were accomplished through enhanced data interpretation and visualization capabilities using advanced data integration, fusion, and 2D rendering. One of the major challenges that the research team had to overcome in assessing the condition of the AMB deck was the presence of an asphalt overlay on the entire bridge deck.

  14. Model-based mask data preparation (MB-MDP) for ArF and EUV mask process correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Kazuyuki; Bork, Ingo; Fujimura, Aki

    2011-05-01

    Using Model-Based Mask Data Preparation (MB-MDP) complex masks with complex sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) can be written in practical write times with today's leading-edge production VSB machines by allowing overlapping VSB shots. This simulation-based approach reduces shot count by taking advantage of the added flexibility in being able to overlap shots. The freedom to overlap shots, it turns out, also increases mask fidelity, CDU on the mask, and CDU on the wafer by writing sub-100nm mask features more accurately, and with better dose margin. This paper describes how overlapping shots enhance mask and wafer quality for various sub-100nm features on ArF masks. In addition, this paper describes how EUV mask accuracy can be enhanced uniquely by allowing overlapping shots.

  15. Imaging performance of attenuated phase-shift mask using coherent scattering microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Uk; Jeong, SeeJun; Hong, Seong Chul; Lee, Seung Min; Ahn, Jinho

    2014-03-01

    The half-tone phase shift mask (PSM) has been suggested for better imaging performances like image contrast, NILS and H-V bias compared to the binary mask (BIM) in EUV lithography. In this paper, we measured imaging performance of a fabricated half-tone attenuated PSM with Coherent Scattering Microscopy (CSM) and the results were compared with simulation data obtained by EM-suite tool. We prepared a half-tone attenuated PSM which has 12.7% reflectivity and 180° phase shift with absorber stack of 16.5mn-thick TaN absorber and 24nm-thick Mo phase shifter. With CSM, an actinic inspection tool, we measured the imaging properties of PSM. The diffraction efficiencies of BIM were measured as 31%, 36%, and 44% for 88 nm, 100 nm, and 128 nm mask CD, respectively, while those of PSM were measured as 45%, 62%, and 81%. Also the aerial image at wafer level obtained by CSM with high volume manufacturing tool's (HVM) illumination condition (NA=0.33, σ=0.9) showed higher image contrast and NILS with phase shift effect. And the measured data were consistent with the simulation data.

  16. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  17. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  18. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  19. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  20. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  1. From Inspection to School Improvement? Evaluating the Accelerated Inspection Programme in Waltham Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, David; Harris, Alma; Watling, Rob; Beresford, John

    1999-01-01

    Outlines the main findings from the evaluation of the Accelerated Inspection Programme (AIP) in Waltham Forest under three main phases (pre-inspection, inspection, and post inspection). Focuses on the relationship between inspection and school improvement. Discusses the recommendations. (CMK)

  2. Effects Of Unsharp Masking On Color Reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molla, R. K.

    1990-06-01

    Unsharp Masking, abbreviated as USM, is one of the few terms that is transferred from photographic color separation technique to modern electronic separation in a scanner. In photographic separation, the color correction mask is made unsharp to enhance details in the reproduction. In a color separation scanner, the principles remained the same, however, a different technique is used to create an optical illusion to enhance sharpness or details in the reproduction. During scanning, when there is a change of density in the copy, two fine lines are generated at the borders of the transition, a lighter line and a darker line at the borders of light and dark edges respectively of the density change. This is possible by scanning the copy with the main aperture as well as a separate larger aperture called unsharp masking aperture. When the separation is in progress, the signal from the unsharp masking aperture is compared with the signal from the main scanning aperture at a differential stage in the computer. If there is a density change in the copy, the larger unsharp masking aperture senses the change sooner than the smaller main aperture, and at this point, an additional signal is generated and added to the main signal. This makes it possible to create the black and white lines at the borders of a density change. In addition to this function, the same black and white lines can also be produced at the borders of transition of a color by transmitting the unsharp masking beam through any one of red, green, or blue filters. A combination of these apertures and filters can be selected by adjusting a pair of wheels located on the scanning head as in Hell scanners, or by changing specific inserts as in Dainippon Screen scanners. When used moderately, the black and white lines at the borders of a density or color change will create the effects of sharper details in the reproduction. In addition to the above mechanical controls, electronic controls are also provided in most

  3. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Pipe crawlers, pipe inspection {open_quotes}rabbits{close_quotes} and similar vehicles are widely used for inspecting the interior surfaces of piping systems, storage tanks and process vessels for damaged or flawed structural features. This paper describes the design of a flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus.

  4. Multi-Sensor Inspection Telerobot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaram, J.; Hayati, S.; Volpe, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a telerobotic multi-sensor inspection system for space platforms developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A multi-sensor inspection end-effector incorporates cameras and lighting for visual inspection, as well as temperature and gas leak-detection sensors.

  5. 7 CFR 29.40 - Mandatory inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.40 Mandatory inspection. Inspection authorized or required under section 5 of the Act or Section 759 of the Appropriations Act. definitions...

  6. 23 CFR 650.313 - Inspection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS National Bridge Inspection Standards § 650.313 Inspection procedures. (a) Inspect each bridge in accordance with the inspection procedures in the AASHTO Manual (incorporated...

  7. 23 CFR 650.313 - Inspection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS National Bridge Inspection Standards § 650.313 Inspection procedures. (a) Inspect each bridge in accordance with the inspection procedures in the AASHTO Manual (incorporated...

  8. Overview of the software inspection process

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, G.L.; Dabbs, R.

    1997-11-01

    This tutorial introduces attendees to the Inspection Process and teaches them how to organize and participate in a software inspection. The tutorial advocates the benefits of inspections and encourages attendees to socialize the inspection process in their organizations.

  9. Rule-based inspection of printed green ceramic tape

    SciTech Connect

    Patek, D.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Karnowski, T.; Lamond, D.; Hawkins, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    A template-based vision system for the 100% inspection of printed flaws on green ceramic tape has been developed. Design goals included a requirement for the detection of flaws as small as two thousandths of an inch on parts up to 8 by 8 inches in size. The inspection engine is a Datacube, Inc., MV200 pipeline processor. As each part is inspected, four 2K by 2K pixel quadrant images are stitched together to construct a single 4K by 4K pixel image with the aid of multiple fiducials located in each quadrant. The part fiducial locations, mask image, and punched-hole position data are generated, beforehand, from CAD designs using a defect map editor (DME), a preprocessing software package developed for the PC. The DME also generates a part ``defect map``. Each unique structure in the printed pattern is defined as an object. Objects are grouped into user-defined categories such as die pads, contact fingers, traces, and electrolysis buses. The map is used during the runtime inspection to associate each detected defect with an object group and a particular defect specification for that group. Repeat defects are optionally tracked for up to three consecutive parts.

  10. Oronasal Masks Require a Higher Pressure than Nasal and Nasal Pillow Masks for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sheetal; Joosten, Simon; Turton, Anthony; Edwards, Bradley A.; Landry, Shane; Mansfield, Darren R.; Hamilton, Garun S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Oronasal masks are frequently used for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of this study was to (1) determine if CPAP requirements are higher for oronasal masks compared to nasal mask interfaces and (2) assess whether polysomnography and patient characteristics differed among mask preference groups. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all CPAP implementation polysomnograms between July 2013 and June 2014. Prescribed CPAP level, polysomnography results and patient data were compared according to mask type (n = 358). Results: Oronasal masks were used in 46%, nasal masks in 35% and nasal pillow masks in 19%. There was no difference according to mask type for baseline apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), body mass index (BMI), waist or neck circumference. CPAP level was higher for oronasal masks, 12 (10–15.5) cm H2O compared to nasal pillow masks, 11 (8–12.5) cm H2O and nasal masks, 10 (8–12) cm H2O, p < 0.0001 (Median [interquartile range]). Oronasal mask type, AHI, age, and BMI were independent predictors of a higher CPAP pressure (p < 0.0005, adjusted R2 = 0.26.). For patients with CPAP ≥ 15 cm H2O, there was an odds ratio of 4.5 (95% CI 2.5–8.0) for having an oronasal compared to a nasal or nasal pillow mask. Residual median AHI was higher for oronasal masks (11.3 events/h) than for nasal masks (6.4 events/h) and nasal pillows (6.7 events/h), p < 0.001. Conclusions: Compared to nasal mask types, oronasal masks are associated with higher CPAP pressures (particularly pressures ≥ 15 cm H2O) and a higher residual AHI. Further evaluation with a randomized control trial is required to definitively establish the effect of mask type on pressure requirements. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1209. Citation: Deshpande S, Joosten S, Turton A, Edwards BA, Landry S, Mansfield DR, Hamilton GS. Oronasal masks require a higher pressure than nasal and

  11. In collaboration with mask suppliers for change management enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Erwin; Lee, Chun Der; Lee, Rachel

    2013-06-01

    For those wafer fabs that have no their own maskshops, the main target of mask quality department is to gain stable mask quality performance through effective supplier management, and therefore achieves competitive business results. After dealing with lots of mask data preparation (MDP) quality problems with suppliers, we have found that incomplete change management procedures are one of major sources that induce incorrect mask data for writing. This article will share our experience in how to enhance change management flows with mask suppliers together and will also show the utility after a series of flow improvement actions.

  12. Impact of a New Nasal Pillows Mask on Patients' Acceptance, Compliance, and Willingness to Remain on CPAP Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wimms, Alison; Ketheeswaran, Sahisha; Ziegenbein, Claus; Jennings, Laura; Woehrle, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) masks are a key factor in patient compliance. This program assessed the performance of a new nasal pillows mask (NPM) on a variety of new and established obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients using CPAP therapy. Methods. Five programs were developed to assess the new NPM [AirFit P10, ResMed] on naïve patients; patients established on another NPM; patients using a nasal mask; patients with low CPAP compliance; and patients who wished to stop using CPAP therapy. Results. A total of 212 patients were included. In naïve patients, CPAP usage after 3 months was 5.9 ± 1.7 hours/night, compared with the control group at 4.6 ± 2.4 hours/night (p < 0.05). In patients established on another NPM, usage improved to 7.4 ± 1.1 hours/night versus 6.7 ± 1.4 (p = 0.001). 78% of nasal mask users wished to continue using the new NPM. Low compliance patients improved with an average of 0.87 hours/night (p = 0.001) when using the new NPM. In patients at the point of quitting CPAP, 60% continued with therapy using the new NPM. Conclusion. The new NPM mask performed well in a variety of clinical groups of OSA patients receiving CPAP therapy and shows that technical advances in CPAP masks can improve patient compliance.

  13. Impact of a New Nasal Pillows Mask on Patients' Acceptance, Compliance, and Willingness to Remain on CPAP Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ketheeswaran, Sahisha; Jennings, Laura; Woehrle, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) masks are a key factor in patient compliance. This program assessed the performance of a new nasal pillows mask (NPM) on a variety of new and established obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients using CPAP therapy. Methods. Five programs were developed to assess the new NPM [AirFit P10, ResMed] on naïve patients; patients established on another NPM; patients using a nasal mask; patients with low CPAP compliance; and patients who wished to stop using CPAP therapy. Results. A total of 212 patients were included. In naïve patients, CPAP usage after 3 months was 5.9 ± 1.7 hours/night, compared with the control group at 4.6 ± 2.4 hours/night (p < 0.05). In patients established on another NPM, usage improved to 7.4 ± 1.1 hours/night versus 6.7 ± 1.4 (p = 0.001). 78% of nasal mask users wished to continue using the new NPM. Low compliance patients improved with an average of 0.87 hours/night (p = 0.001) when using the new NPM. In patients at the point of quitting CPAP, 60% continued with therapy using the new NPM. Conclusion. The new NPM mask performed well in a variety of clinical groups of OSA patients receiving CPAP therapy and shows that technical advances in CPAP masks can improve patient compliance. PMID:27648308

  14. Multi-part mask for implanting workpieces

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.

    2016-05-10

    A multi-part mask has a pattern plate, which includes a planar portion that has the desired aperture pattern to be used during workpiece processing. The multi-part mask also has a mounting frame, which is used to hold the pattern plate. Prior to assembly, the pattern plate has an aligning portion, which has one or more holes through which reusable alignment pins are inserted. These alignment pins enter kinematic joints disposed on the mounting frame, which serve to precisely align the pattern plate to the mounting frame. After the pattern plate has been secured to the mounting frame, the aligning portion can be detached from the pattern plate. The alignment pins can be reused at a later time. In some embodiments, the pattern plate can later be removed from the mounting frame, so that the mounting frame may be reused.

  15. IBIS mask pre-calibration matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reglero, V.; Sánchez, F.; Rodrigo, J.; Velasco, T.; Gasent, J. L.; Chato, R.; Alamo, J.; Burgos, J. A.; Suso, J.; Blay, P.; Martínez, S.; Doñate, M.; Reina, M.; Sabau, D.; Ruiz-Urien, I.; Santos, I.; Zarauz, J.; Vázquez, J.

    2001-09-01

    Coded Aperture System performances are defined by the geometry of the code, detector pixel geometry relationship and focal length. Physical Coded Aperture Systems deviate from the ideal ones on two basic aspects: uncertainties on pixel location and size coming form the manufacturing process and deviations from their theoretical transparency/opacity values (1/0, 0/1), when support structures are required. Mask support structure imposes penalties on transparency as a function of the energy and angle of the incident photons. Pixel position and size values include uncertainties coming from the code cut in tungsten plates and assembly process. The scope of this paper is to summarize the results of the code elements position and size, as well as transparency/opacity values found for the IBIS Coded Aperture System. Both sets of data define the optical performances of the IBIS Mask required to perform accurate imaging of celestial gamma-ray sources.

  16. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    DOE PAGES

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; ...

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than themore » conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.« less

  17. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than the conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.

  18. Masking mediated print defect visibility predictor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaochen; Nachlieli, Hila; Shaked, Doron; Shiffman, Smadar; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Banding is a well-known artifact produced by printing systems. It usually appears as lines perpendicular to the process direction of the print. Therefore, banding is an important print quality issue which has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers. However, little literature has focused on the study of the masking effect of content for this kind of print quality issue. Compared with other image and print quality research, our work is focused on the print quality of typical documents printed on a digital commercial printing press. In this paper, we propose a Masking Mediated Print Defect Visibility Predictor (MMPDVP) to predict the visibility of defects in the presence of customer content. The parameters of the algorithm are trained from ground-truth images that have been marked by subjects. The MMPDVP could help the press operator decide whether the print quality is acceptable for specific customer requirements. Ultimately, this model can be used to optimize the print-shop workflow.

  19. Latent inhibition in human adults without masking.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Martha; Arcediano, Francisco; Miller, Ralph R

    2003-09-01

    Latent inhibition refers to attenuated responding to Cue X observed when the X-outcome pairings are preceded by X-alone presentations. It has proven difficult to obtain in human adults unless the preexposure (X-alone) presentations are embedded within a masking (i.e., distracting) task. The authors hypothesized that the difficulty in obtaining latent inhibition with unmasked tasks is related to the usual training procedures, in which the preexposure and conditioning experiences are separated by a set of instructions. Experiment 1 reports latent inhibition without masking in a task in which preexposure and conditioning occur without interruption. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrate that this attenuation in responding to target Cue X does not pass a summation test for conditioned inhibition and is context specific, thereby confirming that it is latent inhibition. Experiments 3 and 4 confirm that introducing instructions between preexposure and conditioning disrupts latent inhibition.

  20. Inspection Head Design for the In-Service Inspection of Fuel Channels of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Haruray, Amit Kumar; Veerapur, R.D.; Puri, R.K.; Singh, Manjit

    2006-07-01

    This paper discusses the challenges associated with the mechanical design of Inspection Head for the in-service inspection (ISI) of fuel channels of Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). ISI is carried out during shut down period in the reactor. Non Destructive Examination (NDE) of fuel channels is a mandatory requirement to acquire knowledge about the structural condition. A typical 220 MWe Reactor-core consists of 306 horizontal fuel channel assemblies (tubular in shape). There are typical design challenges due to their horizontal nature, long length (each assembly is around 9 meters long), and high radiation. Because of combined effect of above mentioned factors, these fuel channels develop permanent downward sag during service. This sag has to be negotiated by the Inspection Head. The Inspection Head houses all the NDE sensors and is deployed in the fuel channel with the help of reactor fuelling machine. It is driven inside the fuel channel by a separate external drive-system, which is capable of linearly advancing, retracting as well as rotating it all-round to achieve full-volumetric inspection. The paper also discusses an important design feature in the Inspection Head, which helps in maintaining a fixed distance between NDE sensors and the internal surface (ID) of the fuel channel, to enable us to obtain reliable and consistent inspection results. This objective is achieved with the help of two specially designed leaf-spring loaded roller modules, which are assembled in the Inspection Head at its front and rear, with NDE Sensor Module sandwiched between them. Another very important design feature in the Inspection Head helps the Spring-Loaded Roller Modules in carrying out their intended function of maintaining fixed distance despite the weight of the long drive extension links attached at the rear of Inspection Head or deviations due to any other reason. There are multiple drive extension links attached at the rear of the Inspection Head as the