Science.gov

Sample records for advanced measurement approaches

  1. Measuring Alumna Career Advancement: An Approach Based on Educational Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ur, Tamar; Rogers, Glen

    Alverno College (Wisconsin), a women's liberal arts college, has developed an Alumni Career Level Classification (AACLC) scheme to measure alumna career advancement and demonstrate institutional accountability. This validation study was part of a larger longitudinal study of two entire cohorts of students entering the college in 1976 and 1977, of…

  2. 12 CFR Appendix F to Part 208 - Capital Adequacy Guidelines for Banks: Internal-Ratings-Based and Advanced Measurement Approaches

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Capital Adequacy Guidelines for Banks: Internal-Ratings-Based and Advanced Measurement Approaches F Appendix F to Part 208 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM MEMBERSHIP OF STATE BANKING INSTITUTIONS IN THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (REGULATION...

  3. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  4. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Richard; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-06-24

    U.S. efforts to promote the international expansion of nuclear energy through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will result in a dramatic expansion of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the United States. New demonstration facilities, such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF), the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), and the Consolidated Fuel Treatment Center (CFTC) will use advanced nuclear and chemical process technologies that must incorporate increased proliferation resistance to enhance nuclear safeguards. The ASA-100 Project, “Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities,” commissioned by the NA-243 Office of NNSA, has been tasked with reviewing and developing advanced safeguards approaches for these demonstration facilities. Because one goal of GNEP is developing and sharing proliferation-resistant nuclear technology and services with partner nations, the safeguards approaches considered are consistent with international safeguards as currently implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This first report reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new fuel reprocessing processes to be deployed at the AFCF and CFTC facilities. Similar analyses addressing the ABR and transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication lines at AFCF and CFTC will be presented in subsequent reports.

  5. Reliability and Validity of Advanced Phonics Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Sara J.; Hixson, Michael D.; Decker, Dawn M.; Reynolds, Jennifer L.; Drevon, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Two studies explored the technical adequacy of various measures of advanced phonics skills. In Study 1, the advanced phonics measures consisted of pseudowords, real words, or a combination of both. Participants included 39 students in the third grade. Test-retest correlations for all measures were above 0.8 and interrater reliability was high.…

  6. Chemical Approaches for Advanced Optical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhixing

    Advances in optical microscopy have been constantly expanding our knowledge of biological systems. The achievements therein are a result of close collaborations between physicists/engineers who build the imaging instruments and chemists/biochemists who design the corresponding probe molecules. In this work I present a number of chemical approaches for the development of advanced optical imaging methods. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the recent advances of novel imaging approaches taking advantage of chemical tag technologies. Chapter 2 describes the second-generation covalent trimethoprim-tag as a viable tool for live cell protein-specific labeling and imaging. In Chapter 3 we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging approach to map protein-specific micro-environment in live cells using TMP-Cy3 as a chemical probe. In Chapter 4, we present a method harnessing photo-activatable fluorophores to extend the fundamental depth limit in multi-photon microscopy. Chapter 5 describes the development of isotopically edited alkyne palette for multi-color live cell vibrational imaging of cellular small molecules. These studies exemplify the impact of modern chemical approaches in the development of advanced optical microscopies.

  7. An approach to dyspnea in advanced disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Romayne

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To describe an approach to assessment and treatment of dyspnea. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: New level I evidence can guide management of dyspnea in advanced illness. Assessment and use of adjuvant medications and oxygen relies on level II and III evidence. MAIN MESSAGE: Opioids are first-line therapy for managing dyspnea in advanced illness. They are safe and effective in reducing shortness of breath. Neuroleptics are useful adjuvant medications. Evidence does not support use of oxygen for every patient experiencing dyspnea; it should be tried for patients who do not benefit from first-line medications and nonmedicinal therapies. CONCLUSION: Opioids relieve dyspnea and are indicated as first-line treatment for dyspnea arising from advanced disease of any cause. PMID:14708926

  8. Advances in noninvasive bone measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Mazess, R.B.; Barden, H.; Vetter, J.; Ettinger, M.

    1989-01-01

    Several noninvasive measurement methods are used for evaluation of metabolic disease. Single-photon (/sup 125/I) scans of the peripheral skeleton are useful in some diseases but are ineffective in osteoporosis (even on the distal radius or os calcis) because they cannot predict spinal or femoral density. Also, peripheral measurements show high percentages of false negatives, that is many patients with fractures have normal peripheral density. Dual-photon (/sup 153/Gd) scans of the spine, femur, and total skeleton are precise and accurate (2% error) and provide direct measurements of bone strength at fracture sites. This gives the best discrimination of abnormality and the most sensitive monitoring. Quantitative computed computed tomography (QCT) allows measurement of the spine but not the critical proximal femur area. QCT has a large accuracy error because (a) the limited area measured (under 5 cm3) fails to represent the total vertebral body, (b) technical errors, and (c) variable fat and osteoid influence the results. 25 references.

  9. Advanced measurement techniques, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Carraway, Debra L.; Manuel, Gregory S.; Croom, Cynthia C.

    1987-01-01

    In modern laminar flow flight and wind tunnel research, it is important to understand the specific cause(s) of laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition. Such information is crucial to the exploration of the limits of practical application of laminar flow for drag reduction on aircraft. The process of transition involves both the possible modes of disturbance growth, and the environmental conditioning of the instabilities by freestream or surface conditions. The possible modes of disturbance growth include viscous, inviscid, and modes which may bypass these natural ones. Theory provides information on the possible modes of disturbance amplification, but experimentation must be relied upon to determine which of those modes actually dominates the transition process in a given environment. The results to date of research on advanced devices and methods used for the study of transition phenomena in the subsonic and transonic flight and wind tunnel environments are presented.

  10. ADVANCES IN PARTICLE SAMPLING AND MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper, by five authorities who contributed significantly to the second symposium on advances to particle sampling and measurement (October 1979 in Daytona Beach, FL) summarizes salient developments in the field. Current techniques were described as being expensive, complicate...

  11. Advances in Measurement Technology at NIST's Physical Measurement Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehmer, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    The NIST mission is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology. The Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) has responsibility for maintaining national standards for two dozen physical quantities needed for international trade; and, importantly, it carries out advanced research at the frontiers of measurement science to enable extending innovation into new realms and new markets. This talk will highlight advances being made across several sectors of technology; and it will describe how PML interacts with its many collaborators and clients in industry, government, and academe.

  12. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication

    PubMed Central

    Gricius, Gediminas; Drungilas, Darius; Andziulis, Arunas; Dzemydiene, Dale; Voznak, Miroslav; Kurmis, Mindaugas; Jakovlev, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys), which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information. PMID:26345197

  13. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication.

    PubMed

    Gricius, Gediminas; Drungilas, Darius; Andziulis, Arunas; Dzemydiene, Dale; Voznak, Miroslav; Kurmis, Mindaugas; Jakovlev, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys), which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information. PMID:26345197

  14. The Advanced Noise Control Fan Baseline Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Lauer, Joel T.; Stuliff, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center s (NASA Glenn) Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) was developed in the early 1990s to provide a convenient test bed to measure and understand fan-generated acoustics, duct propagation, and radiation to the farfield. As part of a complete upgrade, current baseline and acoustic measurements were documented. Extensive in-duct, farfield acoustic, and flow field measurements are reported. This is a follow-on paper to documenting the operating description of the ANCF.

  15. An advanced approach to reactivity rating.

    PubMed

    Kossoy, A; Benin, A; Akhmetshin, Yu

    2005-02-14

    Reactive hazards remain a significant safety challenge in the chemical industry despite continual attention devoted to this problem. The application of various criteria, which are recommended by the guidelines for assessment of reactive hazards, often causes unsafe results to be obtained. The main origins of such failures are as follows: (a) reactivity of a compound is considered as an inherent property of a compound; (b) some appropriate criteria are determined by using too simple methods that cannot reveal potential hazards properly. Four well-known hazard indicators--time to certain conversion limit, TCL; adiabatic time to maximum rate, TMR; adiabatic temperature rise; and NFPA reactivity rating number, Nr--are analyzed in the paper. It was ascertained that they could be safely used for preliminary assessment of reactive hazards provided that: (a) the selected indicator is appropriate for the specific conditions of a process; (b) the indicators have been determined by using the pertinent methods. The applicability limits for every indicator were determined and the advanced kinetics-based simulation approach, which allows reliable determination of the indicators, is proposed. The technique of applying this approach is illustrated by two practical examples. PMID:15721524

  16. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

  17. Uncertainty quantification approaches for advanced reactor analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, L. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-24

    The original approach to nuclear reactor design or safety analyses was to make very conservative modeling assumptions so as to ensure meeting the required safety margins. Traditional regulation, as established by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission required conservatisms which have subsequently been shown to be excessive. The commission has therefore moved away from excessively conservative evaluations and has determined best-estimate calculations to be an acceptable alternative to conservative models, provided the best-estimate results are accompanied by an uncertainty evaluation which can demonstrate that, when a set of analysis cases which statistically account for uncertainties of all types are generated, there is a 95% probability that at least 95% of the cases meet the safety margins. To date, nearly all published work addressing uncertainty evaluations of nuclear power plant calculations has focused on light water reactors and on large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) analyses. However, there is nothing in the uncertainty evaluation methodologies that is limited to a specific type of reactor or to specific types of plant scenarios. These same methodologies can be equally well applied to analyses for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and to liquid metal reactors, and they can be applied to steady-state calculations, operational transients, or severe accident scenarios. This report reviews and compares both statistical and deterministic uncertainty evaluation approaches. Recommendations are given for selection of an uncertainty methodology and for considerations to be factored into the process of evaluating uncertainties for advanced reactor best-estimate analyses.

  18. Advanced Measurement Systems Available to PIWG Members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert; Lei, Jih-Fen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It was developed advanced measurement technologies to meet NASA goals: reduce design cycle time, reduce emission, reduce testing time, increase safety. The technology are saving money. This technology are available now for technology transfer: optical diagnostics, the film technology and MEMS devices.

  19. Nonintrusive temperature measurements on advanced turbomachinery components

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Turley, W.D.; Lewis, W.

    1992-12-31

    A nonintrusive, noncontacting method we developed for temperature measurements in hostile environments is well-suited for measurements on advanced turbine components. The method is not only superior to thermocouples in sufficiently difficult environments, but also is the only known method for making measurements in situations where no form of pyrometry works. We demonstrated the method, which uses laser-induced fluorescence of thermographic phosphors bonded to the component surfaces, on turbine blades and vanes in developmental turbine engines. The method is extendable to the much-higher temperatures expected inside advanced turbomachinery. Of particular note is the adaptability of the method to surface-temperature measurements on ceramics operating at high temperatures. In this temperature range, the ceramics become translucent, and surface emissivity becomes meaningless. We shall discuss the method, its advantages and limitations, recent test results on operating turbine engines, and the extension to ceramic components.

  20. Recent advancement of turbulent flow measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battle, T.; Wang, P.; Cheng, D. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Advancements of the fluctuating density gradient cross beam laser Schlieren technique, the fluctuating line-reversal temperature measurement and the development of the two-dimensional drag-sensing probe to a three-dimensional drag-sensing probe are discussed. The three-dimensionality of the instantaneous momentum vector can shed some light on the nature of turbulence especially with swirling flow. All three measured fluctuating quantities (density, temperature, and momentum) can provide valuable information for theoreticians.

  1. Advanced optical blade tip clearance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, M. J.; Honeycutt, R. E.; Nordlund, R. E.; Robinson, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced electro-optical system was developed to measure single blade tip clearances and average blade tip clearances between a rotor and its gas path seal in an operating gas turbine engine. This system is applicable to fan, compressor, and turbine blade tip clearance measurement requirements, and the system probe is particularly suitable for operation in the extreme turbine environment. A study of optical properties of blade tips was conducted to establish measurement system application limitations. A series of laboratory tests was conducted to determine the measurement system's operational performance characteristics and to demonstrate system capability under simulated operating gas turbine environmental conditions. Operational and environmental performance test data are presented.

  2. An alternative approach to advancing resuscitation science.

    PubMed

    Kern, Karl B; Valenzuela, Terence D; Clark, Lani L; Berg, Robert A; Hilwig, Ronald W; Berg, Marc D; Otto, Charles W; Newburn, Daniel; Ewy, Gordon A

    2005-03-01

    Stagnant survival rates in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remain a great impetus for advancing resuscitation science. International resuscitation guidelines, with all their advantages for standardizing resuscitation therapeutic protocols, can be difficult to change. A formalized evidence-based process has been adopted by the International Liason Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) in formulating such guidelines. Currently, randomized clinical trials are considered optimal evidence, and very few major changes in the Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care are made without such. An alternative approach is to allow externally controlled clinical trials more weight in Guideline formulation and resuscitation protocol adoption. In Tucson, Arizona (USA), the Fire Department cardiac arrest database has revealed a number of resuscitation issues. These include a poor bystander CPR rate, a lack of response to initial defibrillation after prolonged ventricular fibrillation, and substantial time without chest compressions during the resuscitation effort. A local change in our previous resuscitation protocols had been instituted based upon this historical database information. PMID:15733752

  3. Multilayer Approach for Advanced Hybrid Lithium Battery.

    PubMed

    Ming, Jun; Li, Mengliu; Kumar, Pushpendra; Li, Lain-Jong

    2016-06-28

    Conventional intercalated rechargeable batteries have shown their capacity limit, and the development of an alternative battery system with higher capacity is strongly needed for sustainable electrical vehicles and hand-held devices. Herein, we introduce a feasible and scalable multilayer approach to fabricate a promising hybrid lithium battery with superior capacity and multivoltage plateaus. A sulfur-rich electrode (90 wt % S) is covered by a dual layer of graphite/Li4Ti5O12, where the active materials S and Li4Ti5O12 can both take part in redox reactions and thus deliver a high capacity of 572 mAh gcathode(-1) (vs the total mass of electrode) or 1866 mAh gs(-1) (vs the mass of sulfur) at 0.1C (with the definition of 1C = 1675 mA gs(-1)). The battery shows unique voltage platforms at 2.35 and 2.1 V, contributed from S, and 1.55 V from Li4Ti5O12. A high rate capability of 566 mAh gcathode(-1) at 0.25C and 376 mAh gcathode(-1) at 1C with durable cycle ability over 100 cycles can be achieved. Operando Raman and electron microscope analysis confirm that the graphite/Li4Ti5O12 layer slows the dissolution/migration of polysulfides, thereby giving rise to a higher sulfur utilization and a slower capacity decay. This advanced hybrid battery with a multilayer concept for marrying different voltage plateaus from various electrode materials opens a way of providing tunable capacity and multiple voltage platforms for energy device applications. PMID:27268064

  4. Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is part of the Instrument Technology Development program to develop advanced sensor systems. The primary focus of the AMAMS project is to develop microelectromechanical (MEMS) acceleration sensor systems to replace existing electromechanical-sensor-based systems presently used to assess relative gravity levels aboard spacecraft. These systems are used in characterizing both vehicle and payload responses to low-gravity vibroacoustic environments. The collection of microgravity acceleration data has cross-disciplinary utility to the microgravity life and physical sciences and the structural dynamics communities. The inherent advantages of semiconductor-based systems are reduced size, mass, and power consumption, while providing enhanced stability.

  5. Advanced Ceramics Property and Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Michael; Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the what, how, how not, and why for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committees inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of all of the standards in one volume.

  6. Advanced high frequency partial discharge measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karady, George G.

    1994-01-01

    This report explains the Advanced Partial Discharge Measuring System in ASU's High Voltage Laboratory and presents some of the results obtained using the setup. While in operation an insulation is subjected to wide ranging temperature and voltage stresses. Hence, it is necessary to study the effect of temperature on the behavior of partial discharges in an insulation. The setup described in this report can be used to test samples at temperatures ranging from -50 C to 200 C. The aim of conducting the tests described herein is to be able to predict the behavior of an insulation under different operating conditions in addition to being able to predict the possibility of failure.

  7. ANDES Measurements for Advanced Reactor Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plompen, A. J. M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Kopecky, S.; Nyman, M.; Rouki, C.; Salvador Castiñeira, P.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Gunsing, F.; Lampoudis, C.; Calviani, M.; Guerrero, C.; Cano-Ott, D.; Gonzalez Romero, E.; Aïche, M.; Jurado, B.; Mathieu, L.; Derckx, X.; Farget, F.; Rodrigues Tajes, C.; Bacquias, A.; Dessagne, Ph.; Kerveno, M.; Borcea, C.; Negret, A.; Colonna, N.; Goncalves, I.; Penttilä, H.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Jokinen, A.

    2014-05-01

    A significant number of new measurements was undertaken by the ANDES “Measurements for advanced reactor systems” initiative. These new measurements include neutron inelastic scattering from 23Na, Mo, Zr, and 238U, neutron capture cross sections of 238U, 241Am, neutron induced fission cross sections of 240Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 245Cm, and measurements that explore the limits of the surrogate technique. The latter study the feasibility of inferring neutron capture cross sections for Cm isotopes, the neutron-induced fission cross section of 238Pu and fission yields and fission probabilities through full Z and A identification in inverse kinematics for isotopes of Pu, Am, Cm and Cf. Finally, four isotopes are studied which are important to improve predictions for delayed neutron precursors and decay heat by total absorption gamma-ray spectrometry (88Br, 94Rb, 95Rb, 137I). The measurements which are performed at state-of-the-art European facilities have the ambition to achieve the lowest possible uncertainty, and to come as close as is reasonably achievable to the target uncertainties established by sensitivity studies. An overview is presented of the activities and achievements, leaving detailed expositions to the various parties contributing to the conference.

  8. Linear induction accelerator approach for advanced radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in induction accelerator technology make it possible to envision a single accelerator that can serve as an intense, precision multiple pulse x-ray source for advanced radiography. Through the use of solid-state modulator technology repetition rates on the order of 1 MHz can be achieved with beam pulse lengths ranging from 200 ns to 2 {micro}secs. By using fast kickers, these pulses may be sectioned into pieces which are directed to different beam lines so as to interrogate the object under study from multiple lines of sight. The ultimate aim is to do a time dependent tomographic reconstruction of a dynamic object. The technology to accomplish these objectives along with a brief discussion of the experimental plans to verify it will be presented.

  9. Advanced interferometric profile measurements through refractive media

    SciTech Connect

    Koev, Stephan T.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2008-09-15

    Optical profilers are valuable tools for the characterization of microelectromechanical systems (MEMSs). They use phase sifting interferometry (PSI) or vertical scanning interferometry to measure the topography of microscale structures with nanometer resolution. However, for many emerging MEMS applications, the sample needs to be imaged while placed in a liquid or in a package with a glass window. The increased refractive index of the transparent medium degrades the interference image contrast and prevents any measurement of the sample. We report on the modification of a Veeco NT1100 optical profiler to enable PSI measurements through refractive media. This approach can be applied to any other optical profiler with PSI capability. The modification consists in replacing the original illumination source with a custom-built narrow linewidth source, which increases the coherence length of the light and the contrast of the interference image. We present measurements taken with the modified configuration on samples covered with 3 mm water or 500 {mu}m glass, and we compare them to measurements of uncovered samples. We show that the measurement precision is only slightly reduced by the water and glass, and that it is still sufficiently high for typical MEMS applications. The described method can be readily used for measuring through other types and thicknesses of refractive materials.

  10. Advancing Instructional Communication: Integrating a Biosocial Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, Sean M.; Afifi, Tamara D.

    2014-01-01

    Celebrating 100 years of the National Communication Association necessitates that, as we commemorate our past, we also look toward our future. As part of a larger conversation about the future of instructional communication, this essay reinvestigates the importance of integrating biosocial approaches into instructional communication research. In…

  11. Approaches for advancing scientific understanding of macrosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levy, Ofir; Ball, Becky A.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Cheruvelil, Kendra S.; Finley, Andrew O.; Lottig, Noah R.; Surangi W. Punyasena; Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Buckley, Lauren B.; Filstrup, Christopher T.; Keitt, Tim H.; Kellner, James R.; Knapp, Alan K.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Tcheng, David; Toomey, Michael; Vargas, Rodrigo; Voordeckers, James W.; Wagner, Tyler; Williams, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of macrosystems ecology (MSE), which focuses on regional- to continental-scale ecological patterns and processes, builds upon a history of long-term and broad-scale studies in ecology. Scientists face the difficulty of integrating the many elements that make up macrosystems, which consist of hierarchical processes at interacting spatial and temporal scales. Researchers must also identify the most relevant scales and variables to be considered, the required data resources, and the appropriate study design to provide the proper inferences. The large volumes of multi-thematic data often associated with macrosystem studies typically require validation, standardization, and assimilation. Finally, analytical approaches need to describe how cross-scale and hierarchical dynamics and interactions relate to macroscale phenomena. Here, we elaborate on some key methodological challenges of MSE research and discuss existing and novel approaches to meet them.

  12. Advanced drug delivery approaches against periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deeksha; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of gums involving the degeneration of periodontal ligaments, creation of periodontal pocket and resorption of alveolar bone, resulting in the disruption of the support structure of teeth. According to WHO, 10-15% of the global population suffers from severe periodontitis. The disease results from the growth of a diverse microflora (especially anaerobes) in the pockets and release of toxins, enzymes and stimulation of body's immune response. Various local or systemic approaches were used for an effective treatment of periodontitis. Currently, controlled local drug delivery approach is more favorable as compared to systemic approach because it mainly focuses on improving the therapeutic outcomes by achieving factors like site-specific delivery, low dose requirement, bypass of first-pass metabolism, reduction in gastrointestinal side effects and decrease in dosing frequency. Overall it provides a safe and effective mode of treatment, which enhances patient compliance. Complete eradication of the organisms from the sites was not achieved by using various surgical and mechanical treatments. So a number of polymer-based delivery systems like fibers, films, chips, strips, microparticles, nanoparticles and nanofibers made from a variety of natural and synthetic materials have been successfully tested to deliver a variety of drugs. These systems are biocompatible and biodegradable, completely fill the pockets, and have strong retention on the target site due to excellent mucoadhesion properties. The review summarizes various available and recently developing targeted delivery devices for the treatment of periodontitis. PMID:25005586

  13. Measuring Test Measurement Error: A General Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Donald; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Test-based accountability as well as value-added asessments and much experimental and quasi-experimental research in education rely on achievement tests to measure student skills and knowledge. Yet, we know little regarding fundamental properties of these tests, an important example being the extent of measurement error and its implications for…

  14. Advances in myelofibrosis: a clinical case approach.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, John O; Orazi, Attilio; Bhalla, Kapil N; Champlin, Richard E; Harrison, Claire; Hoffman, Ronald

    2013-10-01

    Primary myelofibrosis is a member of the myeloproliferative neoplasms, a diverse group of bone marrow malignancies. Symptoms of myelofibrosis, particularly those associated with splenomegaly (abdominal distention and pain, early satiety, dyspnea, and diarrhea) and constitutional symptoms, represent a substantial burden to patients. Most patients eventually die from the disease, with a median survival ranging from approximately 5-7 years. Mutations in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), a kinase that is essential for the normal development of erythrocytes, granulocytes, and platelets, notably the V617F mutation, have been identified in approximately 50% of patients with myelofibrosis. The approval of a JAK2 inhibitor in 2011 has improved the outlook of many patients with myelofibrosis and has changed the treatment landscape. This article focuses on some of the important issues in current myelofibrosis treatment management, including differentiation of myelofibrosis from essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera, up-dated data on the results of JAK2 inhibitor therapy, the role of epigenetic mechanisms in myelofibrosis pathogenesis, investigational therapies for myelofibrosis, and advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Three myelofibrosis cases are included to underscore the issues in diagnosing and treating this complex disease. PMID:24091929

  15. Advancing Profiling Sensors with a Wireless Approach

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Alex; Russomanno, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The notion of a profiling sensor was first realized by a Near-Infrared (N-IR) retro-reflective prototype consisting of a vertical column of wired sparse detectors. This paper extends that prior work and presents a wireless version of a profiling sensor as a collection of sensor nodes. The sensor incorporates wireless sensing elements, a distributed data collection and aggregation scheme, and an enhanced classification technique. In this novel approach, a base station pre-processes the data collected from the sensor nodes and performs data re-alignment. A back-propagation neural network was also developed for the wireless version of the N-IR profiling sensor that classifies objects into the broad categories of human, animal or vehicle with an accuracy of approximately 94%. These enhancements improve deployment options as compared with the first generation of wired profiling sensors, possibly increasing the application scenarios for such sensors, including intelligent fence applications. PMID:23443371

  16. Measuring Health: A Multivariate Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klomp, Jeroen; de Haan, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We examined the health status of 171 countries by employing factor analysis on various national health indicators for the period 2000-2005 to construct two new measures on health. The first measure is based on the health of individuals and the second on (the quality of) the health services. Our measures differ substantially from indicators used in…

  17. Recent Advances in Targeted Drug Delivery Approaches Using Dendritic Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Bugno, Jason; Hsu, Hao-Jui; Hong, Seungpyo

    2014-01-01

    Since they were first synthesized over 30 years ago, dendrimers have seen rapid translation into various biomedical applications. A number of reports have not only demonstrated their clinical utility, but also revealed novel design approaches and strategies based on the elucidation of underlying mechanisms governing their biological interactions. This review focuses on presenting the latest advances in dendrimer design, discussing the current mechanistic understandings, and highlighting recent developments and targeted approaches using dendrimers in drug/gene delivery. PMID:26221937

  18. Demarcating Advanced Learning Approaches from Methodological and Technological Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Imre; Peck, David; Verlinden, Jouke

    2009-01-01

    In the field of design and engineering education, the fast and expansive evolution of information and communication technologies is steadily converting traditional learning approaches into more advanced ones. Facilitated by Broadband (high bandwidth) personal computers, distance learning has developed into web-hosted electronic learning. The…

  19. New Therapeutic Approaches for Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs)

    PubMed Central

    Somaiah, Neeta

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The management of advanced GIST is increasingly complex due to imatinib refractory disease. Primary resistance to imatinib is uncommon, and most patients progress after development of additional genetic changes. This article reviews management strategies including surgical approaches, local modalities for progressive liver metastases, as well as novel therapeutic agents. PMID:19248977

  20. Advance Approach to Concept and Design Studies for Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, M.; Nichols, J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent automated and advanced techniques developed at JPL have created a streamlined and fast-track approach to initial mission conceptualization and system architecture design, answering the need for rapid turnaround of trade studies for potential proposers, as well as mission and instrument study groups.

  1. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  2. The magnet measurement facility for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Doose, C.; Hogrefe, R.; Kim, K.; Merl, R.

    1993-10-01

    A magnet measurement facility has been developed to measure the prototype and production magnets for the Advance Photon Source. The measurement facility is semi-automatic in measurement control and data analysis. One dipole system and three rotating coil measurement systems for quadrupole and sextupole magnets and corresponding probe coils are described.

  3. Measuring advances in HVAC distribution system designs

    SciTech Connect

    Franconi, Ellen

    1998-07-01

    Substantial commercial building energy savings have been achieved by improving the performance of the HVAC distribution system. The energy savings result from distribution system design improvements, advanced control capabilities, and use of variable-speed motors. Yet, much of the commercial building stock remains equipped with inefficient systems. Contributing to this is the absence of a definition for distribution system efficiency as well as the analysis methods for quantifying performance. This research investigates the application of performance indices to assess design advancements in commercial building thermal distribution systems. The index definitions are based on a first and second law of thermodynamics analysis of the system. The second law or availability analysis enables the determination of the true efficiency of the system. Availability analysis is a convenient way to make system efficiency comparisons since performance is evaluated relative to an ideal process. A TRNSYS simulation model is developed to analyze the performance of two distribution system types, a constant air volume system and a variable air volume system, that serve one floor of a large office building. Performance indices are calculated using the simulation results to compare the performance of the two systems types in several locations. Changes in index values are compared to changes in plant energy, costs, and carbon emissions to explore the ability of the indices to estimate these quantities.

  4. Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Franconi, E.

    1998-05-01

    Substantial commercial building energy savings have been achieved by improving the performance of the HV AC distribution system. The energy savings result from distribution system design improvements, advanced control capabilities, and use of variable-speed motors. Yet, much of the commercial building stock remains equipped with inefficient systems. Contributing to this is the absence of a definition for distribution system efficiency as well as the analysis methods for quantifying performance. This research investigates the application of performance indices to assess design advancements in commercial building thermal distribution systems. The index definitions are based on a first and second law of thermodynamics analysis of the system. The second law or availability analysis enables the determination of the true efficiency of the system. Availability analysis is a convenient way to make system efficiency comparisons since performance is evaluated relative to an ideal process. A TRNSYS simulation model is developed to analyze the performance of two distribution system types, a constant air volume system and a variable air volume system, that serve one floor of a large office building. Performance indices are calculated using the simulation results to compare the performance of the two systems types in several locations. Changes in index values are compared to changes in plant energy, costs, and carbon emissions to explore the ability of the indices to estimate these quantities.

  5. Whole-genome CNV analysis: advances in computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pirooznia, Mehdi; Goes, Fernando S.; Zandi, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA copy number variation (CNV) is likely to make a significant contribution to human diversity and also play an important role in disease susceptibility. Recent advances in genome sequencing technologies have enabled the characterization of a variety of genomic features, including CNVs. This has led to the development of several bioinformatics approaches to detect CNVs from next-generation sequencing data. Here, we review recent advances in CNV detection from whole genome sequencing. We discuss the informatics approaches and current computational tools that have been developed as well as their strengths and limitations. This review will assist researchers and analysts in choosing the most suitable tools for CNV analysis as well as provide suggestions for new directions in future development. PMID:25918519

  6. Microbial Burden Approach : New Monitoring Approach for Measuring Microbial Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Vaishampayan, Parag; Barmatz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Advantages of new approach for differentiating live cells/ spores from dead cells/spores. Four examples of Salmonella outbreaks leading to costly destruction of dairy products. List of possible collaboration activities between JPL and other industries (for future discussion). Limitations of traditional microbial monitoring approaches. Introduction to new approach for rapid measurement of viable (live) bacterial cells/spores and its areas of application. Detailed example for determining live spores using new approach (similar procedure for determining live cells). JPL has developed a patented approach for measuring amount of live and dead cells/spores. This novel "molecular" method takes less than 5 to 7 hrs. compared to the seven days required using conventional techniques. Conventional "molecular" techniques can not discriminate live cells/spores among dead cells/spores. The JPL-developed novel method eliminates false positive results obtained from conventional "molecular" techniques that lead to unnecessary delay in the processing and to unnecessary destruction of food products.

  7. P37: Locally advanced thymoma-robotic approach

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Belal B.; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Background The conventional approach to locally advanced thymoma has been via a sternotomy. VATS and robotic thymectomies have been described but typically are reserved for patients with myasthenia gravis only or for small, encapsulated thymic tumors. There have been few reports of minimally invasive resection of locally advanced thymomas. Our objective is to present a case in which a large, locally advanced thymoma was resected en bloc with the pericardium employing robotic assisted thoracoscopic approach. Methods This case illustrates a case of an asymptomatic 29-year-old female found to have an 11 cm anterior mediastinal mass on CT scan. A right-sided, 4 port robotic approach was utilized with the camera port in the 5th intercostal space anterior axillary line and two accessory ports for robotic arm 1 and 2 in the 3rd intercostal space anterior axillary line and 8th intercostal space anterior axillary line. A 5 mm port was used between the camera and 2nd robotic arm for assistance. On exploration the mass was found to be adherent to the pericardium that was resected en bloc via anterior pericardiectomy. Her post-operative course was uncomplicated, and she was discharged home on postoperative day 1. Results Final pathology revealed an 11 cm × 7.5 cm × 3.0 cm WHO class B2 thymoma invading the pericardium, TNM stage T3N0M0, with negative margins. The patient was subsequently sent to receive 5,040 cGy of adjuvant radiation, and follow-up CT scan 6 months postoperatively showed no evidence of disease. Conclusions Very little data exist demonstrating the efficacy of resecting locally advanced thymomas utilising the minimally invasive approach. Our case demonstrates that a robotic assisted thoracoscopic approach is feasible for performing thymectomy for locally advanced thymomas. This may help limit the morbidity of a trans-sternal approach while achieving comparable oncologic results. However, further studies are needed to evaluate its efficacy and long term

  8. A combinatorial approach to the discovery of advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Dong

    This thesis discusses the application of combinatorial methods to the search of advanced materials. The goal of this research is to develop a "parallel" or "fast sequential" methodology for both the synthesis and characterization of materials with novel electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Our hope is to dramatically accelerate the rate at which materials are generated and studied. We have developed two major combinatorial methodologies to this end. One involves generating thin film materials libraries using a combination of various thin film deposition and masking strategies with multi-layer thin film precursors. The second approach is to generate powder materials libraries with solution precursors delivered with a multi-nozzle inkjet system. The first step in this multistep combinatorial process involves the design and synthesis of high density libraries of diverse materials aimed at exploring a large segment of the compositional space of interest based on our understanding of the physical and structural properties of a particular class of materials. Rapid, sensitive measurements of one or more relevant physical properties of each library member result in the identification of a family of "lead" compositions with a desired property. These compositions are then optimized by continuously varying the stoichiometries of a more focused set of precursors. Materials with the optimal composition are then synthesized in quantities sufficient for detailed characterization of their structural and physical properties. Finally, the information obtained from this process should enhance our predictive ability in subsequent experiments. Combinatorial methods have been successfully used in the synthesis and discovery of materials with novel properties. For example, a class of cobaltite based giant magnetoresistance (GMR) ceramics was discovered; Application of this method to luminescence materials has resulted in the discovery of a few highly efficient tricolor

  9. Measuring the Resilience of Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Ann Maria; Dearden, Richard; Levri, Julie A.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the central importance of crew safety in designing and operating a life support system, the metric commonly used to evaluate alternative Advanced Life Support (ALS) technologies does not currently provide explicit techniques for measuring safety. The resilience of a system, or the system s ability to meet performance requirements and recover from component-level faults, is fundamentally a dynamic property. This paper motivates the use of computer models as a tool to understand and improve system resilience throughout the design process. Extensive simulation of a hybrid computational model of a water revitalization subsystem (WRS) with probabilistic, component-level faults provides data about off-nominal behavior of the system. The data can then be used to test alternative measures of resilience as predictors of the system s ability to recover from component-level faults. A novel approach to measuring system resilience using a Markov chain model of performance data is also developed. Results emphasize that resilience depends on the complex interaction of faults, controls, and system dynamics, rather than on simple fault probabilities.

  10. Advances in Evapotranspiration measured with Scintillometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartogensis, Oscar; Van Kesteren, Bram; Czekala, Harald; De Bruin, Henk

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this presentation will be to review recent developments in scintillometry. Firstly, we will discuss recent progress made in dual-wavelength long-path scintillometry to measure area-averaged evaporation on kilometer scale. Among others, this concerns a 160 GHz radio-wave scintillometer (RWS) combined with an optical scintillometers (OS). Use is made of the fact that scintillations detected at a distance of a radio-wave source are mainly due to water vapor fluctuations, whereas temperature fluctuations are causing primarily scintillations in the optical wavelength region. One of the technical new features is that the so-called Fresnel-zone length scale of the 160 GHz (RWS) and the 30 cm aperture OS become comparable, allowing the direct measurement of the temperature-humidity cross-structure parameter. In addition, we will present resent progress made with short-path laser scintillometry. Among others, evaporation measurements under regional advective conditions over irrigated alfalfa in Idaho will be shown, as well as water vapor and carbon dioxide flux measurements over 1-min time intervals above a wheat field in Germany. In the latter study use has been made of the fact that the laser-scintillometry is able to observe the turbulence mechanism for vertical transfer of scalars. The audience will be invited to participate in new field campaigns to test the different applications of scintillometry under different environmental conditions.

  11. Admiralty Inlet Advanced Turbulence Measurements: June 2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kilcher, Levi

    2014-06-30

    This data is from measurements at Admiralty Head, in Admiralty Inlet (Puget Sound) in June of 2014. The measurements were made using Inertial Motion Unit (IMU) equipped ADVs mounted on Tidal Turbulence Mooring's (TTMs). The TTM positions the ADV head above the seafloor to make mid-depth turbulence measurements. The inertial measurements from the IMU allows for removal of mooring motion in post processing. The mooring motion has been removed from the stream-wise and vertical velocity signals (u, w). The lateral (v) velocity has some 'persistent motion contamination' due to mooring sway. Each ttm was deployed with two ADVs. The 'top' ADV head was positioned 0.5m above the 'bottom' ADV head. The TTMs were placed in 58m of water. The position of the TTMs were: ttm01 : (48.1525, -122.6867) ttm01b : (48.15256666, -122.68678333) ttm02b : (48.152783333, -122.686316666) Deployments TTM01b and TTM02b occurred simultaneously and were spaced approximately 50m apart in the cross-stream direction. Units ----- - Velocity data (_u, urot, uacc) is in m/s. - Acceleration (Accel) data is in m/s^2. - Angular rate (AngRt) data is in rad/s. - The components of all vectors are in 'ENU' orientation. That is, the first index is True East, the second is True North, and the third is Up (vertical). - All other quantities are in the units defined in the Nortek Manual. Motion correction and rotation into the ENU earth reference frame was performed using the Python-based open source DOLfYN library (http://lkilcher.github.io/dolfyn/). Details on motion correction can be found there. Additional details on TTM measurements at this site can be found in the included Marine Energy Technology Symposium paper.

  12. Admiralty Inlet Advanced Turbulence Measurements: May 2015

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kilcher, Levi

    2015-05-18

    This data is from measurements at Admiralty Head, in Admiralty Inlet (Puget Sound) in May of 2015. The measurements were made using Inertial Motion Unit (IMU) equipped ADVs mounted on a 'StableMoor' (Manufacturer: DeepWater Buoyancy) buoy and a Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM). These platforms position ADV heads above the seafloor to make mid-depth turbulence measurements. The inertial measurements from the IMU allows for removal of mooring motion in post processing. The mooring and buoy motion has been removed from the stream-wise and vertical velocity signals (u, w). The lateral (v) velocity has some 'persistent motion contamination' due to mooring sway. The TTM was deployed with one ADV, it's position was: 48 09.145', -122 41.209' The StableMoor was deployed twice, the first time it was deployed in 'wing-mode' with two ADVs ('Port' and 'Star') at: 48 09.166', -122 41.173' The second StableMoor deployment was in 'Nose' mode with one ADV at: 48 09.166', -122 41.174' Units ----- - Velocity data (_u, urot, uacc) is in m/s. - Acceleration (Accel) data is in m/s^2. - Angular rate (AngRt) data is in rad/s. - The components of all vectors are in 'ENU' orientation. That is, the first index is True East, the second is True North, and the third is Up (vertical). - All other quantities are in the units defined in the Nortek Manual. Motion correction and rotation into the ENU earth reference frame was performed using the Python-based open source DOLfYN library (http://lkilcher.github.io/dolfyn/). Details on motion correction can be found there. Additional details on TTM measurements at this site can be found in the included Marine Energy Technology Symposium paper.

  13. Advance particle and Doppler measurement methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, C.

    1985-01-01

    Particle environments, i.e., rain, ice, and snow particles are discussed. Two types of particles addressed are: (1) the natural environment in which airplanes fly and conduct test flights; and (2) simulation environments that are encountered in ground-test facilities such as wind tunnels, ranges, etc. There are characteristics of the natural environment that one wishes to measure. The liquid water content (LWC) is the one that seems to be of most importance; size distribution may be of importance in some applications. Like snow, the shape of the particle may be an important parameter to measure. As one goes on to environment in simulated tests, additional parameters may be required such as velocity distribution, the velocity lag of the particle relative to the aerodynamic flow, and the trajectory of the particle as it goes through the aerodynamic flow and impacts on the test object.

  14. Advanced giant magnetoresistance technology for measurement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Roland; Mattheis, Roland; Reiss, Günter

    2013-08-01

    Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors are considered one of the first real applications of nanotechnology. They consist of nm-thick layered structures where ferromagnetic metals are sandwiched by nonmagnetic metals. Such multilayered films produce a large change in resistance (typically 10 to 20%) when subjected to a magnetic field, compared with a maximum change of a few per cent for other types of magnetic sensors. This technology has been intensively used in read heads for hard disk drives and now increasingly finds applications due to the high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally these sensors are compatible with miniaturization and thus offer a high spatial resolution combined with a frequency range up to the 100 MHz regime and simple electronic conditioning. In this review, we first discuss the basics of the underlying magnetoresistance effects in layered structures and then present three prominent examples for future applications: in the field of current sensing the new GMR sensors offer high bandwidth and good accuracy in a space-saving open loop measurement configuration. In rotating systems they can be used for multiturn angle measurements, and in biotechnology the detection of magnetic particles enables the quantitative measurement of biomolecule concentrations.

  15. Measuring consciousness: relating behavioural and neurophysiological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Anil K.; Dienes, Zoltán; Cleeremans, Axel; Overgaard, Morten; Pessoa, Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The resurgent science of consciousness has been accompanied by a recent emphasis on the problem of measurement. Having dependable measures of consciousness is essential both for mapping experimental evidence to theory and for designing perspicuous experiments. Here, we review a series of behavioural and brain-based measures, assessing their ability to track graded consciousness and clarifying how they relate to each other by showing what theories are presupposed by each. We identify possible and actual conflicts among measures that can stimulate new experiments, and we conclude that measures must prove themselves by iteratively building knowledge in the context of theoretical frameworks. Advances in measuring consciousness have implications for basic cognitive neuroscience, for comparative studies of consciousness and for clinical applications. PMID:18606562

  16. Advanced IMCW Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS CO2 Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel; lin, bing; nehrir, amin; harrison, fenton; obland, michael

    2015-04-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation.

  17. Advanced (Measurement) Applications of Curriculum-Based Measurement in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petscher, Yaacov; Cummings, Kelli Dawn; Biancarosa, Gina; Fien, Hank

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a commentary on the current state of several measurement issues pertaining to curriculum-based measures of reading (R-CBM). We begin by providing an overview of the utility of R-CBM, followed by a presentation of five specific measurements considerations: (a) the reliability of R-CBM oral reading fluency…

  18. Advanced Stirling Convertor Dynamic Test Approach and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meer, David W.; Hill, Dennis; Ursic, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin Corporation (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. As part of the extended operation testing of this power system, the Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC) at NASA GRC undergo a vibration test sequence intended to simulate the vibration history that an ASC would experience when used in an ASRG for a space mission. This sequence includes testing at workmanship and flight acceptance levels interspersed with periods of extended operation to simulate prefueling and post fueling. The final step in the test sequence utilizes additional testing at flight acceptance levels to simulate launch. To better replicate the acceleration profile seen by an ASC incorporated into an ASRG, the input spectra used in testing the convertors was modified based on dynamic testing of the ASRG Engineering Unit (ASRG EU) at LM. This paper outlines the overall test approach, summarizes the test results from the ASRG EU, describes the incorporation of those results into the test approach, and presents the results of applying the test approach to the ASC-1 #3 and #4 convertors. The test results include data from several accelerometers mounted on the convertors as well as the piston position and output power variables.

  19. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, Cetin; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal; Carmack, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  20. Advancing Performance Measures for Use of Medications in Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Garnick, Deborah W.; Horgan, Constance M.; McCorry, Frank; Gmyrek, Amanda; Chalk, Mady; Gastfriend, David; Rinaldo, Suzanne Gelber; Albright, Joann; Capoccia, Victor; Harris, Alex; Harwood, Henrick J.; Greenberg, Pamela; Mark, Tami; Un, Huong; Oros, Marla; Stringer, Mark; Thatcher, James

    2010-01-01

    Performance measures have the potential to drive high quality health care. However, technical and policy challenges exist in developing and implementing measures to assess substance use disorder (SUD) pharmacotherapy. Of critical importance in advancing performance measures for use of SUD pharmacotherapy is recognition that different measurement approaches may be needed in the public and private sectors, and will be determined by the availability of different data collection and monitoring systems. In 2009, the Washington Circle convened a panel of nationally recognized insurers, purchasers, providers, policy makers, and researchers to address this topic. The charge of the panel was to identify opportunities and challenges in advancing use of SUD pharmacotherapy performance measures across a range of systems. This paper summarizes those findings by identifying a number of critical themes related to advancing SUD pharmacotherapy performance measures, highlighting examples from the field, and recommending actions for policy makers. PMID:20934836

  1. Advances in Measurement of Carbonyls in Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, M.; Jakober, C.; Spaulding, R.; Green, P.; Destaillats, H.; Hughes, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    Chamber studies establish the formation of highly polar oxygenated species from the reaction of anthropogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons with hydroxyl radicals or ozone. A paucity of data exists however on the generation and fate of these organics in the ambient atmospheric environment. This is primarily due to the absence of suitable analytical methods. To address limitations of existing methods, we developed methods that rely on O-(2,3,4,5,6)-pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine (PFBHA), and bis-(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) in concert with GC/ion trap mass spectrometry (GC/ITMS) to identify and quantify carbonyl, dicarbonyl and hydroxy carbonyl photooxidation products in aerosols at part-per-trillion (pptv) levels. We also optimized and evaluated a mist chamber to sample carbonyls and multi-functional carbonyls with 10 minute sampling times. We applied the method to identify and quantify 2-hydroxy-2-methyl propanal (2-HMPR), a proposed photooxidation product of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) in the Blodgett Forest, CA. The average 2-HMPR/MBO mixing ratio was 0.33ñ 0.25, which is reasonable since the expected yield of 2-HMPR from the hydroxyl radical oxidation of MBO is 0.19-0.35. Further method development in our laboratory is exploring the employment of HPLC/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectra to identify model aliphatic and aromatic carbonyls (the major classes were aldehydes, ketones, dicarbonyls, and quinones) in aerosols. The data indicate the potential for pentafluorobenzyl derivatization in concert with GC/ITMS and HPLC/ITMS to measure a broad range of carbonyls.

  2. CUAHSI's Hydrologic Measurement Facility: Putting Advanced Tools in Scientists' Hands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, R. P.; Robinson, D.; Selker, J.; Duncan, J.

    2006-05-01

    Like related environmental sciences, the hydrologic sciences community has been defining environmental observatories and the support components necessary for their successful implementation, such as informatics (cyberinfrastructure) and instrumentation. Unlike programs, such as NEON and OOI, that have been pursuing large-scale capital funding through the Major Research Equipment program of the National Science Foundation, CUAHSI has been pursuing incremental development of observatories that has allowed us to pilot different parts of these support functions, namely Hydrologic Information Systems and a Hydrologic Measurement Facility (HMF), the subject of this paper. The approach has allowed us to gain greater specificity of the requirements for these facilities and their operational challenges. The HMF is developing the foundation to support innovative research across the breadth of the Hydrologic Community, including classic PI-driven projects as well as over 20 grass-roots observatories that have been developing over the past 2 years. HMF is organized around three basic areas: water cycle instrumentation, biogeochemistry and geophysics. Committees have been meeting to determined the most effective manner to deliver instrumentation, whether by special instrumentation packages proposed by host institutions; collaborative agreements with federal agencies; and contributions from industrial partners. These efforts are guided by the results of a community wide survey conducted in Nov-Dec 2005, and a series of ongoing workshops. The survey helped identify the types of equipment that will advance hydrological sciences and are often beyond the capabilities of individual PI's. Respondents to the survey indicated they were keen for HMF to focus on providing supported equipment such as atmospheric profilers like LIDAR, geophysical instrumentation ranging from airborne sensors to ground-penetrating radar, and field-deployed mass spectrophotometers. A recently signed agreement

  3. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT )

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

  4. A computer vision-based approach for structural displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yunfeng

    2010-04-01

    Along with the incessant advancement in optics, electronics and computer technologies during the last three decades, commercial digital video cameras have experienced a remarkable evolution, and can now be employed to measure complex motions of objects with sufficient accuracy, which render great assistance to structural displacement measurement in civil engineering. This paper proposes a computer vision-based approach for dynamic measurement of structures. One digital camera is used to capture image sequences of planar targets mounted on vibrating structures. The mathematical relationship between image plane and real space is established based on computer vision theory. Then, the structural dynamic displacement at the target locations can be quantified using point reconstruction rules. Compared with other tradition displacement measurement methods using sensors, such as accelerometers, linear-variable-differential-transducers (LVDTs) and global position system (GPS), the proposed approach gives the main advantages of great flexibility, a non-contact working mode and ease of increasing measurement points. To validate, four tests of sinusoidal motion of a point, free vibration of a cantilever beam, wind tunnel test of a cross-section bridge model, and field test of bridge displacement measurement, are performed. Results show that the proposed approach can attain excellent accuracy compared with the analytical ones or the measurements using conventional transducers, and proves to deliver an innovative and low cost solution to structural displacement measurement.

  5. Advanced Measurement Technology at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antcliff, Richard R.

    1998-01-01

    Instrumentation systems have always been essential components of world class wind tunnels and laboratories. Langley continues to be on the forefront of the development of advanced systems for aerospace applications. This paper will describe recent advances in selected measurement systems which have had significant impact on aerospace testing. To fully understand the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics influencing aerospace vehicles, highly accurate and repeatable measurements need to be made of critical phenomena. However, to maintain leadership in a highly competitive world market, productivity enhancement and the development of new capabilities must also be addressed aggressively. The accomplishment of these sometimes conflicting requirements has been the challenge of advanced measurement developers. However, several new technologies have recently matured to the point where they have enabled the achievement of these goals. One of the critical areas where advanced measurement systems are required is flow field velocity measurements. These measurements are required to correctly characterize the flowfield under study, to quantify the aerodynamic performance of test articles and to assess the effect of aerodynamic vehicles on their environment. Advanced measurement systems are also making great strides in obtaining planar measurements of other important thermodynamic quantities, including species concentration, temperature, pressure and the speed of sound. Langley has been on the forefront of applying these technologies to practical wind tunnel environments. New capabilities in Projection Moire Interferometry and Acoustics Array Measurement systems have extended our capabilities into the model deformation, vibration and noise measurement arenas. An overview of the status of these techniques and recent applications in practical environments will be presented in this paper.

  6. Technical approaches for measurement of human errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, W. F.; Heffley, R. K.; Jewell, W. F.; Mcruer, D. T.

    1980-01-01

    Human error is a significant contributing factor in a very high proportion of civil transport, general aviation, and rotorcraft accidents. The technical details of a variety of proven approaches for the measurement of human errors in the context of the national airspace system are presented. Unobtrusive measurements suitable for cockpit operations and procedures in part of full mission simulation are emphasized. Procedure, system performance, and human operator centered measurements are discussed as they apply to the manual control, communication, supervisory, and monitoring tasks which are relevant to aviation operations.

  7. Kinetic Approaches to Measuring Peroxiredoxin Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Winterbourn, Christine C.; Peskin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins are ubiquitous thiol proteins that catalyse the breakdown of peroxides and regulate redox activity in the cell. Kinetic analysis of their reactions is required in order to identify substrate preferences, to understand how molecular structure affects activity and to establish their physiological functions. Various approaches can be taken, including the measurement of rates of individual steps in the reaction pathway by stopped flow or competitive kinetics, classical enzymatic analysis and measurement of peroxidase activity. Each methodology has its strengths and they can often give complementary information. However, it is important to understand the experimental conditions of the assay so as to interpret correctly what parameter is being measured. This brief review discusses different kinetic approaches and the information that can be obtained from them. PMID:26813658

  8. Simulating advanced life support systems to test integrated control approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortenkamp, D.; Bell, S.

    Simulations allow for testing of life support control approaches before hardware is designed and built. Simulations also allow for the safe exploration of alternative control strategies during life support operation. As such, they are an important component of any life support research program and testbed. This paper describes a specific advanced life support simulation being created at NASA Johnson Space Center. It is a discrete-event simulation that is dynamic and stochastic. It simulates all major components of an advanced life support system, including crew (with variable ages, weights and genders), biomass production (with scalable plantings of ten different crops), water recovery, air revitalization, food processing, solid waste recycling and energy production. Each component is modeled as a producer of certain resources and a consumer of certain resources. The control system must monitor (via sensors) and control (via actuators) the flow of resources throughout the system to provide life support functionality. The simulation is written in an object-oriented paradigm that makes it portable, extensible and reconfigurable.

  9. Reliability Demonstration Approach for Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, CHuong; Zampino, Edward; Penswick, Barry; Spronz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Developed for future space missions as a high-efficiency power system, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) has a design life requirement of 14 yr in space following a potential storage of 3 yr after fueling. In general, the demonstration of long-life dynamic systems remains difficult in part due to the perception that the wearout of moving parts cannot be minimized, and associated failures are unpredictable. This paper shows a combination of systematic analytical methods, extensive experience gained from technology development, and well-planned tests can be used to ensure a high level reliability of ASRG. With this approach, all potential risks from each life phase of the system are evaluated and the mitigation adequately addressed. This paper also provides a summary of important test results obtained to date for ASRG and the planned effort for system-level extended operation.

  10. A Novel Approach to Material Development for Advanced Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.; Wang, L.

    1999-12-22

    OAK B188 A Novel Approach to Material Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Year one of this project had three major goals. First, to specify, order and install a new high current ion source for more rapid and stable proton irradiation. Second, to assess the use low temperature irradiation and chromium pre-enrichment in an effort to isolate a radiation damage microstructure in stainless steels without the effects of RIS. Third, to prepare for the irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steel and Zircaloy. In year 1 quarter 1, the project goal was to order the high current ion source and to procure and prepare samples of stainless steel for low temperature proton irradiation.

  11. A Novel Approach to Material Development for Advanced Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.; Wang, L.

    2000-06-27

    OAK B188 A Novel Approach to Material Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Year one of this project had three major goals. First, to specify, order and install a new high current ion source for more rapid and stable proton irradiation. Second, to assess the use of low temperature irradiation and chromium pre-enrichment in an effort to isolate a radiation damage microstructure in stainless steel without the effects of RIS. Third, to initiate irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steel and Zircaloy. In year 1 quarter 3, the project goal was to complete irradiation of model alloys of RPV steels for a range of doses and begin sample characterization. We also planned to prepare samples for microstructure isolation in stainless steels, and to identify sources of Zircaloy for irradiation and characterization.

  12. Measurement understood through the quantum potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohm, D.; Hiley, B. J.

    1984-03-01

    We review briefly the quantum potential approach to quantum theory, and show that it yields a completely consistent account of the measurement process, including especially what has been called the “collapse of the wave function.” This is done with the aid of a new concept of active information, which enables us to describe the evolution of a physical system as a unique actuality, in principle independent of any observer (so that we can, for example, provide a simple and coherent answer to the Schrödinger cat paradox). Finally, we extend this approach to relativistic quantum field theories, and show that it leads to results that are consistent with all the known experimental implications of the theory of relativity, despite the nonlocality which this approach entails.

  13. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2010-01-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual’s segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial–ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces. PMID:21643546

  14. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, David W. S.; Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2011-06-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual's segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial-ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces.

  15. Lung volume reduction for advanced emphysema: surgical and bronchoscopic approaches.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Sherry L; Westfall, Elizabeth; Dransfield, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is the third leading cause of death in the United States, affecting more than 24 million people. Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of therapy; they improve symptoms and quality of life and reduce exacerbations. These and smoking cessation and long-term oxygen therapy for hypoxemic patients are the only medical treatments definitively demonstrated to reduce mortality. Surgical approaches include lung transplantation and lung volume reduction and the latter has been shown to improve exercise tolerance, quality of life, and survival in highly selected patients with advanced emphysema. Lung volume reduction surgery results in clinical benefits. The procedure is associated with a short-term risk of mortality and a more significant risk of cardiac and pulmonary perioperative complications. Interest has been growing in the use of noninvasive, bronchoscopic methods to address the pathological hyperinflation that drives the dyspnea and exercise intolerance that is characteristic of emphysema. In this review, the mechanism by which lung volume reduction improves pulmonary function is outlined, along with the risks and benefits of the traditional surgical approach. In addition, the emerging bronchoscopic techniques for lung volume reduction are introduced and recent clinical trials examining their efficacy are summarized. PMID:22189668

  16. Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) project is part of NASA s Instrument Technology Development program to develop advanced sensor systems. The primary focus of the AMAMS project is to develop microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for acceleration sensor systems to replace existing electromechanical sensor systems presently used to assess relative gravity levels aboard spacecraft. These systems are used to characterize both vehicle and payload responses to low-gravity vibroacoustic environments. The collection of microgravity acceleration data is useful to the microgravity life sciences, microgravity physical sciences, and structural dynamics communities. The inherent advantages of semiconductor-based systems are reduced size, mass, and power consumption, with enhanced long-term calibration stability.

  17. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement.

    PubMed

    Grönqvist, R; Abeysekera, J; Gard, G; Hsiang, S M; Leamon, T B; Newman, D J; Gielo-Perczak, K; Lockhart, T E; Pai, C Y

    2001-10-20

    A number of human-centred methodologies--subjective, objective, and combined--are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of footwear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  18. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement

    PubMed Central

    Grönqvist, Raoul; Abeysekera, John; Gard, Gunvor; Hsiang, Simon M.; Leamon, Tom B.; Newman, Dava J.; Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Pai, Clive Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of human-centred methodologies—subjective, objective, and combined—are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of foot wear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  19. Development of precision measurement network of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liandong; Zhao, Huining; Zhang, Wei; Li, Weishi; Deng, Huaxia; Song, Yuntao; Gu, Yongqi

    2014-12-01

    In order to obtain accurate position of the inner key components in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST), a combined optical measurement method which is comprised of a laser tracker (LT) and articulated coordinate measuring machine (CMM) has been brought forward. LT, which is an optical measurement instrument and has a large measurement range and high accuracy, is employed for establishing the precision measurement network of EAST, and the articulated CMM is also employed for measuring the inner key components of EAST. The measurement uncertainty analyzed by the Unified Spatial Metrology Network (USMN) is 0.20 mm at a confidence probability of 95.44%. The proposed technology is appropriate for the inspection of the reconstruction of the EAST.

  20. Radiation measurements at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, H.J.; Vacca, J.H.; Veluri, V.R.; White, M.

    1995-07-01

    The injector and source of particles for the Advanced Photon Source is a 2856-MHz, S-band, electron-positron linear accelerator (linac). It produces electrons with energies up to 650 MeV or positrons with energies up to 450 MeV. Radiation measurements were made during normal electron and positron operation, as well as during several beam loss scenarios. Neutron and gamma measurements made outside the shielding walls during normal operation are within DOE guidelines. Measured radiation fields are compared to predicted levels for different conditions.

  1. A new approach to measuring tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wert, Amanda; Scott, Sherry E.

    2012-03-01

    The detection and measurement of the tortuosity - i.e. the bending and winding - of vessels has been shown to be potentially useful in the assessment of cancer progression and treatment response. Although several metrics for tortuosity are used, no single one measure is able to capture all types of tortuosity. This report presents a new multiscale technique for measuring vessel tortuosity. The approach is based on a method - called the ergodicity defect - which gives a scale-dependent measure of deviation from ergodicity. Ergodicity is a concept that captures the manner in which trajectories or signals sample the space; thus, ergodicity and vessel tortuosity both involve the notion of how a signal samples space. Here we begin to explore this connection. We first apply the ergodicity defect tortuosity measure to both 2D and 3D synthetic data in order to demonstrate the response of the method to three types of tortuosity observed in clinical patterns. We then implement the technique on segmented vessels extracted from brain tumor MRA images. Results indicate that the method can be effectively used to detect and measure several types of vessel tortuosity.

  2. A Challenging Surgical Approach to Locally Advanced Primary Urethral Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Spilotros, Marco; Vavallo, Antonio; Palazzo, Silvano; Miacola, Carlos; Forte, Saverio; Matera, Matteo; Campagna, Marcello; Colamonico, Ottavio; Schiralli, Francesco; Sebastiani, Francesco; Di Cosmo, Federica; Bettocchi, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Vincenti, Leonardo; Ludovico, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary urethral carcinoma (PUC) is a rare and aggressive cancer, often underdetected and consequently unsatisfactorily treated. We report a case of advanced PUC, surgically treated with combined approaches. A 47-year-old man underwent transurethral resection of a urethral lesion with histological evidence of a poorly differentiated squamous cancer of the bulbomembranous urethra. Computed tomography (CT) and bone scans excluded metastatic spread of the disease but showed involvement of both corpora cavernosa (cT3N0M0). A radical surgical approach was advised, but the patient refused this and opted for chemotherapy. After 17 months the patient was referred to our department due to the evidence of a fistula in the scrotal area. CT scan showed bilateral metastatic disease in the inguinal, external iliac, and obturator lymph nodes as well as the involvement of both corpora cavernosa. Additionally, a fistula originating from the right corpus cavernosum extended to the scrotal skin. At this stage, the patient accepted the surgical treatment, consisting of different phases. Phase I: Radical extraperitoneal cystoprostatectomy with iliac-obturator lymph nodes dissection. Phase II: Creation of a urinary diversion through a Bricker ileal conduit. Phase III: Repositioning of the patient in lithotomic position for an overturned Y skin incision, total penectomy, fistula excision, and “en bloc” removal of surgical specimens including the bladder, through the perineal breach. Phase IV: Right inguinal lymphadenectomy. The procedure lasted 9-and-a-half hours, was complication-free, and intraoperative blood loss was 600 mL. The patient was discharged 8 days after surgery. Pathological examination documented a T4N2M0 tumor. The clinical situation was stable during the first 3 months postoperatively but then metastatic spread occurred, not responsive to adjuvant chemotherapy, which led to the patient's death 6 months after surgery. Patients with advanced stage tumors of

  3. A Trait-Based Approach to Advance Coral Reef Science.

    PubMed

    Madin, Joshua S; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Connolly, Sean R; Darling, Emily S; Falster, Daniel S; Huang, Danwei; Keith, Sally A; Mizerek, Toni; Pandolfi, John M; Putnam, Hollie M; Baird, Andrew H

    2016-06-01

    Coral reefs are biologically diverse and ecologically complex ecosystems constructed by stony corals. Despite decades of research, basic coral population biology and community ecology questions remain. Quantifying trait variation among species can help resolve these questions, but progress has been hampered by a paucity of trait data for the many, often rare, species and by a reliance on nonquantitative approaches. Therefore, we propose filling data gaps by prioritizing traits that are easy to measure, estimating key traits for species with missing data, and identifying 'supertraits' that capture a large amount of variation for a range of biological and ecological processes. Such an approach can accelerate our understanding of coral ecology and our ability to protect critically threatened global ecosystems. PMID:26969335

  4. Organic and inorganic nitrogen dynamics in soil - advanced Ntrace approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Björsne, Anna-Karin; Bodé, Samuel; Klemedtsson, Leif; Boeckx, Pascal; Rütting, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Depolymerization of soil organic nitrogen (SON) into monomers (e.g. amino acids) is currently thought to be the rate limiting step for the terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycle. The production of free amino acids (AA) is followed by AA mineralization to ammonium, which is an important fraction of the total N mineralization. Accurate assessment of depolymerization and AA mineralization rate is important for a better understanding of the rate limiting steps. Recent developments in the 15N pool dilution techniques, based on 15N labelling of AA's, allow quantifying gross rates of SON depolymerization and AA mineralization (Wanek et al., 2010; Andersen et al., 2015) in addition to gross N mineralization. However, it is well known that the 15N pool dilution approach has limitations; in particular that gross rates of consumption processes (e.g. AA mineralization) are overestimated. This has consequences for evaluating the rate limiting step of the N cycle, as well as for estimating the nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). Here we present a novel 15N tracing approach, which combines 15N-AA labelling with an advanced version of the 15N tracing model Ntrace (Müller et al., 2007) explicitly accounting for AA turnover in soil. This approach (1) provides a more robust quantification of gross depolymerization and AA mineralization and (2) suggests a more realistic estimate for the microbial NUE of amino acids. Advantages of the new 15N tracing approach will be discussed and further improvements will be identified. References: Andresen, L.C., Bodé, S., Tietema, A., Boeckx, P., and Rütting, T.: Amino acid and N mineralization dynamics in heathland soil after long-term warming and repetitive drought, SOIL, 1, 341-349, 2015. Müller, C., Rütting, T., Kattge, J., Laughlin, R. J., and Stevens, R. J.: Estimation of parameters in complex 15N tracing models via Monte Carlo sampling, Soil Biology & Biochemistry, 39, 715-726, 2007. Wanek, W., Mooshammer, M., Blöchl, A., Hanreich, A., and Richter

  5. Advancement in contemporary diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, L Dinesh; Karthik, R; Gayathri, N; Sivasudha, T

    2016-04-01

    This review is intended to provide a summary of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapies for rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common form of inflammatory autoimmune disease with unknown aetiology. Bone degradation, cartilage and synovial destruction are three major pathways of RA pathology. Sentinel cells includes dendritic cells, macrophages and mast cells bound with the auto antigens and initiate the inflammation of the joints. Those cells further activates the immune cells on synovial membrane by releasing inflammatory cytokines Interleukin 1, 6, 17, etc., Diagnosis of this disease is a combinational approach comprises radiological imaging, blood and serology markers assessment. The treatment of RA still remain inadequate due to the lack of knowledge in disease development. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease modifying anti rheumatic drugs and corticosteroid are the commercial drugs to reduce pain, swelling and suppressing several disease factors. Arthroscopy will be an useful method while severe degradation of joint tissues. Gene therapy is a major advancement in RA. Suppressor gene locus of inflammatory mediators and matrix degrading enzymes were inserted into the affected area to reduce the disease progression. To overcome the issues aroused from those therapies like side effects and expenses, phytocompounds have been investigated and certain compounds are proved for their anti-arthritic potential. Furthermore certain complementary alternative therapies like yoga, acupuncture, massage therapy and tai chi have also been proved for their capability in RA treatment. PMID:27044812

  6. Advances in Non-Contact Measurement of Creep Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert; Canepari, Stacy; White, Erica Bischoff; Cretegny, Laurent; Rogers, jan

    2009-01-01

    As the required service temperatures for superalloys increases, so do the demands on testing for development of these alloys. Non-contact measurement of creep of refractory metals using electrostatic levitation has been demonstrated at temperatures up to 2300 C using samples of only 20-40 mg. These measurements load the spherical specimen by inertial forces due to rapid rotation. However, the first measurements relied on photon pressure to accelerate the samples to the high rotational rates of thousands of rotations per second, limiting the applicability to low stresses and high temperatures. Recent advances in this area extend this measurement to higher stresses and lower-temperatures through the use of an induction motor to drive the sample to such high rotational speeds. Preliminary results on new measurements on new materials will be presented.

  7. Landing approach airframe noise measurements and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Mackall, K. G.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Putnam, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    Flyover measurements of the airframe noise produced by the AeroCommander, JetStar, CV-990, and B-747 airplanes are presented for various landing approach configurations. Empirical and semiempirical techniques are presented to correlate the measured airframe noise with airplane design and aerodynamic parameters. Airframe noise for the jet-powered airplanes in the clean configuration (flaps and gear retracted) was found to be adequately represented by a function of airplane weight and the fifth power of airspeed. Results show the airframe noise for all four aircraft in the landing configuration (flaps extended and gear down) also varied with the fifth power of airspeed, but this noise level could not be represented by the addition of a constant to the equation for clean-configuration airframe noise.

  8. Voice measures of workload in the advanced flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Sid J.; Alpert, Murray; Odonnell, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Voice samples were obtained from 14 male subjects under high and low workload conditions. Acoustical analysis of the voice suggested that high workload conditions can be revealed by their effects on the voice over time. Aircrews in the advanced flight deck will be voicing short, imperative sentences repeatedly. A drop in the energy of the voice, as reflected by reductions in amplitude and frequency over time, and the failure to achieve old amplitude and frequency levels after rest periods, can signal that the workload demands of the situation are straining the speaker. This kind of measurement would be relatively unaffected by individual differences in acoustical measures.

  9. Measuring students' school context exposures: A trajectory-based approach.

    PubMed

    Halpern-Manners, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Studies of school effects on children's outcomes usually use single time-point measures. I argue that this approach fails to account for (1) age-based variation in children's sensitivity to their surroundings; (2) differential effects stemming from differences in the length of young people's exposures; and (3) moves between contexts and endogenous changes over time within them. To evaluate the merits of this argument, I specify and test a longitudinal model of school effects on children's academic performance. Drawing on recent advances in finite mixture modeling, I identify a series of distinct school context trajectories that extend across a substantial portion of respondents' elementary and secondary school years. I find that these trajectories vary significantly with respect to shape, with some students experiencing significant changes in their environments over time. I then show that students' trajectories of exposure are related to their 8th grade achievement, even after controlling for point-in-time measures of school context. PMID:27194656

  10. Estimation of base station position using timing advance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitoharju, Matti; Ali-Löytty, Simo; Wirola, Lauri

    2011-10-01

    Timing Advance is used in TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) systems, such as GSM and LTE, to synchronize the mobile phone to the cellular BS (Base Station). Mobile phone positioning can use TA measurements if BS positions are known, but in many cases BS positions are not in the public domain. In this work we study how to use a set of TA measurements taken by mobile phones at known positions to estimate the position of a BS. This paper describes two methods -- GMF (Gaussian Mixture Filter) and PMF (Point Mass Filter) for estimation of the BS position. Positioning performance is evaluated using simulated and real measurements. In suburban field tests, TA measurements suffice to determine BS position with an error comparable to the TA granularity (550m). GMF computes BS position much faster than PMF and is only slightly less accurate.

  11. A unique approach to accurately measure thickness in thick multilayers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bing; Hiller, Jon M; Liu, Yuzi; Liu, Chian; Qian, Jun; Gades, Lisa; Wieczorek, Michael J; Marander, Albert T; Maser, Jorg; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2012-05-01

    X-ray optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs) provide a promising path to focusing hard X-rays with high focusing efficiency at a resolution between 5 nm and 20 nm. MLLs consist of thousands of depth-graded thin layers. The thickness of each layer obeys the linear zone plate law. X-ray beamline tests have been performed on magnetron sputter-deposited WSi(2)/Si MLLs at the Advanced Photon Source/Center for Nanoscale Materials 26-ID nanoprobe beamline. However, it is still very challenging to accurately grow each layer at the designed thickness during deposition; errors introduced during thickness measurements of thousands of layers lead to inaccurate MLL structures. Here, a new metrology approach that can accurately measure thickness by introducing regular marks on the cross section of thousands of layers using a focused ion beam is reported. This new measurement method is compared with a previous method. More accurate results are obtained using the new measurement approach. PMID:22514179

  12. Advances in optical property measurements of spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the instruments and experimental approaches, used for measuring the optical properties of thermal control systems, are presented. The instruments' use in studies concerning the effects of combined contaminants and space environment on these materials, and in the qualification of hardware for spacecraft, are described. Instruments for measuring the solar absorptance and infrared emittance offer improved speed, accuracy and data handling. A transient method for directly measuring material infrared emittance is described. It is shown that oxygen exposure before measuring the solar absorptance should be avoided.

  13. TAMIS for rectal tumors: advancements of a new approach.

    PubMed

    Rega, Daniela; Pace, Ugo; Niglio, Antonello; Scala, Dario; Sassaroli, Cinzia; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    TAMIS allows transanal excision of rectal lesions by the means of a single-incision access port and traditional laparoscopic instruments. This technique represents a promising treatment of rectal neoplasms since it guarantees precise dissection and reproducible approaches. From May 2010 to September 2015, we performed excisions of rectal lesions in 55 patients using a SILS port. The pre-operative diagnosis was 26 tumours, 26 low and high grade displasias and 3 other benign neoplasias. 11 patients had a neoadjuvant treatment. Pneumorectum was established at a pressure of 15-20 mmHg CO2 with continuous insufflation, and ordinary laparoscopic instruments were used to perform full thickness resection of rectal neoplasm with a conventional 5-mm 30° laparoscopic camera. The average operative time was 78 min. Postoperative recovery was uneventful in 53 cases: in one case a Hartmann procedure was necessary at two postoperative days due to an intraoperative intraperitoneal perforation; in another case, a diverting colostomy was required at the five postoperative days due to an intraoperative perforation of the vaginal wall. Unclear resection margins were detected in six patients: thereafter five patients underwent radical surgery; the other patient was unfit for radical surgery, but is actually alive and well. Patients were discharged after a median of 3 days. Transanal minimally invasive surgery is an advanced transanal platform that provides a safe and effective method for low rectal tumors. The feasibility of TAMIS also for malignant lesions treated in a neoadjuvant setting could be cautiously evaluated in the future. PMID:27052544

  14. Advancing understanding of executive function impairments and psychopathology: bridging the gap between clinical and cognitive approaches.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Hannah R; Miyake, Akira; Hankin, Benjamin L

    2015-01-01

    Executive function (EF) is essential for successfully navigating nearly all of our daily activities. Of critical importance for clinical psychological science, EF impairments are associated with most forms of psychopathology. However, despite the proliferation of research on EF in clinical populations, with notable exceptions clinical and cognitive approaches to EF have remained largely independent, leading to failures to apply theoretical and methodological advances in one field to the other field and hindering progress. First, we review the current state of knowledge of EF impairments associated with psychopathology and limitations to the previous research in light of recent advances in understanding and measuring EF. Next, we offer concrete suggestions for improving EF assessment. Last, we suggest future directions, including integrating modern models of EF with state of the art, hierarchical models of dimensional psychopathology as well as translational implications of EF-informed research on clinical science. PMID:25859234

  15. Advancing understanding of executive function impairments and psychopathology: bridging the gap between clinical and cognitive approaches

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Hannah R.; Miyake, Akira; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Executive function (EF) is essential for successfully navigating nearly all of our daily activities. Of critical importance for clinical psychological science, EF impairments are associated with most forms of psychopathology. However, despite the proliferation of research on EF in clinical populations, with notable exceptions clinical and cognitive approaches to EF have remained largely independent, leading to failures to apply theoretical and methodological advances in one field to the other field and hindering progress. First, we review the current state of knowledge of EF impairments associated with psychopathology and limitations to the previous research in light of recent advances in understanding and measuring EF. Next, we offer concrete suggestions for improving EF assessment. Last, we suggest future directions, including integrating modern models of EF with state of the art, hierarchical models of dimensional psychopathology as well as translational implications of EF-informed research on clinical science. PMID:25859234

  16. Sleepwalking Into Infertility: The Need for a Public Health Approach Toward Advanced Maternal Age.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Marie-Eve; Ravitsky, Vardit

    2015-01-01

    In Western countries today, a growing number of women delay motherhood until their late 30s and even 40s, as they invest time in pursuing education and career goals before starting a family. This social trend results from greater gender equality and expanded opportunities for women and is influenced by the availability of contraception and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). However, advanced maternal age is associated with increased health risks, including infertility. While individual medical solutions such as ART and elective egg freezing can promote reproductive autonomy, they entail significant risks and limitations. We thus argue that women should be better informed regarding the risks of advanced maternal age and ART, and that these individual solutions need to be supplemented by a public health approach, including policy measures that provide women with the opportunity to start a family earlier in life without sacrificing personal career goals. PMID:26575814

  17. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  18. Conceptual and methodological advances in child-reported outcomes measurement

    PubMed Central

    Bevans, Katherine B; Riley, Anne W; Moon, JeanHee; Forrest, Christopher B

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, clinical, pharmaceutical and translational research studies use patient-reported outcomes as primary and secondary end points. Obtaining this type of information from children themselves is now possible, but effective assessment requires developmentally sensitive conceptual models of child health and an appreciation for the rapid change in children’s cognitive capacities. To overcome these barriers, outcomes researchers have capitalized on innovations in modern measurement theory, qualitative methods for instrument development and new computerized technologies to create reliable and valid methods for obtaining self-reported health data among 8–17-year-old children. This article provides a developmentally focused framework for selecting child-report health assessment instruments. Several generic health-related quality of life instruments and the assessment tools developed by the NIH-sponsored Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System network are discussed to exemplify advances in the measurement of children’s self-reported health, illness, wellbeing and quality of life. PMID:20715916

  19. 76 FR 52954 - Workshop: Advancing Research on Mixtures; New Perspectives and Approaches for Predicting Adverse...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Workshop: Advancing Research on Mixtures; New Perspectives and Approaches for Predicting... ``Advancing Research on Mixtures: New Perspectives and Approaches for Predicting Adverse Human Health Effects... Research and Training, NIEHS, P.O. Box 12233, MD K3-04, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, (telephone)...

  20. Dynamic Aperture Measurements at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Decking, W.; Robin, D.

    1999-03-12

    A large dynamic aperture for a storage ring is of importance for long lifetimes and a high injection efficiency. Measurements of the dynamic aperture of the third generation synchrotron light source Advanced Light Source (ALS) using beam excitation with kicker magnets are presented. The experiments were done for various accelerator conditions, allowing us to investigate the influence of different working points, chromaticities, insertion devices, etc.. The results are compared both with tracking calculations and a simple model for the dynamic aperture yielding good agreements. This gives us confidence in the predictability of the nonlinear accelerator model. This is especially important for future ALS upgrades as well as new storage ring designs.

  1. Canadian Educational Approaches for the Advancement of Pharmacy Practice

    PubMed Central

    Louizos, Christopher; Austin, Zubin

    2014-01-01

    Canadian faculties (schools) of pharmacy are actively engaged in the advancement and restructuring of their programs in response to the shift in pharmacy to pharmacists having/assuming an advanced practitioner role. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of evidence outlining optimal strategies for accomplishing this task. This review explores several educational changes proposed in the literature to aid in the advancement of pharmacy education such as program admission requirements, critical-thinking assessment and teaching methods, improvement of course content delivery, value of interprofessional education, advancement of practical experiential education, and mentorship strategies. Collectively, implementation of these improvements to pharmacy education will be crucial in determining the direction the profession will take. PMID:25258448

  2. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  3. Select Methodology for Validating Advanced Satellite Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xi; Smith, William L.

    2008-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global measurements of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Measurement system validation is crucial to achieving this goal and maximizing research and operational utility of resultant data. Field campaigns including satellite under-flights with well calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft are an essential part of the validation task. This presentation focuses on an overview of validation methodology developed for assessment of high spectral resolution infrared systems, and includes results of preliminary studies performed to investigate the performance of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument aboard the MetOp-A satellite.

  4. Advanced haptic sensor for measuring human skin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimi, Daisuke; Okuyama, Takeshi; Tanaka, Mami

    2009-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a tactile sensor using PVDF (Polyvinylidene Fluoride) film as a sensory receptor of the sensor to evaluate softness, smoothness, and stickiness of human skin. Tactile sense is the most important sense in the sensation receptor of the human body along with eyesight, and we can examine skin condition quickly using these sense. But, its subjectivity and ambiguity make it difficult to quantify skin conditions. Therefore, development of measurement device which can evaluate skin conditions easily and objectively is demanded by dermatologists, cosmetic industries, and so on. In this paper, an advanced haptic sensor system that can measure multiple information of skin condition in various parts of human body is developed. The applications of the sensor system to evaluate softness, smoothness, and stickiness of skin are investigated through two experiments.

  5. Advanced haptic sensor for measuring human skin conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimi, Daisuke; Okuyama, Takeshi; Tanaka, Mami

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a tactile sensor using PVDF (Polyvinylidene Fluoride) film as a sensory receptor of the sensor to evaluate softness, smoothness, and stickiness of human skin. Tactile sense is the most important sense in the sensation receptor of the human body along with eyesight, and we can examine skin condition quickly using these sense. But, its subjectivity and ambiguity make it difficult to quantify skin conditions. Therefore, development of measurement device which can evaluate skin conditions easily and objectively is demanded by dermatologists, cosmetic industries, and so on. In this paper, an advanced haptic sensor system that can measure multiple information of skin condition in various parts of human body is developed. The applications of the sensor system to evaluate softness, smoothness, and stickiness of skin are investigated through two experiments.

  6. Advanced fractal approach for unsupervised classification of SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Triloki; Singh, Dharmendra; Srivastava, Tanuja

    2010-06-01

    Unsupervised classification of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is the alternative approach when no or minimum apriori information about the image is available. Therefore, an attempt has been made to develop an unsupervised classification scheme for SAR images based on textural information in present paper. For extraction of textural features two properties are used viz. fractal dimension D and Moran's I. Using these indices an algorithm is proposed for contextual classification of SAR images. The novelty of the algorithm is that it implements the textural information available in SAR image with the help of two texture measures viz. D and I. For estimation of D, the Two Dimensional Variation Method (2DVM) has been revised and implemented whose performance is compared with another method, i.e., Triangular Prism Surface Area Method (TPSAM). It is also necessary to check the classification accuracy for various window sizes and optimize the window size for best classification. This exercise has been carried out to know the effect of window size on classification accuracy. The algorithm is applied on four SAR images of Hardwar region, India and classification accuracy has been computed. A comparison of the proposed algorithm using both fractal dimension estimation methods with the K-Means algorithm is discussed. The maximum overall classification accuracy with K-Means comes to be 53.26% whereas overall classification accuracy with proposed algorithm is 66.16% for TPSAM and 61.26% for 2DVM.

  7. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. ); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specified conversion behavior is ARF's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization, and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. The program includes: (1) validation of the submodels by comparison with laboratory data obtained in this program, (2) extensive validation of the modified comprehensive code by comparison of predicted results with data from bench-scale and process scale investigations of gasification, mild gasification and combustion of coal or coal-derived products in heat engines, and (3) development of well documented user friendly software applicable to a workstation'' environment.

  8. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. ); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specific conversion behavior is AFR's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization, and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. Success in this program will be a major step in improving in predictive capabilities for coal conversion processes including: demonstrated accuracy and reliability and a generalized first principles'' treatment of coals based on readily obtained composition data. The progress during the fifteenth quarterly of the program is presented. 56 refs., 41 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Recent treatment advances and novel therapeutic approaches in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review recent advances in the treatment of epilepsy. It includes five antiepileptic drugs that have been recently added to the pharmacologic armamentarium and surgical techniques that have been developed in the last few years. Finally, we review ongoing research that may have a potential role in future treatments of epilepsy. PMID:26097734

  10. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active

  11. Development of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings Using a High-Heat-Flux Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The development of low conductivity, robust thermal and environmental barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity and cyclic resistance at very high surface temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux test approach is established for evaluating advanced low conductivity, high temperature capability thermal and environmental barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. The test approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity, which initially rises under the steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and later drops under the cyclic thermal gradient test due to coating cracking/delamination. The coating system is then evaluated based on damage accumulation and failure after the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The lattice and radiation thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic coatings can also be evaluated using laser heat-flux techniques. The external radiation resistance of the coating is assessed based on the measured specimen temperature response under a laser- heated intense radiation-flux source. The coating internal radiation contribution is investigated based on the measured apparent coating conductivity increases with the coating surface test temperature under large thermal gradient test conditions. Since an increased radiation contribution is observed at these very high surface test temperatures, by varying the laser heat-flux and coating average test temperature, the complex relation between the lattice and radiation conductivity as a function of surface and interface test temperature may be derived.

  12. Damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mantena, R.; Gibson, R.F.; Place, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the application of damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials. A recently developed impulse-frequency response technique was used to obtain damping capacity measurements on crossplied E-glass/epoxy laminates which had been subjected to four-point bending and cantilever bending to produce matrix cracking in the transverse plies. The size and location of the damage zone were correlated with changes in damping. With the expected introduction of Rapidly Solidified Alloys (RSA) as effective alternatives to conventional materials, the applicability of damping capacity measurements as a nondestructive means of evaluating degradation in these materials was also studied. A conventional A710 structural steel having three different microstructures was used for developing the methodology to be used later on RSA specimens. It is shown that damping is more sensitive to matrix cracking than stiffness is in E-glass/epoxy composite specimens. In the case of A710 steel, the damping changes at low strain, though significant, do not correlate with the mechanical property data. Damping data at high strains does correlate with the mechanical property data, however.

  13. Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences I: Measurements.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jorgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Holbek, Simon; Hoyos, Carlos Armando Villagómez; Bradway, David P; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2016-01-01

    A method for rapid measurement of intensities (I(spta)), mechanical index (MI), and probe surface temperature for any ultrasound scanning sequence is presented. It uses the scanner's sampling capability to give an accurate measurement of the whole imaging sequence for all emissions to yield the true distributions. The method is several orders of magnitude faster than approaches using an oscilloscope, and it also facilitates validating the emitted pressure field and the scanner's emission sequence software. It has been implemented using the experimental synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound system (SARUS) scanner and the Onda AIMS III intensity measurement system (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). Four different sequences have been measured: a fixed focus emission, a duplex sequence containing B-mode and flow emissions, a vector flow sequence with B-mode and flow emissions in 17 directions, and finally a SA duplex flow sequence. A BK8820e (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) convex array probe is used for the first three sequences and a BK8670 linear array probe for the SA sequence. The method is shown to give the same intensity values within 0.24% of the AIMS III Soniq 5.0 (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) commercial intensity measurement program. The approach can measure and store data for a full imaging sequence in 3.8-8.2 s per spatial position. Based on I(spta), MI, and probe surface temperature, the method gives the ability to determine whether a sequence is within U.S. FDA limits, or alternatively indicate how to scale it to be within limits. PMID:26625411

  14. SMOS Measurements Preliminary Validation: Objectives and Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabia, Roberto; Gourrion, Jerome; Gabarró, Carolina; Talone, Marco; Portabella, Marcos; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Lopez de Aretxabaleta, Alfredo; Camps, Adriano; Monerris, Alessandra; Font, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    strategy to mitigate the scene-dependent bias found in the SMOS measurements. The comparison of TB departures distributions will be performed within specific classes, aiming at reducing the degrees of freedom of the measurement. Namely, the data will be sorted according to the incidence angle, the wind speed, the across-track distance, the radiometric accuracy and the spatial resolution. Concerning SSS, in turn, the proposed activities will involve inter-comparisons with various external salinity sources. As a further classification, external sources can be distinguished into data coming from models and data collected in-situ. The validation strategy foresees the comparison of SSS misfit (retrieved SSS minus ground-truth SSS) distributions within specific classes. This will be performed sorting geographical areas (different oceans, different zonal frames) and geophysical conditions (e.g. low/high surface temperature, wind speed and SSS conditions). Specific comparisons with in-situ data coming from oceanographic cruises transects and from VOS (Voluntary Observatory Ships) are foreseen, as well as against moored buoys, profilers, and drifters. These data will be arranged in specific match-up datasets, to properly organize the spatio-temporal collocation of the SMOS and in-situ measurements. The possibility of using model solutions for validation will also be considered. Model data are obtained from hindcast simulations from available prediction systems. Concerning the salinity retrieval inversion scheme, efforts will be devoted to the optimization of both the GMF (Geophysical Model Function) and the minimization cost function. With the increase of data availability, the semi-empirical GMF in the ocean salinity Level 2 operational processor will be improved, in particular the roughness-dependent TB term. The introduction of non-linear relationships in the semi-empirical roughness model is a likely extension of this formulation. The prospective approach is to develop, at a

  15. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  16. Recent advances in rational approaches for enzyme engineering

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Kerstin; Schwab, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes are an attractive alternative in the asymmetric syntheses of chiral building blocks. To meet the requirements of industrial biotechnology and to introduce new functionalities, the enzymes need to be optimized by protein engineering. This article specifically reviews rational approaches for enzyme engineering and de novo enzyme design involving structure-based approaches developed in recent years for improvement of the enzymes’ performance, broadened substrate range, and creation of novel functionalities to obtain products with high added value for industrial applications. PMID:24688651

  17. Carbon Dioxide Measurements from Space: Scientific Advance and Societal Benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, S. W.; Duren, R. M.; Miller, C. E.

    2009-04-01

    The dawn of the 21st Century finds spaceborne sensors poised to revolutionize the atmospheric CO2 record by providing high-quality measurements with unprecedented spatio-temporal coverage and density. Space-based CO2 observations will augment local and regional measurements from ground and airborne sensors, providing global context for existing measurements and covering regions not readily accessible or instrumented by other means. Hyperspectral data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), launched in 2002, have been used to produce global maps of CO2 concentrations in the mid-troposphere. These data provide important new constraints on the global distribution and transport of CO2. Future satellite missions dedicated to CO2 observations will collect precise global measurements, enabling more detailed process studies and contributing to further improvements in coupled carbon-climate model development, initialization, and validation. Japan's GOSAT mission, scheduled for launch in January 2009 will measure CO2 and CH4 spectral radiances via thermal and near infrared spectrometry to study the transport mechanisms of greenhouse gases with an emphasis on identification of CO2 sources and sinks on sub-continental scales in support of the Kyoto protocol. NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), scheduled to launch in February 2009, will deliver measurements of column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, with the precision, temporal and spatial resolution, and coverage needed to characterize the variability of CO2 sources and sinks on regional spatial scales and seasonal to interannual time scales. Satellite CO2 observations, combined with continued ground and airborne measurements, will improve our understanding of the natural processes and human activities that regulate the atmospheric abundance and distribution of this important greenhouse gas, generating both scientific advance and societal benefit. Deriving actionable information from these observation

  18. Impact of Measurement System Characteristics on Advanced Sounder Information Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Achieving such an improvement in geophysical information inferred from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as instrument system enhancements for future sensors. This presentation addresses results of tradeoff studies evaluating the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content, with a specific emphasis on thermodynamic state and trace species information obtainable from advanced atmospheric sounders. Particular attention will be devoted toward information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument to fly aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites expected to begin in late 2011. While all of these systems cover nearly the same infrared spectral extent, they have very different number of channels, instrument line shapes, coverage continuity, and instrument noise. AIRS is a grating spectrometer having 2378 discrete spectral channels ranging from about 0.4 to 2.2/cm resolution; IASI is a Michelson interferometer with 8461 uniformly-spaced spectral channels of 0.5/cm (apodized) resolution; and CrIS is a Michelson interferometer having 1305 spectral channels of 0.625, 1.250, and 2.50/cm (unapodized) spectral resolution, respectively, over its three continuous but non-overlapping bands. Results of tradeoff studies showing information content sensitivity to assumed measurement system characteristics will be presented.

  19. Advanced Stirling Convertor Dynamic Test Approach and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meer, David W.; Hill, Dennis; Ursic, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. As part of the extended operation testing of this power system, the Advanced Stirling Converters (ASC) at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center undergo a vibration test sequence intended to simulate the vibration history of an ASC used in an ASRG for a space mission. This sequence includes testing at Workmanship and Flight Acceptance levels interspersed with periods of extended operation to simulate pre and post fueling. The final step in the test sequence utilizes additional testing at Flight Acceptance levels to simulate launch. To better replicate the acceleration profile seen by an ASC incorporated into an ASRG, the input spectra used in testing the convertors was modified based on dynamic testing of the ASRG Engineering Unit ( ASRG-EU) at Lockheed Martin. This paper presents the vibration test plan for current and future ASC units, including the modified input spectra, and the results of recent tests using these spectra. The test results include data from several accelerometers mounted on the convertors as well as the piston position and output power variables.

  20. Advances in the Rising Bubble Technique for discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgersom, Koen; Luxemburg, Willem; Willemsen, Geert; Bussmann, Luuk

    2014-05-01

    Already in the 19th century, d'Auria described a discharge measurement technique that applies floats to find the depth-integrated velocity (d'Auria, 1882). The basis of this technique was that the horizontal distance that the float travels on its way to the surface is the image of the integrated velocity profile over depth. Viol and Semenov (1964) improved this method by using air bubbles as floats, but still distances were measured manually until Sargent (1981) introduced a technique that could derive the distances from two photographs simultaneously taken from each side of the river bank. Recently, modern image processing techniques proved to further improve the applicability of the method (Hilgersom and Luxemburg, 2012). In the 2012 article, controlling and determining the rising velocity of an air bubble still appeared a major challenge for the application of this method. Ever since, laboratory experiments with different nozzle and tube sizes lead to advances in our self-made equipment enabling us to produce individual air bubbles with a more constant rising velocity. Also, we introduced an underwater camera to on-site determine the rising velocity, which is dependent on the water temperature and contamination, and therefore is site-specific. Camera measurements of the rising velocity proved successful in a laboratory and field setting, although some improvements to the setup are necessary to capture the air bubbles also at depths where little daylight penetrates. References D'Auria, L.: Velocity of streams; A new method to determine correctly the mean velocity of any perpendicular in rivers and canals, (The) American Engineers, 3, 1882. Hilgersom, K.P. and Luxemburg, W.M.J.: Technical Note: How image processing facilitates the rising bubble technique for discharge measurement, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(2), 345-356, 2012. Sargent, D.: Development of a viable method of stream flow measurement using the integrating float technique, Proceedings of

  1. Advanced numerical methods and software approaches for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    CAREY,GRAHAM F.; PARDHANANI,A.L.; BOVA,STEVEN W.

    2000-03-23

    In this article the authors concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to drift-dominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the drift-diffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of upwind and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter-Gummel approach, Petrov-Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), entropy variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of the methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. They have included numerical examples from the recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and they emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, they briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.

  2. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  3. Advanced optical measuring systems for measuring the properties of fluids and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Four advanced optical models are reviewed for the measurement of visualization of flow and structural properties. Double-exposure, diffuse-illumination, holographic interferometry can be used for three-dimensional flow visualization. When this method is combined with optical heterodyning, precise measurements of structural displacements or fluid density are possible. Time-average holography is well known as a method for displaying vibrational mode shapes, but it also can be used for flow visualization and flow measurements. Deflectometry is used to measure or visualize the deflection of light rays from collimation. Said deflection occurs because of refraction in a fluid or because of reflection from a tilted surface. The moire technique for deflectometry, when combined with optical heterodyning, permits very precise measurements of these quantities. The rainbow schlieren method of deflectometry allows varying deflection angles to be encoded with colors for visualization.

  4. Advanced quantitative measurement methodology in physics education research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing

    The ultimate goal of physics education research (PER) is to develop a theoretical framework to understand and improve the learning process. In this journey of discovery, assessment serves as our headlamp and alpenstock. It sometimes detects signals in student mental structures, and sometimes presents the difference between expert understanding and novice understanding. Quantitative assessment is an important area in PER. Developing research-based effective assessment instruments and making meaningful inferences based on these instruments have always been important goals of the PER community. Quantitative studies are often conducted to provide bases for test development and result interpretation. Statistics are frequently used in quantitative studies. The selection of statistical methods and interpretation of the results obtained by these methods shall be connected to the education background. In this connecting process, the issues of educational models are often raised. Many widely used statistical methods do not make assumptions on the mental structure of subjects, nor do they provide explanations tailored to the educational audience. There are also other methods that consider the mental structure and are tailored to provide strong connections between statistics and education. These methods often involve model assumption and parameter estimation, and are complicated mathematically. The dissertation provides a practical view of some advanced quantitative assessment methods. The common feature of these methods is that they all make educational/psychological model assumptions beyond the minimum mathematical model. The purpose of the study is to provide a comparison between these advanced methods and the pure mathematical methods. The comparison is based on the performance of the two types of methods under physics education settings. In particular, the comparison uses both physics content assessments and scientific ability assessments. The dissertation includes three

  5. SUMMARY REPORT ON RESEARCH RESULTS FROM THE ADVANCE MEASUREMENT INITIATIVE (AMI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA created the Advanced Measurement Initiative (AMI) to permit the early and inexpensive evaluation of innovative advanced technology and to encourage broad and rapid application in EPA operations. The AMI program focused on improving EPA's technological capabilities and acceler...

  6. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01

    Tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle coating is critical for the future use of nuclear energy produced byadvanced gas reactors (AGRs). The fuel kernels are coated using chemical vapor deposition in a spouted fluidized bed. The challenges encountered in operating TRISO fuel coaters are due to the fact that in modern AGRs, such as High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs), the acceptable level of defective/failed coated particles is essentially zero. This specification requires processes that produce coated spherical particles with even coatings having extremely low defect fractions. Unfortunately, the scale-up and design of the current processes and coaters have been based on empirical approaches and are operated as black boxes. Hence, a voluminous amount of experimental development and trial and error work has been conducted. It has been clearly demonstrated that the quality of the coating applied to the fuel kernels is impacted by the hydrodynamics, solids flow field, and flow regime characteristics of the spouted bed coaters, which themselves are influenced by design parameters and operating variables. Further complicating the outlook for future fuel-coating technology and nuclear energy production is the fact that a variety of new concepts will involve fuel kernels of different sizes and with compositions of different densities. Therefore, without a fundamental understanding the underlying phenomena of the spouted bed TRISO coater, a significant amount of effort is required for production of each type of particle with a significant risk of not meeting the specifications. This difficulty will significantly and negatively impact the applications of AGRs for power generation and cause further challenges to them as an alternative source of commercial energy production. Accordingly, the proposed work seeks to overcome such hurdles and advance the scale-up, design, and performance of TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters. The overall objectives of the proposed work are

  7. Detailed Precipitation Measurements for GV: Advances in Video-Distrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwinzerl, Martin; Lammer, Günter; Schönhuber, Michael

    2014-05-01

    dedicated algorithms and procedures in order to meet the arising high demands with respect to throughput, scalability and stability, thus allowing the instrument to cope very well with such very high data rates. Advances in camera technology, which allow for higher resolutions and larger scan rates, are bound to contribute to further increases in the amount of data. Moreover, the degree of integration and the level of complexity in forming precipitation products, including measurements from GV, are also on the rise. Due to these influences, improvements to algorithms and data formats have been studied and first results of these improvements for the 2DVD and upcoming 1DVD are presented as well.

  8. Treatment of advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma: standard and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Wolf, J; Diehl, V

    1999-07-01

    The introduction of polychemotherapy and improved radiation techniques has transformed Hodgkin's lymphoma from an incurable disease to a malignancy with one of the highest cure rates. Milestones were the development of the MOPP (mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) and ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine) regimens. Radiotherapy is commonly used, although its precise role has not been defined for patients with advanced-stage disease. More recently, dose-intensified schedules such as Stanford V (doxorubicin, vinblastine, mechlorethamine, vincristine, bleomycin, etoposide, and prednisone) were shown to be effective in this group of patients. In particular, the BEACOPP regimen (bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone), in both standard and escalated doses, has produced impressive results in a randomized three-arm study when compared with COPP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone)/ABVD. The significantly higher rates of complete remission (CR) and freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) suggest that the new BEACOPP regimen improves efficacy, but definitive conclusions require further years of follow-up evaluation. Interestingly, BEACOPP abrogates the impact of the newly described seven-factor prognostic scoring system that was reported for patients treated with MOPP/ABVD or similar regimens. The prognostic index includes factors such as serum albumin, hemoglobin, male sex, stage IV disease, age more than 45 years, white blood cell count, and lymphocyte count. Whereas patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma have a good prognosis on first diagnosis, those with relapsed or refractory disease face a poor outcome. PMID:10462328

  9. Advanced Modular Power Approach to Affordable, Supportable Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Kimnach, Greg L.; Fincannon, James; Mckissock,, Barbara I.; Loyselle, Patricia L.; Wong, Edmond

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of missions to the Moon, Mars and Near Earth Asteroids (NEA) indicate that these missions often involve several distinct separately launched vehicles that must ultimately be integrated together in-flight and operate as one unit. Therefore, it is important to see these vehicles as elements of a larger segmented spacecraft rather than separate spacecraft flying in formation. The evolution of large multi-vehicle exploration architecture creates the need (and opportunity) to establish a global power architecture that is common across all vehicles. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Modular Power System (AMPS) project managed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is aimed at establishing the modular power system architecture that will enable power systems to be built from a common set of modular building blocks. The project is developing, demonstrating and evaluating key modular power technologies that are expected to minimize non-recurring development costs, reduce recurring integration costs, as well as, mission operational and support costs. Further, modular power is expected to enhance mission flexibility, vehicle reliability, scalability and overall mission supportability. The AMPS project not only supports multi-vehicle architectures but should enable multi-mission capability as well. The AMPS technology development involves near term demonstrations involving developmental prototype vehicles and field demonstrations. These operational demonstrations not only serve as a means of evaluating modular technology but also provide feedback to developers that assure that they progress toward truly flexible and operationally supportable modular power architecture.

  10. Advancing Partnerships Towards an Integrated Approach to Oil Spill Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. S.; Stough, T.; Gallegos, S. C.; Leifer, I.; Murray, J. J.; Streett, D.

    2015-12-01

    Oil spills can cause enormous ecological and economic devastation, necessitating application of the best science and technology available, and remote sensing is playing a growing critical role in the detection and monitoring of oil spills, as well as facilitating validation of remote sensing oil spill products. The FOSTERRS (Federal Oil Science Team for Emergency Response Remote Sensing) interagency working group seeks to ensure that during an oil spill, remote sensing assets (satellite/aircraft/instruments) and analysis techniques are quickly, effectively, appropriately, and seamlessly available to oil spills responders. Yet significant challenges remain for addressing oils spanning a vast range of chemical properties that may be spilled from the Tropics to the Arctic, with algorithms and scientific understanding needing advances to keep up with technology. Thus, FOSTERRS promotes enabling scientific discovery to ensure robust utilization of available technology as well as identifying technologies moving up the TRL (Technology Readiness Level). A recent FOSTERRS facilitated support activity involved deployment of the AVIRIS NG (Airborne Visual Infrared Imaging Spectrometer- Next Generation) during the Santa Barbara Oil Spill to validate the potential of airborne hyperspectral imaging to real-time map beach tar coverage including surface validation data. Many developing airborne technologies have potential to transition to space-based platforms providing global readiness.

  11. Advances in a distributed approach for ocean model data interoperability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; Snowden, Derrick P.

    2014-01-01

    An infrastructure for earth science data is emerging across the globe based on common data models and web services. As we evolve from custom file formats and web sites to standards-based web services and tools, data is becoming easier to distribute, find and retrieve, leaving more time for science. We describe recent advances that make it easier for ocean model providers to share their data, and for users to search, access, analyze and visualize ocean data using MATLAB® and Python®. These include a technique for modelers to create aggregated, Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention datasets from collections of non-standard Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) output files, the capability to remotely access data from CF-1.6-compliant NetCDF files using the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Observation Service (SOS), a metadata standard for unstructured grid model output (UGRID), and tools that utilize both CF and UGRID standards to allow interoperable data search, browse and access. We use examples from the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed, a project in which modelers using both structured and unstructured grid model output needed to share their results, to compare their results with other models, and to compare models with observed data. The same techniques used here for ocean modeling output can be applied to atmospheric and climate model output, remote sensing data, digital terrain and bathymetric data.

  12. Advances in Assays and Analytical Approaches for Botulinum Toxin Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Warner, Marvin G.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Marks, James D.

    2010-08-04

    Methods to detect botulinum toxin, the most poisonous substance known, are reviewed. Current assays are being developed with two main objectives in mind: 1) to obtain sufficiently low detection limits to replace the mouse bioassay with an in vitro assay, and 2) to develop rapid assays for screening purposes that are as sensitive as possible while requiring an hour or less to process the sample an obtain the result. This review emphasizes the diverse analytical approaches and devices that have been developed over the last decade, while also briefly reviewing representative older immunoassays to provide background and context.

  13. Advanced measurement and analysis of surface textures produced by micro-machining processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordatchev, Evgueni V.; Hafiz, Abdullah M. K.

    2014-09-01

    Surface texture of a part or a product has significant effects on its functionality, physical-mechanical properties and visual appearance. In particular for miniature products, the implication of surface quality becomes critical owing to the presence of geometrical features with micro/nano-scale dimensions. Qualitative and quantitative assessments of surface texture are carried out predominantly by profile parameters, which are often insufficient to address the contribution of constituent spatial components with varied amplitudes and wavelengths. In this context, this article presents a novel approach for advanced measurement and analysis of profile average roughness (Ra) and its spatial distribution at different wavelength intervals. The applicability of the proposed approach was verified for three different surface topographies prepared by grinding, laser micro-polishing and micro-milling processes. From the measurement and analysis results, Ra(λ) spatial distribution was found to be an effective measure of revealing the contributions of various spatial components within specific wavelength intervals towards formation of the entire surface profile. In addition, the approach was extended to the measurement and analysis of areal average roughness Sa(λ) spatial distribution within different wavelength intervals. Besides, the proposed method was demonstrated to be a useful technique in developing a functional correlation between a manufacturing process and its corresponding surface profile.

  14. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  15. Laser Sounder Approach for Measuring Atmospheric CO2 from Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Allan, Graham R.; Burris, John F.; Collatz, G. James; Riris, Harris; Stephen, Mark A.; Sun, Xiao-Li; Abshire, James B.

    2004-01-01

    We report on an active remote sensing approach using an erbium fiber amplifier based transmitter for atmospheric CO2 measurements in an overtone band near 1.57 microns and initial horizontal path measurements to less than 1% precision.

  16. A new approach to cotton trash measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two different studies were conducted to determine the feasibility of measuring the mass of trash in a sample of cotton lint by means of a rapid/non-destructive spectroscopic method. The first involved three cottons grown in three states subjected to two different harvesting treatments and processed...

  17. A Greener Approach for Measuring Colligative Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Sean M.; Gordon-Wylie, Scott W.

    2005-01-01

    As a first step towards the greening of instructional laboratories, we present a new greener version of a laboratory procedure designed to measure colligative properties. The greener procedure substitutes the nontoxic, noncarcinogenic compounds stearic, myristic, lauric, and palmitic acids for the less benign aromatic compounds p-dichlorobenzene,…

  18. Assessing macroinvertebrate biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems: Advances and challenges in dna-based approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfrender, M.E.; Ferrington, L.C., Jr.; Hawkins, C.P.; Hartzell, P.L.; Bagley, M.; Jackson, S.; Courtney, G.W.; Larsen, D.P.; Creutzburg, B.R.; Levesque, C.A.; Epler, J.H.; Morse, J.C.; Fend, S.; Petersen, M.J.; Ruiter, D.; Schindel, D.; Whiting, M.

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the biodiversity of macroinvertebrate fauna in freshwater ecosystems is an essential component of both basic ecological inquiry and applied ecological assessments. Aspects of taxonomic diversity and composition in freshwater communities are widely used to quantify water quality and measure the efficacy of remediation and restoration efforts. The accuracy and precision of biodiversity assessments based on standard morphological identifications are often limited by taxonomic resolution and sample size. Morphologically based identifications are laborious and costly, significantly constraining the sample sizes that can be processed. We suggest that the development of an assay platform based on DNA signatures will increase the precision and ease of quantifying biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems. Advances in this area will be particularly relevant for benthic and planktonic invertebrates, which are often monitored by regulatory agencies. Adopting a genetic assessment platform will alleviate some of the current limitations to biodiversity assessment strategies. We discuss the benefits and challenges associated with DNA-based assessments and the methods that are currently available. As recent advances in microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies will facilitate a transition to DNA-based assessment approaches, future research efforts should focus on methods for data collection, assay platform development, establishing linkages between DNA signatures and well-resolved taxonomies, and bioinformatics. ?? 2010 by The University of Chicago Press.

  19. Advances in Non-contact Measurement of Creep Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Canepari, Stacy; Rogers, Jan. R.

    2009-01-01

    Our team has developed a novel approach to measuring creep at extremely high temperatures using electrostatic levitation (ESL). This method has been demonstrated on niobium up to 2300 C, while ESL has melted tungsten (3400 C). High-precision machined spheres of the sample are levitated in the NASA MSFC ESL, a national user facility, and heated with a laser. The laser is aligned off-center so that the absorbed photons transfer their momentum to the sample, causing it to rotate at up to 250,000+ RPM. The rapid rotation loads the sample through centripetal acceleration, causing it to deform. The deformation of the sample is captured on high-speed video, which is analyzed by machine-vision software from the University of Massachusetts. The deformations are compared to finite element models to determine the constitutive constants in the creep relation. Furthermore, the noncontact method exploits stress gradients within the sample to determine the stress exponent in a single test. This method was validated in collaboration with the University of Tennessee for niobium at 1985 C, with agreement within the uncertainty of the conventional measurements. A similar method is being employed on Ultra-High-Temperature ZrB2- SiC composites, which may see application in rocket nozzles and sharp leading edges for hypersonic vehicles.

  20. Measuring work stress among correctional staff: a Rasch measurement approach.

    PubMed

    Higgins, George E; Tewksbury, Richard; Denney, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Today, the amount of stress the correctional staff endures at work is an important issue. Research has addressed this issue, but has yielded no consensus as to a properly calibrated measure of perceptions of work stress for correctional staff. Using data from a non-random sample of correctional staff (n = 228), the Rasch model was used to assess whether a specific measure of work stress would fit the model. Results show that three items rather than six items accurately represented correctional staff perceptions of work stress. PMID:23270982

  1. A review of hemorheology: Measuring techniques and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Patrícia C.; Pinho, Fernando T.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Mónica S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the years on the topic of hemorheology, not only in terms of the development of more accurate and sophisticated techniques, but also in terms of understanding the phenomena associated with blood components, their interactions and impact upon blood properties. The rheological properties of blood are strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical properties of red blood cells, and a variation of these properties can bring further insight into the human health state and can be an important parameter in clinical diagnosis. In this article, we provide both a reference for hemorheological research and a resource regarding the fundamental concepts in hemorheology. This review is aimed at those starting in the field of hemodynamics, where blood rheology plays a significant role, but also at those in search of the most up-to-date findings (both qualitative and quantitative) in hemorheological measurements and novel techniques used in this context, including technical advances under more extreme conditions such as in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow or under extensional flow, which impose large deformations comparable to those found in the microcirculatory system and in diseased vessels. Given the impressive rate of increase in the available knowledge on blood flow, this review is also intended to identify areas where current knowledge is still incomplete, and which have the potential for new, exciting and useful research. We also discuss the most important parameters that can lead to an alteration of blood rheology, and which as a consequence can have a significant impact on the normal physiological behavior of blood.

  2. State of Modern Measurement Approaches in Social Work Research Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unick, George J.; Stone, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The need to develop measures that tap into constructs of interest to social work, refine existing measures, and ensure that measures function adequately across diverse populations of interest is critical. Item response theory (IRT) is a modern measurement approach that is increasingly seen as an essential tool in a number of allied professions.…

  3. Advancing health literacy measurement: a pathway to better health and health system performance.

    PubMed

    Pleasant, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    The concept of health literacy initially emerged and continues to gain strength as an approach to improving health status and the performance of health systems. Numerous studies clearly link low levels of education, literacy, and health literacy with poor health, poor health care utilization, increased barriers to care, and early death. However, theoretical understandings and methods of measuring the complex social construct of health literacy have experienced a continual evolution that remains incomplete. As a result, the seemingly most-cited definition of health literacy proposed in the now-decade-old Institute of Medicine report on health literacy is long overdue for updating. Such an effort should engage a broad and diverse set of health literacy researchers, practitioners, and members of the public in creating a definition that can earn broad consensus through validation testing in a rigorous scientific approach. That effort also could produce the basis for a new universally applicable measure of health literacy. Funders, health systems, and policymakers should reconsider their timid approach to health literacy. Although the field and corresponding evidence base are not perfect, health literacy-especially when combined with a focus on prevention and integrative health-is one of the most promising approaches to advancing public health. PMID:25491583

  4. Advancing Health Literacy Measurement: A Pathway to Better Health and Health System Performance

    PubMed Central

    Pleasant, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The concept of health literacy initially emerged and continues to gain strength as an approach to improving health status and the performance of health systems. Numerous studies clearly link low levels of education, literacy, and health literacy with poor health, poor health care utilization, increased barriers to care, and early death. However, theoretical understandings and methods of measuring the complex social construct of health literacy have experienced a continual evolution that remains incomplete. As a result, the seemingly most-cited definition of health literacy proposed in the now-decade-old Institute of Medicine report on health literacy is long overdue for updating. Such an effort should engage a broad and diverse set of health literacy researchers, practitioners, and members of the public in creating a definition that can earn broad consensus through validation testing in a rigorous scientific approach. That effort also could produce the basis for a new universally applicable measure of health literacy. Funders, health systems, and policymakers should reconsider their timid approach to health literacy. Although the field and corresponding evidence base are not perfect, health literacy—especially when combined with a focus on prevention and integrative health—is one of the most promising approaches to advancing public health. PMID:25491583

  5. Measuring up: Advances in How We Assess Reading Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatini, John; Albro, Elizabeth; O'Reilly, Tenaha

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, the science of reading acquisition, processes, and individual differences in general and special populations has been continuously advancing through interdisciplinary research in cognitive, psycholinguistic, developmental, genetic, neuroscience, cross-language studies, and experimental comparison studies of effective…

  6. Recent Advances in Treatment Approaches of Mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

    PubMed

    Giugliani, Roberto; Carvalho, Clarissa Gutiérrez; Herber, Silvani; de Camargo Pinto, Louise Lapagesse

    2011-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI is caused by accumulation of the glycosaminoglycan dermatan sulfate in all tissues due to decreased activity of the enzyme arylsulfatase B. Patients exhibit multisystemic signs and symptoms in a chronic and progressive manner, especially with changes in the skeleton, cardiopulmonary system, cornea, skin, liver, spleen and meninges. Patients usually have normal intelligence. In the past, treatment of mucopolysaccharidoses was limited to palliative medical care. The outcome for affected patients improved with the introduction of new technologies as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, relegated to specific situations after enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) became available. The specific ERT for MPS VI, galsulfase (Naglazyme®, Biomarin Pharmaceutical) was approved in 2005 by FDA and in 2006 by EMEA, and three clinical studies including 56 patients have evaluated the efficacy and safety. Long-term follow up data with patients treated up to 5 years showed that ERT is well tolerated and associated with sustained improvements in the patients' clinical condition. Intrathecal ERT may be considered in situations of high neurosurgical risk but still it is experimental in humans, as is intra-articular ERT. It is possible that the full impact of this therapy will only be demonstrated when patients are identified and treated soon after birth, as it was shown that early introduction of ERT produced immune tolerance and improved enzyme effectiveness in the cat model. New insights on the pathophysiology of MPS disorders are leading to alternative therapeutic approaches, as gene therapy, inflammatory response modulators and substrate reduction therapy. PMID:21506914

  7. Visualizing approaches for displaying measures of sentiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Sue E.; Roy, Heather; Cassenti, Daniel N.

    2015-05-01

    The overall purpose of intelligence analysis platforms is to extract key information from multi-source data. Ultimately, these systems are meant to save intelligence analysts time and effort by offering knowledge discovery capabilities. However, intelligence analysis platforms only assist analysts to the extent they are designed with human factors in mind. Poorly designed intelligence analysis platforms can hinder the knowledge discovery process, or worse, promote the misinterpretation of analysis results. Future intelligence systems must be critical enablers for improving speed, efficiency, and effectiveness of command-level decision making. Human-centered research is needed to address the challenge of visualizing large data collections to facilitate orientation and context, enable the discovery and selection of relevant information, and provide dynamic feedback for identifying changes in the state of a targeted region or topic. From the perspective of the `Human as a Data Explorer,' this study investigates the visual presentation of intelligence information to support timely and accurate decision making. The investigation is a starting point in understanding the rich and varied set of information visualizations sponsored by the Army in recent years. A human-subjects experiment explores two visualization approaches against a control condition for displaying sentiment about a set of topics with an emphasis on the performance metrics of decision accuracy and response time. The resulting data analysis is the first in a series of experiments providing input for technology development informing future interface designs and system prototypes.

  8. Advances in the use of Distributed Temperature Sensing for measuring soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Dong, J.; Ochsner, T. E.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation will focus on advances in the use of passive distributed temperature sensing for large-scale, high resolution monitoring of soil moisture. In this approach, cables are plowed into the ground at several depths and use to make continuous measurements of soil temperature. Unlike Active DTS, external heating is not applied to the cables. The soil temperature profile variations in response to the diurnal net radiation cycle are observed instead. Recent results will be presented from an improved inversion approach, in which the vertical profile of thermal diffusivity is inferred from the cable temperatures and limited ancillary information. Results will also be presented from a promising new data assimilation approach, in which temperature observations are assimilated into a model to obtain simultaneous soil moisture and temperature profiles. This approach is particularly well suited to handling the vertical and horizontal spatial variability in moisture content and soil texture. It is less sensitive to errors in cable depth than the inversion method and circumvents the problem of inferring one of two possible soil moisture values from a thermal diffusivity estimate. We will conclude with some perspectives on how this approach can be extended to facilitate the combined use of active and passive DTS for soil moisture estimation.

  9. Assessing Conduct Disorder: A New Measurement Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reavy, Racheal; Stein, L. A. R.; Quina, Kathryn; Paiva, Andrea L.

    2015-01-01

    The Delinquent Activities Scale (DAS) was used to develop indicators of conduct disorder (CD) in terms of symptom severity and age of onset. Incarcerated adolescents (N = 190) aged 14 to 19 were asked about their delinquent behaviors, including age the behavior was first performed, as well as substance use and parental and peer influences. Assessments were performed for the 12 months prior to incarceration and at 3-month postrelease follow-up. Evidence supports the utility of the DAS as a measure of CD diagnosis, including concurrent incremental validity. Furthermore, CD severity (symptom count) was significantly associated with two peer factors: friend substance use and friend prior arrests, with medium to large effect sizes (ESs). Earlier age of CD onset was associated with earlier marijuana use. This study finds that the DAS is a useful instrument in that it is easy to apply and has adequate psychometrics. PMID:24241820

  10. Gasificaton Transport: A Multiphase CFD Approach & Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitri Gidaspow; Veeraya Jiradilok; Mayank Kashyap; Benjapon Chalermsinsuwan

    2009-02-14

    The objective of this project was to develop predictive theories for the dispersion and mass transfer coefficients and to measure them in the turbulent fluidization regime, using existing facilities. A second objective was to use our multiphase CFD tools to suggest optimized gasifier designs consistent with aims of Future Gen. We have shown that the kinetic theory based CFD codes correctly compute: (1) Dispersion coefficients; and (2) Mass transfer coefficients. Hence, the kinetic theory based CFD codes can be used for fluidized bed reactor design without any such inputs. We have also suggested a new energy efficient method of gasifying coal and producing electricity using a molten carbonate fuel cell. The principal product of this new scheme is carbon dioxide which can be converted into useful products such as marble, as is done very slowly in nature. We believe this scheme is a lot better than the canceled FutureGen, since the carbon dioxide is safely sequestered.

  11. Funnel function approach to determine uncertainty: Some advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, P. S.

    2006-12-01

    Given a finite number of noisy data it is difficult (perhaps impossible) to obtain unique average of the model value in any region of the model (Backus & Gilbert, 1970; Oldenburg, 1983). This difficulty motivated Backus and Gilbert to construct the averaging kernels that is in some sense close to delta function. Averaging kernels describe how the true model is averaged over the entire domain to generate the model value in the region of interest. An unique average value is difficult to obtain theoretically. However we can compute the bounds on the average value and this allows us to obtain a measure of uncertainty. This idea was proposed by Oldenburg (1983). As the region of interest increases the uncertainty decreases associated with the average value giving a funnel like shape. Mathematically this is equivalent to solving minimization and maximization problem of average value (Oldenburg, 1983). In this work I developed a nonlinear interior point method to solve this min-max problem and construct the bounds. The bounds determined in this manner honors all types of available information: (a) geophysical data with errors (b) deterministic or statistical prior information and (c ) complementary information from other data sets at different scales (such as hydrology or other geophysical data) if they are formulated in a joint inversion framework.

  12. On the use of the systems approach to certify advanced aviation technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Mark A.; Wise, John A.

    1994-01-01

    The field of human factors is as varied and diverse as the human subject itself. But one of its most important applications is the facilitation of safety and efficiency in a particular working environment through the implementation of paradigms known about humans and their working relationship with machines and systems. During the period since World War II (which is often viewed as the birth of Human Factors) no area has been the subject of more human factors research than aviation. And in no time during that epoch is the influence of human factors more important, nor more imperative than it is today. As technology driven designs have been finding their way into the national airspace system (NAS), there has been growing concern within the aviation industry itself, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the general public for a means by which to certify complex systems and the advanced aviation technologies that will be responsible for transporting, directing, and maintaining our airborne travel. While it is widely agreed human factors certification is desirable, the philosophy that will underlie the approach is debatable. There are, in general, two different approaches to certification: (1) the top-down or systems approach; and, (2) the bottom-up or monadical approach. The top-down approach is characterized by the underlying assumption that certification can be best achieved by looking at the system as a whole, understanding its objectives and operating environment, then examining the constituent parts. In an aircraft cockpit, this would be accomplished by first examining what the aircraft is supposed to be (e.g., fighter, general aviation, passenger), identifying its operating environment (IFR, VMC, combat, etc.) and looking at the entire working system which includes the hardware, software, liveware and their interactions; then, evaluative measures can be applied to the subsystems (e.g., individual instruments, CRT displays, controls). The bottom

  13. Incorporation of a risk analysis approach for the nuclear fuel cycle advanced transparency framework.

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Carmen Margarita; York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko; Kitabata, Takuya; Vugrin, Eric D.; Vugrin, Kay White; Rochau, Gary Eugene; Cleary, Virginia D.

    2007-05-01

    Proliferation resistance features that reduce the likelihood of diversion of nuclear materials from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. A framework that monitors process information continuously can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation by measuring and reducing diversion risk, thus ensuring the legitimate use of the nuclear fuel cycle. The automation of new nuclear facilities requiring minimal manual operation makes this possible by generating instantaneous system state data that can be used to track and measure the status of the process and material at any given time. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) are working in cooperation to develop an advanced transparency framework capable of assessing diversion risk in support of overall plant transparency. The ''diversion risk'' quantifies the probability and consequence of a host nation diverting nuclear materials from a civilian fuel cycle facility. This document introduces the details of the diversion risk quantification approach to be demonstrated in the fuel handling training model of the MONJU Fast Reactor.

  14. Defining Neighborhood Boundaries for Social Measurement: Advancing Social Work Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Kirk A.; Hipp, J. Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Much of the current neighborhood-based research uses variables aggregated on administrative boundaries such as zip codes, census tracts, and block groups. However, other methods using current technological advances in geographic sciences may broaden our ability to explore the spatial concentration of neighborhood factors affecting individuals and…

  15. Measurement of storage ring motion at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The mechanical stability of the Advanced Light Source storage ring is examined over a period of 1.5 years from the point of view of floor motion. The storage ring beam position monitor stability is examined under various operating conditions.

  16. Advanced boundary layer transition measurement methods for flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Croom, C. C.; Gail, P. D.; Manuel, G. S.; Carraway, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    In modern laminar flow flight research, it is important to understand the specific cause(s) of laminar to turbulent boundary-layer transition. Such information is crucial to the exploration of the limits of practical application of laminar flow for drag reduction on aircraft. The transition modes of interest in current flight investigations include the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting instability, the inflectional instability at laminar separation, and the crossflow inflectional instability, as well as others. This paper presents the results to date of research on advanced devices and methods used for the study of laminar boundary-layer transition phenomena in the flight environment. Recent advancements in the development of arrayed hot-film devices and of a new flow visualization method are discussed. Arrayed hot-film devices have been designed to detect the presence of laminar separation, and of crossflow vorticity. The advanced flow visualization method utilizes color changes in liquid-crystal coatings to detect boundary-layer transition at high altitude flight conditions. Flight and wind tunnel data are presented to illustrate the design and operation of these advanced methods. These new research tools provide information on disturbance growth and transition mode which is essential to furthering our understanding of practical design limits for applications of laminar flow technology.

  17. Percutaneous irreversible electroporation of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma using the dorsal approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Hester J; Melenhorst, Marleen C A M; Vogel, Jantien A; van Tilborg, Aukje A J M; Nielsen, Karin; Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R

    2015-06-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively. PMID:25288173

  18. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffer, Hester J. Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van; Nielsen, Karin Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R.

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  19. 3D shape measurement of the aspheric mirror by advanced phase measuring deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Su, Xianyu; Liu, Yuankun; Jing, Hailong

    2008-09-15

    An advanced Phase Measuring Deflectometry(PMD) is proposed to measure the three dimensional (3D) shape of the aspheric mirror. In the measurement process, a liquid crystal display(LCD)screen displaying sinusoidal fringe patterns and a camera observing the fringe patterns reflected via the tested mirror, are moved along the tested mirror optical axis, respectively. At each movement position, the camera records the fringe patterns of the screen located at two different positions. Using these fringe patterns, every camera pixels can find a corresponding point on the tested mirror and gets its coordinate and slope. By integrating, the 3D shape of the tested mirror can be reconstructed. Compared with the traditional PMD, this method doesn???t need complex calibration and can measure the absolute height of the aspheric mirror which has large range of surface geometries unambiguously. Furthermore, this method also has strong anti-noise ability. Computer simulations and preliminary experiment validate the feasibility of this method. PMID:18795046

  20. Advances in Measurement of Skin Friction in Airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L.; Naughton, Jonathan W.

    2006-01-01

    The surface interferometric skin-friction (SISF) measurement system is an instrument for determining the distribution of surface shear stress (skin friction) on a wind-tunnel model. The SISF system utilizes the established oil-film interference method, along with advanced image-data-processing techniques and mathematical models that express the relationship between interferograms and skin friction, to determine the distribution of skin friction over an observed region of the surface of a model during a single wind-tunnel test. In the oil-film interference method, a wind-tunnel model is coated with a thin film of oil of known viscosity and is illuminated with quasi-monochromatic, collimated light, typically from a mercury lamp. The light reflected from the outer surface of the oil film interferes with the light reflected from the oil-covered surface of the model. In the present version of the oil-film interference method, a camera captures an image of the illuminated model and the image in the camera is modulated by the interference pattern. The interference pattern depends on the oil-thickness distribution on the observed surface, and this distribution can be extracted through analysis of the image acquired by the camera. The oil-film technique is augmented by a tracer technique for observing the streamline pattern. To make the streamlines visible, small dots of fluorescentchalk/oil mixture are placed on the model just before a test. During the test, the chalk particles are embedded in the oil flow and produce chalk streaks that mark the streamlines. The instantaneous rate of thinning of the oil film at a given position on the surface of the model can be expressed as a function of the instantaneous thickness, the skin-friction distribution on the surface, and the streamline pattern on the surface; the functional relationship is expressed by a mathematical model that is nonlinear in the oil-film thickness and is known simply as the thin-oil-film equation. From the

  1. Exploring Advanced Piano Students' Approaches to Sight-Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhukov, Katie

    2014-01-01

    The ability to read music fluently is fundamental for undergraduate music study yet the training of sight-reading is often neglected. This study compares approaches to sight-reading and accompanying by students with extensive sight-reading experience to those with limited experience, and evaluates the importance of this skill to advanced pianists…

  2. Evaluating New Approaches to Teaching of Sight-Reading Skills to Advanced Pianists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhukov, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates three teaching approaches to improving sight-reading skills against a control in a large-scale study of advanced pianists. One hundred pianists in four equal groups participated in newly developed training programmes (accompanying, rhythm, musical style and control), with pre- and post-sight-reading tests analysed using…

  3. Waves and Wine: Advanced approaches for characterizing and exploiting micro-terroir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S. S.; Grote, K. R.; Freese, P.; Peterson, J. E.; Rubin, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Development of viticultural strategies that are focused on promoting uniformly high quality wine grapes requires an understanding of the properties that influence wine grape development. Our objective is to explore the spatial and temporal variability of above and below ground factors that can influence grape variability at the block scale (or micro-terroir) using a combination of conventional point measurements and non-invasive geophysical approaches, and to use that information to guide the development of new vineyards or the management of existing vineyards. Climate clearly plays a dominant role in determining the success of certain viticultural regions or vintages. However, wine grapes of the same variety, which are grown in the same microclimate region and cultivated and made into wine using identical practices, can lead to remarkably different wines when the grapes are grown on different types of soils. The soil texture controls soil water availability, which greatly influences grapevine physiological status, vegetative and reproductive growth, and ultimately red wine grape quality. One aspect of our research has focused on developing surface geophysical methods, particularly ground penetrating radar (GPR), to characterize soil texture variability and to monitor vineyard water content. Through testing the approaches in three California wineries, we find that analysis of GPR groundwave and reflected waves enable mapping of shallow soil water content in high resolution, with acceptable accuracy, and in a non-invasive manner, and that use of multiple GPR methods and frequencies offer the potential to characterize the soil in 3-D space. We use the dense data to explore spatial and temporal correlations in soil water content, soil texture, and vegetation vigor and the associated implications for vineyard management. We also describe a new zonal-based vineyard development strategy that honors the natural variability of the site, or the micro-terrior. The approach

  4. New Approaches For Validating Satellite Global Precipitation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The scientific successes of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and additional recent satellite-focused precipitation retrieval projects, particularly those based on use of passive microwave radiometer measurements, have paved the way for a more advanced mission currently under development as the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. This new mission is motivated by a number of scientific questions that TRMM research has posed over a range of space-time scales and within a variety of scientific disciplines that are becoming more integrated into earth system science modeling.

  5. Advanced one-dimensional optical strain measurement system, phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, Christian T.

    1992-01-01

    An improved version of the speckle-shift strain measurement system was developed. The system uses a two-dimensional sensor array to maintain speckle correlation in the presence of large off-axis rigid body motions. A digital signal processor (DSP) is used to calculate strains at a rate near the RS-170 camera frame rate. Strain measurements were demonstrated on small diameter wires and fibers used in composite materials research. Accurate values of Young's modulus were measured on tungsten wires, and silicon carbide and sapphire fibers. This optical technique has measured surface strains at specimen temperatures above 750 C and has shown the potential for measurements at much higher temperatures.

  6. Alcohol Measurement Methodology in Epidemiology: Recent Advances and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Thomas K.; Kerr, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Aim To review and discuss measurement issues in survey assessment of alcohol consumption for epidemiological studies. Methods The following areas are considered: implications of cognitive studies of question answering like self-referenced schemata of drinking, reference period and retrospective recall, as well as the assets and liabilities of types of current (e.g., food frequency, quantity frequency, graduated frequencies, and heavy drinking indicators) and lifetime drinking measures. Finally we consider units of measurement and improving measurement by detailing the ethanol content of drinks in natural settings. Results and conclusions Cognitive studies suggest inherent limitations in the measurement enterprise, yet diary studies show promise of broadly validating methods that assess a range of drinking amounts per occasion; improvements in survey measures of drinking in the life course are indicated; attending in detail to on and off-premise drink pour sizes and ethanol concentrations of various beverages shows promise of narrowing the coverage gap plaguing survey alcohol measurement. PMID:18422826

  7. Advanced subsonic transport approach noise: The relative contribution of airframe noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    With current engine technology, airframe noise is a contributing source for large commercial aircraft on approach, but not the major contributor. With the promise of much quieter jet engines with the planned new generation of high-by-pass turbofan engines, airframe noise has become a topic of interest in the advanced subsonic transport research program. The objective of this paper is to assess the contribution of airframe noise relative to the other aircraft noise sources on approach. The assessment will be made for a current technology large commercial transport aircraft and for an envisioned advanced technology aircraft. NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) will be used to make total aircraft noise predictions for these two aircraft types. Predicted noise levels and areas of noise contours will be used to determine the relative importance of the contributing approach noise sources. The actual set-up decks used to make the ANOPP runs for the two aircraft types are included in appendixes.

  8. Performance Measurement of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) since 2006. A key element of the ASRG project is providing life, reliability, and performance testing data of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC). The latest version of the ASC (ASC-E3, to represent the third cycle of engineering model test hardware) is of a design identical to the forthcoming flight convertors. For this generation of hardware, a joint Sunpower and GRC effort was initiated to improve and standardize the test support hardware. After this effort was completed, the first pair of ASC-E3 units was produced by Sunpower and then delivered to GRC in December 2012. GRC has begun operation of these units. This process included performance verification, which examined the data from various tests to validate the convertor performance to the product specification. Other tests included detailed performance mapping that encompassed the wide range of operating conditions that will exist during a mission. These convertors were then transferred to Lockheed Martin for controller checkout testing. The results of this latest convertor performance verification activity are summarized here.

  9. Recent advances in capacitance type of blade tip clearance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barranger, John P.

    1988-01-01

    Two recent electronic advances at NASA-Lewis that meet the blade tip clearance needs of a wide class of fans, compressors, and turbines are described. The first is a frequency modulated (FM) oscillator that requires only a single low cost ultrahigh frequency operational amplifier. Its carrier frequency is 42.8 MHz when used with a 61 cm long hermetically sealed coaxial cable. The oscillator can be calibrated in the static mode and has a negative peak frequency deviation of 400 kHz for a typical rotor blade. High temperature performance tests of the probe and 13 cm of the adjacent cable show good accuracy up to 600 C, the maximum which produces a clearance error of + or - 10 microns at a clearance of 500 microns. In the second advance, a guarded probe configuration allows a longer cable capacitance. The capacitance of the probe is part of a small time constant feedback in a high speed operational amplifier. The solution of the governing differential equation is applied to a ramp type of input. The results show an amplifier output that contains a term which is proportional to the derivative of the feedback capacitance. The capacitance is obtained by subtracting a balancing reference channel followed by an integration stage.

  10. A unified approach to asphaltene precipitation: Laboratory measurement and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    MacMillan, D.J.; Tackett, J.E. Jr.; Jessee, M.A.; Monger-McClure, T.G.

    1995-11-01

    A unified approach to evaluating asphaltene precipitation based on laboratory measurement and modeling is presented. This approach used an organic deposition cell for measuring asphaltene drop out onset conditions. Asphaltene precipitation was detected by changes in optical fluorescence, electrical conductance, and visual observation. A series of experiments measured the effects of changing pressure, temperature and composition on asphaltene precipitation. A fully-compositional V-L-S mathematical model completed the analysis by matching the experimental results. The model was then used to forecast asphaltene precipitation under a variety of production scenarios including response to gas-lift operations, and to evaluate the possible location of a tar-mat.

  11. Advances in the Measurement of Atomic Transition Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brian, Thomas Raymond

    The technology for measuring absolute atomic transition probabilities is extended. Radiative lifetimes are measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic beam generated by a versatile hollow cathode discharge source. The radiative lifetimes are free from systematic error at the five percent level. Combined with branching fractions measured with emission or absorption sources, the lifetimes result in absolute transition probabilities usually accurate to 5-10 %. Three new developments in the lifetime and branching fraction technique are reported. Radiative lifetimes for 186 levels in neutral iron are measured, with the energy of the upper levels densely spanning the entire excitation range of neutral iron. Combined with branching fractions measured in emission with Fourier transform spectrophotometry, the level lifetimes directly yield absolute transition probabilities for 1174 transitions. An additional 640 transition probabilities are determined by interpolating level populations in an emission source. The dense energy spacing of the levels with directly measured lifetimes permits accurate population interpolation despite departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium. This technique has the potential to permit accurate absolute transition probability measurements for essentially every classified line in a spectrum. Radiative lifetime measurements are extended into the vacuum ultraviolet with a continuously tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser based on stimulated anti-Stokes Raman scattering. When used with the hollow cathode atomic beam source, accurate lifetimes are measured for 47 levels in neutral silicon and 8 levels in neutral boron, primarily in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. Transition probabilities are reported for many lines connected to these upper levels, using previously measured or calculated branching fractions. The hollow cathode beam source is developed for use with refractory non-metals. Intense atomic beams of boron

  12. Advances in Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K.; Demoz, B.; DiGirolamo, P.; Mielke, B.; Stein, B.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Tooman, T.; Turner, D.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent technology upgrades to the NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar have permitted significant improvements in the daytime and nighttime measurement of water vapor using Raman lidar. Numerical simulation has been used to study the temperature sensitivity of the narrow spectral band measurements presented here.

  13. ATWS Analysis with an Advanced Boiling Curve Approach within COBRA 3-CP

    SciTech Connect

    Gensler, A.; Knoll, A.; Kuehnel, K.

    2007-07-01

    In 2005 the German Reactor Safety Commission issued specific requirements on core coolability demonstration for PWR ATWS (anticipated transients without scram). Thereupon AREVA NP performed detailed analyses for all German PWRs. For a German KONVOI plant the results of an ATWS licensing analysis are presented. The plant dynamic behavior is calculated with NLOOP, while the hot channel analysis is performed with the thermal hydraulic computer code COBRA 3-CP. The application of the fuel rod model included in COBRA 3-CP is essential for this type of analysis. Since DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) occurs, the advanced post DNB model (advanced boiling curve approach) of COBRA 3-CP is used. The results are compared with those gained with the standard BEEST model. The analyzed ATWS case is the emergency power case 'loss of main heat sink with station service power supply unavailable'. Due to the decreasing coolant flow rate during the transient the core attains film boiling conditions. The results of the hot channel analysis strongly depend on the performance of the boiling curve model. The BEEST model is based on pool boiling conditions whereas typical PWR conditions - even in most transients - are characterized by forced flow for which the advanced boiling curve approach is particularly suitable. Compared with the BEEST model the advanced boiling curve approach in COBRA 3-CP yields earlier rewetting, i.e. a shorter period in film boiling. Consequently, the fuel rod cladding temperatures, that increase significantly due to film boiling, drop back earlier and the high temperature oxidation is significantly diminished. The Baker-Just-Correlation was used to calculate the value of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR), i.e. the reduction of cladding thickness due to corrosion throughout the transient. Based on the BEEST model the ECR value amounts to 0.4% whereas the advanced boiling curve only leads to an ECR value of 0.2%. Both values provide large margins to the 17

  14. Current approaches to the treatment of advanced-stage Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rusthoven, J J

    1986-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy (CT) has been the mainstay of treatment of advanced-stage Hodgkin's disease since the late 1960s. Although treatment with MOPP (nitrogen mustard, vincristine sulfate [Oncovin], procarbazine and prednisone) has resulted in long-term disease-free survival rates exceeding 50%, newer approaches have been studied to improve on this success rate and to reduce the toxic effects associated with MOPP. Prognostic factors have now been defined that identify patients who may require more aggressive treatment; they include age greater than 40 years, presence of B symptoms and more advanced (especially extranodal) disease. A small number of patients with pathological stage III disease may still be successfully treated with extensive radiotherapy (RT) alone. Among patients with advanced-stage disease, significantly better therapeutic results are being obtained with newer treatment approaches than with MOPP, particularly in patients with factors that predict a poor outcome. These newer approaches include combination CT plus RT, alternating cycles of two non-cross-resistant CT regimens and hybrid regimens, which combine agents from two different CT regimens in one cycle. The prognosis of patients who suffer relapse after combination CT remains poor, even with newer drug regimens. The newer treatment approaches may well lead to better cure rates and fewer short-term and long-term toxic effects. PMID:2427176

  15. Advanced turboprop wing installation effects measured by unsteady blade pressure and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Woodward, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    A single rotation model propeller (SR-7A) was tested at simulated takeoff/approach conditions (Mach 0.2), in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Ft Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Both unsteady blade surface pressures and noise measurements were made for a tractor configuration with propeller/straight wing and propeller alone configurations. The angle between the wing chord and propeller axis (droop angle) was varied along with the wing angle of attack to determine the effects on noise and unsteady loading. A method was developed that uses unsteady blade pressure measurements to provide a quantitative indication of propeller inflow conditions, at least for a uniform (across the propeller disk) inflow angle. The wing installation caused a nearly uniform upwash at the propeller inlet as evidenced by the domination of the pressure spectra by the first shaft order. This inflow angle increased at a rate of almost 150 percent of that of the wing angle-of-attack for a propeller-wing spacing of 0.54 wing chords at a constant droop angle. The flyover noise, as measured by the maximum blade passing frequency level, correlates closely with the propeller inflow angle (approx. 0.6 dB per degree of inflow angle) for all droop angles and wing angles of attack tested, including the propeller alone data. Large changes in the unsteady pressure responses on the suction surface of the blade were observed as the advance ratio was varied. The presence of a leading edge vortex may explain this behavior since changes in the location of this vortex would change with loading (advance ratio).

  16. Robust quantitative parameter estimation by advanced CMP measurements for vadose zone hydrological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, C.; Wang, H.; Khuut, T.; Kawai, T.; Sato, M.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture plays a crucial role in the understanding of processes in the vadose zone hydrology. In the last two decades ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been widely discussed has nondestructive measurement technique for soil moisture data. Especially the common mid-point (CMP) technique, which has been used in both seismic and GPR surveys to investigate the vertical velocity profiles, has a very high potential for quantitaive obervsations from the root zone to the ground water aquifer. However, the use is still rather limited today and algorithms for robust quantitative paramter estimation are lacking. In this study we develop an advanced processing scheme for operational soil moisture reetrieval at various depth. Using improved signal processing, together with a semblance - non-normalized cross-correlation sum combined stacking approach and the Dix formula, the interval velocities for multiple soil layers are obtained from the RMS velocities allowing for more accurate estimation of the permittivity at the reflecting point. Where the presence of a water saturated layer, like a groundwater aquifer, can be easily identified by its RMS velocity due to the high contrast compared to the unsaturated zone. By using a new semi-automated measurement technique the acquisition time for a full CMP gather with 1 cm intervals along a 10 m profile can be reduced significantly to under 2 minutes. The method is tested and validated under laboratory conditions in a sand-pit as well as on agricultural fields and beach sand in the Sendai city area. Comparison between CMP estimates and TDR measurements yield a very good agreement with RMSE of 1.5 Vol.-%. The accuracy of depth estimation is validated with errors smaller than 2%. Finally, we demonstrate application of the method in a test site in semi-arid Mongolia, namely the Orkhon River catchment in Bulgan, using commercial 100 MHz and 500 MHz RAMAC GPR antennas. The results demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method for

  17. ADVANCES IN THE MEASUREMENT OF AMBIENT CARBON FIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methodologies that have been used in a number of passive collectors and active detectors for measuring ambient carbon fibers are summarized. The need for improved performance in terms of specificity, sensitivity, detection efficiency, accuracy, precision, speed, stability and ser...

  18. Advances in measuring techniques for turbine cooling test rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, F. G.

    1972-01-01

    Surface temperature distribution measurements for turbine vanes and blades were obtained by measuring the infrared energy emitted by the airfoil. The IR distribution can be related to temperature distribution by suitable calibration methods and the data presented in the form of isotherm maps. Both IR photographic and real time electro-optical methods are being investigated. The methods can be adapted to rotating as well as stationary targets, and both methods can utilize computer processing. Pressure measurements on rotating components are made with a rotating system incorporating 10 miniature transducers. A mercury wetted slip ring assembly was used to supply excitation power and as a signal transfer device. The system was successfully tested up to speeds of 9000 rpm and is now being adapted to measure rotating blade airflow quantities in a spin rig and a research engine.

  19. Advanced sensors for spaceborne measurements of the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, E. D.

    1982-01-01

    Concepts involved in remote sensing from space are reviewed, together with performance requirements of proposed and planned equipment. Attention is focused on measurements of the troposphere, particularly meteorological variables and chemical species. The principles of absorption, using either passive or active sensors, emission detection, fluorescence measurements, and EM radiation scattering are outlined. The proposed NASA Windsat, using a CO2 laser from the Orbiter or from an 800 km orbit spacecraft to measure low-level wind speeds is described, as are the uses of the AMTS atmospheric sounder instrument for IR atmospheric temperature sensing and a 20-channel microwave radiometer to detect moisture profiles in the water vapor bands. Additionally, a microwave pressure sounder to detect backscattered signals at 60 GHz is outlined, along with lidar pressure and wind speed measurement methods.

  20. Ultra-sensitive transducer advances micro-measurement range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, V. L.

    1964-01-01

    An ultrasensitive piezoelectric transducer, that converts minute mechanical forces into electrical impulses, measures the impact of micrometeoroids against space vehicles. It has uniform sensitivity over the entire target area and a high degree of stability.

  1. Advances in bioanalytical techniques to measure steroid hormones in serum.

    PubMed

    French, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Steroid hormones are measured clinically to determine if a patient has a pathological process occurring in the adrenal gland, or other hormone responsive organs. They are very similar in structure making them analytically challenging to measure. Additionally, these hormones have vast concentration differences in human serum adding to the measurement complexity. GC-MS was the gold standard methodology used to measure steroid hormones clinically, followed by radioimmunoassay, but that was replaced by immunoassay due to ease of use. LC-MS/MS has now become a popular alternative owing to simplified sample preparation than for GC-MS and increased specificity and sensitivity over immunoassay. This review will discuss these methodologies and some new developments that could simplify and improve steroid hormone analysis in serum. PMID:27217264

  2. Learning from Recent Advances in Measuring Teacher Effectiveness (Washington, DC, August 9, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betebenner, Damian; Braun, Henry; Corcoran, Sean; Darling-Hammond, Linda; Friedman, John; Goldhaber, Daniel; Ho, Andrew; Kane, Thomas; Ladd, Helen; Pianta, Robert; Rockoff, Jonah; Rothstein, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    On August 9, 2012, the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) convened a meeting of researchers and U.S. Department of Education (ED) and IES staff to discuss recent advances in measuring teacher effectiveness. The objectives of the meeting were to: (1) Identify and discuss recent advances in the use of value-added models (VAMs) and student growth…

  3. Learning from Recent Advances in Measuring Teacher Effectiveness. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, August 9, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Education Sciences, 2012

    2012-01-01

    On August 9, 2012, the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) convened a meeting of researchers and U.S. Department of Education (ED) and IES staff to discuss recent advances in measuring teacher effectiveness. The objectives of the meeting were to: (1) Identify and discuss recent advances in the use of value-added models (VAMs) and student growth…

  4. [The research advance of measuring techniques on corneoscleral constitutive parameters].

    PubMed

    Bao, Fangjun; Deng, Manli; Wang, Qinmei

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence and development of myopia and keratoconus is closely related to the changes of scleral and corneal biomechanical properties. The accurate measurement of biomechanical properties for corneoscleral tissure is very important on diagnosis of eye diseases, improvement of ocular operation, ocular biological parameter measurement and invention of ophthalmic instrument. Corneoscleral tissue, composed of bundles of compact and staggered collagen fiber and extracellular matrix, constitute the outer surface of the eyeball. The inhomogeneous distribution of the diameter, gap and amount of collagen fiber, makes its biomechanical characteristics really complex, characterized by nonlinear, viscoelastic, anisotropic, regional variation and age-related variation and etc. With the development of medical diagnostic technology, the importance of the ocular biomechanical property measurement is increasingly recognized. Nevertheless, measuring technology on ocular biomechanics properties are still not well understood by the majority of ophthalmologists. In order to facilitate the researchers to select a suitable measuring platform and method, the development of international corneoscleral biomechanical propertiy measuring technology was reviewed in this article. PMID:26850590

  5. Advances in Swept-Wavelength Interferometry for Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Eric D.

    2011-12-01

    Originally developed for radar applications in the 1950s, swept-wavelength interferometry (SWI) at optical wavelengths has been an active area of research for the past thirty years, with applications in fields ranging from fiber optic telecommunications to biomedical imaging. It now forms the basis of several measurement techniques, including optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR), swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), and frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) lidar. In this thesis, I present several novel contributions to the field of SWI that include improvements and extensions to the state of the art in SWI for performing precision measurements. The first is a method for accurately monitoring the instantaneous frequency of the tunable source to accommodate nonlinearities in the source tuning characteristics. This work ex- tends the commonly used method incorporating an auxiliary interferometer to the increasingly relevant cases of long interferometer path mismatches and high-speed wavelength tuning. The second contribution enables precision absolute range measurements to within a small fraction of the transform-limited range resolution of the SWI system. This is accomplished through the use of digital filtering in the time domain and phase slope estimation in the frequency domain. Measurements of optical group delay with attosecond-level precision are experimentally demonstrated and applied to measurements of group refractive index and physical thickness. The accuracy of the group refractive index measurement is shown to be on the order of 10-6, while measurements of absolute thicknesses of macroscopic samples are accomplished with accuracy on the order of 10 nm. Furthermore, sub-nanometer uncertainty for relative thickness measurements can be achieved. For the case of crystalline silicon wafers, the achievable uncertainty is on the same order as the Si-Si bond length, opening the door to potential thickness profiling with single atomic

  6. Precise Nuclear Data Measurements Possible with the NIFFTE fissionTPC for Advanced Reactor Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towell, Rusty; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) Collaboration has applied the proven technology of Time Projection Chambers (TPC) to the task of precisely measuring fission cross sections. With the NIFFTE fission TPC, precise measurements have been made during the last year at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center from both U-235 and Pu-239 targets. The exquisite tracking capabilities of this device allow the full reconstruction of charged particles produced by neutron beam induced fissions from a thin central target. The wealth of information gained from this approach will allow systematics to be controlled at the level of 1%. The fissionTPC performance will be presented. These results are critical to the development of advanced uranium-fueled reactors. However, there are clear advantages to developing thorium-fueled reactors such as Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors over uranium-fueled reactors. These advantages include improved reactor safety, minimizing radioactive waste, improved reactor efficiency, and enhanced proliferation resistance. The potential for using the fissionTPC to measure needed cross sections important to the development of thorium-fueled reactors will also be discussed.

  7. Cruise noise measurements of a scale model advanced ducted propulsor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Bock, Lawrence A.; Hall, David G.

    1993-01-01

    A scale model Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) was tested in NASA Lewis Research Center's 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel to obtain acoustic data at cruise conditions. The model, designed and manufactured by Pratt & Whitney Division of United Technologies, was tested with three inlet lengths. The model has 16 rotor blades and 22 stator vanes, which results in a cut-on condition with respect to rotor-stator interaction noise. Comparisons of the noise directivity of the ADP with that of a previously tested high-speed, unducted propeller showed that the ADP peak blade passing tone was about 30 dB below that of the propeller, and therefore, should not present a cabin or enroute noise problem. The maximum blade passing tone first increased with increasing helical tip Mach number, peaked, and then decreased at a higher Mach number. The ADP tests with the shortest inlet showed more noise in the inlet arc than did tests with either of the other two inlet lengths.

  8. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. ); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. )

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this proposed study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines. This report describes progress during twenty second quarter of the program. Specifically, the paper discusses progress in three task areas: (1) Submodel development and evaluation: coal to char chemistry submodel; fundamental high-pressure reaction rate data; secondary reaction of pyrolysis product and burnout submodels; ash physics and chemistry submodel; large particle submodels; large char particle oxidation at high pressures; and SO[sub x]-NO[sub x] submodel development and evaluation; (2) Comprehensive model development and evaluation: integration of advanced submodels into entrained-flow code, with evaluation and documentation; comprehensive fixed-bed modeling review, development evaluation and implementation; and generalized fuels feedstock submodel; and (3) Application of integrated codes: application of generalized pulverized coal comprehensive code and application of fixed-bed code.

  9. Recent Advances in Spaceborne Precipitation Radar Measurement Techniques and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.; Tanelli, Simone

    2006-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced instrument concepts and technologies for future spaceborne atmospheric radars, with an over-arching objective of making such instruments more capable in supporting future science needs and more cost effective. Two such examples are the Second-Generation Precipitation Radar (PR-2) and the Nexrad-In-Space (NIS). PR-2 is a 14/35-GHz dual-frequency rain radar with a deployable 5-meter, wide-swath scanned membrane antenna, a dual-polarized/dual-frequency receiver, and a realtime digital signal processor. It is intended for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) operations to provide greatly enhanced rainfall profile retrieval accuracy while consuming only a fraction of the mass of the current TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). NIS is designed to be a 35-GHz Geostationary Earth Orbiting (GEO) radar for providing hourly monitoring of the life cycle of hurricanes and tropical storms. It uses a 35-m, spherical, lightweight membrane antenna and Doppler processing to acquire 3-dimensional information on the intensity and vertical motion of hurricane rainfall.

  10. Human system interaction measures: An approach to improve system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the analysis of system performance. This approach is based upon a functional model of the system, and performance measures of that system. The paper also presents a model of total system performance which is composed of the following three parts: challenges (the challenge represented by the scenario), functions (the resources available to be applied to the challenge), and sequence (how resources are used to cope with the challenge). The approach and model are applied and presented in a civil aviation application. 2 figs.

  11. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  12. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  13. Advancing Measurement of Work and Family Domain Boundary Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Russell A.; Barnes-Farrell, Janet L.; Bulger, Carrie A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research offers promising theoretical frameworks for thinking about the work-family interface in terms of the boundaries individuals develop around work and family. However, measures for important constructs proposed by these theories are needed. Using two independent samples, we report on the refinement of existing "boundary flexibility"…

  14. Advances in the Conceptualization and Measurement of Critical Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diemer, Matthew A.; McWhirter, Ellen Hawley; Ozer, Emily J.; Rapa, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews three emergent measures of critical consciousness (CC), which refers to marginalized or oppressed people's critical reflection on oppressive social, economic, or political conditions, the motivation to address perceived injustice, and action taken to counter such injustice in a liberatory manner (Freire in "Education for…

  15. Curriculum-Based Measurement of Reading: Recent Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madelaine, Alison; Wheldall, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    A significant amount of literature has been published on curriculum-based measurement (CBM) in the last decade. Much of the conceptual work on CBM was done in the 1980s and early 1990s. This review concentrates on the large body of research published within the last 10 years on CBM of reading, including further research demonstrating its technical…

  16. Advances in soil erosion research: processes, measurement, and modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion by the environmental agents of water and wind is a continuing global menace that threatens the agricultural base that sustains our civilization. Members of ASABE have been at the forefront of research to understand erosion processes, measure erosion and related processes, and model very...

  17. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ADVANCED APPROACH FOR NEXT-GENERATION INTEGRATED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Scott R. Reeves

    2005-04-01

    Accurate, high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) reservoir characterization can provide substantial benefits for effective oilfield management. By doing so, the predictive reliability of reservoir flow models, which are routinely used as the basis for investment decisions involving hundreds of millions of dollars and designed to recover millions of barrels of oil, can be significantly improved. Even a small improvement in incremental recovery for high-value assets can result in important contributions to bottom-line profitability. Today's standard practice for developing a 3D reservoir description is to use seismic inversion techniques. These techniques make use of geostatistics and other stochastic methods to solve the inverse problem, i.e., to iteratively construct a likely geologic model and then upscale and compare its acoustic response to that actually observed in the field. This method has several inherent flaws, such as: (1) The resulting models are highly non-unique; multiple equiprobable realizations are produced, meaning (2) The results define a distribution of possible outcomes; the best they can do is quantify the uncertainty inherent in the modeling process, and (3) Each realization must be run through a flow simulator and history matched to assess it's appropriateness, and therefore (4) The method is labor intensive and requires significant time to complete a field study; thus it is applied to only a small percentage of oil and gas producing assets. A new approach to achieve this objective was first examined in a Department of Energy (DOE) study performed by Advanced Resources International (ARI) in 2000/2001. The goal of that study was to evaluate whether robust relationships between data at vastly different scales of measurement could be established using virtual intelligence (VI) methods. The proposed workflow required that three specific relationships be established through use of artificial neural networks (ANN's): core-to-log, log

  19. Advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: Pathogenesis, treatment, and novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Swiecicki, Paul L; Malloy, Kelly M; Worden, Francis P

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer accounts for approximately 2.8% of newly cancer cases. Although classically a tobacco related disease, most cases today are related to infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) and present with locally advanced tumors. HPV related tumors have been recognized as a molecularly distinct entity with higher response rates to therapy, lower rates of relapse, and improved overall survival. Treatment of oropharyngeal cancer entails a multi-disciplinary approach with concomitant chemoradiation. The role of induction chemotherapy in locally advanced tumors continues to be controversial however large studies have demonstrated no difference in survival or time to treatment failure. Surgical approaches may be employed with low volume oropharyngeal cancers and with development new endoscopic tools, more tumors are able to be resected via an endoscopic approach. Given advances in the understanding of HPV related oropharyngeal cancer, ongoing research is looking at ways to minimize toxicities via de-intensification of therapy. Unfortunately, some patients develop recurrent or metastatic disease. Novel therapeutics are currently being investigated for this patient population including immunotherapeutics. This review discusses the current understanding of the pathogenesis of oropharyngeal cancer and treatment. We also discuss emerging areas of research as it pertains to de-intensification as well novel therapeutics for the management of metastatic disease. PMID:26862488

  20. Advanced Laser Based Measurements in Porous Media Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements using dual-pump dual-broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (DP-DBB-CARS) inside a porous media burner. This work continues our previous measurements in such combustion systems. The existing setup was significantly modified with the aim of providing improved data quality and data rate, reduction of interferences and additional species information. These changes are presented and discussed in detail. The CARS technique was expanded to a dual-pump dual-broadband CARS system which in principle enables acquisition of temperatures together with relative H2/N2- and O2/N2- species concentrations. Experimental complexity was reduced by the use of a modified spectrometer enabling the detection of both signals, vibrational and rotational CARS, with only one detection system.

  1. Ultrasonic Technologies for Advanced Process Monitoring, Measurement, and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J. ); Morra, Marino ); Greenwood, Margaret S. ); Bamberger, Judith A. ); Pappas, Richard A. )

    2003-06-02

    Ultrasonic signals are well suited to the characterization of liquids, slurries and multi-phase flows. Ultrasound sensor systems provide real-time, in-situ measurements or visualizations and the sensing systems are compact, rugged and relatively inexpensive. The objective is to develop ultrasonic sensors that (1) can be attached permanently to a pipeline wall, possibly as a spool piece inserted into the line and (2) can clamp onto an existing pipeline wall and be movable to another location. Two examples of systems based on pulse-echo and transmission signal analysis are used to illustrate some of the capabilities of ultrasonic on-line measurements with technologies that have use in the nuclear, petro-chemical, and food process industries.

  2. Advanced optical smoke meters for jet engine exhaust measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitz, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Smoke meters with increased sensitivity, improved accuracy, and rapid response are needed to measure the smoke levels emitted by modern jet engines. The standard soiled tape meter in current use is based on filtering, which yields long term averages and is insensitive to low smoke levels. Two new optical smoke meter techniques that promise to overcome these difficulties have been experimentally evaluated: modulated transmission (MODTRAN) and photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS). Both techniques are based on light absorption by smoke, which is closely related to smoke density. They are variations on direct transmission measurements which produce a modulated signal that can be easily measured with phase sensitive detection. The MODTRAN and PDS techniques were tested on low levels of smoke and diluted samples of NO2 in nitrogen, simulating light adsorption due to smoke. The results are evaluated against a set of ideal smoke meter criteria that include a desired smoke measurement range of 0.1 to 12 mg cu.m. (smoke numbers of 1 to 50) and a frequency response of 1 per second. The MODTRAN instrument is found to be inaccurate for smoke levels below 3 mg/cu.m. and is able to make a only about once every 20 seconds because of its large sample cell. The PDS instrument meets nearly all the characteristics of an ideal smoke meter: it has excellent sensitivity over a range of smoke levels from 0.1 to 20 mg/cu.m. (smoke numbers of 1 to 60) and good frequency response (1 per second).

  3. Advanced coordinate measuring machine at Sandia National Laboratories/California

    SciTech Connect

    Pilkey, R.D.; Klevgard, P.A.

    1993-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/California has acquired a new Moore M-48V CNC five-axis universal coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Site preparation, acceptance testing, and initial performance results are discussed. Unique features of the machine include a ceramic ram and vacuum evacuated laser pathways (VELPS). The implementation of a VELPS system on the machine imposed certain design requirements and entailed certain start-up problems. The machine's projected capabilities, workload, and research possibilities are outlined.

  4. Advanced coordinate measuring machine at Sandia National Laboratories/California

    SciTech Connect

    Pilkey, R.D.; Klevgard, P.A.

    1993-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/California has acquired a new Moore M-48V CNC five-axis universal coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Site preparation, acceptance testing, and initial performance results are discussed. Unique features of the machine include a ceramic ram and vacuum evacuated laser pathways (VELPS). The implementation of a VELPS system on the machine imposed certain design requirements and entailed certain start-up problems. The machine`s projected capabilities, workload, and research possibilities are outlined.

  5. Advances in Patient-Reported Outcomes: The NIH PROMIS® Measures

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Rothrock, Nan; Crane, Paul K.; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are questionnaire measures of patients’ symptoms, functioning, and health-related quality of life. They are designed to provide important clinical information that generally cannot be captured with objective medical testing. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health launched a research initiative to improve the clinical research enterprise by developing state-of-the-art PROs. The NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System (PROMIS) and Assessment Center are the products of that initiative. Adult, pediatric, and parent-proxy item banks have been developed by using contemporary psychometric methods, yielding rapid, accurate measurements. PROMIS currently provides tools for assessing physical, mental, and social health using short-form and computer-adaptive testing methods. The PROMIS tools are being adopted for use in clinical trials and translational research. They are also being introduced in clinical medicine to assess a broad range of disease outcomes. Recent legislative developments in the United States support greater efforts to include patients’ reports of health experience in order to evaluate treatment outcomes, engage in shared decision-making, and prioritize the focus of treatment. PROs have garnered increased attention by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for evaluating drugs and medical devices. Recent calls for comparative effectiveness research favor inclusion of PROs. PROs could also potentially improve quality of care and disease outcomes, provide patient-centered assessment for comparative effectiveness research, and enable a common metric for tracking outcomes across providers and medical systems. PMID:25848562

  6. Advanced wavefront measurement and analysis of laser system modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, C.R.; Auerback, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    High spatial resolution measurements of the reflected or transmitted wavefronts of large aperture optical components used in high peak power laser systems is now possible. These measurements are produced by phase shifting interferometry. The wavefront data is in the form of 3-D phase maps that reconstruct the wavefront shape. The emphasis of this work is on the characterization of wavefront features in the mid-spatial wavelength range (from 0.1 to 10.0 mm) and has been accomplished for the first time. Wavefront structure from optical components with spatial wavelengths in this range are of concern because their effects in high peak power laser systems. At high peak power, this phase modulation can convert to large magnitude intensity modulation by non-linear processes. This can lead to optical damage. We have developed software to input the measured phase map data into beam propagation codes in order to model this conversion process. We are analyzing this data to: (1) Characterize the wavefront structure produced by current optical components, (2) Refine our understanding of laser system performance, (3) Develop a database from which future optical component specifications can be derived.

  7. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  8. ADVANCES TOWARDS THE MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL LHC TUNE AND CHROMATICITY

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, P.; CUPOLO, J.; DEGEN, C.; DELLAPENNA, A.; HOFF, L.; MEAD, J.; SIKORA, R.

    2005-06-06

    Requirements for tune and chromaticity control in most superconducting hadron machines, and in particular the LHC, are stringent. In order to reach nominal operation, the LHC will almost certainly require feedback on both tune and chromaticity. Experience at RHIC has also shown that coupling control is crucial to successful tune feedback. A prototype baseband phase-locked loop (PLL) tune measurement system has recently been brought into operation at RHIC as part of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). We report on the performance of that system and compare it with the extensive accumulation of data from the RHIC 245MHz PLL.

  9. Two-phase flow measurements with advanced instrumented spool pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Turnage, K.C.

    1980-09-01

    A series of two-phase, air-water and steam-water tests performed with instrumented piping spool pieces is described. The behavior of the three-beam densitometer, turbine meter, and drag flowmeter is discussed in terms of two-phase models. Results from application of some two-phase mass flow models to the recorded spool piece data are shown. Results of the study are used to make recommendations regarding spool piece design, instrument selection, and data reduction methods to obtain more accurate measurements of two-phase flow parameters. 13 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Two Approaches to Measuring Task Interdependence in Elementary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, W. W., Jr.

    This report compares two approaches to measuring task interdependence, a theoretically fruitful concept for analyzing an organization's technical system. Task interdependence exists among operating personnel in the degree that task performance of one operative constrains, augments, or otherwise poses contingencies for the performance of another.…

  11. Approaches to Measuring and Understanding Employer Training Expenditure: Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Burke, Gerald; Long, Michael; Dumbrell, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This support document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Approaches to Measuring and Understanding Employer Training Expenditure," and is an added resource for further information. As outlined in the report, the research for this study was based on interviews and case studies, analysis of other research and a…

  12. Global Precipitation Measurement: GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) Algorithm Development Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the approach to the development of the Global Precipitation Measurement algorithm. This presentation includes information about the responsibilities for the development of the algorithm, and the calibration. Also included is information about the orbit, and the sun angle. The test of the algorithm code will be done with synthetic data generated from the Precipitation Processing System (PPS).

  13. The JRC-ITU approach to the safety of advanced nuclear fuel cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Fanghaenel, T.; Rondinella, V.V.; Somers, J.; Konings, R.; Erdmann, N.; Uffelen, P. van; Glatz, J.P.

    2013-07-01

    The JRC-ITU safety studies of advanced fuels and cycles adopt two main axes. First the full exploitation of still available and highly relevant knowledge and samples from past fuel preparation and irradiation campaigns (complementing the limited number of ongoing programmes). Secondly, the shift of focus from simple property measurement towards the understanding of basic mechanisms determining property evolution and behaviour of fuel compounds during normal, off-normal and accident conditions. The final objective of the second axis is the determination of predictive tools applicable to systems and conditions different from those from which they were derived. State of the art experimental facilities, extensive networks of partnerships and collaboration with other organizations worldwide, and a developing programme for training and education are essential in this approach. This strategy has been implemented through various programs and projects. The SUPERFACT programme constitutes the main body of existing knowledge on the behavior in-pile of MOX fuel containing minor actinides. It encompassed all steps of a closed fuel cycle. Another international project investigating the safety of a closed cycle is METAPHIX. In this case a U-Pu19-Zr10 metal alloy containing Np, Am and Cm constitutes the fuel. 9 test pins have been prepared and irradiated. In addition to the PIE (Post Irradiation Examination), pyrometallurgical separation of the irradiated fuel has been performed, to demonstrate all the steps of a multiple recycling closed cycle and characterize their safety relevant aspects. Basic studies like thermodynamic fuel properties, fuel-cladding-coolant interactions have also been carried out at JRC-ITU.

  14. Advanced optical measurements for characterizing photophysical properties of single nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Ronen; Davis, Ryan W.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Wheeler, David Roger

    2009-09-01

    Formation of complex nanomaterials would ideally involve single-pot reaction conditions with one reactive site per nanoparticle, resulting in a high yield of incrementally modified or oriented structures. Many studies in nanoparticle functionalization have sought to generate highly uniform nanoparticles with tailorable surface chemistry necessary to produce such conjugates, with limited success. In order to overcome these limitations, we have modified commercially available nanoparticles with multiple potential reaction sites for conjugation with single ssDNAs, proteins, and small unilamellar vesicles. These approaches combined heterobifunctional and biochemical template chemistries with single molecule optical methods for improved control of nanomaterial functionalization. Several interesting analytical results have been achieved by leveraging techniques unique to SNL, and provide multiple paths for future improvements for multiplex nanoparticle synthesis and characterization. Hyperspectral imaging has proven especially useful for assaying substrate immobilized fluorescent particles. In dynamic environments, temporal correlation spectroscopies have been employed for tracking changes in diffusion/hydrodynamic radii, particle size distributions, and identifying mobile versus immobile sample fractions at unbounded dilution. Finally, Raman fingerprinting of biological conjugates has been enabled by resonant signal enhancement provided by intimate interactions with nanoparticles and composite nanoshells.

  15. Multiresolution Approach for Noncontact Measurements of Arterial Pulse Using Thermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekmenev, Sergey Y.; Farag, Aly A.; Miller, William M.; Essock, Edward A.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    This chapter presents a novel computer vision methodology for noncontact and nonintrusive measurements of arterial pulse. This is the only investigation that links the knowledge of human physiology and anatomy, advances in thermal infrared (IR) imaging and computer vision to produce noncontact and nonintrusive measurements of the arterial pulse in both time and frequency domains. The proposed approach has a physical and physiological basis and as such is of a fundamental nature. A thermal IR camera was used to capture the heat pattern from superficial arteries, and a blood vessel model was proposed to describe the pulsatile nature of the blood flow. A multiresolution wavelet-based signal analysis approach was applied to extract the arterial pulse waveform, which lends itself to various physiological measurements. We validated our results using a traditional contact vital signs monitor as a ground truth. Eight people of different age, race and gender have been tested in our study consistent with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations and internal review board approval. The resultant arterial pulse waveforms exactly matched the ground truth oximetry readings. The essence of our approach is the automatic detection of region of measurement (ROM) of the arterial pulse, from which the arterial pulse waveform is extracted. To the best of our knowledge, the correspondence between noncontact thermal IR imaging-based measurements of the arterial pulse in the time domain and traditional contact approaches has never been reported in the literature.

  16. Summer Support of the Advanced Structures and Measurements Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuber, Alexander Lee

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is my exit presentation summarizing the work that I did this summer during my 10 week summer internship. It is primarily focused on tensile testing of composite coupons including the use of the ARAMIS optical strain measurement system, but it also includes some discussion of other support that I provided for the Dryden composites working group effort. My main efforts in that area were focused on T-joint design for an upcoming hands-on-workshop as well as design of a fixture to test joint coupons. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the other small projects that I worked on, including support of structurally integrated thermal protection system (STIPS) research and the Global Observer wing loads test.

  17. Advanced measurements and techniques in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Lacerda, A.H.; Kim, Y.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). High magnetic fields present a unique environment for studying the electronic structure of materials. Two classes of materials were chosen for experiments at the national high Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos: highly correlated electron systems and semiconductors. Magnetotransport and thermodynamic experiments were performed on the renormalized ground states of highly correlated electron systems (such as heavy fermion materials and Kondo insulators) in the presence of magnetic fields that are large enough to disrupt the many-body correlations. A variety of optical measurements in high magnetic fields were performed on semiconductor heterostructures including GaAs/AlGaAs single heterojunctions (HEMT structure), coupled double quantum wells (CDQW), asymmetric coupled double quantum wells (ACDQW), multiple quantum wells and a CdTe single crystal thin film.

  18. Advances in corneal topography measurements with conical null-screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-García, Manuel; Cossio-Guerrero, Cesar; Huerta-Carranza, Oliver; Moreno-Oliva, Víctor I.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we report the design of a null-screen for corneal topography. To avoid the difficulties in the alignment of the test system due to the face contour (eyebrows, nose, or eyelids), we design a conical null-screen with a novel radial points distribution drawn on it in such a way that its image, which is formed by reflection on the test surface, becomes an exact array of circular spots if the surface is perfect. Additionally, an algorithm to compute the sagittal and meridional radii of curvature for the corneal surface is presented. The sagittal radius is obtained from the surface normal, and the meridional radius is calculated from a function fitted to the derivative of the sagittal curvature by using the surfacenormals raw data. Experimental results for the testing a calibration spherical surface are shown. Also, we perform some corneal topography measurements.

  19. Advances in Radioactive-Isotope Science from Mass Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunney, David

    Mass is a fundamental property that is indispensable for the study of nuclear structure, for applications in stellar nucleosynthesis and neutron-star composition, as well as studies of atomic and weak-interaction physics. We briefly review the mass-measurement programs at radioactive-beam facilities worldwide and examine the wealth of new mass data, compare the strengths of the different installations and reflect on the multitude of physics results. The series of ENAM meetings from 1995 to 2008 saw the rise and subsequent dominance of Penning traps in the field of mass spectrometry, which has continued through the new era of the ARIS meetings. As for the ARIS 2011 conference, we attempt a nomination for "Penning trap of the year."

  20. A Relational Approach to Measuring Competition Among Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Min-Woong

    2002-01-01

    Objective To present a new, relational approach to measuring competition in hospital markets and to compare this relational approach with alternative methods of measuring competition. Data Sources The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development patient discharge abstracts and financial disclosure files for 1991. Study Design Patient discharge abstracts for an entire year were used to derive patient flows, which were combined to calculate the extent of overlap in patient pools for each pair of hospitals. This produces a cross-sectional measure of market competition among hospitals. Principal Findings The relational approach produces measures of competition between each and every pair of hospitals in the study sample, allowing us to examine a much more “local” as well as dyadic effect of competition. Preliminary analyses show the following: (1) Hospital markets are smaller than thought. (2) For-profit hospitals received considerably more competition from their neighbors than either nonprofit or government hospitals. (3) The size of a hospital does not matter in the amount of competition received, but the larger hospitals generated significantly more competition than smaller ones. Comparisons of this method to the other methods show considerable differences in identifying competitors, indicating that these methods are not as comparable as previously thought. Conclusion The relational approach measures competition in a more detailed way and allows researchers to conduct more fine-grained analyses of market competition. This approach allows one to model market structure in a manner that goes far beyond the traditional categories of monopoly, oligopoly, and perfect competition. It also opens up an entirely new range of analytic possibilities in examining the effect of competition on hospital performance, price of medical care, changes in the market, technology acquisition, and many other phenomena in the health care field. PMID:12036003

  1. Severe accident approach - final report. Evaluation of design measures for severe accident prevention and consequence mitigation.

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A. M.; Parma, E.; Wei, T.; Wigeland, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; SNL; INL

    2010-03-01

    An important goal of the US DOE reactor development program is to conceptualize advanced safety design features for a demonstration Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). The treatment of severe accidents is one of the key safety issues in the design approach for advanced SFR systems. It is necessary to develop an in-depth understanding of the risk of severe accidents for the SFR so that appropriate risk management measures can be implemented early in the design process. This report presents the results of a review of the SFR features and phenomena that directly influence the sequence of events during a postulated severe accident. The report identifies the safety features used or proposed for various SFR designs in the US and worldwide for the prevention and/or mitigation of Core Disruptive Accidents (CDA). The report provides an overview of the current SFR safety approaches and the role of severe accidents. Mutual understanding of these design features and safety approaches is necessary for future collaborations between the US and its international partners as part of the GEN IV program. The report also reviews the basis for an integrated safety approach to severe accidents for the SFR that reflects the safety design knowledge gained in the US during the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) and Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) programs. This approach relies on inherent reactor and plant safety performance characteristics to provide additional safety margins. The goal of this approach is to prevent development of severe accident conditions, even in the event of initiators with safety system failures previously recognized to lead directly to reactor damage.

  2. A unified approach to asphaltene precipitation: Laboratory measurement and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    MacMillan, D.J.; Tackett, J.E. Jr.; Jessee, M.A.; Monger-McClure, T.G.

    1995-09-01

    A unified approach to evaluation of asphaltene precipitation based on laboratory measurement and modeling is presented. This approach uses an organic deposition cell (ODC) for measuring asphaltene-dropout onset conditions. Asphaltene precipitation was detected by changes in optical fluorescence, electrical conductance, and visual observation. A series of experiments measured the effects of changing pressure,m temperature, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. A fully compositional vapor/liquid/solid (V/L/S) mathematical model completed by analysis by matching the experimental results. The authors then used the model to forecast asphaltene precipitation under a variety of production scenarios, including response to gas-lift operations,and to evaluate the possible location of a tar mat.

  3. Advanced Precipitation Radar Antenna to Measure Rainfall From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Lin, John; Huang, John; Im, Eastwood; Lou, Michael; Lopez, Bernardo; Durden, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    To support NASA s planned 20-year mission to provide sustained global precipitation measurement (EOS-9 Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)), a deployable antenna has been explored with an inflatable thin-membrane structure. This design uses a 5.3 5.3-m inflatable parabolic reflector with the electronically scanned, dual-frequency phased array feeds to provide improved rainfall measurements at 2.0-km horizontal resolution over a cross-track scan range of up to 37 , necessary for resolving intense, isolated storm cells and for reducing the beam-filling and spatial sampling errors. The two matched radar beams at the two frequencies (Ku and Ka bands) will allow unambiguous retrieval of the parameters in raindrop size distribution. The antenna is inflatable, using rigidizable booms, deployable chain-link supports with prescribed curvatures, a smooth, thin-membrane reflecting surface, and an offset feed technique to achieve the precision surface tolerance (0.2 mm RMS) for meeting the low-sidelobe requirement. The cylindrical parabolic offset-feed reflector augmented with two linear phased array feeds achieves dual-frequency shared-aperture with wide-angle beam scanning and very low sidelobe level of -30 dB. Very long Ku and Ka band microstrip feed arrays incorporating a combination of parallel and series power divider lines with cosine-over-pedestal distribution also augment the sidelobe level and beam scan. This design reduces antenna mass and launch vehicle stowage volume. The Ku and Ka band feed arrays are needed to achieve the required cross-track beam scanning. To demonstrate the inflatable cylindrical reflector with two linear polarizations (V and H), and two beam directions (0deg and 30deg), each frequency band has four individual microstrip array designs. The Ku-band array has a total of 166x2 elements and the Ka-band has 166x4 elements with both bands having element spacing about 0.65 lambda(sub 0). The cylindrical reflector with offset linear array feeds

  4. AN ADVANCED CALIBRATION PROCEDURE FOR COMPLEX IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Morrison; Jon P. Christophersen; Patrick Bald; John L. Morrison

    2012-06-01

    With the increasing demand for electric and hybrid electric vehicles and the explosion in popularity of mobile and portable electronic devices such as laptops, cell phones, e-readers, tablet computers and the like, reliance on portable energy storage devices such as batteries has likewise increased. The concern for the availability of critical systems in turn drives the availability of battery systems and thus the need for accurate battery health monitoring has become paramount. Over the past decade the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Montana Tech of the University of Montana (Tech), and Qualtech Systems, Inc. (QSI) have been developing the Smart Battery Status Monitor (SBSM), an integrated battery management system designed to monitor battery health, performance and degradation and use this knowledge for effective battery management and increased battery life. Key to the success of the SBSM is an in-situ impedance measurement system called the Impedance Measurement Box (IMB). One of the challenges encountered has been development of an accurate, simple, robust calibration process. This paper discusses the successful realization of this process.

  5. Technological advances in MRI measurement of brain perfusion.

    PubMed

    Duyn, Jeff H; van Gelderen, Peter; Talagala, Lalith; Koretsky, Alan; de Zwart, Jacco A

    2005-12-01

    Measurement of brain perfusion using arterial spin labeling (ASL) or dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) based MRI has many potential important clinical applications. However, the clinical application of perfusion MRI has been limited by a number of factors, including a relatively poor spatial resolution, limited volume coverage, and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is difficult to improve any of these aspects because both ASL and DSC methods require rapid image acquisition. In this report, recent methodological developments are discussed that alleviate some of these limitations and make perfusion MRI more suitable for clinical application. In particular, the availability of high magnetic field strength systems, increased gradient performance, the use of RF coil arrays and parallel imaging, and increasing pulse sequence efficiency allow for increased image acquisition speed and improved SNR. The use of parallel imaging facilitates the trade-off of SNR for increases in spatial resolution. As a demonstration, we obtained DSC and ASL perfusion images at 3.0 T and 7.0 T with multichannel RF coils and parallel imaging, which allowed us to obtain high-quality images with in-plane voxel sizes of 1.5 x 1.5 mm(2). PMID:16267852

  6. Comparison of a Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment Approach with Advanced Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis L; Mandelli, Diego; Zhegang Ma

    2014-11-01

    As part of the Light Water Sustainability Program (LWRS) [1], the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [2] Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. We also describe our approach we are using to represent advanced flooding analysis.

  7. Advanced Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Improved SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Adler; L. Dunyushkina; S. Huff; Y. Lu; J. Wilson

    2006-12-31

    The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of factors governing performance and degradation of mixed-conducting SOFC cathodes. Two new diagnostic tools were developed to help achieve this goal: (1) microelectrode half-cells for improved isolation of cathode impedance on thin electrolytes, and (2) nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS), a variant of traditional impedance that allows workers to probe nonlinear rates as a function of frequency. After reporting on the development and efficacy of these tools, this document reports on the use of these and other tools to better understand performance and degradation of cathodes based on the mixed conductor La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSC) on gadolinia or samaria-doped ceria (GDC or SDC). We describe the use of NLEIS to measure O{sub 2} exchange on thin-film LSC electrodes, and show that O{sub 2} exchange is most likely governed by dissociative adsorption. We also describe parametric studies of porous LSC electrodes using impedance and NLEIS. Our results suggest that O{sub 2} exchange and ion transport co-limit performance under most relevant conditions, but it is O{sub 2} exchange that is most sensitive to processing, and subject to the greatest degradation and sample-to-sample variation. We recommend further work that focuses on electrodes of well-defined or characterized geometry, and probes the details of surface structure, composition, and impurities. Parallel work on primarily electronic conductors (LSM) would also be of benefit to developers, and to improved understanding of surface vs. bulk diffusion.

  8. A three-dimensional measurement approach for the morphology of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Charys M; Turgeon, James G; Goela, Aashish; Rice, Charles L; Wilson, Timothy D

    2014-01-01

    The hip joint is one of the most frequent sites of osteoarthritis. Advances in diagnosis and clinical treatment have progressed dramatically in the last few decades; however, there are limitations associated with the lack of reliable measures for quantifying hip joint morphology. Current diagnostic measures of the hip are performed with pre-determined measures, typically lengths and angles, on 2D radiographic planes. The current measurement techniques do not utilize the inherent 3D nature of CT and MR imaging and do not necessarily quantify the relevant clinical pathologies. A valid and reliable measurement modality that measures the surface geometry of the femoral head is necessary for early diagnosis and treatment of hip disease. The purpose of this study was to establish a method to quantify femoral head morphology using a three-dimensional model. A novel measurement approach was applied to 45 cadaveric femurs (23 right; 22 left; nine female, 17 male) and their digitally reconstructed 3D CT models. The mean difference between the cadaveric and digital measures was −2.04 mm with 95% confidence limits (CI) of 13.67 mm and −17.75 mm, respectively. The digital measurement approach was found to have excellent intraobserver reliability (ICC = 0.99, CI 0.98–0.99) and interobserver reliability (ICC = 0.98, CI 0.93–0.99). This valid and reliable novel digital measurement approach enables quantification of the 3D surface geometry of the femoral head and is able to measure individual variations and potentially detect abnormalities. This method may be used to assist future studies to establish valid diagnostic measurements for femoral head and head–neck junction pathologies. PMID:24952992

  9. High-throughput and quantitative approaches for measuring circadian rhythms in cyanobacteria using bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K; Paddock, Mark L; Katsuki, Takeo; Greenspan, Ralph J; Golden, Susan S

    2015-01-01

    The temporal measurement of a bioluminescent reporter has proven to be one of the most powerful tools for characterizing circadian rhythms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Primarily, two approaches have been used to automate this process: (1) detection of cell culture bioluminescence in 96-well plates by a photomultiplier tube-based plate-cycling luminometer (TopCount Microplate Scintillation and Luminescence Counter, Perkin Elmer) and (2) detection of individual colony bioluminescence by iteratively rotating a Petri dish under a cooled CCD camera using a computer-controlled turntable. Each approach has distinct advantages. The TopCount provides a more quantitative measurement of bioluminescence, enabling the direct comparison of clock output levels among strains. The computer-controlled turntable approach has a shorter set-up time and greater throughput, making it a more powerful phenotypic screening tool. While the latter approach is extremely useful, only a few labs have been able to build such an apparatus because of technical hurdles involved in coordinating and controlling both the camera and the turntable, and in processing the resulting images. This protocol provides instructions on how to construct, use, and process data from a computer-controlled turntable to measure the temporal changes in bioluminescence of individual cyanobacterial colonies. Furthermore, we describe how to prepare samples for use with the TopCount to minimize experimental noise and generate meaningful quantitative measurements of clock output levels for advanced analysis. PMID:25662451

  10. High throughput and quantitative approaches for measuring circadian rhythms in cyanobacteria using bioluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K.; Paddock, Mark L.; Katsuki, Takeo; Greenspan, Ralph J.; Golden, Susan S.

    2016-01-01

    The temporal measurement of a bioluminescent reporter has proven to be one of the most powerful tools for characterizing circadian rhythms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Primarily, two approaches have been used to automate this process: (1) detection of cell culture bioluminescence in 96-well plates by a photomultiplier tube-based plate-cycling luminometer (TopCount Microplate Scintillation and Luminescence Counter, Perkin Elmer) and (2) detection of individual colony bioluminescence by iteratively rotating a Petri dish under a cooled CCD camera using a computer-controlled turntable. Each approach has distinct advantages. The TopCount provides a more quantitative measurement of bioluminescence, enabling the direct comparison of clock output levels among strains. The computer-controlled turntable approach has a shorter set-up time and greater throughput, making it a more powerful phenotypic screening tool. While the latter approach is extremely useful, only a few labs have been able to build such an apparatus because of technical hurdles involved in coordinating and controlling both the camera and the turntable, and in processing the resulting images. This protocol provides instructions on how to construct, use, and process data from a computer-controlled turntable to measure the temporal changes in bioluminescence of individual cyanobacterial colonies. Furthermore, we describe how to prepare samples for use with the TopCount to minimize experimental noise, and generate meaningful quantitative measurements of clock output levels for advanced analysis. PMID:25662451

  11. Measuring neuronal branching patterns using model-based approach.

    PubMed

    Luczak, Artur

    2010-01-01

    Neurons have complex branching systems which allow them to communicate with thousands of other neurons. Thus understanding neuronal geometry is clearly important for determining connectivity within the network and how this shapes neuronal function. One of the difficulties in uncovering relationships between neuronal shape and its function is the problem of quantifying complex neuronal geometry. Even by using multiple measures such as: dendritic length, distribution of segments, direction of branches, etc, a description of three dimensional neuronal embedding remains incomplete. To help alleviate this problem, here we propose a new measure, a shape diffusiveness index (SDI), to quantify spatial relations between branches at the local and global scale. It was shown that growth of neuronal trees can be modeled by using diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) process. By measuring "how easy" it is to reproduce the analyzed shape by using the DLA algorithm it can be measured how "diffusive" is that shape. Intuitively, "diffusiveness" measures how tree-like is a given shape. For example shapes like an oak tree will have high values of SDI. This measure is capturing an important feature of dendritic tree geometry, which is difficult to assess with other measures. This approach also presents a paradigm shift from well-defined deterministic measures to model-based measures, which estimate how well a model with specific properties can account for features of analyzed shape. PMID:21079752

  12. Application of the LBB regulatory approach to the steamlines of advanced WWER 1000 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselyov, V.A.; Sokov, L.M.

    1997-04-01

    The LBB regulatory approach adopted in Russia in 1993 as an extra safety barrier is described for advanced WWER 1000 reactor steamline. The application of LBB concept requires the following additional protections. First, the steamline should be a highly qualified piping, performed in accordance with the applicable regulations and guidelines, carefully screened to verify that it is not subjected to any disqualifying failure mechanism. Second, a deterministic fracture mechanics analysis and leak rate evaluation have been performed to demonstrate that postulated through-wall crack that yields 95 1/min at normal operation conditions is stable even under seismic loads. Finally, it has been verified that the leak detection systems are sufficiently reliable, diverse and sensitive, and that adequate margins exist to detect a through wall crack smaller than the critical size. The obtained results are encouraging and show the possibility of the application of the LBB case to the steamline of advanced WWER 1000 reactor.

  13. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1991-12-31

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

  14. An alternative approach to control measurements of crane rails.

    PubMed

    Marjetič, Aleš; Kregar, Klemen; Ambrožič, Tomaž; Kogoj, Dušan

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal and vertical positions of points for the control assessment of crane rails are classically determined separately. The procedure is time consuming and causes non-homogenous accuracy of the horizontal and vertical position of control points. The proposed alternative approach is based on polar measurements using a high accuracy total station instrument and a special platform with two precise surveying prisms fixed on it. Measurements are carried out from a single station thus ensuring a common coordinate system and homogenous accuracy. The position of the characteristic point of a rail is derived from the measured positions of both prisms with known geometry of the platform. The influence of platform non-horizontality is defined, along with its elimination procedure. Accuracy assessment is ensured with redundant measurements. Result of the proposed procedure is a numerical and graphical presentation of characteristic points. The control parameters required in international Eurocode standards are easily determined from them. PMID:22778621

  15. The "Guarded Torus" approach for MUPUS thermal properties measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, E.; Knollenberg, J.; Kargl, G.; Kömle, N. I.

    2012-09-01

    In the past few years scientists developed an increasing interest in the structure and behaviour of extraterrestrial surfaces. Comets are playing a main role as targets of these investigations. They are composed of ice, dust and organics and it is assumed that comets consist of the basic material out of which the solar system was formed. The properties at the surface and the upper layers of comets as well as their change during the approach to the sun are therefore of special interest. The thermal and mechanical properties of the comet 67P/Churyumov- Gerasimenko and their changes should be measured with the MUPUS-probe, one of the instruments on the Rosetta lander Philae. The "Guarded Torus" approach is a possible way of optimizing the scientific results of the thermal conductivity measurements with MUPUS like sensors.

  16. Advanced ultrasonic measurement methodology for non-invasive interrogation and identification of fluids in sealed containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Brian J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Eckenrode, Brian A.

    2006-03-01

    Government agencies and homeland security related organizations have identified the need to develop and establish a wide range of unprecedented capabilities for providing scientific and technical forensic services to investigations involving hazardous chemical, biological, and radiological materials, including extremely dangerous chemical and biological warfare agents. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a prototype portable, hand-held, hazardous materials acoustic inspection prototype that provides noninvasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities using nondestructive ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements. Due to the wide variety of fluids as well as container sizes and materials encountered in various law enforcement inspection activities, the need for high measurement sensitivity and advanced ultrasonic measurement techniques were identified. The prototype was developed using a versatile electronics platform, advanced ultrasonic wave propagation methods, and advanced signal processing techniques. This paper primarily focuses on the ultrasonic measurement methods and signal processing techniques incorporated into the prototype. High bandwidth ultrasonic transducers combined with an advanced pulse compression technique allowed researchers to 1) obtain high signal-to-noise ratios and 2) obtain accurate and consistent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements through a variety of highly attenuative containers and fluid media. Results of work conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated that the prototype experimental measurement technique also provided information regarding container properties, which will be utilized in future container-independent measurements of hidden liquids.

  17. Advanced ultrasonic measurement methodology for non-invasive interrogation and identification of fluids in sealed containers

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Brian J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Eckenrode, Brian A.

    2006-05-01

    Government agencies and homeland security related organizations have identified the need to develop and establish a wide range of unprecedented capabilities for providing scientific and technical forensic services to investigations involving hazardous chemical, biological, and radiological materials, including extremely dangerous chemical and biological warfare agents. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a prototype portable, hand-held, hazardous materials acoustic inspection prototype that provides noninvasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities using nondestructive ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements. Due to the wide variety of fluids as well as container sizes and materials encountered in various law enforcement inspection activities, the need for high measurement sensitivity and advanced ultrasonic measurement techniques were identified. The prototype was developed using a versatile electronics platform, advanced ultrasonic wave propagation methods, and advanced signal processing techniques. This paper primarily focuses on the ultrasonic measurement methods and signal processing techniques incorporated into the prototype. High bandwidth ultrasonic transducers combined with an advanced pulse compression technique allowed researchers to 1) obtain high signal-to-noise ratios and 2) obtain accurate and consistent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements through a variety of highly attenuative containers and fluid media. Results of work conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated that the prototype experimental measurement technique also provided information regarding container properties, which will be utilized in future container-independent measurements of hidden liquids.

  18. Advanced Ultrasonic Measurement Methodology for Non-Invasive Interrogation and Identification of Fluids in Sealed Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Brian J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Eckenrode, Brian A.

    2006-03-16

    The Hazardous Materials Response Unit (HMRU) and the Counterterrorism and Forensic Science Research Unit (CTFSRU), Laboratory Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) have been mandated to develop and establish a wide range of unprecedented capabilities for providing scientific and technical forensic services to investigations involving hazardous chemical, biological, and radiological materials, including extremely dangerous chemical and biological warfare agents. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a portable, hand-held, hazardous materials acoustic inspection device (HAZAID) that provides noninvasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities using nondestructive ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements. Due to the wide variety of fluids as well as container sizes and materials, the need for high measurement sensitivity and advanced ultrasonic measurement techniques were identified. The HAZAID prototype was developed using a versatile electronics platform, advanced ultrasonic wave propagation methods, and advanced signal processing techniques. This paper primarily focuses on the ultrasonic measurement methods and signal processing techniques incorporated into the HAZAID prototype. High bandwidth ultrasonic transducers combined with the advanced pulse compression technique allowed researchers to 1) impart large amounts of energy, 2) obtain high signal-to-noise ratios, and 3) obtain accurate and consistent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements through a variety of highly attenuative containers and fluid media. Results of this feasibility study demonstrated that the HAZAID experimental measurement technique also provided information regarding container properties, which will be utilized in future container-independent measurements of hidden liquids.

  19. A Novel Approach to Materials Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Annual Report for Year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.; Wang, L.

    2000-09-28

    OAK B188 A Novel Approach to Materials Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Annual Report for Year 1 Year one of this project had three major goals. First, to specify, order and install a new high current ion source for more rapid and stable proton irradiation. Second, to assess the use of chromium pre-enrichment and the combination of cold-work and irradiation hardening in an effort to assess the role of radiation damage in IASCC without the effects of RIS. Third, to initiate irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steel and Zircaloy. Program Achievements for Year One: Progress was made on all 4 tasks in year one.

  20. Approach to the measurement of astronomical mirrors with new procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofbauer, E.; Rascher, R.; Stubenrauch, Th.; Liebl, J.; Maurer, R.; Zimmermann, A.; Rösch, O.; Reitberger, J.

    2013-04-01

    The manufacturing of optical components more often requires grinding and polishing of non rotational symmetric aspheres or freeform surfaces. Although there are measurement techniques available for small diameters of some 10th of mm the measuring of larger surfaces is not or only by extreme efforts feasible. Based on the specification for a large mirror in semi professional and scientific astronomy with up to 1.2 m diameter and a relative aperture of F# < 1.5 a final measurement approach for the measurement of radius and shape deviation (parameters of code number 3 of DIN ISO 10110) is described. The combination and evaluation of different sensors and measurement methods for the measurement of high-precision optical surfaces with concave radii of 3.000 mm to infinity is examined and presented. A reproducibility and absolute accuracy of better l/12 (PV) and l/40 (rms) is to be achieved. The absolute maximum radius difference should be smaller than 0,1 %. Thus, also the measurement of aspheric surfaces and free-form surfaces are investigated. For the measurement of large surfaces, up to 100 individual sub apertures with up to 100 Million Points are recorded by deflectometric or interferometric measurement techniques and composed algorithmically to a total surface area. A precision granite portal with multifunctional device carrier will be presented as precise movements are crucial for all tests. The realization of the required accuracy in the portal-measurement device is verified, documented and compared with a simulation. Results on specimens of 200 and 430 mm diameter are evaluated. The measurements were taken by deflectometry and interferometry on the described test equipment. The validation of the samples with various interferometric procedures was performed. The obtained results are presented, analyzed and discussed.

  1. Measuring Regional CO2 Fluxes Using a Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, D. K.; Sweeney, C.; Stirm, B. H.; Shepson, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    The difficulty of measuring regional fluxes of CO2 has limited our understanding of the global carbon budget and the processes controlling carbon exchange across politically relevant spatial scales. A Lagrangian experiment was conducted over Iowa on June 19, 2007 as part of the North American Carbon Program's Mid-Continent Intensive using a light-weight, cost-effective aircraft to measure a net drawdown of CO2 concentration within the boundary layer. The drawdown is related to photosynthetic uptake when emission footprints are considered using a combination of emission inventories from the Vulcan project and HYSPLIT source contributions. Entrainment through the top of the boundary layer is measured directly using turbulence measurements from an onboard probe capable of measuring winds in 3-dimensions. Results show a total average CO2 flux of -5.3±0.7 μmol m-2 s-1. The average flux from fossil fuels over the measurement area is 2.8±0.4 μmol m-2 s-1. Thus, the CO2 flux attributable to the vegetation is -8.1±0.8 μmol m-2 s-1. The magnitude of the vegetative flux is comparable to other studies using the Lagrangian approach, but it is smaller than tower- based eddy covariance fluxes over the same period and measurement area. Sensitivities to analysis procedures and discrepancies between aircraft and tower-based measurements are discussed. We describe an aircraft Lagrangian experiment that offers direct, reliable, and cost-effective means for measuring CO2 fluxes at regional scales that can be used to compare to ecosystem models or to satellite measurements.

  2. An Advanced Orbiting Systems Approach to Quality of Service in Space-Based Intelligent Communication Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riha, Andrew P.

    2005-01-01

    As humans and robotic technologies are deployed in future constellation systems, differing traffic services will arise, e.g., realtime and non-realtime. In order to provide a quality of service framework that would allow humans and robotic technologies to interoperate over a wide and dynamic range of interactions, a method of classifying data as realtime or non-realtime is needed. In our paper, we present an approach that leverages the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) data link protocol. Specifically, we redefine the AOS Transfer Frame Replay Flag in order to provide an automated store-and-forward approach on a per-service basis for use in the next-generation Interplanetary Network. In addition to addressing the problem of intermittent connectivity and associated services, we propose a follow-on methodology for prioritizing data through further modification of the AOS Transfer Frame.

  3. Advances in Domain Connectivity for Overset Grids Using the X-Rays Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Kim, Noah; Pandya, Shishir A.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in automation and robustness of the X-rays approach to domain connectivity for overset grids are presented. Given the surface definition for each component that makes up a complex configuration, the determination of hole points with appropriate hole boundaries is automatically and efficiently performed. Improvements made to the original X-rays approach for identifying the minimum hole include an automated closure scheme for hole-cutters with open boundaries, automatic determination of grid points to be considered for blanking by each hole-cutter, and an adaptive X-ray map to economically handle components in close proximity. Furthermore, an automated spatially varying offset of the hole boundary from the minimum hole is achieved using a dual wall-distance function and an orphan point removal iteration process. Results using the new scheme are presented for a number of static and relative motion test cases on a variety of aerospace applications.

  4. An Ontological-Fuzzy Approach to Advance Reservation in Multi-Cluster Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, D. J.; Dantas, M. A. R.; Bauer, Michael A.

    2010-11-01

    Advance reservation is an important mechanism for a successful utilization of available resources in distributed multi-cluster environments. This mechanism allows, for example, a user to provide parameters aiming to satisfy requirements related to applications' execution time and temporal dependence. This predictability can lead the system to reach higher levels of QoS. However, the support for advance reservation has been restricted due to the complexity of large scale configurations and also dynamic changes verified in these systems. In this research work it is proposed an advance reservation method, based on a ontology-fuzzy approach. It allows a user to reserve a wide variety of resources and enable large jobs to be reserved among different nodes. In addition, it dynamically verifies the possibility of reservation with the local RMS, avoiding future allocation conflicts. Experimental results of the proposal, through simulation, indicate that the proposed mechanism reached a successful level of flexibility for large jobs and more appropriated distribution of resources in a distributed multi-cluster configuration.

  5. Managing customer satisfaction: New approaches to measurement and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, J.M.; Leon, G.H.

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes the development of Duke Power`s Customer Satisfaction Manager -- an innovative customer satisfaction measurement system -- from its inception to its application as a planning tool. It provides both market researchers and utility planners with the conceptual foundation for evaluating current satisfaction measurement systems and for moving toward the development of a satisfaction manager system. Importantly, it demonstrates the practical applications of the system and the various uses of the information that it yields by presenting results from customer requirement analyses and simulated service models. The paper concludes with discussions on Duke`s expansions of the approach to incorporate transaction-specific satisfaction measures and long-term satisfaction tracking methods.

  6. Fixing the system, not the women: an innovative approach to faculty advancement.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Claudia S; Schmidt, Mary Lou

    2008-10-01

    Women in academic medicine are approaching parity without power. Although the number of women choosing careers in medicine has grown substantially over the last 35 years, there has not been a commensurate increase in the percentage of women in senior leadership positions. To redress this situation at the University of Illinois College of Medicine (UICM), the Faculty Academic Advancement Committee (FAAC) was established in January 2003. FAAC's long-term goals are to create an institution whose faculty, department leaders, and deans reflect the gender and ethnic profile of the college's student body and to enable excellence in research, teaching, and patient care while promoting work/life balance. Commissioned as a Dean's Committee, FAAC brings together a diverse group of faculty and academic professionals from inside and outside the college to learn, reflect, and act. FAAC has committed to increasing the percentage of tenured women faculty and advancing women into leadership positions by carrying out an ambitious evidence-based institutional transformation effort. FAAC's initiatives-data gathering, constituency building, department transformation, policy reform, and advocacy-have helped to create an enabling environment for change at UICM. This case study outlines the history, conceptual approach, structure, initiatives, and initial outcomes of FAAC's efforts. PMID:18771391

  7. Advanced materials synthesis at the nano and macro scale: An electrochemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvin, Charles Leon

    There are many environmentally demanding and specific applications which require synthesis of advanced materials which are either difficult to make or extremely expensive on a large scale using standard methods such as integrated circuit fabrication. These applications can range from the need to modify the surface properties of an alloy in order to inhibit corrosion processes to reducing the size of a particular metal or semiconductor in order to confine electrons, which occurs as length scale is reduced to between 1--20 nm. There are a multitude of tools, techniques and processing steps that can be utilized to synthesize these materials. Electrochemical techniques offer an inexpensive method that utilizes the large installed manufacturing base to modify the surface of materials and to produce materials with necessary sizes. A methodology to electrochemically produce advanced materials was followed that (1) identified applications where advanced materials were necessary, (2) identified electrochemical techniques that could produce those materials with appropriate templates providing the necessary control over size and geometry, (3) developed a general framework and/or simple one-dimensional model to understand what factors were necessary to control or manipulate in order to produce an advanced material with the proper material performance and (4) finally, these materials were synthesized and evaluated using electrochemical and surface analysis techniques. The versatility of this approach was shown through four applications that included (1) elimination or minimization of the environmentally hazardous Cr(III)/Cr(VI) redox couple from conversion coating formulations, (2) electrophoretic synthesis of ordered nano-arrays from colloidal materials for use as sensors, (3) synthesis of two- and three-dimensional electrodes for fuel cell applications, and (4) development of a process to produce semiconductor wires for improvements in photovoltaic devices and infrared

  8. Space Borne Swath Mapping Laser Altimeters - Comparison of Measurement Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.; Harding, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Laser altimetry is an important technique for studying the surface topography of the planets and the Earth from orbit. Presently orbital laser altimeters profile surface height along a single ground track, such as the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). NASA is developing new technologies for an orbiting swath mapping laser altimeter with faster pulse rate and smaller footprint size to provide an instantaneous 3-dimentional measurement of the of icesheets, land topography and vegetation structure. The goal is to provide a greater than 200 m wide swath with 5 to 10 m diameter laser footprint from a 400 km altitude orbit. To achieve these goals, we have to use more efficient laser transmitters and more sensitive detectors to allow simultaneous multi-channel measurement with a reasonable instrument size and electrical power requirement. The measurement efficiency in terms of electrical energy needed per laser ranging measurement needs to be improved by more than an order of magnitude. Several different approaches were considered, including the use of fiber lasers, shorter laser pulse widths, lower noise analog detectors and photon counting detectors. The receiver sensitivity was further improved by averaging the results from a number of laser pulse measurements. Different laser pulse modulation formats, such as the pseudo random noise code modulation used in the Global Position System (GPS), were investigated to give more flexibility in laser selection and to further improve the ranging performance. We have analyzed and compared measurement performance for several different approaches using the receiver models that was validated with GLAS in orbit measurement data. We compared measurement performance with the traditional high-power low-pulse-rate laser transmitters to those with low-energy high-pulse-rate laser transmitters. For this work we considered laser characteristics representative of Microchip lasers

  9. Experimental measurements of motion cue effects on STOL approach tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.; Stapleford, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental program to investigate the effects of motion cues on STOL approach is presented. The simulator used was the Six-Degrees-of-Freedom Motion Simulator (S.01) at Ames Research Center of NASA which has ?2.7 m travel longitudinally and laterally and ?2.5 m travel vertically. Three major experiments, characterized as tracking tasks, were conducted under fixed and moving base conditions: (1) A simulated IFR approach of the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft (AWJSRA), (2) a simulated VFR task with the same aircraft, and (3) a single-axis task having only linear acceleration as the motion cue. Tracking performance was measured in terms of the variances of several motion variables, pilot vehicle describing functions, and pilot commentary.

  10. An Algebraic Approach to Unital Quantities and their Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domotor, Zoltan; Batitsky, Vadim

    2016-06-01

    The goals of this paper fall into two closely related areas. First, we develop a formal framework for deterministic unital quantities in which measurement unitization is understood to be a built-in feature of quantities rather than a mere annotation of their numerical values with convenient units. We introduce this idea within the setting of certain ordered semigroups of physical-geometric states of classical physical systems. States are assumed to serve as truth makers of metrological statements about quantity values. A unital quantity is presented as an isomorphism from the target system's ordered semigroup of states to that of positive reals. This framework allows us to include various derived and variable quantities, encountered in engineering and the natural sciences. For illustration and ease of presentation, we use the classical notions of length, time, electric current and mean velocity as primordial examples. The most important application of the resulting unital quantity calculus is in dimensional analysis. Second, in evaluating measurement uncertainty due to the analog-to-digital conversion of the measured quantity's value into its measuring instrument's pointer quantity value, we employ an ordered semigroup framework of pointer states. Pointer states encode the measuring instrument's indiscernibility relation, manifested by not being able to distinguish the measured system's topologically proximal states. Once again, we focus mainly on the measurement of length and electric current quantities as our motivating examples. Our approach to quantities and their measurement is strictly state-based and algebraic in flavor, rather than that of a representationalist-style structure-preserving numerical assignment.

  11. Measurement issues in assessing employee performance: A generalizability theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, B.O.

    1996-08-01

    Increasingly, organizations are assessing employee performance through the use of rating instruments employed in the context of varied data collection strategies. For example, the focus may be on obtaining multiple perspectives regarding employee performance (360{degree} evaluation). From the standpoint of evaluating managers, upward assessments and ``peer to peer`` evaluations are perhaps two of the more common examples of such a multiple perspective approach. Unfortunately, it is probably fair to say that the increased interest and use of such data collection strategies has not been accompanied by a corresponding interest in addressing both validity and reliability concerns that have traditionally been associated with other forms of employee assessment (e.g., testing, assessment centers, structured interviews). As a consequence, many organizations may be basing decisions upon information collected under less than ideal measurement conditions. To the extent that such conditions produce unreliable measurements, the process may be both dysfunctional to the organization and/or unfair to the individual(s) being evaluated. Conversely, the establishment of reliable and valid measurement processes may in itself support the utilization of results in pursuit of organizational goals and enhance the credibility of the measurement process (see McEvoy (1990), who found the acceptance of subordinate ratings to be related to perceived accuracy and fairness of the measurement process). The present paper discusses a recent ``peer to peer`` evaluation conducted in our organization. The intent is to focus on the design of the study and present a Generalizability Theory (GT) approach to assessing the overall quality of the data collection strategy, along with suggestions for improving future designs. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. EDITORIAL: Advances in Measurement Technology and Intelligent Instruments for Production Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Takaya, Yasuhiro; Gao, Yongsheng; Krystek, Michael

    2008-08-01

    the other papers, two are related to length measurement, which forms the basis of dimensional measurement. Schödel et al from Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) describe the recent state of thermal expansion measurements with PTB's Precision Interferometer, which are based on the observation of the absolute length of samples by using phase stepping interferometry. Meiners-Hagen et al, also from PTB, investigate an improved method for compensation of the refractive index of air in length measurements by optical interferometry where the air pressure and the humidity are measured. Three papers concern surface metrology. Song et al from NIST (National Institutes of Standards and Technology) report topography measurement for determining the decay factors in surface replication of Standard Casing to support ballistics measurements in the US. Takahashi et al from the University of Tokyo present a lateral resolution improvement for a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope that employs the combined use of standing evanescent light and a scattering distribution retrieval algorithm with successive approximation. X Liu et al from Warwick University report on a new investigation into how surface topography and friction affect the touch-feel perception, with the results showing that both the measured roughness and friction coefficient have a strong correlation with rough-smooth and grippy-slippery feelings. Measurement algorithms and calibration are described in the following three papers. Hessling from SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden presents a general unprecedented framework for dynamic evaluation of measurement systems, which separates physical experiments, analysis and signal processing methods into succeeding steps of evaluations. Wübbeler et al from PTB illustrate the Monte Carlo method required for the numerical calculations of the probability density function approach, which has been proposed for evaluation of measurement uncertainty

  13. Advances in Treatment Integrity Research: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the Conceptualization, Measurement, and Enhancement of Treatment Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulte, Ann C.; Easton, Julia E.; Parker, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Documenting treatment integrity is an important issue in research and practice in any discipline concerned with prevention and intervention. However, consensus concerning the dimensions of treatment integrity and how they should be measured has yet to emerge. Advances from three areas in which significant treatment integrity work has taken…

  14. ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, TRA660, INTERIOR. REACTOR INSIDE TANK. METAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, TRA-660, INTERIOR. REACTOR INSIDE TANK. METAL WORK PLATFORM ABOVE. THE REACTOR WAS IN A SMALL WATER-FILLED POOL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 66-6373. Unknown Photographer, ca. 1966 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. A New Computerised Advanced Theory of Mind Measure for Children with Asperger Syndrome: The ATOMIC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaumont, Renae B.; Sofronoff, Kate

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the ability of children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to attribute mental states to characters in a new computerised, advanced theory of mind measure: The Animated Theory of Mind Inventory for Children (ATOMIC). Results showed that children with AS matched on IQ, verbal comprehension, age and gender performed equivalently on…

  16. Advances in Children's Rights and Children's Well-Being Measurement: Implications for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosher, Hanita; Jiang, Xu; Ben-Arieh, Asher; Huebner, E. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have brought important changes to the profession of school psychology, influenced by larger social, scientific, and political trends. These trends include the emergence of children's rights agenda and advances in children's well-being measurement. During these years, a growing public attention and commitment to the notion of…

  17. A Coupled Approach for Structural Damage Detection with Incomplete Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Cao, Timothy; Kaouk, Mo; Zimmerman, David

    2013-01-01

    This historical work couples model order reduction, damage detection, dynamic residual/mode shape expansion, and damage extent estimation to overcome the incomplete measurements problem by using an appropriate undamaged structural model. A contribution of this work is the development of a process to estimate the full dynamic residuals using the columns of a spring connectivity matrix obtained by disassembling the structural stiffness matrix. Another contribution is the extension of an eigenvector filtering procedure to produce full-order mode shapes that more closely match the measured active partition of the mode shapes using a set of modified Ritz vectors. The full dynamic residuals and full mode shapes are used as inputs to the minimum rank perturbation theory to provide an estimate of damage location and extent. The issues associated with this process are also discussed as drivers of near-term development activities to understand and improve this approach.

  18. A nuclear data approach for the Hubble constant measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.

    2015-06-09

    An extraordinary number of Hubble constant measurements challenges physicists with selection of the best numerical value. The standard U.S. Nuclear Data Program (USNDP) codes and procedures have been applied to resolve this issue. The nuclear data approach has produced the most probable or recommended Hubble constant value of 67.00(770) (km/sec)/Mpc. This recommended value is based on the last 25 years of experimental research and includes contributions from different types of measurements. The present result implies (14.6±1.7) x 109 years as a rough estimate for the age of the Universe. The complete list of recommended results is given and possible implications are discussed.

  19. A new approach in measuring graduate employability skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Mohd Hafiz; Yatim, Bidin; Ismail, Suzilah

    2014-06-01

    Globalization makes graduate recruitment for an organization becomes more complex because employers believe that a holistic workforce is the key success of an organization. Currently, although graduates are said to possess specific skills but they still lack of employability skills, and this lead to increment of training cost either by government or even employers. Therefore, graduate level of employability skills should be evaluated before entering work market. In this study, a valid and reliable instrument embedding a new approach of measuring employability skills was developed using Situational Judgment Test (SJT). The instrument comprises of twelve (12) items measuring communication skill, professional ethics and morality, entrepreneurial skill, critical thinking in problem solving and personal quality. Instrument's validity was achieved through expert opinion and the reliability (in terms of stability) was based on the Chi-Square for homogeneity test. Generally, the instrument is beneficial to graduates, employers, government agencies, university, and workforce recruitment agencies when evaluating the level of employability skills.

  20. Advances in Landslide Nowcasting: Evaluation of a Global and Regional Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia Bach; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Adler, Robert; Hong, Yang; Kumar, Sujay; Lerner-Lam, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    The increasing availability of remotely sensed data offers a new opportunity to address landslide hazard assessment at larger spatial scales. A prototype global satellite-based landslide hazard algorithm has been developed to identify areas that may experience landslide activity. This system combines a calculation of static landslide susceptibility with satellite-derived rainfall estimates and uses a threshold approach to generate a set of nowcasts that classify potentially hazardous areas. A recent evaluation of this algorithm framework found that while this tool represents an important first step in larger-scale near real-time landslide hazard assessment efforts, it requires several modifications before it can be fully realized as an operational tool. This study draws upon a prior work s recommendations to develop a new approach for considering landslide susceptibility and hazard at the regional scale. This case study calculates a regional susceptibility map using remotely sensed and in situ information and a database of landslides triggered by Hurricane Mitch in 1998 over four countries in Central America. The susceptibility map is evaluated with a regional rainfall intensity duration triggering threshold and results are compared with the global algorithm framework for the same event. Evaluation of this regional system suggests that this empirically based approach provides one plausible way to approach some of the data and resolution issues identified in the global assessment. The presented methodology is straightforward to implement, improves upon the global approach, and allows for results to be transferable between regions. The results also highlight several remaining challenges, including the empirical nature of the algorithm framework and adequate information for algorithm validation. Conclusions suggest that integrating additional triggering factors such as soil moisture may help to improve algorithm performance accuracy. The regional algorithm scenario

  1. Mission simulation as an approach to develop requirements for automation in Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, J. D.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Barta, D. J.; Dragg, J.; Henninger, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines mission simulation as an approach to develop requirements for automation and robotics for Advanced Life Support Systems (ALSS). The focus is on requirements and applications for command and control, control and monitoring, situation assessment and response, diagnosis and recovery, adaptive planning and scheduling, and other automation applications in addition to mechanized equipment and robotics applications to reduce the excessive human labor requirements to operate and maintain an ALSS. Based on principles of systems engineering, an approach is proposed to assess requirements for automation and robotics using mission simulation tools. First, the story of a simulated mission is defined in terms of processes with attendant types of resources needed, including options for use of automation and robotic systems. Next, systems dynamics models are used in simulation to reveal the implications for selected resource allocation schemes in terms of resources required to complete operational tasks. The simulations not only help establish ALSS design criteria, but also may offer guidance to ALSS research efforts by identifying gaps in knowledge about procedures and/or biophysical processes. Simulations of a planned one-year mission with 4 crewmembers in a Human Rated Test Facility are presented as an approach to evaluation of mission feasibility and definition of automation and robotics requirements.

  2. Recent advances in innovative therapeutic approaches for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: from discovery to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shouta; Komaki, Hirofumi; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked progressive degenerative muscle disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. There is no curative therapy, although innovative therapeutic approaches have been aggressively investigated over recent years. Currently, the international clinical trial registry platform for this disease has been constructed and clinical trials for innovative therapeutic approaches are underway. Among these, exon skipping and read-through of nonsense mutations are in the most advanced stages, with exon skipping theoretically applicable to a larger number of patients. To date, exon skipping that targets exons 51, 44, 45, and 53 is being globally investigated including in USA, EU, and Japan. The latest announcement from Japan was made, demonstrating successful dystrophin production in muscles of patients with DMD after treating with exon 53 skipping antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). However, the innovative therapeutic approaches have demonstrated limited efficacy. To address this issue in exon skipping, studies to unveil the mechanism underlying gymnotic delivery of ASO uptake in living cells have been conducted in an effort to improve in vivo delivery. Further, establishing the infrastructures to integrate multi-institutional clinical trials are needed to facilitate the development of successful therapies for DMD, which ultimately is applicable to other myopathies and neurodegenerative diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy and motor neuron diseases. PMID:27398133

  3. A New Approach to Measuring Precipitation over Snow Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Liu, Y.; Arsenault, K. R.; Behrangi, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the great challenges for truly global precipitation measurement is the remote sensing of precipitation over snow cover. Due to the physical limitation in the current retrieval methodology, satellite-based measurements of precipitation over snow-covered areas are unreliable and largely unavailable. In this presentation, a new satellite-based approach to the estimation of precipitation over snow cover is proposed and tested. The method is based on the principle that precipitation can be inferred by the changes in the water content of the snowpack. During the EOS era operational remote sensing of snow water equivalent is available, with similar spatial and temporal resolutions of the precipitation-sensing passive microwave sensors. With these satellite-based snow water equivalent measurements, daily precipitation amounts can be derived. We tested the method for the Northern Hemisphere for three snow-accumulation seasons, with AMSR-E snow water equivalent data, and compared with existing datasets, including CPC gauge analysis and GPCP. The new precipitation estimates captured natural- and realistic-looking storm events over largely under-instrumented regions. The spatial distribution appeared more reasonable than existing global datasets over many boreal inland areas. The results indicate this approach is feasible and promising. Besides the capability to estimate precipitation over snow cover, this new approach has the following additional advantages over the conventional methods: 1. The relationship between precipitation and the observed variable (i.e., SWE) is more direct than the conventional methods, which have to rely on scattering signals from hydrometeors (passive microwave) or cloud top brightness temperatures (infrared) to infer precipitation; 2. Temporal sampling error is small. The method will not miss any precipitation amount even if there are no instantaneous satellite overpasses during the precipitation event. The memory of the snowpack stores the

  4. An advanced vision-based system for real-time displacement measurement of high-rise buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Han; Ho, Hoai-Nam; Shinozuka, Masanobu; Lee, Jong-Jae

    2012-12-01

    This paper introduces an advanced vision-based system for dynamic real-time displacement measurement of high-rise buildings using a partitioning approach. The partitioning method is based on the successive estimation of relative displacements and rotational angles at several floors using a multiple vision-based displacement measurement system. In this study, two significant improvements were made to realize the partitioning method: (1) time synchronization, (2) real-time dynamic measurement. Displacement data and time synchronization information are wirelessly transferred via a network using the TCP/IP protocol. The time synchronization process is periodically conducted by the master system to guarantee the system time at the master and slave systems are synchronized. The slave system is capable of dynamic real-time measurement and it is possible to economically expand measurement points at slave levels using commercial devices. To verify the accuracy and feasibility of the synchronized multi-point vision-based system and partitioning approach, many laboratory tests were carried out on a three-story steel frame model. Furthermore, several tests were conducted on a five-story steel frame tower equipped with a hybrid mass damper to experimentally confirm the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  5. Perspectives for the high field approach in fusion research and advances within the Ignitor Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, B.; Airoldi, A.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; Belforte, G.; Boggio-Sella, E.; Cardinali, A.; Cenacchi, G.; Conti, F.; Costa, E.; D'Amico, A.; Detragiache, P.; De Tommasi, G.; DeVellis, A.; Faelli, G.; Ferraris, P.; Frattolillo, A.; Giammanco, F.; Grasso, G.; Lazzaretti, M.; Mantovani, S.; Merriman, L.; Migliori, S.; Napoli, R.; Perona, A.; Pierattini, S.; Pironti, A.; Ramogida, G.; Rubinacci, G.; Sassi, M.; Sestero, A.; Spillantini, S.; Tavani, M.; Tumino, A.; Villone, F.; Zucchi, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Ignitor Program maintains the objective of approaching D-T ignition conditions by incorporating systematical advances made with relevant high field magnet technology and with experiments on high density well confined plasmas in the present machine design. An additional objective is that of charting the development of the high field line of experiments that goes from the Alcator machine to the ignitor device. The rationale for this class of experiments, aimed at producing poloidal fields with the highest possible values (compatible with proven safety factors of known plasma instabilities) is given. On the basis of the favourable properties of high density plasmas produced systematically by this line of machines, the envisioned future for the line, based on novel high field superconducting magnets, includes the possibility of investigating more advanced fusion burn conditions than those of the D-T plasmas for which Ignitor is designed. Considering that a detailed machine design has been carried out (Coppi et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 104013), the advances made in different areas of the physics and technology that are relevant to the Ignitor project are reported. These are included within the following sections of the present paper: main components issues, assembly and welding procedures; robotics criteria; non-linear feedback control; simulations with three-dimensional structures and disruption studies; ICRH and dedicated diagnostics systems; anomalous transport processes including self-organization for fusion burning regimes and the zero-dimensional model; tridimensional structures of the thermonuclear instability and control provisions; superconducting components of the present machine; envisioned experiments with high field superconducting magnets.

  6. NASA Programs in Advanced Sensors and Measurement Technology for Aeronautical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Bruce A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many challenges facing designers and operators of our next-generation aircraft in meeting the demands for efficiency, safety, and reliability which are will be imposed. This paper discusses aeronautical sensor requirements for a number of research and applications areas pertinent to the demands listed above. A brief overview will be given of aeronautical research measurements, along with a discussion of requirements for advanced technology. Also included will be descriptions of emerging sensors and instrumentation technology which may be exploited for enhanced research and operational capabilities. Finally, renewed emphasis of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in advanced sensor and instrumentation technology development will be discussed, including project of technology advances over the next 5 years. Emphasis on NASA efforts to more actively advance the state-of-the-art in sensors and measurement techniques is timely in light of exciting new opportunities in airspace development and operation. An up-to-date summary of the measurement technology programs being established to respond to these opportunities is provided.

  7. Advances in membrane emulsification. Part B: recent developments in modelling and scale-up approaches.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Fotis; Lloyd, David M; Hancocks, Robin D; Pawlik, Aleksandra K

    2014-03-15

    Membrane emulsification is a promising process for formulating emulsions and particulates. It offers many advantages over conventional 'high-shear' processes with narrower size distribution products, higher batch repeatability and lower energy consumption commonly demonstrated at a small scale. Since the process was first introduced around 25 years ago, understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved during microstructure formation has advanced significantly leading to the development of modelling approaches that predict processing output; e.g. emulsion droplet size and throughput. The accuracy and ease of application of these models is important to allow for the development of design equations which can potentially facilitate scale-up of the process and meet the manufacturer's specific requirements. Part B of this review considers the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of models developed to predict droplet size, flow behaviour and other phenomena (namely droplet-droplet interactions), with presentation of the appropriate formulae where necessary. Furthermore, the advancement of the process towards an industrial scale is also highlighted with additional recommendations by the authors for future work. PMID:24122852

  8. Identifying human disease genes: advances in molecular genetics and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, S M; Ali, A; Baig, S M; Barh, D; Miyoshi, A; Azevedo, V

    2014-01-01

    The human genome project is one of the significant achievements that have provided detailed insight into our genetic legacy. During the last two decades, biomedical investigations have gathered a considerable body of evidence by detecting more than 2000 disease genes. Despite the imperative advances in the genetic understanding of various diseases, the pathogenesis of many others remains obscure. With recent advances, the laborious methodologies used to identify DNA variations are replaced by direct sequencing of genomic DNA to detect genetic changes. The ability to perform such studies depends equally on the development of high-throughput and economical genotyping methods. Currently, basically for every disease whose origen is still unknown, genetic approaches are available which could be pedigree-dependent or -independent with the capacity to elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms. Computer algorithms and programs for linkage analysis have formed the foundation for many disease gene detection projects, similarly databases of clinical findings have been widely used to support diagnostic decisions in dysmorphology and general human disease. For every disease type, genome sequence variations, particularly single nucleotide polymorphisms are mapped by comparing the genetic makeup of case and control groups. Methods that predict the effects of polymorphisms on protein stability are useful for the identification of possible disease associations, whereas structural effects can be assessed using methods to predict stability changes in proteins using sequence and/or structural information. PMID:25061732

  9. Novel Approaches to Treatment of Advanced Melanoma: A Review on Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Niezgoda, Anna; Niezgoda, Piotr; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing. The majority of patients are diagnosed in early stages when the disease is highly curable. However, the more advanced or metastatic cases have always been a challenge for clinicians. The poor prognosis for patients with melanoma is now changing as numerous of promising approaches have appeared recently. The discovery of aberrations of pathways responsible for intracellular signal transduction allowed us to introduce agents specifically targeting the mutated cascades. Numerous clinical studies have been conducted to improve effectiveness of melanoma treatment. From 2011 until now, the U.S. FDA has approved seven novel agents, such as BRAF-inhibitors (vemurafenib 2011, dabrafenib 2013), MEK-inhibitors (trametinib 2013), anti-PD1 antibodies (nivolumab 2014, pembrolizumab 2014), anti-CTLA-4 antibody (ipilimumab 2011), or peginterferon-alfa-2b (2011) intended to be used in most advanced cases of melanoma. Nevertheless, clinicians continue working on new possible methods of treatment as resistance to the novel drugs is a commonly observed problem. This paper is based on latest data published until the end of January 2015. PMID:26171394

  10. Novel Approaches to Treatment of Advanced Melanoma: A Review on Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Niezgoda, Anna; Niezgoda, Piotr; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing. The majority of patients are diagnosed in early stages when the disease is highly curable. However, the more advanced or metastatic cases have always been a challenge for clinicians. The poor prognosis for patients with melanoma is now changing as numerous of promising approaches have appeared recently. The discovery of aberrations of pathways responsible for intracellular signal transduction allowed us to introduce agents specifically targeting the mutated cascades. Numerous clinical studies have been conducted to improve effectiveness of melanoma treatment. From 2011 until now, the U.S. FDA has approved seven novel agents, such as BRAF-inhibitors (vemurafenib 2011, dabrafenib 2013), MEK-inhibitors (trametinib 2013), anti-PD1 antibodies (nivolumab 2014, pembrolizumab 2014), anti-CTLA-4 antibody (ipilimumab 2011), or peginterferon-alfa-2b (2011) intended to be used in most advanced cases of melanoma. Nevertheless, clinicians continue working on new possible methods of treatment as resistance to the novel drugs is a commonly observed problem. This paper is based on latest data published until the end of January 2015. PMID:26171394

  11. A thermodynamic approach for advanced fuels of gas-cooled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéneau, C.; Chatain, S.; Gossé, S.; Rado, C.; Rapaud, O.; Lechelle, J.; Dumas, J. C.; Chatillon, C.

    2005-09-01

    For both high temperature reactor (HTR) and gas cooled fast reactor (GFR) systems, the high operating temperature in normal and accidental conditions necessitates the assessment of the thermodynamic data and associated phase diagrams for the complex system constituted of the fuel kernel, the inert materials and the fission products. A classical CALPHAD approach, coupling experiments and thermodynamic calculations, is proposed. Some examples of studies are presented leading with the CO and CO 2 gas formation during the chemical interaction of [UO 2± x/C] in the HTR particle, and the chemical compatibility of the couples [UN/SiC], [(U, Pu)N/SiC], [(U, Pu)N/TiN] for the GFR system. A project of constitution of a thermodynamic database for advanced fuels of gas-cooled reactors is proposed.

  12. New approach for treatment of advanced malignant tumors: combination of chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian-xing; Ju, Hua-lamg; Chem, Zhem-ming

    1995-03-01

    Eighty-three patients suffering from moderate or advanced malignant tumors were treated by combined chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT) in our hospital. The short term result of such management is very promising, the effectiveness seems to be nearly 100% and the general responsive rate is 79.5% (CR + PR). If compared with another group of 84 similar patients whom were treated with PDT alone, the short term efficacy is 85.7% while the general response rate is 54.7% (P < 0.01), there is a significant statistic. The better result of the combined approach is probably due to the action of the chemotherapeutic agent, potentially blocking the mitosis of the cellular cycle at certain phases of the cancer cells, making the cell membrane become more permeable to the photochemical agent, HPD, and eliciting a better cancerocidal effect.

  13. Advanced Strategies for End-Stage Heart Failure: Combining Regenerative Approaches with LVAD, a New Horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Cheyenne C. S.; Ramjankhan, Faiz Z.; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the improved treatment of cardiovascular diseases, the population with end-stage heart failure (HF) is progressively growing. The scarcity of the gold standard therapy, heart transplantation, demands novel therapeutic approaches. For patients awaiting transplantation, ventricular-assist devices have been of great benefit on survival. To allow explantation of the assist device and obviate heart transplantation, sufficient and durable myocardial recovery is necessary. However, explant rates so far are low. Combining mechanical circulatory support with regenerative therapies such as cell (-based) therapy and biomaterials might give rise to improved long-term results. Although synergistic effects are suggested with mechanical support and stem cell therapy, evidence in both preclinical and clinical setting is lacking. This review focuses on advanced and innovative strategies for the treatment of end-stage HF and furthermore appraises clinical experience with combined strategies. PMID:25905105

  14. Lessons learned from New York's community approach to advance care planning and MOLAT.

    PubMed

    Bomba, Patricia A; Orem, Katie

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the lessons learned from the development and implementation of New York's community approach to advance care planning (ACP) as a wellness initiative and the key components of the complementary programs: Community Conversations on Compassionate Care (CCCC) and Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST). Shared, informed medical decision-making is a patient-centered process that is critical to ensuring patient preferences for care are honored at the end of life. Providers must be trained, qualified, and comfortable with the discussions needed for effective shared, informed medical decision-making. Development, implementation, outcomes, lessons learned and sustainability of the CCCC and MOLST programs highlight the success of a healthcare and community collaborative initiative focused on improving care at the end of life. Community data support the value of implementing the CCCC and New York's MOLST throughout the country. PMID:25813415

  15. Oxygen Penalty for Waste Oxidation in an Advanced Life Support System: A Systems Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Fisher, John

    2002-01-01

    Oxidation is one of a number of technologies that are being considered for waste management and resource recovery from waste materials generated on board space missions. Oxidation processes are a very effective and efficient means of clean and complete conversion of waste materials to sterile products. However, because oxidation uses oxygen there is an "oxygen penalty" associated either with resupply of oxygen or with recycling oxygen from some other source. This paper is a systems approach to the issue of oxygen penalty in life support systems and presents findings on the oxygen penalty associated with an integrated oxidation-Sabatier-Oxygen Generation System (OGS) for waste management in an Advanced Life Support System. The findings reveal that such an integrated system can be operated to form a variety of useful products without a significant oxygen penalty.

  16. Numerical approach for the voloxidation process of an advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byung Heung; Jeong, Sang Mun; Seo, Chung-Seok

    2007-07-01

    A voloxidation process is adopted as the first step of an advanced spent fuel conditioning process in order to prepare the SF oxide to be reduced in the following electrolytic reduction process. A semi-batch type voloxidizer was devised to transform a SF pellet into powder. In this work, a simple reactor model was developed for the purpose of correlating a gas phase flow rate with an operation time as a numerical approach. With an assumption that a solid phase and a gas phase are homogeneous in a reactor, a reaction rate for an oxidation was introduced into a mass balance equation. The developed equation can describe a change of an outlet's oxygen concentration including such a case that a gas flow is not sufficient enough to continue a reaction at its maximum reaction rate. (authors)

  17. Advances in regenerative therapies for spinal cord injury: a biomaterials approach

    PubMed Central

    Tsintou, Magdalini; Dalamagkas, Kyriakos; Seifalian, Alexander Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in the permanent loss of function, causing enormous personal, social and economic problems. Even though neural regeneration has been proven to be a natural mechanism, central nervous system repair mechanisms are ineffective due to the imbalance of the inhibitory and excitatory factors implicated in neuroregeneration. Therefore, there is growing research interest on discovering a novel therapeutic strategy for effective spinal cord injury repair. To this direction, cell-based delivery strategies, biomolecule delivery strategies as well as scaffold-based therapeutic strategies have been developed with a tendency to seek for the answer to a combinatorial approach of all the above. Here we review the recent advances on regenerative/neural engineering therapies for spinal cord injury, aiming at providing an insight to the most promising repair strategies, in order to facilitate future research conduction. PMID:26109946

  18. Risk management measures for chemicals: the "COSHH essentials" approach.

    PubMed

    Garrod, A N I; Evans, P G; Davy, C W

    2007-12-01

    "COSHH essentials" was developed in Great Britain to help duty holders comply with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations. It uses a similar approach to that described in the new European "REACH" Regulation (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals; EC No. 1907/2006 of the European Parliament), insofar as it identifies measures for managing the risk for specified exposure scenarios. It can therefore assist REACH duty holders with the identification and communication of appropriate risk-management measures. The technical basis for COSHH essentials is explained in the original papers published in the Annals of Occupational Hygiene. Its details will, therefore, not be described here; rather, its ability to provide a suitable means for communicating risk-management measures will be explored. COSHH essentials is a simple tool based on an empirical approach to risk assessment and risk management. The output is a "Control Guidance Sheet" that lists the "dos" and "don'ts" for control in a specific task scenario. The guidance in COSHH essentials recognises that exposure in the workplace will depend not just on mechanical controls, but also on a number of other factors, including administrative and behavioural controls, such as systems of work, supervision and training. In 2002, COSHH essentials was made freely available via the internet (http://www.coshh-essentials.org.uk/). This electronic delivery enabled links to be made between product series that share tasks, such as drum filling, and with ancillary guidance, such as setting up health surveillance for work with a respiratory sensitiser. COSHH essentials has proved to be a popular tool for communicating good control practice. It has attracted over 1 million visits to its site since its launch. It offers a common benchmark of good practice for chemical users, manufacturers, suppliers and importers, as well as regulators and health professionals. PMID:17565355

  19. Identifying Successful Advancement Approaches in Four Catholic Universities: The Effectiveness of the Four Advancement Models of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonglia, Jean-Pierre K.

    2010-01-01

    The current longitudinal study of the most successful Catholic universities in the United States identifies the prevalence of four advancement models of communication that have contributed to make those institutions successful in their philanthropic efforts. While research by Grunig and Kelly maintained that the two-way symmetrical model of…

  20. A study of core Thomson scattering measurements in ITER using a multi-laser approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurskiev, G. S.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Bassan, M.; Andrew, P.; Bazhenov, A. N.; Bukreev, I. M.; Chernakov, P. V.; Kochergin, M. M.; Kukushkin, A. B.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Mukhin, E. E.; Razdobarin, A. G.; Samsonov, D. S.; Semenov, V. V.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Kajita, S.; Masyukevich, S. V.

    2015-05-01

    The electron component is the main channel for anomalous power loss and the main indicator of transient processes in the tokamak plasma. The electron temperature and density profiles mainly determine the operational mode of the machine. This imposes demanding requirements on the precision and on the spatial and temporal resolution of the Thomson scattering (TS) measurements. Measurements of such high electron temperature with good accuracy in a large fusion device such as ITER using TS encounter a number of physical problems. The 40 keV TS spectrum has a significant blue shift. Due to the transmission functions of the fibres and to their darkening that can occur under a strong neutron irradiation, the operational wavelength range is bounded on the blue side. For example, high temperature measurements become impossible with the 1064 nm probing wavelength since the TS signal within the boundaries of the operational window weakly depends on Te. The second problem is connected with the TS calibration. The TS system for a large fusion machine like ITER will have a set of optical components inaccessible for maintenance, and their spectral characteristics may change with time. Since the present concept of the TS system for ITER relies on the classical approach to measuring the shape of the scattered spectra using wide spectral channels, the diagnostic will be very sensitive to the changes in the optical transmission. The third complication is connected with the deviation of the electron velocity distribution function from a Maxwellian that can happen under a strong ECRH/ECCD, and it may additionally hamper the measurements. This paper analyses the advantages of a ‘multi-laser approach’ implementation for the current design of the core TS system. Such an approach assumes simultaneous plasma probing with different wavelengths that allows the measurement accuracy to be improved significantly and to perform the spectral calibration of the TS system. Comparative analysis

  1. Development Approach of the Advanced Life Support On-line Project Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levri, Julie A.; Hogan, John A.; Morrow, Rich; Ho, Michael C.; Kaehms, Bob; Cavazzoni, Jim; Brodbeck, Christina A.; Whitaker, Dawn R.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program has recently accelerated an effort to develop an On-line Project Information System (OPIS) for research project and technology development data centralization and sharing. There has been significant advancement in the On-line Project Information System (OPIS) over the past year (Hogan et al, 2004). This paper presents the resultant OPIS development approach. OPIS is being built as an application framework consisting of an uderlying Linux/Apache/MySQL/PHP (LAMP) stack, and supporting class libraries that provides database abstraction and automatic code generation, simplifying the ongoing development and maintenance process. Such a development approach allows for quick adaptation to serve multiple Programs, although initial deployment is for an ALS module. OPIS core functionality will involve a Web-based annual solicitation of project and technology data directly from ALS Principal Investigators (PIs) through customized data collection forms. Data provided by PIs will be reviewed by a Technical Task Monitor (TTM) before posting the information to OPIS for ALS Community viewing via the Web. Such Annual Reports will be permanent, citable references within OPIS. OPlS core functionality will also include Project Home Sites, which will allow PIS to provide updated technology information to the Community in between Annual Report updates. All data will be stored in an object-oriented relational database, created in MySQL(Reistered Trademark) and located on a secure server at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Upon launch, OPlS can be utilized by Managers to identify research and technology development (R&TD) gaps and to assess task performance. Analysts can employ OPlS to obtain the current, comprehensive, accurate information about advanced technologies that is required to perform trade studies of various life support system options. ALS researchers and technology developers can use OPlS to achieve an improved understanding of the NASA

  2. Damping capacity measurements of degradation in advanced materials. [Rapidly solidified alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mantena, R.; Gibson, R.F.; Place, T.A.

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes the application of damping capacity measurements for characterization of degradation in advanced materials. A recently developed impulse-frequency response technique was used to obtain damping capacity measurements on crossplied E-glass/epoxy laminates that had been subjected to four-point bending and cantilever bending to produce matrix cracking in the transverse plies. The size and location of the damage zone were correlated with changes to damping. With the expected introduction of Rapidly Solidified Alloys (RSA) as effective alternatives to conventional materials, the applicability of damping capacity measurements as a non destructive means of evaluating degradation in these materials was also studied. 17 references, 15 figures.

  3. Measuring energy efficiency in economics: Shadow value approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademvatani, Asgar

    For decades, academic scholars and policy makers have commonly applied a simple average measure, energy intensity, for studying energy efficiency. In contrast, we introduce a distinctive marginal measure called energy shadow value (SV) for modeling energy efficiency drawn on economic theory. This thesis demonstrates energy SV advantages, conceptually and empirically, over the average measure recognizing marginal technical energy efficiency and unveiling allocative energy efficiency (energy SV to energy price). Using a dual profit function, the study illustrates how treating energy as quasi-fixed factor called quasi-fixed approach offers modeling advantages and is appropriate in developing an explicit model for energy efficiency. We address fallacies and misleading results using average measure and demonstrate energy SV advantage in inter- and intra-country energy efficiency comparison. Energy efficiency dynamics and determination of efficient allocation of energy use are shown through factors impacting energy SV: capital, technology, and environmental obligations. To validate the energy SV, we applied a dual restricted cost model using KLEM dataset for the 35 US sectors stretching from 1958 to 2000 and selected a sample of the four sectors. Following the empirical results, predicted wedges between energy price and the SV growth indicate a misallocation of energy use in stone, clay and glass (SCG) and communications (Com) sectors with more evidence in the SCG compared to the Com sector, showing overshoot in energy use relative to optimal paths and cost increases from sub-optimal energy use. The results show that energy productivity is a measure of technical efficiency and is void of information on the economic efficiency of energy use. Decomposing energy SV reveals that energy, capital and technology played key roles in energy SV increases helping to consider and analyze policy implications of energy efficiency improvement. Applying the marginal measure, we also

  4. Advanced digital methods for blood flow flux analysis using µPIV approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurochkin, Maxim A.; Timoshina, Polina A.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    A digital optical system focused on work with laboratory animals for intravital capillaroscopy has been developed. It implements the particle image velocimetry (PIV) based approach for measurements of red blood cells velocity in laboratory rat stomach capillaries. We propose a method of involuntary displacement compensation of the capillary network images. Image stabilization algorithm is based on correlation of feature tracking. The efficiency of designed image stabilization algorithm was experimentally demonstrated. The results of capillary blood flow analysis are demonstrated.

  5. Telemetric Intracranial Pressure Measurement: A Graphical Approach to Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Maeske, Michele; Mayer, Simon; Blanc, Sebastian M; Schulz, Chris; Kunz, Ulrich; Mauer, Uwe Max

    2016-05-01

    Purpose In recent years, radiofrequency identification has been used for the continuous measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt for hydrocephalus . Unlike ICP monitoring in an inpatient setting, measurements in mobile patients outside the hospital provide ICP data that take into account the everyday activities of each individual patient. Common methods of ICP monitoring and analysis cannot be used for those patients. In addition, ICP measurements in mobile patients require considerably longer observation times than in-hospital monitoring. For this reason, ICP measurements over a period of 7 to 10 days must be analyzed effectively and efficiently. Methods A possible approach is to analyze ICP data graphically. Pathologic changes can be expected to be associated with specific patterns that can be detected graphically (e.g., Lundberg A waves). Patients without pathologic ICP values and without intracranial pathologies usually show an approximately normal distribution of ICP data. By contrast, patients with pathologic ICP values are likely to show major deviations from a normal distribution such as changes in minimum and maximum values and multimodal distributions. Against this background, we present a new graphical method for detecting pathologic conditions. This novel method is based on the distribution of ICP data that is assessed using GNU R, a free software package for statistical computing and graphics. Results A left-skewed distribution indicates CSF shunt overdrainage and a right-skewed distribution suggests CSF shunt underdrainage. In addition, an additive analysis of the number of physiologic ICP values can be helpful in detecting possible causes of CSF shunt overdrainage or underdrainage. The approach presented here shows that patients with hydrocephalus objectively benefited from ICP-guided adjustments of the opening pressure of a shunt valve or the insertion of a valve. This objective improvement

  6. Hydrometeor classification from polarimetric radar measurements: a clustering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioli, J.; Tuia, D.; Berne, A.

    2015-01-01

    A data-driven approach to the classification of hydrometeors from measurements collected with polarimetric weather radars is proposed. In a first step, the optimal number of hydrometeor classes (nopt) that can be reliably identified from a large set of polarimetric data is determined. This is done by means of an unsupervised clustering technique guided by criteria related both to data similarity and to spatial smoothness of the classified images. In a second step, the nopt clusters are assigned to the appropriate hydrometeor class by means of human interpretation and comparisons with the output of other classification techniques. The main innovation in the proposed method is the unsupervised part: the hydrometeor classes are not defined a priori, but they are learned from data. The approach is applied to data collected by an X-band polarimetric weather radar during two field campaigns (from which about 50 precipitation events are used in the present study). Seven hydrometeor classes (nopt = 7) have been found in the data set, and they have been identified as light rain (LR), rain (RN), heavy rain (HR), melting snow (MS), ice crystals/small aggregates (CR), aggregates (AG), and rimed-ice particles (RI).

  7. Hydrometeor classification from polarimetric radar measurements: a clustering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioli, J.; Tuia, D.; Berne, A.

    2014-08-01

    A data-driven approach to the classification of hydrometeors from measurements collected with polarimetric weather radars is proposed. In a first step, the optimal number nopt of hydrometeor classes that can be reliably identified from a large set of polarimetric data is determined. This is done by means of an unsupervised clustering technique guided by criteria related both to data similarity and to spatial smoothness of the classified images. In a second step, the nopt clusters are assigned to the appropriate hydrometeor class by means of human interpretation and comparisons with the output of other classification techniques. The main innovation in the proposed method is the unsupervised part: the hydrometeor classes are not defined a-priori, but they are learned from data. The proposed approach is applied to data collected by an X-band polarimetric weather radar during two field campaigns (totalling about 3000 h of precipitation). Seven hydrometeor classes have been found in the data set and they have been associated to drizzle (DZ), light rain (LR), heavy rain (HR), melting snow (MS), ice crystals/small aggregates (CR), aggregates (AG), rimed particles (RI).

  8. A Novel Microcharacterization Technique in the Measurement of Strain and Orientation Gradient in Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmestai, H.; Harris, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-01-01

    Representation of morphology and evolution of the microstructure during processing and their relation to properties requires proper experimental techniques. Residual strains, lattice distortion, and texture (micro-texture) at the interface and the matrix of a layered structure or a functionally gradient material and their variation are among parameters important in materials characterization but hard to measure with present experimental techniques. Current techniques available to measure changes in interred material parameters (residual stress, micro-texture, microplasticity) produce results which are either qualitative or unreliable. This problem becomes even more complicated in the case of a temperature variation. These parameters affect many of the mechanical properties of advanced materials including stress-strain relation, ductility, creep, and fatigue. A review of some novel experimental techniques using recent advances in electron microscopy is presented here to measure internal stress, (micro)texture, interracial strength and (sub)grain formation and realignment. Two of these techniques are combined in the chamber of an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to measure strain and orientation gradients in advanced materials. These techniques which include Backscattered Kikuchi Diffractometry (BKD) and Microscopic Strain Field Analysis are used to characterize metallic and intermetallic matrix composites and superplastic materials. These techniques are compared with the more conventional x-ray diffraction and indentation techniques.

  9. Comparison of Pilots' Situational Awareness While Monitoring Autoland Approaches Using Conventional and Advanced Flight Display Formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Busquets, Anthony M.

    2000-01-01

    A simulation experiment was performed to assess situation awareness (SA) and workload of pilots while monitoring simulated autoland operations in Instrument Meteorological Conditions with three advanced display concepts: two enhanced electronic flight information system (EFIS)-type display concepts and one totally synthetic, integrated pictorial display concept. Each concept incorporated sensor-derived wireframe runway and iconic depictions of sensor-detected traffic in different locations on the display media. Various scenarios, involving conflicting traffic situation assessments, main display failures, and navigation/autopilot system errors, were used to assess the pilots' SA and workload during autoland approaches with the display concepts. From the results, for each scenario, the integrated pictorial display concept provided the pilots with statistically equivalent or substantially improved SA over the other display concepts. In addition to increased SA, subjective rankings indicated that the pictorial concept offered reductions in overall pilot workload (in both mean ranking and spread) over the two enhanced EFIS-type display concepts. Out of the display concepts flown, the pilots ranked the pictorial concept as the display that was easiest to use to maintain situational awareness, to monitor an autoland approach, to interpret information from the runway and obstacle detecting sensor systems, and to make the decision to go around.

  10. Remote Bridge Deflection Measurement Using an Advanced Video Deflectometer and Actively Illuminated LED Targets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Long; Pan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    An advanced video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets is proposed for remote, real-time measurement of bridge deflection. The system configuration, fundamental principles, and measuring procedures of the video deflectometer are first described. To address the challenge of remote and accurate deflection measurement of large engineering structures without being affected by ambient light, the novel idea of active imaging, which combines high-brightness monochromatic LED targets with coupled bandpass filter imaging, is introduced. Then, to examine the measurement accuracy of the proposed advanced video deflectometer in outdoor environments, vertical motions of an LED target with precisely-controlled translations were measured and compared with prescribed values. Finally, by tracking six LED targets mounted on the bridge, the developed video deflectometer was applied for field, remote, and multipoint deflection measurement of the Wuhan Yangtze River Bridge, one of the most prestigious and most publicized constructions in China, during its routine safety evaluation tests. Since the proposed video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets offers prominent merits of remote, contactless, real-time, and multipoint deflection measurement with strong robustness against ambient light changes, it has great potential in the routine safety evaluation of various bridges and other large-scale engineering structures. PMID:27563901

  11. A Multifaceted Approach to Modernizing NASA's Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System (AMMOS) System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estefan, Jeff A.; Giovannoni, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Multi-Mission Operations Systems (AMMOS) is NASA's premier space mission operations product line offering for use in deep-space robotic and astrophysics missions. The general approach to AMMOS modernization over the course of its 29-year history exemplifies a continual, evolutionary approach with periods of sponsor investment peaks and valleys in between. Today, the Multimission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) office-the program office that manages the AMMOS for NASA-actively pursues modernization initiatives and continues to evolve the AMMOS by incorporating enhanced capabilities and newer technologies into its end-user tool and service offerings. Despite the myriad of modernization investments that have been made over the evolutionary course of the AMMOS, pain points remain. These pain points, based on interviews with numerous flight project mission operations personnel, can be classified principally into two major categories: 1) information-related issues, and 2) process-related issues. By information-related issues, we mean pain points associated with the management and flow of MOS data across the various system interfaces. By process-related issues, we mean pain points associated with the MOS activities performed by mission operators (i.e., humans) and supporting software infrastructure used in support of those activities. In this paper, three foundational concepts-Timeline, Closed Loop Control, and Separation of Concerns-collectively form the basis for expressing a set of core architectural tenets that provides a multifaceted approach to AMMOS system architecture modernization intended to address the information- and process-related issues. Each of these architectural tenets will be further explored in this paper. Ultimately, we envision the application of these core tenets resulting in a unified vision of a future-state architecture for the AMMOS-one that is intended to result in a highly adaptable, highly efficient, and highly cost

  12. Advances in peripheral nervous system regenerative therapeutic strategies: A biomaterials approach.

    PubMed

    Dalamagkas, Kyriakos; Tsintou, Magdalini; Seifalian, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a very common medical condition with varying clinical severity but always great impact on the patients' productivity and the quality of life. Even the current 1st-choice surgical therapeutic approach or the "gold standard" as frequently called in clinical practice, is not addressing the problem efficiently and cost-effectively, increasing the mortality through the need of a second surgical intervention, while it does not take into account the several different types of nerves involved in peripheral nerve injuries. Neural tissue engineering approaches could potentially offer a very promising and attractive tool for the efficient peripheral nerve injury management, not only by mechanically building the gap, but also by inducing neuroregenerative mechanisms in a well-regulated microenvironment which would mimic the natural environment of the specific nerve type involved in the injury to obtain an optimum clinical outcome. There is still room for a lot of optimizations in regard to the conduits which have been developed with the help of neural engineering since many parameters affect the clinical outcome and the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. Especially the intraluminal cues controlling the microenvironment of the conduits are in an infantile stage but there is profound potential in the application of the scaffolds. The aim of our review is to provide a quick reference to the recent advances in the field, focusing on the parameters that can significantly affect the clinical potentials of each approach, with suggestions for future improvements that could take the current work from bench to bedside. Thus, further research could shed light to those questions and it might hold the key to discover new more efficient and cost-effective therapies. PMID:27157770

  13. Measurement approaches to support future warhead arms control transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.; Frankle, C.M.; Johnson, M.W.; Poths, J.

    1998-12-31

    Transparency on warhead stockpiles, warhead dismantlement, and fissile material stockpiles in nuclear weapons states will become increasingly important in the move beyond START II toward lower quantities of warheads. Congressional support for further warhead reductions will likely depend on the degree of irreversibility, or in other words, the rapidity with which warhead inventories could be reconstituted. Whether irreversibility considerations can be satisfied will depend on monitoring dismantlement as well as constraining the available stockpile of fissile materials for possible refabrication into warheads. Measurement techniques designed to address the above problems will need to consider NPT Article 1 obligations as well as Russian and US classification regulations, which prohibit or restrict the transfer of nuclear warhead design information to other states. Classification considerations currently limit the potential completeness of future inspections of weapons materials. Many conventional international safeguards approaches are not currently viable for arms control applications because they would reveal weapons design information. The authors discuss a variety of technical measures that may help to improve transparence of warhead and fissile material stockpiles and may enable limited warhead dismantlement transparency.

  14. Final Technical Report: Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Burton, Patrick D.; Hansen, Clifford; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors project focuses on improving the accuracy and reducing the uncertainty of PV performance model predictions by addressing a common element of all PV performance models referred to as “derates”. Widespread use of “rules of thumb”, combined with significant uncertainty regarding appropriate values for these factors contribute to uncertainty in projected energy production.

  15. Advanced Placement Results, 2013-14. Measuring Up. D&A Report No.15.01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilleland, Kevin; Muli, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Placement (AP) outcomes for Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) students have continued an upward trend for over 18 years, out-performing the state and the nation in all measures. In 2013-14 there were 13,757 exams taken by 6,955 WCPSS test-takers with almost 76% of the exams resulting in scores at or above 3, outperforming Guilford…

  16. An Assessment of Wind Plant Complex Flows Using Advanced Doppler Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunter, W. S.; Schroeder, J.; Hirth, B.; Duncan, J.; Guynes, J.

    2015-12-01

    As installed wind energy capacity continues to steadily increase, the need for comprehensive measurements of wind plant complex flows to further reduce the cost of wind energy has been well advertised by the industry as a whole. Such measurements serve diverse perspectives including resource assessment, turbine inflow and power curve validation, wake and wind plant layout model verification, operations and maintenance, and the development of future advanced wind plant control schemes. While various measurement devices have been matured for wind energy applications (e.g. meteorological towers, LIDAR, SODAR), this presentation will focus on the use of advanced Doppler radar systems to observe the complex wind flows within and surrounding wind plants. Advanced Doppler radars can provide the combined advantage of a large analysis footprint (tens of square kilometers) with rapid data analysis updates (a few seconds to one minute) using both single- and dual-Doppler data collection methods. This presentation demonstrates the utility of measurements collected by the Texas Tech University Ka-band (TTUKa) radars to identify complex wind flows occurring within and nearby operational wind plants, and provide reliable forecasts of wind speeds and directions at given locations (i.e. turbine or instrumented tower sites) 45+ seconds in advance. Radar-derived wind maps reveal commonly observed features such as turbine wakes and turbine-to-turbine interaction, high momentum wind speed channels between turbine wakes, turbine array edge effects, transient boundary layer flow structures (such as wind streaks, frontal boundaries, etc.), and the impact of local terrain. Operational turbine or instrumented tower data are merged with the radar analysis to link the observed complex flow features to turbine and wind plant performance.

  17. Scenarios and performance measures for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1991-01-01

    Described here are the contemplated input and expected output for the Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) and Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) Models. The discrete event simulations of these models are presented with specific scenarios that stress ISDN satellite parameters. Performance measure criteria are presented for evaluating the advanced ISDN communication satellite designs of the NASA Satellite Communications Research (SCAR) Program.

  18. Approach for measuring the angle of hallux valgus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Hlavacek, Petr; Xu, Bo; Chen, Wuyong

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is medium correlation between the current anthropometric method and the radiography in the angle of hallux valgus (AoH) measurement, so this study aimed at designing a reliable and more accurate approach to measure the AoH (AoH). Materials and Methods: Fifteen age, body weight, and height matched male students were included and those with foot disorders, deformities, or injuries were excluded from the study. The dorsal protrusions of the first metatarsal and the hallux were marked by palpating from three experienced observers; then their barefoot model in standing was collected by a three dimensional laser scanning system. The AoH was defined in the X-Y plane by the angle between the line joining the marks of centre of head and centre of base of metatarsal shaft and the one connecting the marks of the centre of metatarsal head and the hallux. The same procedure was repeated a week later. Besides, other measures based on the footprint, outline, and the radiography were also available for comparisons. Paired t-test, linear regression, and reliability analysis were applied for statistical analysis with significant level of 0.05 and 95% confidence interval. Results: There were no significant differences recorded between the new method and the radiographic method (P = 0.069). The AoH was superior to the methods of footprint and outline and it displayed a relative higher correlation with the radiographic method (r = 0.94, r2 = 0.89). Moreover both the inter and intraobserver reliabilities of this method were proved to be good. Conclusion: This new method can be used for hallux valgus inspection and evaluation. PMID:23798759

  19. Rapid Intelligent Inspection Process Definition for dimensional measurement in advanced manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.W.

    1993-03-01

    The Rapid Intelligent Inspection Process Definition (RIIPD) project is an industry-led effort to advance computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems for the creation and modification of inspection process definitions. The RIIPD project will define, design, develop, and demonstrate an automated tool (i.e., software) to generate inspection process plans and coordinate measuring machine (CMM) inspection programs, as well as produce support information for the dimensional measurement of piece parts. The goal of this project is to make the inspection and part verification function, specifically CMM measurements, a more effective production support tool by reducing inspection process definition flowtime, creating consistent and standard inspections, increasing confidence of measurement results, and capturing inspection expertise. This objective is accomplished through importing STEP geometry definitions, applying solid modeling, incorporating explicit tolerance representations, establishing dimensional inspection,techniques, embedding artificial intelligence techniques, and adhering to the Dimensional Measuring Interface Standard (DMIS) national standard.

  20. Remote Internet access to advanced analytical facilities: a new approach with Web-based services.

    PubMed

    Sherry, N; Qin, J; Fuller, M Suominen; Xie, Y; Mola, O; Bauer, M; McIntyre, N S; Maxwell, D; Liu, D; Matias, E; Armstrong, C

    2012-09-01

    Over the past decade, the increasing availability of the World Wide Web has held out the possibility that the efficiency of scientific measurements could be enhanced in cases where experiments were being conducted at distant facilities. Examples of early successes have included X-ray diffraction (XRD) experimental measurements of protein crystal structures at synchrotrons and access to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and NMR facilities by users from institutions that do not possess such advanced capabilities. Experimental control, visual contact, and receipt of results has used some form of X forwarding and/or VNC (virtual network computing) software that transfers the screen image of a server at the experimental site to that of the users' home site. A more recent development is a web services platform called Science Studio that provides teams of scientists with secure links to experiments at one or more advanced research facilities. The software provides a widely distributed team with a set of controls and screens to operate, observe, and record essential parts of the experiment. As well, Science Studio provides high speed network access to computing resources to process the large data sets that are often involved in complex experiments. The simple web browser and the rapid transfer of experimental data to a processing site allow efficient use of the facility and assist decision making during the acquisition of the experimental results. The software provides users with a comprehensive overview and record of all parts of the experimental process. A prototype network is described involving X-ray beamlines at two different synchrotrons and an SEM facility. An online parallel processing facility has been developed that analyzes the data in near-real time using stream processing. Science Studio and can be expanded to include many other analytical applications, providing teams of users with rapid access to processed results along with the means for detailed

  1. 1/f noise measurements for faster evaluation of electromigration in advanced microelectronics interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyne, Sofie; Croes, Kristof; De Wolf, Ingrid; Tőkei, Zsolt

    2016-05-01

    The use of 1/f noise measurements is explored for the purpose of finding faster techniques for electromigration (EM) characterization in advanced microelectronic interconnects, which also enable a better understanding of its underlying physical mechanisms. Three different applications of 1/f noise for EM characterization are explored. First, whether 1/f noise measurements during EM stress can serve as an early indicator of EM damage. Second, whether the current dependence of the noise power spectral density (PSD) can be used for a qualitative comparison of the defect concentration of different interconnects and consequently also their EM lifetime t50. Third, whether the activation energies obtained from the temperature dependence of the 1/f noise PSD correspond to the activation energies found by means of classic EM tests. In this paper, the 1/f noise technique has been used to assess and compare the EM properties of various advanced integration schemes and different materials, as they are being explored by the industry to enable advanced interconnect scaling. More concrete, different types of copper interconnects and one type of tungsten interconnect are compared. The 1/f noise measurements confirm the excellent electromigration properties of tungsten and demonstrate a dependence of the EM failure mechanism on copper grain size and distribution, where grain boundary diffusion is found to be a dominant failure mechanism.

  2. Unequal-period combination approach of gray code and phase-shifting for 3-D visual measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuang; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Xiaoyang; Sun, Xiaoming; Wu, Haibin

    2016-09-01

    Combination of Gray code and phase-shifting is the most practical and advanced approach for the structured light 3-D measurement so far, which is able to measure objects with complex and discontinuous surface. However, for the traditional combination of the Gray code and phase-shifting, the captured Gray code images are not always sharp cut-off in the black-white conversion boundaries, which may lead to wrong decoding analog code orders. Moreover, during the actual measurement, there also exists local decoding error for the wrapped analog code obtained with the phase-shifting approach. Therefore, for the traditional approach, the wrong analog code orders and the local decoding errors will consequently introduce the errors which are equivalent to a fringe period when the analog code is unwrapped. In order to avoid one-fringe period errors, we propose an approach which combines Gray code with phase-shifting according to unequal period. With theoretical analysis, we build the measurement model of the proposed approach, determine the applicable condition and optimize the Gray code encoding period and phase-shifting fringe period. The experimental results verify that the proposed approach can offer a reliable unwrapped analog code, which can be used in 3-D shape measurement.

  3. Advancing current approaches to disease management evaluation: capitalizing on heterogeneity to understand what works and for whom

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evaluating large-scale disease management interventions implemented in actual health care settings is a complex undertaking for which universally accepted methods do not exist. Fundamental issues, such as a lack of control patients and limited generalizability, hamper the use of the ‘gold-standard’ randomized controlled trial, while methodological shortcomings restrict the value of observational designs. Advancing methods for disease management evaluation in practice is pivotal to learn more about the impact of population-wide approaches. Methods must account for the presence of heterogeneity in effects, which necessitates a more granular assessment of outcomes. Methods This paper introduces multilevel regression methods as valuable techniques to evaluate ‘real-world’ disease management approaches in a manner that produces meaningful findings for everyday practice. In a worked example, these methods are applied to retrospectively gathered routine health care data covering a cohort of 105,056 diabetes patients who receive disease management for type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Netherlands. Multivariable, multilevel regression models are fitted to identify trends in clinical outcomes and correct for differences in characteristics of patients (age, disease duration, health status, diabetes complications, smoking status) and the intervention (measurement frequency and range, length of follow-up). Results After a median one year follow-up, the Dutch disease management approach was associated with small average improvements in systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein, while a slight deterioration occurred in glycated hemoglobin. Differential findings suggest that patients with poorly controlled diabetes tend to benefit most from disease management in terms of improved clinical measures. Additionally, a greater measurement frequency was associated with better outcomes, while longer length of follow-up was accompanied by less positive results

  4. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 6 of 6: Temperature Measurement of Galvanneal Steel

    SciTech Connect

    S.W. Allison; D.L. Beshears; W.W. Manges

    1999-06-30

    This report describes the successful completion of the development of an accurate in-process measurement instrument for galvanneal steel surface temperatures. This achievement results from a joint research effort that is a part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AISI) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S> Department of Energy and fifteen North American Steelmakers. This three-year project entitled ''Temperature Measurement of Galvanneal Steel'' uses phosphor thermography, and outgrowth of Uranium enrichment research at Oak Ridge facilities. Temperature is the controlling factor regarding the distribution of iron and zinc in the galvanneal strip coating, which in turn determines the desired product properties

  5. A Challenging Surgical Approach to Locally Advanced Primary Urethral Carcinoma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Spilotros, Marco; Vavallo, Antonio; Palazzo, Silvano; Miacola, Carlos; Forte, Saverio; Matera, Matteo; Campagna, Marcello; Colamonico, Ottavio; Schiralli, Francesco; Sebastiani, Francesco; Di Cosmo, Federica; Bettocchi, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Vincenti, Leonardo; Ludovico, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Primary urethral carcinoma (PUC) is a rare and aggressive cancer, often underdetected and consequently unsatisfactorily treated. We report a case of advanced PUC, surgically treated with combined approaches.A 47-year-old man underwent transurethral resection of a urethral lesion with histological evidence of a poorly differentiated squamous cancer of the bulbomembranous urethra. Computed tomography (CT) and bone scans excluded metastatic spread of the disease but showed involvement of both corpora cavernosa (cT3N0M0). A radical surgical approach was advised, but the patient refused this and opted for chemotherapy. After 17 months the patient was referred to our department due to the evidence of a fistula in the scrotal area. CT scan showed bilateral metastatic disease in the inguinal, external iliac, and obturator lymph nodes as well as the involvement of both corpora cavernosa. Additionally, a fistula originating from the right corpus cavernosum extended to the scrotal skin. At this stage, the patient accepted the surgical treatment, consisting of different phases. Phase I: Radical extraperitoneal cystoprostatectomy with iliac-obturator lymph nodes dissection. Phase II: Creation of a urinary diversion through a Bricker ileal conduit. Phase III: Repositioning of the patient in lithotomic position for an overturned Y skin incision, total penectomy, fistula excision, and "en bloc" removal of surgical specimens including the bladder, through the perineal breach. Phase IV: Right inguinal lymphadenectomy.The procedure lasted 9-and-a-half hours, was complication-free, and intraoperative blood loss was 600 mL. The patient was discharged 8 days after surgery. Pathological examination documented a T4N2M0 tumor. The clinical situation was stable during the first 3 months postoperatively but then metastatic spread occurred, not responsive to adjuvant chemotherapy, which led to the patient's death 6 months after surgery.Patients with advanced stage tumors of the

  6. Measures of Adequacy for Library Collections in Australian Colleges of Advanced Education. Report of a Research Project Conducted in Behalf of the Commission on Advanced Education. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainwright, E. J.; Dean, J. E.

    This study investigates the bases for constructing quantitative and qualitative measures of Australian Colleges of Advanced Education (CAE) library collection adequacy, and the feasibility of producing specialized and appropriate measures to guide future collection planning. Adequacy is based on the libraries' policies for providing materials to…

  7. Examining single-source secondary impacts estimated from brute-force, decoupled direct method, and advanced plume treatment approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, James T.; Baker, Kirk R.; Napelenok, Sergey L.; Roselle, Shawn J.

    2015-06-01

    In regulatory assessments, there is a need for reliable estimates of the impacts of precursor emissions from individual sources on secondary PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microns) and ozone. Three potential methods for estimating these impacts using Eulerian grid photochemical models are the brute-force (B-F) method, the decoupled direct method (DDM), and advanced plume treatment (APT). Here, we systematically inter-compare and assess the B-F, DDM, and APT approaches using hypothetical sources in a consistent modeling platform for a wide range of source conditions (i.e., emissions amount and composition, location within two California air basins, and stack parameters). The impacts of NOx and VOC sources on ozone and SO2 sources on PM2.5 sulfate calculated by these methods are in general agreement. The agreement is evident in the similar magnitudes, spatial patterns, and strong correlations among the impacts. This result, along with previous model evaluations based on similar Eulerian grid modeling, builds confidence in the reliability of the impact estimates. Disagreement among methods is evident in calculations of PM2.5 nitrate impacts associated with NH3 and NOx sources. Numerical instabilities in DDM sensitivity calculations compromise the nitrate impact estimates from that approach. The B-F and APT methods, which use brute-force differencing to identify impacts, are affected by numerical artifacts to a lesser degree than (H)DDM, with the artifacts being more prominent for APT than B-F. Overall, our results indicate that the (H)DDM, B-F, and APT approaches are viable for use in estimating single-source impacts for ozone and secondary PM2.5 sulfate, while the B-F method appears to be the most reliable for estimating nitrate impacts. There is a need for additional field study measurements to better constrain model estimates of single-source secondary impacts.

  8. Final Report for SERDP Project RC-1649: Advanced Chemical Measurements of Smoke from DoD-prescribed Burns

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Weise, David; Lincoln, E. N.; Sams, Robert L.; Cameron, Melanie; Veres, Patrick; Yokelson, Robert J.; Urbanski, Shawn; Profeta, Luisa T.; Williams, S.; Gilman, Jessica; Kuster, W. C.; Akagi, Sheryl; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Mendoza, Albert; Wold, Cyle E.; Warneke, Carsten; de Gouw, Joost A.; Burling, Ian R.; Reardon, James; Schneider, Matthew D.; Griffith, David WT; Roberts, James M.

    2013-12-17

    Objectives: Project RC-1649, “Advanced Chemical Measurement of Smoke from DoD-prescribed Burns” was undertaken to use advanced instrumental techniques to study in detail the particulate and vapor-phase chemical composition of the smoke that results from prescribed fires used as a land management tool on DoD bases, particularly bases in the southeastern U.S. The statement of need (SON) called for “(1) improving characterization of fuel consumption” and “(2) improving characterization of air emissions under both flaming and smoldering conditions with respect to volatile organic compounds, heavy metals, and reactive gases.” The measurements and fuels were from several bases throughout the southeast (Camp Lejeune, Ft. Benning, and Ft. Jackson) and were carried out in collaboration and conjunction with projects 1647 (models) and 1648 (particulates, SW bases). Technical Approach: We used an approach that featured developing techniques for measuring biomass burning emission species in both the laboratory and field and developing infrared (IR) spectroscopy in particular. Using IR spectroscopy and other methods, we developed emission factors (EF, g of effluent per kg of fuel burned) for dozens of chemical species for several common southeastern fuel types. The major measurement campaigns were laboratory studies at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory (FSL) as well as field campaigns at Camp Lejeune, NC, Ft. Jackson, SC, and in conjunction with 1648 at Vandenberg AFB, and Ft. Huachuca. Comparisons and fusions of laboratory and field data were also carried out, using laboratory fuels from the same bases. Results: The project enabled new technologies and furthered basic science, mostly in the area of infrared spectroscopy, a broadband method well suited to biomass burn studies. Advances in hardware, software and supporting reference data realized a nearly 20x improvement in sensitivity and now provide quantitative IR spectra for potential detection of ~60 new

  9. Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes: Advances in the Perturbative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, C. O.

    2005-08-01

    meeting in the Albert Einstein Institute in Germany http://www.aei-potsdam.mpg.de/~lousto/CAPRA/Capra4.html/. In 2002 Capra 5 was held in Pennsylvania http://cgwp.gravity.psu.edu/events/Capra5/capra5-BKP_2002-05-24-1200.shtml, and in 2003 the venue for Capra 6 was Kyoto, Japan http://www2.yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~misao/capra6/html/. Continuing with the tradition of the meeting taking place in the US on alternate years, I organized the 7th Capra meeting in Brownsville, Texas http://cgwa.phys.utb.edu/Events/agendaView.php?EventID=3 in 2004. This year, the 8th Capra meeting will be in Oxford, UK http://www.sstd.rl.ac.uk/capra/Index.htm. This volume contains contributions describing the current state of the field and topical areas of interest. It also contains some reviews of the advances made since 1997 and, most interesting to the readers, it describes the open problems and future lines of research in the field. The contributions have been divided into four logical groups. Part I is a collection of papers that deal with first-order perturbation theory. They contain a brief summary of the metric and curvature approaches to perturbations in terms of waveforms and the reconstruction of the metric perturbations in preparation for the computation of the self-force. This section also reviews the energy-momentum balance approach that makes use of the information about the radiation emitted to first perturbative order to correct the trajectory of the particle. Part II comprises works reviewing and expanding the formalism of the self-force. It reviews the newest description in terms of the regular and singular parts of the fields, replacing the original description in terms of tail and divergent parts. Part III contains several examples of application of the self-force formulae, from scalar to gravitational fields and from post-Newtonian expansions to matched expansions. Finally, part IV introduces the problem of computing second-order perturbations of the gravitational field, assuming

  10. An Approach for the Accurate Measurement of Social Morality Levels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Xia; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    In the social sciences, computer-based modeling has become an increasingly important tool receiving widespread attention. However, the derivation of the quantitative relationships linking individual moral behavior and social morality levels, so as to provide a useful basis for social policy-making, remains a challenge in the scholarly literature today. A quantitative measurement of morality from the perspective of complexity science constitutes an innovative attempt. Based on the NetLogo platform, this article examines the effect of various factors on social morality levels, using agents modeling moral behavior, immoral behavior, and a range of environmental social resources. Threshold values for the various parameters are obtained through sensitivity analysis; and practical solutions are proposed for reversing declines in social morality levels. The results show that: (1) Population size may accelerate or impede the speed with which immoral behavior comes to determine the overall level of social morality, but it has no effect on the level of social morality itself; (2) The impact of rewards and punishment on social morality levels follows the “5∶1 rewards-to-punishment rule,” which is to say that 5 units of rewards have the same effect as 1 unit of punishment; (3) The abundance of public resources is inversely related to the level of social morality; (4) When the cost of population mobility reaches 10% of the total energy level, immoral behavior begins to be suppressed (i.e. the 1/10 moral cost rule). The research approach and methods presented in this paper successfully address the difficulties involved in measuring social morality levels, and promise extensive application potentials. PMID:24312189

  11. A New Approach in Advance Network Reservation and Provisioning for High-Performance Scientific Data Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Balman, Mehmet; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alex

    2010-01-28

    Scientific applications already generate many terabytes and even petabytes of data from supercomputer runs and large-scale experiments. The need for transferring data chunks of ever-increasing sizes through the network shows no sign of abating. Hence, we need high-bandwidth high speed networks such as ESnet (Energy Sciences Network). Network reservation systems, i.e. ESnet's OSCARS (On-demand Secure Circuits and Advance Reservation System) establish guaranteed bandwidth of secure virtual circuits at a certain time, for a certain bandwidth and length of time. OSCARS checks network availability and capacity for the specified period of time, and allocates requested bandwidth for that user if it is available. If the requested reservation cannot be granted, no further suggestion is returned back to the user. Further, there is no possibility from the users view-point to make an optimal choice. We report a new algorithm, where the user specifies the total volume that needs to be transferred, a maximum bandwidth that he/she can use, and a desired time period within which the transfer should be done. The algorithm can find alternate allocation possibilities, including earliest time for completion, or shortest transfer duration - leaving the choice to the user. We present a novel approach for path finding in time-dependent networks, and a new polynomial algorithm to find possible reservation options according to given constraints. We have implemented our algorithm for testing and incorporation into a future version of ESnet?s OSCARS. Our approach provides a basis for provisioning end-to-end high performance data transfers over storage and network resources.

  12. Energy Therapies in Advanced Practice Oncology: An Evidence-Informed Practice Approach

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practitioners in oncology want patients to receive state-of-the-art care and support for their healing process. Evidence-informed practice (EIP), an approach to evaluating evidence for clinical practice, considers the varieties of evidence in the context of patient preference and condition as well as practitioner knowledge and experience. This article offers an EIP approach to energy therapies, namely, Therapeutic Touch (TT), Healing Touch (HT), and Reiki, as supportive interventions in cancer care; a description of the author’s professional experience with TT, HT, and Reiki in practice and research; an overview of the three energy healing modalities; a review of nine clinical studies related to oncology; and recommendations for EIP. These studies demonstrate a response to previous research design critiques. Findings indicate a positive benefit for oncology patients in the realms of pain, quality of life, fatigue, health function, and mood. Directionality of healing in immune response and cell line studies affirms the usual explanation that these therapies bring harmony and balance to the system in the direction of health. Foremost, the research literature demonstrates the safety of these therapies. In order to consider the varieties of evidence for TT, HT, and Reiki, EIP requires a qualitative examination of patient experiences with these modalities, exploration of where these modalities have been integrated into cancer care and how the practice works in the oncology setting, and discovery of the impact of implementation on provider practice and self-care. Next steps toward EIP require fleshing out the experience of these modalities by patients and health-care providers in the oncology care setting. PMID:25031994

  13. Comet assay to measure DNA repair: approach and applications

    PubMed Central

    Azqueta, Amaya; Slyskova, Jana; Langie, Sabine A. S.; O’Neill Gaivão, Isabel; Collins, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cellular repair enzymes remove virtually all DNA damage before it is fixed; repair therefore plays a crucial role in preventing cancer. Repair studied at the level of transcription correlates poorly with enzyme activity, and so assays of phenotype are needed. In a biochemical approach, substrate nucleoids containing specific DNA lesions are incubated with cell extract; repair enzymes in the extract induce breaks at damage sites; and the breaks are measured with the comet assay. The nature of the substrate lesions defines the repair pathway to be studied. This in vitro DNA repair assay has been modified for use in animal tissues, specifically to study the effects of aging and nutritional intervention on repair. Recently, the assay was applied to different strains of Drosophila melanogaster proficient and deficient in DNA repair. Most applications of the repair assay have been in human biomonitoring. Individual DNA repair activity may be a marker of cancer susceptibility; alternatively, high repair activity may result from induction of repair enzymes by exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Studies to date have examined effects of environment, nutrition, lifestyle, and occupation, in addition to clinical investigations. PMID:25202323

  14. Approaches to measuring calcium in zebrafish: focus on neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Rachel

    2004-05-01

    Calcium ions are known to act as important cellular signals during nervous system development. In vitro studies have provided significant information on the role of calcium signals during neuronal development; however, the function of this messenger in nervous system maturation in vivo remains to be established. The zebrafish has emerged as a valuable model for the study of vertebrate embryogenesis. Fertilisation is external and the rapid growth of the transparent embryo, including development of internal organs, can be observed easily making it well suited for imaging studies. The developing nervous system is relatively simple and has been well characterised, allowing individual neurons to be identified. Using the zebrafish model, both intracellular and intercellular calcium signals throughout embryonic development have been characterised. This review summarises technical approaches to measure calcium signals in developing embryonic and larval zebrafish, and includes recent developments that will facilitate the study of calcium signalling in vivo. The application of calcium imaging techniques to investigate the action of this messenger during embryogenesis in intact zebrafish is illustrated by discussion of their contribution to our understanding of neuronal development in vivo. PMID:15003849

  15. The Management of Advanced Germ Cell Tumors in 2016: The Memorial Sloan Kettering Approach.

    PubMed

    Funt, Samuel A; Feldman, Darren R; Bosl, George J

    2016-07-01

    The high cure rate of patients with advanced germ cell tumors is the result of effective cisplatin-based chemotherapy; both previously untreated and relapsing patients can be cured. Risk stratification is particularly important in previously untreated patients. While retrospective salvage therapy analyses suggest that a number of clinical factors are associated with outcome, the appropriate selection of patients for, and the sequencing of, conventional- and high-dose regimens are subjects of debate because of the introduction of paclitaxel and different approaches to the administration of high-dose chemotherapy. This therapeutic landscape has been molded in part by our current understanding of treatment-associated toxicity. In this paper, we review the use of serum tumor markers in risk assignment and response evaluation; the treatment of previously untreated and relapsing patients; the role of surgical resection of residual disease, including retroperitoneal node dissection; and the importance of clinical trials for addressing unanswered questions and testing new therapies. Management controversies and possible future treatment enhancements that incorporate serum tumor marker decline and tumor genomics will also be discussed. PMID:27422113

  16. Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Flourishing Novel Approaches in the Era of Biological Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Joanne W.; Wong, Hilda; Leung, Roland; Pang, Roberta; Cheung, Tan-To; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Poon, Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    The progress in the development of systemic treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) has been slow. The mainstream treatment remains using chemotherapy including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel. Erlotinib is the only approved biological therapy with marginal benefit. Studies of agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and RAS signaling have not been satisfying, and the usefulness of targeted therapy in APC is uncertain. Understanding in molecular processes and tumor biology has opened the door for new treatment strategies such as targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, transforming growth factor β, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and Notch pathway. New directions also include the upcoming immunotherapy and many novel agents that act on the microenvironment. The practice of personalized medicine using predictive biomarkers and pharmacogenomics signatures may also enhance the effectiveness of existing treatment. Future treatment approaches may involve comprehensive genomic assessment of tumor and integrated combinations of multiple agents to overcome treatment resistance. PMID:25117068

  17. Advanced pancreatic cancer: flourishing novel approaches in the era of biological therapy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Joanne W; Wong, Hilda; Leung, Roland; Pang, Roberta; Cheung, Tan-To; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Poon, Ronnie; Yau, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The progress in the development of systemic treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (APC) has been slow. The mainstream treatment remains using chemotherapy including gemcitabine, FOLFIRINOX, and nab-paclitaxel. Erlotinib is the only approved biological therapy with marginal benefit. Studies of agents targeting epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and RAS signaling have not been satisfying, and the usefulness of targeted therapy in APC is uncertain. Understanding in molecular processes and tumor biology has opened the door for new treatment strategies such as targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, transforming growth factor β, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and Notch pathway. New directions also include the upcoming immunotherapy and many novel agents that act on the microenvironment. The practice of personalized medicine using predictive biomarkers and pharmacogenomics signatures may also enhance the effectiveness of existing treatment. Future treatment approaches may involve comprehensive genomic assessment of tumor and integrated combinations of multiple agents to overcome treatment resistance. PMID:25117068

  18. Current Advance and Future Prospects of Tissue Engineering Approach to Dentin/Pulp Regenerative Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting; Heng, Boon Chin; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in biomaterial science and tissue engineering technology have greatly spurred the development of regenerative endodontics. This has led to a paradigm shift in endodontic treatment from simply filling the root canal systems with biologically inert materials to restoring the infected dental pulp with functional replacement tissues. Currently, cell transplantation has gained increasing attention as a scientifically valid method for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. This multidisciplinary approach which involves the interplay of three key elements of tissue engineering-stem cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules-has produced an impressive number of favorable outcomes in preclinical animal studies. Nevertheless, many practical hurdles need to be overcome prior to its application in clinical settings. Apart from the potential health risks of immunological rejection and pathogenic transmission, the lack of a well-established banking system for the isolation and storage of dental-derived stem cells is the most pressing issue that awaits resolution and the properties of supportive scaffold materials vary across different studies and remain inconsistent. This review critically examines the classic triad of tissue engineering utilized in current regenerative endodontics and summarizes the possible techniques developed for dentin/pulp regeneration. PMID:27069484

  19. Advancing data reuse in phyloinformatics using an ontology-driven Semantic Web approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses can resolve historical relationships among genes, organisms or higher taxa. Understanding such relationships can elucidate a wide range of biological phenomena, including, for example, the importance of gene and genome duplications in the evolution of gene function, the role of adaptation as a driver of diversification, or the evolutionary consequences of biogeographic shifts. Phyloinformaticists are developing data standards, databases and communication protocols (e.g. Application Programming Interfaces, APIs) to extend the accessibility of gene trees, species trees, and the metadata necessary to interpret these trees, thus enabling researchers across the life sciences to reuse phylogenetic knowledge. Specifically, Semantic Web technologies are being developed to make phylogenetic knowledge interpretable by web agents, thereby enabling intelligently automated, high-throughput reuse of results generated by phylogenetic research. This manuscript describes an ontology-driven, semantic problem-solving environment for phylogenetic analyses and introduces artefacts that can promote phyloinformatic efforts to promote accessibility of trees and underlying metadata. PhylOnt is an extensible ontology with concepts describing tree types and tree building methodologies including estimation methods, models and programs. In addition we present the PhylAnt platform for annotating scientific articles and NeXML files with PhylOnt concepts. The novelty of this work is the annotation of NeXML files and phylogenetic related documents with PhylOnt Ontology. This approach advances data reuse in phyloinformatics. PMID:24565381

  20. Current Advance and Future Prospects of Tissue Engineering Approach to Dentin/Pulp Regenerative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ting; Heng, Boon Chin; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in biomaterial science and tissue engineering technology have greatly spurred the development of regenerative endodontics. This has led to a paradigm shift in endodontic treatment from simply filling the root canal systems with biologically inert materials to restoring the infected dental pulp with functional replacement tissues. Currently, cell transplantation has gained increasing attention as a scientifically valid method for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. This multidisciplinary approach which involves the interplay of three key elements of tissue engineering—stem cells, scaffolds, and signaling molecules—has produced an impressive number of favorable outcomes in preclinical animal studies. Nevertheless, many practical hurdles need to be overcome prior to its application in clinical settings. Apart from the potential health risks of immunological rejection and pathogenic transmission, the lack of a well-established banking system for the isolation and storage of dental-derived stem cells is the most pressing issue that awaits resolution and the properties of supportive scaffold materials vary across different studies and remain inconsistent. This review critically examines the classic triad of tissue engineering utilized in current regenerative endodontics and summarizes the possible techniques developed for dentin/pulp regeneration. PMID:27069484

  1. Advancing data reuse in phyloinformatics using an ontology-driven Semantic Web approach.

    PubMed

    Panahiazar, Maryam; Sheth, Amit P; Ranabahu, Ajith; Vos, Rutger A; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses can resolve historical relationships among genes, organisms or higher taxa. Understanding such relationships can elucidate a wide range of biological phenomena, including, for example, the importance of gene and genome duplications in the evolution of gene function, the role of adaptation as a driver of diversification, or the evolutionary consequences of biogeographic shifts. Phyloinformaticists are developing data standards, databases and communication protocols (e.g. Application Programming Interfaces, APIs) to extend the accessibility of gene trees, species trees, and the metadata necessary to interpret these trees, thus enabling researchers across the life sciences to reuse phylogenetic knowledge. Specifically, Semantic Web technologies are being developed to make phylogenetic knowledge interpretable by web agents, thereby enabling intelligently automated, high-throughput reuse of results generated by phylogenetic research. This manuscript describes an ontology-driven, semantic problem-solving environment for phylogenetic analyses and introduces artefacts that can promote phyloinformatic efforts to promote accessibility of trees and underlying metadata. PhylOnt is an extensible ontology with concepts describing tree types and tree building methodologies including estimation methods, models and programs. In addition we present the PhylAnt platform for annotating scientific articles and NeXML files with PhylOnt concepts. The novelty of this work is the annotation of NeXML files and phylogenetic related documents with PhylOnt Ontology. This approach advances data reuse in phyloinformatics. PMID:24565381

  2. Identifying contamination with advanced visualization and analysis practices: metagenomic approaches for eukaryotic genome assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Delmont, Tom O.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing provides a fast and cost-effective mean to recover genomes of organisms from all domains of life. However, adequate curation of the assembly results against potential contamination of non-target organisms requires advanced bioinformatics approaches and practices. Here, we re-analyzed the sequencing data generated for the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, and created a holistic display of the eukaryotic genome assembly using DNA data originating from two groups and eleven sequencing libraries. By using bacterial single-copy genes, k-mer frequencies, and coverage values of scaffolds we could identify and characterize multiple near-complete bacterial genomes from the raw assembly, and curate a 182 Mbp draft genome for H. dujardini supported by RNA-Seq data. Our results indicate that most contaminant scaffolds were assembled from Moleculo long-read libraries, and most of these contaminants have differed between library preparations. Our re-analysis shows that visualization and curation of eukaryotic genome assemblies can benefit from tools designed to address the needs of today’s microbiologists, who are constantly challenged by the difficulties associated with the identification of distinct microbial genomes in complex environmental metagenomes. PMID:27069789

  3. Advancing the 3Rs in regulatory ecotoxicology: A pragmatic cross-sector approach.

    PubMed

    Burden, Natalie; Benstead, Rachel; Clook, Mark; Doyle, Ian; Edwards, Peter; Maynard, Samuel K; Ryder, Kathryn; Sheahan, Dave; Whale, Graham; van Egmond, Roger; Wheeler, James R; Hutchinson, Thomas H

    2016-07-01

    The ecotoxicity testing of chemicals for prospective environmental safety assessment is an area in which a high number of vertebrates are used across a variety of industry sectors. Refining, reducing, and replacing the use of animals such as fish, birds, and amphibians for this purpose addresses the ethical concerns and the increasing legislative requirements to consider alternative test methods. Members of the UK-based National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) Ecotoxicology Working Group, consisting of representatives from academia, government organizations, and industry, have worked together over the past 6 y to provide evidence bases to support and advance the application of the 3Rs in regulatory ecotoxicity testing. The group recently held a workshop to identify the areas of testing, demands, and drivers that will have an impact on the future of animal use in regulatory ecotoxicology. As a result of these discussions, we have developed a pragmatic approach to prioritize and realistically address key opportunity areas, to enable progress toward the vision of a reduced reliance on the use of animals in this area of testing. This paper summarizes the findings of this exercise and proposes a pragmatic strategy toward our key long-term goals-the incorporation of reliable alternatives to whole-organism testing into regulations and guidance, and a culture shift toward reduced reliance on vertebrate toxicity testing in routine environmental safety assessment. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:417-421. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26440537

  4. Toward Optimized Bioclogging and Biocementation Through Combining Advanced Geophysical Monitoring and Reactive Transport Modeling Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, C. G.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wu, Y.; Surasani, V.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Commer, M.; Dou, S.; Kwon, T.; Li, L.; Fouke, B. W.; Coates, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Bioclogging and biocementation offer exciting opportunities for solutions to diverse problems ranging from soil stabilization to microbially enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. The effectiveness of bioclogging and biocementation strategies is governed by processes and properties ranging from microbial metabolism at the submicron scale, to changes in pore geometry at the pore scale, to geological heterogeneities at the field scale. Optimization of these strategies requires advances in mechanistic reactive transport modeling and geophysical monitoring methodologies. Our research focuses on (i) performing laboratory experiments to refine understanding of reaction networks and to quantify changes in hydrological properties (e.g. permeability), the evolution of biominerals and geophysical responses (focusing on seismic and electrical techniques); (ii) developing and using a reactive transport simulator capable of predicting the induced metabolic processes to numerically explore how to optimize the desired effect; and (iii) using loosely coupled reactive transport and geophysical simulators to explore detectability and resolvability of induced bioclogging and biocementation processes at the field scale using time-lapse geophysical methods. Here we present examples of our research focused on three different microbially-mediated methods to enhance hydrocarbon recovery through selective clogging of reservior thief zones, including: (a) biopolymer clogging through dextran production; (b) biomineral clogging through iron oxide precipitation; and (c) biomineral clogging through carbonate precipitation. We will compare the utility of these approaches for enhancing hydrocarbon recovery and will describe the utility of geophysical methods to remotely monitor associated field treatments.

  5. 77 FR 52977 - Regulatory Capital Rules: Advanced Approaches Risk-Based Capital Rule; Market Risk Capital Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ...The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) (collectively, the agencies) are seeking comment on three notices of proposed rulemaking (NPRs) that would revise and replace the agencies' current capital rules. In this NPR (Advanced Approaches and Market Risk NPR) the......

  6. Development of an integrated energetic neutral particle measurement system on experimental advanced full superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y. B. Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Zhang, J. Z.; Qi, M. Z.; Xia, S. B.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.

    2014-11-15

    Full function integrated, compact silicon photodiode based solid state neutral particle analyzers (ssNPA) have been developed for energetic particle (EP) relevant studies on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The ssNPAs will be mostly operated in advanced current mode with a few channels to be operated in conventional pulse-counting mode, aiming to simultaneously achieve individually proved ultra-fast temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution capabilities. The design details together with considerations on EAST specific engineering realities and physics requirements are presented. The system, including a group of single detectors on two vertical ports and two 16-channel arrays on a horizontal port, can provide both active and passive charge exchange measurements. ssNPA detectors, with variable thickness of ultra thin tungsten dominated foils directly deposited on the front surface, are specially fabricated and utilized to achieve about 22 keV energy resolution for deuterium particle detection.

  7. An aggregate modeling and measurement approach for power estimation of through-the-wall target returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thajudeen, Christopher; Hoorfar, Ahmad; Ahmad, Fauzia; Dogaru, Traian

    2010-04-01

    With recent advances in both algorithm and component technologies, through-the-wall sensing and imaging is emerging as an affordable sensor technology in civilian and military settings. One of the primary objectives of through-the-wall sensing systems is to detect and identify targets of interest, such as humans and cache of weapons, enclosed in building structures. Effective approaches that achieve proper target radar cross section (RCS) registration behind walls must, in general, exploit a detailed understanding of the radar phenomenology and more specifically, knowledge of the expected strength of the radar return from targets of interest. In this paper, we investigate the effects of various wall types on the received power of the target return through the use of a combined measurement and electromagnetic modeling approach. The RCS of material-exact rifle and human models are investigated in free-space using numerical electromagnetic modeling tools. A modified radar range equation, which analytically accounts for the wall effects, including multiple reflections within a given homogeneous or layered wall, is then employed in conjunction with wideband measured parameters of various common wall types, to estimate the received power versus frequency from the aforementioned targets. The proposed technique is, in principle, applicable to both bistatic and mono-static operations.

  8. Lead field theoretical approach in bioimpedance measurements: towards more controlled measurement sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P K; Hyttinen, J A; Kööbi, T; Malmivuo, J

    1999-04-20

    This study was conducted to demonstrate the potentiality of lead field theoretical approach in analyzing bioimpedance (BI) measurements. Anatomically accurate computer models and the lead field theory were used to develop BI measurement configurations capable of detecting more localized BI changes in the human body. The methods were applied to assess the measurement properties of conventional impedance cardiography (ICG) and such BI measurement configurations as can be derived using (i) the 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) and (ii) the international 10-20 electroencephalography (EEG) electrode systems. Information as to how various electrode configurations are sensitive to detecting conductivity changes in different tissues and organs was thus obtained. Theoretical results with the 12-lead system suggested that, compared to conventional ICGs, significantly more selective ICG configurations can be derived for cardiovascular structures. In addition to theoretical investigations, clinical test measurements were made with the 12-lead system to establish whether characteristic waveforms are available. Sensitivity distributions obtained with the 10-20 electrode system give promise of the possibility of monitoring noninvasively cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) impedance changes related to impending epileptic seizures. PMID:10372161

  9. 3D-profile measurement of advanced semiconductor features by reference metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Iwaki, Yuuki; Takahashi, Satoru; Kawada, Hiroki; Ikota, Masami; Lorusso, Gian F.; Horiguchi, Naoto

    2016-03-01

    A method of sub-nanometer uncertainty for the 3D-profile measurement using TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) images is proposed to standardize 3D-profile measurement through reference metrology. The proposed method has been validated for profiles of Si lines, photoresist features and advanced-FinFET (Fin-shaped Field-Effect Transistor) features in our previous investigations. However, efficiency of 3D-profile measurement using TEM is limited by measurement time including processing of the sample. In this article, we demonstrate a novel on-wafer 3D-profile metrology as "FIB-to-CDSEM method" with FIB (Focused Ion Beam) slope cut and CD-SEM (Critical Dimension Secondary Electron Microscope) measuring. Using the method, a few micrometer wide on a wafer is coated and cut by 45 degree slope using FIB tool. Then, the wafer is transferred to CD-SEM to measure the cross section image by top down CD-SEM measurement. We apply FIB-to-CDSEM method to CMOS sensor device. 3D-profile and 3D-profile parameters such as top line width and side wall angles of CMOS sensor device are evaluated. The 3D-profile parameters also are measured by TEM images as reference metrology. We compare the 3D-profile parameters by TEM method and FIB-to-CDSEM method. The average values and correlations on the wafer are agreed well between TEM and FIB-to- CDSEM methods.

  10. A Combined Approach to Measure Micropollutant Behaviour during Riverbank Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driezum, Inge; Saracevic, Ernis; Derx, Julia; Kirschner, Alexander; Sommer, Regina; Farnleitner, Andreas; Blaschke, Alfred Paul

    2016-04-01

    Riverbank filtration (RBF) systems are widely used as natural treatment process. The advantages of RBF over surface water abstraction are the elimination of for example suspended solids, biodegradable compounds (like specific micropollutants), bacteria and viruses (Hiscock and Grischek, 2002). However, in contrast to its importance, remarkably less is known on the respective external (e.g. industrial or municipal sewage) and the internal (e.g. wildlife and agricultural influence) sources of contaminants, the environmental availability and fate of the various hazardous substances, and its potential transport during soil and aquifer passage. The goal of this study is to get an insight in the behaviour of various micropollutants and microbial indicators during riverbank filtration. Field measurements were combined with numerical modelling approaches. The study area comprises an alluvial backwater and floodplain area downstream of Vienna. The river is highly dynamic, with discharges ranging from 900 m3/s during low flow to 11000 m3/s during flood events. Samples were taken in several monitoring wells along a transect extending from the river towards a backwater river in the floodplain. Three of the piezometers were situated in the first 20 meters away from the river in order to obtain information about micropollutant behaviour close to the river. A total of 9 different micropollutants were analysed in grab samples taken under different river flow conditions (n=33). Following enrichment using SPE, analysis was performed using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Faecal indicators (E. coli and enterococci) and bacterial spores were enumerated in sample volumes of 1 L each using cultivation based methods (ISO 16649-1, ISO 7899-2:2000 and ISO 6222). The analysis showed that some compounds, e.g. ibuprofen and diclofenac, were only found in the river. These compounds were already degraded in the first ten meters away from the river. Analysis of

  11. Hydrometeor classification from polarimetric radar measurements: a clustering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioli, Jacopo; Tuia, Devis; Berne, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Hydrometeor classification is the process that aims at identifying the dominant type of hydrometeor (e.g. rain, hail, snow aggregates, hail, graupel, ice crystals) in a domain covered by a polarimetric weather radar during precipitation. The techniques documented in the literature are mostly based on numerical simulations and fuzzy logic. This involves the arbitrary selection of a set of hydrometeor classes and the numerical simulation of theoretical radar observations associated to each class. The information derived from the simulation is then applied to actual radar measurements by means of fuzzy logic input-output association. This approach has some limitations: the number and type of the hydrometeor categories undergoing identification is selected arbitrarily and the scattering simulations are based on constraining assumptions, especially in case of solid hydrometeors. Furthermore, in presence of noise and uncertainties, it is not guaranteed that the selected hydrometeor classes can be effectively identified in actual observations. In the present work we propose a different starting point for the classification task, which is based on observations instead of numerical simulations. We provide criteria for the selection of the number of hydrometeor classes that can be identified, by looking at how polarimetric observations collected over different precipitation events form clusters in the multi-dimensional space of the polarimetric variables. Two datasets, collected by an X-band weather radar, are employed in the study. The first dataset covers mountainous weather conditions (Swiss Alps), while the second includes Mediterranean orographic precipitation events collected during the special observation period (SOP) 2012 of the HyMeX campaign. We employ an unsupervised hierarchical clustering method to group the observations into clusters and we introduce a spatial smoothness constraint for the groups, assuming that the hydrometeor type changes smoothly in space

  12. Measuring Early Childhood Health and Health Disparities: A New Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Lanza, Stephanie T.; Landale, Nancy S.; Oropesa, R. S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Efforts to improve the health of U.S. children and reduce disparities have been hampered by lack of a rigorous way to summarize the multi-dimensional nature of children’s health. This research employed a novel statistical approach to measurement to provide an integrated, comprehensive perspective on early childhood health and disparities. Methods Nationally-representative data (n=8,800) came from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to classify health at 48 months, incorporating health conditions, functioning, and aspects of physical, cognitive, and emotional development. Health disparities by gender, poverty, race/ethnicity, and birthweight were examined. Results Over half of all children were classified as healthy using multidimensional latent class methodology; others fell into one of seven less optimal health statuses. The analyses highlighted pervasive disparities in health, with poor children at increased risk of being classified into the most disadvantaged health status consisting of chronic conditions and a cluster of developmental problems including low cognitive achievement, poor social skills, and behavior problems. Children with very low birthweight had the highest rate of being in the most disadvantaged health status (25.2%), but moderately low birthweight children were also at elevated risk (7.9% versus 3.4% among non-low birthweight children). Conclusions Latent class analysis provides a uniquely comprehensive picture of child health and health disparities that identifies clusters of problems experienced by some groups. The findings underscore the importance of continued efforts to reduce preterm birth, and to ameliorate poverty’s effects on children’s health through access to high-quality healthcare and other services. PMID:23225206

  13. Applications of Advanced Nondestructive Measurement Techniques to Address Safety of Flight Issues on NASA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Advanced nondestructive measurement techniques are critical for ensuring the reliability and safety of NASA spacecraft. Techniques such as infrared thermography, THz imaging, X-ray computed tomography and backscatter X-ray are used to detect indications of damage in spacecraft components and structures. Additionally, sensor and measurement systems are integrated into spacecraft to provide structural health monitoring to detect damaging events that occur during flight such as debris impacts during launch and assent or from micrometeoroid and orbital debris, or excessive loading due to anomalous flight conditions. A number of examples will be provided of how these nondestructive measurement techniques have been applied to resolve safety critical inspection concerns for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and a variety of launch vehicles and unmanned spacecraft.

  14. Advanced high quality aerosol data: novel results from the EUSAAR in situ measurement network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, P.; Philippin, S.; Putaud, J.-P.; Wiedensohler, A.; de Leeuw, G.; Fjaeraa, A. M.; Platt, U.; Baltensperger, U.; Fiebig, M.

    2009-04-01

    The EU-funded project EUSAAR (EUropean Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research) aims at integrating measurements of atmospheric aerosol properties from a distributed network of 20 high-quality European ground-based stations. The objective is to ensure harmonization, validation and data diffusion of current measurements of particle optical, physical and chemical properties which are critical parameters for quantifying the key processes and the impact of aerosols on climate and air quality. We will present and discuss the results and highlights of the activities and achievements during the first 3 years of the project during which EUSAAR has contributed to improving the comparability of measurements for data users and to adopting best practices in aerosol monitoring procedures, and has started providing high quality aerosol data much needed in the atmospheric research community from the most advanced monitoring stations currently operational in Europe.

  15. Analysis of insertion device magnet measurements for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.M.; Schlueter, R.; Wang, C.

    1993-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), which is currently being commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a third generation light source designed to produce XUV radiation of unprecedented brightness. To meet the high brightness goal the storage ring has been designed for very small electron beam emittance and the undulators installed in the ALS are built to a high degree of precision. The allowable magnetic field errors are driven by electron beam and radiation requirements. Detailed magnetic measurements and adjustments are performed on each undulator to qualify it for installation in the ALS. The first two ALS undulators, IDA and IDB, have been installed. This paper describes the program of measurements, data analysis, and adjustments carried out for these two devices. Calculations of the radiation spectrum, based upon magnetic measurements, are included. Final field integral distributions are also shown. Good field integral uniformity has been achieved using a novel correction scheme, which is also described.

  16. Palliative Surgical Approach in Advanced Nonresponsive Mucinous Ovarian Cancer: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Manika; Kumar, Ritesh; Topno, Noor; Mishra, Shweta; Dhirasaria, Ashish; Singh, A Santa

    2016-01-01

    Advanced mucinous ovarian cancer is a separate entity and has different biological behaviour. There is a wide range of therapeutic challenges and dilemmas in the management of these patients. The authors present a case of advanced ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma with pseudomyxoma peritonei who had poor response to standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This case is highlighted to emphasize the challenges in the decision making for the management of advanced mucinous ovarian cancer. PMID:27162429

  17. Complex Care Options for Patients With Advanced Heart Failure Approaching End of Life.

    PubMed

    Wordingham, Sara E; McIlvennan, Colleen K; Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Swetz, Keith M

    2016-02-01

    Care for patients with advanced cardiac disease continues to evolve in a complex milieu of therapeutic options, advanced technological interventions, and efforts at improving patient-centered care and shared decision-making. Despite improvements in quality of life and survival with these interventions, optimal supportive care across the advanced illness trajectory remains diverse and heterogeneous. Herein, we outline challenges in prognostication, communication, and caregiving in advanced heart failure and review the unique needs of patients who experience frequent hospitalizations, require chronic home inotropic support, and who have implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and mechanical circulatory support in situ, to name a few. PMID:26829929

  18. New advances in invasive aspergillosis immunobiology leading the way towards personalized therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Obar, Joshua J; Hohl, Tobias M; Cramer, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) remains a devastating disease in immune compromised patients despite significant advances in our understanding of fungal virulence and host defense mechanisms. In this review, we summarize important research advances in the fight against IA with particular focus on early events in the interactions between Aspergillus fumigatus and the host that occur in the respiratory tract. Advances in understanding mechanisms of immune effector cell recruitment, antifungal effector mechanisms, and how the dynamic host-fungal interaction alters the local microenvironment to effect outcomes are highlighted. These advances illustrate exciting new therapeutic opportunities, but also emphasize the importance of understanding each unique fungus-host interaction for improving patient outcomes. PMID:27253487

  19. Advanced Method for In-Field Measurement, Monitoring and Verification of Total Soil Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, M. H.; Harris, R. D.; Ploss, J. C.; Clegg, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    The Earth`s oceans, forests, agricultural lands and other natural areas absorb about half of the carbon dioxide emitted from anthropogenic sources. Terrestrial carbon sequestration strategies are immediately available to bridge the gap between current terrestrial sequestration capacity and high-capacity geologic sequestration projects available in 10 to 20 years. Terrestrial carbon sequestration strategies consist of implementing land management practices aimed at decreasing CO2 emitted into the atmosphere and developing advanced measurement tools to inventory and monitor carbon processes in soils and biota. In addition to atmospheric CO2 mitigation and carbon trading advantages, terrestrial carbon sequestration produces a variety of benefits which include reclamation of degraded lands, increased soil productivity, increased land value and a more secure food source. Carbon storage in soil depends on climate and management practices, with potential yearly increases estimated from 0 to 150 kg-C ha-1 yr-1 in semiarid environments and up to 1000 kg-C ha-1 yr-1 in more humid environments. Measuring these increases, or in some cases losses of C, is currently a challenge with conventional instrumentation. Development of rapid, accurate, and cost effective and methods of measuring soil carbon are needed to address terrestrial sequestration issues and other aspects of global change. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is one promising advanced measurement method for soil carbon. LIBS has several advantages to conventional analytical tools including speed, analysis takes minutes, and portability as well as increased accuracy and precision. We will show the development of LIBS instrumentation for soil carbon measurement and test results to demonstrate the potential of LIBS to help address the measurement challenge.

  20. Performance of an Advanced Stirling Convertor Based on Heat Flux Sensor Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Dcott D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two highefficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower, Inc., and NASA Glenn Research Center. The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot-end and cold-end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given heat input. It is difficult to measure heat input to Stirling convertors due to the complex geometries of the hot components, temperature limits of sensor materials, and invasive integration of sensors. A thin-film heat flux sensor was used to directly measure heat input to an ASC. The effort succeeded in designing and fabricating unique sensors, which were integrated into a Stirling convertor ground test and exposed to test temperatures exceeding 700 C in air for 10,000 hr. Sensor measurements were used to calculate thermal efficiency for ASC-E (Engineering Unit) #1 and #4. The post-disassembly condition of the sensors is also discussed.

  1. Performance of an Advanced Stirling Convertor Based on Heat Flux Sensor Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower, Inc., and NASA Glenn Research Center. The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot-end and cold-end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given heat input. It is difficult to measure heat input to Stirling convertors due to the complex geometries of the hot components, temperature limits of sensor materials, and invasive integration of sensors. A thin-film heat flux sensor was used to directly measure heat input to an ASC. The effort succeeded in designing and fabricating unique sensors, which were integrated into a Stirling convertor ground test and exposed to test temperatures exceeding 700 C in air for 10,000 hr. Sensor measurements were used to calculate thermal efficiency for ASC-E (Engineering Unit) #1 and #4. The post-disassembly condition of the sensors is also discussed.

  2. Precision bone and muscle loss measurements by advanced, multiple projection DEXA (AMPDXA) techniques for spaceflight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, H. K. Jr; Beck, T. J.; Feldmesser, H. S.; Magee, T. C.; Spisz, T. S.; Pisacane, V. L.

    2001-01-01

    An advanced, multiple projection, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (AMPDXA) scanner system is under development. The AMPDXA is designed to make precision bone and muscle loss measurements necessary to determine the deleterious effects of microgravity on astronauts as well as develop countermeasures to stem their bone and muscle loss. To date, a full size test system has been developed to verify principles and the results of computer simulations. Results indicate that accurate predictions of bone mechanical properties can be determined from as few as three projections, while more projections are needed for a complete, three-dimensional reconstruction. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Techniques for measurement of the thermal expansion of advanced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques available to measure small thermal displacements in flat laminates and structural tubular elements of advanced composite materials are described. Emphasis is placed on laser interferometry and the laser interferometric dilatometer system used at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. Thermal expansion data are presented for graphite-fiber reinforced 6061 and 2024 aluminum laminates and for graphite fiber reinforced AZ91 C and QH21 A magnesium laminates before and after processing to minimize or eliminate thermal strain hysteresis. Data are also presented on the effects of reinforcement volume content on thermal expansion of silicon-carbide whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum.

  4. The investigation of advanced remote sensing techniques for the measurement of aerosol characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Becher, J.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced remote sensing techniques and inversion methods for the measurement of characteristics of aerosol and gaseous species in the atmosphere were investigated. Of particular interest were the physical and chemical properties of aerosols, such as their size distribution, number concentration, and complex refractive index, and the vertical distribution of these properties on a local as well as global scale. Remote sensing techniques for monitoring of tropospheric aerosols were developed as well as satellite monitoring of upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols. Computer programs were developed for solving multiple scattering and radiative transfer problems, as well as inversion/retrieval problems. A necessary aspect of these efforts was to develop models of aerosol properties.

  5. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS): Design and on-orbit performance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gargione, F.; Acosta, R.; Coney, T.; Krawczyk, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), developed and built by Lockheed Martin Astro space for the NASA Lewis Research Center, was launched in September 1993 on the shuttle STS 51 mission. ACTS is a digital experimental communications test bed that incorporates gigahertz bandwidth transponders operating at Ka band, hopping spot beams, on-board storage and switching, and dynamic rain fade compensation. This paper describes the ACTS enabling technologies, the design of the communications payload, the constraints imposed on the spacecraft bus, and the measurements conducted to verify the performance of the system in orbit.

  6. Advancing Interdisciplinary Approaches for Research and Applications for Forestry, Biodiversity and Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, J. S.; Craglia, M.; Bertrand, F.; Nativi, S.; Gaigalas, G.; Dubois, G.; Niemeyer, S.; Fritz, S.

    2010-12-01

    The challenge for research and applications of issues such as climate change and its impacts is that they need to be addressed through multi-disciplinary collaboration and analyses. Ultimately, this requires the ability to integrate information across scientific domains. For this purpose, the focus is not only with data sets, but also with modeling and analyses, leading to information for decision makers EuroGEOSS, an EC-sponsored FP7 project, is addressing and demonstrating interdisciplinary collaboration through an initial operating capability (IOC) for a European Environment Earth Observation System in the three strategic areas of drought, forestry and biodiversity. The challenge is that many times each domain has its own language, geospatial protocols and modeling approaches. Recognizing this, EuroGEOSS has implemented a brokering service that allows finding and accessing data from a wide range of standards and domain-specific practices. This brokering service has also been augmented with semantically rich querying capabilities to facilitate the inter-disciplinary dialogue. An important feature of EuroGEOSS is that it makes it possible to access and re-use not just data but also analytical models formalized in workflows, and made executable through Web Processing Services. The paper presents the range of functionalities achieved by EuroGEOSS, with the possibility to find and access data and models for drought, forestry, and biodiversity in Europe. This will be addressed through examining the consolidation within domains. Then, through a case-study in Spain, the cross-domain implications are examined where the combination of global, European, and local data sources in the three domains makes it possible to address scientific questions at the intersection of the three thematic areas in novel ways. The paper will also present the impact of advanced services through an assessment of societal benefits of the extended information availability.

  7. Advances in peptidic and peptidomimetic-based approaches to inhibit STAT signaling in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Szelag, Malgorzata; Wesoly, Joanna; Bluyssen, Hans A R

    2016-01-01

    STATs promote fundamental cellular processes, marking them as convergence points of many oncogenic and inflammatory pathways. Therefore, aberrant activation of STAT signaling is implicated in a plethora of human diseases, like cancer, inflammation and auto-immunity. Identification of STAT-specific inhibitors is the topic of great practical importance, and various inhibitory strategies are being pursued. An interesting approach includes peptides and peptide-like biopolymers, because they allow the manipulation of STAT signaling without the transfer of genetic material. Phosphopeptides and peptidomimetics directly target STATs by inhibiting dimerization. Despite that a large number of efficient peptide- based STAT3-specific inhibitors have been reported to date, none of them was able to meet the pharmacological requirements to serve as a potent anti-cancer drug. The existing limitations, like metabolic instability and poor cell permeability during in vivo tests, excluded these macromolecules from further clinical development. To overcome these liabilities, in the last five years many advances have been made to develop next generation STAT-specific inhibitors. Here we discuss the pitfalls of current STAT inhibitory strategies and review the progress on the development of peptide-like prodrugs directly targeting STATs. Novel strategies involve screening of high-complexity libraries of random peptides, as specific STAT3 or STAT5 DNA-binding inhibitors, to construct cell permeable peptide aptamers and aptides for cancer therapy. Another new direction is synthesis of negative dominant α-helical mimetics of the STAT3 N-domain, preventing oligomerization on DNA. Moreover, construction of phosphopeptide conjugates with molecules mediating cellular uptake offers new therapeutic possibilities in treatment of cancer, asthma and allergy. PMID:26521960

  8. Innovative Approaches to Development and Ground Testing of Advanced Bimodal Space Power and Propulsion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Thomas Johnathan; Noble, Cheryl Ann; Noble, C.; Martinell, John Stephen; Borowski, S.

    2000-07-01

    The last major development effort for nuclear power and propulsion systems ended in 1993. Currently, there is not an initiative at either the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that requires the development of new nuclear power and propulsion systems. Studies continue to show nuclear technology as a strong technical candidate to lead the way toward human exploration of adjacent planets or provide power for deep space missions, particularly a 15,000 lbf bimodal nuclear system with 115 kW power capability. The development of nuclear technology for space applications would require technology development in some areas and a major flight qualification program. The last major ground test facility considered for nuclear propulsion qualification was the U.S. Air Force/DOE Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project. Seven years have passed since that effort, and the questions remain the same, how to qualify nuclear power and propulsion systems for future space flight. It can be reasonable assumed that much of the nuclear testing required to qualify a nuclear system for space application will be performed at DOE facilities as demonstrated by the Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor Experiment (NERVA) and Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) programs. The nuclear infrastructure to support testing in this country is aging and getting smaller, though facilities still exist to support many of the technology development needs. By renewing efforts, an innovative approach to qualifying these systems through the use of existing facilities either in the U.S. (DOE's Advance Test Reactor, High Flux Irradiation Facility and the Contained Test Facility) or overseas should be possible.

  9. Innovation Approaches to Development and Ground Testing of Advanced Bimodal Space Power and Propulsion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, T.; Noble, C.; Martinell, J.; Borowski, S.

    2000-07-14

    The last major development effort for nuclear power and propulsion systems ended in 1993. Currently, there is not an initiative at either the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that requires the development of new nuclear power and propulsion systems. Studies continue to show nuclear technology as a strong technical candidate to lead the way toward human exploration of adjacent planets or provide power for deep space missions, particularly a 15,000 lbf bimodal nuclear system with 115 kW power capability. The development of nuclear technology for space applications would require technology development in some areas and a major flight qualification program. The last major ground test facility considered for nuclear propulsion qualification was the U.S. Air Force/DOE Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project. Seven years have passed since that effort, and the questions remain the same, how to qualify nuclear power and propulsion systems for future space flight. It can be reasonably assumed that much of the nuclear testing required to qualify a nuclear system for space application will be performed at DOE facilities as demonstrated by the Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor Experiment (NERVA) and Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) programs. The nuclear infrastructure to support testing in this country is aging and getting smaller, though facilities still exist to support many of the technology development needs. By renewing efforts, an innovative approach to qualifying these systems through the use of existing facilities either in the U.S. (DOE's Advance Test Reactor, High Flux Irradiation Facility and the Contained Test Facility) or overseas should be possible.

  10. Treatment of real industrial wastewater using the combined approach of advanced oxidation followed by aerobic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, Lokeshkumar P; Gogate, Parag R

    2016-05-01

    Fenton oxidation and ultrasound-based pretreatment have been applied to improve the treatment of real industrial wastewater based on the use of biological oxidation. The effect of operating parameters such as Fe(2+) loading, contact time, initial pH, and hydrogen peroxide loading on the extent of chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction and change in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5)/COD ratio has been investigated. The optimum operating conditions established for the pretreatment were initial pH of 3.0, Fe(2+) loading of 2.0, and 2.5 g L(-1) for the US/Fenton/stirring and Fenton approach, respectively, and temperature of 25 °C with initial H2O2 loading of 1.5 g L(-1). The use of pretreatment resulted in a significant increase in the BOD5/COD ratio confirming the production of easily digestible intermediates. The effect of the type of sludge in the aerobic biodegradation was also investigated based on the use of primary activated sludge (PAS), modified activated sludge (MAS), and activated sludge (AS). Enhanced removal of the pollutants as well as higher biomass yield was observed for MAS as compared to PAS and AS. The use of US/Fenton/stirring pretreatment under the optimized conditions followed by biological oxidation using MAS resulted in maximum COD removal at 97.9 %. The required hydraulic retention time for the combined oxidation system was also significantly lower as compared to only biological oxidation operation. Kinetic studies revealed that the reduction in the COD followed a first-order kinetic model for advanced oxidation and pseudo first-order model for biodegradation. The study clearly established the utility of the combined technology for the effective treatment of real industrial wastewater. PMID:26846248

  11. Advances in Landslide Hazard Forecasting: Evaluation of Global and Regional Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia B.; Adler, Robert; Hone, Yang; Kumar, Sujay; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Lerner-Lam, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    A prototype global satellite-based landslide hazard algorithm has been developed to identify areas that exhibit a high potential for landslide activity by combining a calculation of landslide susceptibility with satellite-derived rainfall estimates. A recent evaluation of this algorithm framework found that while this tool represents an important first step in larger-scale landslide forecasting efforts, it requires several modifications before it can be fully realized as an operational tool. The evaluation finds that the landslide forecasting may be more feasible at a regional scale. This study draws upon a prior work's recommendations to develop a new approach for considering landslide susceptibility and forecasting at the regional scale. This case study uses a database of landslides triggered by Hurricane Mitch in 1998 over four countries in Central America: Guatemala, Honduras, EI Salvador and Nicaragua. A regional susceptibility map is calculated from satellite and surface datasets using a statistical methodology. The susceptibility map is tested with a regional rainfall intensity-duration triggering relationship and results are compared to global algorithm framework for the Hurricane Mitch event. The statistical results suggest that this regional investigation provides one plausible way to approach some of the data and resolution issues identified in the global assessment, providing more realistic landslide forecasts for this case study. Evaluation of landslide hazards for this extreme event helps to identify several potential improvements of the algorithm framework, but also highlights several remaining challenges for the algorithm assessment, transferability and performance accuracy. Evaluation challenges include representation errors from comparing susceptibility maps of different spatial resolutions, biases in event-based landslide inventory data, and limited nonlandslide event data for more comprehensive evaluation. Additional factors that may improve

  12. CD bias reduction in CD-SEM linewidth measurements for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Maki; Meessen, Jeroen; Shishido, Chie; Watanabe, Kenji; Minnaert-Janssen, Ingrid; Vanoppen, Peter

    2008-03-01

    The linewidth measurement capability of the model-based library (MBL) matching technique was evaluated experimentally. This technique estimates the dimensions and shape of a target pattern by comparing a measured SEM image profile to a library of simulated line scans. The simulation model uses a non-linear least squares method to estimate pattern geometry parameters. To examine the application of MBL matching in an advanced lithography process, a focus-exposure matrix wafer was prepared with a leading-edge immersion lithography tool. The evaluation used 36 sites with target structures having various linewidths from 45 to 200 nm. The measurement accuracy was evaluated by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) as a reference measurement system. The results of a first trial indicated that two or more solutions could exist in the parameter space in MBL matching. To solve this problem, we obtained a rough estimation of the scale parameter in SEM imaging, based on experimental results, in order to add a constraint in the matching process. As a result, the sensitivity to sidewall variation in MBL matching was improved, and the measurement bias was reduced from 22.1 to 16 nm. These results indicate the possibility of improving the CD measurement capability by applying this tool parameter appropriately.

  13. Approach to market-penetration analysis for advanced electric-power-generation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lamontagne, J.; Love, P.; Queirolo, A.

    1980-12-01

    If commercialization of new technologies is the primary objective of the Department of Energy's Research, Development and Demonstration (RD and D) programs, the ultimate measure of benefit from RD and D programs is the extent of commercial acceptance of the developed technologies. Uncertainty about barriers to commercialization - government policy, fuel supply, etc. - make the task of estimating this acceptance very difficult. However, given that decisions must be made regarding allocation of RD and D funds, the best information available, with due regard for uncertainty, should serve as input to these decisions. An approach is presented for quantifying the range of market potential for new technologies (specifically in the utility sector) based on historical information and known plans for the future.

  14. Advances in the regionalization approach: geostatistical techniques for estimating flood quantiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarello, Valentina; Caporali, Enrica; Matthies, Hermann G.

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of peak flow discharges and associated floods is of primary importance in engineering practice for planning of water resources and risk assessment. Streamflow characteristics are usually estimated starting from measurements of river discharges at stream gauging stations. However, the lack of observations at site of interest as well as the measurement inaccuracies, bring inevitably to the necessity of developing predictive models. Regional analysis is a classical approach to estimate river flow characteristics at sites where little or no data exists. Specific techniques are needed to regionalize the hydrological variables over the considered area. Top-kriging or topological kriging, is a kriging interpolation procedure that takes into account the geometric organization and structure of hydrographic network, the catchment area and the nested nature of catchments. The continuous processes in space defined for the point variables are represented by a variogram. In Top-kriging, the measurements are not point values but are defined over a non-zero catchment area. Top-kriging is applied here over the geographical space of Tuscany Region, in Central Italy. The analysis is carried out on the discharge data of 57 consistent runoff gauges, recorded from 1923 to 2014. Top-kriging give also an estimation of the prediction uncertainty in addition to the prediction itself. The results are validated using a cross-validation procedure implemented in the package rtop of the open source statistical environment R The results are compared through different error measurement methods. Top-kriging seems to perform better in nested catchments and larger scale catchments but no for headwater or where there is a high variability for neighbouring catchments.

  15. Accuracy Advances in Measuring Earth Emission Spectra for Weather and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revercomb, H. E.; Best, F. A.; Tobin, D. C.; Knuteson, R. O.; Taylor, J. K.; Gero, P.; Adler, D. P.; Pettersen, C.; Mulligan, M.

    2011-12-01

    Launch of the first component of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) in late October is expected to initiate a new series of US afternoon satellites to complement the EUMETSAT MetOp EPS morning observations. A key component is the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) designed for advanced temperature and water vapor profiling for weather and climate applications. We have worked on getting this operational capability in space ever since conducting a Phase A instrument design in 1990, and will report on what is expected to be its highly accurate radiometric and spectral performance post launch. The expectation from thermal/vacuum testing is that the accuracy will exceed 0.2 K (k=3) brightness temperature at scene temperature for all three bands in the region from 3.5 to 15 microns. CrIS is expected to offer further confirmation of techniques that have proven to offer significant accuracy improvements for the new family of advanced sounding instruments including AIRS on NASA Aqua platform and IASI on MetOp A and that are needed in the new IR Decadal Survey measurements. CrIS and these other advanced sounders help set the stage for a new era in establishing spectrally resolved IR climate benchmark measurements from space. Here we report on being able to achieve even higher accuracy with instruments designed specifically for climate missions similar to the Decadal Survey Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO). Results will be presented from our NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) effort for which a new concept for on-orbit verification and test has been developed. This system is capable of performing fundamental radiometric calibration, spectral characterization and calibration, and other key performance tests that are normally only performed prior to launch in thermal/vacuum testing. By verifying accuracy directly on-orbit, this capability should provide the ultra-high confidence in data sets needed for societal decision making.

  16. A Multi-Dimensional Approach to Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vraga, Emily; Tully, Melissa; Kotcher, John E.; Smithson, Anne-Bennett; Broeckelman-Post, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Measuring news media literacy is important in order for it to thrive in a variety of educational and civic contexts. This research builds on existing measures of news media literacy and two new scales are presented that measure self-perceived media literacy (SPML) and perceptions of the value of media literacy (VML). Research with a larger sample…

  17. Integrated Multipoint-Laser Endoscopic Airway Measurements by Transoral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Neitsch, Marie; Horn, Iris-Susanne; Hofer, Mathias; Dietz, Andreas; Fischer, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Optical and technical characteristics usually do not allow objective endoscopic distance measurements. So far no standardized method for endoscopic distance measurement is available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of transoral airway measurements with a multipoint-laser endoscope. Methods. The semirigid endoscope includes a multipoint laser measurement system that projects 49 laser points (wavelength 639 nm, power < 5 mW) into the optical axis of the endoscopic view. Distances, areas, and depths can be measured in real-time. Transoral endoscopic airway measurements were performed on nine human cadavers, which were correlated with CT measurements. Results. The preliminary experiment showed an optimum distance between the endoscope tip and the object of 5 to 6 cm. There was a mean measurement error of 3.26% ± 2.53%. A Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.95 (p = 0.01) was calculated for the laryngeal measurements and of 0.93 (p < 0.01) for the tracheal measurements compared to the CT. Using the Bland-Altman-Plot, the 95% limits of agreement for the laryngeal measurements were satisfactory: −0.76 and 0.93. Conclusions. Integrated multipoint-laser endoscopic measurement is a promising technical supplement, with potential use in diagnostic endoscopy and transoral endoscopic surgery in daily practice. PMID:27022612

  18. Application of visible bremsstrahlung to Z(eff) measurement on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingjie; Wu, Zhenwei; Gao, Wei; Ti, Ang; Zhang, Ling; Jie, Yinxian; Zhang, Jizong; Huang, Juan; Xu, Zong; Zhao, Junyu

    2015-02-01

    The multi-channel visible bremsstrahlung measurement system has been developed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). In addition to providing effective ion charge Zeff as a routine diagnostic, this diagnostic can also be used to estimate other parameters. With the assumption that Zeff can be seen as constant across the radius and does not change significantly during steady state discharges, central electron temperature, averaged electron density, electron density profile, and plasma current density profile have been obtained based on the scaling of Zeff with electron density and the relations between Zeff and these parameters. The estimated results are in good coincidence with measured values, providing an effective and convenient method to estimate other plasma parameters. PMID:25725844

  19. Advanced Nuclear Measurements - Sensitivity Analysis Emerging Safeguards, Problems and Proliferation Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, J.S.

    1999-07-15

    During the past year this component of the Advanced Nuclear Measurements LDRD-DR has focused on emerging safeguards problems and proliferation risk by investigating problems in two domains. The first is related to the analysis, quantification, and characterization of existing inventories of fissile materials, in particular, the minor actinides (MA) formed in the commercial fuel cycle. Understanding material forms and quantities helps identify and define future measurement problems, instrument requirements, and assists in prioritizing safeguards technology development. The second problem (dissertation research) has focused on the development of a theoretical foundation for sensor array anomaly detection. Remote and unattended monitoring or verification of safeguards activities is becoming a necessity due to domestic and international budgetary constraints. However, the ability to assess the trustworthiness of a sensor array has not been investigated. This research is developing an anomaly detection methodology to assess the sensor array.

  20. Advancing the extended parallel process model through the inclusion of response cost measures.

    PubMed

    Rintamaki, Lance S; Yang, Z Janet

    2014-01-01

    This study advances the Extended Parallel Process Model through the inclusion of response cost measures, which are drawbacks associated with a proposed response to a health threat. A sample of 502 college students completed a questionnaire on perceptions regarding sexually transmitted infections and condom use after reading information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the health risks of sexually transmitted infections and the utility of latex condoms in preventing sexually transmitted infection transmission. The questionnaire included standard Extended Parallel Process Model assessments of perceived threat and efficacy, as well as questions pertaining to response costs associated with condom use. Results from hierarchical ordinary least squares regression demonstrated how the addition of response cost measures improved the predictive power of the Extended Parallel Process Model, supporting the inclusion of this variable in the model. PMID:24730535

  1. Application of visible bremsstrahlung to Z{sub eff} measurement on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yingjie; Wu, Zhenwei; Gao, Wei; Ti, Ang; Zhang, Ling; Jie, Yinxian; Zhang, Jizong; Huang, Juan; Xu, Zong; Zhao, Junyu

    2015-02-15

    The multi-channel visible bremsstrahlung measurement system has been developed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). In addition to providing effective ion charge Z{sub eff} as a routine diagnostic, this diagnostic can also be used to estimate other parameters. With the assumption that Z{sub eff} can be seen as constant across the radius and does not change significantly during steady state discharges, central electron temperature, averaged electron density, electron density profile, and plasma current density profile have been obtained based on the scaling of Z{sub eff} with electron density and the relations between Z{sub eff} and these parameters. The estimated results are in good coincidence with measured values, providing an effective and convenient method to estimate other plasma parameters.

  2. Unified Instrumentation: Examining the Simultaneous Application of Advanced Measurement Techniques for Increased Wind Tunnel Testing Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A. (Editor); Bartram, Scott M.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Joseph W.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Meyers, James F.; South, Bruce W.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2002-01-01

    A Unified Instrumentation Test examining the combined application of Pressure Sensitive Paint, Projection Moire Interferometry, Digital Particle Image Velocimetry, Doppler Global Velocimetry, and Acoustic Microphone Array has been conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. The fundamental purposes of conducting the test were to: (a) identify and solve compatibility issues among the techniques that would inhibit their simultaneous application in a wind tunnel, and (b) demonstrate that simultaneous use of advanced instrumentation techniques is feasible for increasing tunnel efficiency and identifying control surface actuation / aerodynamic reaction phenomena. This paper provides summary descriptions of each measurement technique used during the Unified Instrumentation Test, their implementation for testing in a unified fashion, and example results identifying areas of instrument compatibility and incompatibility. Conclusions are drawn regarding the conditions under which the measurement techniques can be operated simultaneously on a non-interference basis. Finally, areas requiring improvement for successfully applying unified instrumentation in future wind tunnel tests are addressed.

  3. Badhwar-O'Neil 2007 Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model Using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Measurements for Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. M.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite measurements of the galactic cosmic ray flux and correlation with the Climax Neutron Monitor count over Solar Cycle 23 are used to update the Badhwar O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) model.

  4. Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Kelley, N.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades were compared to assess the accuracy of predictions and to identify the sources of error affecting both predictions and measurements. An awareness of these sources of error contributes to improved prediction and measurement methods that will ultimately benefit future rotor design efforts. Propeller/vane anemometers were found to underestimate the wind speed in turbulent environments such as the San Gorgonio Pass wind farm area. Using sonic or cup anemometers, good agreement was achieved between predicted and measured power output for wind speeds up to 8 m/sec. At higher wind speeds an optimistic predicted power output and the occurrence of peak power at wind speeds lower than measurements resulted from the omission of turbulence and yaw error. In addition, accurate two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil data prior to stall and a post stall airfoil data synthesization method that reflects three-dimensional (3-D) effects were found to be essential for accurate performance prediction. 11 refs.

  5. Measurements of the subcriticality using advanced technique of shooting source during operation of NPP reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, G. V. Petrov, V. V.; Bobylyov, V. T.; Butov, R. I.; Zhukov, A. M.; Sladkov, A. A.

    2014-12-15

    According to the rules of nuclear safety, the measurements of the subcriticality of reactors should be carried out in the process of performing nuclear hazardous operations. An advanced technique of shooting source of neutrons is proposed to meet this requirement. As such a source, a pulsed neutron source (PNS) is used. In order to realize this technique, it is recommended to enable a PNS with a frequency of 1–20 Hz. The PNS is stopped after achieving a steady-state (on average) number of neutrons in the reactor volume. The change in the number of neutrons in the reactor volume is measured in time with an interval of discreteness of ∼0.1 s. The results of these measurements with the application of a system of point-kinetics equations are used in order to calculate the sought subcriticality. The basic idea of the proposed technique used to measure the subcriticality is elaborated in a series of experiments on the Kvant assembly. The conditions which should be implemented in order to obtain a positive result of measurements are formulated. A block diagram of the basic version of the experimental setup is presented, whose main element is a pulsed neutron generator.

  6. Measurements of the subcriticality using advanced technique of shooting source during operation of NPP reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, G. V.; Petrov, V. V.; Bobylyov, V. T.; Butov, R. I.; Zhukov, A. M.; Sladkov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    According to the rules of nuclear safety, the measurements of the subcriticality of reactors should be carried out in the process of performing nuclear hazardous operations. An advanced technique of shooting source of neutrons is proposed to meet this requirement. As such a source, a pulsed neutron source (PNS) is used. In order to realize this technique, it is recommended to enable a PNS with a frequency of 1-20 Hz. The PNS is stopped after achieving a steady-state (on average) number of neutrons in the reactor volume. The change in the number of neutrons in the reactor volume is measured in time with an interval of discreteness of ˜0.1 s. The results of these measurements with the application of a system of point-kinetics equations are used in order to calculate the sought subcriticality. The basic idea of the proposed technique used to measure the subcriticality is elaborated in a series of experiments on the Kvant assembly. The conditions which should be implemented in order to obtain a positive result of measurements are formulated. A block diagram of the basic version of the experimental setup is presented, whose main element is a pulsed neutron generator.

  7. A Unified Approach for Reporting ARM Measurement Uncertainties Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, E; Sisterson, DL

    2015-10-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is observationally based, and quantifying the uncertainty of its measurements is critically important. With over 300 widely differing instruments providing over 2,500 datastreams, concise expression of measurement uncertainty is quite challenging. The ARM Facility currently provides data and supporting metadata (information about the data or data quality) to its users through a number of sources. Because the continued success of the ARM Facility depends on the known quality of its measurements, the Facility relies on instrument mentors and the ARM Data Quality Office (DQO) to ensure, assess, and report measurement quality. Therefore, an easily-accessible, well-articulated estimate of ARM measurement uncertainty is needed.

  8. An integrative approach for measuring semantic similarities using gene ontology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene Ontology (GO) provides rich information and a convenient way to study gene functional similarity, which has been successfully used in various applications. However, the existing GO based similarity measurements have limited functions for only a subset of GO information is considered in each measure. An appropriate integration of the existing measures to take into account more information in GO is demanding. Results We propose a novel integrative measure called InteGO2 to automatically select appropriate seed measures and then to integrate them using a metaheuristic search method. The experiment results show that InteGO2 significantly improves the performance of gene similarity in human, Arabidopsis and yeast on both molecular function and biological process GO categories. Conclusions InteGO2 computes gene-to-gene similarities more accurately than tested existing measures and has high robustness. The supplementary document and software are available at http://mlg.hit.edu.cn:8082/. PMID:25559943

  9. Systemic treatment approaches in her2-negative advanced breast cancer—guidance on the guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Joy, A.A.; Ghosh, M.; Fernandes, R.; Clemons, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advancements in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer, many patients still develop disease recurrence; others present with de novo metastatic disease. For most patients with advanced breast cancer, the primary treatment intent is noncurative—that is, palliative—in nature. The goals of treatment should therefore focus on maximizing symptom control and extending survival. Treatments should be evaluated on an individualized basis in terms of evidence, but also with full respect for the wishes of the patient in terms of acceptable toxicity. Given the availability of extensive reviews on the roles of endocrine therapy and her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)–targeted therapies for advanced disease, we focus here mainly on treatment guidelines for the non-endocrine management of her2-negative advanced breast cancer in a Canadian health care context. PMID:25848337

  10. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 5 of 6: Phase Measurement of Galvanneal

    SciTech Connect

    Cristopher Burnett; Ronald Guel; James R. Philips; L. Lowry; Beverly Tai

    1999-05-31

    Augmentation of the internal software of a commercial X-ray fluorescence gauge is shown to enable the instrument to extend its continuous on-line real-time measurements of a galvanneal coating's total elemental content to encompass similar measurements of the relative thickness of the coating's three principal metallurgical phases. The mathematical structure of this software augmentation is derived from the theory of neural networks. The performance of the augmented gauge is validated by comparing the gauge implied real-time phase distribution with the phase distribution independently measured off-line on between the gauge and laboratory measurements and to suggest preferred approaches to be followed in future application of the augmented gauge.

  11. Advances in GRAIL Gravity Field Determination Using the Celestial Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, S.; Arnold, D.; Jaeggi, A.; Beutler, G.; Mervart, L.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA mission GRAIL inherits its concept from the GRACE mission to determine the gravity field of the Moon. The use of inter-satellite Ka-band range-rate (KBRR) observations enables data acquisition even when the spacecraft are not tracked from the Earth. The data allows for a highly accurate estimation of the lunar gravity field on both sides of the Moon, which is leading to huge improvements in our understanding of its internal structure and thermal evolution. In this presentation we discuss the latest GRAIL-based lunar gravity fields generated with the Celestial Mechanics Approach using the Bernese GNSS Software. We present our recent solutions up to d/o 200, where KBRR observations and position data (GNI1B products) were used to solve for the lunar gravity field parameters in a generalized orbit determination problem. We detail our parametrization in terms of pseudo-stochastic pulses and empirical accelerations, which allows for high quality results even while using a simple model of non-gravitational forces and pre-GRAIL a priori fields. Moreover, we present our latest advances towards the computation of a lunar gravity field with improved spatial resolution.As a further extension of our processing, the GNI1B positions are replaced by the original Doppler observations of the Deep Space Network (DSN) to allow for a completely independent determination of the lunar gravity field. Based on Doppler data, we perform orbit determination by solving six initial orbital elements, dynamical parameters, and stochastic parameters in daily arcs using least squares-adjustment. The pseudo-stochastic parameters are estimated to absorb deficiencies in our dynamical modeling (e.g. due to non-gravitational forces). DSN Doppler and KBRR data are then used together with an appropriate weighting for a combined orbit determination process. We present our latest results in the orbit determination of GRAIL over the primary mission phase (PM, March-May 2012) and eventually present

  12. Probabilistic approach to cloud and snow detection on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musial, J. P.; Hüsler, F.; Sütterlin, M.; Neuhaus, C.; Wunderle, S.

    2014-03-01

    Derivation of probability estimates complementary to geophysical data sets has gained special attention over the last years. Information about a confidence level of provided physical quantities is required to construct an error budget of higher-level products and to correctly interpret final results of a particular analysis. Regarding the generation of products based on satellite data a common input consists of a cloud mask which allows discrimination between surface and cloud signals. Further the surface information is divided between snow and snow-free components. At any step of this discrimination process a misclassification in a cloud/snow mask propagates to higher-level products and may alter their usability. Within this scope a novel probabilistic cloud mask (PCM) algorithm suited for the 1 km × 1 km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data is proposed which provides three types of probability estimates between: cloudy/clear-sky, cloudy/snow and clear-sky/snow conditions. As opposed to the majority of available techniques which are usually based on the decision-tree approach in the PCM algorithm all spectral, angular and ancillary information is used in a single step to retrieve probability estimates from the precomputed look-up tables (LUTs). Moreover, the issue of derivation of a single threshold value for a spectral test was overcome by the concept of multidimensional information space which is divided into small bins by an extensive set of intervals. The discrimination between snow and ice clouds and detection of broken, thin clouds was enhanced by means of the invariant coordinate system (ICS) transformation. The study area covers a wide range of environmental conditions spanning from Iceland through central Europe to northern parts of Africa which exhibit diverse difficulties for cloud/snow masking algorithms. The retrieved PCM cloud classification was compared to the Polar Platform System (PPS) version 2012 and Moderate Resolution Imaging

  13. Recent Advances in AC-DC Transfer Measurements Using Thin-Film Thermal Converters

    SciTech Connect

    WUNSCH,THOMAS F.; KINARD,JOSEPH R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; LIPE,THOMAS E.; SOLOMON JR.,OTIS M.; JUNGLING,KENNETH C.

    2000-12-08

    New standards for ac current and voltage measurements, thin-film multifunction thermal converters (MJTCS), have been fabricated using thin-film and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Improved sensitivity and accuracy over single-junction thermoelements and targeted performance will allow new measurement approaches in traditionally troublesome areas such as the low frequency and high current regimes. A review is presented of new microfabrication techniques and packaging methods that have resulted from a collaborative effort at Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (MHZ).

  14. Recent advances in hardware and software are to improve spent fuel measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, P.; Beddingfield, D. H.; Lestone, J. P.; Pelowitz, D. G.; Bytchkov, M.; Starovich, Z.; Harizanov, I.; Luna-Vellejo, J.; Lavender, C.

    2001-01-01

    Vast quantities of spent fuel are available for safeguard measurements, primarily in Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) of the former Soviet Union. This spent fuel, much of which consists of long-cooling-time material, is going to become less unique in the world safeguards arena as reprocessing projects or permanent repositories continue to be delayed or postponed. The long cooling time of many of the spent fuel assemblies being prepared for intermediate term storage in the CIS countries promotes the possibility of increased accuracy in spent fuel assays. This improvement is made possible through the process of decay of the Curium isotopes and of fission products. An important point to consider for the future that could advance safeguards measurements for reverification and inspection would be to determine what safeguards requirements should be imposed upon this 'new' class of spent fuel, Improvements in measurement capability will obviously affect the safeguards requirements. What most significantly enables this progress in spent fuel measurements is the improvement in computer processing power and software enhancements leading to user-friendly Graphical User Interfaces (GUT's). The software used for these projects significantly reduces the IAEA inspector's time expenditure for both learning and operating computer and data acquisition systems, At the same time, by standardizing the spent fuel measurements, it is possible to increase reproducibility and reliability of the measurement data. Hardware systems will be described which take advantage of the increased computer control available to enable more complex measurement scenarios. A specific example of this is the active regulation of a spent fuel neutron coincident counter's {sup 3}He tubes high voltage, and subsequent scaling of measurement results to maintain a calibration for direct assay of the plutonium content of Fast Breeder Reactor spent fuel. The plutonium content has been successfully determined

  15. The Fitness Landscape of HIV-1 Gag: Advanced Modeling Approaches and Validation of Model Predictions by In Vitro Testing

    PubMed Central

    Omarjee, Saleha; Walker, Bruce D.; Chakraborty, Arup; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2014-01-01

    Viral immune evasion by sequence variation is a major hindrance to HIV-1 vaccine design. To address this challenge, our group has developed a computational model, rooted in physics, that aims to predict the fitness landscape of HIV-1 proteins in order to design vaccine immunogens that lead to impaired viral fitness, thus blocking viable escape routes. Here, we advance the computational models to address previous limitations, and directly test model predictions against in vitro fitness measurements of HIV-1 strains containing multiple Gag mutations. We incorporated regularization into the model fitting procedure to address finite sampling. Further, we developed a model that accounts for the specific identity of mutant amino acids (Potts model), generalizing our previous approach (Ising model) that is unable to distinguish between different mutant amino acids. Gag mutation combinations (17 pairs, 1 triple and 25 single mutations within these) predicted to be either harmful to HIV-1 viability or fitness-neutral were introduced into HIV-1 NL4-3 by site-directed mutagenesis and replication capacities of these mutants were assayed in vitro. The predicted and measured fitness of the corresponding mutants for the original Ising model (r = −0.74, p = 3.6×10−6) are strongly correlated, and this was further strengthened in the regularized Ising model (r = −0.83, p = 3.7×10−12). Performance of the Potts model (r = −0.73, p = 9.7×10−9) was similar to that of the Ising model, indicating that the binary approximation is sufficient for capturing fitness effects of common mutants at sites of low amino acid diversity. However, we show that the Potts model is expected to improve predictive power for more variable proteins. Overall, our results support the ability of the computational models to robustly predict the relative fitness of mutant viral strains, and indicate the potential value of this approach for understanding viral immune evasion

  16. Advancing the science of measurement of diagnostic errors in healthcare: the Safer Dx framework

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hardeep; Sittig, Dean F

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic errors are major contributors to harmful patient outcomes, yet they remain a relatively understudied and unmeasured area of patient safety. Although they are estimated to affect about 12 million Americans each year in ambulatory care settings alone, both the conceptual and pragmatic scientific foundation for their measurement is under-developed. Health care organizations do not have the tools and strategies to measure diagnostic safety and most have not integrated diagnostic error into their existing patient safety programs. Further progress toward reducing diagnostic errors will hinge on our ability to overcome measurement-related challenges. In order to lay a robust groundwork for measurement and monitoring techniques to ensure diagnostic safety, we recently developed a multifaceted framework to advance the science of measuring diagnostic errors (The Safer Dx framework). In this paper, we describe how the framework serves as a conceptual foundation for system-wide safety measurement, monitoring and improvement of diagnostic error. The framework accounts for the complex adaptive sociotechnical system in which diagnosis takes place (the structure), the distributed process dimensions in which diagnoses evolve beyond the doctor's visit (the process) and the outcomes of a correct and timely “safe diagnosis” as well as patient and health care outcomes (the outcomes). We posit that the Safer Dx framework can be used by a variety of stakeholders including researchers, clinicians, health care organizations and policymakers, to stimulate both retrospective and more proactive measurement of diagnostic errors. The feedback and learning that would result will help develop subsequent interventions that lead to safer diagnosis, improved value of health care delivery and improved patient outcomes. PMID:25589094

  17. Solid-state dosimeters: A new approach for mammography measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brateman, Libby F.; Heintz, Philip H.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To compare responses of modern commercially available solid-state dosimeters (SStDs) used in mammography medical physics surveys for two major vendors of current digital mammography units. To compare differences in dose estimates among SStD responses with ionization chamber (IC) measurements for several target/filter (TF) combinations and report their characteristics. To review scientific bases for measurements of quantities required for mammography for traditional measurement procedures and SStDs. Methods: SStDs designed for use with modern digital mammography units were acquired for evaluation from four manufacturers. Each instrument was evaluated under similar conditions with the available mammography beams provided by two modern full-field digital mammography units in clinical use: a GE Healthcare Senographe Essential (Essential) and a Hologic Selenia Dimensions 5000 (Dimensions), with TFs of Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh; and Rh/Rh and W/Rh, W/Ag, and W/Al, respectively. Measurements were compared among the instruments for the TFs over their respective clinical ranges of peak tube potentials for kVp and half-value layer (HVL) measurements. Comparisons for air kerma (AK) and their associated relative calculated average glandular doses (AGDs), i.e., using fixed mAs, were evaluated over the limited range of 28–30 kVp. Measurements were compared with reference IC measurements for AK, reference HVLs and calculated AGD, for two compression paddle heights for AK, to evaluate scatter effects from compression paddles. SStDs may require different positioning from current mammography measurement protocols. Results: Measurements of kVp were accurate in general for the SStDs (within −1.2 and +1.1 kVp) for all instruments over a wide range of set kVp’s and TFs and most accurate for Mo/Mo and W/Rh. Discrepancies between measurements and reference values were greater for HVL and AK. Measured HVL values differed from reference values by −6.5% to +3.5% depending on the SStD and

  18. Measured noise of a scale model high speed propeller at simulated takeoff/approach conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    A model high-speed advanced propeller, SR-7A, was tested in the NASA Lewis 9x15 foot anechoic wind tunnel at simulated takeoff/approach conditions of 0.2 Mach number. These tests were in support of the full-scale Propfan Text Assessment (PTA) flight program. Acoustic measurements were taken with fixed microphone arrays and with an axially translating microphone probe. Limited aerodynamic measurements were also taken to establish the propeller operating conditions. Tests were conducted with the propeller alone and with three down-stream wing configurations. The propeller was run over a range of blade setting angles from 32.0 deg. to 43.6 deg., tip speeds from 183 to 290 m/sec (600 to 950 ft/sec), and angles of attack from -10 deg. to +15 deg. The propeller alone BPF tone noise was found to increase 10 dB in the flyover plane at 15 deg. propeller axis angle of attack. The installation of the straight wing at minimum spacing of 0.54 wing chord increased the tone noise 5 dB under the wing of 10 deg. propeller axis angle of attack, while a similarly spaced inboard upswept wing only increased the tone noise 2 dB.

  19. MPACT FY2011 Advanced Time-Correlated Measurement Research at INL

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; S. M. Watson

    2011-09-01

    Simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate advanced time-correlated measurement methods for characterizing and assaying nuclear material for safeguarding the nuclear fuel cycle. These activities are part of a project studying advanced instrumentation techniques in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and its Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) program. For fiscal year 2011 work focused on examining the practical experimental aspects of using a time-tagged, associated-particle electronic neutron generator for interrogating low-enrichment uranium in combination with steady-state interrogation using a moderated 241Am-Li neutron source. Simulation work for the project involved the use of the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation tool to determine the relative strength and the time-of-flight energy spectra of different sample materials under irradiation. Work also took place to develop a post-processor parser code to extract comparable data from the MCNP5&6 codes. Experiments took place using a commercial deuterium-tritium associated-particle electronic neutron generator to irradiate a number of uranium-bearing material samples. Time-correlated measurements of neutron and photon signatures of these measurements were made using five liquid scintillator detectors in a novel array, using high-speed waveform digitizers for data collection. This report summarizes the experiments that took place in FY2011, presents preliminary analyses that have been carried out to date for a subpart of these experiments, and describes future activities planned in this area. The report also describes support Idaho National Laboratory gave to Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2011 to facilitate 2-dimensional imagery of mixed-oxide fuel pins for safeguards applications as a part of the MPACT program.

  20. Solving Complex Problems: A Convergent Approach to Cognitive Load Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Robert; Cook, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The study challenged the current practices in cognitive load measurement involving complex problem solving by manipulating the presence of pictures in multiple rule-based problem-solving situations and examining the cognitive load resulting from both off-line and online measures associated with complex problem solving. Forty-eight participants…

  1. Defining and Measuring Entrepreneurship for Regional Research: A New Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    In this dissertation, I develop a definition and regional measure of entrepreneurship that will aid entrepreneurship research and economic development policy. My new indicators represent an improvement over current measures of entrepreneurship. The chief contribution of these new indicators is that they incorporate innovation, which others ignore.…

  2. The Relative Importance of Job Factors: A New Measurement Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nealey, Stanley M.

    This paper reports on a new two-phase measurement technique that permits a direct comparison of the perceived relative importance of economic vs. non-economic factors in a job situation in accounting for personnel retention, the willingness to produce, and job satisfaction. The paired comparison method was used to measure the preferences of 91…

  3. Measuring Nitrification: A Laboratory Approach to Nutrient Cycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an approach to the study of nutrient cycling in the school laboratory. Discussed are obtaining, processing, and incubating samples; extraction of ions from soil; procedures for nitrate and ammonium analysis; data analysis; an example of results; and other aspects of the nitrogen cycle. (CW)

  4. A novel approach to Hugoniot measurements utilizing transparent crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J. H.; Akin, M. C.; Chau, R.; Holmes, N. C.

    2013-01-01

    A new absolute equation of state measurement technique is described and demonstrated measuring the shock state and the refractive index of MgO up to 226GPa. This technique utilizes steady shock waves and the high-pressure transparency of MgO under dynamic shock compression and release. Hugoniot measurements performed using this technique are consistent with the previous measurements. A linear dependence of the shocked refractive index and density is observed up to 226GPa, over a magnitude greater in pressure that previous studies. The transparency of MgO along the principal Hugoniot is higher than any other material reported to date. We observe a significant change in the refractive index of MgO as the Hugoniot elastic limit is exceeded due to the transition from uniaxial to hydrostatic strain. Measurements of the elastic-plastic two-wave structure in MgO indicate a nucleation time for plastic deformation.

  5. Advancements in Root Growth Measurement Technologies and Observation Capabilities for Container-Grown Plants

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Lesley A.; Jackson, Brian E.; Fonteno, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The study, characterization, observation, and quantification of plant root growth and root systems (Rhizometrics) has been and remains an important area of research in all disciplines of plant science. In the horticultural industry, a large portion of the crops grown annually are grown in pot culture. Root growth is a critical component in overall plant performance during production in containers, and therefore it is important to understand the factors that influence and/or possible enhance it. Quantifying root growth has varied over the last several decades with each method of quantification changing in its reliability of measurement and variation among the results. Methods such as root drawings, pin boards, rhizotrons, and minirhizotrons initiated the aptitude to measure roots with field crops, and have been expanded to container-grown plants. However, many of the published research methods are monotonous and time-consuming. More recently, computer programs have increased in use as technology advances and measuring characteristics of root growth becomes easier. These programs are instrumental in analyzing various root growth characteristics, from root diameter and length of individual roots to branching angle and topological depth of the root architecture. This review delves into the expanding technologies involved with expertly measuring root growth of plants in containers, and the advantages and disadvantages that remain. PMID:27135334

  6. Further measurements of bremsstrahlung from the insertion device beamlines of the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Job, P. K.

    1998-09-16

    Bremsstrahlung is produced in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring when the positron beam interacts with the storage-ring components or with the residual gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum. The interaction of the positrons with the gas molecules occurs continually during storage ring operation. Bremsstrahlung is important at the insertion device straight sections because the contribution from each interaction adds up to produce a narrow mono-directional beam that travel down the beamlines. At the APS, with long storage ring beam straight paths (15.38 meters), gas bremsstrahlung in the insertion device beamlines can be significant. The preliminary results of the bremsstrahlung measurements in the insertion device beamlines of the APS was presented at SATIF3. This paper presents the results of further measurements at the two insertion device (ID) beamlines with higher statistics in the data collection. The beam current and the vacuum normalized bremsstrahlung power is fairly constant in a beamline for a given storage ring fill pattern, but may vary from beamline to beamline. The average bremsstrahlung power is measured as 118 {+-} 9 GeV/s/nT/mA at beamline 11 ID and as 36 {+-} 2 GeV/s/nT/mA at beamline 6 ID. These results, along with the results from the four previous independent bremsstrahlung measurements, enabled us to conclude upon the various reasons causing this variation.

  7. Phase loop bandwidth measurements on the advanced photon source 352 MHz rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, D.; Nassiri, A.; Schwartz, C.

    1997-08-01

    Phase loop bandwidth tests were performed on the Advanced Photon Source storage ring 352-MHz rf systems. These measurements were made using the HP3563A Control Systems Analyzer, with the rf systems running at 30 kilowatts into each of the storage ring cavities, without stored beam. An electronic phase shifter was used to inject approximately 14 degrees of stimulated phase shift into the low-level rf system, which produced measureable response voltage in the feedback loops without upsetting normal rf system operation. With the PID (proportional-integral-differential) amplifier settings at the values used during accelerator operation, the measurement data revealed that the 3-dB response for the cavity sum and klystron power-phase loops is approximately 7 kHz and 45 kHz, respectively, with the cavities the primary bandwidth-limiting factor in the cavity-sum loop. Data were taken at various PID settings until the loops became unstable. Crosstalk between the two phase loops was measured.

  8. Recent Advances in Ligand-Based Drug Design: Relevance and Utility of the Conformationally Sampled Pharmacophore Approach

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Chayan; Coop, Andrew; Polli, James E.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of three-dimensional (3D) structures of potential drug targets, ligand-based drug design is one of the popular approaches for drug discovery and lead optimization. 3D structure-activity relationships (3D QSAR) and pharmacophore modeling are the most important and widely used tools in ligand-based drug design that can provide crucial insights into the nature of the interactions between drug target and ligand molecule and provide predictive models suitable for lead compound optimization. This review article will briefly discuss the features and potential application of recent advances in ligand-based drug design, with emphasis on a detailed description of a novel 3D QSAR method based on the conformationally sample pharmacophore (CSP) approach (denoted CSP-SAR). In addition, data from a published study is used to compare the CSP-SAR approach to the Catalyst method, emphasizing the utility of the CSP approach for ligand-based model development. PMID:20807187

  9. Science-Based Approach for Advancing Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy: Integrating Numerical Simulations with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Chamorro, L. P.; Hill, C.

    2011-12-01

    experimentally in the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory Main Channel. The experiments and simulations are compared with each other and shown to be in very good agreement both in terms of the mean flow and the turbulence statistics. The results are analyzed to study the structure of turbulence in the wake of the turbine and also identify the effects of turbulent fluctuations in the approach flow on the power produced by the turbine. Overall our results make a strong case that high-resolution numerical modeling, validated with detailed laboratory measurements, is a viable tool for assessing and optimizing the performance of MHK devices.

  10. Advanced Endovascular Approaches in the Management of Challenging Proximal Aortic Neck Anatomy: Traditional Endografts and the Snorkel Technique.

    PubMed

    Quatromoni, Jon G; Orlova, Ksenia; Foley, Paul J

    2015-09-01

    Advances in endovascular technology, and access to this technology, have significantly changed the field of vascular surgery. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), in which endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has replaced the traditional open surgical approach in patients with suitable anatomy. However, approximately one-third of patients presenting with AAAs are deemed ineligible for standard EVAR because of anatomic constraints, the majority of which involve the proximal aneurysmal neck. To overcome these challenges, a bevy of endovascular approaches have been developed to either enhance stent graft fixation at the proximal neck or extend the proximal landing zone to allow adequate apposition to the aortic wall and thus aneurysm exclusion. This article is composed of two sections that together address new endovascular approaches for treating aortic aneurysms with difficult proximal neck anatomy. The first section will explore advancements in the traditional EVAR approach for hostile neck anatomy that maximize the use of the native proximal landing zone; the second section will discuss a technique that was developed to extend the native proximal landing zone and maintain perfusion to vital aortic branches using common, off-the-shelf components: the snorkel technique. While the techniques presented differ in terms of approach, the available clinical data, albeit limited, support the notion that they may both have roles in the treatment algorithm for patients with challenging proximal neck anatomy. PMID:26327748

  11. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  12. Advanced video extensometer for non-contact, real-time, high-accuracy strain measurement.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Tian, Long

    2016-08-22

    We developed an advanced video extensometer for non-contact, real-time, high-accuracy strain measurement in material testing. In the established video extensometer, a "near perfect and ultra-stable" imaging system, combining the idea of active imaging with a high-quality bilateral telecentric lens, is constructed to acquire high-fidelity video images of the test sample surface, which is invariant to ambient lighting changes and small out-of-plane motions occurred between the object surface and image plane. In addition, an efficient and accurate inverse compositional Gauss-Newton algorithm incorporating a temporal initial guess transfer scheme and a high-accuracy interpolation method is employed to achieve real-time, high-accuracy displacement tracking with negligible bias error. Tensile tests of an aluminum sample and a carbon fiber filament sample were performed to demonstrate the efficiency, repeatability and accuracy of the developed advanced video extensometer. The results indicate that longitudinal and transversal strains can be estimated and plotted at a rate of 117 fps and with a maximum strain error less than 30 microstrains. PMID:27557188

  13. Two Automated Techniques for Carotid Lumen Diameter Measurement: Regional versus Boundary Approaches.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tadashi; Kumar, P Krishna; Suri, Harman S; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Gupta, Ajay; Saba, Luca; Rajan, Jeny; Lavra, Francesco; Sharma, Aditya M; Shafique, Shoaib; Nicolaides, Andrew; Laird, John R; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-07-01

    The degree of stenosis in the carotid artery can be predicted using automated carotid lumen diameter (LD) measured from B-mode ultrasound images. Systolic velocity-based methods for measurement of LD are subjective. With the advancement of high resolution imaging, image-based methods have started to emerge. However, they require robust image analysis for accurate LD measurement. This paper presents two different algorithms for automated segmentation of the lumen borders in carotid ultrasound images. Both algorithms are modeled as a two stage process. Stage one consists of a global-based model using scale-space framework for the extraction of the region of interest. This stage is common to both algorithms. Stage two is modeled using a local-based strategy that extracts the lumen interfaces. At this stage, the algorithm-1 is modeled as a region-based strategy using a classification framework, whereas the algorithm-2 is modeled as a boundary-based approach that uses the level set framework. Two sets of databases (DB), Japan DB (JDB) (202 patients, 404 images) and Hong Kong DB (HKDB) (50 patients, 300 images) were used in this study. Two trained neuroradiologists performed manual LD tracings. The mean automated LD measured was 6.35 ± 0.95 mm for JDB and 6.20 ± 1.35 mm for HKDB. The precision-of-merit was: 97.4 % and 98.0 % w.r.t to two manual tracings for JDB and 99.7 % and 97.9 % w.r.t to two manual tracings for HKDB. Statistical tests such as ANOVA, Chi-Squared, T-test, and Mann-Whitney test were conducted to show the stability and reliability of the automated techniques. PMID:27299355

  14. Simple Approaches for Measuring Dry Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition to Watersheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts of total N deposition (wet, dry, and cloud vapor); however, dry deposition is difficult to measure and is often spatially variable. Affordable passive sampling methods...

  15. Visceral Leishmaniasis: Advancements in Vaccine Development via Classical and Molecular Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sumit; Rawat, Keerti; Yadav, Narendra Kumar; Kumar, Vikash; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Dube, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) or kala-azar, a vector-borne protozoan disease, shows endemicity in larger areas of the tropical, subtropical and the Mediterranean countries. WHO report suggested that an annual incidence of VL is nearly 200,000 to 400,000 cases, resulting in 20,000 to 30,000 deaths per year. Treatment with available anti-leishmanial drugs are not cost effective, with varied efficacies and higher relapse rate, which poses a major challenge to current kala-azar control program in Indian subcontinent. Therefore, a vaccine against VL is imperative and knowing the fact that recovered individuals developed lifelong immunity against re-infection, it is feasible. Vaccine development program, though time taking, has recently gained momentum with the emergence of omic era, i.e., from genomics to immunomics. Classical as well as molecular methodologies have been overtaken with alternative strategies wherein proteomics based knowledge combined with computational techniques (immunoinformatics) speed up the identification and detailed characterization of new antigens for potential vaccine candidates. This may eventually help in the designing of polyvalent synthetic and recombinant chimeric vaccines as an effective intervention measures to control the disease in endemic areas. This review focuses on such newer approaches being utilized for vaccine development against VL. PMID:25202307

  16. The CNO Concentration in Cosmic Ray Spectrum as Measured From The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazely, A. R.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Ahn, H.; Ampe, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the spectra of CNO nuclei in the cosmic radiation as measured in the first flight of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment (ATIC) which lasted for 16 days, starting in December, 2000 with a launch from McMurdo, Antarctica. ATIC is a multiple, long duration balloon flight, investigation for the study of cosmic ray spectra from below 50 GeV to near 100 TeV total energy, using a fully active Bismuth Germanate (BGO) calorimeter. It is equipped with the first large area mosaic of small fully depleted silicon detector pads capable of charge identification in cosmic rays from H to Fe. As a redundancy check for the charge identification and a coarse particle tracking system, three projective layers of x-y scintillator hodoscopes were employed, above, in the center and below a Carbon interaction "target".

  17. Recent Beam Measurements and New Instrumentation at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sannibale, F.; Baptiste, K.; Barry, W.; Chin, M.; Filippetto, D.; Jaegerhofer, L.; Julian, J.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Low, R.; Plate, D.; Portmann, G.; Robin, D.; Scarvie, T.; Stupakov, G.; Weber, J.; Zolotorev, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-04-11

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years.

  18. RECENT BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND NEW INSTRUMENTATION AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sannibale, Fernando; Baptiste, Kenneth; Barry, Walter; Chin, Michael; Filippetto, Daniele; Jaegerhofer, Lukas; Julian, James; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Low, Raymond; Plate, David; Portmann, Gregory; Robin, David; Scarvie, Tomas; Stupakov, Gennady; Weber, Jonah; Zolotorev, Max

    2008-05-05

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years.

  19. Optical Fuel Injector Patternation Measurements in Advanced Liquid-Fueled, High Pressure, Gas Turbine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Zaller, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and planar Mie scattering are used to examine the fuel distribution pattern (patternation) for advanced fuel injector concepts in kerosene burning, high pressure gas turbine combustors. Three fuel injector concepts for aerospace applications were investigated under a broad range of operating conditions. Fuel PLIF patternation results are contrasted with those obtained by planar Mie scattering. For one injector, further comparison is also made with data obtained through phase Doppler measurements. Differences in spray patterns for diverse conditions and fuel injector configurations are readily discernible. An examination of the data has shown that a direct determination of the fuel spray angle at realistic conditions is also possible. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of these nonintrusive optical techniques for investigating fuel spray patternation under actual combustor conditions.

  20. Advancement of an Infra-Red Technique for Whole-Field Concentration Measurements in Fluidized Beds

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Jose A.; de Nooijer, Niek C. A.; Gallucci, Fausto; van Sint Annaland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    For a better understanding and description of the mass transport phenomena in dense multiphase gas-solids systems such as fluidized bed reactors, detailed and quantitative experimental data on the concentration profiles is required, which demands advanced non-invasive concentration monitoring techniques with a high spatial and temporal resolution. A novel technique based on the selective detection of a gas component in a gas mixture using infra-red properties has been further developed. The first stage development was carried out using a very small sapphire reactor and CO2 as tracer gas. Although the measuring principle was demonstrated, the real application was hindered by the small reactor dimensions related to the high costs and difficult handling of large sapphire plates. In this study, a new system has been developed, that allows working at much larger scales and yet with higher resolution. In the new system, propane is used as tracer gas and quartz as reactor material. In this study, a thorough optimization and calibration of the technique is presented which is subsequently applied for whole-field measurements with high temporal resolution. The developed technique allows the use of a relatively inexpensive configuration for the measurement of detailed concentration fields and can be applied to a large variety of important chemical engineering topics. PMID:26927127

  1. Advancement of an Infra-Red Technique for Whole-Field Concentration Measurements in Fluidized Beds.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Jose A; de Nooijer, Niek C A; Gallucci, Fausto; van Sint Annaland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    For a better understanding and description of the mass transport phenomena in dense multiphase gas-solids systems such as fluidized bed reactors, detailed and quantitative experimental data on the concentration profiles is required, which demands advanced non-invasive concentration monitoring techniques with a high spatial and temporal resolution. A novel technique based on the selective detection of a gas component in a gas mixture using infra-red properties has been further developed. The first stage development was carried out using a very small sapphire reactor and CO₂ as tracer gas. Although the measuring principle was demonstrated, the real application was hindered by the small reactor dimensions related to the high costs and difficult handling of large sapphire plates. In this study, a new system has been developed, that allows working at much larger scales and yet with higher resolution. In the new system, propane is used as tracer gas and quartz as reactor material. In this study, a thorough optimization and calibration of the technique is presented which is subsequently applied for whole-field measurements with high temporal resolution. The developed technique allows the use of a relatively inexpensive configuration for the measurement of detailed concentration fields and can be applied to a large variety of important chemical engineering topics. PMID:26927127

  2. Measurements of Intra-Beam Scattering at Low Emittance in the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.; De Santis, S.; Steier, C.; Wolski, A.; Wu, Y.; Bane, K.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, T.; /SLAC

    2006-03-13

    The beam emittance at the interaction point of linear colliders is expected to be strongly influenced by the emittance of the beams extracted from the damping rings. Intra-beam scattering (IBS) potentially limits the minimum emittance of low-energy storage rings, and this effect strongly influences the choice of energy of damping rings [1]. Theoretical analysis suggests that the NLC damping rings will experience modest emittance growth at 1.98 GeV, however there is little experimental data of IBS effects for very low-emittance machines in the energy regime of interest. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a third-generation synchrotron light source operating with high-intensity, low-emittance beams at energies of approximately 1-2 GeV, and with emittance coupling capability of 1% or less. We present measurements of the beam growth in three dimensions as a function of current, for normalized natural horizontal emittance of approximately 1-10 mm-mrad at energies of 0.7-1.5 GeV, values comparable to the parameters in an NLC damping ring. Using a dedicated diagnostic beamline with an x-ray scintillator imaging system, measurements of the transverse beamsize are made, and bunch length measurements are made using an optical streak camera. Emittance growth as a function of bunch current is determined, and compared with preliminary calculation estimates.

  3. Sampling Approaches for Multi-Domain Internet Performance Measurement Infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    Calyam, Prasad

    2014-09-15

    The next-generation of high-performance networks being developed in DOE communities are critical for supporting current and emerging data-intensive science applications. The goal of this project is to investigate multi-domain network status sampling techniques and tools to measure/analyze performance, and thereby provide “network awareness” to end-users and network operators in DOE communities. We leverage the infrastructure and datasets available through perfSONAR, which is a multi-domain measurement framework that has been widely deployed in high-performance computing and networking communities; the DOE community is a core developer and the largest adopter of perfSONAR. Our investigations include development of semantic scheduling algorithms, measurement federation policies, and tools to sample multi-domain and multi-layer network status within perfSONAR deployments. We validate our algorithms and policies with end-to-end measurement analysis tools for various monitoring objectives such as network weather forecasting, anomaly detection, and fault-diagnosis. In addition, we develop a multi-domain architecture for an enterprise-specific perfSONAR deployment that can implement monitoring-objective based sampling and that adheres to any domain-specific measurement policies.

  4. Radiology Quality Measure Compliance Reporting: an Automated Approach.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Marc; Schonlau, Duane

    2016-06-01

    As part of its ongoing effort to improve healthcare quality, the Center of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has transitioned from monetary rewards to reimbursement penalties for noncompliance or nonparticipation with its quality measurement initiatives. More specifically, eligible providers who bill for CMS patient care, such as radiologists, will face a 2 % negative payment adjustment, if they fail to report adequate participation and compliance with sufficient CMS quality measures in 2015. Although several methods exist to report participation and compliance, each method requires the gathering of relevant studies and assessing the reports for compliance. To aid in this data gathering and to prevent reduced reimbursements, radiology groups should consider implementing automated processes to monitor compliance with these quality measure standards. This article describes one method of creating an automated report scanner, utilizing an open source interface engine called Mirth Connect, that may facilitate the data gathering and monitoring related to reporting compliance with CMS standard #195 Stenosis measurement in Ultrasound Carotid Imaging Reports. The process described in this article is currently utilized by a large multi-institutional radiology group to assess for report compliance and offers the user near real time surveillance of compliance with the quality measure. PMID:26510752

  5. Principles of Technology Student Achievement in Advanced Physics Measured by a Normed Physics Test.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, James Alan

    1991-02-01

    The Principles of Technology (PT) curriculum, now in approximately 1,200 schools, has produced a profound change in the delivery of applied physics. If high school PT programs and traditional physics courses deliver comparable student outcomes, as some research suggests, the PT curriculum may find wider acceptance in vocational programs and postsecondary schools may have rationale for accepting PT as physics. This study measured PT student performance on an advanced physics test, after they have had one year (7 units) of PT. The 1988R version of the National Association of Physics Teachers and National Science Teachers Association physics test, with more than 7500 copies sold, was selected as the research instrument. This test covers advanced aspects of traditional high school physics. A secondary enquiry included an attempt to link PT teacher preparation and credentialing and/or PT site demographics to variation in PT student scores on the 1988R test. The 10 PT sites in this study were self-selected from the 29 PT field study schools, the most mature PT sites. The researcher determined, that the 1988R physics test lacked content validity for the PT students tested. The PT students tested had a composite mean score of 17.67 questions correct out of 80, (below the second percentile), not statistically different than a chance score. No differences were found between site mean scores. Interpretation of the results regarding the effect of teachers, or demographics was not justified. The value of PT to the vocational-technical programs that it was designed for was not measured, nor was the awarding of general science credit for PT completion. One year of the PT curriculum, at the sampled schools, has not prepared students in the advanced scientific aspects of traditional physics found on the 1988R examination. The primary implication is that educators should not expect year one PT to prepare students for classes or curricula that include traditional physics as a

  6. Rapid measurements of intensities for safety assessment of advanced imaging sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav G.

    2014-03-01

    FDA requires that intensity and safety parameters are measured for all imaging schemes for clinical imaging. This is often cumbersome, since the scan sequence has to broken apart, measurements conducted for the individually emitted beams, and the final intensity levels calculated by combining the intensities from the individual beams. This paper suggests a fast measurement scheme using the multi-line sampling capability of modern scanners and research systems. The hydrophone is connected to one sampling channel in the research system, and the intensity is measured for all imaging lines in one emission sequence. This makes it possible to map out the pressure field and hence intensity level for all imaging lines in a single measurement. The approach has several advantages: the scanner does not have to be re-programmed and can use the scan sequence without modification. The measurements are orders of magnitude faster (minutes rather than hours) and the final intensity level calculation can be made generic and reused for any kind of scan sequence by just knowing the number of imaging lines and the pulse repetition time. The scheme has been implemented on the Acoustic Intensity Measurement System AIMS III (Onda, Sunnyvale, California, USA). The research scanner SARUS is used for the experiments, where one of the channels is used for the hydrophone signal. A 3 MHz BK 8820e (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) convex array with 192 elements is used along with an Onda HFL-0400 hydrophone connected to a AH-2010 pre-amplifier (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, USA). A single emission sequence is employed for testing and calibrating the approach. The measurements using the AIMS III and SARUS systems after calibration agree within a relative standard deviation of 0.24%. A duplex B-mode and flow sequence is also investigated. The complex intensity map is measured and the time averaged spatial peak intensity is found. A single point measurement takes 3.43 seconds and the whole sequence can

  7. Improved equilibrium reconstructions by advanced statistical weighting of the internal magnetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Murari, A; Gelfusa, M; Peluso, E; Gaudio, P; Mazon, D; Hawkes, N; Point, G; Alper, B; Eich, T

    2014-12-01

    In a Tokamak the configuration of the magnetic fields remains the key element to improve performance and to maximise the scientific exploitation of the device. On the other hand, the quality of the reconstructed fields depends crucially on the measurements available. Traditionally in the least square minimisation phase of the algorithms, used to obtain the magnetic field topology, all the diagnostics are given the same weights, a part from a corrective factor taking into account the error bars. This assumption unduly penalises complex diagnostics, such as polarimetry, which have a limited number of highly significant measurements. A completely new method to choose the weights, to be given to the internal measurements of the magnetic fields for improved equilibrium reconstructions, is presented in this paper. The approach is based on various statistical indicators applied to the residuals, the difference between the actual measurements and their estimates from the reconstructed equilibrium. The potential of the method is exemplified using the measurements of the Faraday rotation derived from JET polarimeter. The results indicate quite clearly that the weights have to be determined carefully, since the inappropriate choice can have significant repercussions on the quality of the magnetic reconstruction both in the edge and in the core. These results confirm the limitations of the assumption that all the diagnostics have to be given the same weight, irrespective of the number of measurements they provide and the region of the plasma they probe. PMID:25554293

  8. Improved equilibrium reconstructions by advanced statistical weighting of the internal magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, A.; Gelfusa, M.; Peluso, E.; Gaudio, P.; Mazon, D.; Hawkes, N.; Point, G.; Alper, B.; Eich, T.

    2014-12-01

    In a Tokamak the configuration of the magnetic fields remains the key element to improve performance and to maximise the scientific exploitation of the device. On the other hand, the quality of the reconstructed fields depends crucially on the measurements available. Traditionally in the least square minimisation phase of the algorithms, used to obtain the magnetic field topology, all the diagnostics are given the same weights, a part from a corrective factor taking into account the error bars. This assumption unduly penalises complex diagnostics, such as polarimetry, which have a limited number of highly significant measurements. A completely new method to choose the weights, to be given to the internal measurements of the magnetic fields for improved equilibrium reconstructions, is presented in this paper. The approach is based on various statistical indicators applied to the residuals, the difference between the actual measurements and their estimates from the reconstructed equilibrium. The potential of the method is exemplified using the measurements of the Faraday rotation derived from JET polarimeter. The results indicate quite clearly that the weights have to be determined carefully, since the inappropriate choice can have significant repercussions on the quality of the magnetic reconstruction both in the edge and in the core. These results confirm the limitations of the assumption that all the diagnostics have to be given the same weight, irrespective of the number of measurements they provide and the region of the plasma they probe.

  9. Systems approach to measuring short-duration acceleration transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelby, F.

    It is common for failures to occur when attempting to acquire acceleration structural response measurements during crash, impact, and pyrotechnic testing. The structural response of a mechanical system to severe transient loading is commonly measured by accelerometers which are less than ideal. In particular, their amplitude-frequency response has one or more resonant peaks so that the output of the accelerometer may not be an exact replica of the input if the transient input stimulus contains frequencies near these resonant peaks, signal distortion, over-ranging of signal conditioning electronics, or even failure of the sensing element may occur. These and other problems have spurred the development of a new acceleration-measuring system which incorporates the following features; Transduction Element; Connectors; Mounting; Electronics; and Transducer Resonance.

  10. Systems approach to measuring short-duration acceleration transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelby, F.

    A shock measurement system was developed in which the quartz seismic system, two poole active filter and an FET source follower are incorporated in a transducer housing. It is shown that the system will survive + or 100,000g without damage. The PCB can supply different ranges as required. The PCB Model 305M23, can obtain data comparable to those of standard piezoelectric and piezoresistive accelerometers when high frequencies are absent. In the presence of high frequency stimuli, the accelerometer has obtained data without over ranging its data channel and without introducing error signals from excitation of the resonant frequency of its seismic system. It is useful for impact and pyrotechnic measurements. The development effort and test program have enhanced the probability of acquiring successful structural measurements in harsh mechanical loading environments.

  11. A new approach to highly resolved measurements of turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, J.; Hölling, A.; Peinke, J.; Bhiladvala, R.; Hölling, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present the design and principle of a new anemometer, namely the 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA), which has been developed for highly resolved flow speed measurements of two components (2d) under laboratory conditions. We will explain the working principle and demonstrate the sensor’s performance by means of comparison measurements of wake turbulence with a commercial X-wire. In the past we have shown that the 2d-LCA is capable of being applied in liquid and particle-laden domains, but we also believe that other challenging areas of operation such as near-wall flows can become accessible.

  12. A computer simulation approach to measurement of human control strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J.; Davenport, E. L.; Engler, H. F.; Sears, W. E., III

    1982-01-01

    Human control strategy is measured through use of a psychologically-based computer simulation which reflects a broader theory of control behavior. The simulation is called the human operator performance emulator, or HOPE. HOPE was designed to emulate control learning in a one-dimensional preview tracking task and to measure control strategy in that setting. When given a numerical representation of a track and information about current position in relation to that track, HOPE generates positions for a stick controlling the cursor to be moved along the track. In other words, HOPE generates control stick behavior corresponding to that which might be used by a person learning preview tracking.

  13. Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science: Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy: An Odyssey in Measurement Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, Albert

    Perhaps the speeds of sound, or, equivalently, the elastic moduli are some of the most fundamental attributes of a solid, connecting to fundamental physics, metallurgy, non-destructive testing, and more. Unlike most of the quantities used to characterize condensed matter, the elastic moduli are fourth-rank tensors containing a wealth of detail, directional information, and consistency constraints that provide some of the most revealing probes of solids. We describe here the current state of the art in one method, Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, where the mechanical resonances of a specimen of regular shape (easy to measure) are analyzed (difficult computational problem) to obtain the full elastic tensor. With modern advances in electronics and analysis, fractions of a part per million changes in elastic moduli are detectable providing new and important insight into grand challenges in condensed matter physics. This work was supported as part of the Materials Science of Actinides, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # DE-SC0001089.

  14. An analytical approach for treating background in spectral analysis measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ian; Holmes, Thomas W.; Gardner, Robin P.

    2015-11-01

    A method of determining the spectral shape of background radiation present in experimental spectra via a mathematical approach is presented. Elements of interest will be subtracted from an experimental spectrum using the linear correlation coefficient across a characteristic peak to determine their contribution. Once all elements of interest are removed, the remainder of the experimental spectrum should represent an approximation of the background. This approximation can then be used in conjunction with library least-squares to determine the background and elemental contributions to the unknown spectrum.

  15. Visual Analyses and Discriminations: One Approach to Measuring Students' Metacognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

    2006-01-01

    The metacognitive performance of four groups of students was examined. The students' processes of visual analysis and discrimination of real-life pictures were used to measure metacognition. There were 61 participants: 18 hearing students, 18 deaf and hard of hearing students, 16 students with mild mental disabilities, and 9 students with physical…

  16. Three Approximations of Standard Error of Measurement: An Empirical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, Alfred D.

    Three successively simpler formulas for approximating the standard error of measurement were derived by applying successively more simplifying assumptions to the standard formula based on the standard deviation and the Kuder-Richardson formula 20 estimate of reliability. The accuracy of each of these three formulas, with respect to the standard…

  17. Measuring Afterschool Program Quality Using Setting-Level Observational Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Yoonkyung; Osgood, D. Wayne; Smith, Emilie P.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of afterschool hours for youth development is widely acknowledged, and afterschool settings have recently received increasing attention as an important venue for youth interventions, bringing a growing need for reliable and valid measures of afterschool quality. This study examined the extent to which the two observational tools,…

  18. Systems approach to measuring short-duration acceleration transients

    SciTech Connect

    Schelby, F.

    1983-01-01

    A shock measurement system has been developed in which the quartz seismic system, two-poole active filter and an FET source follower are incorporated in a transducer housing measuring 5/16'' hex.x 5/8''. Tests have shown that the system will survive +- 100,000g without damage. Although the results reported here are for accelerometers ranged to +- 20,000g, there is no reason to limit the accelerometers to that range and PCB can supply different ranges as required. The PCB Model 305M23, developed to Sandia's specifications, has proved capable of obtaining data comparable to that of standard piezoelectric and piezoresistive accelerometers when high frequencies are absent. In the presence of high frequency stimuli, the accelerometer has obtained data without over-ranging its data channel and without introducing error signals from excitation of the resonant frequency of its seismic system. It should, therefore, be especially useful for impact and pyrotechnic measurements. These shock accelerometers are in the process of being fielded in earth penetrator vehicles; in shale rubblization experiments will soon be available. It appears this joint development effort and test program has greatly enhanced the probability of acquiring successful structural measurements in harsh mechanical loading environments.

  19. Performance Measures for Information Retrieval Systems--An Experimental Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regazzi, John J.

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated critical factors that would constitute reliable performance measures for bibliographic information retrieval systems, and compared the operational effectiveness of the relevance-theoretic and utility-theoretic models. The factors discussed include document and information attributes, judges, and environmental factors. (18…

  20. Corruption in Higher Education: Conceptual Approaches and Measurement Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osipian, Ararat L.

    2007-01-01

    Corruption is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon. Forms of corruption are multiple. Measuring corruption is necessary not only for getting ideas about the scale and scope of the problem, but for making simple comparisons between the countries and conducting comparative analysis of corruption. While the total impact of corruption is indeed…

  1. Measuring Quality in Universities: An Approach to Weighting Research Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Print, Murray; Hattie, John

    1997-01-01

    A study tested a procedure to identify and weigh various indicators of college faculty research productivity, as one measure of program quality. Eighty-six faculty in 34 Australian schools of education were surveyed. Highly valued indicators of research productivity included refereed journal articles, peer reviewed books, and major competitive…

  2. The Stakeholder Approach to the Construction of Performance Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, John C.

    Glasgow Caledonian University Library (Scotland) conducted a pilot study to design a set of user chosen performance measures which can be used in British academic libraries for data collection. Members of 8 stakeholder groups were identified and given an 103-question survey, with each question to be rated on a 1-5 scale of importance. Stakeholder…

  3. Suggested Approaches to the Measurement of Computer Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toris, Carol

    Psychologists can gain insight into human behavior by examining what people feel about, know about, and do with, computers. Two extreme reactions to computers are computer phobia, or anxiety, and computer addiction, or "hacking". A four-part questionnaire was developed to measure computer anxiety. The first part is a projective technique which…

  4. Design of psychosocial factors questionnaires: a systematic measurement approach

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Angélica; Felknor, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    Background Evaluation of psychosocial factors requires instruments that measure dynamic complexities. This study explains the design of a set of questionnaires to evaluate work and non-work psychosocial risk factors for stress-related illnesses. Methods The measurement model was based on a review of literature. Content validity was performed by experts and cognitive interviews. Pilot testing was carried out with a convenience sample of 132 workers. Cronbach’s alpha evaluated internal consistency and concurrent validity was estimated by Spearman correlation coefficients. Results Three questionnaires were constructed to evaluate exposure to work and non-work risk factors. Content validity improved the questionnaires coherence with the measurement model. Internal consistency was adequate (α=0.85–0.95). Concurrent validity resulted in moderate correlations of psychosocial factors with stress symptoms. Conclusions Questionnaires´ content reflected a wide spectrum of psychosocial factors sources. Cognitive interviews improved understanding of questions and dimensions. The structure of the measurement model was confirmed. PMID:22628068

  5. Traditional versus Computer-Mediated Approaches of Teaching Educational Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkharusi, Hussain; Kazem, Ali; Al-Musawai, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that to adequately prepare teachers for the task of classroom assessment, attention should be given to the educational measurement instruction. In addition, the literature indicates that the use of computer-mediated instruction has the potential to affect student knowledge, skills, and attitudes. This study compared the effects…

  6. How to Measure Development in Corpora? An Association Strength Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Sabine; Gries, Stefan Th.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method for characterizing development in large longitudinal corpora. The method has the following three features: (i) it suggests how to represent development without assuming predefined stages; (ii) it includes caregiver speech/child-directed speech; (iii) it uses statistical association measures for investigating…

  7. Approaches to Measuring and Understanding Employer Training Expenditure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Burke, Gerald; Long, Michael; Dumbrell, Tom

    2008-01-01

    While it is recognised that employers invest a substantial amount of money and time in training, the exact nature and amount of this investment is poorly measured and understood. This project set out to supplement the available data, which have many limitations, with more detailed data for selected industries. However, it became quickly apparent…

  8. System Approach for Improved Whole Canopy Photosynthesis Measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole canopy photosynthetic rate (Pn) measurement is used for quantifying short term integral plant responses to the environment and for determining the final yield of a crop. Pn of an Open assimilation chamber is determined using the product of air flow rate of the chamber and CO2 differential bet...

  9. Advanced atmospheric measurements demonstrated by the 2.33 µm IIP Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometers (TIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Rairden, R. L.; Roche, A. E.; Chatfield, R. B.

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: With support of NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometers (TIMS) have been demonstrated for multi-layer retrieval of Atmospheric CO. Two TIMS units operating near 2.33 µm and 4.68 µm were developed for this demonstration. The project was completed in Dec. 2008. It was possible to scale ground based measurements to show that the design would support a measurement from geostationary orbit of CO that would satisfy all the CO measurements requirements as listed for the Decadal Survey National Research Council Report for the Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Mission. This includes better than 10% total column precision, vertical retrieval in 3 or more independent layers, on contiguous coverage from 45S to 50N on the American Continents and coasts, with footprints < 7 km on a side, and with one hour revisit time. The measurements also indicated this design would collaterally provide measurement of total CH4 column of about 1% precision, O3 with vertical resolution of the troposphere and H2O profile with unprecedented vertical resolution in the lower troposphere. Advanced 2.33 µm TIMS measurements: The shortfall at the end of the project was that the demonstrated data were obtained from the ground, and in the community there was perceived a need to acquire air borne nadir looking measurements in order to reinforce the predictions for the GEO-CAPE application. Since the end of the project we have had some internal support towards this goal for at least one of the TIMS, the 2.33 µm unit. As a first small step we have recently obtained ground based data looking at the moon that illustrate not only the retrieval of earth atmospheric CO, CH4 and H2O, but also the spatial variation of lunar albedo. This latter measurement improves on the original IIP ground based demonstrations. The next nearly ultimate step is to acquire data in the nadir viewing mode from an air craft. Significant effort

  10. Synthesis of an Advanced Intermediate of the Jatrophane Diterpene Pl-4: A Dibromide Coupling Approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The preparation of an advanced intermediate toward the synthesis of the jatrophane diterpene Pl-4 is described. The key step is a regioselective chelation-controlled lithiation of the (Z)-configured bromide in the corresponding vinyl dibromide precursor. The method outlined within this Article is suitable for the facile access of sterically hindered internal vinyl halides for further coupling reactions. PMID:23895274

  11. Multisectoral Approaches in Advancing Girls' Education: Lessons Learned in Five SAGE Countries. SAGE Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugh, Andrea

    Strategies for Advancing Girls' Education (SAGE) is a project of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Bureau for Economic Growth, Agriculture and Trade/Office of Women in Development (EGAT/WID). Five countries participated in SAGE: Guinea, Mali, Ghana, El Salvador; and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The project started in…

  12. Development of cost effective fenceline monitoring approaches to support advanced leak detection and repair strategies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cost-effective fence line and process monitoring systems to support advanced leak detection and repair (LDAR) strategies can enhance protection of public health, facilitate worker safety, and help companies realize cost savings by reducing lost product. The U.S. EPA Office of Re...

  13. An Empirical Grounded Theory Approach to Characterizing Advanced Mathematical Thinking in College Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabb, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    The research literature has made calls for greater coherence and consistency with regard to the meaning and use of the term advanced mathematical thinking (AMT) in mathematics education (Artigue, Batanero, & Kent, 2007; Selden & Selden, 2005). Educators and researchers agree that students should be engaged in AMT but it is unclear…

  14. Retention and Advancement in the Retail Industry: A Career Ladder Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Heath J.

    Retailing is the largest industry in the United States, employing roughly 18 percent of the total labor force. However, high turnover resulting from low wages in entry-level positions and the perceptions of retail workers that job security is far from certain and that advancement potential is limited have resulted in low levels of employee…

  15. A Mixed Methods Approach to Examining an Advanced Placement Program in One Connecticut Public School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docimo, Chelsey L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this eleventh grade Advanced Placement (AP) program study was to determine factors associated with AP placement and subsequent student performance. This research was considered to be a mixed methods case study with elements of arrested action research. One hundred and twenty-four students, four guidance counselors, three AP…

  16. Should a High School Adopt Advanced Placement or a Concurrent Enrollment Program? An Expected Benefit Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutkowsky, Donald H.; Evensky, Jerry M.; Edmonds, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an explicit framework for evaluating the expected benefit to college-bound students of courses offered by Advanced Placement (AP) versus concurrent enrollment programs (CEP). District personnel can use it to assess the relative merits of these programs, given the characteristics of their students, in deciding which model to…

  17. Advancing a Complex Systems Approach to Personalized Learning Communities: Bandwidth, Sightlines, and Teacher Generativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Educational technologies have advanced one of the most important visions of educational reformers, to customize formal and informal learning to individuals. The application of a complex systems framework to the design of learning ecologies suggests that each of a series of ten desirable and malleable features stimulates or propels the other ten,…

  18. The Biopsychosocial Approach to Chronic Pain: Scientific Advances and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatchel, Robert J.; Peng, Yuan Bo; Peters, Madelon L.; Fuchs, Perry N.; Turk, Dennis C.

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence and cost of chronic pain is a major physical and mental health care problem in the United States today. As a result, there has been a recent explosion of research on chronic pain, with significant advances in better understanding its etiology, assessment, and treatment. The purpose of the present article is to provide a review of…

  19. A multiple-plane approach to measure the structural properties of functionally active regions in the human cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Garfinkel, Sarah N; King, Anthony P; Angstadt, Mike; Dennis, Michael J; Xie, Hong; Welsh, Robert C; Tamburrino, Marijo B; Liberzon, Israel

    2010-02-15

    Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide the means of studying both the structural and the functional properties of various brain regions, allowing us to address the relationship between the structural changes in human brain regions and the activity of these regions. However, analytical approaches combining functional (fMRI) and structural (sMRI) information are still far from optimal. In order to improve the accuracy of measurement of structural properties in active regions, the current study tested a new analytical approach that repeated a surface-based analysis at multiple planes crossing different depths of cortex. Twelve subjects underwent a fear conditioning study. During these tasks, fMRI and sMRI scans were acquired. The fMRI images were carefully registered to the sMRI images with an additional correction for cortical borders. The fMRI images were then analyzed with the new multiple-plane surface-based approach as compared to the volume-based approach, and the cortical thickness and volume of an active region were measured. The results suggested (1) using an additional correction for cortical borders and an intermediate template image produced an acceptable registration of fMRI and sMRI images; (2) surface-based analysis at multiple depths of cortex revealed more activity than the same analysis at any single depth; (3) projection of active surface vertices in a ribbon fashion improved active volume estimates; and (4) correction with gray matter segmentation removed non-cortical regions from the volumetric measurement of active regions. In conclusion, the new multiple-plane surface-based analysis approaches produce improved measurement of cortical thickness and volume of active brain regions. These results support the use of novel approaches for combined analysis of functional and structural neuroimaging. PMID:19922802

  20. Measuring afterschool program quality using setting-level observational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoonkyung; Osgood, D. Wayne; Smith, Emilie Phillips

    2016-01-01

    As the importance of afterschool hours for youth development is widely acknowledged, afterschool settings have recently received increasing attention as an important venue for youth interventions. A range of intervention programs have been in place, generally aiming at positive youth development through enhancing the quality of programs. A growing need has thus arisen for reliable and valid measures of afterschool quality. This study examined the extent to which the two observational tools, i.e., Caregiver Interaction Scales (CIS) and Promising Practices Rating Scales (PPRS), could serve as reliable and valid tools for assessing the various dimensions of afterschool setting quality. The study shows the potential promise of the instruments, on the one hand, and suggests future directions for improvement of measurement design and development of the field, on the other hand. In particular, our findings suggest the importance of addressing the effect of day-to-day fluctuations in observed afterschool quality. PMID:26819487

  1. The advanced characterization of aerosol properties from measurements of spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Benjamin; Toledano, Carlos; Dubovik, Oleg; Litvinov, Pavel; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Fuertes, David; Tanre, Didier; Goloub, Phillipe

    The main purpose of the work is to assess the potential of using spectral optical thickness measurement for characterizing aerosol properties. While the use of these measurements is limited to the characterization of aerosol loading in the atmosphere, several studies demonstrated that these observations could be used for deriving more detailed information about aerosol, such as size distribution (King et al. 1978) and for discriminating between the extinction of fine and coarse modes of aerosol (O’Neill 2003). In this study, we test the possibilities of using AERONET inversion (Dubovik and King 2000) for improving the interpretation of measurements of optical thickness. In addition, we study the potential of synergetic scenarios for inverting optical thickness using GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) algorithm (Dubovik et al., 2011). This algorithm uses new multi-pixel retrieval approach. According to this approach, the accuracy of aerosol retrieval can be improved if several sets of observations (e.g. observations of satellite over several pixels) are inverted together under additional a priori constraints on time and spatial variability of the retrieved parameters. The application of this approach appears to be promising for the present study. First, the retrieval stability can be improved by inverting more than a single set of spectral aerosol optical depth at once. Second, the set of spectral aerosol optical depth can be inverted together with the radiances observed in the same day. The preliminary results of using simulated data (for different scenarios and aerosol models), as well as, the applications to real data from several AERONET sites will be presented.

  2. Measuring geographic segregation: a graph-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seong-Yun; Sadahiro, Yukio

    2014-04-01

    Residential segregation is a multidimensional phenomenon that encompasses several conceptually distinct aspects of geographical separation between populations. While various indices have been developed as a response to different definitions of segregation, the reliance on such single-figure indices could oversimplify the complex, multidimensional phenomena. In this regard, this paper suggests an alternative graph-based approach that provides more detailed information than simple indices: The concentration profile graphically conveys information about how evenly a population group is distributed over the study region, and the spatial proximity profile depicts the degree of clustering across different threshold levels. These graphs can also be summarized into single numbers for comparative purposes, but the interpretation can be more accurate by inspecting the additional information. To demonstrate the use of these methods, the residential patterns of three major ethnic groups in Auckland, namely Māori, Pacific peoples, and Asians, are examined using the 2006 census data.

  3. Advances in Remote Sensing Approaches for Hazard Mitigation and Natural Resource Protection in Pacific Latin America: A Workshop for Advanced Graduate Students, Post- Doctoral Researchers, and Junior Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierke, J. S.; Rose, W. I.; Waite, G. P.; Palma, J. L.; Gross, E. L.

    2008-12-01

    Though much of the developing world has the potential to gain significantly from remote sensing techniques in terms of public health and safety, they often lack resources for advancing the development and practice of remote sensing. All countries share a mutual interest in furthering remote sensing capabilities for natural hazard mitigation and resource development. With National Science Foundation support from the Partnerships in International Research and Education program, we are developing a new educational system of applied research and engineering for advancing collaborative linkages among agencies and institutions in Pacific Latin American countries (to date: Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Ecuador) in the development of remote sensing tools for hazard mitigation and water resources management. The project aims to prepare students for careers in science and engineering through their efforts to solve suites of problems needing creative solutions: collaboration with foreign agencies; living abroad immersed in different cultures; and adapting their academic training to contend with potentially difficult field conditions and limited resources. The ultimate goal of integrating research with education is to encourage cross-disciplinary, creative, and critical thinking in problem solving and foster the ability to deal with uncertainty in analyzing problems and designing appropriate solutions. In addition to traditional approaches for graduate and undergraduate research, we have built new educational systems of applied research and engineering: (1) the Peace Corp/Master's International program in Natural Hazards which features a 2-year field assignment during service in the U.S. Peace Corps, (2) the Michigan Tech Enterprise program for undergraduates, which gives teams of students from different disciplines the opportunity to work for three years in a business-like setting to solve real-world problems, and (3) a unique university exchange

  4. A microwave systems approach to measuring root zone soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W.; Paris, J. F.; Clark, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Computer microwave satellite simulation models were developed and the program was used to test the ability of a coarse resolution passive microwave sensor to measure soil moisture over large areas, and to evaluate the effect of heterogeneous ground covers with the resolution cell on the accuracy of the soil moisture estimate. The use of realistic scenes containing only 10% to 15% bare soil and significant vegetation made it possible to observe a 60% K decrease in brightness temperature from a 5% soil moisture to a 35% soil moisture at a 21 cm microwave wavelength, providing a 1.5 K to 2 K per percent soil moisture sensitivity to soil moisture. It was shown that resolution does not affect the basic ability to measure soil moisture with a microwave radiometer system. Experimental microwave and ground field data were acquired for developing and testing a root zone soil moisture prediction algorithm. The experimental measurements demonstrated that the depth of penetration at a 21 cm microwave wavelength is not greater than 5 cm.

  5. An approach for measuring methane emissions from whole farms.

    PubMed

    McGinn, S M; Flesch, T K; Harper, L A; Beauchemin, K A

    2006-01-01

    Estimates of enteric methane (CH4) emissions from ruminants are typically measured by confining animals in large chambers, using head hoods or masks, or by a ratiometric technique involving sampling respired air of the animal. These techniques are not appropriate to evaluate large-scale farm emissions and the variability between farms that may be partly attributed to different farm management. This study describes the application of an inverse-dispersion technique to calculate farm emissions in a controlled tracer-release experiment. Our study was conducted at a commercial dairy farm in southern Alberta, Canada (total of 321 cattle, including 152 lactating dairy cows). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and CH4 were released from 10 outlet locations (barn and open pens) using mass-flow controllers. A Lagrangian stochastic (LS) dispersion model was then used to infer farm emissions from downwind gas concentrations. Concentrations of SF6 and CH4 were measured by gas chromatography analysis and open path lasers, respectively. Wind statistics were measured with a three-dimensional sonic anemometer. Comparing the inferred emissions with the known release rate showed we recovered 86% of the released CH4 and 100% of the released SF6. The location of the concentration observations downwind of the farm was critically important to the success of this technique. PMID:16391273

  6. A Comparison of Two Approaches for Measuring Educational Growth from CTBS and P-ACT+ Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Julie; Sawyer, Richard

    The purpose of the study was to compare two regression-based approaches for measuring educational effectiveness in Tennessee high schools: the mean residual approach (MR), and a more general linear models (LM) approach. Data were obtained from a sample of 1,011 students who were enrolled in 48 high schools, and who had taken the Comprehensive…

  7. Using Rasch Measurement Theory to Examine Two Instructional Approaches for Teaching and Learning of French Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Severine P.; Engelhard, George, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a quantitative approach based on Rasch measurement theory for evaluating classroom assessments within the context of foreign language classes. A secondary purpose was to examine the effects of two instructional approaches to teach grammar, a guided inductive and a deductive approach, through the lens of Rasch measurement…

  8. Photon stimulated desorption measurement of an extruded aluminum beam chamber for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Noonan, J.R.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently being commisioned, will produce X-ray s of unprecedented brightness. The high energy ring of the APS is a 7 GeV positron storage ring, 1104 meters in circumference designed to operate at less than 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with 300 ma of beam and a greater than 10 hour lifetime. The storage ring vacuum chamber is constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy. During the construction phase, a 2.34 m long section of the APS extruded aluminum chamber was set up on National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X-ray Beamlline X28A and Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) was measured. Cleaning and preparation of the chamber was identical to that of the APS construction. In addition to the chamber, small samples of M, Be, and Cu were also exposed to white light having a critical energy of 5 keV. In addition to PSD, measurements were made of specular and diffuse scattering of photons. The chamber and samples were each exposed to a dose greater than 10{sup 23} photons per meter. Desorption yields for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}0 are reported as a function of accumulated flux, critical energy, incidence angle, and preparation. These results are compared with previous results for aluminum on NSLS Beamlline U1OB and PSD results of other laboratories published for aluminum.

  9. Rapid development of a measurement and control system for the Advanced Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.L. Jr.; May, M.W.; Kozubal, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is being used to develop a measurement and control system for the Advanced Free-Electron laser (AFEL) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. EPICS is an integrated system of applications development tools and a distributed run time environment that supports an input-output database, a graphical operator interface, sequential control through state'' definition, data archiving, data analysis, and fault management. It is very advantageous in terms of both time and system integrity to be able to perform much of the control system development before the actual hardware for the AFEL is in place. Using the EPICS applications tools, we are developing prototype measurements and controls that can be directly transferred to the AFEL during installation and commissioning. This is possible due primarily to three aspects of EPICS. First we can easily model physical systems with the state notation language. Second, we can simulate input and output channels with soft'' database channels, which are created using the database configuration tool. Third, we can easily build and modify operator interface screens with the display editor. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Initial measurements of beam breakup instability in the advanced test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Y.P.; Caporaso, G.J.; Struve, K.W.

    1985-05-13

    This paper reports the measurements of beam breakup (BBU) instability performed on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) up to the end of February, 1984. The main objective was to produce a high current usable electron beam at the ATA output. A well-known instability is BBU which arises from the accelerator cavity modes interacting with the electron beam. The dominant mode is TM/sub 130/ at a frequency of approximately 785 MHz. It couples most strongly to the beam motion and has been observed to grow in the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) which has only eight accelerator cavities. ATA has one hundred and seventy cavities and, therefore, the growth of BBU is expected to be more severe. In this paper, BBU measurements are reported for ATA with beam currents of 4 to 7 kA. Analysis showed that the growth of the instability with propagation distance was as expected for the lower currents. However, the high-current data showed an apparent higher growth rate than expected. An explanation for this anomaly is given in terms of a ''corkscrew'' excitation. The injector BBU noise level for a field emission brush cathode was found to be an order of magnitude lower than for a cold plasma discharge cathode. These injector rf amplitudes agree very well with values obtained using the method of differenced B sub solar loops.

  11. Photon stimulated desorption measurement of an extruded aluminum beam chamber for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Noonan, J.R.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently being commissioned, will produce x rays of unprecedented brightness. The high energy ring of the APS is a 7 GeV positron storage ring, 1104 m in circumference designed to operate at less than 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with 300 mA of beam and a greater than 10 h lifetime. The storage ring vacuum chamber is constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy. During the construction phase, a 2.34-m-long section of the APS extruded aluminum chamber was set up on National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X-ray Beamline X28A and photon stimulated desorption (PSD) was measured. Cleaning and preparation of the chamber was identical to that of the APS construction. In addition to the chamber, small samples of Al, Be, and Cu were also exposed to white light having a critical energy of 5 keV. In addition to PSD, measurements were made of the specular and diffuse scattering of photons. The chamber and samples were each exposed to a dose greater than 10{sup 23} photons per m. Desorption yields for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}O are reported as a function of accumulated flux, critical energy, incidence angle, and preparation. These results are compared with previous results for aluminum on NSLS Beamline U10B and PSD results of other laboratories published for aluminum. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  12. X-ray beam size measurements on the Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, K.W.; Chambers, F.W.; Lauer, E.J.; Slaughter, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The electron beam size has been determined on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) by intercepting the beam with a target and measuring the resulting x-ray intensity as a function of time as the target is moved through the beam. Several types of targets have been used. One is a tantalum rod which extends completely across the drift chamber. Another is a tungsten powder filled carbon crucible. Both of these probes are moved from shot to shot so that the x-ray signal intensity varies with probe position. A third is a larger tantalum disk which is inserted on beam axis to allow determining beam size on a one shot basis. The x-ray signals are detected with an MCP photomultiplier tube located at 90/sup 0/ to the beamline. It is sufficiently shielded to reject background x-rays and neutrons. The signals were digitized, recorded and later unfolded to produce plots of x-ray intensity versus probe position for several times during the pulse. The presumption that the x-ray intensity is proportional to beam current density is checked computationally. Details of the probe construction and PMT shielding, as well as sample measurements are given.

  13. 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar Instrument Advancements for Tropospheric Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Koch, G.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge derived from global tropospheric wind measurement is an important constituent of our overall understanding of climate behavior [1]. Accurate weather prediction saves lives and protects properties from destructions. High-energy 2-micron laser is the transmitter of choice for coherent Doppler wind detection. In addition to the eye-safety, the wavelength of the transmitter suitably matches the aerosol size in the lower troposphere. Although the technology of the 2-micron laser has been maturing steadily, lidar derived wind data is still a void in the global weather database. In the last decade, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have been engaged in this endeavor, contributing to the scientific database of 2-micron lidar transmitters. As part of this effort, an in depth analysis of the physics involved in the workings of the Ho: Tm laser systems have been published. In the last few years, we have demonstrated lidar transmitter with over1Joule output energy. In addition, a large body of work has been done in characterizing new laser materials and unique crystal configurations to enhance the efficiency and output energy of the 2-micron laser systems. At present 2-micron lidar systems are measuring wind from both ground and airborne platforms. This paper will provide an overview of the advancements made in recent years and the technology maturity levels attained.

  14. Internal Acoustics Measurements of a Full Scale Advanced Ducted Propulsor Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa Maria, O. L.; Soderman, P. T.; Horne, W. C.; Jones, M. G.; Bock, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustics measurements of a Pratt & Whitney full-scale ADP (Advanced Ducted Propulsor), an ultrahigh by-pass ratio engine, were conducted in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. This paper presents data from measurements taken from sensors on a fan exit guide vane in the ADP. Data from two sensors, one at mid-span and the other at the tip of the fan exit guide vane, are presented. At the blade passage frequency (BPF), the levels observed at the various engine and wind speeds were higher at the mid-span sensor than the tip sensor. The coherence between these internal sensors and external microphones were calculated and plotted as a function of angle (angles ranged from 5 degrees to 160 degrees) relative to the ADP longitudinal axis. At the highest engine and wind speeds, the coherence between the tip sensor and the external microphones was observed to decrease at higher multiples of the BPF. These results suggest that the rotor-stator interaction tones are stronger in the mid-span region than at the tip.

  15. Technologies for Inclusive Education: Beyond Traditional Integration Approaches. Advances in Educational Technologies and Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barres, David Griol; Carrion, Zoraida Callejas; Lopez-Cozar Delgado, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    By providing students with the opportunities to receive a high quality education regardless of their social or cultural background, inclusive education is a new area that goes beyond traditional integration approaches. These approaches hope to provide the educative system with the ability to adapt to the diversity of its students. Technologies for…

  16. Advances in technologies for the measurement of uranium in diverse matrices.

    PubMed

    Rathore, D P S

    2008-10-19

    An overview of the advances in technologies, which can be used in the field as well as in a laboratory for the measurement of uranium in diverse matrices like, waters, minerals, mineralized rocks, and other beneficiation products for its exploration and processing industries is presented. Laser based technologies, ion chromatography, microsample X-ray analysis method followed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique (MXA-EDXRF), sensors for electrochemical detection followed by cyclic voltammogram and alpha liquid scintillation counting techniques are the most promising techniques. Among these techniques, laser fluorimetry/spectrofluorimetry, in particular, is the technique of choice because of its high performance qualification (PQ), inherent sensitivity, simplicity, cost effectiveness, minimum generation of analytical waste, rapidity, easy calibration and operation. It also fulfills the basic essential requirements of reliability, applicability and practicability (RAPs) for the analysis of uranium in solution of diverse matrices in entire nuclear fuel cycle. A very extensive range of uranium concentrations may be covered. Laser fluorimetry is suitable for direct determination of uranium in natural water systems within the microg L(-1) and mg L(-1) range while differential technique in laser fluorimetry (DT-LIF) is suitable for mineralized rocks and concentrates independent of matrix effects (uranium in samples containing >0.01% uranium). The most interesting feature of TRLIF is its capability of performing speciation of complexes directly in solution as well as remote determination via fiber optics and optrode. Future trend and advances in lasers, miniaturization and automation via flow injection analysis (FIA) has been discussed. PMID:18804592

  17. Measuring engagement in advance care planning: a cross-sectional multicentre feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Michelle; Bonham, Aaron J; Heyland, Daren K; Sudore, Rebecca; Fassbender, Konrad; Robinson, Carole A; McKenzie, Michael; Elston, Dawn; You, John J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility, acceptability and clinical sensibility of a novel survey, the advance care planning (ACP) Engagement Survey, in various healthcare settings. Setting A target sample of 50 patients from each of primary care, hospital, cancer care and dialysis care settings. Participants A convenience sample of patients without cognitive impairment who could speak and read English was recruited. Patients 50 and older were eligible in primary care; patients 80 and older or 55 and older with clinical markers of advanced chronic disease were recruited in hospital; patients aged 19 and older were recruited in cancer and renal dialysis centres. Outcomes We assessed feasibility, acceptability and clinical sensibility of the ACP Engagement Survey using a 6-point scale. The ACP Engagement Survey measures ACP processes (knowledge, contemplation, self-efficacy and readiness) on 5-point Likert scales and actions (yes/no). Results 196 patients (38–96 years old, 50.5% women) participated. Mean (±SD) time to administer was 48.8±19.6 min. Mean acceptability scores ranged from 3.2±1.3 in hospital to 4.7±0.9 in primary care, and mean relevance ranged from 3.5±1.0 in hospital to 4.9±0.9 in dialysis centres (p<0.001 for both). The mean process score was 3.1±0.6 and the mean action score was 11.2±5.6 (of a possible 25). Conclusions The ACP Engagement Survey demonstrated feasibility and acceptability in outpatient settings but was less feasible and acceptable among hospitalised patients due to length. A shorter version may improve feasibility. Engagement in ACP was low to moderate. PMID:27338877

  18. Hosted Services for Advanced V and V Technologies: An Approach to Achieving Adoption without the Woes of Usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Penix, John; Markosian, Lawrence Z.; OMalley, Owen; Brew, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Attempts to achieve widespread use of software verification tools have been notably unsuccessful. Even 'straightforward', classic, and potentially effective verification tools such as lint-like tools face limits on their acceptance. These limits are imposed by the expertise required applying the tools and interpreting the results, the high false positive rate of many verification tools, and the need to integrate the tools into development environments. The barriers are even greater for more complex advanced technologies such as model checking. Web-hosted services for advanced verification technologies may mitigate these problems by centralizing tool expertise. The possible benefits of this approach include eliminating the need for software developer expertise in tool application and results filtering, and improving integration with other development tools.

  19. Modern Measurement Approaches to Health Literacy Scale Development and Refinement: Overview, Current Uses, and Next Steps.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tam H; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Kim, Miyong T; Han, Hae-Ra; Chan, Kitty S

    2015-01-01

    There are currently more than 100 health literacy instruments. The procedures used to develop and test the measures are primarily guided by classical test theory. However, a small and growing number (n = 13) of health literacy measures are guided by modern measurement theories such as item response theory. This article briefly describes (a) the benefits of using modern measurement approaches for the development of health literacy measures, (b) how these approaches have been used with existing health literacy measures, and (c) some considerations for how modern measurement theory can help strengthen future work in health literacy measurement. Ultimately, this article provides evidence to support an assertive shift toward the use of modern measurement approaches in health literacy instrument development. PMID:26513038

  20. Wireless Hearing Aid System Simulations using Advanced Design System™: A Behavioral Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Singh Rana, Ram; Bin, Tang; Liang, Zhang; Hari Krishna, Garg; De Yun, Wang

    2005-01-01

    The stringent requirements on size and power consumption constrain the conventional hearing aid devices from providing the patients an economic and user friendly solution, specifically for better noise cancellation. With the advancements in technologies such as integrated circuits design, wireless communications and digital signal processing techniques, the wireless hearing aids having multi-microphones, analog, digital and mixed signals and radio frequency signals processing circuits, DSP and programmable units seem to be promising to provide enhanced performance. The focus of this paper is about the system simulation of a typical wireless hearing aid using Agilent Advanced Design System™. The behavioral modeling features are exploited to enable the whole system simulations including electro-acoustic transducers. A few system level simulation results are included. PMID:17282359

  1. Flight test evaluation of advanced symbology for general aviation approach to landing displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, D. R.; Bryant, W. H.; Yenni, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a set of flight test experiments which were designed to evaluate the relative utility of candidate displays with advanced symbology for General Aviation IFR operations in the terminal area. This symbology was previously evaluated as part of the NASA Langley Research Center's Terminal Configured Vehicle Program for use in commercial airlines. The advanced symbology included vehicle track-angle, flight path angle and a perspective representation of the runway. These symbols were selectively drawn on a CRT display along with the roll attitude, pitch attitude, localizer-deviation and glideslope deviation. In addition to the CRT display, the instrument panel contained standard turn and bank, altimeter, rate of climb, airspeed, heading and engine instruments. The symbology was evaluated using tracking performance and pilot subjective ratings for an ILS capture and tracking task.

  2. An advanced Thermal-FSI approach to flow heating/cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badur, J.; Ziółkowski, P.; Zakrzewski, W.; Sławiński, D.; Kornet, S.; Kowalczyk, T.; Hernet, J.; Piotrowski, R.; Felincjancik, J.; Ziółkowski, P. J.

    2014-08-01

    Actually, two-way thermal-energy exchange between working fluid and solid material of a casing is a leading problem for modern - semi automatic - design techniques. Many questions should be solved, especially, the turbulent mode of thermal energy transport both in fluid and solid, should be re-examined and reformulated from the primary principles. In the present paper, a group of researchers from Energy Conversion Department of IMP PAN at Gdańsk, tries to summarise a last three-years efforts towards to mathematical modelling of advanced models of thermal energy transport. This extremely difficult problem in "thermal-FSI" ("Fluid Solid Interaction") means that the both for solid and fluid mathematical model of a surface layer should be self-equilibrated and self-concise. Taking these requirements into account, an advanced Reynolds-Stanton analogy has been discussed and implemented. Some numerical examples concerning of the benchmarks experiments and industrial applications have also been developed and presented.

  3. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  4. Advanced Technology Program: a new approach to U.S. competitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, Brian C.

    1992-05-01

    The Advanced Technology Program (ATP) is a new extramural program managed by the Technology Administration's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The purpose of the program is to enhance U.S. competitiveness by funding industry-led precompetitive, generic technology development. While most Federal R&D programs focus either on basic research or on technology development for specific agency mission needs, the ATP is unique in that it provides a mechanism for obtaining funding for innovative, high-risk industrially oriented R&D projects that companies or consortia deem most important to their future. This paper describes the ATP, the awards that resulted from the first competition, and lessons learned. Examples of funded projects related to advanced optics and imaging include `Short Wavelength Sources for Optical Recording' (National Storage Industry Consortium), `Volume Holographic Mass Storage Subsystem' (MCC), and `Precision Optics for Soft X-ray Projection Lithography' (AT&T Bell Laboratories).

  5. An integrated approach: advances in the use of Clostridium for biofuel.

    PubMed

    Kök, M Samil

    2015-01-01

    Almost 90% of our energy comes from fossil fuels, which are both limited and polluting, hence the need to find alternative sources. Biofuels can provide a sustainable and renewable source of energy for the future. Recent significant advances in genetic engineering and fermentation technology have made microbial bio-based production of chemicals from renewable resources more viable. Clostridium species are considered as promising micro-organisms for the production of a wide range of chemicals for industrial use. However, a number of scientific challenges still need to be overcome to facilitate an economically viable production system. These include the use of cheap non-food-based substrates, a better understanding of the metabolic processes involved, improvement of strains through genetic engineering and innovation in process technology. This paper reviews recent developments in these areas, advancing the use of Clostridium within an industrial context especially for the production of biofuels. PMID:27160660

  6. How to measure soundscapes. A theoretical and practical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Fortkamp, Brigitte

    2002-11-01

    Noise sources interact with the specific acoustic and environmental makeup, topography, meteorology, land use pattern, and lifestyle. The evaluation of soundscapes needs subject-related methodological procedures. With such suitable measurements a way has to be found that allows us to rely on different dimensions on reaction to noise. Improving the soundscape of an urban environment imposes to account for the qualitative appreciation as a cognitive judgment given by listeners and, particularly, for the interaction between acoustic dimensions and other sensory modalities in qualitative judgments of an urban environment (Maffiolo). The structure of the residential area that is, the combination of noise sources are important for the judgment of a soundscope and are also important as subjective parameters which are relevant in people's point of view. Moreover, the relationship of both define the background for assessments. Studies are needed on the subject and its capability in perception and interpretation; studies on the subject inside the society, studies on the social and cultural context, and field studies including physical measurements. Soundscapes may be defined in its effects on man and vice versa and probably acoustical ecology will serve to understand the function of soundscapes.

  7. Pictorial approaches for measuring time use in rural Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Yuta J.; Fortmann, Lea; Gugerty, Mary Kay; Smith-Nilson, Marla; Cook, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Time use researchers working in least developed countries (LDCs) face difficulties collecting data from illiterate populations who may conceptualize time differently than those in industrialized countries. We identify existing gaps in time use data collection methods and discuss two novel, pictorial methods to collect time use data from these populations. The first method is a modified recall interview modeled on participatory rural appraisal (PRA) methods that asks respondents to place macaroni on pictures of activity categories in proportion to the amount of time spent on that activity during the previous day. The second is a simplified pictorial time diary that uses a timer and sequentially-numbered stickers to re-create the temporal order of activities in 30-minute increments. The latter method also avoids recall bias problems. We present time use data collected in 2009 using these methods in a study examining the impacts of water infrastructure on women and children’s time use in rural Ethiopia. In total, we collected information using the first method from 263 household members over age 10, including 167 water collectors, and pilot-tested the pictorial diary approach with 10 adult respondents. PMID:25620832

  8. Multimodality approach to surgical management of locally advanced epidermoid carcinoma of the anorectum

    SciTech Connect

    Wanebo, H.J.; Futrell, W.; Constable, W.

    1981-06-15

    Seven patients (five female, two male) had locally advanced epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal. Three patients had recurrent or persistent disease previously treated and four had advanced primary cancer. Five patients had groin node metastasis. The treatment protocol consisted of chemotherapy with continuous 5-day infusion of 5-fluorouracil, 750 mg/m2, and mitomycin C, 15 mg/m2, by bolus injection and radiation 3000 rads. All patients received one or two cycles of chemotherapy pre-operatively and four (not previously irradiated) received radiation. Tumor regression greater than 50% occurred in five patients, minor regression (25-50%) occurred in one patient and one patient showed no regression (on chemotherapy alone). All patients had total resection of all gross tumor with microscopic clear margins and five had groin dissection. One patient had no residual cancer in specimen and one patient had a microscopic focus only. Four of five patients had residual nodal metastases at groin dissection. Currently three patients are free of disease at 24, 24, and 26 months. Two patients died with disease at 6 months and 34 months, and two patients died of other causes while still free of disease, at 4 and 5 months after resection. Multimodality therapy of locally advanced epidermoid cancer of anal canal can provide effective control and palliation of many of these tumors and, in some, possibly effect cure.

  9. Pressure driven spinning: A multifaceted approach for preparing nanoscaled functionalized fibers, scaffolds, and membranes with advanced materials

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Suwan N.; Suter, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    Electrospinning, a flexible jet-based fiber, scaffold, and membrane fabrication approach, has been elucidated as having significance to the heath sciences. Its capabilities have been most impressive as it possesses the ability to spin composite fibers ranging from the nanometer to the micrometer scale. Nonetheless, electrospinning has limitations and hazards, negating its wider exploration, for example, the inability to handle highly conducting suspensions, to its hazardous high voltage. Hence, to date electrospinning has undergone an exhaustive research regime to a point of cliché. Thus, in the work reported herein we unveil a competing technique to electrospinning, which has overcome the above limitations and hazards yet comparable in capabilities. The fiber preparation approach unearthed herein is referred to as “pressure driven spinning (PDS).” The driving mechanism exploited in this fiber spinning process is the pressurized by-pass flow. This mechanism allows the drawing of either micro- or nanosized fibers while processing polymeric suspensions containing a wide range of advanced materials spanning structural, functional, and biological entities. Similar to electrospinning if the collection time of these continuous formed fibers is varied, composite scaffolds and membranes are generated. In keeping with our interests, multicompositional structural entities such as these could have several applications in biology and medicine, for example, ranging from the development of three-dimensional cultures (including disease models) to the development of synthetic tissues and organ structures to advanced approaches for controlled and targeted therapeutics. PMID:20644675

  10. Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT)-based elongation measurements in Advanced Test Reactor high temperature irradiation testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

    2012-02-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. These materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. Currently, such changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a specified period of time in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The labor and time to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To resolve these issues, an instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant conditions in the ATR at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop this testing capability. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper focuses on efforts to design and evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL).

  11. Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT)-based elongation measurements in Advanced Test Reactor high temperature irradiation testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

    2012-02-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. These materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. Currently, such changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a specified period of time in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The labor and time to remove, examine and return irradiated samples for each measurement make this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To resolve these issues, an instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated under pressurized water reactor coolant conditions in the ATR at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop this testing capability. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper focuses on efforts to design and evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory.

  12. Visual analyses and discriminations: one approach to measuring students' metacognition.

    PubMed

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A

    2006-01-01

    THE METACOGNITIVE performance of four groups of students was examined. The students' processes of visual analysis and discrimination of real-life pictures were used to measure metacognition. There were 61 participants: 18 hearing students, 18 deaf and hard of hearing students, 16 students with mild mental disabilities, and 9 students with physical disabilities. Analysis revealed no significant differences among hearing students, deaf and hard of hearing students, and students with physical disabilities. The performance of these three groups of students was significantly better than the performance of students with mild mental disabilities. It appears that students with mild mental disabilities encountered difficulties with pictures that required complex visual analyses and discriminations. These difficulties were manifested in a form of deficient simultaneous visual processing along with a low level of knowledge acquisition. PMID:16856642

  13. Measuring efficiency of international crude oil markets: A multifractality approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niere, H. M.

    2015-01-01

    The three major international crude oil markets are treated as complex systems and their multifractal properties are explored. The study covers daily prices of Brent crude, OPEC reference basket and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude from January 2, 2003 to January 2, 2014. A multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) is employed to extract the generalized Hurst exponents in each of the time series. The generalized Hurst exponent is used to measure the degree of multifractality which in turn is used to quantify the efficiency of the three international crude oil markets. To identify whether the source of multifractality is long-range correlations or broad fat-tail distributions, shuffled data and surrogated data corresponding to each of the time series are generated. Shuffled data are obtained by randomizing the order of the price returns data. This will destroy any long-range correlation of the time series. Surrogated data is produced using the Fourier-Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (F-DFA). This is done by randomizing the phases of the price returns data in Fourier space. This will normalize the distribution of the time series. The study found that for the three crude oil markets, there is a strong dependence of the generalized Hurst exponents with respect to the order of fluctuations. This shows that the daily price time series of the markets under study have signs of multifractality. Using the degree of multifractality as a measure of efficiency, the results show that WTI is the most efficient while OPEC is the least efficient market. This implies that OPEC has the highest likelihood to be manipulated among the three markets. This reflects the fact that Brent and WTI is a very competitive market hence, it has a higher level of complexity compared against OPEC, which has a large monopoly power. Comparing with shuffled data and surrogated data, the findings suggest that for all the three crude oil markets, the multifractality is mainly due to long

  14. Measurement of the Specific Heat Using a Gravity Cancellation Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Fang

    2003-01-01

    The specific heat at constant volume C(sob V) of a simple fluid diverges near its liquid-vapor critical point. However, gravity-induced density stratification due to the divergence of isothermal susceptibility hinders the direct comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of renormalization group theory. In the past, a microgravity environment has been considered essential to eliminate the density stratification. We propose to perform specific heat measurements of He-3 on the ground using a method to cancel the density stratification. A He-3 fluid layer will be heated from below, using the thermal expansion of the fluid to cancel the hydrostatic compression. A 6% density stratification at a reduced temperature of 10(exp -5) can be cancelled to better than 0.1% with a steady 1.7 micro K temperature difference across a 0.05 cm thick fluid layer. A conventional AC calorimetry technique will be used to determine the heat capacity. The minimized bulk density stratification with a relaxation time 6500 sec at a reduced temperature of 10(exp -5) will stay unchanged during 1 Hz AC heating. The smear of the specific heat divergence due to the temperature difference across the cell is about 0.1% at a reduced temperature of 10(exp -6). The combination of using High Resolution Thermometry with a 0.5 n K temperature resolution in the AC technique and the cancellation of the density stratification will enable C(sub V) to be measured down to a reduced temperature of 10(exp -6) with less than a 1% systematic error.

  15. An isotopic approach to measuring nitrogen balance in caribou

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gustine, D.D.; Barboza, P.S.; Adams, L.G.; Farnell, R.G.; Parker, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional restrictions in winter may reduce the availability of protein for reproduction and survival in northern ungulates. We refined a technique that uses recently voided excreta on snow to assess protein status in wild caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in late winter. Our study was the first application of this non-invasive, isotopic approach to assess protein status of wild caribou by determining dietary and endogenous contributions of nitrogen (N) to urinary urea. We used isotopic ratios of N (??15N) in urine and fecal samples to estimate the proportion of urea N derived from body N (p-UN) in pregnant, adult females of the Chisana Herd, a small population that ranged across the Alaska-Yukon border. We took advantage of a predator-exclosure project to examine N status of penned caribou in April 2006. Lichens were the primary forage (>40%) consumed by caribou in the pen and ?? 15N of fiber tracked the major forages in their diets. The ??15N of urinary urea for females in the pen was depleted relative (-1.3 ?? 1.0 parts per thousand [??], x?? ?? SD) to the ??15N of body N (2.7 ?? 0.7??). A similar proportion of animals in the exclosure lost core body mass (excluding estimates of fetal and uterine tissues; 55%) and body protein (estimated by isotope ratios; 54%). This non-invasive technique could be applied at various spatial and temporal scales to assess trends in protein status of free-ranging populations of northern ungulates. Intra- and inter-annual estimates of protein status could help managers monitor effects of foraging conditions on nutritional constraints in ungulates, increase the efficiency and efficacy of management actions, and help prepare stakeholders for potential changes in population trends. ?? 2010 The Wildlife Society.

  16. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  17. Advanced imaging as a novel approach to the characterization of membranes for microfiltration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marroquin, Milagro

    : dextran) within wet, asymmetric polyethersulfone microfiltration membranes. Information from filtration flux profiles and cross-sectional CLSM images of the membranes that processed single-component solutions and mixtures agreed with each other. Concentration profiles versus depth for each individual component present in the feed solution were developed from the analysis of the CLSM images at different levels of fouling for single-component solutions and mixtures. CLSM provided visual information that helped elucidate the role of each component on membrane fouling and provided a better understanding of how component interactions impact the fouling profiles. Finally, Chapter 4 extends the application of my cross-sectional CLSM imaging protocol to study the fouling of asymmetric polyethersulfone membranes during the microfiltration of protein, polyphenol, and polysaccharide mixtures to better understand the solute-solute and solute-membrane interactions leading to fouling in beverage clarification processes. Again, cross-sectional CLSM imaging provided information on the location and extent of fouling throughout the entire thickness of the PES membrane. Quantitative analysis of the cross-sectional CLSM images provided a measurement of the masses of foulants deposited throughout the membrane. Moreover, flux decline data collected for different mixtures of casein, tannic acid and beta-cyclodextrin were analyzed with standard fouling models to determine the fouling mechanisms at play when processing different combinations of foulants. Results from model analysis of flux data were compared with the quantitative visual analysis of the correspondent CLSM images. This approach, which couples visual and performance measurements, is expected to provide a better understanding of the causes of fouling that, in turn, is expected to aid in the design of new membranes with tailored structure or surface chemistry that prevents the deposition of the foulants in "prone to foul" regions

  18. Some recent advances in the bottom-up holographic approach to QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, S. S.

    2014-07-23

    We give a brief report on our recent results in the bottom-up holographic approach to QCD. The holographic description of the heavy vector quarkonia and generalization of the Soft Wall model are discussed.

  19. An approach to knowledge structuring for advanced phases of the Technical and Management Information System (TMIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goranson, H. T.

    1986-01-01

    The Technical and Management Information System (TMIS) must employ on enlightened approach to its object structure, but basic issues in conceptual structuring remain to be resolved. Sirius outlines the necessary agenda and reports on progress toward solutions.

  20. Measurement of airborne {sup 218}Po - A Bayesian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Groer, P.G.; Lo, Y.

    1996-12-01

    The standard mathematical treatment of the buildup and decay of airborne radionuclides on a filter paper uses the solutions of the so-called bateman equations adapted to the sampling process. The equations can be interpreted as differential equations for the expectation of an underlying stochastic process, which describes the random fluctuations in the accumulation and decay of the sampled radioactive atoms. The process for the buildup and decay of airborne {sup 218}Po can be characterized as an {open_quotes}immigration-death process{close_quotes} in the widely adopted, biologically based jargon. The probability distribution for the number of {sup 218}Po atoms, accumulated after sampling time t, is Poisson. We show that the distribution of the number of counts, registered by a detector with efficiency {epsilon} during a counting period T after the end of sampling, it also Poisson, with mean dependent on {epsilon},t,T, the flowrate and N{sub o}, the number of airborne {sup 218}Po atoms per unit volume. This Poisson distribution was used to construct the likelihood given the observed number of counts. After inversion with Bayes` Theorem we obtained the posterior density for N{sub o}. This density characterizes the remaining uncertainty about the measured under of {sup 218}Po atoms per unit volume of air. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Measurement of airborne 218Po--a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Groer, P G; Lo, Y

    1996-12-01

    The standard mathematical treatment of the buildup and decay of airborne radionuclides on a filter paper uses the solutions of the so-called Bateman equations adapted to the sampling process. These equations can be interpreted as differential equations for the expectation of an underlying stochastic process, which describes the random fluctuations in the accumulation and decay of the sampled radioactive atoms. The process for the buildup and decay of airborne 218Po can be characterized as an "immigration-death process" in the widely adopted, biologically based jargon. The probability distribution for the number of 218Po atoms, accumulated after sampling time t, is Poisson. We show that the distribution of the number of counts, registered by a detector with efficiency epsilon during a counting period T after the end of sampling, is also Poisson, with mean dependent on epsilon, t, T, the flowrate and N(o), the number of airborne 218Po atoms per unit volume. This Poisson distribution was used to construct the likelihood given the observed number of counts. After inversion with Bayes' Theorem we obtained the posterior density for N(o). This density characterizes the remaining uncertainty about the measured number of 218Po atoms per unit volume of air. PMID:8919080

  2. A new approach to mass spectrometer measurements of thermospheric density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, L. T., Jr.; Brock, F. J.; Brown, C. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The gas sampling problem in satellite and high velocity probes was investigated by applying the theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas. A lens system using a free stream ion source was developed and experimentally evaluated over the pressure range of 0.00001 to 0.01 N/m sq (approx. 10 to the minus 7th power to 0.0001 torr). The source has high beam transparency, which minimizes gas-surface collisions within, or near, the ionization volume. It is shown that for high ion energy (60 eV), the extracted ion beam has an on-axis energy spread of less than 4 eV, and that 90 percent of the ions are within 2.5 deg of the beam axis. It is concluded that the molecular beam mass spectrometer concept, developed for gas density measurements in the upper atmosphere, substantially reduces gas-surface scattering and gas-surface reactions in the sample, and preserves the integrity of the gas sample during the analysis process. Studies show that both the Scout and Delta launch vehicles have adequate volume, control, velocity, and data acquisition capability necessary to obtain thermospheric number density in real time.

  3. One-health approach as counter-measure against "autoimmune" responses in biosecurity.

    PubMed

    Mutsaers, Inge

    2015-03-01

    This Swine flu pandemic of 2009 and the potential Avian flu threat of 2011-2012 have revived a most challenging debate on protection against infectious diseases. The response to the Swine flu pandemic has been ambivalent, both on the societal (political) and the scientific level. While some scientists warned against potential massive loss of human lives and urged for immediate and large-scale vaccination, others accused them of unnecessary scaremongering, arguing that the pandemic would not be that severe. The lab-created virulent Avian flu virus - which has been created in order to 'fight' a potential Avian flu pandemic - sparked a fierce debate on the dual-use risks of such a pre-emptive strategy. This article involves an analysis of the medical-political response to these recent viral threats using Peter Sloterdijk's immunological framework as diagnostic tool. In his trilogy Spheres Sloterdijk uses immunological concepts to analyse and assess the contemporary biopolitical situation. It shows how drawing a parallel between the functioning of the biological immune system and "immune responses" on socio-political level enables to assess and reconceptualise biosecurity. It demonstrates that ideas such as "nature is the biggest terrorist" - as advanced by many virologists - sometimes result in exaggerated "immunisation responses". This strong defensive attitude sometimes brings about collateral damage. In other words, fierce biosecurity measures sometimes risk developing into "autoimmune" responses that actually destruct the body politic they are meant to protect. By drawing on recent insights in the functioning of the biological immune system it is shown how a One-Health approach that incorporates a broader and nuanced "immunological" repertoire could act as counter-measure against "autoimmune" responses in biosecurity. PMID:25446776

  4. Advances in adaptive control theory: Gradient- and derivative-free approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucelen, Tansel

    In this dissertation, we present new approaches to improve standard designs in adaptive control theory, and novel adaptive control architectures. We first present a novel Kalman filter based approach for approximately enforcing a linear constraint in standard adaptive control design. One application is that this leads to alternative forms for well known modification terms such as e-modification. In addition, it leads to smaller tracking errors without incurring significant oscillations in the system response and without requiring high modification gain. We derive alternative forms of e- and adaptive loop recovery (ALR-) modifications. Next, we show how to use Kalman filter optimization to derive a novel adaptation law. This results in an optimization-based time-varying adaptation gain that reduces the need for adaptation gain tuning. A second major contribution of this dissertation is the development of a novel derivative-free, delayed weight update law for adaptive control. The assumption of constant unknown ideal weights is relaxed to the existence of time-varying weights, such that fast and possibly discontinuous variation in weights are allowed. This approach is particulary advantageous for applications to systems that can undergo a sudden change in dynamics, such as might be due to reconfiguration, deployment of a payload, docking, or structural damage, and for rejection of external disturbance processes. As a third and final contribution, we develop a novel approach for extending all the methods developed in this dissertation to the case of output feedback. The approach is developed only for the case of derivative-free adaptive control, and the extension of the other approaches developed previously for the state feedback case to output feedback is left as a future research topic. The proposed approaches of this dissertation are illustrated in both simulation and flight test.

  5. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-20

    Proteomics, and the larger field of systems biology, have recently demonstrated utility in both the understanding of cellular processes on the molecular level and the identification of potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents a challenge in data processing, analysis and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics analysis and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed in order to interpret and display the large volumes of data produced.

  6. The Critical Path Institute's approach to precompetitive sharing and advancing regulatory science.

    PubMed

    Woosley, R L; Myers, R T; Goodsaid, F

    2010-05-01

    Many successful large industries, such as computer-chip manufacturers, the cable television industry, and high-definition television developers,(1) have established successful precompetitive collaborations focusing on standards, applied science, and technology that advance the field for all stakeholders and benefit the public.(2) The pharmaceutical industry, however, has a well-earned reputation for fierce competition and did not demonstrate willingness to share data or knowledge until the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) launched the Critical Path Initiative in 2004 (ref. 3). PMID:20407457

  7. Recent advances in real-time analysis of ionograms and ionospheric drift measurements with digisondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Huang, X.; Galkin, I. A.; Paznukhov, V.; Kozlov, A.

    2005-08-01

    Reliable long distance RF communication and transionospheric radio links depend critically on space weather, and specifically ionospheric conditions. Modern ground-based ionosondes provide space weather parameters in real-time including the vertical electron density distribution up to ˜1000 km and the velocity components of the ionospheric F region drift. A global network of digisondes distributes this information in real-time via internet connections. The quality of the automatic scaling of the echo traces in ionograms was a continuous concern ever since first attempts have been reported. The modern low-power ionosonde with ˜100 W transmitters (compared to several kilowatt for the older ionosondes) relies on more sophisticated signal processing to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and to retrieve the essential ionospheric characteristics. Recent advances in the automatic scaling algorithm ARTIST have significantly increased the reliability of the autoscaled data, making the data, in combination with models, more useful for ionospheric now-casting. Vertical and horizontal F region drift velocities are a new real-time output of the digisondes. The “ionosonde drift” is derived from the measured Doppler frequency shift and angle of arrival of ionospherically reflected HF echoes, a method similar to that used by coherent VHF and incoherent scatter radars.

  8. Requirements and Technology Advances for Global Wind Measurement with a Coherent Lidar: A Shrinking Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, G. David

    2007-01-01

    Early concepts to globally measure vertical profiles of vector horizontal wind from space planned on an orbit height of 525 km, a single pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system to cover the full troposphere, and a continuously rotating telescope/scanner that mandated a vertical line of sight wind profile from each laser shot. Under these conditions system studies found that laser pulse energies of approximately 20 J at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate with a rotating telescope diameter of approximately 1.5 m was required. Further requirements to use solid state laser technology and an eyesafe wavelength led to the relatively new 2-micron solid state laser. With demonstrated pulse energies near 20 mJ at 5 Hz, and no demonstration of a rotating telescope maintaining diffraction limited performance in space, the technology gap between requirements and demonstration was formidable. Fortunately the involved scientists and engineers set out to reduce the gap, and through a combination of clever ideas and technology advances over the last 15 years, they have succeeded. This paper will detail the gap reducing factors and will present the current status.

  9. Design and Laboratory Evaluation of Future Elongation and Diameter Measurements at the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; J. C. Crepeau; S. Solstad

    2015-07-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. In order to accurately predict these changes, real-time data must be obtained under prototypic irradiation conditions for model development and validation. To provide such data, researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) are developing several instrumented test rigs to obtain data real-time from specimens irradiated in well-controlled pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop and evaluate prototype test rigs that rely on Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) in laboratory settings. Although similar LVDT-based test rigs have been deployed in lower flux Materials Testing Reactors (MTRs), this effort is unique because it relies on robust LVDTs that can withstand higher temperatures and higher fluxes than often found in other MTR irradiations. Specifically, the test rigs are designed for detecting changes in length and diameter of specimens irradiated in ATR PWR loops. Once implemented, these test rigs will provide ATR users with unique capabilities that are sorely needed to obtain measurements such as elongation caused by thermal expansion and/or creep loading and diameter changes associated with fuel and cladding swelling, pellet-clad interaction, and crud buildup.

  10. Characterization of geolocation accuracy of Suomi NPP Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yang; Weng, Fuzhong; Zou, Xiaolei; Yang, Hu; Scott, Deron

    2016-05-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite has 22 channels at frequencies ranging from 23 to 183 GHz for probing the atmospheric temperature and moisture under all weather conditions. As part of the ATMS calibration and validation activities, the geolocation accuracy of ATMS data must be well characterized and documented. In this study, the coastline crossing method (CCM) and the land-sea fraction method (LFM) are utilized to characterize and quantify the ATMS geolocation accuracy. The CCM is based on the inflection points of the ATMS window channel measurements across the coastlines, whereas the LFM collocates the ATMS window channel data with high-resolution land-sea mask data sets. Since the ATMS measurements provide five pairs of latitude and longitude data for K, Ka, V, W, and G bands, respectively, the window channels 1, 2, 3, 16, and 17 from each of these five bands are chosen for assessing the overall geolocation accuracy. ATMS geolocation errors estimated from both methods are generally consistent from 40 cases in June 2014. The ATMS along-track (cross-track) errors at nadir are within ±4.2 km (±1.2 km) for K/Ka, ±2.6 km (±2.7 km) for V bands, and ±1.2 km (±0.6 km) at W and G bands, respectively. At the W band, the geolocation errors derived from both algorithms are probably less reliable due to a reduced contrast of brightness temperatures in coastal areas. These estimated ATMS along-track and cross-track geolocation errors are well within the uncertainty requirements for all bands.

  11. Measurement of gas bremsstrahlung from the insertion device beamlines of the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Pisharody, M.; Job, P.K.; Magill, S.

    1997-03-01

    High energy electron storage rings generate energetic bremsstrahlung photons through radiative interaction of the electrons (or positrons) with the residual gas molecules inside the storage ring. The resulting radiation exits at an average emittance angle of (m{sub 0}c{sub 2}/E) radian with respect to the electron beam path, where m{sub 0}c{sup 2} is the rest mass of E the electron and E its kinetic energy. Thus, at straight sections of the storage rings, moving electrons will produce a narrow and intense monodirectional photon beam. At synchrotron radiation facilities, where beamlines are channeled out of the storage ring, a continuous gas bremsstrahlung spectrum, with a maximum energy of the electron beam, will be present. There are a number of compelling reasons that a measurement of the bremsstrahlung characteristics be conducted at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Although the number of residual gas molecules present in the storage ring at typical nTorr vacuum is low, because of the long straight paths of the electrons in the storage ring at APS, significant production of bremsstrahlung will be produced. This may pose a radiation hazard. It is then imperative that personnel be shielded from dose rates due to this radiation. There are not many measurements available for gas bremsstrahlung, especially for higher electron beam energies. The quantitative estimates of gas bremsstrahlung from storage rings as evaluated by Monte Carlo codes also have several uncertainties. They are in general calculated for air at atmospheric pressure, the results of which are then extrapolated to typical storage ring vacuum values (of the order of 10{sup -9} Torr). Realistically, the actual pressure profile can vary inside the narrow vacuum chamber. Also, the actual chemical composition of the residual gas inside the storage ring is generally different from that of air.

  12. Carbon-12 + Carbon-12 Fusion: Measurement and Advances Toward the Gamow Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zickefoose, James

    Knowledge of carbon fusion reaction rates at stellar temperatures is necessary for a complete picture of stellar evolution. The minimum stellar mass necessary for quiescent carbon burning as well as the conditions necessary for type Ia supernovae depend on them. The astrophysically relevant region of reaction rates is contained within a narrow energy band (the Gamow window), which lies on the fax low energy end of the cross section curve. Due to the difficulty in measurements of cross sections at low energies, current rates in this regime rely heavily on extrapolated values from higher energies and ignore the effects of possible resonances in or near the Gamow window. The challenge in obtaining data at low energy primarily stems from observing very low counting rates, due to the exponentially falling cross section, in the presence of background that is insignificant at higher energies. Historically the measurement of the total fusion cross section has been halted at the high energy edge of the Gamow window by background radiation from hydrogen isotopes. Recent advances in target preparation have extended the data near the region of stellar interest, but the emergence of a highly improbable two-step reaction has again limited the lowest attained energy. However, improvements in target quality and vacuum composition have yielded promising results. In the present work the identification and reduction of this background will be discussed along with carbon fusion data, implications, and future techniques. The 12 -- (12C, p)23 Na fusion reaction has been studied by charged particle spectroscopy from Ecm = 2.1 -- 4 MeV. Thick targets were used in an ultra low hydrogen environment in order to suppress beam induced background. Confirmation of previously measured resonances below Ecm = 4 MeV as well as new structure down to Ecm= 2.25 MeV have been studied. Furthermore a Bragg ionization chamber has been developed for the purpose of future charged particle measurements of the

  13. Dose Measurements of Bremsstrahlung-Produced Neutrons at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Job, P.K.; Pisharody, M.; Semones, E.

    1998-08-01

    Bremsstrahlung is generated in the storage rings of the synchrotron radiation facilities by the radiative interaction of the circulating particle beam with both the residual gas molecules and storage ring components. These bremsstrahlung photons, having an energy range of zero to the maximum energy of the particle beam, interact with beamline components like beam stops and collimators generating photoneutrons of varying energies. There are three main processes by which photoneutrons may be produced by the high energy bremsstrahlung photons: giant nuclear dipole resonance and decay (10 MeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 30 MeV), quasi-deuteron production and decay (50 MeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 300 MeV), and intranuclear cascade and evaporation (E{sub {gamma}} > 140 MeV). The giant resonance neutrons are emitted almost isotropically and have an average energy of about 2 MeV. High energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) emitted from the quasi-deuteron decay and intranuclear cascade are peaked in the forward direction. At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), where bremsstrahlung energy can be as high as 7 GeV, production of photoneutrons in varying yields is possible from all of the above three processes. The bremsstrahlung produced along a typical 15.38-m straight path of the insertion device (ID) beamline of the APS has been measured and analyzed in previous studies. High-Z materials constituting the beamline components, such as collimators and beam stops, can produce photoneutrons upon interaction with these bremsstrahlung photons. The 1/E nature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum and the fact that the photoneutron production cross section is comparatively larger in the energy region 10 MeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 30 MeV, results in the giant resonance interaction being the dominant mechanism that generates photoneutrons at the APS. Such neutron flux in the vicinities of the first optics enclosures (FOEs) of ID beamlines is important, from the point of view of radiation protection of the personnel. Only

  14. The TEF modeling and analysis approach to advance thermionic space power technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Albert C.

    1997-01-01

    Thermionics space power systems have been proposed as advanced power sources for future space missions that require electrical power levels significantly above the capabilities of current space power systems. The Defense Special Weapons Agency's (DSWA) Thermionic Evaluation Facility (TEF) is carrying out both experimental and analytical research to advance thermionic space power technology to meet this expected need. A Modeling and Analysis (M&A) project has been created at the TEF to develop analysis tools, evaluate concepts, and guide research. M&A activities are closely linked to the TEF experimental program, providing experiment support and using experimental data to validate models. A planning exercise has been completed for the M&A project, and a strategy for implementation was developed. All M&A activities will build on a framework provided by a system performance model for a baseline Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) concept. The system model is composed of sub-models for each of the system components and sub-systems. Additional thermionic component options and model improvements will continue to be incorporated in the basic system model during the course of the program. All tasks are organized into four focus areas: 1) system models, 2) thermionic research, 3) alternative concepts, and 4) documentation and integration. The M&A project will provide a solid framework for future thermionic system development.

  15. Electrochemical advanced oxidation and biological processes for wastewater treatment: a review of the combined approaches.

    PubMed

    Ganzenko, Oleksandra; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    As pollution becomes one of the biggest environmental challenges of the twenty-first century, pollution of water threatens the very existence of humanity, making immediate action a priority. The most persistent and hazardous pollutants come from industrial and agricultural activities; therefore, effective treatment of this wastewater prior to discharge into the natural environment is the solution. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have caused increased interest due to their ability to degrade hazardous substances in contrast to other methods, which mainly only transfer pollution from wastewater to sludge, a membrane filter, or an adsorbent. Among a great variety of different AOPs, a group of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), including electro-Fenton, is emerging as an environmental-friendly and effective treatment process for the destruction of persistent hazardous contaminants. The only concern that slows down a large-scale implementation is energy consumption and related investment and operational costs. A combination of EAOPs with biological treatment is an interesting solution. In such a synergetic way, removal efficiency is maximized, while minimizing operational costs. The goal of this review is to present cutting-edge research for treatment of three common and problematic pollutants and effluents: dyes and textile wastewater, olive processing wastewater, and pharmaceuticals and hospital wastewater. Each of these types is regarded in terms of recent scientific research on individual electrochemical, individual biological and a combined synergetic treatment. PMID:24965093

  16. Synthesizing Marketing, Community Engagement, and Systems Science Approaches for Advancing Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, Shawn M; Leeman, Jennifer; McCall, Pamela; Hassmiller-Lich, Kristen; Bobashev, Georgiy; Schwartz, Todd A; Gilmore, Robert; Riggan, Scott; Gil, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The adoption and implementation of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) are the goals of translational research; however, potential end-users' perceptions of an EBI value have contributed to low rates of adoption. In this article, we describe our application of emerging dissemination and implementation science theoretical perspectives, community engagement, and systems science principles to develop a novel EBI dissemination approach. Using consumer-driven, graphics-rich simulation, the approach demonstrates predicted implementation effects on health and employment outcomes for socioeconomically disadvantaged women at the local level and is designed to increase adoption interest of county program managers accountable for improving these outcomes in their communities. PMID:26244479

  17. Using and Developing Measurement Instruments in Science Education: A Rasch Modeling Approach. Science & Engineering Education Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiufeng

    2010-01-01

    This book meets a demand in the science education community for a comprehensive and introductory measurement book in science education. It describes measurement instruments reported in refereed science education research journals, and introduces the Rasch modeling approach to developing measurement instruments in common science assessment domains,…

  18. An Active Learning Approach to Teach Advanced Multi-Predictor Modeling Concepts to Clinicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samsa, Gregory P.; Thomas, Laine; Lee, Linda S.; Neal, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    Clinicians have characteristics--high scientific maturity, low tolerance for symbol manipulation and programming, limited time outside of class--that limit the effectiveness of traditional methods for teaching multi-predictor modeling. We describe an active-learning based approach that shows particular promise for accommodating these…

  19. Aspects of a Neoteric Approach to Advance Students' Ability to Conjecture, Prove, or Disprove

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLoughlin, M. Padraig M. M.

    2010-01-01

    The author of this paper suggests several neoteric, unconventional, idiosyncratic, or unique approaches to beginning Set Theory that he found seems to work well in building students' introductory understanding of the Foundations of Mathematics. This paper offers some ideas on how the author uses certain "unconventional" definitions and "standards"…

  20. The Hundred Languages of Children: The Reggio Emilia Approach--Advanced Reflections. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Carolyn, Ed.; Gandini, Lella, Ed.; Forman, George, Ed.

    This collection of essays and interviews documents the unique approach to early childhood education taken by schools in the Reggio Emilia region of Italy. Howard Gardner and David Hawkins provide reflections in chapters that begin the book. The book is then divided into four major parts. Part I includes an introduction by Carolyn Edwards and…