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Sample records for advanced medical therapies

  1. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    ScienceCinema

    Tijana Rajh

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology – an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

  2. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  3. Encountering Challenges with the EU Regulation on Advance Therapy Medical Products.

    PubMed

    Mansnérus, Juli

    2015-12-01

    This article aims at analysing how well the Advanced Therapy Medical Product Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 (ATMP Regulation) meets the needs of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMES), academia and public tissue establishments developing advanced therapy medical products (ATMPS). Benefits and shortcomings of the ATMP Regulation are identified, and possible amendments are proposed to accelerate the translation of research into advanced therapies and to facilitate the commercialisation of ATMPS whilst ensuring safety. It was set up as a lex specialis to ensure the free movement of ATMPS within the EU in order to facilitate their access to the internal market and to foster the competitiveness of European pharmaceutical companies, while guaranteeing the highest level protection of public health. Since the adoption of the ATMP Regulation in late 2008, only 5 ATMPS have been granted marketing authorisations thus far. Hence, there is a need to analyse whether the ATMP Regulation meets its objectives. PMID:26665690

  4. Encountering Challenges with the EU Regulation on Advance Therapy Medical Products.

    PubMed

    Mansnérus, Juli

    2015-12-01

    This article aims at analysing how well the Advanced Therapy Medical Product Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 (ATMP Regulation) meets the needs of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMES), academia and public tissue establishments developing advanced therapy medical products (ATMPS). Benefits and shortcomings of the ATMP Regulation are identified, and possible amendments are proposed to accelerate the translation of research into advanced therapies and to facilitate the commercialisation of ATMPS whilst ensuring safety. It was set up as a lex specialis to ensure the free movement of ATMPS within the EU in order to facilitate their access to the internal market and to foster the competitiveness of European pharmaceutical companies, while guaranteeing the highest level protection of public health. Since the adoption of the ATMP Regulation in late 2008, only 5 ATMPS have been granted marketing authorisations thus far. Hence, there is a need to analyse whether the ATMP Regulation meets its objectives.

  5. Deep brain stimulation plus best medical therapy versus best medical therapy alone for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD SURG trial): a randomised, open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Adrian; Gill, Steven; Varma, Thelekat; Jenkinson, Crispin; Quinn, Niall; Mitchell, Rosalind; Scott, Richard; Ives, Natalie; Rick, Caroline; Daniels, Jane; Patel, Smitaa; Wheatley, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Surgical intervention for advanced Parkinson's disease is an option if medical therapy fails to control symptoms adequately. We aimed to assess whether surgery and best medical therapy improved self-reported quality of life more than best medical therapy alone in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. Methods The PD SURG trial is an ongoing randomised, open-label trial. At 13 neurosurgical centres in the UK, between November, 2000, and December, 2006, patients with Parkinson's disease that was not adequately controlled by medical therapy were randomly assigned by use of a computerised minimisation procedure to immediate surgery (lesioning or deep brain stimulation at the discretion of the local clinician) and best medical therapy or to best medical therapy alone. Patients were analysed in the treatment group to which they were randomised, irrespective of whether they received their allocated treatment. The primary endpoint was patient self-reported quality of life on the 39-item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39). Changes between baseline and 1 year were compared by use of t tests. This trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN34111222. Findings 366 patients were randomly assigned to receive immediate surgery and best medical therapy (183) or best medical therapy alone (183). All patients who had surgery had deep brain stimulation. At 1 year, the mean improvement in PDQ-39 summary index score compared with baseline was 5·0 points in the surgery group and 0·3 points in the medical therapy group (difference −4·7, 95% CI −7·6 to −1·8; p=0·001); the difference in mean change in PDQ-39 score in the mobility domain between the surgery group and the best medical therapy group was −8·9 (95% CI −13·8 to −4·0; p=0·0004), in the activities of daily living domain was −12·4 (−17·3 to −7·5; p<0·0001), and in the bodily discomfort domain was −7·5 (−12·6 to −2·4; p=0·004). Differences

  6. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in a Student-Staffed Medication Therapy Management Call Center

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Anna M.; Roane, Teresa E.; Mistry, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation of an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in medication therapy management (MTM) designed to contribute to student pharmacists’ confidence and abilities in providing MTM. Design. Sixty-four student pharmacists provided MTM services during an APPE in a communication and care center. Assessment. Students conducted 1,495 comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) identifying 6,056 medication-related problems. Ninety-eight percent of the students who completed a survey instrument (52 of 53) following the APPE expressed that they had the necessary knowledge and skills to provide MTM services. Most respondents felt that pharmacist participation in providing Medicare MTM could move the profession of pharmacy forward and that pharmacists will have some role in deciding the specific provisions of the Medicare MTM program (92% and 91%, respectively). Conclusion. Students completing the MTM APPE received patient-centered experiences that supplemented their confidence, knowledge, and skill in providing MTM services in the future. PMID:22919086

  7. Pharmacists’ perceptions of advancing public health priorities through medication therapy management

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Public health priorities can be addressed by pharmacists through channels such as medication therapy management (MTM) to optimize patient and population outcomes. However, no studies have specifically assessed pharmacists’ perceptions of addressing public health priorities through MTM. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess pharmacists’ opinions regarding the feasibility and appropriateness of addressing seven areas of public health priority through MTM services to impact public health in direct patient care settings. Methods: An anonymous 37-question electronic survey was conducted to evaluate Ohio pharmacists’ opinions of advancing seven public health priorities identified from Healthy People 2020 (family planning, preconception care, smoking cessation, immunizations, nutrition/biometric wellness assessments, point-of-care testing, fall prevention) through MTM activities; to identify potential barriers; and to collect demographic information. The cross-sectional survey was sent to a random sample of 500 pharmacists registered with the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy. Results: Seventy-six pharmacists responded to the survey, resulting in a 16% response rate. On average, it took respondents 5-10 minutes to complete the survey. The majority of respondents thought that each of the seven public health priorities were “important” or “very important” to patient health; the most commonly identified areas included smoking cessation, immunizations, and fall prevention (97.5%). When asked to indicate which of the seven areas they thought they could potentially have a role to provide services through MTM, on average pharmacists picked 4 of the priority areas. Only 6.6% indicated there was no role for pharmacists to provide MTM services for any of the listed categories. Staffing, time, and reimbursement represented the most commonly perceived barriers for pharmacists in providing MTM services. Fifty-seven percent indicated an interest in

  8. [Report from the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT). Pitfalls on the way from concept to medical treatment with advanced therapy medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Reiss, M; Büttel, I C; Schneider, C K

    2011-07-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are highly innovative and complex medicines. They comprise gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). With the European Regulation on ATMP that came into force in 2008, a consolidated regulatory framework was created, where the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) plays a central role. This article discusses pitfalls and challenges that the CAT has experienced in its discussions of various procedures. Often ATMPs are developed by small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) which also face nonscientific challenges. The CAT wishes to meet these challenges on a scientific and regulatory level during its 2010-2015 work program.

  9. A randomised trial of lung sealant versus medical therapy for advanced emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Come, Carolyn E.; Kramer, Mordechai R.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Abu-Hijleh, Muhanned; Berkowitz, David; Bezzi, Michela; Bhatt, Surya P.; Boyd, Michael B.; Cases, Enrique; Chen, Alexander C.; Cooper, Christopher B.; Flandes, Javier; Gildea, Thomas; Gotfried, Mark; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; Leeds, William; Liesching, Timothy; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Marquette, Charles; Mularski, Richard A.; Pinto-Plata, Victor M.; Pritchett, Michael A.; Rafeq, Samaan; Rubio, Edmundo R.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Stratakos, Grigoris; Sy, Alexander; Tsai, Larry W.; Wahidi, Momen; Walsh, John; Wells, J. Michael; Whitten, Patrick E.; Yusen, Roger; Zulueta, Javier J.; Criner, Gerard J.; Washko, George R.

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled pilot studies demonstrated promising results of endoscopic lung volume reduction using emphysematous lung sealant (ELS) in patients with advanced, upper lobe predominant emphysema. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ELS in a randomised controlled setting. Patients were randomised to ELS plus medical treatment or medical treatment alone. Despite early termination for business reasons and inability to assess the primary 12-month end-point, 95 out of 300 patients were successfully randomised, providing sufficient data for 3- and 6-month analysis. 57 patients (34 treatment and 23 control) had efficacy results at 3 months; 34 (21 treatment and 13 control) at 6 months. In the treatment group, 3-month lung function, dyspnoea, and quality of life improved significantly from baseline when compared to control. Improvements persisted at 6 months with >50% of treated patients experiencing clinically important improvements, including some whose lung function improved by >100%. 44% of treated patients experienced adverse events requiring hospitalization (2.5-fold more than control, p=0.01), with two deaths in the treated cohort. Treatment responders tended to be those experiencing respiratory adverse events. Despite early termination, results show that minimally invasive ELS may be efficacious, yet significant risks (probably inflammatory) limit its current utility. PMID:25837041

  10. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Plöckinger, U.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs), dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided. PMID:22550484

  11. Medical therapy of urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Micali, S; Grande, M; Sighinolfi, M C; De Carne, C; De Stefani, S; Bianchi, G

    2006-11-01

    Nephrolithiasis treatment has become easier and less invasive with the development of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) and endourologic techniques. However, medical therapy represents a well-established and complementary approach that can improve the efficacy of SWL and endourology. During recent decades, pharmacologic intervention has become more effective in stone disease: drugs can control the pain of renal colic, interfere at various levels in lithogenesis, and contribute to the expulsion of stones. It is well known that lithogenesis is a multifactorial process influenced by environmental-nutritional factors (low urinary volume, diet rich in animal protein, etc) and metabolic alterations; i.e., hypercalciuria, hyperuricosuria, and deficiency of stone-inhibiting factors (citrate, magnesium, glycosaminoglycans [GAGs]). Specific drugs such as citrate, allopurinol, and thiazide represent highly effective treatments for the promoting factors. Furthermore, recent findings suggest an interesting role for a phytotherapeutic agent, Phillantus niruri, and its inhibitory action on calcium oxalate crystallization related to the higher incorporation of GAGs into the calculi. Another step forward in medical management of stone disease is expulsive therapy. Many studies have proven the efficacy of medical expulsive therapy with nifedipine and alpha-blockers: their specific action on ureteral smooth muscle in association with anti-edema drugs accounts for their efficacy in expelling ureteral stones. In this paper, we provide an update on the medical treatment of stone disease, focusing our attention on what is known and what is new in renal colic and litholithic and expulsive medical therapy.

  12. [Clinical trials with advanced therapy medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Schüssler-Lenz, M; Schneider, C K

    2010-01-01

    For advanced therapies, the same basic principles for assessment apply as for any other biotechnological medicinal product. Nevertheless, the extent of data for quality, safety, and efficacy can be highly specific. Until recently, advanced therapies were not uniformly regulated across Europe, e.g., tissue engineered products were regulated either as medicinal products or medical devices. Thus, for some products no data from clinical studies are available, e.g., for autologous chondrocyte products. The draft guideline on Good Clinical Practice for clinical trials with advanced therapies describes specific additional requirements, e.g., ensuring traceability. Most clinical studies with advanced therapies in Germany are still in early phase I or II trials with highly divergent types of products and clinical indications. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) has been established to meet the scientific and regulatory challenges with advanced therapies.

  13. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  14. Medical therapy for premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Mohee, Amar; Eardley, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common male sexual dysfunction. Advances in PE research have been hampered owing to a nonstandardized definition of PE, until the definition by the International Society of Sexual Medicine (ISSM) in 2009. Once the diagnosis of PE is established through a thorough history, a variety of medical therapies is available, including tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), centrally acting opiates, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors and topical desensitizing creams. Most of these treatments increase the intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) and patient satisfaction scores, with the most convincing evidence for SSRIs and topical creams. Daily SSRIs such as paroxetine, although efficacious, do have a substantial and prolonged side effect profile. Dapoxetine, which is a on-demand SSRI, is the only licensed drug for the treatment of PE, increasing IELT by a factor of 2.5 to 3 with limited and tolerable side effects. In the near future, the topical aerosol PSD502 is due to be licensed for the treatment of PE, increasing IELT by up to a factor of 6 but having minimal local and negligible systemic side effects. PMID:22046199

  15. [Benign prostatic hyperplasia: medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Schlenker, B; Gratzke, C; Weidlich, P; Seitz, M; Reich, O; Stief, C G

    2007-08-16

    Primary aims of the medical therapy for BPH are improvement of subjective symptoms and quality of life as well as the prevention of long-term complications such as acute urinary retention and renal failure. Secondary goal is inhibition of disease progression. The medical therapy should be tailored to each patient according to the individual complaints and risk of progression. Plant extracts, alpha-blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors represent the most common prescribed substances. Recent data suggest beneficial effects for the use of antimuscarinic agents and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. PMID:17912863

  16. Translational research on advanced therapies.

    PubMed

    Belardelli, Filippo; Rizza, Paola; Moretti, Franca; Carella, Cintia; Galli, Maria Cristina; Migliaccio, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues) is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  17. Medication management during electroconvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zolezzi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has demonstrated to be highly effective and safe, even life saving for many psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Most patients who require ECT are also on concurrent pharmacotherapy. As such, the objective of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature focusing on the medications used during an ECT procedure and on the effects of concurrent psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications on the effectiveness and safety of ECT. The review also attempts to summarize the recommendations derived from existing documents to guide pharmacotherapy decisions for patients undergoing ECT. For this purpose, using electronic databases, an extensive search of the current literature was made using ECT and medications or drug classes as keywords. PMID:27143894

  18. Immunomicelles for advancing personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Rupa R; Jhaveri, Aditi M; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2012-10-01

    Personalized medicine, which ultimately seeks to afford tailored therapeutic regimens for individual patients, is quickly emerging as a new paradigm in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The idea of casting aside generic treatments in favor of patient-centric therapies has become feasible owing to advances in nanotechnology and drug delivery coupled with an enhanced knowledge of genomics and an understanding of disease at the molecular level. This review highlights polymeric immunomicelles as a class of nanocarriers that have the potential to combine diagnosis, targeted drug therapy, as well as imaging and monitoring of therapeutic response, to render a personalized approach to the management of disease. Smart multi-functional immunomicelles, as the next generation of nanocarriers, are poised for facilitating personalized cancer treatment. This review provides an assessment of immunomicelles as tools for advancing personalized therapy of diseases, with cancer being the major focus. PMID:22917778

  19. Medical therapy for calculus disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shrawan K; Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Sharma, Sumit

    2011-02-01

    Urolithiasis is a common problem with a high recurrence rate. Medical therapy directed to relieve agonizing pain, expulsion of stone, dissolution of uric acid and cystine stone and prevention of recurrence. NSAIDs are superior to opioids for renoureteral colic because their use doesn't induce vomiting and there is lesser requirement of rescue analgesia. In randomized trials, anticholinergics were not found to be beneficial. Alpha blockers, particularly tamsulosin, reduce pain and facilitate expulsion of stone and fragments of stone following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and ureterorenoscopic lithotripsy. Potassium citrate helps in chemodissolution of uric acid and cystine stones and is useful in prevention of stone recurrence in general and in those who have undergone SWL or percutaneious nephrolithotomy. Other measures for prevention of stone recurrence include fluid and dietary therapy, counteracting underlying metabolic abnormalities using suitable medications, phytotheurapeutic agents and probiotics. Once the role of nanobacteria is established in genesis of urinary stones, anti-nanobacteria therapy holds the promise of opening new horizons for prevention of urinary stones. PMID:21244607

  20. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  1. Advances in radiation therapy dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, Bhudatt; Tewatia, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade, there has been an explosion of new radiation therapy planning and delivery tools. We went through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments, and additional new techniques for motion-adaptive radiation therapy are being introduced. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care; and with the addition of IMRT, temporal dimensions are major challenges for the radiotherapy patient dosimetry and delivery verification. Advanced techniques are less tolerant to poor implementation than are standard techniques. Mis-administrations are more difficult to detect and can possibly lead to poor outcomes for some patients. Instead of presenting a manual on quality assurance for radiation therapy, this manuscript provides an overview of dosimetry verification tools and a focused discussion on breath holding, respiratory gating and the applications of four-dimensional computed tomography in motion management. Some of the major challenges in the above areas are discussed. PMID:20098555

  2. Medical Art Therapy: Defining a Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malchiodi, Cathy A.

    Although art therapy has traditionally focused on the use of art expression in psychotherapy, the practice of medical art therapy has begun to grow rapidly. This paper provides a brief overview of the emerging specialty of medical art therapy and its importance as a counseling tool with people suffering from serious health problems. The paper…

  3. A prospective comparison of alginate-hydrogel with standard medical therapy to determine impact on functional capacity and clinical outcomes in patients with advanced heart failure (AUGMENT-HF trial)

    PubMed Central

    Anker, Stefan D.; Coats, Andrew J.S.; Cristian, Gabriel; Dragomir, Dinu; Pusineri, Enrico; Piredda, Massimo; Bettari, Luca; Dowling, Robert; Volterrani, Maurizio; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Mas, Jean-Louis; Danchin, Nicolas; Solomon, Scott D.; Lee, Randall J.; Ahmann, Frank; Hinson, Andy; Sabbah, Hani N.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims AUGMENT-HF was an international, multi-centre, prospective, randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and safety of a novel method of left ventricular (LV) modification with alginate-hydrogel. Methods Alginate-hydrogel is an inert permanent implant that is directly injected into LV heart muscle and serves as a prosthetic scaffold to modify the shape and size of the dilated LV. Patients with advanced chronic heart failure (HF) were randomized (1 : 1) to alginate-hydrogel (n = 40) in combination with standard medical therapy or standard medical therapy alone (Control, n = 38). The primary endpoint of AUGMENT-HF was the change in peak VO2 from baseline to 6 months. Secondary endpoints included changes in 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, as well as assessments of procedural safety. Results Enrolled patients were 63 ± 10 years old, 74% in NYHA functional class III, had a LV ejection fraction of 26 ± 5% and a mean peak VO2 of 12.2 ± 1.8 mL/kg/min. Thirty-five patients were successfully treated with alginate-hydrogel injections through a limited left thoracotomy approach without device-related complications; the 30-day surgical mortality was 8.6% (3 deaths). Alginate-hydrogel treatment was associated with improved peak VO2 at 6 months—treatment effect vs. Control: +1.24 mL/kg/min (95% confidence interval 0.26–2.23, P = 0.014). Also 6MWT distance and NYHA functional class improved in alginate-hydrogel-treated patients vs. Control (both P < 0.001). Conclusion Alginate-hydrogel in addition to standard medical therapy for patients with advanced chronic HF was more effective than standard medical therapy alone for improving exercise capacity and symptoms. The results of AUGMENT-HF provide proof of concept for a pivotal trial. Trial Registration Number NCT01311791. PMID:26082085

  4. Medication therapy management services: definitions and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Annette N; Martin, Michelle T; Tilton, Jessica J; Touchette, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    In the US, the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 required that Medicare Part D insurers provide medication therapy management (MTM) services (MTMS) to selected beneficiaries, with the goals of providing education, improving adherence, or detecting adverse drug events and medication misuse. These broad goals and variety in MTM programmes available make assessment of these programmes difficult. The objectives of this article are to review the definitions of MTMS proposed by various stakeholders, and to summarize and evaluate the outcomes of MTMS consistent with those that may be offered in Medicare Part D or reimbursed by State Medicaid programmes. MTM programmes are approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Pharmacy, medical and insurance organizations have provided guidelines and definitions for MTM programmes, distinguishing them from other types of community pharmacy activities. MTM has been distinguished from disease state management because of the focus on medications and multiple conditions. It differs from patient counselling because it is delivered independent of dispensing and involves collaboration with patients and providers. There is no consensus on the recommended mode of delivery (i.e. face-to-face or by telephone) for MTM. A MEDLINE search was conducted to identify articles published after 2000 using the search terms 'medication therapy management' and 'medication management'. Studies with outcomes evaluating community-based programmes consistent with MTMS, regardless of MTMS reimbursement source, were included in the review. Seven publications describing four MTMS were identified. For each of the identified articles, we describe the study design, service setting, inclusion criteria and outcomes. An additional three surveys describing multiple MTMS were identified and are summarized. Finally, ongoing efforts by CMS to evaluate the success of MTMS in the US are described. To date, there are limited outcomes available for MTMS

  5. Desktop supercomputers. Advance medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Frisiello, R S

    1991-02-01

    Medical imaging tools that radiologists as well as a wide range of clinicians and healthcare professionals have come to depend upon are emerging into the next phase of functionality. The strides being made in supercomputing technologies--including reduction of size and price--are pushing medical imaging to a new level of accuracy and functionality.

  6. Recent advances in migraine therapy.

    PubMed

    Antonaci, Fabio; Ghiotto, Natascia; Wu, Shizheng; Pucci, Ennio; Costa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common and highly disabling neurological disorder associated with a high socioeconomic burden. Effective migraine management depends on adequate patient education: to avoid unrealistic expectations, the condition must be carefully explained to the patient soon as it is diagnosed. The range of available acute treatments has increased over time. At present, abortive migraine therapy can be classed as specific (ergot derivatives and triptans) or non-specific (analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Even though acute symptomatic therapy can be optimised, migraine continues to be a chronic and potentially progressive condition. In addition to the drugs officially approved for migraine prevention by international governmental regulatory agencies, numerous different agents are commonly used for this indication, showing various levels of evidence of efficacy and tolerability. Guidelines published in recent years, based on evidence-based medicine data on migraine prophylaxis, are a useful source of guidance, especially for primary care physicians and neurologists without specific expertise in headache medicine. Although the field of pharmacological migraine prevention has seen few advances in recent years, potential novel approaches are now being developed. This review looks at emerging pharmacological strategies for acute and preventive migraine treatment that are nearing or have already entered the clinical trial phase. Specifically, it discusses preclinical and clinical data on compounds acting on calcitonin gene-related peptide or its receptor, the serotonin 5-HT1F receptor, nitric oxide synthase, and acid-sensing ion channel blockers. PMID:27330903

  7. Group 2 PH: Medical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, Marco; Labate, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to left heart disease, classified as Group 2, is a widely underestimated target of therapy. Prevention and treatment of initial subclinical stages are not valued as a priority in the management of this chronic disease population, whereas attention is high for PH consequences in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) requiring a left ventricular mechanical assist device or heart transplant candidates. Even so, there is a growing interest toward the evidence of a clinical and prognostic role of PH in the elderly populations and in HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Certainly, along with a prevalence definition not yet defined, the search for effective pharmacological approaches that might favorably affect the aging process and the natural history of HFpEF from earlier stages is not an easy task. Pharmacological studies that have tested some traditional pulmonary arterial hypertension approved drugs (i.e., prostanoids and endothelin-1 receptor blockers) primarily in PH and HF with reduced ejection fraction have not been positive, especially because of concomitant side effects, i.e., systemic hypotension, fluid retention and hepatic toxicity. In recent years, interest has moved toward drugs overexpressing the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway with recent availability of well-tolerated selective pulmonary vasodilators, such as phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and guanylate cyclase stimulators. Single center studies performed with these drugs have shown good tolerability and safety profile providing alternating hemodynamic results mainly because of recruitment of patients at different stages of the pulmonary vascular disease. Nonetheless, the overexpression of NO pathway appears to remain the most solid background for targeting lung microvessel dysfunction and treating RV dysfunction since the earliest stages of the disease. PMID:27389809

  8. Medical technology advances from space research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    Details of medical research and development programs, particularly an integrated medical laboratory, as derived from space technology are given. The program covers digital biotelemetry systems, automatic visual field mapping equipment, sponge electrode caps for clinical electroencephalograms, and advanced respiratory analysis equipment. The possibility of using the medical laboratory in ground based remote areas and regional health care facilities, as well as long duration space missions is discussed.

  9. Medical technology advances from space research.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    NASA-sponsored medical R & D programs for space applications are reviewed with particular attention to the benefits of these programs to earthbound medical services and to the general public. Notable among the results of these NASA programs is an integrated medical laboratory equipped with numerous advanced systems such as digital biotelemetry and automatic visual field mapping systems, sponge electrode caps for electroencephalograms, and sophisticated respiratory analysis equipment.

  10. Advanced medical video services through context-aware medical networks.

    PubMed

    Doukas, Charalampos N; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Pliakas, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a framework for advanced medical video delivery services, through network and patient-state awareness. Under this scope a context-aware medical networking platform is described. The developed platform enables proper medical video data coding and transmission according to both a) network availability and/or quality and b) patient status, optimizing thus network performance and telediagnosis. An evaluation platform has been developed based on scalable H.264 coding of medical videos. Corresponding results of video transmission over a WiMax network have proved the effectiveness and efficiency of the platform providing proper video content delivery. PMID:18002643

  11. Advanced medical video services through context-aware medical networks.

    PubMed

    Doukas, Charalampos N; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Pliakas, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a framework for advanced medical video delivery services, through network and patient-state awareness. Under this scope a context-aware medical networking platform is described. The developed platform enables proper medical video data coding and transmission according to both a) network availability and/or quality and b) patient status, optimizing thus network performance and telediagnosis. An evaluation platform has been developed based on scalable H.264 coding of medical videos. Corresponding results of video transmission over a WiMax network have proved the effectiveness and efficiency of the platform providing proper video content delivery.

  12. [Laser radiations in medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Richand, P; Boulnois, J L

    1983-06-30

    The therapeutic effects of various types of laser beams and the various techniques employed are studied. Clinical and experimental research has shown that Helio-Neon laser beams are most effective as biological stimulants and in reducing inflammation. For this reasons they are best used in dermatological surgery cases (varicose ulcers, decubital and surgical wounds, keloid scars, etc.). Infrared diode laser beams have been shown to be highly effective painkillers especially in painful pathologies like postherpetic neuritis. The various applications of laser therapy in acupuncture, the treatment of reflex dermatologia and optic fibre endocavital therapy are presented. The neurophysiological bases of this therapy are also briefly described.

  13. Best evidence for medical therapy for carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Jason; Jayia, Parveen; Hamilton, George

    2013-10-01

    Carotid atheromatous disease is an important cause of stroke and represents a key target in stroke prevention. Randomized trials have shown the efficacy of carotid endarterectomy in secondary stroke prevention. Carotid stenting presents a less invasive alternative to surgical intervention. Advances in medical management, if compliance can be ensured, are leading to improvement in outcomes when implemented as sole therapy in the treatment of atherosclerotic carotid stenosis. This includes lifestyle modification, blood pressure control, and antiplatelet and statin therapy. Over the last 20 years, the annual rate of ipsilateral stroke associated with asymptomatic carotid stenosis has decreased from 2% to 4% to less than 1%. This is largely due to improvements in medical therapy. However, despite numerous trials and years of clinical research, the optimal management of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease remains controversial. This article presents and summarizes the evidence supporting best medical treatment for carotid artery stenosis.

  14. [PVB therapy for advanced testicular cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakao, M; Nakagawa, S; Toyoda, K; Nukui, M; Takada, H; Ebisui, K; Sugimoto, K; Watanabe, H; Maegawa, M; Miyakoda, K

    1989-11-01

    Twelve cases of advanced testicular cancer, including 5 cases of seminoma, 3 cases of teratocarcinoma, 1 case of yolk sac tumor, 1 case of embryonal carcinoma and 2 cases of mixed cell type, were treated with cisplatin-vinblastine-bleomycin (PVB) therapy. Among them, 10 cases had measurable metastatic lesions and the objective response rate was 80%. Three cases showed complete response. Ten cases showed nonexistent disease after PVB therapy and salvage operation. Though PVB therapy was useful for the treatment of advanced testicular cancer, a few cases having poor prognostic factors showed no response to the therapy.

  15. [Recent advances in medical and surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Akira; Koganei, Kazutaka; Tatsumi, Kenji; Futatsuki, Ryo; Kuroki, Hirosuke; Yamada, Kyoko; Arai, Katsuhiko; Fukushima, Tsuneo

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in both medical and surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis have been remarkable. Changes in medical treatment are mainly good results of therapy with the anti-TNF-α antibody, tacrolimus, and those in surgical treatment are an expansion of the surgical indications to include patients with intractable disease, such as treatment refractoriness and chronic corticosteroid dependence, by a better postoperative clinical course after pouch surgery, improred selection of surgical procedures and the timing of surgery in elderly patients. To offer the optimal treatment for patients with ulcerative colitis, new medical therapies should be analyzed from the standpoint of the efficacy and limitations of effect. Long postoperative clinical course of surgical patients including colitic cancer, prevention of postoperative complications should be also analyzed.

  16. Recent advances in systemic therapy for gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pelley, R J; Bukowski, R M

    1999-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare tumors which can be classified as amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation tumors (APU-Domas). Although the majority of clinically apparent tumors are malignant, they are frequently slow growing. Despite this characteristic, they may generate disabling hormonal syndromes requiring aggressive treatment to achieve palliation. Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of these tumors has led to better medical therapy with chemotherapeutic agents, somatostatin analogues, and biologic therapies. This review will update the recent efforts in systemic therapies of the gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

  17. Medical Therapy for Pediatric Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Judith F.; Soni, Heather Mills; Pimpalwar, Sheena

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies (VAs) comprise a large variety of individual diagnoses that in different phases of treatment require a diverse number of medical specialists to provide optimal care. Medical therapies include agents usually associated with cancer chemotherapy, such as vincristine, as well more immunomodulatory types of drugs, such as glucocorticoids and sirolimus. These immunomodulating drugs are being successfully applied in cases that are typically categorized as vascular tumors, including kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE) and tufted angioma (TA), as well as some of the more invasive types of vascular malformations (i.e., microcystic lymphatic malformations and blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS). These therapies need to be combined with good supportive care, which often involves anticoagulation, antimicrobial prophylaxis, and comprehensive pain and symptom-relief strategies, as well as appropriate drug monitoring and management of side effects of medical treatment. The optimal care of these patients frequently involves close collaboration between surgeons, interventional and conventional radiologists, medical subspecialists, and nurses. PMID:25045333

  18. Advances in Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.; Carpenter, D.E.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Fifth International Symposium on Neutron Capture Therapy held September 14--17, 1992 in Columbus, Ohio. Individual papers were separately abstracted and indexed for the database.

  19. HIV gene therapy research advances.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M

    2013-02-28

    In this issue of Blood, Tebas et al report antiviral effects in a clinical trial of multiple infusions of lentiviral vector–modified autologous CD4T lymphocytes in 17 HIV-infected patients aviremic on antiretroviral therapy (ART).

  20. Rapid medical advances challenge the tooling industry.

    PubMed

    Conley, B

    2008-01-01

    The requirement for greater performance in smaller spaces has increased demands for product and process innovation in tubing and other medical products. In turn, these developments have placed greater demands on the producers of the advanced tooling for these products. Tooling manufacturers must now continuously design equipment with much tighter tolerances for more sophisticated coextrusions and for newer generations of multilumen and multilayer tubing.

  1. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT...

  2. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  3. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  4. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  5. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  6. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  7. Molecular targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although medical treatment has been shown to improve quality of life and prolong survival, no significant progress has been made in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) within the last two decades. Thus, the optimum standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for AGC remains debatable, and most responses to chemotherapy are partial and of short duration; the median survival is approximately 7 to 11 months, and survival at 2 years is exceptionally > 10%. Recently, remarkable progress in tumor biology has led to the development of new agents that target critical aspects of oncogenic pathways. For AGC, many molecular targeting agents have been evaluated in international randomized studies, and trastuzumab, an anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibody, has shown antitumor activity against HER-2-positive AGC. However, this benefit is limited to only ~20% of patients with AGC (patients with HER-2-positive AGC). Therefore, there remains a critical need for both the development of more effective agents and the identification of molecular predictive and prognostic markers to select those patients who will benefit most from specific chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies. PMID:23525404

  8. Recent Advances in Combined Modality Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nyati, Mukesh K.; Morgan, Meredith A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2010-01-01

    Combined modality therapy emerged from preclinical data showing that carefully chosen drugs could enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to radiation while having nonoverlapping toxicities. Recent advances in molecular biology involving the identification of cellular receptors, enzymes, and pathways involved in tumor growth and immortality have resulted in the development of biologically targeted drugs. This review highlights the recent clinical data in support of newer generation cytotoxic chemotherapies and systemic targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy. PMID:20413642

  9. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  10. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy - Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-09-22

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when 'photoradiation therapy' was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  11. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee schedule...

  12. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee schedule...

  13. Advances in stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Pérez López, Silvia; Otero Hernández, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Since the beginning of stem cell biology, considerable effort has been focused in the translation of scientific insights into new therapies. Cell-based assays represent a new strategy for organ and tissue repair in several pathologies. Moreover, alternative treatment strategies are urgently needed due to donor organ shortage that costs many lives every year and results in lifelong immunosuppression. At the moment, only the use of hematopoietic stem cells is considered as the standard for the treatment of malignant and genetic bone marrow disorders, being all other stem cell applications highly experimental. The present chapter tries to summarize some ongoing approaches of stem cell regenerative medicine and also introduces recent findings from published studies and trials conducted in various tissues such as skeletal muscle, liver and lung.

  14. Medical and endoscopic therapy of primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Weismüller, Tobias J; Lankisch, Tim O

    2011-12-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a rare cholestatic liver disease mainly affecting young male patients. PSC is characterised by chronic inflammation and fibrotic strictures of the intra- and extrahepatic biliary system, which eventually lead to cholestasis and biliary cirrhosis. However, the clinical course remains very variable. As the aetiology remains unknown, the development of a causative treatment is challenging and today no specific medical therapy is available. Ursodeoxycholic acid has been widely used for the treatment of PSC, but improved only biochemistry and/or symptoms in low- or medium dosages and is probably harmful in higher dosages. Other drugs such as immunosuppressive, antifibrotic or antibiotic agents have not been proven to be effective in large clinical trials. The endoscopic therapy encompasses balloon-dilatation and/or stenting of strictures, relieves clinical symptoms and improves a cholestatic enzyme profile. However, endoscopic therapy is limited to patients in advanced stages of PSC with biliary obstruction.

  15. Combination Therapy for Advanced Kaposi Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, adult patients with any form of advanced Kaposi sarcoma will be treated with liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab every 3 weeks for a maximum of six treatments.  Patients who respond to this therapy or have stable disease will rec

  16. Angina Treatment -- Medical Versus Interventional Therapy (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop the progression of the disease and thereby prolong life. MEDICAL ANGINA TREATMENT — Medical treatment for coronary ... be recommended. Stenting has not been shown to prolong life compared with medical therapy. It is used ...

  17. Preoperative therapy in locally advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Sharma, Jyoti; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Goel, Aakanksha; Gaur, Manish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an aggressive malignancy associated with dismal treatment outcomes. Presence of two distinct histopathological types distinguishes it from other gastrointestinal tract malignancies. Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment in locally advanced esophageal cancer (T2 or greater or node positive); however, a high rate of disease recurrence (systemic and loco-regional) and poor survival justifies a continued search for optimal therapy. Various combinations of multimodality treatment (preoperative/perioperative, or postoperative; radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy) are being explored to lower disease recurrence and improve survival. Preoperative therapy followed by surgery is presently considered the standard of care in resectable locally advanced esophageal cancer as postoperative treatment may not be feasible for all the patients due to the morbidity of esophagectomy and prolonged recovery time limiting the tolerance of patient. There are wide variations in the preoperative therapy practiced across the centres depending upon the institutional practices, availability of facilities and personal experiences. There is paucity of literature to standardize the preoperative therapy. Broadly, chemoradiotherapy is the preferred neo-adjuvant modality in western countries whereas chemotherapy alone is considered optimal in the far East. The present review highlights the significant studies to assist in opting for the best evidence based preoperative therapy (radiotherapy, chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy) for locally advanced esophageal cancer.

  18. Synergistic advances in diagnostic and therapeutic medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizzi, Frederic L.

    2003-04-01

    Significant advances are more fully exploiting ultrasound's potential for noninvasive diagnosis and treatment. Therapeutic systems employ intense focused beams to thermally kill cancer cells in, e.g., prostate; to stop bleeding; and to treat specific diseases (e.g., glaucoma). Diagnostic ultrasound techniques can quantitatively image an increasingly broad spectrum of physical tissue attributes. An exciting aspect of this progress is the emerging synergy between these modalities. Advanced diagnostic techniques may contribute at several stages in therapy. For example, treatment planning for small ocular tumors uses 50-MHz, 3-D ultrasonic images with 0.05-mm resolution. Thermal simulations employ these images to evaluate desired and undesired effects using exposure stategies with specially designed treatment beams. Therapy beam positioning can use diagnostic elastography to sense tissue motion induced by radiation pressure from high-intensity treatment beams. Therapy monitoring can sense lesion formation using elastography motion sensing (to detect the increased stiffness in lesions); harmonic imaging (to sense altered nonlinear properties); and spectrum analysis images (depicting changes in the sizes, concentration, and configuration of sub-resolution structures.) Experience from these applications will greatly expand the knowledge of acoustic phenomena in living tissues and should lead to further advances in medical ultrasound.

  19. Medical advances during the Civil War.

    PubMed

    Blaisdell, F W

    1988-09-01

    The contributions to medical care that developed during the Civil War have not been fully appreciated, probably because the quality of care administered was compared against modern standards rather than the standards of the time. The specific accomplishments that constituted major advances were as follows. 1. Accumulation of adequate records and detailed reports for the first time permitted a complete military medical history. This led to the publication of the Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion, which was identified in Europe as the first major academic accomplishment by US medicine. 2. Development of a system of managing mass casualties, including aid stations, field hospitals, and general hospitals, set the pattern for management of the wounded in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. 3. The pavilion-style general hospitals, which were well ventilated and clean, were copied in the design of large civilian hospitals over the next 75 years. 4. The importance of immediate, definitive treatment of wounds and fractures was demonstrated and it was shown that major operative procedures, such as amputation, were optimally carried out in the first 24 hours after wounding. 5. The importance of sanitation and hygiene in preventing infection, disease, and death among the troops in the field was demonstrated. 6. Female nurses were introduced to hospital care and Catholic orders entered the hospital business. 7. The experience and training of thousands of physicians were upgraded and they were introduced to new ideas and standards of care. These included familiarity with prevention and treatment of infectious disease, with anesthetic agents, and with surgical principles that rapidly advanced the overall quality of American medical practice. 8. The Sanitary Commission was formed, a civilian-organized soldier's relief society that set the pattern for the development of the American Red Cross. PMID:3046560

  20. Pharmacogenetics in electroconvulsive therapy and adjunctive medications.

    PubMed

    Mirzakhani, Hooman; van Noorden, Martijn S; Swen, Jesse; Nozari, Ala; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has shown apparent efficacy in treatment of patients with depression and other mental illnesses who do not respond to psychotropic medications or need urgent control of their symptoms. Pharmacogenetics contributes to an individual's sensitivity and response to a variety of drugs. Clinical insights into pharmacogenetics of ECT and adjunctive medications not only improves its safety and efficacy in the indicated patients, but can also lead to the identification of novel treatments in psychiatric disorders through understanding of potential molecular and biological mechanisms involved. In this review, we explore the indications of pharmacogenetics role in safety and efficacy of ECT and present the evidence for its role in patients with psychiatric disorders undergoing ECT.

  1. Gene therapy and medical genetics on Internet.

    PubMed

    Seemann, O; Seemann, M D; Preuss, U; Kuss, J P; Soyka, M

    1998-09-17

    In this report we consider the development of the Internet, from its origins as a military invention in the times of the cold war to its present day role, together with the World Wide Web, as a means of global communication which plays a key role in medical research and particularly in medical genetics. A few of the major genetics related research projects and gene research centers are introduced and their aims are briefly discussed. Detailed information about chromosome and gene mapping, together with sequence and structure databases, can be easily and rapidly accessed through the Internet. A variety of web-sites are briefly described and then listed at the end of the report, which will serve as a useful starting point from which the interested reader can access an almost endless source of genetics related information on the Internet. Finally, some of the ethical, legal and social implications of the links between gene therapy and the Intemet are considered.

  2. [Therapy options in the case of advanced therapy resistant Morbus Parkinson].

    PubMed

    Hakimi, R

    2010-12-01

    In Germany about 300,000 to 400,000 people are suffering from Morbus Parkinson at present. It is one of the most common neurological diseases both in Germany and in Europe as a whole. With the rising number of elderly people in our population, the number of Parkinson patients will strongly increase as well in future. About 20% of these patients are already in an advanced stage. This stage leaves its marks with motor and non-motor sequelae. With the minority of these patients oral medication is ineffective. For these relatively rare cases an indication for an L-dopa-infusion therapy (duodopa pump), an apomorphine pump therapy or a deep brain stimulation may exist. The indication for one of these 3 therapy forms is given by the neurological clinic in agreement with the patient and is only given in case of failure of oral medication. All 3 therapy options are very expensive. In case of the deep brain stimulation, close cooperation between the neurologist and the neurosurgeon as well as with the patient is necessary. Experts warn about a transplantation of stem cells because there are no clinical studies and only partial clinical improvement with severe side effects are known. The transplantation of stem cells for advanced Morbus Parkinson is not a medically necessary treatment at present.

  3. Systemic Therapy for Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jennifer Y; Movva, Sujana

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare tumors that present with distant metastasis in up to 10% of patients. Survival has improved significantly because of advancements in histologic classification and improved management approaches. Older agents such as doxorubicin, ifosfamide, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel continue to demonstrate objective response rates from 18% to 25%. Newer agents such as trabectedin, eribulin, aldoxorubicin, and olaratumab have demonstrated improvements in progression-free survival, overall survival, or toxicity profiles. Future studies on treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma will continue to concentrate on reducing toxicity, personalization of therapy, and targeting novel pathways. PMID:27542647

  4. Advanced Semiconductor Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.

    2011-05-05

    Modern radiation therapy is very conformal, resulting in a complexity of delivery that leads to many small radiation fields with steep dose gradients, increasing error probability. Quality assurance in delivery of such radiation fields is paramount and requires real time and high spatial resolution dosimetry. Semiconductor radiation detectors due to their small size, ability to operate in passive and active modes and easy real time multichannel readout satisfy many aspects of in vivo and in a phantom quality assurance in modern radiation therapy. Update on the recent developments and improvements in semiconductor radiation detectors and their application for quality assurance in radiation therapy, based mostly on the developments at the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, is presented.

  5. Updates in Therapy for Advanced Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhavana P; Salama, April K S

    2016-01-15

    Cutaneous melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer, and is correlated with a large proportion of skin cancer-related deaths. Therapy for cutaneous melanoma has advanced greatly through careful identification of therapeutic targets and the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. The identification of BRAF as well as other driver mutations, have allowed for a specialized approach to treatment. In addition, immune checkpoint inhibition has dramatically changed the treatment landscape over the past 5-10 years. The successful targeting of CTLA-4, as well as PD-1/PD-L1, has been translated into meaningful clinical benefit for patients, with multiple other potential agents in development. Systemic therapy for cutaneous melanoma is becoming more nuanced and often takes a multifaceted strategy. This review aims to discuss the benefits and limitations of current therapies in systemic melanoma treatment as well as areas of future development.

  6. The Downsides of a Major Medical Advance

    PubMed Central

    Fraenkel, Liana

    2010-01-01

    When positive, the results of randomized controlled trials designed to evaluate the effectiveness of new options are released with great fanfare. This is especially true for difficult to treat conditions for which there are few treatment alternatives. This scenario recently played out at the 2009 American College of Rheumatology National meeting when the long anticipated RAVE (Rituximab versus Cyclophosphamide for Induction of Remission in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis) trial results were announced. Since then the results of the RAVE and RITUXVAS trials have demonstrated that rituximab is as effective at inducing remission in patients with ANCA positive vasculitis as cyclophosphamide. Prior to these trials, cyclophosphamide was the option of choice for this potentially life threatening disease, and physicians have long hoped for a viable alternative given the significant toxicity associated with this medication, particularly infection, infertility, and cancer. While the results of the trial were justifiably received with great enthusiasm, practical clinical experience has revealed some noteworthy downsides to this important medical advance. PMID:20665748

  7. Neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced melanoma: new strategies with targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    La Greca, Michele; Grasso, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Giovanna; Russo, Alessia Erika; Bartolotta, Salvatore; D'Angelo, Alessandro; Vitale, Felice Vito; Ferraù, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been successfully tested in several bulky solid tumors, but it has not been utilized in advanced cutaneous melanoma, primarily because effective medical treatments for this disease have been lacking. However, with the development of new immunotherapies (monoclonal antibodies specific for cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 [anti-CTLA-4] and programmed death protein-1 [anti-PD1]) and small molecules interfering with intracellular pathways (anti-BRAF and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [anti- MEK]) the use of this approach is becoming a viable treatment strategy for locally advanced melanoma. The neoadjuvant setting provides a double opportunity for a better knowledge of these drugs: a short-term evaluation of their intrinsic activity, and a deeper analysis of their action and resistance-induction mechanisms. BRAF inhibitors seem to be ideal candidates for the neoadjuvant setting, because of their prompt, repeatedly confirmed response in V600E BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma. In this report we summarize studies focused on the neoadjuvant use of traditional medical treatments in advanced melanoma and anecdotal cases of this approach with the use of biologic therapies. Moreover, we discuss our experience with neoadjuvant targeted therapy as a priming for radical surgery in a patient with BRAF V600E mutation-positive advanced melanoma.

  8. Neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced melanoma: new strategies with targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    La Greca, Michele; Grasso, Giuseppe; Antonelli, Giovanna; Russo, Alessia Erika; Bartolotta, Salvatore; D’Angelo, Alessandro; Vitale, Felice Vito; Ferraù, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been successfully tested in several bulky solid tumors, but it has not been utilized in advanced cutaneous melanoma, primarily because effective medical treatments for this disease have been lacking. However, with the development of new immunotherapies (monoclonal antibodies specific for cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 [anti-CTLA-4] and programmed death protein-1 [anti-PD1]) and small molecules interfering with intracellular pathways (anti-BRAF and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [anti- MEK]) the use of this approach is becoming a viable treatment strategy for locally advanced melanoma. The neoadjuvant setting provides a double opportunity for a better knowledge of these drugs: a short-term evaluation of their intrinsic activity, and a deeper analysis of their action and resistance-induction mechanisms. BRAF inhibitors seem to be ideal candidates for the neoadjuvant setting, because of their prompt, repeatedly confirmed response in V600E BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma. In this report we summarize studies focused on the neoadjuvant use of traditional medical treatments in advanced melanoma and anecdotal cases of this approach with the use of biologic therapies. Moreover, we discuss our experience with neoadjuvant targeted therapy as a priming for radical surgery in a patient with BRAF V600E mutation-positive advanced melanoma. PMID:24971022

  9. Medical Therapy in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Jais, Xavier; Channick, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare but life-threatening condition resulting from unresolved thromboembolic obstructions. Pulmonary endarterectomy surgery is currently the standard of treatment, as it is potentially curative; however, not all cases are amenable to surgical intervention due to distal distribution of the organized thromboembolic material or the presence of comorbidities. Up to one-third of patients have persistent or recurrent pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary endarterectomy. In addition to the occlusive organized thromboembolic material, there is a small-vessel vasculopathy in nonoccluded parts of the pulmonary circulation that is histologically similar to that described in pulmonary arterial hypertension. This observation has led to frequent off-license use of approved pulmonary arterial hypertension therapies in CTEPH. Small uncontrolled trials have investigated prostacyclin analogs, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors in CTEPH with mixed results. A phase III study of the endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan met only one of its two coprimary end points. The first large randomized controlled trial showing a positive treatment effect was the Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator Trial (CHEST). This study led to the licensing of riociguat for use in inoperable or persistent recurrent CTEPH. Rigorous randomized controlled trials of medical therapy for CTEPH are needed, and several are underway or planned. In the future, outcomes research may be facilitated by identification of novel end points specific to CTEPH. PMID:27571006

  10. Medical therapy for polycystic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Dennison, A; Garcea, G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Somatostatin analogues and rapamycin inhibitors are two classes of drugs available for the management of polycystic liver disease but their overall impact is not clearly established. This article systematically reviews the literature on the medical management of polycystic liver disease. The outcomes assessed include reduction in liver volume and the impact on quality of life. Methods The English language literature published between 1966 and August 2014 was reviewed from a MEDLINE(®), PubMed, Embase™ and Cochrane Library search. Search terms included 'polycystic', 'liver', 'sirolimus', 'everolimus', 'PCLD', 'somatostatin', 'octreotide', 'lanreotide' and 'rapamycin'. Both randomised trials and controlled studies were included. References of the articles retrieved were also searched to identify any further eligible publications. The studies included were appraised using the Jadad score. Results Seven studies were included in the final review. Five studies, of which three were randomised trials, investigated the role of somatostatin analogues and the results showed a mean reduction in liver volume ranging from 2.9% at six months to 4.95 ±6.77% at one year. Only one randomised study examined the influence of rapamycin inhibitors. This trial compared dual therapy with everolimus and octreotide versus octreotide monotherapy. Liver volume reduced by 3.5% and 3.8% in the control and intervention groups respectively but no statistical difference was found between the two groups (p=0.73). Two randomised trials investigating somatostatin analogues assessed quality of life using SF-36(®). Only one subdomain score improved in one of the trials while two subdomain scores improved in the other with somatostatin analogue therapy. Conclusions Somatostatin analogues significantly reduce liver volumes after six months of therapy but have only a modest improvement on quality of life. Rapamycin inhibitors do not confer any additional advantage.

  11. CROI 2016: Advances in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Barbara S; Olender, Susan A; Tieu, Hong-Van; Wilkin, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections highlighted exciting advances in antiretroviral therapy, including important data on investigational antiretroviral drugs and clinical trials. Clinical trials demonstrated benefits from a long-acting injectable coformulation given as maintenance therapy, examined intravenous and subcutaneous administration of a monoclonal antibody directed at the CD4 binding site of HIV-1, and provided novel data on tenofovir alafenamide. Several studies focused on the role of HIV drug resistance, including the significance of minority variants, transmitted drug resistance, use of resistance testing, and drug class-related resistance. Novel data on the HIV care continuum in low- and middle-income settings concentrated on differentiated HIV care delivery models and outcomes. Data on progress toward reaching World Health Organization 90-90-90 targets as well as outcomes related to expedited initiation of HIV treatment and adherence strategies were presented. Results from a trial in Malawi showed reduced rates of mother-to-child transmission among HIV-infected women who initiated antiretroviral therapy prior to pregnancy, and several studies highlighted the effect of antiretroviral therapy in pediatric populations. A special session was dedicated to the findings of studies of Ebola virus disease and treatment during the outbreak in West Africa. PMID:27398863

  12. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64 Section 414.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under...

  13. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64 Section 414.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under...

  14. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64 Section 414.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under...

  15. FOREWORD: Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy 2011 Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2012-10-01

    Although physical treatments play a central role in cancer therapy, SI-traceable metrology has only been established for some of them. Several forms of treatment currently used (particularly intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hadron therapy, high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) and brachytherapy) suffer from the limited metrological support, which restricts the success of these techniques. Recognizing this deficit, the European Union identified metrology for health as one of the first four Targeted Programmes in the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) running from 2008 to 2011. This programme included two EMRP projects addressing metrology for cancer therapy: project T2.J06 dealing with brachytherapy project T2.J07 dealing with external beam cancer therapy using ionizing radiation and high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound. Primary measurement standards applicable to modern treatment conditions were developed under both projects, together with measurement techniques which are meant as a basis for future protocols for dosimetry, treatment planning and monitoring. In order to provide a platform for the presentation of current developments in clinical measurement techniques for cancer therapy, together with the achievements of both projects, an international Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy (CAMCT) was held from 29 November to 1 December 2011 at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig, Germany. The main sessions of the conference: Primary and secondary standards of absorbed dose to water for IMRT and brachytherapy, 3D dose distributions and treatment planning for IMRT and brachytherapy, Hadron therapy (protons and carbon ions), High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU), were geared to the main foci of the projects. Metrologists and medical physicists from countries all over the world attended the conference and made it into a forum for the exchange of information and expertise

  16. Efficacy of medical therapy in treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Young, Lee C; Stow, Nicholas W; Zhou, Lifeng; Douglas, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Uncomplicated chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is generally treated with medical therapy initially and surgery is contemplated only after medical therapy has failed. However, there is considerable variation in the medical treatment regimens used and studies defining their efficacy are few. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of patients treated medically who responded sufficiently well so that surgery was not required. Subgroup analysis to identify clinical features that predicted a favorable response to medical therapy was also performed. Eighty patients referred to the Otorhinolaryngology Clinic at North Shore Hospital were treated with a standardized medical therapy protocol (oral prednisone for 3 weeks, oral antibiotics and ongoing saline lavage and intranasal budesonide spray). Symptom scores were collected before and after medical therapy. Clinical features such as presence of polyps, asthma, and aspirin hypersensitivity were recorded. Failure of medical therapy was defined as the persistence of significant CRS symptoms, and those patients who failed medical therapy were offered surgery. Follow-up data were available for 72 (90%) patients. Of this group, 52.5%, (95% CI, 42.7%, 62.2%) failed to respond adequately to medical therapy and were offered surgery. The remaining patients (37.5%) were successfully treated with medical therapy and did not require surgery at the time of follow-up. The premedical therapy symptom scores were significantly higher than the postmedical therapy symptom scores (p < 0.01). The symptom scores of those patients postmedical therapy who proceeded to have surgery were significantly higher than the group who responded well to maximum medical therapy (MMT) and did not require surgery (p < 0.0001). There were no significant differences in the proportion of patients with asthma, aspirin sensitivity, or polyps between the groups failing or not failing MMT. In approximately one-third of patients with CRS, medical therapy

  17. Photodynamic therapy of advanced malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian-xing; Dai, Lu-pin; Lu, Wen-qin

    1993-03-01

    Forty patients with advanced tumors were treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) from May 1991 to August 1991 in our hospital with age ranges from 30 to 81 years old. The pathological diagnosis shows that 13 had tumors in the colon, 3 in the stomach, 2 in the oesophageal, 2 in the palatum, 1 in the cervix, and 19 others with malignant cancers of the skin. The histology was as follows: squamous cell in 20, adenocarcinoma in 19, melanocarcinoma in 1. By TNM classification there were no cases of T1, 5 cases of T2, and 35 cases of T2 - T3. All patients were stage IV. The overall effective rate was 85%, our experience is that the PDT is suitable for the patients with advanced tumor, especially those whose tumor recurrences are hard to treat after conventional treatment (surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy). The PDT appears to be a new and promising possibility to treat advanced tumors and to improve the patients' survival rates.

  18. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  19. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Anne P

    2016-02-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series.

  20. [Academic cell therapy facilities are challenged by European regulation on advanced therapy medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Chabannon, Christian; Sabatier, Florence; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Calmels, Boris; Veran, Julie; Magalon, Guy; Lemarie, Claude; Mahalatchimy, Aurélie

    2014-05-01

    Regulation (EC) n° 1394/2007 from the European Parliament and the Council describes a new category of health products termed « Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products » (ATMPs). ATMPs derive from cell engineering, tissue engineering or genetic manipulations, and can in some instances be combined with medical devices. ATMPs are distributed and administered to patients, after biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies have obtained a marketing authorization that is granted by the European Commission on the basis of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) assessment. Seven years after the publication of the regulation, few of these therapies have received a marketing authorization, and even fewer have met commercial success, suggesting that a number of medical and economic issues still need to be sorted out in order to achieve sustainability in this field. The coexistence of three sets of rules for three categories of health products that are biologically and medically related - ATMPs, ATMPs produced under the hospital exemption rule, and cell therapy products (CTPs) (a specific legal category in France) that have long been used in hematopoietic cell transplantation - constitutes a complex regulatory framework. This situation raises significant issues for historical as well as emerging operators in this moving field that are discussed thereafter.

  1. Targets for medical therapy in obesity.

    PubMed

    Baretić, Maja

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has more than doubled since 1980 all over the world, and in the European perspective it does not seem to be better. Obesity-related diseases like diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke and hyperlipidemia are the main cause of mortality and morbidity in developed countries. These are the reasons for continuous search for efficient treatment of obesity. One of the options is medical therapy. Over history, many anti-obesity drugs were introduced and subsequently removed from the market due to various side effects. Unfortunately, there is still no ideal drug for the treatment of obesity, and the current ones are very strictly evaluated. The anti-obesity drug should target patients that have previously failed to lose weight with lifestyle interventions, with body mass index (BMI) ≥30, or those with BMI ≥27 plus concomitant obesity-related risk factors or diseases. The only drug currently approved in Europe is orlistat, a pancreatic lipase inhibitor. Sibutramine, an appetite suppressant (serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor), has been off the market since 2010 due to cardiovascular side effects. There is a large group of drugs used for other indications with weight loss effects, e.g. incretin mimetics or analogues used in the treatment of diabetes type 2, topiramate used as an anticonvulsant, and fluoxetine and sertraline used in the treatment of depression. PMID:22722433

  2. Nanomedicine in cardiovascular therapy: recent advancements.

    PubMed

    Binsalamah, Ziyad Mohammed; Paul, Arghya; Prakash, Satya; Shum-Tim, Dominique

    2012-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of a group of disorders affecting the heart and blood vessels of the human body and is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Current therapy for CVD is limited to the treatment of already established disease, and it includes pharmacological and/or surgical procedures, such as percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting and coronary artery bypass grafting. However, lots of complications have been raised with these modalities of treatment, including systemic toxicity with medication, stent thrombosis with percutaneous coronary intervention and nonsurgical candidate patients for coronary artery bypass grafting. Nanomedicine has emerged as a potential strategy in dealing with these obstacles. Applications of nanotechnology in medicine are already underway and offer tremendous promise. This review explores the recent developments of nanotechnology in the field of CVD and gives an insight into its potential for diagnostics and therapeutics applications. The authors also explore the characteristics of the widely used biocompatible nanomaterials for this purpose and evaluate their opportunities and challenges for developing novel nanobiotechnological tools with high efficacy for biomedical applications, such as radiological imaging, vascular implants, gene therapy, myocardial infarction and targeted delivery systems.

  3. Resource Letter MPRT-1: Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Steven T.

    2009-09-01

    This resource letter provides a guide to the literature on medical physics in the field of radiation therapy. Journal articles, books, and websites are cited for the following topics: radiological physics, particle accelerators, radiation dose measurements, protocols for radiation dose measurements, radiation shielding and radiation protection, neutron, proton, and heavy-ion therapies, imaging for radiation therapy, brachytherapy, quality assurance, treatment planning, dose calculations, and intensity-modulated and image-guided therapy.

  4. Advances in Stem Cell Therapy for Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hong; Qu, Qi; Liu, Liming; Wu, Depei

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the most effective post remission treatment for leukemia, resulting in lower relapse rates than alternative therapies. However, it is limited by the lack of suitable human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched donors and high rates of transplant-related morbidity and mortality. Cord blood transplantation (CBT) and haploidentical SCT (haplo-SCT) expand the potential donor pool but are also associated with major complications. Co-infusion of third-party donor stem cells with a CBT/haplo-SCT, which is called "dual transplantation," has been reported to improve the outcome of HSCT by accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution and reducing the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In addition, infusion of HLA-mismatched donor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized donor peripheral blood stem cells after chemotherapy, the so called "microtransplantation", has been shown to promote the graft-versus-leukemia effect and hasten hematopoietic recovery without amplifying GVHD. Herein, we review recent advances in stem cell therapy for leukemia with a specific focus on dual transplantation and microtransplantation.

  5. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behavior and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumor treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume. PMID:23582916

  6. Medical Advances in Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Randell A.

    2011-01-01

    This volume is the first of a two-part special issue detailing state of the art practice in medical issues around child sexual abuse. The six articles in this issue explore methods for medical history evaluation, the rationale for when sexual examinations should take place, specific hymenal findings that suggest a child has been sexually abused,…

  7. Advanced therapy medicinal products: current and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cécile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are innovative therapies that encompass gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products. These therapies are expected to bring important health benefits, but also to substantially impact the pharmaceuticals budget. Objective The aim of this study was to characterise the ATMPs in development and discuss future implications in terms of market access. Methods Clinical trials were searched in the following databases: EudraCT (EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials), ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the World Health Organization). Trials were classified by category of ATMP as defined by European regulation EC No. 1394/2007, as well as by development phase and disease area. Results The database search identified 939 clinical trials investigating ATMPs (85% ongoing, 15% completed). The majority of trials were in the early stages (Phase I, I/II: 64.3%, Phase II, II/III: 27.9%, Phase 3: 6.9%). Per category of ATMP, we identified 53.6% of trials for somatic cell therapies, 22.8% for tissue-engineered products, 22.4% for gene therapies, and 1.2% for combined products (incorporating a medical device). Disease areas included cancer (24.8%), cardiovascular diseases (19.4%), musculoskeletal (10.5%), immune system and inflammation (11.5%), neurology (9.1%), and others. Of the trials, 47.2% enrolled fewer than 25 patients. Due to the complexity and specificity of ATMPs, new clinical trial methodologies are being considered (e.g., small sample size, non-randomised trials, single-arm trials, surrogate endpoints, integrated protocols, and adaptive designs). Evidence generation post-launch will become unavoidable to address payers’ expectations. Conclusion ATMPs represent a fast-growing field of interest. Although most of the products are in an early development phase, the combined trial phase and the potential to cure severe chronic conditions suggest

  8. The perfect marriage: solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing in medical family therapy.

    PubMed

    Stermensky, Gage; Brown, Kristina S

    2014-01-01

    Medical family therapy has many potential uses in behavioral medicine and primary care. Current research was reviewed to determine the most advantageous way to apply solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as a perfect marriage in medical family therapy. An extensive literature review was done in the following databases for medical family therapy: Proquest, EBSCO, Medline, and PsychInfo. The search resulted in 86 relevant articles, of which 46 of the most recent were selected for review. Medical family therapy lacks current research that supports solution-focused therapy or motivational interviewing. However, evidence supports the use of solution-focused therapy as a brief format, as well as the closely related intervention, motivational interviewing. While medical family therapy presents many hopeful possibilities in the fields of behavioral medicine, psychology, and marriage and family therapy, little evidence currently exists for the most effective implementation. This review found evidence supporting solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as the perfect marriage of the collaborative team approaches for the future implementation and use of specific interventions in medical family therapy. PMID:25657948

  9. Medication Therapy Management Services Provided by Student Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Micah; Klotz, Roger; Sylvies, Rick; Hess, Karl; Schwartzman, Emmanuelle; Scott, James

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the impact of student pharmacists delivering medication therapy management (MTM) services during an elective advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Methods. Student pharmacists provided MTM services at community pharmacy APPE sites, documented their recommendations, and then made follow-up telephone calls to patients to determine the impact of the MTM provided. Students were surveyed about the MTM experience. Results. Forty-seven students provided MTM services to 509 patients over 2 years and identified 704 drug-related problems (average of 1.4 problems per patient). About 53% of patients relayed the recommendations to their physician and 205 (75%) physicians accepted the recommendations. Eighty-eight percent of patients reported feeling better about their medications after receiving MTM services. A majority of the students perceived their provision of MTM services as valuable to their patients. Conclusions. Providing MTM services to patients in a pharmacy practice setting allowed student pharmacists to apply skills learned in the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum. PMID:22544968

  10. Endovascular Versus Medical Therapy for Atherosclerotic Renovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mark Shipeng; Folt, David A.; Drummond, Christopher A.; Haller, Steven T.; Cooper, Emily L.; Brewster, Pamela; Evans, Kaleigh L.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of renal artery stenosis (RAS) has become increasingly common in part due to greater awareness of ischemic renal disease and increased use of diagnostic techniques. Over 90 % of RAS cases are caused by atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD). Patients with ARVD are at high risk for fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular and renal events. The mortality rate in patients with ARVD is high, especially with other cardiovascular or renal comorbidities. Recent clinical studies have provided substantial evidence concerning medical therapy and endovascular interventional therapeutic approaches for ARVD. Despite previous randomized clinical trials, the optimal therapy for ARVD remained uncertain until the results of the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial were released recently. CORAL demonstrated that optimal medical therapy was equally effective to endovascular therapy in the treatment of ARVD. Clinicians can now practice with more evidence-based medicine to treat ARVD and potentially decrease mortality in patients with ARVD using optimal medical therapy. PMID:25301353

  11. Medical advances in child sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Randell A

    2011-09-01

    This volume is the first of a two-part special issue detailing state of the art practice in medical issues around child sexual abuse. The six articles in this issue explore methods for medical history evaluation, the rationale for when sexual examinations should take place, specific hymenal findings that suggest a child has been sexually abused, the healing of genital injuries, approaches to interpretation of medical findings, and the neurological harm of sexual abuse. From the initial history to the process of the medical examination, the mechanics of what a genital examination might show, and the neurobiological consequences, it is demonstrated that the harm of sexual abuse is has more effect on the brain than the genital area.

  12. An Art Therapy Protocol for the Medical Trauma Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleton, Valerie E.

    1993-01-01

    Presents art therapy intervention protocol developed for burn trauma unit over 10-year period. Considers research model for assessing artwork and psychosocial transition from trauma, rationales for art therapy in medical settings, and documentation. Case study illustrates ways that art media were used to review, integrate, and express personal…

  13. The Importance of Teacher Involvement in Medication Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joseph B.; Katsiyannis, Antonis

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been a steady increase in the use of medication therapy to help control student behavior within schools. While psychotropic medications do not "cure" mental illnesses, they have demonstrated efficacy in helping children function better at school and within their home environment. However, it is important…

  14. Medical physics aspects of particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Jäkel, Oliver

    2009-11-01

    Charged particle beams offer an improved dose conformation to the target volume when compared with photon radiotherapy, with better sparing of normal tissue structures close to the target. In addition, beams of heavier ions exhibit a strong increase of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg peak when compared with the entrance region. These physical and biological properties make ion beams more favourable for radiation therapy of cancer than photon beams. As a consequence, particle therapy with protons and heavy ions has gained increasing interest worldwide. This contribution summarises the physical and biological principles of charged particle therapy with ion beams and highlights some of the developments in the field of beam delivery, the principles of treatment planning and the determination of absorbed dose in ion beams. The clinical experience gathered so far with carbon ion therapy is briefly reviewed.

  15. Applications of medical informatics in antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Evans, R S; Pestotnik, S L

    1994-01-01

    The Infectious Disease Society of America is concerned about the excessive and inappropriate use of antibiotics in U.S. hospitals. Applications of Medical Informatics can help improve the use of antibiotics and help improve patient care by monitoring and managing enormous amounts of patient information. Monitoring the duration of every antibiotic ordered in the hospital or keeping tract of the antibiotic susceptibilities for five years are examples of tasks better performed by computers. The impact of computers in medicine is seen by some as disappointing. The computer revolution has not had the impact in medicine experienced by other areas. The acceptance and use of computers by medicine will be evolutionary rather than revolutionary. In 1979, the MYCIN project demonstrated that the computer could aid physicians in the selection of antibiotics. However, MYCIN was never clinically used because physicians were require to enter all patient information into the computer. The development of computerized medical records is an essential step to further the development and implementation of computer-aided decision support. The science of Medical Informatics is still relatively new but is emerging as a distinct academic field. A few hospitals are now installing information systems and have determined that these systems will play an essential role in their ability to survive into the next century. The telephone and the automobile have been recognized as two of the most important tools for improving medical care during the past 100 years. People could more readily get medical care and the time to transmit medical information was greatly reduced through physician use of the telephone and automobile. The computer is a tool that can be used to help physicians manage the great amount of medical information being generated every day. The computer can also alert the physician of patient conditions that need attention. However, it is the physician who must use and apply the

  16. Irritable bowel syndrome treatment: cognitive behavioral therapy versus medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mahvi-Shirazi, Majid; Rasoolzade-Tabatabaei, Sayed-Kazem; Amini, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The study aims to investigate two kinds of treatment in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and consequently compares its efficacy on improving the symptoms and mental health of patients; one with just medical treatment and another through a combination of psychotherapy and medical treatment. Material and methods Applying general sampling, 50 IBS patients were selected from among those who used to refer to a Gastroenterology Clinic. After physical and mental evaluations based on ROME-II scale and SCL-90-R questionnaires, the subjects were randomly superseded into: the control group with medical treatment and, the case group with a combination of medical and psychological treatments. The acquired data were then analyzed through t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The findings show that the mental health of patients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy along with the medical treatment was higher than those of the control group at post-test level. It was observed that the therapy reduces the disability caused by IBS. Comparatively, while the cognitive therapy and medical treatments cured 80% of the patients, those receiving cognitive therapy alone showed an extensive reduction of symptoms. Conclusions Considering the role of cognitive behavioral therapy, it is therefore recommend that such patients be managed by a combined team of gastroenterologists and psychologists. PMID:22457686

  17. Medical abortion options may advance in 1998.

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    The US debut of mifepristone (RU-486) was delayed in 1997 by legal and manufacturer problems. However, the Population Council is searching worldwide for companies to produce mifepristone for the US market. In the meantime, women in a number of US cities can obtain mifepristone through clinical trials coordinated by the New York City-based Abortion Rights Mobilization. The trials are evaluating the effectiveness of a 200 mg dosage of the drug and will continue until there is a commercial product. New developments in medical abortion will be announced in 1998. Currently, 29 Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) affiliates are recruiting women for its study of methotrexate and misoprostol. By midsummer 1998, the organization expects to have data from what is the largest multicenter trial to date of a methotrexate and misoprostol medical abortion regimen. PMID:12348221

  18. Interest in medical therapy for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Christina A.; Simpson, Suzanne; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Lewis, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A gluten-free diet is the treatment for celiac disease, but pharmaceutical agents are being developed. The level of interest amongst patients in using a medication to treat celiac disease is unknown. This study examined the level of interest amongst patients in medication to treat celiac disease. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to celiac disease patients and data were collected on demographics, presentation, and interest in medication. Three validated celiac disease-specific instruments were incorporated: Celiac Disease Associated Quality of Life, the Celiac Symptom Index, and the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test. Results: Responses were received from 365 individuals with biopsy-proven celiac disease. Respondents were 78% (n = 276) female, 48% (n = 170) over 50 years of age, and experienced a classical (diarrhea predominant) presentation in 44% (n = 154). Of the 339 individuals answering the question regarding use of a medication to treat celiac disease, 66% were interested. Interest was greatest in older individuals (71% >50 years of age versus 60% <50 years of age, p = 0.0415), men (78% men versus 62% women, p = 0.0083), frequent restaurant customers (76% versus 58%, p = 0.0006), those dissatisfied with their weight (73% versus 51%, p = 0.0003) and those concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet (77% versus 64%, p = 0.0176). Length of time since diagnosis, education, presentation, and symptoms with gluten exposure did not demonstrate any effect. Interest in medication was associated with a worse quality of life (CD-QOL 69.4 versus 80.1, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Most individuals with celiac disease are interested in using a medication. Interest was highest among men, older individuals, frequent restaurant customers, individuals dissatisfied with their weight or concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet, and those with a worse quality of life. PMID:24003336

  19. Prayer and meditation as medical therapies.

    PubMed

    Harmon, R L; Myers, M A

    1999-08-01

    Prayer and meditation have been used as health-enhancing techniques for centuries. Their use has been investigated more recently in the context of more conventional, allopathic medical approaches. These studies, despite methodological limitations, show some promise for the formal application and integration of these techniques into western medical practice. Some potential benefits from meditation include reduced perceived stress and improvement in mild hypertension. Prayer appears to offer subjective benefit to those who pray; the effects of intercessory prayer on the health status of unknowing individuals requires more investigation.

  20. Advanced ultrasound probes for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Douglas G.; Smith, L. Scott

    2012-05-01

    New medical ultrasound probe architectures and materials build upon established 1D phased array technology and provide improved imaging performance and clinical value. Technologies reviewed include 1.25D and 1.5D arrays for elevation slice thickness control; electro-mechanical and 2D array probes for real-time 3D imaging; catheter probes for imaging during minimally-invasive procedures; single-crystal piezoelectric materials for greater frequency bandwidth; and cMUT arrays using silicon MEMS in place of piezo materials.

  1. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Yielder, Jill; Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  2. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Yielder, Jill; Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionThis article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). MethodsThe study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. ResultsFindings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. ConclusionsThe authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ. PMID:26229631

  3. Medical cannabis and chronic opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Reisfield, Gary M

    2010-12-01

    Fourteen states and the District of Columbia have legalized the use of cannabis for medical purposes. A small, high-quality literature supports the efficacy of medical cannabis for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The smoked botanical product, however, is associated with a number of adverse medical and psychiatric consequences. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that acute use of cannabis results in impairment of every important metric related to the safe operation of a motor vehicle. Epidemiological data show associations between recent cannabis use and both psychomotor impairment and motor vehicle crashes, associations that are strengthened by the concomitant use of alcohol and other central nervous system depressants. Finally, data from pain clinics reveals an unusually high prevalence of cannabis use in nearly all age groups and an association between cannabis use and opioid and other substance misuse. Based on available data and expert opinion, concomitant use of cannabis and opioids is an absolute contraindication to the operation of a motor vehicle. In patients who use cannabis and are prescribed opioids, heightened vigilance for opioid- and other substance-related problems is warranted. It is appropriate to refrain from prescribing opioids to individuals using medical cannabis if there is reasonable suspicion that the combination will pose a risk to the patient or others.

  4. Advancing Resident Assessment in Graduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Swing, Susan R.; Clyman, Stephen G.; Holmboe, Eric S.; Williams, Reed G.

    2009-01-01

    Background The Outcome Project requires high-quality assessment approaches to provide reliable and valid judgments of the attainment of competencies deemed important for physician practice. Intervention The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) convened the Advisory Committee on Educational Outcome Assessment in 2007–2008 to identify high-quality assessment methods. The assessments selected by this body would form a core set that could be used by all programs in a specialty to assess resident performance and enable initial steps toward establishing national specialty databases of program performance. The committee identified a small set of methods for provisional use and further evaluation. It also developed frameworks and processes to support the ongoing evaluation of methods and the longer-term enhancement of assessment in graduate medical education. Outcome The committee constructed a set of standards, a methodology for applying the standards, and grading rules for their review of assessment method quality. It developed a simple report card for displaying grades on each standard and an overall grade for each method reviewed. It also described an assessment system of factors that influence assessment quality. The committee proposed a coordinated, national-level infrastructure to support enhancements to assessment, including method development and assessor training. It recommended the establishment of a new assessment review group to continue its work of evaluating assessment methods. The committee delivered a report summarizing its activities and 5 related recommendations for implementation to the ACGME Board in September 2008. PMID:21975993

  5. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  6. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  7. Medical therapy for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Mary E; Griffiths, Anne M

    2012-04-01

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease encompasses a spectrum of disease phenotype, severity, and responsiveness to treatment. Intestinal healing rather than merely symptom control is an especially important therapeutic goal in young patients, given the potential for growth impairment as a direct effect of persistent chronic inflammation and the long life ahead, during which other disease complications may occur. Corticosteroids achieve rapid symptom control, but alternate steroid-sparing strategies with greater potential to heal the intestine must be rapidly adopted. Exclusive enteral nutrition is an alternate short-term treatment in pediatric Crohn's disease. The results of multi-center pediatric clinical trials of both infliximab and adalimumab in Crohn's disease and of infliximab in ulcerative colitis (all in children with unsatisfactory responses to other therapies) have now been reported and guide treatment regimens in clinical practice. Optimal patient selection and timing of anti-TNF therapy requires clinical judgment. Attention must be paid to sustaining responsiveness safely.

  8. Contemporary medical therapy for polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lanham, M S M; Lebovic, D I; Domino, S E

    2006-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a multi-system endocrinopathy with long-term metabolic and cardiovascular health consequences. Patients typically present due to symptoms of irregular menstruation, hair growth, or infertility; however, recent management options are aimed at further treating underlying glucose-insulin abnormalities as well as androgen excess for proactive control of symptoms. By a 2003 international consensus conference, diagnosis is made by two out of three criteria: chronic oligoovulation or anovulation after excluding secondary causes, clinical or biochemical evidence of hyperandrogenism (but not necessarily hirsutism due to inter-patient variability in hair follicle sensitivity), and radiological evidence of polycystic ovaries. Traditional medical treatment options include oral contraceptive pills, cyclic progestins, ovulation induction, and anti-androgenic medications (aldosterone antagonist, 5alpha-reductase antagonist, and follicle ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor). Recent pharmacotherapies include insulin-sensitizing medications metformin and two thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone/Avandia and pioglitazone/Actos), a CYP19 aromatase inhibitor (letrozole/Femara), and statins to potentially lower testosterone levels.

  9. Astronomy helps advance medical diagnosis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    Effective treatment of cancer relies on the early detection and removal of cancerous cells. Unfortunately, this is when they are hardest to spot. In the case of breast cancer, now the most prevalent form of cancer in the United Kingdom, cancer cells tend to congregate in the lymph nodes, from where they can rapidly spread throughout the rest of the body. Current medical equipment can give doctors only limited information on tissue health. A surgeon must then perform an exploratory operation to try to identify the diseased tissue. If that is possible, the diseased tissue will be removed. If identification is not possible, the doctor may be forced to take away the whole of the lymphatic system. Such drastic treatment can then cause side effects, such as excessive weight gain, because it throws the patient's hormones out of balance. Now, members of the Science Payloads Technology Division of the Research and Science Support Department, at ESA's science, technology and engineering research centre (ESTEC) in the Netherlands, have developed a new X-ray camera that could make on-the-spot diagnoses and pinpoint cancerous areas to guide surgeons. Importantly, it would be a small device that could be used continuously during operations. "There is no photography involved in the camera we envisage. It will be completely digital, so the surgeon will study the whole lymphatic system and the potentially cancerous parts on his monitor. He then decides which parts he removes," says Dr. Tone Peacock, Head of the Science Payloads Technology Division. The ESA team were trying to find a way to make images using high-energy X-rays because some celestial objects give out large quantities of X-rays but little visible light. To see these, astronomers need to use X-ray cameras. Traditionally, this has been a bit of a blind spot for astronomers. ESA's current X-ray telescope, XMM-Newton, is in orbit now, observing low energy, so-called 'soft' X-rays. European scientists have always wanted to

  10. Challenges with advanced therapy medicinal products and how to meet them.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Christian K; Salmikangas, Paula; Jilma, Bernd; Flamion, Bruno; Todorova, Lyubina Racheva; Paphitou, Anna; Haunerova, Ivana; Maimets, Toivo; Trouvin, Jean-Hugues; Flory, Egbert; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios; Sarkadi, Balázs; Gudmundsson, Kolbeinn; O'Donovan, Maura; Migliaccio, Giovanni; Ancāns, Jānis; Maciulaitis, Romaldas; Robert, Jean-Louis; Samuel, Anthony; Ovelgönne, Johannes H; Hystad, Marit; Fal, Andrzej Mariusz; Lima, Beatriz Silva; Moraru, Anca Stela; Turcáni, Peter; Zorec, Robert; Ruiz, Sol; Akerblom, Lennart; Narayanan, Gopalan; Kent, Alastair; Bignami, Fabrizia; Dickson, J George; Niederwieser, Dietger; Figuerola-Santos, María-Angeles; Reischl, Ilona G; Beuneu, Claire; Georgiev, Rosen; Vassiliou, Maria; Pychova, Alena; Clausen, Mette; Methuen, Taina; Lucas, Sophie; Schüssler-Lenz, Martina; Kokkas, Vasilios; Buzás, Zsuzsanna; MacAleenan, Niall; Galli, Maria Cristina; Linē, Aija; Gulbinovic, Jolanta; Berchem, Guy; Fraczek, Mariusz; Menezes-Ferreira, Margarida; Vilceanu, Nela; Hrubisko, Mikulás; Marinko, Petra; Timón, Marcos; Cheng, Wing; Crosbie, George Andrew; Meade, Nick; di Paola, Michelino Lipucci; VandenDriessche, Thierry; Ljungman, Per; D'Apote, Lucia; Oliver-Diaz, Olga; Büttel, Isabel; Celis, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), which include gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products and tissue-engineered products, are at the cutting edge of innovation and offer a major hope for various diseases for which there are limited or no therapeutic options. They have therefore been subject to considerable interest and debate. Following the European regulation on ATMPs, a consolidated regulatory framework for these innovative medicines has recently been established. Central to this framework is the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMA), comprising a multidisciplinary scientific expert committee, representing all EU member states and European Free Trade Association countries, as well as patient and medical associations. In this article, the CAT discusses some of the typical issues raised by developers of ATMPs, and highlights the opportunities for such companies and research groups to approach the EMA and the CAT as a regulatory advisor during development.

  11. Gantry for medical particle therapy facility

    DOEpatents

    Trbojevic, Dejan

    2012-05-08

    A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing fixed field magnets.

  12. Gantry for medical particle therapy facility

    DOEpatents

    Trbojevic, Dejan

    2013-04-23

    A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of superconducting, variable field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of variable field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing variable field magnets.

  13. Astronomy helps advance medical diagnosis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    Effective treatment of cancer relies on the early detection and removal of cancerous cells. Unfortunately, this is when they are hardest to spot. In the case of breast cancer, now the most prevalent form of cancer in the United Kingdom, cancer cells tend to congregate in the lymph nodes, from where they can rapidly spread throughout the rest of the body. Current medical equipment can give doctors only limited information on tissue health. A surgeon must then perform an exploratory operation to try to identify the diseased tissue. If that is possible, the diseased tissue will be removed. If identification is not possible, the doctor may be forced to take away the whole of the lymphatic system. Such drastic treatment can then cause side effects, such as excessive weight gain, because it throws the patient's hormones out of balance. Now, members of the Science Payloads Technology Division of the Research and Science Support Department, at ESA's science, technology and engineering research centre (ESTEC) in the Netherlands, have developed a new X-ray camera that could make on-the-spot diagnoses and pinpoint cancerous areas to guide surgeons. Importantly, it would be a small device that could be used continuously during operations. "There is no photography involved in the camera we envisage. It will be completely digital, so the surgeon will study the whole lymphatic system and the potentially cancerous parts on his monitor. He then decides which parts he removes," says Dr. Tone Peacock, Head of the Science Payloads Technology Division. The ESA team were trying to find a way to make images using high-energy X-rays because some celestial objects give out large quantities of X-rays but little visible light. To see these, astronomers need to use X-ray cameras. Traditionally, this has been a bit of a blind spot for astronomers. ESA's current X-ray telescope, XMM-Newton, is in orbit now, observing low energy, so-called 'soft' X-rays. European scientists have always wanted to

  14. Medical association supports studies on marijuana therapy.

    PubMed

    1995-06-16

    The Gay and Lesbian Medical Association (GLMA) issued a statement on May 19, 1995, announcing its support of clinical trials of the therapeutic uses of marijuana. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has continued to resist permitting clinical trials of marijuana despite evidence that it can relieve symptoms of cancer, multiple sclerosis, and glaucoma. According to Dr. Alvin Novick, head of GLMA's AIDS Task Force, the Clinton Administration is being asked to not let its political fears blind it to the positive and legitimate scientific research designed to alleviate the suffering of thousands of AIDS patients.

  15. Medical and alternative therapies in urinary tract stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuvanc, Ercan; Yilmaz, Erdal; Tuglu, Devrim; Batislam, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a serious problem for both patients and the health system. Recurrence stands out as a significant problem in urinary system stone disease, the prevalence of which is increasing gradually. If recurrence is not prevented, patients may go through recurrent operations due to nephrolithiasis. While classical therapeutic options are available for all stone types, the number of randomized controlled studies and extensive meta-analyses focusing on their efficiency are inadequate. Various alternative therapeutic options to these medical therapies also stand out in recent years. The etiology of urolithiasis is multifactorial and not always related to nutritional factors. Nutrition therapy seems to be useful, either along with pharmacological therapy or as a monotherapy. General nutrition guidelines are useful in promoting public health and developing nutrition plans that reduce the risk or attenuate the effects of diseases affected by nutrition. Nutrition therapy involves the evaluation of a patient’s nutritional state and intake, the diagnosis of nutrition risk factors, and the organization and application of a nutrition program. The main target is the reduction or prevention of calculus formation and growth via decreasing lithogenic risk factors and increasing lithogenic inhibitors in urine. This review focuses briefly on classical medical therapy, along with alternative options, related diets, and medical expulsive therapy. PMID:26558186

  16. Nurses' perceptions of complementary and alternative medical therapies.

    PubMed

    Brolinson, P G; Price, J H; Ditmyer, M; Reis, D

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of nurses toward the effectiveness and safety, as well as their recommendations for and personal use of complementary and alternative medical therapies. A, random sample of 1000 nurses throughout the United States were surveyed using a three-wave mailing. About half of the respondents perceived there was conclusive evidence or preponderance of evidence that five therapies were effective: biofeedback, chiropractic, meditation/relaxation, multi-vitamins, and massage therapy. The same amount of nurses also perceived five therapies as definitely safe: hypnotherapy, chiropractic, acupressure, acupuncture, and healing touch. However, the nurses were most likely to recommend (regularly or periodically) four therapies: multivitamins, massage, meditation/relaxation, and pastoral/spiritual counseling. The vast majority (79%) of nurses perceived their professional preparation in this area to be fair or poor.

  17. [Psychiatric advance directives--medical models into psychiatric medicine].

    PubMed

    Mautner, Sigal; Lachman, Max; Kaplan, Zeev; Shalev, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Since the year 2005, in the field of general medicine, the legislature in Israel determined ways to implement medically advanced directives according to the power of the law. Different states in the world had implemented parallel legislation for patients who suffer from mental illness. Psychiatric Advance Directives is a legitimate document which is valid in Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, England and in 25 countries in the U.S.A. Psychiatric advance directives (PAD's) allow competent persons, through advance instructions, to state their preferences for future mental health treatment in the event of an incapacitating psychiatric crisis. Self Determination Theory, Self Care and Autonomy are dominant supportive approaches in the creation of Psychiatric Advance Directives. Research conducted on psychiatric advance directives shows positive potential benefits for mental health clients, therapists and psychiatrists. More research in that area must be conducted. Psychiatric advance directives are currently developed and implemented with the cooperation of the Tauber Foundation and the Beer Sheva Mental Health Center. This is the first step in learning of effective ways to use this intervention in Israel and change perceptions toward a positive connection between medical efficiency and client preferences.

  18. Dyslexia and Learning Disabilities: Medical Diagnosis with Educational Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, S. Thomas; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Ways of diagnosing dyslexia are discussed along with the developmental symptoms, which include balancing and hearing deficiencies, reversal of letters or words and unusual posture. Medical treatment with antihistamines and other drugs is described. Approximately 75 percent of individuals are shown to respond favorably to therapy. (CM)

  19. Laser therapy and photosensitive medication: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Ryan L; Lister, Tom; Cole, Richard

    2014-07-01

    In the 2009 guidelines from the BMLA, the use of non-essential aesthetic lasers was contraindicated in patients receiving medication that causes whole-body photosensitisation as well as those causing local light sensitisation. Following this and anecdotal advice, many laser centres refuse to treat patients who are on known photosensitive medication. Therefore, specific patient cohorts that would benefit from laser therapy are being denied because of medications, such as long-term antibiotics for chronic facial acne. This article reviews the published literature on lasers and photosensitive medications, the mechanisms of photosensitivity and the role of laser in its production. The aim is to analyse the available evidence regarding adverse reactions to laser treatment related to photosensitive medication. A PubMed review of published article titles and abstracts was performed using the search term Laser with each of the following terms individually: photosensitive, photosensitiser, photosensitizer, phototoxicity, photoallergy, complications, case-report, tetracycline, minocycline, amiodarone, nitrofurantoin and medication. Four publications were identified, none of which reported any complication in the use of laser in patients taking photosensitising medication. As there are no published accounts of adverse effects of laser in patients with photosensitive medication, we performed a review of the mechanism of photosensitivity by compiling a list of photosensitive medication and the peak wavelength of radiation required to activate the drug. We recommend a national database of drugs and the wavelengths causing photosensitive reactions of each which a laser department can access prior to treatment. PMID:24590242

  20. ED 02-4 MEDICAL THERAPY OF ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSMS.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiongjing

    2016-09-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an important cause of mortality in older adults. Most AAAs are asymptomatic and screening programs have been introduced to identify AAAs. There is currently some recommendations for medical optimisation of patients with AAA, such as anti-hypertension, statin, Anti-platelet therapy, B-blockade, et al. Some medical treatments to limit progression of small AAAs, which have examined the potential of targeting inflammation, proteolysis, the renin-angiotensin system, the coagulation system and sex hormones as approaches to limiting AAA pathogenesis are investigated as well as. However, there is not generally accepted medical therapy for AAAs yet, Few of the treatment targets have translated into an agent, which can effectively reduce AAA progression in clinical practice. PMID:27643007

  1. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments.

  2. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  3. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  4. Biologic therapies for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Aiwu Ruth; Lindenberg, Andreas Peter; Marshall, John Lindsay

    2008-08-01

    Patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer have poor prognosis and short survival due to lack of effective therapy and aggressiveness of the disease. Pancreatic cancer has widespread chromosomal instability, including a high rate of translocations and deletions. Upregulated EGF signaling and mutation of K-RAS are found in most pancreatic cancers. Therefore, inhibitors that target EGF receptor, K-RAS, RAF, MEK, mTOR, VEGF and PDGF, for example, have been evaluated in patients with pancreatic cancer. Although significant activities of these inhibitors have not been observed in the majority of pancreatic cancer patients, an enormous amount of experience and knowledge has been obtained from recent clinical trials. With a better inhibitor or combination of inhibitors, and improvement in the selection of patients for available inhibitors, better therapy for pancreatic cancer is on the horizon.

  5. Progress in systemic therapy of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin-Lei; Qin, Shu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Primary liver cancer, mainly consisting of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is one of common malignancies worldwide, and prevalent among the Chinese population. A diagnosis of early stage HCC has proven to be very difficult because of its insidious feature in onset and development. At the time of diagnosis, most HCC cases are locally advanced and/or distant metastatic, which results in difficulty to be treated and poor prognosis. For advanced HCC, systemic therapy is frequently adopted as an important palliative method. In recent years, clinical studies and observations have often reported about systemic anti-cancer therapy of advanced HCC, including molecular target therapy, systemic chemotherapy and immunotherapy. In this article, we review these treatment modalities to provide a reference for clinicians. PMID:27547002

  6. [Gene therapy for hereditary ophthalmological diseases: Advances and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Chacón-Camacho, Óscar Francisco; Astorga-Carballo, Aline; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising new therapeutic strategy that could provide a novel and more effective way of targeting hereditary ophthalmological diseases. The eye is easily accessible, highly compartmentalized, and an immune-privileged organ that gives advantages as an ideal gene therapy target. Recently, important advances in the availability of various intraocular vector delivery routes and viral vectors that are able to efficiently transduce specific ocular cell types have been described. Gene therapy has advanced in some retinal inherited dystrophies; in this way, preliminary success is now being reported for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). This review will provide an update in the field of gene therapy for the treatment of ocular inherited diseases.

  7. New Players for Advanced Prostate Cancer and the Rationalisation of Insulin-Sensitising Medication

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Jennifer H.; Sarkar, Phoebe L.; Lubik, Amy A.; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are recognised risk factors for the development of some cancers and, increasingly, predict more aggressive disease, treatment failure, and cancer-specific mortality. Many factors may contribute to this clinical observation. Hyperinsulinaemia, dyslipidaemia, hypoxia, ER stress, and inflammation associated with expanded adipose tissue are thought to be among the main culprits driving malignant growth and cancer advancement. This observation has led to the proposal of the potential utility of “old players” for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome as new cancer adjuvant therapeutics. Androgen-regulated pathways drive proliferation, differentiation, and survival of benign and malignant prostate tissue. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) exploits this dependence to systemically treat advanced prostate cancer resulting in anticancer response and improvement of cancer symptoms. However, the initial therapeutic response from ADT eventually progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which is currently incurable. ADT rapidly induces hyperinsulinaemia which is associated with more rapid treatment failure. We discuss current observations of cancer in the context of obesity, diabetes, and insulin-lowering medication. We provide an update on current treatments for advanced prostate cancer and discuss whether metabolic dysfunction, developed during ADT, provides a unique therapeutic window for rapid translation of insulin-sensitising medication as combination therapy with antiandrogen targeting agents for the management of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23573093

  8. Recent advances in neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction to cancer radiotherapy (Neutron Capture therapy, or NCT) has intrigued investigators since the discovery of the neutron. This paper briefly summarizes data describing recently developed boronated compounds with evident tumor specificity and extended biological half-lives. The implication of these compounds to NCT is evaluated in terms of Therapeutic Gain (TG). The optimization of NCT using band-pass filtered beams is described, again in terms of TG, and irradiation times with these less intense beams are estimated. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Role of medication therapy management in preexposure prophylaxis therapy for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Kelli W; Woodard, Laresa M; Woodard, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Patient medication adherence is a long-standing problem and is one that raises serious issues for patient health, public health, and health care quality. Medication nonadherence costs the US economy an estimated US$290 billion in avoidable medical spending every year. One of the most costly health conditions is HIV disease, which continues to be a serious health issue for parts of the world. About 34 million people are living with HIV around the world. With the emerging preventative treatment against HIV, known as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), come concerns surrounding the potential impact of nonadherence to this newly approved medication therapy. Nonadherence to antiretroviral treatments are commonly the root cause for patients not reaching their treatment goals, putting them at risk of progression and worsening of their disease and complications, such as increased risk of opportunistic infections. Therefore, it is essential to improve antiretroviral medication adherence. By identifying members who are nonadherent to their prescribed antiretroviral medications and working collaboratively with patients, physicians, and pharmacists, Medication Therapy Management (MTM) can potentially increase medication adherence by helping patients identify, resolve, and prevent issues that may affect their decision not to take a medication as intended.

  10. Advances in Pediatric Intravenous Iron Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be very common worldwide. Intravenous (IV) iron is an infrequently used therapeutic option in children with IDA despite numerous studies in adults and several small but notable pediatric studies showing efficacy and safety. Presently, the availability of newer IV iron products allows for replacement of the total iron deficit at a single setting. These products appear safer compared to the high molecular weight iron dextrans of the past. Herein, we review the medical literature and suggest that front line use of IV iron should be strongly considered in diseases associated with IDA in children.

  11. Role of Medical Therapy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Fortinsky, Kyle J; Bardou, Marc; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Mortality from UGIB has remained 5-10% over the past decade. This article presents current evidence-based recommendations for the medical management of UGIB. Preendoscopic management includes initial resuscitation, risk stratification, appropriate use of blood products, and consideration of nasogastric tube insertion, erythromycin, and proton pump inhibitor therapy. The use of postendoscopic intravenous proton pump inhibitors is strongly recommended for certain patient populations. Postendoscopic management also includes the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori, appropriate use of proton pump inhibitors and iron replacement therapy. PMID:26142032

  12. Monitoring of girls undergoing medical therapy for isosexual precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, M M; Hernanz-Schulman, M; Genieser, N B; Sklar, C A; Fefferman, N R; David, R

    1994-07-01

    We evaluated the use of sonography in monitoring the efficacy of suppressive therapy with a gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue in girls being treated for isosexual precocious puberty. Ten girls 5 to 9 years of age underwent serial sonography and hormonal stimulation tests on the same day. Sonographic trends of decreasing ovarian volume and uterine length indicated early suppression even when absolute values were above threshold. Changes in ovarian volume were the most sensitive predictor of pituitary-gonadal suppression. Sonography is a sensitive and accurate method of monitoring medical therapy; ovarian volume and analysis of interval change are the most sensitive barometers of change.

  13. Monitoring of girls undergoing medical therapy for isosexual precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, M M; Hernanz-Schulman, M; Genieser, N B; Sklar, C A; Fefferman, N R; David, R

    1994-07-01

    We evaluated the use of sonography in monitoring the efficacy of suppressive therapy with a gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue in girls being treated for isosexual precocious puberty. Ten girls 5 to 9 years of age underwent serial sonography and hormonal stimulation tests on the same day. Sonographic trends of decreasing ovarian volume and uterine length indicated early suppression even when absolute values were above threshold. Changes in ovarian volume were the most sensitive predictor of pituitary-gonadal suppression. Sonography is a sensitive and accurate method of monitoring medical therapy; ovarian volume and analysis of interval change are the most sensitive barometers of change. PMID:7933011

  14. The transthyretin amyloidoses: advances in therapy.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, Simon; Ackermann, Elizabeth; Gillmore, Julian

    2015-08-01

    There are two forms of transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis: non-hereditary and hereditary. The non-hereditary form (ATTRwt) is caused by native or wild-type TTR and was previously referred to as senile systemic amyloidosis. The hereditary form (ATTRm) is caused by variant TTR which results from a genetic mutation of TTR. The predominant effect of ATTRwt amyloidosis is on the heart, with patients having a greater left ventricular wall thickness at presentation than the devastating form which is light chain (AL) amyloidosis. ATTRm amyloidosis is broadly split into two categories: a type that predominantly affects the nervous system (often called familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP)) and one with a predilection for the heart (often called familial amyloid cardiomyopathy (FAC)). Approximately half of all TTR mutations known to express a clinical phenotype cause a cardiomyopathy. Since the introduction of orthotopic liver transplantation for ATTRm amyloidosis in 1991, several additional therapies have been developed. These therapies aim to provide a reduction or elimination of TTR from the plasma (through genetic approaches), stabilisation of the TTR molecule (to prevent deposition) and dissolution of the amyloid matrix. We describe the latest developments in these approaches to management, many of which are also applicable to wild-type amyloidosis. PMID:26048914

  15. Nonadherence to Medication Therapy in Haemodialysis Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Saurav; Castelino, Ronald L.; Lioufas, Nicole M.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R.

    2015-01-01

    Background End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients are often prescribed multiple medications. Together with a demanding weekly schedule of dialysis sessions, increased number of medicines and associated regimen complexity pre-dispose them at high risk of medication nonadherence. This review summarizes existing literature on nonadherence and identifies factors associated with nonadherence to medication therapy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Methods A comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews covering the period from 1970 through November 2014 was performed following a predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Reference lists from relevant materials were reviewed. Data on study characteristics, measures of nonadherence, prevalence rates and factors associated with nonadherence were collected. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines was followed in conducting this systematic review. Results Of 920 relevant publications, 44 were included. The prevalence of medication nonadherence varied from 12.5% to 98.6%, with widespread heterogeneity in measures and definitions employed. Most common patient-related factors significantly associated with nonadherence were younger age, non-Caucasian ethnicity, illness interfering family life, being a smoker, and living single and being divorced or widowed. Similarly, disease-related factors include longevity of haemodialysis, recurrent hospitalization, depressive symptoms and having concomitant illness like diabetes and hypertension. Medication-related factors such as daily tablet count, total pill burden, number of phosphate binders prescribed and complexity of medication regimen were also associated with poor adherence. Conclusions A number of patient-, disease-, and medication-related factors are associated with medication nonadherence in haemodialysis patients. Clinicians should be aware of such factors so that

  16. Recent advances in the optimization of cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Chandraprakasam, Satish; Mentzer, Gina G

    2015-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) continues to grow and affect more than five million people in the USA. One of the leading device therapies in HF is cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) which has been studied for over 20 years. Recent advancements in lead placement, lead technology, patient selection, and CRT optimization by electrical maneuvers and imaging modalities have improved outcomes in morbidity, hospitalization reductions and mortalities in those who have responded CRT therapy. This review article is intended to discuss the mechanisms and benefits of CRT, clinical trials, and guidelines for CRT along with a focus on recent updates from the past 3 to 5 years and glimpse into future directions. PMID:25315038

  17. Advances in sickle cell therapies in the hydroxyurea era.

    PubMed

    Field, Joshua J; Nathan, David G

    2014-01-01

    In the hydroxyurea era, insights into mechanisms downstream of erythrocyte sickling have led to new therapeutic approaches for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Therapies have been developed that target vascular adhesion, inflammation and hemolysis, including innovative biologics directed against P-selectin and invariant natural killer T cells. Advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplant and gene therapy may also provide more opportunities for cures in the near future. Several clinical studies are underway to determine the safety and efficacy of these new treatments. Novel approaches to treat SCD are desperately needed, since current therapies are limited and rates of morbidity and mortality remain high. PMID:25549232

  18. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers for medical imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Oralkan, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have been subject to extensive research for the last two decades. Although they were initially developed for air-coupled applications, today their main application space is medical imaging and therapy. This paper first presents a brief description of CMUTs, their basic structure, and operating principles. Our progression of developing several generations of fabrication processes is discussed with an emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of each process. Monolithic and hybrid approaches for integrating CMUTs with supporting integrated circuits are surveyed. Several prototype transducer arrays with integrated frontend electronic circuits we developed and their use for 2-D and 3-D, anatomical and functional imaging, and ablative therapies are described. The presented results prove the CMUT as a MEMS technology for many medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:21860542

  19. Cardiac gene therapy: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Mason, Daniel; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Krishnan, Harini Venkata; Sant, Shilpa

    2015-10-10

    Gene therapy has the potential to serve as an adaptable platform technology for treating various diseases. Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in the developed world and genetic modification is steadily becoming a more plausible method to repair and regenerate heart tissue. Recently, new gene targets to treat cardiovascular disease have been identified and developed into therapies that have shown promise in animal models. Some of these therapies have advanced to clinical testing. Despite these recent successes, several barriers must be overcome for gene therapy to become a widely used treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we evaluate specific genetic targets that can be exploited to treat cardiovascular diseases, list the important delivery barriers for the gene carriers, assess the most promising methods of delivering the genetic information, and discuss the current status of clinical trials involving gene therapies targeted to the heart.

  20. Stenting and Medical Therapy for Atherosclerotic Renal-Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Christopher J.; Murphy, Timothy P.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Jamerson, Kenneth; Henrich, William; Reid, Diane M.; Cohen, David J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.; Steffes, Michael; Jaff, Michael R.; Prince, Martin R.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; Tuttle, Katherine R.; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Rundback, John H.; Massaro, Joseph M.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Dworkin, Lance D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis is a common problem in the elderly. Despite two randomized trials that did not show a benefit of renal-artery stenting with respect to kidney function, the usefulness of stenting for the prevention of major adverse renal and cardiovascular events is uncertain. METHODS We randomly assigned 947 participants who had atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis and either systolic hypertension while taking two or more antihypertensive drugs or chronic kidney disease to medical therapy plus renal-artery stenting or medical therapy alone. Participants were followed for the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular and renal events (a composite end point of death from cardiovascular or renal causes, myocar-dial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for congestive heart failure, progressive renal insufficiency, or the need for renal-replacement therapy). RESULTS Over a median follow-up period of 43 months (interquartile range, 31 to 55), the rate of the primary composite end point did not differ significantly between participants who underwent stenting in addition to receiving medical therapy and those who received medical therapy alone (35.1% and 35.8%, respectively; hazard ratio with stenting, 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76 to 1.17; P = 0.58). There were also no significant differences between the treatment groups in the rates of the individual components of the primary end point or in all-cause mortality. During follow-up, there was a consistent modest difference in systolic blood pressure favoring the stent group (−2.3 mm Hg; 95% CI, −4.4 to −0.2; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Renal-artery stenting did not confer a significant benefit with respect to the prevention of clinical events when added to comprehensive, multifactorial medical therapy in people with atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis and hypertension or chronic kidney disease. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and others; Clinical

  1. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology.

  2. Creating conditions for the success of the French industrial advanced therapy sector.

    PubMed

    Lirsac, Pierre Noel; Blin, Olivier; Magalon, Jérémy; Angot, Pierre; de Barbeyrac, Estelle; Bilbault, Pascal; Bourg, Elisabeth; Damour, Odile; Faure, Patrick; Ferry, Nicolas; Garbil, Bénédicte; Larghero, Jérôme; Nguon, Marina; Pattou, François; Thumelin, Stéphane; Yates, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Although the European Union merely followed the initiatives of the United States and Japan by introducing special regimes for orphan medicinal products, it has introduced a special status for a new category of biological medicinal products, advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), adopting specific associated regulations. European Regulation (which constitutes the highest legal instrument in the hierarchy of European law texts) [EC] No. 1394/2007, published in 2007, uses this term to define somatic cell therapy medicinal products, tissue-engineered products, and gene therapy medicinal products, possibly combined with medical devices. The stated objective was two-fold: both to promote their industrialization and market access, while guaranteeing a high level of health protection for patients. Since publication of the regulation, few marketing authorizations have been granted in Europe, and these have not been accompanied by commercial success. However, certain recent studies show that this is a growing sector and that France remains the leading European nation in terms of clinical trials. This round table brought together a panel of representatives of French public and private protagonists from the advanced therapy sector. The discussions focused on the conditions to ensure the success of translational research and, more generally, the French advanced therapy sector. These enabled a number of obstacles to be identified, which once lifted, by means of recommendations, would facilitate the development and success of this sector. PMID:25747840

  3. Creating conditions for the success of the French industrial advanced therapy sector.

    PubMed

    Lirsac, Pierre Noel; Blin, Olivier; Magalon, Jérémy; Angot, Pierre; de Barbeyrac, Estelle; Bilbault, Pascal; Bourg, Elisabeth; Damour, Odile; Faure, Patrick; Ferry, Nicolas; Garbil, Bénédicte; Larghero, Jérôme; Nguon, Marina; Pattou, François; Thumelin, Stéphane; Yates, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Although the European Union merely followed the initiatives of the United States and Japan by introducing special regimes for orphan medicinal products, it has introduced a special status for a new category of biological medicinal products, advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), adopting specific associated regulations. European Regulation (which constitutes the highest legal instrument in the hierarchy of European law texts) [EC] No. 1394/2007, published in 2007, uses this term to define somatic cell therapy medicinal products, tissue-engineered products, and gene therapy medicinal products, possibly combined with medical devices. The stated objective was two-fold: both to promote their industrialization and market access, while guaranteeing a high level of health protection for patients. Since publication of the regulation, few marketing authorizations have been granted in Europe, and these have not been accompanied by commercial success. However, certain recent studies show that this is a growing sector and that France remains the leading European nation in terms of clinical trials. This round table brought together a panel of representatives of French public and private protagonists from the advanced therapy sector. The discussions focused on the conditions to ensure the success of translational research and, more generally, the French advanced therapy sector. These enabled a number of obstacles to be identified, which once lifted, by means of recommendations, would facilitate the development and success of this sector.

  4. Advances in Oncolytic Virus Therapy for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Haseley, Amy; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher; Chaudhury, Abhik Ray; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization grossly classifies the various types of astrocytomas using a grade system with grade IV gliomas having the worst prognosis. Oncolytic virus therapy is a novel treatment option for GBM patients. Several patents describe various oncolytic viruses used in preclinical and clinical trials to evaluate safety and efficacy. These viruses are natural or genetically engineered from different viruses such as HSV-1, Adenovirus, Reovirus, and New Castle Disease Virus. While several anecdotal studies have indicated therapeutic advantage, recent clinical trials have revealed the safety of their usage, but demonstration of significant efficacy remains to be established. Oncolytic viruses are being redesigned with an interest in combating the tumor microenvironment in addition to defeating the cancerous cells. Several patents describe the inclusion of tumor microenvironment modulating genes within the viral backbone and in particular those which attack the tumor angiotome. The very innovative approaches being used to improve therapeutic efficacy include: design of viruses which can express cytokines to activate a systemic antitumor immune response, inclusion of angiostatic genes to combat tumor vasculature, and also enzymes capable of digesting tumor extra cellular matrix (ECM) to enhance viral spread through solid tumors. As increasingly more novel viruses are being tested and patented, the future battle against glioma looks promising. PMID:19149710

  5. Overcoming Challenges Facing Advanced Therapies in the EU Market.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Enein, Mohamed; Elsanhoury, Ahmed; Reinke, Petra

    2016-09-01

    While advanced therapy medicinal products offer great clinical promise, most EU-approved products have not achieved satisfactory commercial performance. Here we highlight a number of issues that prevent current products from obtaining commercial success and pitfalls that developers must overcome in future product development.

  6. Factors that Predict Who Takes Advanced Courses in Cognitive Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pehlivanidis, Artemios

    2007-01-01

    Training in Cognitive Therapy (CT) includes theoretical and didactic components combined with clinical supervision. An introductory course in CT might satisfy training needs in psychotherapy and help in the selection of those trainees who wish to continue to an advanced training level. Predictors of success at such an introductory course have been…

  7. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  8. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  9. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  10. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  11. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  12. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  13. Medical Therapy Versus Laparoscopic Surgical Treatment for Ulcer Disease.

    PubMed

    Fletcher

    1994-09-01

    The development of low morbidity vagotomy and H2 antagonists in the early 1970s began the debate as to which was the most appropriate treatment for uncomplicated duodenal ulcer. A review of Australian Medicare and Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme data shows that medical treatment in this country was the preferred option. In the past 12 years, vagotomies have decreased 15-fold while, in the same period, H2 antagonist prescriptions have increased from 0 to 2.5 million per year, doubling in the past 3 years, and currently costs $96 million per year or 6.7% of the country's entire pharmaceutical budget. Similarly, upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopies have increased, costing $15 million per year, doubling in the past 6 years and representing a cost almost equivalent to all other upper gastrointestinal procedures combined. Despite known efficacy and recommendations for use, triple therapy for Heliobacter species is not being used with prescriptions for surface agents actually decreasing to 40,000 per year. A review of the outcome of medical and surgical therapy shows that this expense is not justified; surgery would be more costeffective than medicine at 2 years and safer than medicine after 4 years as a result of complications from failed medical treatment. This margin of benefit is predicted to be greater with laparoscopic vagotomy. Failed medical treatment needs to be redefined by limiting H2 antagonists to a 6-week course. Recurrences or failures are than evaluated endoscopically and those diagnosed with having chronic duoderal ulcers have biopsies taken. Heliobacter pylori positive patients are treated with triple therapy. Failures, recurrences, and originally H pylori negative patients have laparoscopic vagotomy. For such a trial protocol to be evaluated, it requires the long-term use of H2 antagonists to be restricted and laparoscopic vagotomists to document the efficacy of their surgery, including gastric secretion tests. PMID:10401050

  14. 76 FR 48169 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... following public meeting: ``Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical... multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application and public...

  15. Predicting relapse following medical therapy for Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Wilson, R.; Pearson, D.W.; Cuthbert, G.F.; Jenkins, C.; Caine, S.; Thomson, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In 40 patients with Graves' disease (35 female, 5 male; mean age at presentation = 38 yrs) the authors examined the ability of thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake and serum thyroid stimulating immunoglobins (TSI) to identify patients who would relapse after a course of medical therapy. Serum TSI and 20 minute thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake were estimated every 3 months during a 12 month course of carbimazole and tri iodothyronine. TSI levels were estimated by inhibition of receptor binding and expressed as an index (normal value <25). 17 patients (Group 1) remained biochemically euthyroid for at least 1 year after cessation of therapy. 23 (Group II) developed recurrent thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid hormone level did not differ between Groups I and II at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake did not differ significantly in the two groups at presentation and overlap of values persisted throughout therapy. 3 patients had undetectable TSI levels at presentation and throughout follow-up. In the remaining 37, TSI levels at presentation were significantly higher in Group II and all 7 patients with initial values >80 relapsed. After 12 months therapy a TSI level of >25 was present in 1 Group I patient and 16 Group II patients who had detectable TSI at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake was a poor predictor of relapse of thyrotoxicosis. A very high TSI level at presentation (>80) was associated with relapse. An abnormal TSI on completion of 12 months medical therapy had a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 94% for prediction of relapse of thyrotoxicosis in the subsequent year.

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation on advanced life support medications

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, D.J.; Hubbard, L.B.; Broadbent, M.V.; Stewart, P.; Jaeger, M.

    1987-06-01

    Advanced life support medications stored in emergency department stretcher areas, diagnostic radiology rooms, and radiotherapy suites are exposed to ionizing radiation. We hypothesized that radiation may decrease the potency and thus the shelf life of medications stored in these areas. Atropine, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol were exposed to a wide range of ionizing radiation. The potency of the four drugs was unaffected by levels of radiation found in ED stretcher areas and high-volume diagnostic radiograph rooms (eg, chest radiograph, computed tomography, fluoroscopy). The potency of atropine may be reduced by gamma radiation in high-use radiotherapy suites. However, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol were unaffected by high doses of gamma radiation. Atropine, dopamine, epinephrine, and isoproterenol may be safely kept in ED stretcher areas and diagnostic radiology rooms without loss of potency over the shelf life of the drugs.

  17. Ethics of the allocation of highly advanced medical technologies.

    PubMed

    Sass, H M

    1998-03-01

    The disproportionate distribution of financial, educational, social, and medical resources between some rich countries of the northern hemisphere and less fortunate societies creates a moral challenge of global dimension. The development of new forms of highly advanced medical technologies, including neoorgans and xenografts, as well as the promotion of health literacy and predictive and preventive medical services might reduce some problems in allocational justice. Most governments and the World Health Organization (WHO) reject financial and other rewards for living organ donors thus indirectly contributing to the development of black markets. A societal gratuity model supporting and safeguarding a highly regulated market between providers and recipients of organs might provide for better protection of those who provide organs not solely based on altruistic reasons. The moral assessment of global issues in allocation and justice in the distribution of medical technologies must be increased and will have to be based on the principles of self determination and responsibility, solidarity and subsidiarity, and respect for individual values and cultural traditions. PMID:9527289

  18. Advances in Medical Management of Early Stage and Advanced Breast Cancer: 2015.

    PubMed

    Witherby, Sabrina; Rizack, Tina; Sakr, Bachir J; Legare, Robert D; Sikov, William M

    2016-01-01

    Standard management of early stage and advanced breast cancer has been improved over the past few years by knowledge gained about the biology of the disease, results from a number of eagerly anticipated clinical trials and the development of novel agents that offer our patients options for improved outcomes or reduced toxicity or both. This review highlights recent major developments affecting the systemic therapy of breast cancer, broken down by clinically relevant patient subgroups and disease stage, and briefly discusses some of the ongoing controversies in the treatment of breast cancer and promising therapies on the horizon.

  19. Conventional chemotherapy and emerging targeted therapy for advanced adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yun-Ze; Zhu, Yu

    2013-02-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but typically aggressive malignancy. Radical surgery remains the potentially curative option. However, about one third of patients initially present with distant metastases. Regarding to chemotherapy, mitotane alone or in combination with cytotoxic drugs should be the first selection. Meanwhile, a phase lll clinical trial of etoposide, doxorubicin, cisplatin plus mitotane or streptozotocin plus mitotane is currently undergoing worldwide. The study on molecular pathogenesis of ACC is progressing. A lot of targeted therapies are also enrolled in preclinical investigations and clinical trials, including small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, antiangiogenic compounds. This article introduced the conventional chemotherapy, newly developed targeted therapy for advanced ACC.

  20. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Karen; Jasperse, Marieke; Herst, Patries; Yielder, Jill

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board.

  1. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezado, Y.; Adam, J. F.; Berkvens, P.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Vautrin, M.; Deman, P.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Elleaume, H.; Estève, F.; Bravin, A.

    2010-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT). The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  2. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Berkvens, P.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Bravin, A.; Adam, J. F.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Deman, P.; Vautrin, M.

    2010-07-23

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT).The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  3. Clinical considerations for an effective medical therapy in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Karl Heinz; Stremmel, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessively inherited copper overload disorder that leads to hepatic and/or neurologic symptoms. More than a century after the first description of Wilson's disease, the available medical treatment options have not been standardized. The efficacy of the commonly used drugs is satisfactory for hepatic disease, but disappointing in the neurologic patients, including the risk of neurologic deterioration after the initiation of chelation therapy. An approach to overcome this problem is the careful and systematic assessment of biochemical response patterns and the quantitative monitoring of symptoms using validated rating scales. Standardized dosage strategies that address changes in copper pools might improve adherence and reduce side effects. Such an approach may reduce long-term morbidity. In this paper, we discuss considerations for an effective medical treatment and requirements for future studies in Wilson's disease.

  4. [Economic perspectives of the research on advanced therapies].

    PubMed

    Pamo Larrauri, Jose María

    2014-11-03

    Since a new advanced therapy medicinal product is discovered until finally allowed its sale in the domestic market, it has to overcome a series of stages. Biomedical research is the first phase, currently its situation is encouraging to the increase in the number of clinical trials in Spain and in the rest of the world, despite the economic situation and the various difficulties that have faced the pharmaceutical laboratories. The next phase consists in obtaining the authorization of marketing of the European Medicines Agency. After authorization, will attempt to set a fair and moderate price for inclusion in the list of health provision of Social Security. A price for a drug that provides added value to health and society, a price that is generated profits for the pharmaceutical companies that hope to make up for the years of work and investment. Commitment to advanced therapy must be clear and forceful, to fund ongoing research projects and encouraging their creation with economic aid.

  5. Major Changes in Systemic Therapy for Advanced Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John A

    2016-05-01

    Over the past 5 years, a host of new agents have radically changed the therapeutic landscape in advanced melanoma; gone are the days when the only active agents were interferon and dacarbazine. Nearly 25 years ago, few patients with stage IV melanoma reached 2-year survival; today, these survival curves have risen substantially. At the NCCN 21st Annual Conference, John A. Thompson, MD, discussed updates with longer duration of patient follow-up for immune checkpoint therapies. He also reviewed some of the newer approvals in advanced melanoma, including the combination of ipilimumab and nivolumab, high-dose ipilimumab, the oncolytic virus therapy talimogene laherparepvec, and the molecularly targeted combination of the BRAF and MEK inhibitors vemurafenib and cobimetinib. PMID:27226502

  6. Recent Advances and Prospects for Multimodality Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Awalpreet S; Khoo, Allison; Aliru, Maureen L; Arora, Harpreet K; Gunther, Jillian R; Krishnan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    The outcomes for treatment of pancreatic cancer have not improved dramatically in many decades. However, the recent promising results with combination chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease increase optimism for future treatments. With greater control of overt or occult metastatic disease, there will likely be an expanding role for local treatment modalities, especially given that nearly a third of pancreatic cancer patients have locally destructive disease without distant metastatic disease at the time of death. Technical advances have allowed for the safe delivery of dose-escalated radiation therapy, which can then be combined with chemotherapy, targeted agents, immunotherapy, and nanoparticulate drug delivery techniques to produce novel and improved synergistic effects. Here we discuss recent advances and future directions for multimodality therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27619253

  7. [Advanced therapy: from European regulatory framework to national regulatory framework].

    PubMed

    Lucas-Samuel, S

    2013-05-01

    The European regulation n(o) 1394/2007/CE published on the 13th of November 2007 defined and harmonized the European regulatory framework for advanced therapy medicinal products. It creates a specialized committee located at the European Medicine Agency, in charge of the assessment of these medicinal products. The consequences of this regulation are introduced in the French regulation by the law n(o) 2011-302 published on the 22nd of March 2011. It detailed notably the possibility for public establishments (except health establishments) and nonprofit organisms to create pharmaceutical establishments. This law defined also a specific category of advanced therapy medicinal products, which fall under the "hospital exemption" framework. The rules regarding the authorizations of the establishments able to prepare these types of medicinal products and the authorization of the products are defined by the n(o) 2012-1236 decree published on the 6th of November 2012.

  8. Recent Advances and Prospects for Multimodality Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Awalpreet S; Khoo, Allison; Aliru, Maureen L; Arora, Harpreet K; Gunther, Jillian R; Krishnan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    The outcomes for treatment of pancreatic cancer have not improved dramatically in many decades. However, the recent promising results with combination chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease increase optimism for future treatments. With greater control of overt or occult metastatic disease, there will likely be an expanding role for local treatment modalities, especially given that nearly a third of pancreatic cancer patients have locally destructive disease without distant metastatic disease at the time of death. Technical advances have allowed for the safe delivery of dose-escalated radiation therapy, which can then be combined with chemotherapy, targeted agents, immunotherapy, and nanoparticulate drug delivery techniques to produce novel and improved synergistic effects. Here we discuss recent advances and future directions for multimodality therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  9. Remembrance of conversations past: oral advance statements about medical treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Sommerville, A.

    1995-01-01

    Polls show increasing public interest in advance statements or directives about medical treatment ("living wills") but that few people, apart from Jehovah's Witnesses, carry such documents. Patients' firm, witnessed oral decisions are often sufficient to aid clinical decision making but should still be recorded in medical notes. Without documentation, dilemmas arise when others claim to know patients' views on the basis of past unrecorded conversations and demand withdrawal of treatment when patients are not terminally ill and cannot speak for themselves. Legal and ethical considerations oblige doctors to act in the best interests of an incapacitated patient; these considerations are now formally defined in draft legislation as including consideration of the patient's past wishes. The practicalities of ascertaining the strength and validity of such wishes from conversations reported second hand are complex. The paucity of legal and ethical guidance on reported oral advance statements makes debate imperative and renders the alternative of having designated surrogate decision makers increasingly attractive. Images p1664-a PMID:7795460

  10. [Hormonal therapy of advanced or relapsed ovarian granulosa cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Bai, P

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian granulosa cell tumor is a rare gynecologic malignancy with hormonal activity. Surgical excision is the standard treatment for this disease. Most patients present excellent short term prognosis, however, late relapse often occurs, even after many years. Viable treatments of advanced or relapsed granulosa cell tumor are still limited, and the optimal therapy method has not been established. Compared with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, hormonal therapy is a well-tolerated treatment which can be administrated over a long period of time without serious side effects, and the combined application of hormones may achieve a better outcome. Therefore, hormonal therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment option for patients with advanced or relapsed granulosa cell tumor, and to extend the tumor-free interval and attenuate the disease progression. Future researches should be focused on the identification of the hormonal therapy which may provide the greatest clinical benefit, comparing and analyzing the effects of different combined therapeutic regimens of hormone drugs, and on the synthesis of drugs highly activating estrogen receptor β expressed in the granulosa cell tumor cells. PMID:27531259

  11. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs): recent insights and advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. PMID:22886480

  12. Home iv antibiotic therapy through a medical day care unit.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, M; Deschênes, L; Caron, M; Desmarais, M

    1993-05-01

    An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin) were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%). The duration of out-patient therapy ranged from two to 62 days with a mean duration of 9.4 days if treated at the unit, or 13.2 days in the home care model (1476 patient-days). Vein access was peripheral and catheters remained functional for an average of 4.9 days (range 0.5 to 22 days). Only two patients experienced adverse drug reactions that necessitated modification of treatment. One other case was readmitted to the hospital for surgical debridement. The average cost per patient-day was $66 compared with $375 for in-hospital therapy. This program proved to be safe, efficient, and cost-effective.

  13. Home iv antibiotic therapy through a medical day care unit

    PubMed Central

    Gourdeau, Marie; Deschênes, Louise; Caron, Martine; Desmarais, Marc

    1993-01-01

    An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin) were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%). The duration of out-patient therapy ranged from two to 62 days with a mean duration of 9.4 days if treated at the unit, or 13.2 days in the home care model (1476 patient-days). Vein access was peripheral and catheters remained functional for an average of 4.9 days (range 0.5 to 22 days). Only two patients experienced adverse drug reactions that necessitated modification of treatment. One other case was readmitted to the hospital for surgical debridement. The average cost per patient-day was $66 compared with $375 for in-hospital therapy. This program proved to be safe, efficient, and cost-effective. PMID:22346440

  14. Traditional Chinese medical comprehensive therapy for cancer-related fatigue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Li, Tian-Tian; Chu, Yu-Ting; Chen, Ke; Tian, Shao-Dan; Chen, Xin-Yi; Yang, Guo-Wang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common and one of the most severe symptom in the period of onset, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation process of cancer. But there are no confirmed measures to relieve this problem at present. Traditional Chinese medical comprehensive therapy has its advantages in dealing with this condition. Based on the research status of CRF, the following problems have been analyzed and solved: the term of CRF has been defined and recommended, and the definition has been made clear; the disease mechanism is proposed, i.e. healthy qi has been impaired in the long-term disease duration, in the process of surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and biology disturbing; it is clear that the clinical manifestations are related to six Chinese medicine patterns: decreased functioning of the Pi (Spleen) and Wei (Stomach), deficiency of the Pi with dampness retention, deficiency of the Xin (Heart) and Pi, disharmony between the Gan (Liver) and Pi, deficiency of the Pi and Shen (Kidney), and deficiency of the Fei (Lung) and Shen. Based on its severity, the mild patients are advised to have non-drug psychological intervention and sleep treatment in cooperation with appropriate exercise; diet therapy are recommended to moderate patients together with sleep treatment and acupuncture, severe patients are recommended to have herbal treatment based on pattern differentiation together with physiological sleep therapy.

  15. Targeted Therapies in Breast Cancer: Implications for Advanced Oncology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bourdeanu, Laura; Luu, Thehan

    2014-01-01

    The systemic therapeutic management of breast cancer has undergone significant transformation in the past decade. Without targeted therapies, conventional treatment with cytotoxic agents has reached the limit of its potential in terms of patient survival for most types of cancer. Enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis of tumor cell growth and metastasis has led to the identification of signaling growth pathways as targets for these directed therapies. Novel therapies targeted to HER2/neu, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), histone deacetylase (HDAC), the heat shock protein, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors have been developed and have demonstrated some efficacy in breast cancer. Recognition and management of the toxicities associated with targeted therapies is imperative. This review will describe the clinical development and utilization of targeted therapies currently in use or in clinical trials, with a focus on considerations for the oncology advanced practitioner. PMID:26110069

  16. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rastall, David PW; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme’s substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood–brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field. PMID:26170711

  17. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  18. Advances in methodology and current prospects for primary drug therapies for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Knopman, D S

    2000-01-01

    There has been gratifying progress in the development of drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Even though the current generation of medications, the cholinesterase inhibitors (CEIs), has produced only modest benefits, our concept of an "effective" therapy has matured considerably over this time. A less visible but equally important advance has been a quantum leap in expertise in clinical trial methodology. This chapter reviews the methodological underpinnings of clinical trials in AD: patient selection issues, key design issues, and an overview of currently available agents and the prospects for drugs of the future.

  19. Stenting versus Aggressive Medical Therapy for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chimowitz, Marc I.; Lynn, Michael J.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Turan, Tanya N.; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, L. Scott; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Barnwell, Stanley L.; Waters, Michael F.; Hoh, Brian L.; Hourihane, J. Maurice; Levy, Elad I.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Harrigan, Mark R.; Chiu, David; Klucznik, Richard P.; Clark, Joni M.; McDougall, Cameron G.; Johnson, Mark D.; Pride, G. Lee; Torbey, Michel T.; Zaidat, Osama O.; Rumboldt, Zoran; Cloft, Harry J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic intracranial arterial stenosis is an important cause of stroke that is increasingly being treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) to prevent recurrent stroke. However, PTAS has not been compared with medical management in a randomized trial. Methods We randomly assigned patients who had a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke attributed to stenosis of 70 to 99% of the diameter of a major intracranial artery to aggressive medical management alone or aggressive medical management plus PTAS with the use of the Wingspan stent system. The primary end point was stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during the follow-up period or stroke in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days. Results Enrollment was stopped after 451 patients underwent randomization, because the 30-day rate of stroke or death was 14.7% in the PTAS group (nonfatal stroke, 12.5%; fatal stroke, 2.2%) and 5.8% in the medical-management group (nonfatal stroke, 5.3%; non–stroke-related death, 0.4%) (P = 0.002). Beyond 30 days, stroke in the same territory occurred in 13 patients in each group. Currently, the mean duration of follow-up, which is ongoing, is 11.9 months. The probability of the occurrence of a primary end-point event over time differed significantly between the two treatment groups (P = 0.009), with 1-year rates of the primary end point of 20.0% in the PTAS group and 12.2% in the medical-management group. Conclusions In patients with intracranial arterial stenosis, aggressive medical management was superior to PTAS with the use of the Wingspan stent system, both because the risk of early stroke after PTAS was high and because the risk of stroke with aggressive medical therapy alone was lower than expected. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others; SAMMPRIS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00576693.) PMID

  20. Differences in Medical Therapy Goals for Children With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury— An International Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Michael J.; Adelson, P. David; Hutchison, James S.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Tasker, Robert C.; Vavilala, Monica S.; Beers, Sue R.; Fabio, Anthony; Kelsey, Sheryl F.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe the differences in goals for their usual practice for various medical therapies from a number of international centers for children with severe traumatic brain injury. Design A survey of the goals from representatives of the international centers. Setting Thirty-two pediatric traumatic brain injury centers in the United States, United Kingdom, France, and Spain. Patients None. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results A survey instrument was developed that required free-form responses from the centers regarding their usual practice goals for topics of intracranial hypertension therapies, hypoxia/ischemia prevention and detection, and metabolic support. Cerebrospinal fluid diversion strategies varied both across centers and within centers, with roughly equal proportion of centers adopting a strategy of continuous cerebrospinal fluid diversion and a strategy of no cerebrospinal fluid diversion. Use of mannitol and hypertonic saline for hyperosmolar therapies was widespread among centers (90.1% and 96.9%, respectively). Of centers using hypertonic saline, 3% saline preparations were the most common but many other concentrations were in common use. Routine hyperventilation was not reported as a standard goal and 31.3% of centers currently use Pbo2 monitoring for cerebral hypoxia. The time to start nutritional support and glucose administration varied widely, with nutritional support beginning before 96 hours and glucose administration being started earlier in most centers. Conclusions There were marked differences in medical goals for children with severe traumatic brain injury across our international consortium, and these differences seemed to be greatest in areas with the weakest evidence in the literature. Future studies that determine the superiority of the various medical therapies outlined within our survey would be a significant advance for the pediatric neurotrauma field and may lead to new standards of care and improved study

  1. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced or metastatic chordoma patients: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lebellec, Loïc; Aubert, Sébastien; Zaïri, Fahed; Ryckewaert, Thomas; Chauffert, Bruno; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Chordomas, derived from undifferentiated notochordal remnants, represent less than 4% of bone primary tumors. Despite surgery followed by radiotherapy, local and metastatic relapses are frequent. In case of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas, medical treatment is frequently discussed. While chemotherapy is ineffective, it would appear that some molecular targeted therapies, in particular imatinib, could slow down the tumor growth in case-reports, retrospective series, and phase I or II trials. Nineteen publications, between January 1990 and September 2014, have been found describing the activity of these targeted therapies. A systematic analysis of these publications shows that the best objective response with targeted therapies was stabilization in 52 to 69% of chordomas. Given the indolent course of advanced chordoma and because of the absence of randomized trial, the level of evidence to treat chordomas with molecular therapy is low (level III), whatever the drug. Furthermore, we could not draw firm conclusion on the activity of imatinib. Other putative targets have also been described. Therefore, further clinical trials are expected, especially with these targets. Nevertheless, it seems essential, in those future studies, to consider the naturally slow course of the disease.

  2. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Karen; Jasperse, Marieke; Herst, Patries; Yielder, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board. PMID:26229634

  3. Materials Advances for Next-Generation Ingestible Electronic Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Electronic medical implants have collectively transformed the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, but have many inherent limitations. Electronic implants require invasive surgeries, operate in challenging microenvironments, and are susceptible to bacterial infection and persistent inflammation. Novel materials and nonconventional device fabrication strategies may revolutionize the way electronic devices are integrated with the body. Ingestible electronic devices offer many advantages compared with implantable counterparts that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies ranging from gastrointestinal infections to diabetes. This review summarizes current technologies and highlights recent materials advances. Specific focus is dedicated to next-generation materials for packaging, circuit design, and on-board power supplies that are benign, nontoxic, and even biodegradable. Future challenges and opportunities are also highlighted.

  4. Proton beam therapy for locally advanced lung cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Schild, Steven E; Rule, William G; Ashman, Jonathan B; Vora, Sujay A; Keole, Sameer; Anand, Aman; Liu, Wei; Bues, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Protons interact with human tissue differently than do photons and these differences can be exploited in an attempt to improve the care of lung cancer patients. This review examines proton beam therapy (PBT) as a component of a combined modality program for locally advanced lung cancers. It was specifically written for the non-radiation oncologist who desires greater understanding of this newer treatment modality. This review describes and compares photon (X-ray) radiotherapy (XRT) to PBT. The physical differences of these beams are described and the clinical literature is reviewed. Protons can be used to create treatment plans delivering significantly lower doses of radiation to the adjacent organs at risk (lungs, esophagus, and bone marrow) than photons. Clinically, PBT combined with chemotherapy has resulted in low rates of toxicity compared to XRT. Early results suggest a possible improvement in survival. The clinical results of proton therapy in lung cancer patients reveal relatively low rates of toxicity and possible survival benefits. One randomized study is being performed and another is planned to clarify the clinical differences in patient outcome for PBT compared to XRT. Along with the development of better systemic therapy, newer forms of radiotherapy such as PBT should positively impact the care of lung cancer patients. This review provides the reader with the current status of this new technology in treating locally advanced lung cancer. PMID:25302161

  5. Advances in stimuli responsive nanobiomaterials for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Kaarunya; Arulkumar, Shylaja; Ramalingam, Murugan

    2014-03-01

    Cancer has become one of the major reasons for disease mortality with drastic increase of death rate in recent years. The reason for most of these deaths is due to the inefficacy and failure of the current methods of treatments or due to the unavailability of treatment options. Even after extensive research that has been carried out in the field, there is no gold standard in cancer therapy. With the advancement of the field of nanomedicine and materials science, many research works are being aimed at developing micro and nanocarriers for site-specific delivery of anticancer drugs. As a further advancement in the field, smart carriers, based on nanobiomaterials, which respond to various external and internal stimuli and act locally are being developed to improve the efficacy of current treatments. These smart nanobiomaterials act as carriers for not only anticancer drugs but also for gene and other biomolecules. Keeping the importance and advancement of smart carrier anticancer drug delivery system (AcDDS) in view, this review focuses on stimuli responsive nanobiomaterials that are currently being studied for cancer therapy. PMID:24730233

  6. Integrative and complementary therapies for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Lucille

    2014-07-01

    In integrative medicine, well-being is emphasized, and in palliative care, quality of life (QOL) is a similar concept or goal. Both can occur despite advanced cancer. Integrative medicine serves to combine the best of alternative, complementary and conventional therapies to optimize well-being and QOL, whether or not a person is at the end of their life. When integrative medicine is combined with palliative care modalities, the toolbox to provide symptom control and well-being or QOL is increased or broadened. Palliative care and integrative medicine are best provided early in the trajectory of illness such as cancer, and increase in amount as the illness progresses toward end of life. In cancer care, symptoms of the cancer, as well as symptoms produced by cancer therapies, are addressed with conventional and integrative therapies. Goals of care change as the disease progresses, and a patient's unique situation creates a different balance of integrative and conventional therapies. Integrative therapies such as music, aromatherapy, and massage might appeal to more patients than more specific, less common integrative therapies that might be more expensive, or seem more unusual such as Ayurvedic medicine and energy modalities. Each person may be drawn to different integrative modalities depending on factors such as cultural traditions, beliefs, lifestyle, internet information, advice from family and friends, books, etc. This review focuses on how integrative and complementary modalities can be included in comprehensive palliative care for patients with advanced malignancies. Nutrition and movement, often neglected in conventional treatment strategies, will also be included in the larger context of integrative and palliative modalities. Both conventional and integrative modalities in palliative care help patients live with empowerment, hope, and well-being no matter how long their lives last. A comprehensive review of all integrative and complementary therapies is

  7. Advances in Medications and Tailoring Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chamindi; Johnson, Bankole A.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a chronic heritable brain disorder with a variable clinical presentation. This variability, or heterogeneity, in clinical presentation suggests complex interactions between environmental and biological factors, resulting in several underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the development and progression of AUD. Classifying AUD into subgroups of common clinical or pathological characteristics would ease the complexity of teasing apart underlying molecular mechanisms. Genetic association analyses have revealed several polymorphisms—small differences in DNA—that increase a person’s vulnerability to develop AUD and other alcohol-related intermediate characteristics, such as severity of drinking, age of AUD onset, or measures of craving. They also have identified polymorphisms associated with reduced drinking. Researchers have begun utilizing these genetic polymorphisms to identify alcoholics who might respond best to various treatments, thereby enhancing the effectiveness of currently tested medications for treating AUD. This review compares the efficacy of medications tested for treatment of AUD with and without incorporating genetics. It then discusses advances in pre-clinical genetic and genomic studies that potentially could be adapted to clinical trials to improve treatment efficacy. Although a pharmacogenetic approach is promising, it is relatively new and will need to overcome many challenges, including inadequate scientific knowledge and social and logistic constraints, to be utilized in clinical practice. PMID:26259086

  8. Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

  9. [Medical expulsive therapy facilitated by alpha 1 adrenoceptor antagonist].

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yasunori; Niimi, Kazuhiro; Hirose, Yasuhiko

    2011-10-01

    In 2002, speedy elimination of ureterolithiasis in the lower part of ureter was first reported with the alpha 1 blocker. Thereafter, there are a lot of reports including meta-analysis about tamsulosin. In 2011 EAU Guidelines on Urolithiasis, it is the most important to establish effective MET (medical expulsive therapy) to facilitate spontaneous stone passage. Alpha 1 blockers are the preferred agents for MET. As a basic evidence for MET, we reported that alpha 1a and 1d AR subtype mRNA was highly expressed in the human ureter and that alpha 1A AR is the main participant in the human ureteral contraction. It is published newly in Japanese Guidelines on Urolithiasis revised edition to schedule to be published soon. PMID:21960238

  10. Integrating Medication Therapy Management Education into a Core Pharmacy Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Poole, Traci M; Kodali, Leela; Pace, Adam C

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To describe the design of a core course directed at improving confidence and competence of students to perform medication therapy management (MTM) services. Design. Using the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) certificate training program framework, a core course was developed to teach MTM concepts to third-year student pharmacists. Using deep learning and authentic assignments, course instructors attempted to improve student confidence and readiness to provide MTM services. Assessment. Student ability to meet course objectives was evaluated by examinations and the APhA MTM program self-assessment. Students had an overall success rate of 93% on all three assessments. Student perceptions of confidence, competence, and importance of performing MTM services were measured using a survey instrument with 56 Likert-type items. Students completing both surveys reported significantly increased confidence and competence. Conclusion. Integrating MTM-specific education into the core curriculum increased student pharmacists' perceived competence and confidence to perform MTM services. PMID:27293237

  11. Therapies for obesity and medication-associated weight gain.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2013-05-01

    Compared to the general population, individuals with psychiatric illness, especially serious and chronic mood and psychotic disorders, are more likely to be overweight or obese, have higher rates of weight-related medical conditions, and have greater non-suicide mortality rates. Lorcaserin (Belviq(®)), phentermine/topiramate combination (Qsymia(®)), and bupropion/naltrexone combination have been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of obesity, as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and physical activity, although their absolute safety has yet to be established with more widespread use or longer use. Bariatric surgery is an effective approach for morbid obesity, but careful psychiatric assessment before and follow up after surgery is necessary. Behavioral lifestyle interventions to promote weight loss are effective and should be implemented along with or instead of drug therapies or surgery. PMID:23590816

  12. Medical Nutrition Therapy in Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gosmanov, Aidar R.

    2013-01-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) plays an important role in management of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus. The goals of inpatient MNT are to optimize glycemic control, to provide adequate calories to meet metabolic demands, and to create a discharge plan for follow-up care. All patients with and without diabetes should undergo nutrition assessment on admission with subsequent implementation of physiologically sound caloric support. The use of a consistent carbohydrate diabetes meal-planning system has been shown to be effective in facilitating glycemic control in hospitalized patients with diabetes. This system is based on the total amount of carbohydrate offered rather than on specific calorie content at each meal, which facilitates matching the prandial insulin dose to the amount of carbohydrate consumed. In this article, we discuss general guidelines for the implementation of appropriate MNT in hospitalized patients with diabetes. PMID:21997598

  13. Integrating Medication Therapy Management Education into a Core Pharmacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Leela; Pace, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe the design of a core course directed at improving confidence and competence of students to perform medication therapy management (MTM) services. Design. Using the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) certificate training program framework, a core course was developed to teach MTM concepts to third-year student pharmacists. Using deep learning and authentic assignments, course instructors attempted to improve student confidence and readiness to provide MTM services. Assessment. Student ability to meet course objectives was evaluated by examinations and the APhA MTM program self-assessment. Students had an overall success rate of 93% on all three assessments. Student perceptions of confidence, competence, and importance of performing MTM services were measured using a survey instrument with 56 Likert-type items. Students completing both surveys reported significantly increased confidence and competence. Conclusion. Integrating MTM-specific education into the core curriculum increased student pharmacists’ perceived competence and confidence to perform MTM services. PMID:27293237

  14. [Clinical studies and accepted therapies of advanced melanoma].

    PubMed

    Liszkay, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the work is presentation of the available therapeutic results of the clinical trials with anti CTLA-4 and anti PD-1 treatment, which are operating on the immune checkpoints registered in advanced melanoma, and the results of T-VEC vaccination (NCT00094653, NCT00324155, KEYNOTE-001, -002, -006, CheckMate-066, -037, -067, NCT00769704). With ipilimumab therapy, long-term survival can be achieved in the case of 20% of patients, with low (10%) therapeutic response, and grade 3-4 treatment related, predominantly autoimmune adverse events occurring in 10-15% of patients. Anti-PD-1 therapy proved more effective compared to ipilimumab, resulting in 21-40% therapeutic response, with 60-74% one-year survival rate and significantly less severe and frequent side effects. Progression-free survival achieved with ipilimumab/nivolumab combination was 11.5 months with grade 3-4 side effects occurring in 55% of patients. T-VEC therapy resulted in 26.4% objective response rate without a significant survival advantage. In the possession of the new immunotherapeutic possibilities, knowledge of the results of clinical studies is essential for the optimal complex therapy of melanoma. PMID:26934345

  15. Advancing polymeric delivery systems amidst a nucleic acid therapy renaissance

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Paul A.; Pun, Suzie H.; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid therapeutics are attracting renewed interest due to recent clinical advances and product approvals. Most leading programs use chemical conjugates, or viral vectors in the case of gene therapy, while several use no delivery system at all. Polymer systems, which have been at the periphery of this renaissance, often involve greater molecular complexity than competing approaches, which must be justified by their advantages. Advanced analytical methods, along with biological tools for characterizing biotransformation and intracellular trafficking, are increasingly being applied to nucleic acid delivery systems including those based on polymers. These frontiers of investigation create the opportunity for an era where highly defined polymer compositions are optimized based on mechanistic insights in a way that has not been previously possible, offering the prospect of greater differentiation from alternatives. This will require integrated collaboration between polymer scientists and those from other disciplines. PMID:24683504

  16. Advancing polymeric delivery systems amidst a nucleic acid therapy renaissance.

    PubMed

    Burke, Paul A; Pun, Suzie H; Reineke, Theresa M

    2013-10-15

    Nucleic acid therapeutics are attracting renewed interest due to recent clinical advances and product approvals. Most leading programs use chemical conjugates, or viral vectors in the case of gene therapy, while several use no delivery system at all. Polymer systems, which have been at the periphery of this renaissance, often involve greater molecular complexity than competing approaches, which must be justified by their advantages. Advanced analytical methods, along with biological tools for characterizing biotransformation and intracellular trafficking, are increasingly being applied to nucleic acid delivery systems including those based on polymers. These frontiers of investigation create the opportunity for an era where highly defined polymer compositions are optimized based on mechanistic insights in a way that has not been previously possible, offering the prospect of greater differentiation from alternatives. This will require integrated collaboration between polymer scientists and those from other disciplines.

  17. Advancing polymeric delivery systems amidst a nucleic acid therapy renaissance.

    PubMed

    Burke, Paul A; Pun, Suzie H; Reineke, Theresa M

    2013-10-15

    Nucleic acid therapeutics are attracting renewed interest due to recent clinical advances and product approvals. Most leading programs use chemical conjugates, or viral vectors in the case of gene therapy, while several use no delivery system at all. Polymer systems, which have been at the periphery of this renaissance, often involve greater molecular complexity than competing approaches, which must be justified by their advantages. Advanced analytical methods, along with biological tools for characterizing biotransformation and intracellular trafficking, are increasingly being applied to nucleic acid delivery systems including those based on polymers. These frontiers of investigation create the opportunity for an era where highly defined polymer compositions are optimized based on mechanistic insights in a way that has not been previously possible, offering the prospect of greater differentiation from alternatives. This will require integrated collaboration between polymer scientists and those from other disciplines. PMID:24683504

  18. Chapter III: Management of cardiovascular risk factors and medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Diehm, N; Schmidli, J; Setacci, C; Ricco, J-B; de Donato, G; Becker, F; Robert-Ebadi, H; Cao, P; Eckstein, H H; De Rango, P; Teraa, M; Moll, F L; Dick, F; Davies, A H; Lepäntalo, M; Apelqvist, J

    2011-12-01

    Critical limb ischaemia (CLI) is a particularly severe manifestation of lower limb atherosclerosis posing a major threat to both limb and life of affected patients. Besides arterial revascularisation, risk-factor modification and administration of antiplatelet therapy is a major goal in the treatment of CLI patients. Key elements of cardiovascular risk management are smoking cessation and treatment of hyperlipidaemia with dietary modification or statins. Moreover, arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus should be adequately treated. In CLI patients not suitable for arterial revascularisation or subsequent to unsuccessful revascularisation, parenteral prostanoids may be considered. CLI patients undergoing surgical revascularisation should be treated with beta blockers. At present, neither gene nor stem-cell therapy can be recommended outside clinical trials. Of note, walking exercise is contraindicated in CLI patients due to the risk of worsening pre-existing or causing new ischaemic wounds. CLI patients are oftentimes medically frail and exhibit significant comorbidities. Co-existing coronary heart and carotid as well as renal artery disease should be managed according to current guidelines. Considering the above-mentioned treatment goals, interdisciplinary treatment approaches for CLI patients are warranted. Aim of the present manuscript is to discuss currently existing evidence for both the management of cardiovascular risk factors and treatment of co-existing disease and to deduct specific treatment recommendations. PMID:22172471

  19. Medical Therapy of Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Targeted, Symptomatic and Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ferolla, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Whenever feasible, surgery represents the treatment of choice for pulmonary neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs). In patients with hypersecreting tumors, wide metastatic spread or those not candidates for a surgical treatment, medical therapies may assure a control of the secretory pattern and slow the rate of tumor growth. No specific trials have been designed so far for pulmonary NENs and the first randomized trial entirely dedicated to thoracic NENs (the LUNA trial) is ongoing. International scientific society guidelines (ESMO and NANETS) and recommendations (ENETS) are therefore necessarily based on expert experience, on the subgroup analysis of large multicenter trials not focused on pulmonary NENs, and on the analysis of small retrospective series. Somatostatin analogs represent the therapy of choice in the presence of associated carcinoid syndrome and ectopic acromegaly and a reasonable first-line in slow-progressing tumors. Due to the low rate of proliferation, platinum-based chemotherapy is generally reserved to rapidly progressing tumors. Temozolomide alone or in association has shown activity in small retrospective series or monocentric trials - larger multicenter trials will better define its efficacy. Everolimus alone or in combination with somatostatin analogs has shown activity in the subgroup analysis of a large multicenter trial (RADIANT II). Many other drugs have shown activity in the preclinical models but, at the moment, no prospective and randomized data are available. PMID:26303713

  20. Selecting deep brain stimulation or infusion therapies in advanced Parkinson's disease: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Jens; Albanese, Alberto; Antonini, Angelo; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Clarke, Carl E; de Bie, Rob M A; Deuschl, Günther; Eggert, Karla; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Nyholm, Dag; Odin, Per; Østergaard, Karen; Poewe, Werner; Pollak, Pierre; Rabey, Jose Martin; Rascol, Olivier; Ruzicka, Evzen; Samuel, Michael; Speelman, Hans; Sydow, Olof; Valldeoriola, Francesc; van der Linden, Chris; Oertel, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Motor complications in Parkinson's disease (PD) result from the short half-life and irregular plasma fluctuations of oral levodopa. When strategies of providing more continuous dopaminergic stimulation by adjusting oral medication fail, patients may be candidates for one of three device-aided therapies: deep brain stimulation (DBS), continuous subcutaneous apomorphine infusion, or continuous duodenal/jejunal levodopa/carbidopa pump infusion (DLI). These therapies differ in their invasiveness, side-effect profile, and the need for nursing care. So far, very few comparative studies have evaluated the efficacy of the three device-aided therapies for specific motor problems in advanced PD. As a result, neurologists currently lack guidance as to which therapy could be most appropriate for a particular PD patient. A group of experts knowledgeable in all three therapies reviewed the currently available literature for each treatment and identified variables of clinical relevance for choosing one of the three options such as type of motor problems, age, and cognitive and psychiatric status. For each scenario, pragmatic and (if available) evidence-based recommendations are provided as to which patients could be candidates for either DBS, DLI, or subcutaneous apomorphine. PMID:23287972

  1. Recent advances in diagnosis and therapy of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Pelley, R J; Bukowski, R M

    1997-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare tumors that can be classified as APU-Domas (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation). They can be subdivided into the carcinoid tumors of the gastrointestinal submucosa and the islet cell endocrine tumors of the pancreas. Although the majority of tumors that become clinically apparent are malignant, they are frequently slow growing. Despite this, neuroendocrine tumors may generate disabling hormonal syndromes requiring aggressive treatment to achieve palliation. Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of these tumors has led to better radiographic imaging and more accurate localization techniques. Medical therapies with somatostatin analogues, omeprazole, and locoregional tumor ablation have made a positive impact on curative and palliative therapy. This review updates the recent efforts made in the radiographic imaging and therapeutics of the gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

  2. Anonymization of DICOM electronic medical records for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne; Jones, Timothy; Swerdloff, Stuart; Newhauser, Warren; Cilia, Mark; Carver, Robert; Halloran, Andy; Zhang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) and treatment plans are used in research on patient outcomes and radiation effects. In many situations researchers must remove protected health information (PHI) from EMRs. The literature contains several studies describing the anonymization of generic Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) files and DICOM image sets but no publications were found that discuss the anonymization of DICOM radiation therapy plans, a key component of an EMR in a cancer clinic. In addition to this we were unable to find a commercial software tool that met the minimum requirements for anonymization and preservation of data integrity for radiation therapy research. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype software code to meet the requirements for the anonymization of radiation therapy treatment plans and to develop a way to validate that code and demonstrate that it properly anonymized treatment plans and preserved data integrity. We extended an open-source code to process all relevant PHI and to allow for the automatic anonymization of multiple EMRs. The prototype code successfully anonymized multiple treatment plans in less than 1min/patient. We also tested commercial optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms for the detection of burned-in text on the images, but they were unable to reliably recognize text. In addition, we developed and tested an image filtering algorithm that allowed us to isolate and redact alpha-numeric text from a test radiograph. Validation tests verified that PHI was anonymized and data integrity, such as the relationship between DICOM unique identifiers (UID) was preserved. PMID:25147130

  3. Challenges to Integrating Pharmacogenetic Testing into Medication Therapy Management

    PubMed Central

    Allen LaPointe, Nancy M.; Moaddeb, Jivan

    2015-01-01

    Background Some have proposed the integration of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing into medication therapy management (MTM) to enable further refinement of treatment(s) to reduce risk of adverse responses and improve efficacy. PGx testing involves the analysis of genetic variants associated with therapeutic or adverse response and may be useful in enhancing the ability to identify ineffective and/or harmful drugs or drug combinations. This “enhanced” MTM might also reduce patient concerns about side effects and increase confidence that the medication is effective, addressing two key factors that impact patient adherence - concern and necessity. However, the feasibility and effectiveness of the integration of PGx testing into MTM in clinical practice has not yet been determined. Objectives In this paper, we consider some of the challenges to the integration and delivery of PGx testing in MTM services. What is already known about this subject While the addition of pharmacogenetic testing has been suggested, little literature exists exploring the challenges or feasibility of doing so. PMID:25803768

  4. Machine learning approach to optimizing combined stimulation and medication therapies for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Reuben R.; Dolber, Trygve; Noecker, Angela M.; Walter, Benjamin L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic region is an established therapy for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, patients often require time-intensive postoperative management to balance their coupled stimulation and medication treatments. Given the large and complex parameter space associated with this task, we propose that clinical decision support systems (CDSS) based on machine learning algorithms could assist in treatment optimization. Objective Develop a proof-of-concept implementation of a CDSS that incorporates patient-specific details on both stimulation and medication. Methods Clinical data from 10 patients, and 89 post-DBS surgery visits, were used to create a prototype CDSS. The system was designed to provide three key functions: 1) information retrieval; 2) visualization of treatment, and; 3) recommendation on expected effective stimulation and drug dosages, based on three machine learning methods that included support vector machines, Naïve Bayes, and random forest. Results Measures of medication dosages, time factors, and symptom-specific preoperative response to levodopa were significantly correlated with postoperative outcomes (p<0.05) and their effect on outcomes was of similar magnitude to that of DBS. Using those results, the combined machine learning algorithms were able to accurately predict 86% (12/14) of the motor improvement scores at one year after surgery. Conclusions Using patient-specific details, an appropriately parameterized CDSS could help select theoretically optimal DBS parameter settings and medication dosages that have potential to improve the clinical management of PD patients. PMID:26140956

  5. Long-term outcomes of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma who achieved complete remission after sorafenib therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Sorafenib is currently the sole molecular targeted agent that improves overall survival in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Despite the efficacy of sorafenib, the response rate varies in patients with advanced HCC. We retrospectively analyzed a series of Korean patients with advanced HCC with complete remission (CR) after sorafenib therapy. Methods In total, 523 patients with advanced HCC were treated with sorafenib in 3 large tertiary referral hospitals in Korea. A survey was conducted to collect data on patients who experienced CR after sorafenib monotherapy, and their medical records and follow-up data were analyzed. The tumor response and recurrence rates were assessed by radiologic study, based on modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. Results Seven patients with advanced HCC experienced CR after sorafenib therapy. The median time to tumor disappearance and the median disease-free survival time were 3 months and 9 months, respectively. HCC recurrence was identified in three cases (42.9%). Of these, two patients discontinued sorafenib before or after achieving CR and the other patient continued sorafenib after achieving CR. HCC recurred at 3, 10, and 42 months after CR in these three patients. Three patients needed dose reduction for toxicity and adverse events. Conclusions Though CR was achieved after sorafenib therapy in patients with advanced HCC, the recurrence rate was relatively high. Subsequent strategies to reduce a chance of recurrence after sorafenib therapy are required to investigate. PMID:26527250

  6. The use of music therapy to address the suffering in advanced cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Magill, L

    2001-01-01

    Pain associated with advanced cancer is multifaceted and complex, and is influenced by physiological, psychological, social, and spiritual phenomena. Suffering may be identified in patients when pain is associated with impending loss, increased dependency, and an altered understanding of one's existential purpose. Comprehensive pain management aims to address problematic symptoms in order to improve comfort, peace of mind, and quality of life. Music therapy is a treatment modality of great diversity that can offer a range of benefits to patients with advanced cancer pain and symptoms of suffering. Music therapists perform comprehensive assessments that include reviews of social, cultural, and medical history; current medical status; and the ways in which emotions are affecting the pain. A variety of music therapy techniques may be used, including vocal techniques, listening, and instrumental techniques. These techniques provide opportunities for exploration of the feelings and issues compounding the pain experience. Case examples are presented to demonstrate the "lifting", "transporting", and "bringing of peace" qualities of music that offer patients moments of release, reflection, and renewal. PMID:11816757

  7. Geographic Medical History: Advances in Geospatial Technology Present New Potentials in Medical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruque, F. S.; Finley, R. W.

    2016-06-01

    Genes, behaviour, and the environment are known to be the major risk factors for common diseases. When the patient visits a physician, typical questions include family history (genes) and lifestyle of the patient (behaviour), but questions concerning environmental risk factors often remain unasked. It is ironic that 25 centuries ago Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine, noted the importance of environmental exposure in medical investigation as documented in his classic work, "Airs, Waters, Places", yet the practice of routinely incorporating environmental risk factors is still not in place. Modern epigenetic studies have found that unhealthy lifestyle and environmental factors can cause changes to our genes that can increase disease risk factors. Therefore, attempting to solve the puzzle of diseases using heredity and lifestyle alone will be incomplete without accounting for the environmental exposures. The primary reason why environmental exposure has not yet been a routine part of the patient's medical history is mostly due to our inability to provide clinicians useful measures of environmental exposures suitable for their clinical practices. This presentation will discuss advances in geospatial technology that show the potential to catalyse a paradigm shift in medical practice and health research by allowing environmental risk factors to be documented as the patient's "Geographic Medical History". In order to accomplish this we need information on: a) relevant spatiotemporal environmental variables, and b) location of the individual in that person's dynamic environment. Common environmental agents that are known to interact with genetic make-up include air pollutants, mold spores, pesticides, etc. Until recently, the other component, location of an individual was limited to a static representation such as residential or workplace location. Now, with the development of mobile technology, changes in an individual's location can be tracked in real time if

  8. The role of combination medical therapy in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Greco, K A; McVary, K T

    2008-12-01

    To review key trials of monotherapy and combination therapy of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonists (alpha(1)-ARAs), 5alpha-reductase inhibitors (5alphaRIs) and anti-muscarinic agents in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). To assess the safety and efficacy of combination therapies for LUTS associated with BPH, a search of the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases (1976-2008) was conducted for relevant trials and reviews using the terms benign prostatic hyperplasia, lower urinary tract symptoms, alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonists, 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, anti-muscarinics, anticholinergics, combination therapy, alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, terazosin, dutasteride, finasteride, tolterodine, flavoxate, propiverine, oxybutynin, erectile dysfunction, sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil. Data from the Medical Therapy of Prostatic Symptoms (MTOPS) study indicated a role for long-term use of alpha(1)-ARAs and 5alphaRIs in combination. In the MTOPS study, combination therapy with the alpha(1)-ARA doxazosin and the 5alphaRI finasteride was significantly more effective than either component alone in reducing symptoms (P=0.006 vs doxazosin monotherapy; P<0.001 vs finasteride monotherapy) and in lowering the rate of clinical progression (P<0.001 vs either monotherapy). These findings were confirmed by the 2-year preliminary results of the Combination of Avodart and Tamsulosin study. In this study, combination therapy of the alpha(1)-ARA tamsulosin and the 5alphaRI dutasteride resulted in a significantly greater decrease in International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) when compared with either monotherapy. Several recent trials have studied the efficacy of combining alpha(1)-ARAs and anti-muscarinic agents in the treatment of BPH. These studies have found this combination to result in statistically significant benefits in quality of life scores, patient satisfaction, urinary frequency, storage

  9. [Economic perspectives of the research on advanced therapies].

    PubMed

    Pamo Larrauri, Jose María

    2014-01-01

    Since a new advanced therapy medicinal product is discovered until finally allowed its sale in the domestic market, it has to overcome a series of stages. Biomedical research is the first phase, currently its situation is encouraging to the increase in the number of clinical trials in Spain and in the rest of the world, despite the economic situation and the various difficulties that have faced the pharmaceutical laboratories. The next phase consists in obtaining the authorization of marketing of the European Medicines Agency. After authorization, will attempt to set a fair and moderate price for inclusion in the list of health provision of Social Security. A price for a drug that provides added value to health and society, a price that is generated profits for the pharmaceutical companies that hope to make up for the years of work and investment. Commitment to advanced therapy must be clear and forceful, to fund ongoing research projects and encouraging their creation with economic aid. PMID:25542659

  10. Evaluating cost benefits of combination therapies for advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ivar S.; Zacherle, Emily; Blanchette, Christopher M.; Zhang, Jie; Yin, Wes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although a number of monoimmunotherapies and targeted therapies are available to treat BRAF+ advanced melanoma, response rates remain relatively low in the range of 22–53% with progression-free survival (PFS) in the range of 4.8–8.8 months. Recently, combination targeted therapies have improved response rates to about 66–69%, PFS to 11.0–12.6 months and overall survival (OS) to 25.1–25.6 months. While combination immunotherapies have improved response rates of 67 compared with 19–29% with monotherapies and improved PFS of 11.7 compared with 4.4–5.8 months with monotherapies, the OS benefit is yet to be established in phase 3 trials. As healthcare costs continue to rise, US payers have a predominant interest in assessing the value of available treatments. Therefore, a cost-benefit model was developed to evaluate the value of treating BRAF+ advanced melanoma with two combination therapies: nivolumab + ipilimumab (N+I) and dabrafenib + trametinib (D+T). Scope: The model was used to estimate total costs, total costs by expenditure category, cost per month of PFS and cost per responder for the payer, and societal perspectives of treating advanced melanoma patients with the BRAF V600 mutation using combination targeted therapy (D+T) or combination immunotherapy (N+I). The model followed patients from initiation of treatment to the point of progression or death. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the robustness of the results and to understand the dispersion of simulated results. Findings: Based on a hypothetical payer with one million covered lives, it was expected that fourteen metastatic melanoma patients with the BRAF V600 mutation would be treated each year. Cost-benefit with N+I and D+T was simulated from the payer perspective. The cost per month of PFS for N+I was $22,162, while that for D+T was $17,716 (−$4,446 cost difference); the cost per responder for N+I was $388,746 and that for D+T was

  11. Comparative effectiveness of Mitraclip plus medical therapy versus medical therapy alone in high-risk surgical patients: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Fernando Matias; Finch, Aureliano Paolo; Armeni, Patrizio; Boscolo, Paola Roberta; Tarricone, Rosanna

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, Mitraclip has become available as a treatment option for mitral regurgitation in high-risk surgical patients. Focusing on the incremental effectiveness of Mitraclip versus the current standard of care, this article provides a comparative review of the evidence on Mitraclip and standard medical therapy (MT) in high-risk mitral regurgitation patients. Evidence was retrieved from seven major databases. Results suggest that Mitraclip presents a high safety profile and a good middle-term effectiveness performance. Evidence on long-term effectiveness is limited both for Mitraclip and MT. Few studies allow a comparison with MT and comparative results on different endpoints are mixed. Therefore, the available evidence does not conclusively inform whether or under which circumstances Mitraclip should be preferred over MT in the treatment of high-risk patients. Head-to-head real-world studies would be needed, as they would provide great and timely insights to support policy decisions when medical devices are at stake. PMID:26051009

  12. Glucose Addiction in Cancer Therapy: Advances and Drawbacks.

    PubMed

    Granja, Sara; Pinheiro, Céline; Reis, Rui Manuel; Martinho, Olga; Baltazar, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    While normal differentiated cells primarily use mitochondrial respiration to generate the required energy for cellular processes, most cancer cells rely on glycolysis, even in sufficient oxygen conditions. This phenomenon is known as the "Warburg effect" or aerobic glycolysis and the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells towards this altered energy metabolism is currently recognized as one of the "hallmarks of cancer". Aerobic glycolysis underlies the rapid growth of tumor cells, with high rates of glucose consumption and lactic acid production, leading to cellular acidosis. Metabolic reprogramming renders cancer cells dependent on specific metabolic enzymes or pathways that could be exploited in cancer therapy. The development of treatments that target tumor glucose metabolism is receiving renewed attention, with several drugs targeting metabolic pathways currently in clinical trials. The search for suitable targets, however, is limited by the high plasticity of the metabolic network that can induce compensatory routes. Deregulated glucose metabolism is a prominent feature associated with resistance to classical chemotherapy or oncogene-targeted therapies, strengthening the clinical potential of combining these therapies with glycolysis inhibitors. The aim of this review is to compare the advances of different therapeutic strategies targeting the glucose "addiction" of tumor cells, highlighting their potential as effective weapons against cancer. We further discuss recent evidence for the involvement of glucose metabolism as a compensatory response to the use of drugs that target different signaling pathways, where the combination with glycolysis inhibitors could prove extraordinarily useful. PMID:26504932

  13. Advance in Photosensitizers and Light Delivery for Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Il; Li, Jia Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The brief history of photodynamic therapy (PDT) research has been focused on photosensitizers (PSs) and light delivery was introduced recently. The appropriate PSs were developed from the first generation PS Photofrin (QLT) to the second (chlorins or bacteriochlorins derivatives) and third (conjugated PSs on carrier) generations PSs to overcome undesired disadvantages, and to increase selective tumor accumulation and excellent targeting. For the synthesis of new chlorin PSs chlorophyll a is isolated from natural plants or algae, and converted to methyl pheophorbide a (MPa) as an important starting material for further synthesis. MPa has various active functional groups easily modified for the preparation of different kinds of PSs, such as methyl pyropheophorbide a, purpurin-18, purpurinimide, and chlorin e6 derivatives. Combination therapy, such as chemotherapy and photothermal therapy with PDT, is shortly described here. Advanced light delivery system is shown to establish successful clinical applications of PDT. Phtodynamic efficiency of the PSs with light delivery was investigated in vitro and/or in vivo. PMID:23423543

  14. [Systemic therapy and hyperthermia for locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Lindner, L H; Angele, M; Dürr, H R; Rauch, J; Bruns, C

    2014-05-01

    Patients with high-risk soft tissue sarcomas (FNCLCC grades 2-3, > 5 cm and deep lying) are at a high risk of local recurrence or distant metastases despite optimal surgical tumor resection. Therefore, multimodal treatment should be considered for this difficult to treat patient group. Besides surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, hyperthermia has become a valid, complementary treatment option within multimodal treatment concepts. Hyperthermia in this context means the selective heating of the tumor region to temperatures of 40-43 °C for 60 min by microwave radiation in addition to simultaneous chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A randomized phase III study demonstrated that the addition of hyperthermia to neoadjuvant chemotherapy improved tumor response and was associated with a minimal risk of early disease progression as compared to chemotherapy alone. The addition of hyperthermia to a multimodal treatment regimen for high-risk soft tissue sarcoma consisting of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, either in the neoadjuvant or adjuvant setting after incomplete or marginal tumor resection, significantly improved local progression-free and disease-free survival. Based on these results and due to the generally good tolerability of hyperthermia, this treatment method in combination with chemotherapy should be considered as a standard treatment option within multimodal treatment approaches for locally advanced high-risk soft tissue sarcoma.

  15. European regulatory tools for advanced therapy medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Flory, Egbert; Reinhardt, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Increasing scientific knowledge and technical innovations in the areas of cell biology, biotechnology and medicine resulted in the development of promising therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of human diseases. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) reflect a complex and innovative class of biopharmaceuticals as these products are highly research-driven, characterised by innovative manufacturing processes and heterogeneous with regard to their origin, type and complexity. This class of ATMP integrates gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineering products and are often individualized and patient-specific products. Multiple challenges arise from the nature of ATMPs, which are often developed by micro, small and medium sized enterprises, university and academia, for whom regulatory experiences are limited and regulatory requirements are challenging. Regulatory guidance such as the reflection paper on classification of ATMPs and guidelines highlighting product-specific issues support academic research groups and pharmaceutical companies to foster the development of safe and effective ATMPs. This review provides an overview on the European regulatory aspects of ATMPs and highlights specific regulatory tools such as the ATMP classification procedure, a discussion on the hospital exemption for selected ATMPs as well as borderline issues towards transplants/transfusion products.

  16. Advances in stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease (Review).

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongrong; Li, Xianchi; Liu, Min; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Peying

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the primary cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, and represents a group of disorders associated with the loss of cardiac function. Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathologic mechanisms of the disease, the majority of the currently available therapies remain at best palliative, since the problem of cardiac tissue loss has not yet been addressed. Indeed, few therapeutic approaches offer direct tissue repair and regeneration, whereas the majority of treatment options aim to limit scar formation and adverse remodeling, while improving myocardial function. Of all the existing therapeutic approaches, the problem of cardiac tissue loss is addressed uniquely by heart transplantation. Nevertheless, alternative options, particularly stem cell therapy, has emerged as a novel and promising approach. This approach involves the transplantation of healthy and functional cells to promote the renewal of damaged cells and repair injured tissue. Bone marrow precursor cells were the first cell type used in clinical studies, and subsequently, preclinical and clinical investigations have been extended to the use of various populations of stem cells. This review addresses the present state of research as regards stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease.

  17. Case Study: Successful Medication Withdrawal Using Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for a Preadolescent with OCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallinen, Bethany J.; Nangle, Douglas W.; O'Grady, April C.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the addition of manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy to a medication regimen of clomipramine and fluoxetine and the withdrawal of medication during cognitive-behavioral therapy. The participant was an 11-year-old girl with symptoms of obsessive thoughts about germs and illness and…

  18. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. A class 104 license will be issued, to an... useful in the conduct of research and development activities of the types specified in section 31 of the... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research...

  19. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  20. Contributions of medical family therapy to the changing health care system.

    PubMed

    Doherty, William J; McDaniel, Susan H; Hepworth, Jeri

    2014-09-01

    Medical family therapy is a form of professional practice that uses a biopsychosocial approach and systemic family therapy principles in the collaborative treatment of individuals and families dealing with medical problems. It emerged out of the experience of family therapists working in primary medical care settings in the 1980s and 1990s. This article describes how contemporary medical family therapy can contribute to a transformed health care system in four areas: the patient experience of health care, the health of the population, the containment of health care costs, and enhanced practice environments.

  1. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Objective Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. Methods We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Results Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. Conclusion No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may

  2. Medication Reconciliation and Therapy Management in Dialysis-Dependent Patients: Need for a Systematic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Katie E.; Manley, Harold J.; St. Peter, Wendy L.; Shaffer, Rachel; Somers, Michael; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2013-01-01

    Summary Patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis have highly complex medication regimens and disproportionately higher total cost of care compared with the general Medicare population. As shown by several studies, dialysis-dependent patients are at especially high risk for medication-related problems. Providing medication reconciliation and therapy management services is critically important to avoid costs associated with medication-related problems, such as adverse drug events and hospitalizations in the ESRD population. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 included an unfunded mandate stipulating that medication therapy management be offered to high-risk patients enrolled in Medicare Part D. Medication management services are distinct from the dispensing of medications and involve a complete medication review for all disease states. The dialysis facility is a logical coordination center for medication management services, like medication therapy management, and it is likely the first health care facility that a patient will present to after a care transition. A dedicated and adequately trained clinician, such as a pharmacist, is needed to provide consistent, high-quality medication management services. Medication reconciliation and medication management services that could consistently and systematically identify and resolve medication-related problems would be likely to improve ESRD patient outcomes and reduce total cost of care. Herein, this work provides a review of available evidence and recommendations for optimal delivery of medication management services to ESRD patients in a dialysis facility-centered model. PMID:23990162

  3. Medication reconciliation and therapy management in dialysis-dependent patients: need for a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Pai, Amy Barton; Cardone, Katie E; Manley, Harold J; St Peter, Wendy L; Shaffer, Rachel; Somers, Michael; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2013-11-01

    Patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis have highly complex medication regimens and disproportionately higher total cost of care compared with the general Medicare population. As shown by several studies, dialysis-dependent patients are at especially high risk for medication-related problems. Providing medication reconciliation and therapy management services is critically important to avoid costs associated with medication-related problems, such as adverse drug events and hospitalizations in the ESRD population. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 included an unfunded mandate stipulating that medication therapy management be offered to high-risk patients enrolled in Medicare Part D. Medication management services are distinct from the dispensing of medications and involve a complete medication review for all disease states. The dialysis facility is a logical coordination center for medication management services, like medication therapy management, and it is likely the first health care facility that a patient will present to after a care transition. A dedicated and adequately trained clinician, such as a pharmacist, is needed to provide consistent, high-quality medication management services. Medication reconciliation and medication management services that could consistently and systematically identify and resolve medication-related problems would be likely to improve ESRD patient outcomes and reduce total cost of care. Herein, this work provides a review of available evidence and recommendations for optimal delivery of medication management services to ESRD patients in a dialysis facility-centered model.

  4. Response and Tolerance to Oral Vasodilator Uptitration after Intravenous Vasodilator Therapy in Advanced Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, Frederik H.; Dupont, Matthias; Finucan, Michael; Gabi, Alaa; Hawwa, Nael; Mullens, Wilfried; Taylor, David O.; Young, James B.; Starling, Randall C.; Wilson Tang, W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To assess the hemodynamic response and tolerance to aggressive oral hydralazine/isosorbide dinitrate (HYD/ISDN) uptitration after intravenous vasodilator therapy in advanced decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Methods and Results Medical records of 147 consecutive ADHF patients who underwent placement of a pulmonary artery catheter and received intravenous vasodilator therapy were reviewed. Intravenous sodium nitroprusside and sodium nitroglycerin as first-line agent for those with preserved blood pressures were utilized in 143 and 32 patients, respectively. Sixty-one percent of patients were converted to oral HYD/ISDN combination therapy through a standardized conversion protocol. These patients had a significantly higher admission mean pulmonary arterial wedge pressure compared to patients not converted (28 ± 7 versus 25 ± 8 mmHg, respectively; P-value=0.024). Beneficial hemodynamic response to decongestive therapy, defined as low cardiac filling pressures and cardiac index ≥2.20 L/min/m² without emergent hypotension, was achieved in 32% and 29% of patients who did or did not receive oral HYD/ISDN, respectively (P-value=0.762). HYD/ISDN dosing was progressively and consistently decreased up to the moment of hospital discharge and during outpatient follow-up primarily due to incident hypotension. Conclusion The use of a standardized hemodynamically-guided uptitration protocol for conversion from intravenous to oral vasodilators may warrant subsequent dose reductions upon stabilization. PMID:26213182

  5. Paired-eye comparison of medical therapies for glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Solish, Alfred M; James, Friedericke; Walt, John G; Chiang, Tina H

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate efficacy and patient preference retrospectively among intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering prostamide and prostaglandin medications in a real-world clinical setting. Methods Chart review of patients with uncontrolled glaucoma or ocular hypertension seen at a private practice clinic (n = 55) who received bimatoprost 0.03% once daily in one eye and either travoprost 0.004% or latanoprost 0.005% once daily in the fellow eye. IOP was evaluated at the initial visit and at a follow-up visit scheduled 4–6 weeks later. At the follow-up visit, each patient discussed the clinical results with their physician, chose which medication they preferred to continue using, and were queried regarding the reason for their choice. This paired-eye comparison method is used routinely in clinical practice to assess clinical response and involve patients in decisions regarding treatment. Change in mean IOP from baseline and patient medication choice were the outcome measures. Results Bimatoprost-treated eyes (n = 52) had a mean IOP reduction of 2.7 mmHg and travoprost-treated eyes (n = 47) had an average decrease of 1.7 mmHg (P = 0.230). Bimatoprost significantly reduced mean IOP (from 19.8 mmHg at baseline to 17.1 mmHg at follow-up, P < 0.0001), as did travoprost (from 19.4 mmHg at baseline to 17.7 mmHg at follow-up, P = 0.009). Latanoprost-treated eyes were excluded from the efficacy analysis due to small sample size (n = 5). For continued therapy, patients chose bimatoprost over travoprost by a factor of 2.4 to 1. Of the 15 patients who gave a reason for their choice, 80% said their decision was based primarily on IOP change. Conclusions Bimatoprost and travoprost were efficacious in reducing IOP among patients with uncontrolled glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Patients preferred bimatoprost over travoprost when trialed in fellow eyes. PMID:20957060

  6. [Research advance on clinical blood transfusion and tumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue-Bing; Zhang, Li-Ping; Wang, Yan-Ju; Ma, Cong

    2010-08-01

    Clinical blood transfusion is one of the most important supportive therapy for patients with tumor. The blood transfusion has dual effects for patients with tumor. First, blood transfusion can rectify anemia and improve oxygen saturation, accelerate oxidation and necrosis for tumor cells; the second, blood transfusion can induce immunosuppression, tumor recurrence and postoperative infection for tumor patients. Filtering white blood cells (WBC) before blood transfusion can decrease the incidence of the adverse reactions. The rational perioperative autotransfusion for patients with tumors is focus to which the world medical sciences pay close attention. In this article, the support effect of blood transfusion for treatment of tumor patients, blood transfusion and immunosuppression, blood transfusion and postoperative infection and relapse of tumor patients, depleted leukocyte blood transfusion and autologous transfusion of tumor patients are reviewed.

  7. Does adherence therapy improve medication adherence among patients with schizophrenia? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Anna; Kozel, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    Non-adherence to medication is highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. Adherence therapy aims to improve medication adherence of these patients by applying techniques of cognitive behavioural therapy, psycho-education, and motivational interviewing. Even though adherence therapy is frequently discussed and researched, its effectiveness is still uncertain. This paper aims to review the effectiveness of adherence therapy on the medication adherence of patients with schizophrenia. To this end, six electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized, controlled trials on adherence therapy from January 2002 to March 2013. Four trials met the inclusion criteria and were incorporated into the review. The findings suggest that adherence therapy does not improve patients' medication adherence in comparison to treatment as usual or a control intervention. However, all the studies reviewed showed high-adherence ratings at baseline. Thus, further well-designed studies that target adherence therapy to patients who are non-adherent to their medication are needed for a more profound understanding of its effectiveness. In addition, if adherence therapy is aimed not only at improving medication adherence, but also to reach an agreement whereby the patient's decision not to take his medication is accepted, the shared decision-making process needs to be assessed as well.

  8. Simulated Medication Therapy Management Activities in a Pharmacotherapy Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Joshua M.; Trapskin, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To measure the impact of medication therapy management (MTM) learning activities on students’ confidence and intention to provide MTM using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Design. An MTM curriculum combining lecture instruction and active-learning strategies was incorporated into a required pharmacotherapy laboratory course. Assessment. A validated survey instrument was developed to evaluate student confidence and intent to engage in MTM services using the domains comprising the Theory of Planned Behavior. Confidence scores improved significantly from baseline for all items (p < 0.00), including identification of billable services, documentation, and electronic billing. Mean scores improved significantly for all Theory of Planned Behavior items within the constructs of perceived behavioral control and subjective norms (p < 0.05). At baseline, 42% of students agreed or strongly agreed that they had knowledge and skills to provide MTM. This percentage increased to 82% following completion of the laboratory activities. Conclusion. Implementation of simulated MTM activities in a pharmacotherapy laboratory significantly increased knowledge scores, confidence measures, and scores on Theory of Planned Behavior constructs related to perceived behavioral control and subjective norms. Despite these improvements, intention to engage in future MTM services remained unchanged. PMID:21829269

  9. Intermittent hormone therapy versus continuous hormone therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, ZhiLong; Wang, Hanzhang; Xu, MengMeng; Li, Yang; Hou, MingLi; Wei, YanLing; Liu, Xingchen; Wang, ZhiPing; Xie, XiaoDong

    2015-01-01

    Few randomized studies have compared intermittent hormone therapy (IHT) with continuous hormone therapy (CHT) for the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Here, we report the results of a meta-analysis of a randomized controlled trial, evaluating the effectiveness of IHT versus CHT for patients with locally advanced PCa. Types of intervention were IHT versus CHT. The primary endpoint of this study is overall mortality and the secondary endpoints are any progression of disease, quality of life (QOL) and adverse effects between two groups. Six randomized controlled trials totaling 2996 patients were included. Results are as follows: after hormone therapy, patients undergoing IHT demonstrated no significant difference from those undergoing CHT in terms of the overall mortality (OR = 1.0, 95% CI [0.86, 1.17]) and disease progression (OR = 1.16, 95% CI [0.86, 1.57]). Men treated with IHT also reported better QOL, fewer adverse effects and considerable economic benefit for the individual and the community. With no difference in overall mortality and incidence of progression, current clinical studies confirm that both therapeutic methods were safe and effective. However, our study also takes into account QOL. When these secondary measures are considered, IHT may be a better option over CHT as patients report a more affordable treatment with improved QOL and fewer adverse effects.

  10. [Important aspects of virus safety of advanced therapy medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Blümel, J; Stühler, A

    2010-01-01

    Virus safety of advanced therapy medicinal products is a particular challenge. These products may consist of whole cells and the manufacture of these is performed using various human or animal-derived starting materials and reagents. Therefore, extensive testing of donors and of established cell banks is required. Furthermore, the virus safety of reagents such as bovine sera, porcine trypsin, and growth factors needs to be considered. Whenever possible, manufacturing steps for inactivation or removal of viruses should be introduced. However, it is not possible to introduce such steps for cell-based medicinal products as the activity and viability of cells will be compromised. Only in the production of small and stable non-enveloped viral gene vectors is it conceivable to implement steps to selectively inactivate or remove potential contaminating enveloped viruses.

  11. The progress of targeted therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although palliative chemotherapy has been shown to prolong survival and improve quality of life, the survival of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients remains poor. With the advent of targeted therapy, many molecular targeted agents have been evaluated in clinical studies. Trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, has shown activity against HER2-positive AGC and becomes the first targeted agent approved in AGC. Drugs that target epidermal growth factor receptor, including monoclonal antibody and tyrosine kinase inhibitor, do not bring survival benefit to patients with AGC. Additionally, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors are also under investigation. Ramucirumab has shown promising result. Other targeted agents are in preclinical or early clinical development, such as mammalian target of rapamycinm inhibitors and c-MET inhibitors. PMID:24330856

  12. [Anticoagulant therapy clinic: moving towards Advanced Nursing Practice].

    PubMed

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Parrado Borrego, Gema; Rodríguez González, José; Caparrós Miranda, Isabel S; Vargas Lirio, M Isabel; Ortiz Fernández, Primitiva

    2014-01-01

    There is currently around one million people receiving oral anticoagulants in Spain. The drug most used is acenocoumarol, which requires coagulation monitoring to ensure that the patient is within its normal therapeutic range. Patients usually start this treatment in a hospital clinic and, when they are stabilised, they are referred to primary care, where they are followed-up by their community nurses. The usual practice is that nurses are responsible for changes in the dose when the patients are outside the range. This practice is not performed by hospital nurses, despite having sufficient experience and knowledge to adequately manage these types of patients. An Advanced Nursing Practice model has been introduced into the Haematology management unit of the Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga. This involves various aspects of attention and care of patients on anticoagulant therapy, and includes adjusting the doses of their treatment following a catalogue of therapeutic and diagnostic ranges.

  13. Optimal management for alcoholic liver disease: Conventional medications, natural therapy or combination?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Sun; Ong, Madeleine; Qu, Xianqin

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is the principal factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is defined by histological lesions on the liver that can range from simple hepatic steatosis to more advanced stages such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure. As one of the oldest forms of liver injury known to humans, ALD is still a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality and the burden is exerting on medical systems with hospitalization and management costs rising constantly worldwide. Although the biological mechanisms, including increasing of acetaldehyde, oxidative stress with induction of cytochrome p450 2E1, inflammatory cytokine release, abnormal lipid metabolism and induction of hepatocyte apoptosis, by which chronic alcohol consumption triggers serious complex progression of ALD is well established, there is no universally accepted therapy to prevent or reverse. In this article, we have briefly reviewed the pathogenesis of ALD and the molecular targets for development of novel therapies. This review is focused on current therapeutic strategies for ALD, including lifestyle modification with nutrition supplements, available pharmacological drugs and new agents that are under development, liver transplantation, application of complementary medicines, and their combination. The relevant molecular mechanisms of each conventional medication and natural agent have been reviewed according to current available knowledge in the literature. We also summarized efficacy vs safety on conventional and herbal medicines which are specifically used for the prevention and treatment of ALD. Through a system review, this article highlighted that the combination of pharmaceutical drugs with naturally occurring agents may offer an optimal management for ALD and its complications. It is worthwhile to conduct large-scale, multiple centre clinical trials to further prove the safety and benefits for

  14. Opportunities for Regenerative Rehabilitation and Advanced Technologies in Physical Therapy: Perspective From Academia.

    PubMed

    Norland, Ryan; Muchnick, Matthew; Harmon, Zachary; Chin, Tiffany; Kakar, Rumit Singh

    2016-04-01

    As rehabilitation specialists, physical therapists must continue to stay current with advances in technologies to provide appropriate rehabilitation protocols, improve patient outcomes, and be the preferred clinician of choice. To accomplish this vision, the physical therapy profession must begin to develop a culture of lifelong learning at the early stages of education and clinical training in order to embrace cutting-edge advancements such as stem cell therapies, tissue engineering, and robotics, to name a few. The purposes of this article are: (1) to provide a current perspective on faculty and graduate student awareness of regenerative rehabilitation concepts and (2) to advocate for increased integration of these emerging technologies within the doctor of physical therapy (DPT) curriculum. An online survey was designed to gauge awareness of principles in regenerative rehabilitation and to determine whether the topic was included and assessed in doctoral curricula. The survey yielded 1,006 responses from 82 DPT programs nationwide and indicated a disconnect in familiarity with the term "regenerative rehabilitation" and awareness of the inclusion of this material in the curriculum. To resolve this disconnect, the framework of the curriculum can be used to integrate new material via guest lecturers, interdisciplinary partnerships, and research opportunities. Successfully mentoring a generation of clinicians and rehabilitation scientists who incorporate new medical knowledge and technology into their own clinical and research practice depends greatly on sharing the responsibility among graduate students, professors, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), and DPT programs. Creating an interdisciplinary culture and integrating regenerative medicine and rehabilitation concepts into the curriculum will cultivate individuals who will be advocates for interprofessional behaviors and will ensure that the profession meets the goals stated in APTA Vision 2020.

  15. Trends in Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Eligibility Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Qin, Yolanda; Young, Theo; Thomas, Zachary; Spivey, Christina A.; Solomon, David K.; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background To increase the enrollment rate of medication therapy management (MTM) programs in Medicare Part D plans, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) lowered the allowable eligibility thresholds based on the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs for Medicare Part D plans for 2010 and after. However, an increase in MTM enrollment rates has not been realized. Objectives To describe trends in MTM eligibility thresholds used by Medicare Part D plans and to identify patterns that may hinder enrollment in MTM programs. Methods This study analyzed data extracted from the Medicare Part D MTM Programs Fact Sheets (2008–2014). The annual percentages of utilizing each threshold value of the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs, as well as other aspects of MTM enrollment practices, were analyzed among Medicare MTM programs that were established by Medicare Part D plans. Results For 2010 and after, increased proportions of Medicare Part D plans set their eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. For example, in 2008, 48.7% of Medicare Part D plans (N = 347:712) opened MTM enrollment to Medicare beneficiaries with only 2 chronic disease states (specific diseases varied between plans), whereas the other half restricted enrollment to patients with a minimum of 3 to 5 chronic disease states. After 2010, only approximately 20% of plans opened their MTM enrollment to patients with 2 chronic disease states, with the remaining 80% restricting enrollment to patients with 3 or more chronic diseases. Conclusion The policy change by CMS for 2010 and after is associated with increased proportions of plans setting their MTM eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. Changes to the eligibility thresholds by Medicare Part D plans might have acted as a barrier for increased MTM enrollment. Thus, CMS may need to identify alternative strategies to increase MTM enrollment in Medicare plans. PMID:26380030

  16. Decision making on the adoption of advanced medical technology in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lan, C F

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses both the current interest in and approaches to the employment of advanced medical technology in Taiwan. It describes the formation of the national policy, including funding, reimbursement, and regulatory processes, on adopting innovative and expensive medical technologies. Using the case of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), the key players who affect organizational decision making on the adoption and diffusion of medical technology have also been analyzed. Finally, it examines some of the salient features of medical technology adoption and assessment in Taiwan, and in other countries which depend heavily upon imported advanced medical technology. It is hoped that an understanding of Taiwan's attempts to use innovative medical technology wisely while incorporating the practice of technology assessment and appropriate policies, will assist other countries with similar conditions to gain maximal benefit from technological advancement.

  17. Nanoscintillators for microscopic diagnostics of biological and medical objects and medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Nikolay V; Kedrov, Victor V; Ossipyan, Yuri A; Shmurak, Semen Z; Shmyt Ko, Ivan M; Krivko, Oksana A; Kudrenko, Elena A; Kurlov, Vladimir N; Kobelev, Nikolay P; Kiselev, Aleksander P; Bozhko, Sergei I

    2009-03-01

    The main focus of this paper is the description of qualitatively new facilities for diagnostics of biological and medical objects and medical therapy obtained by applications of nanocrystalline scintillators. These facilities are based on abilities of nanoscintillators to selective conjugation with various biomolecular objects and noticeable variations of their atomic structures, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and light-emission characteristics induced by modifications of conditions on their external surfaces. Experimental results presented in this paper provide development of detection in vivo just inside a living organism of various viruses, cancer cells, and other pathological macromolecules by means of scanning X-ray diffractometry of nanoparticles introduced into the body. These data are produced by selective adsorption of pathological bioobjects by these nanoparticles and subsequent modifications of their XRD patterns. Application of narrow collimated X-ray beams and new types of X-ray detector matrices providing microscopic spatial resolution due to usage of nanoscintillators enables determination of the regions where these pathologies are localized with high accuracy. The procedure of detection of pathological organelles by this method improves possibilities for effective destruction of these pathologies by low-dose X-ray irradiation of the places of their localization. High effectiveness of this X-ray destruction is provided by concentrated absorption of X-ray quanta by the nanoscintillators and direct transfer of the absorbed energy to the pathological objects that are attached to the absorbing particles. Constructions of 3-D radiation detector matrices providing necessary microscopic spatial and angular resolutions of X-ray imaging are described on the basis of nanoscintillators, fiber light guides, and microcapillary matrices. PMID:19304500

  18. White paper on how to go forward with cell-based advanced therapies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Erben, Reinhold G; Silva-Lima, Beatriz; Reischl, Ilona; Steinhoff, Gustav; Tiedemann, Gudrun; Dalemans, Wilfried; Vos, Alexander; Janssen, Rob T A; Le Blanc, Katarina; van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Luyten, Frank P

    2014-10-01

    The current White paper summarizes the discussions and exchange of experiences during the first European Interdisciplinary Summit on Cell-Based ATMPs held in Vienna, Austria, May 02-03, 2013. The meeting was supported by the Research Networking Programme REMEDIC (regenerative medicine) funded by the European Science Foundation and by the British Medical Research Council. To improve the competitiveness of Europe in the field of cell-based Advanced Medicinal Therapy Products (ATMPs), the following key issues were identified during the meeting: removal of national hurdles in the European Union, harmonization of national and subnational differences in Hospital Exemption rules, improved treatment algorithms for reimbursement, better knowledge on the mode of action, predictive preclinical efficacy and safety testing, need for innovative systems for preclinical testing, appropriate product characterization, manufacturing with cost of goods in mind, and appropriate design of clinical trials.

  19. Advances in the Genetics and Therapy of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chiaretti, Sabina; Gianfelici, Valentina; O'Brien, Susan M; Mullighan, Charles G

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains an important cause of morbidity in children and adults. In this article, we highlight advances in the genetics and therapy of three key subtypes of ALL: T-cell ALL, BCR-ABL1 (Philadelphia [Ph] chromosone-positive), and Ph-like ALL. T-ALL is an aggressive disease that accounts for about 15% and 25% of ALL among pediatric and adult cohorts, respectively, and exhibits a multistep nature of cancer initiation and progression. The integration of cytogenetics, molecular biology, and immunophenotype analyses has led to the identification of defined T-ALL subgroups, such as early T-cell precursor ALL and novel lesions with a prognostic role, for which specific inhibitors are being developed. Ph-positive ALL was historically regarded as a subtype of ALL with a poor prognosis, and allogeneic stem cell transplant was recommended for all patients who could undergo this procedure. The deep complete responses seen with combination tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and chemotherapy in Ph-positive ALL, and the reports of long-term survival among some patients not undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplant, has raised the question of whether there is a subset of patients who could be cured without this intervention. Ph-like ALL is a subtype of B-progenitor ALL common among older children and adults and associated with a diverse range of genetic alterations that activate kinase signaling. Ph-like ALL is also associated with poor outcome, for which precision medicine trials identifying kinase alterations and testing TKI therapy are being developed. PMID:27249738

  20. 78 FR 61363 - Correction-Scientific Information Request on Medication Therapy Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Medication Therapy Management The original date of publication for this Federal Register notice was September 17, 2013, 78 FR 57159. On this publication, the Web site that appears under ADDRESSES is incorrect...

  1. Recent advances in the rational design of silica-based nanoparticles for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niut, Yuting; Popatt, Amirali; Yu, Meihua; Karmakar, Surajit; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-10-01

    Gene therapy has attracted much attention in modern society and provides a promising approach for treating genetic disorders, diseases and cancers. Safe and effective vectors are vital tools to deliver genetic molecules to cells. This review summarizes recent advances in the rational design of silica-based nanoparticles and their applications in gene therapy. An overview of different types of genetic agents available for gene therapy is provided. The engineering of various silica nanoparticles is described, which can be used as versatile complexation tools for genetic agents and advanced gene therapy. Several challenges are raised and future research directions in the area of gene therapy using silica-based nanoparticles are proposed.

  2. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  3. Low cost biological lung volume reduction therapy for advanced emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Bakeer, Mostafa; Abdelgawad, Taha Taha; El-Metwaly, Raed; El-Morsi, Ahmed; El-Badrawy, Mohammad Khairy; El-Sharawy, Solafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR), using biological agents, is one of the new alternatives to lung volume reduction surgery. Objectives To evaluate efficacy and safety of biological BLVR using low cost agents including autologous blood and fibrin glue. Methods Enrolled patients were divided into two groups: group A (seven patients) in which autologous blood was used and group B (eight patients) in which fibrin glue was used. The agents were injected through a triple lumen balloon catheter via fiberoptic bronchoscope. Changes in high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) volumetry, pulmonary function tests, symptoms, and exercise capacity were evaluated at 12 weeks postprocedure as well as for complications. Results In group A, at 12 weeks postprocedure, there was significant improvement in the mean value of HRCT volumetry and residual volume/total lung capacity (% predicted) (P-value: <0.001 and 0.038, respectively). In group B, there was significant improvement in the mean value of HRCT volumetry and (residual volume/total lung capacity % predicted) (P-value: 0.005 and 0.004, respectively). All patients tolerated the procedure with no mortality. Conclusion BLVR using autologous blood and locally prepared fibrin glue is a promising method for therapy of advanced emphysema in term of efficacy, safety as well as cost effectiveness. PMID:27536091

  4. Advanced Biomatrix Designs for Regenerative Therapy of Periodontal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.H.; Park, C.H.; Perez, R.A.; Lee, H.Y.; Jang, J.H.; Lee, H.H.; Wall, I.B.; Shi, S.; Kim, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth-supporting apparatus, including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. A broad range of treatment options is currently available to restore the structure and function of the periodontal tissues. A regenerative approach, among others, is now considered the most promising paradigm for this purpose, harnessing the unique properties of stem cells. How to make full use of the body’s innate regenerative capacity is thus a key issue. While stem cells and bioactive factors are essential components in the regenerative processes, matrices play pivotal roles in recapitulating stem cell functions and potentiating therapeutic actions of bioactive molecules. Moreover, the positions of appropriate bioactive matrices relative to the injury site may stimulate the innate regenerative stem cell populations, removing the need to deliver cells that have been manipulated outside of the body. In this topical review, we update views on advanced designs of biomatrices—including mimicking of the native extracellular matrix, providing mechanical stimulation, activating cell-driven matrices, and delivering bioactive factors in a controllable manner—which are ultimately useful for the regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues. PMID:25139364

  5. Technological advances in renal replacement therapy: five years and beyond.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anjay; Nissenson, Allen R

    2009-12-01

    The worldwide epidemic of chronic kidney disease shows no signs of abating in the near future. Current dialysis forms of renal replacement therapy (RRT), even though successful in sustaining life and improving quality of life somewhat for patients with ESRD, have many limitations that result in still unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. Transplantation is an excellent option but is limited by the scarcity of organs. An ideal form of RRT would mimic the functions of natural kidneys and be transparent to the patient, as well as affordable to society. Recent advances in technology, although generally in early stages of development, might achieve these goals. The application of nanotechnology, microfluidics, bioreactors with kidney cells, and miniaturized sorbent systems to regenerate dialysate makes clinical reality seem closer than ever before. Finally, stem cells hold much promise, both for kidney disease and as a source of tissues and organs. In summary, nephrology is at an exciting crossroad with the application of innovative and novel technologies to RRT that hold considerable promise for the near future.

  6. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  7. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for HIV Medication Adherence and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Pickard, Robert; Otto, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    For patients with HIV, depression is a common, distressing condition that can interfere with a critical self-care behavior--adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The present study describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment designed to integrate cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression with our previously tested approach to improving adherence to…

  8. Old medications and new targeted therapies in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Vivek; Denton, Christopher P; Khanna, Dinesh

    2015-11-01

    SSc is a multiorgan disease with significant morbidity that is associated with poor health-related quality of life. Treatment of this condition is often organ based and non-curative. However, there are newer, potentially disease-modifying therapies available to treat certain aspects of the disease. This review focuses on old and new therapies in the management of SSc in clinical practice.

  9. Revolutionary advances in medical waste management. The Sanitec system.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Borel, Lise; Jensen, H Gordon; Winters, Kathryne L; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Becker, Daniel G; Chang, Dillon E; Korngold, Jonathan; Chitwood, W Randolph; Lin, Kant Y; Nichter, Larry S; Berenson, Susan; Britt, L D; Tafel, John A

    2006-01-01

    It is the purpose of this collective review to provide a detailed outline of a revolutionary medical waste disposal system that should be used in all medical centers in the world to prevent pollution of our planet from medical waste. The Sanitec medical waste disposal system consists of the following seven components: (1) an all-weather steel enclosure of the waste management system, allowing it to be used inside or outside of the hospital center; (2) an automatic mechanical lift-and-load system that protects the workers from devastating back injuries; (3) a sophisticated shredding system designed for medical waste; (4) a series of air filters including the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter; (5) microwave disinfection of the medical waste material; (6) a waste compactor or dumpster; and (7) an onboard microprocessor. It must be emphasized that this waste management system can be used either inside or outside the hospital. From start to finish, the Sanitec Microwave Disinfection system is designed to provide process and engineering controls that assure complete disinfection and destruction, while minimizing the operator's exposure to risk. There are numerous technologic benefits to the Sanitec systems, including environmental, operational, physical, and disinfection efficiency as well as waste residue disinfection. Wastes treated through the Sanitec system are thoroughly disinfected, unrecognizable, and reduced in volume by approximately 80% (saving valuable landfill space and reducing hauling requirements and costs). They are acceptable in any municipal solid waste program. Sanitec's Zero Pollution Advantage is augmented by a complete range of services, including installation, startup, testing, training, maintenance, and repair, over the life of this system. The Sanitec waste management system has essentially been designed to provide the best overall solution to the customer, when that customer actually looks at the total cost of dealing with the

  10. Revolutionary advances in medical waste management. The Sanitec system.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Borel, Lise; Jensen, H Gordon; Winters, Kathryne L; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Becker, Daniel G; Chang, Dillon E; Korngold, Jonathan; Chitwood, W Randolph; Lin, Kant Y; Nichter, Larry S; Berenson, Susan; Britt, L D; Tafel, John A

    2006-01-01

    It is the purpose of this collective review to provide a detailed outline of a revolutionary medical waste disposal system that should be used in all medical centers in the world to prevent pollution of our planet from medical waste. The Sanitec medical waste disposal system consists of the following seven components: (1) an all-weather steel enclosure of the waste management system, allowing it to be used inside or outside of the hospital center; (2) an automatic mechanical lift-and-load system that protects the workers from devastating back injuries; (3) a sophisticated shredding system designed for medical waste; (4) a series of air filters including the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter; (5) microwave disinfection of the medical waste material; (6) a waste compactor or dumpster; and (7) an onboard microprocessor. It must be emphasized that this waste management system can be used either inside or outside the hospital. From start to finish, the Sanitec Microwave Disinfection system is designed to provide process and engineering controls that assure complete disinfection and destruction, while minimizing the operator's exposure to risk. There are numerous technologic benefits to the Sanitec systems, including environmental, operational, physical, and disinfection efficiency as well as waste residue disinfection. Wastes treated through the Sanitec system are thoroughly disinfected, unrecognizable, and reduced in volume by approximately 80% (saving valuable landfill space and reducing hauling requirements and costs). They are acceptable in any municipal solid waste program. Sanitec's Zero Pollution Advantage is augmented by a complete range of services, including installation, startup, testing, training, maintenance, and repair, over the life of this system. The Sanitec waste management system has essentially been designed to provide the best overall solution to the customer, when that customer actually looks at the total cost of dealing with the

  11. Tall girls: the social shaping of a medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joyce M; Howell, Joel D

    2006-10-01

    During the latter half of the 20th century, estrogen therapy was administered to prevent otherwise healthy girls with tall stature from becoming tall adults by inhibiting further linear growth. We explore how decisions to treat tall girls with estrogen were influenced by both scientific knowledge and sociologic norms. Estrogen therapy represented the logical application of scientific knowledge regarding the role of estrogen for closure of the growth plates, but it also reflected prevailing societal and political beliefs about what it meant to be a tall girl. We discuss the rise and fall in popularity of this therapy and suggest that insight into the present-day treatment of short stature can be gained by comparing the use of estrogen therapy for tall girls with the use of growth hormone therapy for short boys. We suggest that this case study illustrates how scientific knowledge is always created and applied within a particular social context. PMID:17018462

  12. Current therapies and technological advances in aqueous aerosol drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Watts, Alan B; McConville, Jason T; Williams, Robert O

    2008-09-01

    Recent advances in aerosolization technology have led to renewed interest in pulmonary delivery of a variety of drugs. Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) and dry powder inhalers (DPIs) have experienced success in recent years; however, many limitations are presented by formulation difficulties, inefficient delivery, and complex device designs. Simplification of the formulation process as well as adaptability of new devices has led many in the pharmaceutical industry to reconsider aerosolization in an aqueous carrier. In the acute care setting, breath-enhanced air-jet nebulizers are controlling and minimizing the amount of wasted medication, while producing a high percentage of respirable droplets. Vibrating mesh nebulizers offer advantages in higher respirable fractions (RFs) and slower velocity aerosols when compared with air-jet nebulizers. Vibrating mesh nebulizers incorporating formulation and patient adaptive components provide improvements to continuous nebulization technology by generating aerosol only when it is most likely to reach the deep lung. Novel innovations in generation of liquid aerosols are now being adapted for propellant-free pulmonary drug delivery to achieve unprecedented control over dose delivered and are leading the way for the adaptation of systemic drugs for delivery via the pulmonary route. Devices designed for the metered dose delivery of insulin, morphine, sildenafil, triptans, and various peptides are all currently under investigation for pulmonary delivery to treat nonrespiratory diseases. Although these devices are currently still in clinical testing (with the exception of the Respimat), metered dose liquid inhalers (MDLIs) have already shown superior outcomes to current pulmonary and systemic delivery methods.

  13. Advanced Medical Technology Capacity Building and the Medical Mentoring Event: A Unique Application of SOF Counterinsurgency Medical Engagement Strategies.

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Dan; Tate, Charmaine; Wey, Pierre-Francois; Batjom, Emmanuel; Nicholas, Thomas A; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    Background The Medical Civic Assistance Program (MEDCAP) is a military commander?s tool developed during the Vietnam War to gain access to and positively influence an indigenous population through the provision of direct medical care provided by military medical personnel, particularly in Counter Insurgency Operations (COIN). An alternative to MEDCAPs is the medical seminar (MEDSEM). The MEDSEM uses a Commander?s military medical assets to share culturally appropriate medical information with a defined indigenous population in order to create a sustainable training resource for the local population?s health system. At the heart of the MEDSEM is the ?train the trainer? concept whereby medical information is passed to indigenous trainers who then pass that information to an indigenous population. The MEDSEM achieves the Commander?s objectives of increasing access and influence with the population through a medical training venue rather than direct patient care. Previous MEDSEMS conducted in Afghanistan by military forces focused on improvement of rural healthcare through creation of Village Health Care Workers. This model can also be used to engage host nation (HN) medical personnel and improve medical treatment capabilities in population centers. The authors describe a modification of the MEDSEM, a Medical Mentorship (MM), conducted in November 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan, at the Afghan National Army (ANA) National Medical Hospital. This training was designed to improve intubation skills in Afghan National Army Hospitals by ANA medical providers, leave residual training capability, and build relationships within the institution that not only assist the institution, but can also be leveraged to foster Commanders? objectives, such as health and reconstruction initiatives and medical partnering for indigenous corps and medical forces described below. Methods We, the authors, developed a culturally appropriate endotracheal intubation training package including a Dari and

  14. Therapy 101: A Psychotherapy Curriculum for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboul-Fotouh, Frieda; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This pilot project, designed and taught by a resident, created a curriculum to introduce medical students to the practice of psychotherapy. Medical students who are knowledgeable about psychotherapy can become physicians who are able to refer patients to psychotherapeutic treatments. A search of the literature did not identify a…

  15. Inclusion of Medical-Legal Issues in Entry-Level Occupational and Physical Therapy Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekelman, Beth A.; Goodman, Glenn; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina

    2000-01-01

    Directors of 47 occupational therapy (OT) and 65 physical therapy (PT) accredited entry-level programs responded to a survey by indicating their support for inclusion of medical-legal issues in the curriculum. Only 40% of OT and 52% of PT directors believed lawyers should deliver instruction; most felt their faculty were qualified to teach these…

  16. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, David W.; Wemple, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

  17. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.

    1999-07-06

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy is disclosed. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention. 5 figs.

  18. Advanced Medical Technology Capacity Building and the Medical Mentoring Event: A Unique Application of SOF Counterinsurgency Medical Engagement Strategies.

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Dan; Tate, Charmaine; Wey, Pierre-Francois; Batjom, Emmanuel; Nicholas, Thomas A; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    Background The Medical Civic Assistance Program (MEDCAP) is a military commander?s tool developed during the Vietnam War to gain access to and positively influence an indigenous population through the provision of direct medical care provided by military medical personnel, particularly in Counter Insurgency Operations (COIN). An alternative to MEDCAPs is the medical seminar (MEDSEM). The MEDSEM uses a Commander?s military medical assets to share culturally appropriate medical information with a defined indigenous population in order to create a sustainable training resource for the local population?s health system. At the heart of the MEDSEM is the ?train the trainer? concept whereby medical information is passed to indigenous trainers who then pass that information to an indigenous population. The MEDSEM achieves the Commander?s objectives of increasing access and influence with the population through a medical training venue rather than direct patient care. Previous MEDSEMS conducted in Afghanistan by military forces focused on improvement of rural healthcare through creation of Village Health Care Workers. This model can also be used to engage host nation (HN) medical personnel and improve medical treatment capabilities in population centers. The authors describe a modification of the MEDSEM, a Medical Mentorship (MM), conducted in November 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan, at the Afghan National Army (ANA) National Medical Hospital. This training was designed to improve intubation skills in Afghan National Army Hospitals by ANA medical providers, leave residual training capability, and build relationships within the institution that not only assist the institution, but can also be leveraged to foster Commanders? objectives, such as health and reconstruction initiatives and medical partnering for indigenous corps and medical forces described below. Methods We, the authors, developed a culturally appropriate endotracheal intubation training package including a Dari and

  19. Germ-line gene therapy and the medical imperative.

    PubMed

    Munson, Ronald; Davis, Lawrence H

    1992-06-01

    Somatic cell gene therapy has yielded promising results. If germ cell gene therapy can be developed, the promise is even greater: hundreds of genetic diseases might be virtually eliminated. But some claim the procedure is morally unacceptable. We thoroughly and sympathetically examine several possible reasons for this claim but find them inadequate. There is no moral reason, then, not to develop and employ germ-line gene therapy. Taking the offensive, we argue next that medicine has a prima facie moral obligation to do so.

  20. [Application of advanced engineering technologies to medical and rehabilitation fields].

    PubMed

    Fujie, Masakatsu

    2012-07-01

    The words "Japan syndrome" can now be heard increasingly through the media. Facing the approach of an elderly-dominated society, Robot Technology(RT)is expected to play an important role in Japan's medical, rehabilitation, and daily support fields. The industrial robot, which has already spread through the world with a great success in certain isolated environments by doing the work which is specialized for the thing with the hard known characteristic. By comparison, in the medical and rehabilitation fields, environments always change intricately, and individual characteristics differ from person to person. Furthermore, there are many times when a robot will be asked to directly interact with people. Moreover, the relation between a robot and a person turns into a relation which should involve contact flexibly according to a situation, and also turns into a relation which should avoid contact. In our group, we have so far developed practical rehabilitation and medical robots which can respond to difficulties such as environmental change and individual specificity. In developing rehabilitation robots, it is especially important to consider intuitive operability and individual differences. In addition, in developing medical robots, it is important to replace the experimental knowledge of surgeons to the mechanical quantitative properties. In this article, we introduce some practical examples of rehabilitation and medical robots interweaving several detailed technologies we have so far developed. PMID:22790039

  1. [Application of advanced engineering technologies to medical and rehabilitation fields].

    PubMed

    Fujie, Masakatsu

    2012-07-01

    The words "Japan syndrome" can now be heard increasingly through the media. Facing the approach of an elderly-dominated society, Robot Technology(RT)is expected to play an important role in Japan's medical, rehabilitation, and daily support fields. The industrial robot, which has already spread through the world with a great success in certain isolated environments by doing the work which is specialized for the thing with the hard known characteristic. By comparison, in the medical and rehabilitation fields, environments always change intricately, and individual characteristics differ from person to person. Furthermore, there are many times when a robot will be asked to directly interact with people. Moreover, the relation between a robot and a person turns into a relation which should involve contact flexibly according to a situation, and also turns into a relation which should avoid contact. In our group, we have so far developed practical rehabilitation and medical robots which can respond to difficulties such as environmental change and individual specificity. In developing rehabilitation robots, it is especially important to consider intuitive operability and individual differences. In addition, in developing medical robots, it is important to replace the experimental knowledge of surgeons to the mechanical quantitative properties. In this article, we introduce some practical examples of rehabilitation and medical robots interweaving several detailed technologies we have so far developed.

  2. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  3. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  4. POTENTIAL OF HERBAL MEDICINES IN MODERN MEDICAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hakim Mohammed

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses in this paper the potentialities of Herbal medicine in modern therapy. Also he throws some light on the importance of natural drugs which bring about cure without generation side-effects. PMID:22557447

  5. Radiation accidents and nuclear energy: medical consequences and therapy.

    PubMed

    Champlin, R E; Kastenberg, W E; Gale, R P

    1988-11-01

    After the accidents at Chernobyl, the Soviet Union, and in Goiania, Brazil, there is increasing concern about the medical risks from radiation accidents. This overview summarizes the principles of nuclear energy, the biologic effects of accidental radiation exposure, the emergency response to nuclear accidents, and approaches to treating radiation injuries. Also discussed are the related issues of reactor safety, the disposal of radioactive waste, and the proliferation of nuclear weapons. With the increasing use of radioactive materials for power, weapons, and medical diagnostics, the medical community needs to understand the health consequences of radiation exposure.

  6. Use of complementary therapies and non-prescribed medication in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, P; Johnson, M; Wallis, P

    2002-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease resort to complementary therapy and non-prescribed medication in the hope of improving their quality of life. In the US 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease reported the use of at least one form of complementary therapy for Parkinson's disease. Data for the UK are limited. A structured questionnaire was administered to consecutive patients attending a Parkinson's disease clinic. Patients were excluded if they were cognitively impaired, if they were living in an institution, or if they declined to take part. The participants were asked about current and previous use of complementary therapy in general and Parkinson's disease in particular and were presented with an extensive list of complementary therapies and non-prescribed medications. The response rate was 90% and 80 patients met the inclusion criteria. Fifty four per cent (n=44) reported the use of at least one form of complementary therapy or non-prescribed medication either for Parkinson's disease or for some other indication, of whom 31 (38.7% of the total sample) used it solely for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The most commonly used complementary therapies for Parkinson's disease were massage (n=9) and aromatherapy (n=8). Non-prescribed medication was mainly used for indications other than Parkinson's disease and the commonest drugs used were simple analgesics (n=7), cod liver oil (n=5), and multivitamins (n=4). The use of complementary therapy for Parkinson's disease correlated significantly (Pearson's r=0.44, p=0.01) with a younger age at diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Comorbidity correlated significantly with complementary therapy use for indications other than Parkinson's disease (Pearson's r=0.29, p= 0.01). The use of complementary therapy for Parkinson's disease in this UK based clinic closely mimics that in the US. Non-pharmacological complementary therapy is mainly used for Parkinson's disease, while non-prescribed medication is more commonly used for

  7. Client-Centered Advocacy: Every Occupational Therapy Practitioner's Responsibility to Understand Medical Necessity.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alyson D

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners must advocate for clients in multiple ways. The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process as well as the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics lend support to advocacy. Recognizing one's responsibility to provide advocacy for clients is different from knowing how to provide that advocacy. One aspect of health care affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the definition and implementation of medical necessity. This article outlines some major concepts around medical necessity, particularly in relation to the passage of the ACA, and outlines guidance on how to advocate effectively to meet both individual and community needs.

  8. An art therapy in-service program model for medical students and residents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rebecca Beers

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the author's experience implementing an art therapy in-service program into the training of medical students and residents in an urban hospital teaching facility. Emphasis is placed on specific aspects of planning and implementation, including formal and informal assessment, as well as methods of engaging medical students in art therapy experientials relevant to their experience as helping professionals. Benefits and challenges encountered throughout the process are also discussed. This paper is based on a presentation given at the 36th annual American Art Therapy Association conference. PMID:20539921

  9. Client-Centered Advocacy: Every Occupational Therapy Practitioner's Responsibility to Understand Medical Necessity.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alyson D

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners must advocate for clients in multiple ways. The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process as well as the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics lend support to advocacy. Recognizing one's responsibility to provide advocacy for clients is different from knowing how to provide that advocacy. One aspect of health care affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the definition and implementation of medical necessity. This article outlines some major concepts around medical necessity, particularly in relation to the passage of the ACA, and outlines guidance on how to advocate effectively to meet both individual and community needs. PMID:27548855

  10. An art therapy in-service program model for medical students and residents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rebecca Beers

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the author's experience implementing an art therapy in-service program into the training of medical students and residents in an urban hospital teaching facility. Emphasis is placed on specific aspects of planning and implementation, including formal and informal assessment, as well as methods of engaging medical students in art therapy experientials relevant to their experience as helping professionals. Benefits and challenges encountered throughout the process are also discussed. This paper is based on a presentation given at the 36th annual American Art Therapy Association conference.

  11. Eligibility For And Enrollment In Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Programs Varies By Plan Sponsor.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Bruce; Hendrick, Franklin B; Shen, Xian; Dai, Mingliang; Tom, Sarah E; Dougherty, J Samantha; Miller, Laura M

    2016-09-01

    Medicare Part D prescription drug plans must offer medication therapy management to beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions and high drug expenditures. However, plan sponsors have considerable latitude in setting eligibility criteria. Newly available data indicate that enrollment rates in medication therapy management among stand-alone prescription drug plans and Medicare Advantage drug plans averaged only 10 percent in 2012. The enrollment variation across plan sponsors-from less than 0.2 percent to more than 57.0 percent-was associated with the restrictiveness of their eligibility criteria. For example, enrollment was 16.4 percent in plans requiring two chronic conditions versus 9.2 percent in plans requiring three, and 12.7 percent in plans requiring the use of any Part D drug versus 4.4 percent in plans requiring the use of drugs in specific classes. This variation represents inequities in access to medication therapy management across plans and results in missed opportunities for interventions that might improve therapeutic outcomes and reduce spending. The new Part D Enhanced Medication Therapy Management model of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has the potential to significantly increase the impact of medication therapy management by aligning financial incentives with improvements in medication use and encouraging innovation. PMID:27605635

  12. State of the art: diagnostic tools and innovative therapies for treatment of advanced thymoma and thymic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ried, Michael; Marx, Alexander; Götz, Andrea; Hamer, Okka; Schalke, Berthold; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2016-06-01

    In this review article, state-of-the-art diagnostic tools and innovative treatments of thymoma and thymic carcinoma (TC) are described with special respect to advanced tumour stages. Complete surgical resection (R0) remains the standard therapeutic approach for almost all a priori resectable mediastinal tumours as defined by preoperative standard computed tomography (CT). If lymphoma or germ-cell tumours are differential diagnostic considerations, biopsy may be indicated. Resection status is the most important prognostic factor in thymoma and TC, followed by tumour stage. Advanced (Masaoka-Koga stage III and IVa) tumours require interdisciplinary therapy decisions based on distinctive findings of preoperative CT scan and ancillary investigations [magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] to select cases for primary surgery or neoadjuvant strategies with optional secondary resection. In neoadjuvant settings, octreotide scans and histological evaluation of pretherapeutic needle biopsies may help to choose between somatostatin agonist/prednisolone regimens and neoadjuvant chemotherapy as first-line treatment. Finally, a multimodality treatment regime is recommended for advanced and unresectable thymic tumours. In conclusion, advanced stage thymoma and TC should preferably be treated in experienced centres in order to provide all modern diagnostic tools (imaging, histology) and innovative therapy techniques. Systemic and local (hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy) medical treatments together with extended surgical resections have increased the therapeutic options in patients with advanced or recurrent thymoma and TC.

  13. “Keeping the Boogie Man Away”: Medication Self-Management among Women Receiving Anastrozole Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wickersham, Karen; Happ, Mary Beth; Bender, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The oral hormonal agent anastrozole improves clinical outcomes for women with breast cancer, but women have difficulty taking it for the five-year course. The unique medication-taking experiences related to self-management of anastrozole therapy for women with early stage breast cancer are not known. Our purpose was to describe the medication-taking experiences for postmenopausal women with early stage breast cancer who were prescribed a course of anastrozole therapy. Twelve women aged 58 to 67 years, midway through therapy, participated in audio-recorded interviews. Women's medication-taking experiences involved a belief in their importance and an imperative to take anastrozole. We found that women's side effect experiences, particularly menopausal symptoms, were significant, but only one woman stopped anastrozole due to side effects. Medication-taking included routinization interconnected with remembering/forgetting and a storage strategy. Some women noted a mutual medication-taking experience with their spouse, but most felt taking anastrozole was something they had to do alone. Our results provide insight into the way some women with early stage breast cancer manage their hormonal therapy at approximately the midpoint of treatment. Next steps should include examinations of patient-provider communication, potential medication-taking differences between pre- and postmenopausal women, and the effects of medication-taking on clinical outcomes. PMID:23326655

  14. Advanced Respite Care: Medically Challenged. Teacher Edition. Respite Care Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide is designed to help teachers to provide advanced-level training for care providers who want to work with individuals who are chronically or terminally ill and require specialized care. The curriculum contains seven units. Each of the instructional units includes some or all of these basic components: performance objectives,…

  15. Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

  16. Graphene-based nanovehicles for photodynamic medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Dong, Haiqing; Li, Yongyong; Shi, Donglu

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives such as graphene oxide (GO) have been widely explored as promising drug delivery vehicles for improved cancer treatment. In this review, we focus on their applications in photodynamic therapy. The large specific surface area of GO facilitates efficient loading of the photosensitizers and biological molecules via various surface functional groups. By incorporation of targeting ligands or activatable agents responsive to specific biological stimulations, smart nanovehicles are established, enabling tumor-triggering release or tumor-selective accumulation of photosensitizer for effective therapy with minimum side effects. Graphene-based nanosystems have been shown to improve the stability, bioavailability, and photodynamic efficiency of organic photosensitizer molecules. They have also been shown to behave as electron sinks for enhanced visible-light photodynamic activities. Owing to its intrinsic near infrared absorption properties, GO can be designed to combine both photodynamic and photothermal hyperthermia for optimum therapeutic efficiency. Critical issues and future aspects of photodynamic therapy research are addressed in this review.

  17. Fertility preservation for boys and adolescents facing sterilizing medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Ahmed A.; Tran, Nam D.

    2014-01-01

    Improvements in childhood cancer survival have allowed boys and their families to increasingly focus on quality of life after therapy, particularly their future ability to father children. Treatments should maintain comprehensive cancer care goals and consider the long-term quality of life of these children. While semen cryopreservation is a well-established method of fertility preservation for post-pubertal children, the use of cryopreserved pre-treatment testicular tissue represents a promising, yet experimental method of fertility preservation for prepubertal males facing sterilizing therapy. Healthcare providers should counsel families about the fertility risks of therapy, discuss or refer patients for standard fertility preservation options, and consider experimental approaches to fertility preservation while being mindful of the ethical questions these treatments raise. PMID:26816794

  18. Surgery is an essential component of multimodality therapy for patients with locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Correa, Arlene M.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Welsh, James W.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CXRT) has raised questions regarding the additional benefit of surgery after locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma patients achieve a clinical response to CXRT. We sought to quantify the value of surgery by comparing the overall (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of trimodality eligible patients treated with definitive CXRT versus CXRT followed by esophagectomy. Methods We identified 143 clinical stage III esophageal adenocarcinoma patients that were eligible for trimodality therapy. All patients successfully completed neoadjuvant CXRT and were considered appropriate candidates for resection. Patients that were medically inoperable were excluded. Cox regression models were used to identify significant predictors of survival. Results Among the 143 patients eligible for surgery after completing CXRT, 114 underwent resection and 29 did not. Poorly differentiated tumors (HR=2.041, 95% CI 1.235–3.373) and surgical resection (HR=0.504, 95% CI 0.283–0.899) were the only independent predictors of OS. Patients treated with surgery had a 50% and 54% risk reduction in overall and cancer-specific mortality, respectively. Median OS (41.2 months vs. 20.3 months, p=0.012) and DFS (21.5 months vs. 11.4 months, p=0.007) were significantly improved with the addition of surgery compared to definitive CXRT. Conclusions Surgery provides a significant survival benefit to trimodality-eligible esophageal adenocarcinoma patients with locally advanced disease. PMID:23715646

  19. Medical therapy of stricturing Crohn’s disease: what the gut can learn from other organs - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic remitting and relapsing disease. Fibrostenosing complications such as intestinal strictures, stenosis and ultimately obstruction are some of its most common long-term complications. Despite recent advances in the pathophysiological understanding of CD and a significant improvement of anti-inflammatory therapeutics, medical therapy for stricturing CD is still inadequate. No specific anti-fibrotic therapy exists and the incidence rate of strictures has essentially remained unchanged. Therefore, the current therapy of established fibrotic strictures comprises mainly endoscopic dilation as well as surgical approaches. However, these treatment options are associated with major complications as well as high recurrence rates. Thus, a specific anti-fibrotic therapy for CD is urgently needed. Importantly, there is now a growing body of evidence for prevention as well as effective medical treatment of fibrotic diseases of other organs such as the skin, lung, kidney and liver. In face of the similarity of molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis across these organs, translation of therapeutic approaches from other fibrotic diseases to the intestine appears to be a promising treatment strategy. In particular transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) neutralization, selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors, blockade of components of the renin-angiotensin system, IL-13 inhibitors and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have emerged as potential drug candidates for anti-fibrotic therapy and may retard progression or even reverse established intestinal fibrosis. However, major challenges have to be overcome in the translation of novel anti-fibrotics into intestinal fibrosis therapy, such as the development of appropriate biomarkers that predict the development and accurately monitor therapeutic responses. Future clinical studies are a prerequisite to evaluate the optimal timing for anti-fibrotic treatment approaches, to elucidate the best

  20. Recent Advances in Molecular Image-Guided Cancer Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Duo; Sun, Xianlei; Gao, Liquan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-targeted radionuclide therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of a wide variety of malignancies, especially those resistant to conventional therapies. However, to improve the use of targeted radionuclide therapy for the management of cancer patients, the in vivo behaviors, dosimetry, and efficacy of radiotherapeutic agents need to be well characterized and monitored. Molecular imaging, which is a powerful tool for the noninvasive characterization and quantification of biological processes in living subjects at the cellular and molecular levels, plays an important role in the guidance of cancer radionuclide therapy. In this review, we introduce the radiotherapeutics for cancer-targeted therapy and summarize the most recent evidence supporting the use of molecular imaging to guide cancer radionuclide therapy.

  1. [Research advances on medical genetics in China in 2015].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanfeng; Han, Yubo; Cao, Pengbo; Meng, Jinfeng; Li, Haibei; Qin, Geng; Zhang, Feng; Jin, Guangfu; Yang, Yong; Wu, Lingqian; Ping, Jie; Zhou, Gangqiao

    2016-05-01

    Steady progress has been achieved in the medical genetics in China in 2015, as numerous original researches were published in the world's leading journals. Chinese scientists have made significant contributions to various fields of medical genetics, such as pathogenicity of rare diseases, predisposition of common diseases, somatic mutations of cancer, new technologies and methods, disease-related microRNAs (miRNAs), disease-related long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), disease-related competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs), disease-related RNA splicing and molecular evolution. In these fields, Chinese scientists have gradually formed the tendency, from common variants to rare variants, from single omic analyses to multipleomics integration analyses, from genetic discovery to functional confirmation, from basic research to clinical application. Meanwhile, the findings of Chinese scientists have been drawn great attentions of international peers. This review aims to provide an overall picture of the front in Chinese medical genetics, and highlights the important findings and their research strategy.

  2. Present and future evolution of advanced breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although the introduction of novel therapies and drug combinations has improved the prognosis of metastatic breast cancer, the disease remains incurable. Increased knowledge of the biology and the molecular alterations in breast cancer has facilitated the design of targeted therapies. These agents include receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (epidermal growth factor receptor family), intracellular signaling pathways (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin) angiogenesis inhibitors and agents that interfere with DNA repair (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors). In the present review, we present the most promising studies of these new targeted therapies and novel combinations of targeted therapies with cytotoxic agents. PMID:21050422

  3. [DGRW-update: exercise therapy in medical rehabilitation--effects, quality, perspectives].

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, K; Sudeck, G; Brüggemann, S; Huber, G

    2010-08-01

    Exercise therapy constitutes the better part of rehabilitative treatment. However, in rehabilitation research the scientific analysis of exercise therapy only plays a minor role. Taking the theoretical model of rehabilitation and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) into account, we propose a heuristic model of aims and effects of exercise therapy and define a system of methodological target setting. This system offers a background for an expanded scientific discussion about biopsychosocial determinants and effects of exercise therapy as well as quality development and the evaluation of exercise treatment concepts within and across indications in the context of multimodal medical rehabilitation. PMID:20677118

  4. Medical Skepticism and Complementary Therapy Use among Older Rural African-Americans and Whites

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ronny A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Quandt, Sara A.; Neiberg, Rebecca; Lang, Wei; Nguyen, Ha; Altizer, Kathryn P.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study documents demographic, health, and complementary therapy (CT) correlates of medical skepticism among rural older adults. Methods Older (≥65 years) African Americans and Whites in rural North Carolina (N=198) were interviewed. Medical skepticism was assessed using the four items from the Medical Expenditure Survey. Bivariate associations between medical skepticism and demographic and health characteristics and CT use were assessed, and independent effects on CT use. Findings Positive responses to medical skepticism questions ranged from 19.7% (can overcome illness without help) to 59.6% (believes own behavior determines their health). Medical skepticism indicators were associated with few demographic and health characteristics, and one CT category. Conclusions This study shows a high degree of medical skepticism among rural older adults, but limited associations with demographic and health characteristics and CT use. Further research is needed to understand relationships of attitudes towards conventional care and CT use in this population. PMID:23728044

  5. Steady advance of stem cell therapies: report from the 2011 World Stem Cell Summit, Pasadena, California, October 3-5.

    PubMed

    Swan, Melanie

    2011-12-01

    Stem cell research and related therapies (including regenerative medicine and cellular therapies) could have a significant near-term impact on worldwide public health and aging. One reason is the industry's strong linkage between policy, science, industry, and patient advocacy, as was clear in the attendance and programming at the 7(th) annual World Stem Cell Summit held in Pasadena, California, October 3-5, 2011. A special conference session sponsored by the SENS Foundation discussed how stem cell therapies are being used to extend healthy life span. Stem cells are useful not only in cell-replacement therapies, but also in disease modeling, drug discovery, and drug toxicity screening. Stem cell therapies are currently being applied to over 50 diseases, including heart, lung, neurodegenerative, and eye disease, cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Dozens of companies are developing therapeutic solutions that are in different stages of clinical use and clinical trials. Some high-profile therapies include Dendreon's Provenge for prostate cancer, Geron's first-ever embryonic stem cell trials for spinal cord injury, Fibrocell's laViv cellular therapy for wrinkles, and well-established commercial skin substitutes (Organogenesis' Apligraf and Advanced BioHealing's Dermagraft). Stem cell policy issues under consideration include medical tourism, standards for large-scale stem cell manufacturing, and lingering ethical debates over the use of embryonic stem cells. Contemporary stem cell science advances include a focus on techniques for the direct reprogramming of cells from one lineage to another without returning to pluripotency as an intermediary step, improved means of generating and characterizing induced pluripotent cells, and progress in approaches to neurodegenerative disease.

  6. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Margalit, Danielle N.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)-conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique. There

  7. Fostering a culture of interprofessional education for radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, Charlotte Miller, Seth; Church, Jessica; Chen, Ronald C.; Muresan, Petronella A.; Adams, Robert D.

    2014-04-01

    A less-studied aspect of radiation therapy and medical dosimetry education is experiential learning through attendance at interprofessional conferences. University of North Carolina radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students regularly attended morning conferences and daily pretreatment peer review, including approximately 145 hours of direct interaction with medical attending physicians and residents, medical physicists, and other faculty. We herein assessed the effect of their participation in these interprofessional conferences on knowledge and communication. The students who graduated from our radiation therapy and medical dosimetry programs who were exposed to the interprofessional education initiative were compared with those who graduated in the previous years. The groups were compared with regard to their knowledge (as assessed by grades on end-of-training examinations) and team communication (assessed via survey). The results for the 2 groups were compared via exact tests. There was a trend for the examination scores for the 2012 cohort to be higher than for the 2007 to 2011 groups. Survey results suggested that students who attended the interprofessional education sessions were more comfortable speaking with attending physicians, residents, physicists, and faculty compared with earlier students who did not attend these educational sessions. Interprofessional education, particularly vertical integration, appears to provide an enhanced educational experience both in regard to knowledge (per the examination scores) and in building a sense of communication (via the survey results). Integration of interprofessional education into radiation therapy and medical dosimetry educational programs may represent an opportunity to enrich the learning experience in multiple ways and merits further study.

  8. Electron beam ion sources for use in second generation synchrotrons for medical particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Zschornack, G; Ritter, E; Schmidt, M; Schwan, A

    2014-02-01

    Cyclotrons and first generation synchrotrons are the commonly applied accelerators in medical particle therapy nowadays. Next generation accelerators such as Rapid Cycling Medical Synchrotrons (RCMS), direct drive accelerators, or dielectric wall accelerators have the potential to improve the existing accelerator techniques in this field. Innovative accelerator concepts for medical particle therapy can benefit from ion sources which meet their special requirements. In the present paper we report on measurements with a superconducting Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIS-SC, under the aspect of application in combination with RCMS as a well proven technology. The measurements indicate that this ion source can offer significant advantages for medical particle therapy. We show that a superconducting EBIS can deliver ion pulses of medically relevant ions such as protons, C(4 +) and C(6 +) ions with intensities and frequencies required for RCMS [S. Peggs and T. Satogata, "A survey of Hadron therapy accelerator technology," in Proceedings of PAC07, BNL-79826- 2008-CP, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, 2007; A. Garonna, U. Amaldi et al., "Cyclinac medical accelerators using pulsed C(6 +)/H2(+) ion sources," in Proceedings of EBIST 2010, Stockholm, Sweden, July 2010]. Ion extraction spectra as well as individual ion pulses have been measured. For example, we report on the generation of proton pulses with up to 3 × 10(9) protons per pulse and with frequencies of up to 1000 Hz at electron beam currents of 600 mA.

  9. Advances in osteoporosis therapy. 2003 update of practical guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Aliya

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review evidence for current therapies for postmenopausal osteoporosis and to establish practical guidelines for management of osteoporosis by family physicians. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched from January 1990 to January 2003. Articles retrieved were graded by level of evidence (I to III). Recommendations for diagnosis and therapy were based on evidence from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. MAIN MESSAGE: Osteoporosis is treatable. Early diagnosis and intervention is recommended. After excluding secondary causes of osteoporosis, physicians should advise patients to take appropriate calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Those with osteopenia at risk of fractures and those with established osteoporosis need additional therapy. CONCLUSION: Approved pharmacologic therapies include alendronate, risedronate, raloxifene, calcitonin, cyclical etidronate, and hormone replacement therapy. Family physicians can help with early diagnosis and intervention and should discuss lifestyle modification with patients. PMID:12729240

  10. Medical advances in the treatment of postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ducloy-Bouthors, Anne-Sophie; Susen, Sophie; Wong, Cynthia A; Butwick, Alex; Vallet, Benoit; Lockhart, Evelyn

    2014-11-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Recent advances in the management of severe bleeding for trauma patients may provide insight into PPH management, but must be applied with caution considering the significant differences between trauma and obstetric patients. In this review, we summarized evidence for current management strategies for patients with major obstetric hemorrhage, including (1) rapid laboratory assessment of coagulopathy, (2) early transfusion of plasma and high plasma-to-red blood cell transfusion ratios in massive PPH, and (3) use of tranexamic acid and fibrinogen concentrates in the setting of PPH complicated by coagulopathy.

  11. [Cost-effective medical therapy of hepatitis C employing novel compensation models - pay for cure].

    PubMed

    Foerster, F; Wörns, M A; Galle, P R; Schattenberg, J M

    2015-12-01

    Direct acting antivirals (DAAs) have increased cure rates for chronic hepatitis C infection up to nearly 100 %. At the same time treatment costs have risen significantly. Treating all HCV infected patients in Germany with DAAs would generate medication costs ranging between 19 and 37 billion EUR depending on the drug regimen used. Expenses in patients who fail to respond to treatment would amount to approximately 0.9 to 2.15 billion EUR. In difficult to treat patient populations that are characterized by prior failure to treatment or advanced liver disease, lost drug expenses are particularly high due to lower cure rates and longer treatment duration. Outcome-based reimbursement schemes are used to improve the quality of care and to reduce costs in the health care system. In Germany, disease management programs have been implemented for defined chronic diseases. However, drug reimbursement is still based on packages sold (pay for pill). In this context, it would be appealing to link reimbursement and treatment success (pay for cure) in order to reward successful treatment, limit lost drug spending and develop a shared risk environment that would involve all concerned parties. Under the assumption that 20,000 patients with HCV are treated each year in Germany and that cure rates are 95.4 %, the saved treatment costs would amount up to 45 and 107 million EUR per year. By this approach, economic incentives to withhold therapy from difficult to treat patients could be avoided. PMID:26666278

  12. Graphene-based nanovehicles for photodynamic medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Dong, Haiqing; Li, Yongyong; Shi, Donglu

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives such as graphene oxide (GO) have been widely explored as promising drug delivery vehicles for improved cancer treatment. In this review, we focus on their applications in photodynamic therapy. The large specific surface area of GO facilitates efficient loading of the photosensitizers and biological molecules via various surface functional groups. By incorporation of targeting ligands or activatable agents responsive to specific biological stimulations, smart nanovehicles are established, enabling tumor-triggering release or tumor-selective accumulation of photosensitizer for effective therapy with minimum side effects. Graphene-based nanosystems have been shown to improve the stability, bioavailability, and photodynamic efficiency of organic photosensitizer molecules. They have also been shown to behave as electron sinks for enhanced visible-light photodynamic activities. Owing to its intrinsic near infrared absorption properties, GO can be designed to combine both photodynamic and photothermal hyperthermia for optimum therapeutic efficiency. Critical issues and future aspects of photodynamic therapy research are addressed in this review. PMID:25848263

  13. The use of medical orders in acute care oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming; Elliott, Malcolm

    The life of every living organism is sustained by the presence of oxygen and the acute deprivation of oxygen will, therefore, result in hypoxia and ultimately death. Although oxygen is normally present in the air, higher concentrations are required to treat many disease processes. Oxygen is therefore considered to be a drug requiring a medical prescription and is subject to any law that covers its use and prescription. Administration is typically authorized by a physician following legal written instructions to a qualified nurse. This standard procedure helps prevent incidence of misuse or oxygen deprivation which could worsen the patients hypoxia and ultimate outcome. Delaying the administration of oxygen until a written medical prescription is obtained could also have the same effect. Clearly, defined protocols should exist to allow for the legal administration of oxygen by nurses without a physicians order because any delay in administering oxygen to patients can very well lead to their death. PMID:19377391

  14. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  15. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye.

    PubMed

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future.

  16. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Michael A; Simon, Elias D; Little, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  17. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Michael A.; Simon, Elias D.; Little, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  18. Argon gas: a potential neuroprotectant and promising medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Nowrangi, Derek S; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2014-02-17

    Argon is a noble gas element that has demonstrated narcotic and protective abilities that may prove useful in the medical field. The earliest records of argon gas have exposed its ability to exhibit narcotic symptoms at hyperbaric pressures greater than 10 atmospheres with more recent evidence seeking to display argon as a potential neuroprotective agent. The high availability and low cost of argon provide a distinct advantage over using similarly acting treatments such as xenon gas. Argon gas treatments in models of brain injury such as in vitro Oxygen-Glucose-Deprivation (OGD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), as well as in vivo Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO) have largely demonstrated positive neuroprotective behavior. On the other hand, some warning has been made to potential negative effects of argon treatments in cases of ischemic brain injury, where increases of damage in the sub-cortical region of the brain have been uncovered. Further support for argon use in the medical field has been demonstrated in its use in combination with tPA, its ability as an organoprotectant, and its surgical applications. This review seeks to summarize the history and development of argon gas use in medical research as mainly a neuroprotective agent, to summarize the mechanisms associated with its biological effects, and to elucidate its future potential.

  19. Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of Jaws: A Low-Level Laser Therapy and Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Case Approach

    PubMed Central

    Minamisako, Mariana Comparotto; Lisboa, Mariáh Luz; Mariela Rodríguez Cordeiro, Mabel; Grando, Liliane Janete

    2016-01-01

    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) can be considered an inability of the alveolar bone to respond to an injury, which frequently leads to severe local and systemic complications. Once the problem is installed, dentist must use all therapeutic approaches recommended. This manuscript reports a successful management of MRONJ handled with antibiotics, conservative debridement, low-level laser therapy (LLLT), and photodynamic therapy (PDT) up to 12 months. As healing of MRONJ may be very slow, combined therapeutic approaches are required. Besides the recommended conventional treatment protocol, LLLT and PDT are important tools to contribute to healing and improvement of patient's quality of life.

  20. Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of Jaws: A Low-Level Laser Therapy and Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Case Approach

    PubMed Central

    Minamisako, Mariana Comparotto; Lisboa, Mariáh Luz; Mariela Rodríguez Cordeiro, Mabel; Grando, Liliane Janete

    2016-01-01

    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) can be considered an inability of the alveolar bone to respond to an injury, which frequently leads to severe local and systemic complications. Once the problem is installed, dentist must use all therapeutic approaches recommended. This manuscript reports a successful management of MRONJ handled with antibiotics, conservative debridement, low-level laser therapy (LLLT), and photodynamic therapy (PDT) up to 12 months. As healing of MRONJ may be very slow, combined therapeutic approaches are required. Besides the recommended conventional treatment protocol, LLLT and PDT are important tools to contribute to healing and improvement of patient's quality of life. PMID:27668100

  1. Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of Jaws: A Low-Level Laser Therapy and Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Case Approach.

    PubMed

    Minamisako, Mariana Comparotto; Ribeiro, Guilherme Henrique; Lisboa, Mariáh Luz; Mariela Rodríguez Cordeiro, Mabel; Grando, Liliane Janete

    2016-01-01

    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) can be considered an inability of the alveolar bone to respond to an injury, which frequently leads to severe local and systemic complications. Once the problem is installed, dentist must use all therapeutic approaches recommended. This manuscript reports a successful management of MRONJ handled with antibiotics, conservative debridement, low-level laser therapy (LLLT), and photodynamic therapy (PDT) up to 12 months. As healing of MRONJ may be very slow, combined therapeutic approaches are required. Besides the recommended conventional treatment protocol, LLLT and PDT are important tools to contribute to healing and improvement of patient's quality of life. PMID:27668100

  2. Advanced ESPI-based medical instruments for otolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castracane, James; Conerty, M.; Cacace, Anthony T.; Gardner, Glendon M.; Miller, Mitchell B.; Parnes, Steven M.

    1993-05-01

    Optical fibers have long been used for visual inspection inside the human body for medical diagnoses and treatment. By making use of sophisticated optical interferometric and ultra- small imaging techniques, combined with automated image processing, it is possible to extract significantly increased information for more accurate medical diagnoses. With support from NIH under the SBIR program, we have been developing a range of such instruments. One of these supported by the NIDCD is capable of providing detailed spatial information on the vibratory response of the tympanic membrane (TM). This instrument involves the examination of the TM by means of high speed electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI). This provides a real time view of the vibration patterns of the TM for clinical diagnosis. This Interferometric Otoscope consists of mode conserving fiber optics, miniature diode lasers and high speed solid state detector arrays. We present the current status of the research including holography and ESPI of TM models and excised temporal bone preparations. A second instrument, also developed with support from NIDCD, is for application to the larynx. This system is also ESPI based but will incorporate features for direct vocal cord (VC) examination. By careful examination of the vibratory response of the VC during phonation, the characteristics of the mucosal wave may be examined. Adynamic regions of the cords can signal the start of lesions or cysts. Results of surgery can be evaluated in a quantitative manner. The design of a clinical prototype and preliminary electro-optic experiments on excised larynges and VC models will be presented.

  3. Economic Evaluation of Endoscopic Sinus Surgery versus Continued Medical Therapy for Refractory Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Rudmik, Luke; Soler, Zachary M.; Mace, Jess C.; Schlosser, Rodney J.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) compared to continued medical therapy for patients with refractory chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Study Design Cohort-style Markov decision tree economic evaluation Methods The economic perspective was the US third party payer with a 30 year time horizon. The two comparative treatment strategies were: 1) ESS followed by appropriate postoperative medical therapy and 2) continued medical therapy alone. Primary outcome was the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Costs were discounted at a rate of 3.5% in the reference case. Multiple sensitivity analyses were performed including differing time-horizons, discounting scenarios, and a probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA). Results The reference case demonstrated that the ESS strategy cost a total of $48,838.38 and produced a total of 20.50 QALYs. The medical therapy alone strategy cost a total of $28,948.98 and produced a total of 17.13 QALYs. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) for ESS versus medical therapy alone is $5,901.90 per QALY. The cost-effectiveness acceptability curve from the PSA demonstrated that there is 74% certainty that the ESS strategy is the most cost-effective decision for any willingness to pay threshold greater then $25,000. The time horizon analysis suggests that ESS becomes the cost-effective intervention within the 3rd year after surgery. Conclusion Results from this study suggest that employing an ESS treatment strategy is the most cost-effective intervention compared to continued medical therapy alone for the long-term management of patients with refractory CRS. PMID:25186499

  4. Predictors of Medication-Related Problems Among Medicaid Patients Participating in a Pharmacist-Provided Telephonic Medication Therapy Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Margie E.; Frail, Caitlin K.; Jaynes, Heather; Pater, Karen S.; Zillich, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective To identify predictors of medication-related problems (MRPs) among Medicaid patients participating in a telephonic medication therapy management (MTM) program. Design Retrospective analysis of data from patients enrolled in a previously published study Data Sources Two Medicaid administrative claims file databases (for healthcare utilization and prescription dispensing information) and one pharmacy organization file for MTM program information. Patients Seven hundred twelve adult Medicaid patients who participated in a statewide pharmacist-provided telephone-based MTM program and who received an initial medication therapy review. Measurements and Main Results The primary dependent variable was the number of MRPs detected during the initial medication therapy review. Secondary dependent variables were the detection of one or more MRPs related to indication, effectiveness, safety, and adherence. Predictor variables were selected a priori that, from the literature and our own practice experiences, were hypothesized as being potentially associated with MRPs: demographics, comorbidities, medication use, and healthcare utilization. Bivariate analyses were performed, and multivariable models were constructed. All predictor variables with significant associations (defined a priori as p<0.1) with the median number of MRPs detected were then entered into a three-block multiple linear regression model. The overall model was significant (p<0.001, R2= 0.064). Significant predictors of any MRPs (p<0.05) were total number of medications, obesity, dyslipidemia, and one or more emergency department visits in the past 3 months. For indication-related MRPs, the model was significant (p<0.001, R2= 0.049), and predictors included female sex, obesity, dyslipidemia, and total number of medications (p<0.05). For effectiveness-related MRPs, the model was significant (p<0.001, R2= 0.054), and predictors included bone disease and dyslipidemia (p<0.05). For safety-related MRPs

  5. Maggot Debridement Therapy: Advancing to the Past in Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Kelsey; Steinwedel, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is experiencing resurgence as an effective alternative to conventional mechanical debridement in nonhealing wounds, especially those with antibiotic-resistant organisms. MDT has antibiotic, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. Military use is on the rise.

  6. Advanced Interventional Therapy for Radiation-Induced Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea, aortic stenosis, and coronary artery disease—typical side effects of radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. A poor candidate for surgery, she underwent successful high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention and subsequent transcatheter aortic valve replacement. This report highlights some of the cardiovascular-specific sequelae of radiation therapy for cancer treatment; in addition, possible directions for future investigations are discussed. PMID:27547140

  7. Hospital based superconducting cyclotron for neutron therapy: Medical physics perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudelev, M.; Burmeister, J.; Blosser, E.; Maughan, R. L.; Kota, C.

    2001-12-01

    The neutron therapy facility at the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center, Harper University Hospital in Detroit has been operational since September 1991. The d(48.5)+Be beam is produced in a gantry mounted superconducting cyclotron designed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Measurements were performed in order to obtain the physical characteristics of the neutron beam and to collect the data necessary for treatment planning. This included profiles of the dose distribution in a water phantom, relative output factors and the design of various beam modifiers, i.e., wedges and tissue compensators. The beam was calibrated in accordance with international protocol for fast neutron dosimetry. Dosimetry and radiobiology intercomparions with three neutron therapy facilities were performed prior to clinical use. The radiation safety program was established in order to monitor and reduce the exposure levels of the personnel. The activation products were identified and the exposure in the treatment room was mapped. A comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program was developed to sustain safe and reliable operation of the unit at treatment standards comparable to those for conventional photon radiation. The program can be divided into three major parts: maintenance of the cyclotron and related hardware; QA of the neutron beam dosimetry and treatment delivery; safety and radiation protection. In addition the neutron beam is used in various non-clinical applications. Among these are the microdosimetric characterization of the beam, the effects of tissue heterogeneity on dose distribution, the development of boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy and variety of radiobiology experiments.

  8. Advanced practice nursing students in the patient-centered medical home: preparing for a new reality.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Kathryn; Murphy, Marcia Pencak; Dreher, Melanie C; Behal, Raj; Haines, Alison; Ryan, Mary; Ryan, Norman; Saba, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Driven by reimbursement incentives for increased access, improved quality and reduced cost, the patient-centered medical home model of health care delivery is being adopted in primary care practices across the nation. The transition from traditional primary care models to patient-centered medical homes presents many challenges, including the assembly of a well-prepared, interprofessional provider team to achieve effective, well-coordinated care. In turn, advanced practice nursing education programs are challenged to prepare graduates who are qualified for practice in the new reality of health care reform. This article reviews the patient-centered medical home model and describes how one college of nursing joined 7 primary care physician practices to prepare advanced practice nursing students for the new realities of health care reform while supporting each practice in its transition to the patient-centered medical home. PMID:24720942

  9. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events.

  10. The current format and ongoing advances of medical education in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gishen, Kriya; Ovadia, Steven; Arzillo, Samantha; Avashia, Yash; Thaller, Seth R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the current system of medical education along with the advances that are being made to support the demands of a changing health care system. American medical education must reform to anticipate the future needs of a changing health care system. Since the dramatic transformations to medical education that followed the publication of the Flexner report in 1910, medical education in the United States has largely remained unaltered. Today, the education of future physicians is undergoing modifications at all levels: premedical education, medical school, and residency training. Advances are being made with respect to curriculum design and content, standardized testing, and accreditation milestones. Fields such as plastic surgery are taking strides toward improving resident training as the next accreditation system is established. To promote more efficacious medical education, the American Medical Association has provided grants for innovations in education. Likewise, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlined 6 core competencies to standardize the educational goals of residency training. Such efforts are likely to improve the education of future physicians so that they are able to meet the future needs of American health care.

  11. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events. PMID:25868677

  12. [Dyslipidemia management with medical nutrition therapy: current status and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Sucato, Vincenzo; Triolo, Oreste Fabio; Bronte, Enrico; Trovato, Rosaria Linda; Tona, Giuseppe Riccardo; Novo, Salvatore

    2013-09-01

    In Italy, patients with dyslipidemia account for 15-20% of the adult population with major healthcare and socio-economic impact. According to the ESC/EAS guidelines for the management of dyslipidemias, desirable cholesterol and triglyceride levels can be achieved with a synergy between drug treatment and adequate diet therapy. However, what diets should be adopted? In this review article, different types of dietary treatments are compared, with a special focus on diet education. The new scientific frontier of nutrigenetics is also discussed.

  13. LED-array light source for medical therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.; Ignatius, Ronald W.

    1993-07-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) array light sources currently in development offer an alternative to laser light sources in a wide range of medical applications. Previously developed as light sources for research in photosynthesis in plant growth experimentation, LED arrays have produced an average continuous output of 4 - 6 watts at a wavelength of 660 nm. This output is equivalent to the terrestrially sensed output of the sun at this wavelength at high noon. LED chips are arrayed on an alumina tile substrate that may be formed to provide optical power focused on a specified target area.

  14. [TCM/aciipuncture therapy and medical insurance support in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Tian, Kaiyu; Yuan, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Based on the expeienes in th acdemic exchanges in Switzerland and relevant data, the development of TCM/acupuncture in Switzerland, Swiss medical insurance system and the acceptance to TCM/acupuncture were introduced in the paper. The case analysis was applied to explain the reimbursement, proportion and additional conditions of Obligatory Basic Insurance and Supplementary Alternative Insurance on TCM/acupuncture; Additionally, in the paper, the certification and registration from EMR, ASCA and NVS for the TCM physician were introduced, which is required to the recognition by insurance companies. All of these provide the guarantee for the positive development of TCM/acupuncture in Switzerland.

  15. Intramedullary spinal neurocysticercosis treated successfully with medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shameem; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2014-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis caused by Taenia solium and is a common parasitic disease of the cental nervous system. It usually presents with seizures, headaches, progressively worsening focal neurologic symptoms, visual disturbances, loss of bladder control, etc. However, acute onset symptoms may also be seen. MRI scans can accurately diagnose spinal or cerebral lesions and is also helpful in monitoring progress while on treatment. Albendazole is currently the drug of choice along with steroids for medical management of neurocysticercosis. The case of intramedullary spinal neurocysticercosis was treated with praziquantel.

  16. Assessing the effectiveness of pharmacist- directed medication therapy management in improving diabetes outcomes in patients with poorly controlled diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Jeannine S.; Poe, Brett; Hopper, Rebecca; Boyer, Alaina; Wilkins, Consuelo H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare medication adherence rates and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) health outcomes in a sample of underserved patients with suboptimally controlled T2DM (HbA1C>7%) who had received pharmacist-directed medication therapy management (MTM) to those who had not received MTM. Methods A retrospective review of 100 patient records was conducted. For the MTM group, a pharmacist engaged patients in patient-centered services to optimize therapeutic outcomes. Non-MTM patients received usual care. Outcomes were HbA1C, medication adherence, blood pressure, lipids and creatinine. Group comparisons on clinical outcomes were analyzed before and after matching MTM and non-MTM patients on demographic characteristics. Results Before matching, the MTM group had a higher rate of medication adherence than the non-MTM group. Hemoglobin A1C levels were lower in the MTM group compared to the non-MTM group. Similarly, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were lower in the MTM group compared to the non-MTM group. After matching, medication adherence rate remained higher in the MTM group than the non-MTM group. Similarly, HbA1C levels remained lower in the MTM group than the non-MTM group. Conclusions There is a paucity of research focused on behavioral interventions for improving health outcomes in underserved communities. Our results advance the existing literature by demonstrating a positive association between pharmacist-directed MTM, medication adherence, and glycemic control in a sample of underserved patients with suboptimally controlled T2DM. A prospective pharmacy intervention and examination of long-term effects of MTM on medication adherence and T2DM health outcomes in this population is warranted. PMID:26009557

  17. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  18. Empirical medical therapy in idiopathic male infertility: Promise or panacea?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hung

    2014-01-01

    Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility and in 25% of cases, the etiology of male infertility is unknown. Effective treatments are well-established for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, male accessory gland infection, retrograde ejaculation, and positive antisperm antibody. However, the appropriate treatment for idiopathic male infertility is unclear. Empirical medical treatment (EMT) has been used in men with idiopathic infertility and can be divided into two categories based on the mode of action: hormonal treatment and antioxidant supplementation. Hormonal medications consist of gonadotropins, androgens, estrogen receptor blockers, and aromatase inhibitors. Antioxidants such as vitamins, zinc, and carnitines have also been widely used to reduce oxidative stress-induced spermatozoa damage. Although scientifically acceptable evidence of EMT is limited because of the lack of large, randomized, controlled studies, recent systematic reviews with meta-analyses have shown that the administration of gonadotropins, anti-estrogens, and oral antioxidants results in a significant increase in the live birth rate compared with control treatments. Therefore, all physicians who treat infertility should bear in mind that EMT can improve semen parameters and subsequent fertility potential through natural intercourse. PMID:25309854

  19. Advanced illumination control algorithm for medical endoscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Ricardo M.; Wäny, Martin; Santos, Pedro; Morgado-Dias, F.

    2015-05-01

    CMOS image sensor manufacturer, AWAIBA, is providing the world's smallest digital camera modules to the world market for minimally invasive surgery and one time use endoscopic equipment. Based on the world's smallest digital camera head and the evaluation board provided to it, the aim of this paper is to demonstrate an advanced fast response dynamic control algorithm of the illumination LED source coupled to the camera head, over the LED drivers embedded on the evaluation board. Cost efficient and small size endoscopic camera modules nowadays embed minimal size image sensors capable of not only adjusting gain and exposure time but also LED illumination with adjustable illumination power. The LED illumination power has to be dynamically adjusted while navigating the endoscope over changing illumination conditions of several orders of magnitude within fractions of the second to guarantee a smooth viewing experience. The algorithm is centered on the pixel analysis of selected ROIs enabling it to dynamically adjust the illumination intensity based on the measured pixel saturation level. The control core was developed in VHDL and tested in a laboratory environment over changing light conditions. The obtained results show that it is capable of achieving correction speeds under 1 s while maintaining a static error below 3% relative to the total number of pixels on the image. The result of this work will allow the integration of millimeter sized high brightness LED sources on minimal form factor cameras enabling its use in endoscopic surgical robotic or micro invasive surgery.

  20. Minimally invasive eyelid care in dermatology: medical, laser, and cosmetic therapies.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Ramin; Pfeiffer, Margaret L; Tsoukas, Maria

    2015-01-01

    There is a high demand for facial aesthetic enhancement, and the periorbital region is one of the first areas to show signs of aging. Many nonsurgical therapies exist to tackle these problems. These therapies are becoming more efficacious while reducing postprocedural recovery time. The goal is to restore the natural youthful appearance rather than to create an effect that differs from the patient's appearance earlier in life. Eyelid care, and cosmetic dermatology in general, intends to restore balance and symmetry. We discuss the initial consultation, relevant anatomy for the dermatologist, and medical, laser and cosmetic therapies.

  1. The advance of poststructuralism and its influence on family therapy.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Victoria C

    2014-09-01

    Postmodernism began to influence family therapy very early in the 1980s with articles referencing postmodern ideas, focusing on meaning and multiplicity. With the appearance of narrative therapy on the scene in the 1990s there was a shift toward poststructural thinking, which refined the movement and politicized the clinical work. Even with a bit of a backlash, whether because this was a new idea or it somehow threatened a positivistic culture, a poststructural view has continued to have effects on family therapy. This article explores the variety of influences: the expansion of narrative ideas, the innovation of Madsen's collaborative helping, and also more nuanced effects. I argue that a poststructural view has effectively changed how many family therapists think and may also be subtly influencing how they might work.

  2. Advances in biodegradable nanomaterials for photothermal therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao-Feng; Wang, Shun-Hao; Yu, Ying-Jie; Shen, He-Yun; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Hui-Ling; Wang, Hai; Li, Lin-Lin; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal cancer therapy is an alternative to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. With the development of nanophotothermal agents, this therapy holds immense potential in clinical translation. However, the toxicity issues derived from the fact that nanomaterials are trapped and retained in the reticuloendothelial systems limit their biomedical application. Developing biodegradable photothermal agents is the most practical route to address these concerns. In addition to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, various internal and external stimuli play key roles on nanomaterials uptake, transport, and clearance. In this review, we summarized novel nanoplatforms for photothermal therapy; these nanoplatforms can elicit stimuli-triggered degradation. We focused on the recent innovative designs endowed with biodegradable photothermal agents under different stimuli, including enzyme, pH, and near-infrared (NIR) laser. PMID:27807498

  3. Growth Hormone Tumor Histological Subtypes Predict Response to Surgical and Medical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kiseljak-Vassiliades, Katja; Carlson, Nichole E.; Borges, Manuel T.; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K.; Lillehei, Kevin O.; Kerr, Janice M.; Wierman, Margaret E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Growth hormone (GH) pituitary tumors are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current treatments, including surgery and medical therapy with somatostatin analogues (SSA), dopamine agonists and/or a GH receptor antagonist, result in disease remission in approximately half of patients. Predictors of GH tumor response to different therapies have been incompletely defined based on histologic subtype, particularly densely (DG) versus sparsely (SG) granulated adenomas. The aim of this study was to examine our own institutional experience with GH adenomas and correlate how subtype related to clinical parameters as well as response to surgery and medical therapies. Methods A retrospective chart review of 101 acromegalic patients operated by a single neurosurgeon was performed. Clinical data were correlated with histologic subtype and disease control, as defined by IGF-1 levels, and random growth hormone levels in response to surgery and/or medical therapies. Results SG tumors, compared to DG, occurred in younger patients (p=0.0010), were 3-fold larger (p=0.0030), but showed no differences in tumor-invasion characteristics (p=0.12). DG tumors had a higher rate of remission in response to surgery compared to SG, 65.7% vs. 14.3% (p<0.0001), as well as to medical therapy with SSAs (68.8% for DG vs. 28.6% for SG tumors; p=0.028). SG tumors not controlled with SSAs consistently responded to a switch to, or addition of, a GH receptor antagonist. Conclusions Histological GH tumor subtyping implicates a different clinical phenotype and biologic behavior, and provides prognostic significance for surgical success and response to medical therapies. PMID:25129651

  4. Recent advances of thermally responsive nanogels for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajing; Xu, Hongjiang; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Thermally responsive nanogel drug delivery systems (TRNDDS) have been widely investigated as a new strategy for active targeting tumor therapy, as these can accumulate on the tumor site and/or release the payload at the desired site by structure changes rapidly once stimulated by temperature changes. In this review, we discuss the evolution of TRNDDS and future perspectives for antitumor drug and gene delivery. With further understanding of the specificity of tumor site at the cellular and molecular level, in parallel with the development of nanomaterial design and preparation, TRNDDS show great potential for tumor targeting therapy. PMID:26478174

  5. Conceptualisation of the characteristics of advanced practitioners in the medical radiation professions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tony; Harris, Jillian; Woznitza, Nick; Maresse, Sharon; Sale, Charlotte

    2015-09-01

    Professions grapple with defining advanced practice and the characteristics of advanced practitioners. In nursing and allied health, advanced practice has been defined as 'a state of professional maturity in which the individual demonstrates a level of integrated knowledge, skill and competence that challenges the accepted boundaries of practice and pioneers new developments in health care'. Evolution of advanced practice in Australia has been slower than in the United Kingdom, mainly due to differences in demography, the health system and industrial relations. This article describes a conceptual model of advanced practitioner characteristics in the medical radiation professions, taking into account experiences in other countries and professions. Using the CanMEDS framework, the model includes foundation characteristics of communication, collaboration and professionalism, which are fundamental to advanced clinical practice. Gateway characteristics are: clinical expertise, with high level competency in a particular area of clinical practice; scholarship and teaching, including a masters qualification and knowledge dissemination through educating others; and evidence-based practice, with judgements made on the basis of research findings, including research by the advanced practitioner. The pinnacle of advanced practice is clinical leadership, where the practitioner has a central role in the health care team, with the capacity to influence decision making and advocate for others, including patients. The proposed conceptual model is robust yet adaptable in defining generic characteristics of advanced practitioners, no matter their clinical specialty. The advanced practice roles that evolve to meet future health service demand must focus on the needs of patients, local populations and communities. PMID:26451243

  6. Conceptualisation of the characteristics of advanced practitioners in the medical radiation professions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tony; Harris, Jillian; Woznitza, Nick; Maresse, Sharon; Sale, Charlotte

    2015-09-15

    Professions grapple with defining advanced practice and the characteristics of advanced practitioners. In nursing and allied health, advanced practice has been defined as ‘a state of professional maturity in which the individual demonstrates a level of integrated knowledge, skill and competence that challenges the accepted boundaries of practice and pioneers new developments in health care’. Evolution of advanced practice in Australia has been slower than in the United Kingdom, mainly due to differences in demography, the health system and industrial relations. This article describes a conceptual model of advanced practitioner characteristics in the medical radiation professions, taking into account experiences in other countries and professions. Using the CanMEDS framework, the model includes foundation characteristics of communication, collaboration and professionalism, which are fundamental to advanced clinical practice. Gateway characteristics are: clinical expertise, with high level competency in a particular area of clinical practice; scholarship and teaching, including a masters qualification and knowledge dissemination through educating others; and evidence-based practice, with judgements made on the basis of research findings, including research by the advanced practitioner. The pinnacle of advanced practice is clinical leadership, where the practitioner has a central role in the health care team, with the capacity to influence decision making and advocate for others, including patients. The proposed conceptual model is robust yet adaptable in defining generic characteristics of advanced practitioners, no matter their clinical specialty. The advanced practice roles that evolve to meet future health service demand must focus on the needs of patients, local populations and communities.

  7. Comparative effectiveness and safety between oxaliplatin-based and cisplatin-based therapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanjie; Huang, Jiale; Liu, Yanna; Zhao, Liying; Li, Zhijia; Liu, Hao; Wang, Qi-long; Qi, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Platinum-based drugs are the most significant chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer. The study aims to compare the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin-based therapy versus cisplatin-based therapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Materials and Methods An adequate literature search in EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) was conducted. Phase II or III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared effectiveness and safety between oxaliplatin-based and cisplatin-based therapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer were eligible. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The second endpoint was the adverse events. Results Five phase II or III RCTs involving a total of 2,046 patients were identified. The results showed that there were no significant difference in ORR (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.98–1.40, p = 0.08, I2 = 0%), PFS (HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.84–1.01, p = 0.09, I2 = 0%) and OS (HR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.82–1.01, p = 0.07, I2 = 0%) between oxaliplatin-based therapy and cisplatin-based therapy. In addition, oxaliplatin-based therapy had lower risk of neutropenia, anemia, nausea, alopecia, thromboembolism, stomatitis and creatinine increased at all grades, and neutropenia, anemia, leukopenia and alopecia at 3–4 grades than cisplatin-based therapy. However, oxaliplatin-based therapy was associated with increased risk of neurosensory toxicity and thrombocytopenia. Conclusions Our meta-analysis showed that there were no significant difference in ORR, PFS and OS between oxaliplatin-based therapy and cisplatin-based therapy. The oxaliplatin-based therapy could generally decrease the risk of adverse effects except neurosensory toxicity and thrombocytopenia. PMID:27166187

  8. Sex Therapy: Advances in Paradigms, Nomenclature, and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althof, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author reviews the historical paradigms that have influenced the treatment of sexual problems, changes in the diagnostic nomenclature, and recent innovations in sex therapy. Methods: The author reviews the literature and provides expert opinion. Results: The author gives a historical overview of how theoretical models of…

  9. Advances in nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: Review

    PubMed Central

    Wędrychowicz, Andrzej; Zając, Andrzej; Tomasik, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic, life-long, and relapsing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there are no complete cure possibilities, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy may induce remission of the disease. Malnutrition and specific nutritional deficiencies are frequent among IBD patients, so the majority of them need nutritional treatment, which not only improves the state of nutrition of the patients but has strong anti-inflammatory activity as well. Moreover, some nutrients, from early stages of life are suspected as triggering factors in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. Both parenteral and enteral nutrition is used in IBD therapy, but their practical utility in different populations and in different countries is not clearly established, and there are sometimes conflicting theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD. This review presents the actual data from research studies on the influence of nutrition on the etiopathogenesis of IBD and the latest findings regarding its mechanisms of action. The use of both parenteral and enteral nutrition as therapeutic methods in induction and maintenance therapy in IBD treatment is also extensively discussed. Comparison of the latest research data, scientific theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD, and different opinions about them are also presented and discussed. Additionally, some potential future perspectives for nutritional therapy are highlighted. PMID:26811646

  10. Advanced multimodal nanoparticles delay tumor progression with clinical radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Detappe, Alexandre; Kunjachan, Sijumon; Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Biancur, Douglas; Drane, Pascal; Guieze, Romain; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Tillement, Olivier; Langer, Robert; Berbeco, Ross

    2016-09-28

    Radiation therapy is a major treatment regimen for more than 50% of cancer patients. The collateral damage induced on healthy tissues during radiation and the minimal therapeutic effect on the organ-of-interest (target) is a major clinical concern. Ultra-small, renal clearable, silica based gadolinium chelated nanoparticles (SiGdNP) provide simultaneous MR contrast and radiation dose enhancement. The high atomic number of gadolinium provides a large photoelectric cross-section for increased photon interaction, even for high-energy clinical radiation beams. Imaging and therapy functionality of SiGdNP were tested in cynomolgus monkeys and pancreatic tumor-bearing mice models, respectively. A significant improvement in tumor cell damage (double strand DNA breaks), growth suppression, and overall survival under clinical radiation therapy conditions were observed in a human pancreatic xenograft model. For the first time, safe systemic administration and systematic renal clearance was demonstrated in both tested species. These findings strongly support the translational potential of SiGdNP for MR-guided radiation therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:27423325

  11. An Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience Based on a Medication Therapy Management Service Model

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Donna; Brandt, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To implement and evaluate an introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) based on the medication therapy management (MTM) service model. Design. Patient Care 2 is an IPPE that introduces third-year pharmacy students to the MTM service model. Students interacted with older adults to identify medication-related problems and develop recommendations using core MTM elements. Course outcome evaluations were based on number of documented medication-related problems, recommendations, and student reviews. Assessment. Fifty-seven older adults participated in the course. Students identified 52 medication-related problems and 66 medical problems, and documented 233 recommendations relating to health maintenance and wellness, pharmacotherapy, referrals, and education. Students reported having adequate experience performing core MTM elements. Conclusion. Patient Care 2 may serve as an experiential learning model for pharmacy schools to teach the core elements of MTM and provide patient care services to the community. PMID:21829256

  12. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. 50.21 Section 50.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Classification and Description of Licenses § 50.21 Class 104...

  13. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. 50.21 Section 50.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Classification and Description of Licenses § 50.21 Class 104...

  14. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. 50.21 Section 50.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Classification and Description of Licenses § 50.21 Class 104...

  15. A Study of Mathematics Needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Keith J.

    A study was conducted to determine what mathematics skills were needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy. Data obtained from studies, course outlines, textbooks, and reports were used to construct a 79-item mathematics skill questionnaire. This questionnaire was administered to employers,…

  16. Comparing Two Cooperative Small Group Formats Used with Physical Therapy and Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Eon, Marcel; Proctor, Peggy; Reeder, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    This study compared "Structured Controversy" (a semi-formal debate like small group activity) with a traditional open discussion format for medical and physical therapy students. We found that those students who had participated in Structured Controversy changed their personal opinion on the topic more than those who were in the Open Discussion…

  17. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module III. Shock and Fluid Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on shock and fluid therapy is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) body fluids, electrolytes and their effect on the body, and the general principles of fluid and acid base balances; (2) characteristics of…

  18. Teaching Electroconvulsive Therapy to Medical Students: Effects of Instructional Method on Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnell, Ronald L.; Duk, Anthony D.; Christison, George W.; Haviland, Mark G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of learning about electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) via live observation to learning via an instructional videotape. Method: During their psychiatry clerkship, 122 medical students were randomized using these two educational methods, and their ECT knowledge and attitudes were assessed during the first and last weeks…

  19. Prediction of Response to Medication and Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Jay C.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Gallop, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial found nearly equivalent response rates for antidepressant medications and cognitive therapy in a sample of moderate to severely depressed outpatients. In this article, the authors seek to identify the variables that were associated with response across both treatments as well as variables that predicted…

  20. Medical Family Therapy for a Woman with End-stage Crohn's Disease and Her Son.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Susan H.; Harkness, Jennifer L.; Epstein, Ronald M.

    2001-01-01

    Medical family therapy grew out of the experiences of family therapists working with other professionals to provide comprehensive, integrated healthcare for patients. This is the story of one such patient and provides an account of the experience through quotes from videotaped sessions and electronic mail communications that occurred throughout…

  1. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux before and after medical therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1981-07-01

    Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is a quantitative technique that can be employed to detect and quantitate gastroesophageal reflux before and after the application of therapeutic modalities, including change in body position, bethanechol, atropine, antacids, and antacid-alginate compounds. Five groups of 10-15 patients each were studied before and after using each therapeutic modality and before and after atropine. The results were compared to the patient's symptomatology and to the acid reflux test. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy was performed following oral administration of 300 microCi 99mTc-sulfur colloid in 300 ml acidified orange juice. Thirty-second gamma camera images were obtained as the gastroesophageal gradient was increased from approximately 10 to 35 mm Hg at 5 mm Hg increments using an inflatable abdominal binder. Data were processed using a digital computer. Reflux was reduced by change in position from recumbent to upright, and by the use of subcutaneous bethanechol, oral antacid, or oral antacidalginate compound. Atropine increased reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is more sensitive than fluoroscopy, correlates well with clinical symptomatology, and is a reliable and convenient technique for the quantitative estimation of reflux before and after therapy.

  2. Gains in employment status following antidepressant medication or cognitive therapy for depression

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Jay C.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Amsterdam, Jay; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression can adversely affect employment status. Aims To examine whether there is a relative advantage of cognitive therapy or antidepressant medication in improving employment status following treatment, using data from a previously reported trial. Method Random assignment to cognitive therapy (n = 48) or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxetine (n = 93) for 4 months; treatment responders were followed for up to 24 months. Differential effects of treatment on employment status were examined. Results At the end of 28 months, cognitive therapy led to higher rates of full-time employment (88.9%) than did antidepressant medication among treatment responders (70.8%), χ21 = 5.78, P = 0.02, odds ratio (OR) = 5.66, 95% CI 1.16–27.69. In the shorter-term, the main effect of treatment on employment status was not significant following acute treatment (χ21 = 1.74, P = 0.19, OR = 1.77, 95% CI 0.75–4.17); however, we observed a site×treatment interaction (χ21 = 6.87, P = 0.009) whereby cognitive therapy led to a higher rate of full-time employment at one site but not at the other. Conclusions Cognitive therapy may produce greater improvements in employment v. medication, particularly over the longer term. PMID:24925985

  3. Pediatric glaucoma medical therapy: who more accurately reports medication adherence, the caregiver or the child?

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Daniel B; Neustein, Rebecca F; Jones, Sarah K; Robin, Alan L; Muir, Kelly W

    2015-01-01

    As they grow older, most children with glaucoma must eventually face the transition to self-administering medications. We previously reported factors associated with better or worse medication adherence in children with glaucoma, using an objective, electronic monitor. Utilizing the same data set, the purpose of the current study was to determine whose report (the caregiver’s or the child’s) corresponded better with electronically monitored adherence. Of the 46 participants (22 girls), the mean age of children primarily responsible, and caregiver primarily responsible for medication administration was 15±2 and 10±2 years, respectively. For the children whose caregiver regularly administered the eyedrops, the caregiver’s assessment of drop adherence was associated with measured adherence (P=0.012), but the child’s was not (P=0.476). For the children who self-administered eyedrops, neither the child’s (P=0.218) nor the caregiver’s (P=0.395) assessment was associated with measured percent adherence. This study highlights potential errors when relying on self-reporting of compliance in patients and caregivers with pediatric glaucoma, particularly when the child is responsible for administering their own eyedrops. Frank discussions about the importance of medication adherence and how to improve compliance may help both the child and caregiver better communicate with the treating provider. PMID:26648687

  4. The charisma and deception of reparative therapies: when medical science beds religion.

    PubMed

    Grace, André P

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I examine the history and resurgence of interest in sexual reorientation or reparative therapies. I begin with a critique of the contemporary "ex-gay" movement, interrogating Exodus as the prototype of a politico-religious transformational ministry that works to "cure" homosexuals, and examine how Exodus utilizes ex-gay testimony to deceive harried homosexuals looking for escape from the effects of internalized and cultural homophobia. Next, I investigate how reparative therapies function as orthodox treatments that charismatically meld conservative religious perspectives with medical science to produce a pseudoscience promising to treat homosexuality effectively. In this regard, I assess the ongoing debate regarding gay-affirming versus reparative therapies by first looking at the history of medicalizing homosexuality and then surveying the debate spurred by Robert L. Spitzer's research. I conclude with a consideration of research needed to measure whether efficacious change in sexual orientation is possible.

  5. [Organization of anesthesia management and advanced life support at military medical evacuation levels].

    PubMed

    Shchegolev, A V; Petrakov, V A; Savchenko, I F

    2014-07-01

    Anesthesia management and advanced life support for the severely wounded personnel at military medical evacuation levels in armed conflict (local war) is time-consuming and resource-requiring task. One of the mathematical modeling methods was used to evaluate capabilities of anesthesia and intensive care units at tactical level. Obtained result allows us to tell that there is a need to make several system changes of the existing system of anesthesia management and advanced life support for the severely wounded personnel at military medical evacuation levels. In addition to increasing number of staff of anesthesiology-critical care during the given period of time another solution should be the creation of an early evacuation to a specialized medical care level by special means while conducting intensive monitoring and treatment.

  6. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Acute Treatment of Adults with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimidjian, Sona; Hollon, Steven D.; Dobson, Keith S.; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Addis, Michael E.; Gallop, Robert; McGlinchey, Joseph B.; Markley, David K.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Atkins, David C.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is considered the current standard for severe depression, and cognitive therapy is the most widely investigated psychosocial treatment for depression. However, not all patients want to take medication, and cognitive therapy has not demonstrated consistent efficacy across trials. Moreover, dismantling designs have…

  7. Nano polymeric carrier fabrication technologies for advanced antitumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Mengxin; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Li; Li, Huafei; Zhang, Fulei; Sun, Yun; Dai, Jianxin; Wang, Hao; Guo, Yajun

    2013-01-01

    Comparing with the traditional therapeutic methods, newly developed cancer therapy based on the nanoparticulates attracted extensively interest due to its unique advantages. However, there are still some drawbacks such as the unfavorable in vivo performance for nanomedicine and undesirable tumor escape from the immunotherapy. While as we know that the in vivo performance strongly depended on the nanocarrier structural properties, thus, the big gap between in vitro and in vivo can be overcome by nanocarrier's structural tailoring by fine chemical design and microstructural tuning. In addition, this fine nanocarrier's engineering can also provide practical solution to solve the problems in traditional cancer immunotherapy. In this paper, we review the latest development in nanomedicine, cancer therapy, and nanoimmunotherapy. We then give an explanation why fine nanocanrrie's engineering with special focus on the unique pathology of tumor microenvironments and properties of immunocells can obviously promote the in vivo performance and improve the therapeutic index of nanoimmunotherapy.

  8. Recent Advances in Antiviral Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Tamori, Akihiro; Enomoto, Masaru; Kawada, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major worldwide health problem. Chronic infection induces continuous inflammation in the liver, progression of hepatic fibrosis, eventual cirrhosis, and possible hepatocellular carcinoma. Eradication of the virus is one of the most important treatment aims. A number of promising new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have been developed over the past 10 years. Due to their increased efficacy, safety, and tolerability, interferon-free oral therapies with DAAs have been approved for patients with HCV, including those with cirrhosis. This review introduces the characteristics and results of recent clinical trials of several DAAs: NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B inhibitors. DAA treatment failure and prognosis after DAA therapy are also discussed. PMID:27022210

  9. Advances in T-cell therapy for ALL

    PubMed Central

    Grupp, Stephan A.

    2014-01-01

    CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CART19 or CTL019) have been used with success in pediatric and adult acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. While this therapy has caused toxicities, including cytokine release syndrome and macrophage activation syndrome, these conditions are reversible with IL-6 blockade using the monoclonal antibody tocilizumab. Furthermore, 90% of the very high-risk patients who underwent infusion with CTL019 achieved a complete response, despite the fact that they previously failed multiple therapies and/or transplant. With improved cell persistence, this immunotherapy may one day prove to be more than a bridge to transplant and may in fact be a transplant alternative. PMID:25455270

  10. Mind-body therapies: evidence and implications in advanced oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Mayden, Kelley D

    2012-11-01

    The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom control. Traditional training has not been structured to provide advanced practitioners with an in-depth knowledge of the clinical applications of mind-body therapies. The aim of this article is to acquaint the reader with common mind-body modalities (meditation/mindfulness-based stress reduction, relaxation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, support groups, and aromatherapy) and to examine important evidence in support of or against their clinical application.

  11. Mind-Body Therapies: Evidence and Implications in Advanced Oncology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mayden,, Kelley D.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom control. Traditional training has not been structured to provide advanced practitioners with an in-depth knowledge of the clinical applications of mind-body therapies. The aim of this article is to acquaint the reader with common mind-body modalities (meditation/mindfulness-based stress reduction, relaxation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, support groups, and aromatherapy) and to examine important evidence in support of or against their clinical application. PMID:25031967

  12. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events.

  13. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events. PMID:26390952

  14. Neuronal dysfunction and medical therapy in heart failure: can an imaging biomarker help to "personalize" therapy?

    PubMed

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Udelson, James E

    2015-06-01

    (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) imaging is a tool for evaluating one of the fundamental pathophysiologic abnormalities seen in heart failure (HF), that of an upregulated sympathetic nervous system and its effect on the myocardium. Although this imaging technique offers information about prognosis for patients treated with contemporary guideline-based HF therapies and improves risk stratification, there are neither rigorous nor sufficient outcome data to suggest that this imaging tool can guide therapeutic decision making or better target subsets of patients with HF for particular therapies.

  15. Neuronal dysfunction and medical therapy in heart failure: can an imaging biomarker help to "personalize" therapy?

    PubMed

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Udelson, James E

    2015-06-01

    (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) imaging is a tool for evaluating one of the fundamental pathophysiologic abnormalities seen in heart failure (HF), that of an upregulated sympathetic nervous system and its effect on the myocardium. Although this imaging technique offers information about prognosis for patients treated with contemporary guideline-based HF therapies and improves risk stratification, there are neither rigorous nor sufficient outcome data to suggest that this imaging tool can guide therapeutic decision making or better target subsets of patients with HF for particular therapies. PMID:26033899

  16. Medication taking behaviors among breast cancer patients on adjuvant endocrine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kimmick, Gretchen; Edmond, Sara N.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Marcom, Paul K.; Blackwell, Kimberly; Keefe, Francis J.; Shelby, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore how symptoms and psychosocial factors are related to intentional and unintentional non-adherent medication taking behaviors. Methods Included were postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive, stage I-IIIA breast cancer, who had completed surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation, and were taking endocrine therapy. Self-administered, standardized measures were completed during a routine clinic visit: Brief Fatigue Inventory, Brief Pain Inventory, Menopause Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy General and Neurotoxicity scales, and Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale. Regression analyses were performed to determine the degree to which demographic, medical, symptom, and psychosocial variables, explain intentional, such as changing one’s doses or stopping medication, and unintentional, such as forgetting to take one’s medication, non-adherent behaviors. Results Participants were 112 women: mean age 64 (SD=9) years; 81% white; mean time from surgery 40 (SD=28) months; 49% received chemotherapy (39% including a taxane); mean time on endocrine therapy, 35 (SD=29.6) months; 82% taking an aromatase inhibitor. Intentional and unintentional non-adherent behaviors were described in 33.9% and 58.9% of participants, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that higher self-efficacy for taking medication was associated with lower levels of unintentional (p=0.002) and intentional (p=0.004) non-adherent behaviors. The presence of symptoms (p=0.03) and lower self-efficacy for physician communication (p=0.009) were associated with higher levels of intentional non-adherent behaviors. Conclusions These results suggest that women who report greater symptoms, lower self-efficacy for communicating with their physician, and lower self-efficacy for taking their medication are more likely to engage in both intentional and unintentional non-adherent behaviors. PMID:26189978

  17. Does advanced medical technology encourage hospitalist use and their direct employment by hospitals?

    PubMed

    David, Guy; Helmchen, Lorens A; Henderson, Robert A

    2009-02-01

    In the United States, inpatient medical care increasingly encompasses the use of expensive medical technology and, at the same time, is coordinated and supervised more and more by a rapidly growing number of inpatient-dedicated physicians (hospitalists). In the production of inpatient care services, Hospitalist services can be viewed as complementary to sophisticated and expensive medical equipment in the provision of inpatient medical care. We investigate the causal relationship between a hospital's access to three types of sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic medical equipment - intensity-modulated radiation therapy, gamma knife, and multi-slice computed tomography - and its likelihood of using hospitalists. To rule out omitted variables bias and reverse causality, we use technology-specific Certificate of Need regulation to predict technology use. We find a strong positive association, yet no causal link between access to medical technology and hospitalist use. We also study the choice of employment modality among hospitals that use hospitalists, and find that access to expensive medical technology reduces the hospital's propensity to employ hospitalists directly.

  18. Improving medical graduates’ training in palliative care: advancing education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Head, Barbara A; Schapmire, Tara J; Earnshaw, Lori; Chenault, John; Pfeifer, Mark; Sawning, Susan; Shaw, Monica A

    2016-01-01

    The needs of an aging population and advancements in the treatment of both chronic and life-threatening diseases have resulted in increased demand for quality palliative care. The doctors of the future will need to be well prepared to provide expert symptom management and address the holistic needs (physical, psychosocial, and spiritual) of patients dealing with serious illness and the end of life. Such preparation begins with general medical education. It has been recommended that teaching and clinical experiences in palliative care be integrated throughout the medical school curriculum, yet such education has not become the norm in medical schools across the world. This article explores the current status of undergraduate medical education in palliative care as published in the English literature and makes recommendations for educational improvements which will prepare doctors to address the needs of seriously ill and dying patients. PMID:26955298

  19. Improving medical graduates' training in palliative care: advancing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Head, Barbara A; Schapmire, Tara J; Earnshaw, Lori; Chenault, John; Pfeifer, Mark; Sawning, Susan; Shaw, Monica A

    2016-01-01

    The needs of an aging population and advancements in the treatment of both chronic and life-threatening diseases have resulted in increased demand for quality palliative care. The doctors of the future will need to be well prepared to provide expert symptom management and address the holistic needs (physical, psychosocial, and spiritual) of patients dealing with serious illness and the end of life. Such preparation begins with general medical education. It has been recommended that teaching and clinical experiences in palliative care be integrated throughout the medical school curriculum, yet such education has not become the norm in medical schools across the world. This article explores the current status of undergraduate medical education in palliative care as published in the English literature and makes recommendations for educational improvements which will prepare doctors to address the needs of seriously ill and dying patients.

  20. Advancing the science for active surveillance: rationale and design for the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership.

    PubMed

    Stang, Paul E; Ryan, Patrick B; Racoosin, Judith A; Overhage, J Marc; Hartzema, Abraham G; Reich, Christian; Welebob, Emily; Scarnecchia, Thomas; Woodcock, Janet

    2010-11-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 mandated that the FDA develop a system for using automated health care data to identify risks of marketed drugs and other medical products. The Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership is a public-private partnership among the FDA, academia, data owners, and the pharmaceutical industry that is responding to the need to advance the science of active medical product safety surveillance by using existing observational databases. The Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership's transparent, open innovation approach is designed to systematically and empirically study critical governance, data resource, and methodological issues and their interrelationships in establishing a viable national program of active drug safety surveillance by using observational data. This article describes the governance structure, data-access model, methods-testing approach, and technology development of this effort, as well as the work that has been initiated.

  1. Advancing the science for active surveillance: rationale and design for the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership.

    PubMed

    Stang, Paul E; Ryan, Patrick B; Racoosin, Judith A; Overhage, J Marc; Hartzema, Abraham G; Reich, Christian; Welebob, Emily; Scarnecchia, Thomas; Woodcock, Janet

    2010-11-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 mandated that the FDA develop a system for using automated health care data to identify risks of marketed drugs and other medical products. The Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership is a public-private partnership among the FDA, academia, data owners, and the pharmaceutical industry that is responding to the need to advance the science of active medical product safety surveillance by using existing observational databases. The Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership's transparent, open innovation approach is designed to systematically and empirically study critical governance, data resource, and methodological issues and their interrelationships in establishing a viable national program of active drug safety surveillance by using observational data. This article describes the governance structure, data-access model, methods-testing approach, and technology development of this effort, as well as the work that has been initiated. PMID:21041580

  2. Recent advances of sonodynamic therapy in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guo-Yun; Liu, Yang; Chen, Bo-Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Yin-Song; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is an emerging approach that involves a combination of low-intensity ultrasound and specialized chemical agents known as sonosensitizers. Ultrasound can penetrate deeply into tissues and can be focused into a small region of a tumor to activate a sonosensitizer which offers the possibility of non-invasively eradicating solid tumors in a site-directed manner. In this article, we critically reviewed the currently accepted mechanisms of sonodynamic action and summarized the classification of sonosensitizers. At the same time, the breath of evidence from SDT-based studies suggests that SDT is promising for cancer treatment. PMID:27807500

  3. Recent advances in targeted therapy for Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pishas, Kathleen I; Lessnick, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neoplasm of solid bone that disproportionally afflicts the young. Despite intensive multi-modal therapy and valiant efforts, 70% of patients with relapsed and metastatic Ewing sarcoma will succumb to their disease. The persistent failure to improve overall survival for this subset of patients highlights the urgent need for rapid translation of novel therapeutic strategies. As Ewing sarcoma is associated with a paucity of mutations in readily targetable signal transduction pathways, targeting the key genetic aberration and master regulator of Ewing sarcoma, the EWS/ETS fusion, remains an important goal. PMID:27635231

  4. Recent advances in targeted therapy for Ewing sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Pishas, Kathleen I.; Lessnick, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neoplasm of solid bone that disproportionally afflicts the young. Despite intensive multi-modal therapy and valiant efforts, 70% of patients with relapsed and metastatic Ewing sarcoma will succumb to their disease. The persistent failure to improve overall survival for this subset of patients highlights the urgent need for rapid translation of novel therapeutic strategies. As Ewing sarcoma is associated with a paucity of mutations in readily targetable signal transduction pathways, targeting the key genetic aberration and master regulator of Ewing sarcoma, the EWS/ETS fusion, remains an important goal. PMID:27635231

  5. Recent advances in targeted therapy for Ewing sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Pishas, Kathleen I.; Lessnick, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neoplasm of solid bone that disproportionally afflicts the young. Despite intensive multi-modal therapy and valiant efforts, 70% of patients with relapsed and metastatic Ewing sarcoma will succumb to their disease. The persistent failure to improve overall survival for this subset of patients highlights the urgent need for rapid translation of novel therapeutic strategies. As Ewing sarcoma is associated with a paucity of mutations in readily targetable signal transduction pathways, targeting the key genetic aberration and master regulator of Ewing sarcoma, the EWS/ETS fusion, remains an important goal.

  6. Recent Advances of Stem Cell Therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuxi; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Xin; Ghazaryan, Emma; Li, Ying; Xie, Jianan; Su, Guanfang

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited retinal disorders characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors and eventually leads to retina degeneration and atrophy. Until now, the exact pathogenesis and etiology of this disease has not been clear, and many approaches for RP therapies have been carried out in animals and in clinical trials. In recent years, stem cell transplantation-based attempts made some progress, especially the transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This review will provide an overview of stem cell-based treatment of RP and its main problems, to provide evidence for the safety and feasibility for further clinical treatment. PMID:25141102

  7. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for advanced neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Bodei, Lisa; Cremonesi, Marta; Kidd, Mark; Grana, Chiara M; Severi, Stefano; Modlin, Irvin M; Paganelli, Giovanni

    2014-08-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) consists of the systemic administration of a synthetic peptide, labeled with a suitable β-emitting radionuclide, able to irradiate tumors and their metastases via internalization through a specific receptor (usually somatostatin S2), over-expressed on the cell membrane. After almost 2 decades of experience, PRRT, with either (90)Y-octreotide or (177)Lu-octreotate, has established itself to be an efficient and effective therapeutic modality. As a treatment, it is relatively safe up to the known thresholds of absorbed and bio-effective isotope dosages and the renal and hematological toxicity profiles are acceptable if adequate protective measures are undertaken.

  8. The Association of Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy with Healthcare Utilization and Costs for Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Edward M.; Maravi, Moises E.; Rietmeijer, Cornelis; Davidson, Arthur J.; Burman, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The association between antiretroviral adherence, healthcare utilization and medical costs has not been well studied. Objective To examine the relationship of adherence to antiretroviral medications to healthcare utilization and healthcare costs. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using data from 325 previously antiretroviral medication-naive HIV-infected individuals initiating first antiretroviral therapy from 1997 through 2003. The setting was an inner-city safety net hospital and HIV clinic in the US. Adherence was assessed using pharmacy refill data. The average wholesale price was used for prescription costs. Healthcare utilization data and medical costs were obtained from the hospital billing database, and differences according to quartile of adherence were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess predictors of higher annual medical costs. Sensitivity analyses were used to examine alternative antiretroviral pricing schemes. The perspective was that of the healthcare provider, and costs were in year 2005 values. Results In 325 patients followed for a mean (± SD) 3.2 (1.9) years, better adherence was associated with lower healthcare utilization but higher total medical costs. Annual non-antiretroviral medical costs were $US7612 in the highest adherence quartile versus $US10 190 in the lowest adherence quartile. However, antiretroviral costs were significantly higher in the highest adherence quartile ($US17 513 vs $US8690), and therefore the total annual medical costs were also significantly higher in the highest versus lowest adherence quartile ($US25 125 vs $US18 880). In multivariate analysis, for every 10% increase in adherence, the odds of having annual medical costs in the highest versus lowest quartile increased by 87% (odds ratio 1.87; 95% CI 1.45, 2.40). In sensitivity analyses, very low antiretroviral prices (as seen in resource-limited settings) inverted this

  9. [Advances in the research of effects of music therapy on pain and anxiety in burn patients].

    PubMed

    Jinyi, Li; Yungui, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Pain and anxiety engender major psychic problems during all phases of treatment for burn patients. Analgesic alone does not allay these problems satisfactorily in these patients. Music therapy, as an important complementary and alternative therapy, has been widely used in multiple medical fields. However, its positive effect on alleviation of pain and anxiety in burn patients is undefined. The objective of this review is to summarize the feasibility, application fields, methods, and the effectiveness of music therapy in allaying pain and anxiety of burn patients during the whole course of treatment.

  10. [Advances in the research of effects of music therapy on pain and anxiety in burn patients].

    PubMed

    Jinyi, Li; Yungui, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Pain and anxiety engender major psychic problems during all phases of treatment for burn patients. Analgesic alone does not allay these problems satisfactorily in these patients. Music therapy, as an important complementary and alternative therapy, has been widely used in multiple medical fields. However, its positive effect on alleviation of pain and anxiety in burn patients is undefined. The objective of this review is to summarize the feasibility, application fields, methods, and the effectiveness of music therapy in allaying pain and anxiety of burn patients during the whole course of treatment. PMID:26564564

  11. Current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer: improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Pedro Nazareth; Muniz, Thiago Pimentel; Miranda, Raelson Rodrigues; Tadokoro, Hakaru; Forones, Nora Manoukian; Monteiro, Ines-de-Paula; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Mello, Ramon Andrade de

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we review the literature on the current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer aimed at improving patient care. We conclude that the key to guiding targeted therapy is individual biomarkers, which are not completely elucidated. HER2 overexpression is the only predictive biomarker currently in use. Furthermore, it is necessary to understand that gastric tumors are heterogeneous; therefore, is impossible to evaluate a novel biological compound without evaluating personal biomarkers. The selection of patients who are able to receive each treatment is paramount for improving advanced gastric cancer survival and reducing unnecessary costs.

  12. Prediction of Response to Medication and Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Depression

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Jay C.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Gallop, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial found nearly equivalent response rates for antidepressant medications and cognitive therapy in a sample of moderate-to-severely depressed outpatients. In this article, we seek to identify the variables that were associated with response across both treatments as well as variables that predicted superior response in one treatment over the other. The sample consisted of 180 depressed outpatients: 60 of whom were randomly assigned to cognitive therapy; 120 were assigned to antidepressant medications. Treatment was provided for 16 weeks. Chronic depression, older age, and lower intelligence each predicted relatively poor response across both treatments. Three prescriptive variables were identified: marriage, unemployment, and having experienced a greater number of recent life events predicted superior response to cognitive therapy compared to antidepressant medications. Thus, six markers of treatment outcome were identified, each of which might be expected to carry considerable clinical utility. The three prognostic variables identify subgroups that might benefit from alternative treatment strategies; the three prescriptive variables identify groups who appear to respond particularly well to cognitive therapy. PMID:19634969

  13. Surviving with lung cancer: medication-taking and oral targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Wickersham, Karen E; Happ, Mary Beth; Bender, Catherine M; Engberg, Sandra J; Tarhini, Ahmad; Erlen, Judith A

    2014-01-01

    Oral epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) improve survival for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, medication-taking implications are unknown. We used grounded theory to explore the process of medication-taking for NSCLC patients receiving oral EGFRIs. Thirty-two interviews were conducted for 13 participants purposively selected for gender, race/ethnicity, age, time in therapy, dose reductions, and therapy discontinuation and theoretically sampled for age and health insurance carrier. The study produced a grounded theory, Surviving with Lung Cancer, in which participants framed EGFRI therapy within recognition of NSCLC as a life-limiting illness without cure. Medication-taking was a "window" into participants' process of surviving with metastatic cancer that included deciding and preparing to take EGFRIs and treating lung cancer as a chronic condition. Our results contribute to understanding how NSCLC patients view themselves in the context of a life-limiting illness and support development of a theoretically-based intervention to improve medication-taking with EGFRIs.

  14. Surviving with Lung Cancer: Medication-Taking and Oral Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    WICKERSHAM, Karen E.; HAPP, Mary Beth; BENDER, Catherine M.; ENGBERG, Sandra J.; TARHINI, Ahmad; ERLEN, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) improve survival for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, medication-taking implications are unknown. We used grounded theory to explore the process of medication-taking for NSCLC patients receiving oral EGFRIs. Thirty-two interviews were conducted for 13 participants purposively selected for gender, race/ethnicity, age, time in therapy, dose reductions, and therapy discontinuation and theoretically sampled for age and health insurance carrier. The study produced a grounded theory, Surviving with Lung Cancer, in which participants framed EGFRI therapy within recognition of NSCLC as a life-limiting illness without cure. Medication-taking was a “window” into participants’ process of surviving with metastatic cancer that included deciding and preparing to take EGFRIs and treating lung cancer as a chronic condition. Our results contribute to understanding how NSCLC patients view themselves in the context of a life-limiting illness and support development of a theoretically-based intervention to improve medication-taking with EGFRIs. PMID:24702721

  15. Nanoparticulate drug delivery platforms for advancing bone infection therapies

    PubMed Central

    Uskoković, Vuk; Desai, Tejal A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The ongoing surge of resistance of bacterial pathogens to antibiotic therapies and the consistently aging median member of the human race signal an impending increase in the incidence of chronic bone infection. Nanotechnological platforms for local and sustained delivery of therapeutics hold the greatest potential for providing minimally invasive and maximally regenerative therapies for this rare but persistent condition. Areas covered Shortcomings of the clinically available treatment options, including poly(methyl methacrylate) beads and calcium sulfate cements, are discussed and their transcending using calcium-phosphate/polymeric nanoparticulate composites is foreseen. Bone is a composite wherein the weakness of each component alone is compensated for by the strength of its complement and an ideal bone substitute should be fundamentally the same. Expert opinion Discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo bioactivity assessments is highlighted, alongside the inherent imperfectness of the former. Challenges entailing the cross-disciplinary nature of engineering a new generation of drug delivery vehicles are delineated and it is concluded that the future for the nanoparticulate therapeutic carriers belongs to multifunctional, synergistic and theranostic composites capable of simultaneously targeting, monitoring and treating internal organismic disturbances in a smart, feedback fashion and in direct response to the demands of the local environment. PMID:25109804

  16. Advances in endonasal low intensity laser irradiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian-Ling; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Liu, Song-hao

    2005-07-01

    Endonasal low intensity laser therapy (ELILT) began in China in 1998. Now in China it is widely applied to treat hyperlipidemia and brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, poststroke depression, intractable headache, ache in head or face, cerebral thrombosis, acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease, migraine, brain lesion and mild cognitive impairment. There are four pathways mediating EILILT, Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells. Two unhealth acupoints of Yangming channal inside nose might mediate the one as is low intensity laser acupuncture. Unbalance autonomic nervous systems might be modulated. Blood cells might mediate the one as is intravascular low intensity laser therapy. These three pathways are integrated in ELILT so that serum amyloid β protein, malformation rate of erythrocyte, CCK-8, the level of viscosity at lower shear rates and hematocrit, or serum lipid might decrease, and melanin production/SOD activity or β endorphin might increase after ELILT treatment. These results indicate ELILT might work, but it need to be verified by randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  17. Targeted Therapies for Advanced Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yunyun; Ludwig, Joseph; Janku, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of adolescent and young adult patients battling metastatic Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumours (ESFT) remains less than 30% despite the development of systemic therapies. In the era of personalized medicine, novel molecular targets have been tested in preclinical or clinical settings in ESFT. In this review, we focus on early clinical and translational research that identified multiple molecular targets, including IGF-1R; mTOR; tyrosine kinase inhibitors; EWS-FLI1-related targets, and others. Overall, novel targeted therapies demonstrated modest efficacy; however pronounced and durable antineoplastic responses have been observed in small subsets of treated patients, for example with IGF-1R antibodies. Identifying outcome-predicting biomarkers and overcoming treatment resistance remain major challenges. Due to the rarity of ESFT, multi-institutional collaboration efforts of clinicians, basic and translational scientists are needed in order to understand biology of therapeutic response or resistance, which can lead to development of novel therapeutic methods and improved patient outcomes. PMID:25869102

  18. Reducing the Human Burden of Breast Cancer: Advanced Radiation Therapy Yields Improved Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Currey, Adam D; Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy R; Wilson, J Frank

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important modality in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. While its efficacy in the treatment of breast cancer was known shortly after the discovery of x-rays, significant advances in radiation delivery over the past 20 years have resulted in improved patient outcomes. With the development of improved systemic therapy, optimizing local control has become increasingly important and has been shown to improve survival. Better understanding of the magnitude of treatment benefit, as well as patient and biological factors that confer an increased recurrence risk, have allowed radiation oncologists to better tailor treatment decisions to individual patients. Furthermore, significant technological advances have occurred that have reduced the acute and long-term toxicity of radiation treatment. These advances continue to reduce the human burden of breast cancer. It is important for radiation oncologists and nonradiation oncologists to understand these advances, so that patients are appropriately educated about the risks and benefits of this important treatment modality.

  19. End-of-life discontinuation of destination therapy with cardiac and ventilatory support medical devices: physician-assisted death or allowing the patient to die?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die." Discussion Advances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body are used for permanent support of respiration. Clinical studies have shown that destination therapy with ventricular assist devices improves patient survival compared to medical management, but at the cost of a substantial alteration in end-of-life trajectories. The moral and legal assessment of the appropriateness and permissibility of complying with a patient's request to electively discontinue destination therapy in a life-terminating act in non-futile situations has generated controversy. Some argue that complying with this request is ethically justified because patients have the right to request withdrawal of unwanted treatment and be allowed to die of preexisting disease. Other commentators reject the argument that acceding to an elective request for death by discontinuing destination therapy is 'allowing a patient to die' because of serious flaws in interpreting the intention, causation, and moral responsibility of the ensuing death. Summary Destination therapy with cardiac and/or ventilatory medical devices replaces native physiological functions and successfully treats a preexisting disease. We posit that discontinuing cardiac and/or ventilatory support at the request of a patient or surrogate can be viewed as allowing the patient to die if--and only if--concurrent lethal pathophysiological conditions are present that are unrelated to those functions already supported by medical devices in

  20. Nontraditional or noncentralized models of diabetes care: medication therapy management services.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sweta

    2011-11-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM)services were introduced in the mid-2000s as part of Medicare Part D--the prescription drug benefit. Key goals of MTM services are to counsel patients to improve understanding of their medications, improve medication adherence, detect adverse drug reactions and patterns of improper drug use. MTM services are becoming well established in pharmacy practice. Pharmacists can help improve outcomes by following patient progress between physician visits, utilizing their clinical expertise to monitor and manage diabetes medication plans, educating patients on disease, lifestyle,and adherence issues. Although referral by a physician/health care professional (HCP) is not required for MTM provided by a pharmacist, the physician/HCP needs to be contacted for anything that requires a change in management

  1. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) in advanced inoperable bronchial carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghissi, Keyvan; Dixon, Kate; Stringer, Mark R.; Brown, Stanley B.

    1996-12-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of PDT to: Palliate symptoms, control disease and extend survival in patients with advanced inoperable cancer. Subject and Method: 55 Males and 23 females aged between 45-81 years (mean 66 years) with inoperable and advanced lung cancer with > 5O. obstructive lesions of the main, lobar or segmental bronchi. Patients had pre-treatment routine clinical radiological, functional and endoscopic assessment with proven histological diagnosis. Protocol of PDT was; Intravenous injection of 2 mg/Kg bodyweight Polyhaematoporphyrin (equivalent to Photofrin) or Photofrin followed 24-72 hours later by illumination of tumour using 630 nm light (Oxford Laser) delivered via an optical fibre with end diffuser. Treatments were carried out under general anaesthesia as a day case procedure. Patients were rebronchoscoped for debridement/retreatment 4-7 days later. Results: There was no treatment related mortality. Two patients developed mild photosensitivity reaction. All patients showed symptomatic improvement with good initial functional and radiological amelioration. Every patient responded to treatment. Seven patients had complete response and negative histology for 3-12 months. After the first treatment average Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) improvement was 0.5 litres and 0.4 litres respectively. Twenty five percent of patients (nr 19) survived more than 2 years, 10'. (nr=8) between 1-2 years and the remaining 51 patients less than a year. Conclusion: PDT should be considered as a therapeutic modality for all stages of lung cancer and is an excellent treatment modality for palliation in advanced bronchial malignancies.

  2. Complex antithrombotic therapy: determinants of patient preference and impact on medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Neena S; Naik, Aanand D; Street, Richard L; Castillo, Diana L; Deswal, Anita; Richardson, Peter A; Hartman, Christine M; Shelton, George; Fraenkel, Liana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose For years, older patients have been prescribed multiple blood-thinning medications (complex antithrombotic therapy [CAT]) to decrease their risk of cardiovascular events. These therapies, however, increase risk of adverse bleeding events. We assessed patient-reported trade-offs between cardioprotective benefit, gastrointestinal bleeding risk, and burden of self-management using adaptive conjoint analysis (ACA). As ACA could be a clinically useful tool to obtain patient preferences and guide future patient-centered care, we examined the clinical application of ACA to obtain patient preferences and the impact of ACA on medication adherence. Patients and methods An electronic ACA survey led 201 respondents through medication risk–benefit trade-offs, revealing patients’ preferences for the CAT risk/benefit profile they valued most. The post-ACA prescription regimen was categorized as concordant or discordant with elicited preferences. Adherence was measured using VA pharmacy refill data to measure persistence of use prior to and 1 year following preference-elicitation. Additionally, we analyzed qualitative interviews of 56 respondents regarding their perception of the ACA and the preference elicitation experience. Results Participants prioritized 5-year cardiovascular benefit over preventing adverse events. Medication side effects, medication-associated activity restrictions, and regimen complexity were less important than bleeding risk and cardioprotective benefit. One year after the ACA survey, a 15% increase in adherence was observed in patients prescribed a preference-concordant CAT strategy. An increase of only 6% was noted in patients prescribed a preference-discordant strategy. Qualitative interviews showed that the ACA exercise contributed to increase inpatient activation, patient awareness of preferences, and patient engagement with clinicians about treatment decisions. Conclusion By working through trade-offs, patients actively clarified their

  3. Providing massage therapy for people with advanced cancer: what to expect.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marlaine C; Yamashita, Traci E; Bryant, Lucinda L; Hemphill, Linnea; Kutner, Jean S

    2009-04-01

    There is very little information in the literature to prepare massage therapists for what they might expect when they provide treatment to people with advanced cancer in hospice or palliative care. We report an analysis of a subset of data collected from a large multi-site clinical trial of the efficacy of massage therapy for people with advanced cancer. This is the first analysis of empirical data of patient presentation, massage treatment environment, and the characteristics of massage provided for this population.

  4. Advances in targeting strategies for nanoparticles in cancer imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YheeThese Authors Contributed The Same., Ji Young; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2014-10-01

    In the last decade, nanoparticles have offered great advances in diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery. In particular, nanoparticles have provided remarkable progress in cancer imaging and therapy based on materials science and biochemical engineering technology. Researchers constantly attempted to develop the nanoparticles which can deliver drugs more specifically to cancer cells, and these efforts brought the advances in the targeting strategy of nanoparticles. This minireview will discuss the progress in targeting strategies for nanoparticles focused on the recent innovative work for nanomedicine.

  5. Advances in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Genomics, Biomarkers, and Antiplatelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Emanuele; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Stolen, Craig; Taylor, Angela; Barton, Paul J.; Bartunek, Jozef; Iaizzo, Paul; Judge, Daniel P.; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie; Blaxall, Burns C.; Terzic, Andre; Hall, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The Journal provides the clinician and scientist with the latest advances in discovery research, emerging technologies, pre-clinical research design and testing, and clinical trials. We highlight advances in areas of induced pluripotent stem cells, genomics, biomarkers, multi-modality imaging and antiplatelet biology and therapy. The top publications are critically discussed and presented along with anatomical reviews and FDA insight to provide context. PMID:24659088

  6. Report on disaster medical operations with acupuncture/massage therapy after the great East Japan earthquake.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Shin; Kamiya, Tetsuharu; Watanabe, Masashi; Hirano, Atsushi; Matsuda, Ayane; Monma, Yasutake; Numata, Takehiro; Kusuyama, Hiroko; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake inflicted immense damage over a wide area of eastern Japan with the consequent tsunami. Department of Traditional Asian Medicine, Tohoku University, started providing medical assistance to the disaster-stricken regions mainly employing traditional Asian therapies.We visited seven evacuation centers in Miyagi and Fukushima Prefecture and provided acupuncture/massage therapy. While massage therapy was performed manually, filiform needles and press tack needles were used to administer acupuncture. In total, 553 people were treated (mean age, 54.0 years; 206 men, 347 women). Assessment by interview showed that the most common complaint was shoulder/back stiffness. The rate of therapy satisfaction was 92.3%. Many people answered that they experienced not only physical but also psychological relief.At the time of the disaster, acupuncture/massage therapy, which has both mental and physical soothing effects, may be a therapeutic approach that can be effectively used in combination with Western medical practices. PMID:22563235

  7. Advancing Translational Research Through the NHLBI Gene Therapy Resource Program (GTRP)

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Janet; Cornetta, Kenneth; Diggins, Margaret; Johnston, Julie C.; Sepelak, Susan; Wang, Gensheng; Wilson, James M.; Wright, J. Fraser; Skarlatos, Sonia I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Translational research is a lengthy, complex, and necessary endeavor in order to bring basic science discoveries to clinical fruition. The NIH offers several programs to support translational research including an important resource established specifically for gene therapy researchers—the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Gene Therapy Resource Program (GTRP). This paper reviews the core components of the GTRP and describes how the GTRP provides researchers with resources that are critical to advancing investigational gene therapy products into clinical testing. PMID:23692378

  8. New advances in the mesenchymal stem cells therapy against skin flaps necrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu-Gui; Tang, Xiu-Fa

    2014-09-26

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), multipotential cells that reside within the bone marrow, can be induced to differentiate into various cells, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, vascular endothelial progenitor cells, and other cell types. MSCs are being widely studied as potential cell therapy agents due to their angiogenic properties, which have been well established by in vitro and in vivo researches. Within this context, MSCs therapy appears to hold substantial promise, particularly in the treatment of conditions involving skin grafts, pedicle flaps, as well as free flaps described in literatures. The purpose of this review is to report the new advances and mechanisms underlying MSCs therapy against skin flaps necrosis.

  9. LLNL medical and industrial laser isotope separation: large volume, low cost production through advanced laser technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Scheibner, K. F.; Shaw, M.; Wilder, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of this LDRD project was to demonstrate the technical and economical feasibility of applying laser isotope separation technology to the commercial enrichment (>lkg/y) of stable isotopes. A successful demonstration would well position the laboratory to make a credible case for the creation of an ongoing medical and industrial isotope production and development program at LLNL. Such a program would establish LLNL as a center for advanced medical isotope production, successfully leveraging previous LLNL Research and Development hardware, facilities, and knowledge.

  10. M-health medical video communication systems: an overview of design approaches and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Panayides, A S; Pattichis, M S; Constantinides, A G; Pattichis, C S

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the new, High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard, combined with wide deployment of 4G wireless networks, will provide significant support toward the adoption of mobile-health (m-health) medical video communication systems in standard clinical practice. For the first time since the emergence of m-health systems and services, medical video communication systems can be deployed that can rival the standards of in-hospital examinations. In this paper, we provide a thorough overview of today's advancements in the field, discuss existing approaches, and highlight the future trends and objectives.

  11. KRAS Testing for Anti-EGFR Therapy in Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    specimens. It is believed that KRAS status is not affected by treatments, therefore, for patients for whom surgical tissue is available for KRAS testing, additional biopsies prior to treatment with these targeted agents is not necessary. For patients that have not undergone surgery or for whom surgical tissue is not available, a biopsy of either the primary or metastatic site is required to determine their KRAS status. This is possible as status at the metastatic and primary tumour sites is considered to be similar. Research Question To determine if there is predictive value of KRAS testing in guiding treatment decisions with anti-EGFR targeted therapies in advanced colorectal cancer patients refractory to chemotherapy. Research Methods Literature Search The Medical Advisory Secretariat followed its standard procedures and on May 18, 2010, searched the following electronic databases: Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and The International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment database. The subject headings and keywords searched included colorectal cancer, cetuximab, panitumumab, and KRAS testing. The search was further restricted to English-language articles published between January 1, 2009 and May 18, 2010 resulting in 1335 articles for review. Excluded were case reports, comments, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, and letters. Studies published from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2008 were identified in a health technology assessment conducted by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), published in 2010. In total, 14 observational studies were identified for inclusion in this EBA: 4 for cetuximab monotherapy, 7 for the cetuximab-irinotecan combination therapy, and 3 to be included in the review for panitumumab monotherapy Inclusion Criteria English-language articles, and English or French-language HTAs

  12. [A report on staff development in advanced knowledge and technology of gene diagnosis for medical technologists by the Japanese Association of Medical Technologists: the view of medical technologists].

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, S; Ueno, I

    2000-10-01

    With advancement of the molecular biology, gene diagnosis is widely utilized in clinical application of medicine. For medical technologists, it is necessary to receive continued education to practice such advanced scientific trends. The Japanese Association of Medical Technologists established a working group for a staff development program of gene diagnosis and chromosome analysis in 1996, and has continued its activities in making inquiries about the present conditions, publishing a textbook, and providing seminars. The internal laboratory utilization of gene diagnosis was 8.7%(213 of 2437 hospitals). Based on the fact that about half of the hospitals use external laboratory, staff development for the internal utilization of gene diagnosis is an urgent issue. We have been providing seminars to meet the educational needs of our members. In addition to those activities, we have continued our efforts in providing a manual with clinically useful information, standardizing methods, establishing an information network, and conducting a controlled survey. The role of the working group is now shared by the local prefecture to further increase the numbers of those with expertise in gene diagnosis. We, medical technologists, need to have a global view of professional growth, and also to cooperate with academic societies related to gene diagnosis to establish a certification system. PMID:11215100

  13. EDITORIAL Complexity of advanced radiation therapy necessitates multidisciplinary inquiry into dose reconstruction and risk assessment Complexity of advanced radiation therapy necessitates multidisciplinary inquiry into dose reconstruction and risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhauser, Wayne

    2010-07-01

    computational cancer research, particularly research involving supercomputing. In April 2010, a symposium entitled '4th Joint Symposium on Computational Medical Physics: The Nexus of Research on Cancer, Radiation, and Supercomputing: Dawn of a Golden Age?' was convened at Rice University in Houston, Texas. One objective of this symposium was to provide researchers and clinicians with an overview of recent progress in advanced radiation therapy. Another was to review basic concepts and methods from a wide variety of disciplines related to cancer radiation therapy, including supercomputing, physics, informatics, imaging, and epidemiology. The symposium featured current issues and controversies and, in particular, a review of recent advances in research on proton and photon therapies. Sessions included Current Issues in Proton Therapy for Pediatric Cancers; Current Issues in Advanced Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer; Charged Particles in Space and Military Applications; Recent Advances in Radiation Epidemiology; Advanced Computing Techniques: Perspectives from Cancer Researchers and Computer Scientists; Radiobiologic, Dosimetric, and Outcomes Modeling; Imaging and Informatics, and a Young Investigators' Symposium. The complete program is available at www.regonline.com/joint_symposium. The symposium was attended by more than 100 delegates who delivered 47 oral presentations. The delegates included leading scientists and clinicians from the fields of epidemiology, particle physics, medical physics, mathematics, oncology, and cancer prevention. This issue of Physics in Medicine and Biology contains 13 original research articles based on selected presentations from the symposium. Each article underwent the journal's usual rigorous peer review process; we are grateful to the many individuals who contributed to this issue, including the publishing editor, board members, referees, and of course the authors, all of whom generously shared their time and expertise. The majority of articles

  14. Conceptualisation of the characteristics of advanced practitioners in the medical radiation professions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tony; Harris, Jillian; Woznitza, Nick; Maresse, Sharon; Sale, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Professions grapple with defining advanced practice and the characteristics of advanced practitioners. In nursing and allied health, advanced practice has been defined as ‘a state of professional maturity in which the individual demonstrates a level of integrated knowledge, skill and competence that challenges the accepted boundaries of practice and pioneers new developments in health care’. Evolution of advanced practice in Australia has been slower than in the United Kingdom, mainly due to differences in demography, the health system and industrial relations. This article describes a conceptual model of advanced practitioner characteristics in the medical radiation professions, taking into account experiences in other countries and professions. Using the CanMEDS framework, the model includes foundation characteristics of communication, collaboration and professionalism, which are fundamental to advanced clinical practice. Gateway characteristics are: clinical expertise, with high level competency in a particular area of clinical practice; scholarship and teaching, including a masters qualification and knowledge dissemination through educating others; and evidence-based practice, with judgements made on the basis of research findings, including research by the advanced practitioner. The pinnacle of advanced practice is clinical leadership, where the practitioner has a central role in the health care team, with the capacity to influence decision making and advocate for others, including patients. The proposed conceptual model is robust yet adaptable in defining generic characteristics of advanced practitioners, no matter their clinical specialty. The advanced practice roles that evolve to meet future health service demand must focus on the needs of patients, local populations and communities. PMID:26451243

  15. Advanced carcinoma of the stomach treated with definitive proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, S.; Kawanishi, N.; Fukutomi, H.; Osuga, T.; Iijima, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kitagawa, T. )

    1990-04-01

    We report the case of a 72-yr-old man who suffered from severe chronic emphysema with poor pulmonary function, and who had advanced cancer of the stomach. Proton beam radiotherapy was applied to the lesion, since surgery was contraindicated. The total dose to the stomach lesion was 61 Gy in 7 wk. The tumor on the stomach regressed, with flattening of the round wall of the lesion. The reactive changes of the proton beam radiotherapy, based on the histopathological examination, revealed extensive tumor necrosis and sparing of vital architecture of normal tissue around the irradiated tumor tissue. Only small clusters of vital or devitalized tumor cells with less than approximately 5% of the whole tumor tissue remained after treatment. We suggest that a high dose of radiation delivered by well-defined proton field could result in an improved therapeutic outcome without undue risk of injury to normal tissue.

  16. Advances in Corticosteroid Therapy for Ocular Inflammation: Loteprednol Etabonate

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, Timothy L.; DeCory, Heleen H.

    2012-01-01

    Topical corticosteroids are effective in reducing anterior segment inflammation but are associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) and cataract formation. Retrometabolic drug design has advanced the development of new corticosteroids with improved therapeutic indices. Engineered from prednisolone, loteprednol etabonate (LE) has a 17α-chloromethyl ester, in lieu of a ketone group, and a 17β-etabonate group. LE is highly lipophilic and binds with high affinity to the glucocorticoid receptor; any unbound LE is metabolized to inactive metabolites. LE has been studied in several anterior segment inflammatory conditions (giant papillary conjunctivitis, allergic conjunctivitis, anterior uveitis, and keratoconjunctivitis sicca), and in postoperative ocular inflammation and pain. Combined with tobramycin, it is effective in blepharokeratoconjunctivitis. Elevations in IOP are infrequent with LE, and the absence of a C-20 ketone precludes formation of Schiff base intermediates with lens proteins, a common first step implicated in cataract formation with ketone steroids. PMID:22536546

  17. New advances in the pathogenesis and therapy of essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Levine, Ross L; Heaney, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a hematopoietic disorder that manifests clinically as thrombocytosis, and patients with ET are at increased risk for developing thrombosis, myelofibrosis, and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Although ET was recognized as a distinct clinical syndrome more than 6 decades ago and was classified as a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) by William Dameshek in 1951, the molecular pathogenesis of ET remained unknown until 2005, when activating mutations in the JAK2 tyrosine kinase (JAK2V617F) were identified in a significant proportion of patients with ET, polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). In addition, subsequent studies have identified gain-of-function mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor (MPL) in a subset of patients with JAK2V617F-negative ET, suggesting that JAK2 activation by distinct mechanisms contributes to the pathogenesis of ET. Despite these important observations, important questions remain regarding the role of JAK2/MPL mutations in ET pathogenesis, the etiology of JAK2/MPL negative ET, the factors that distinguish ET from other MPNs with the JAK2V617F mutation, and the role of JAK2-targeted therapies for the treatment of these MPNs.

  18. Nanotechnology-Based Photodynamic Therapy: Concepts, Advances, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Jain, Nitin K; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photoactive process that uses the combination of photosensitizers (PSs) and specific wavelengths of light for the treatment of solid tumors and other diseases. PDT received increased attention after regulatory approval of several photosensitizing drugs and light applicators worldwide. With the advent of newer PSs, the role of PDT in the treatment of cancer and other diseases has been revolutionized. In addition, various targeting strategies developed for site-specific delivery of PSs will be helpful for avoiding phototoxicity to normal tissues. Receptor-mediated targeted PDT approaches using nanocarriers offer the opportunity of enhancing photodynamic efficiency by directly targeting diseased cells and tissues. At present, clinical application of PDT is well established in medicine and surgery. Successfully used in dermatology, urology, gastroenterology, and neurosurgery, PDT has also seen much progress in basic sciences and clinical photodynamics in recent years. Currently, the use of PDT is just beginning, and more research must be performed to prove its therapeutic efficacy. However, nontoxic compounds involved in PDT provide a certain hope that it will evolve to be an effective mechanism for combating chronic diseases. PMID:26559433

  19. Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Barry; Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-08-15

    Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and, in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant. PMID:27212445

  20. Effectiveness of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ando, Michiyo; Kira, Haruko; Hayashida, Shigeru; Ito, Sayoko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese patients with advanced cancer. Patients learned mindfulness practices and then made art to express their feelings in the first session. After receiving instruction on practicing mindfulness 2 weeks later, they participated in a second…

  1. Functional inclusion bodies produced in bacteria as naturally occurring nanopills for advanced cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Esther; Corchero, José L; Burgueño, Joan F; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Kosoy, Ana; Bosser, Ramon; Mendoza, Rosa; Martínez-Láinez, Joan Marc; Rinas, Ursula; Fernández, Ester; Ruiz-Avila, Luis; García-Fruitós, Elena; Villaverde, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    Inclusion bodies (50-500 nm in diameter) produced in recombinant bacteria can be engineered to contain functional proteins with therapeutic potential. Upon exposure, these protein particles are efficiently internalized by mammalian cells and promote recovery from diverse stresses. Being fully biocompatible, inclusion bodies are a novel platform, as tailored nanopills, for sustained drug release in advanced cell therapies.

  2. Regulation of Clinical Trials with Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in Germany.

    PubMed

    Renner, Matthias; Anliker, Brigitte; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schuele, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union, clinical trials for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products are regulated at the national level, in contrast to the situation for a Marketing Authorisation Application, in which a centralised procedure is foreseen for these medicinal products. Although based on a common understanding regarding the regulatory requirement to be fulfilled before conduct of a clinical trial with an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product, the procedures and partly the scientific requirements for approval of a clinical trial application differ between the European Union Member States. This chapter will thus give an overview about the path to be followed for a clinical trial application and the subsequent approval process for an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product in Germany and will describe the role of the stakeholders that are involved. In addition, important aspects of manufacturing, quality control and non-clinical testing of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in the clinical development phase are discussed. Finally, current and future approaches for harmonisation of clinical trial authorisation between European Union Member States are summarised.

  3. [Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 on advanced therapy medicinal products : Incorporation into national law].

    PubMed

    Dwenger, A; Strassburger, J; Schwerdtfeger, W

    2010-01-01

    Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 has created a new legal framework for advanced therapy medicinal products (gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineered products). The Regulation is directly applicable in the Member States of the European Union and, in principle, requires no incorporation into national law. However, the amendment of Directive 2001/83/EC, which results from Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007, has created a need for incorporation into and amendment of the German Medicinal Products Act. This is one of the objectives of the 15th amendment of the German Medicinal Products Act. In particular, the definition "advanced therapy medicinal products" and the special provisions for advanced therapy medicinal products prepared on a non-routine basis, which are based on the special provisions contained in Art. 28 No. 2 of Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007, are to be incorporated into the German Medicinal Products Act. These special provisions will be explained in detail.

  4. A Medical Mission to Guatemala as an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Skoy, Elizabeth T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the development and outcomes of an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) for a medical mission trip to Guatemala. Design. Pre-mission preparation and post-mission reflection activities were combined with in-country activities to create a 5-week APPE. During the 10-day medical mission trip, pharmacy students dispensed medications, counseled patients, conducted quality improvement assessments, and presented their findings and experiences as part of an interdisciplinary health care team. Assessment. The students who completed the mission trip met the objectives of the APPE and reported substantial learning in the areas of interdisciplinary teamwork and cultural competency. All students’ scores on the Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence—Student Version (IAPCC-SV) increased. The majority (81%) of student-generated quality improvement recommendations were implemented by the mission team. Conclusions. The medical mission APPE provided a rich learning environment for pharmacy students and resulted in modifications to the medical mission operation. This type of APPE could be implemented in other colleges of pharmacy via formation of partnerships with established medical mission teams as this one was. PMID:23129855

  5. In-depth Medical Nutrition Therapy for a Woman with Diabetes: From Pregnancy to Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes in pregnancy is associated with higher rates of miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, preterm labor, and fetal malformation. To prevent these obstetric and perinatal complications, women with diabetes have to control levels of blood sugar, both prior to and during pregnancy. Thus, individualized medical nutrition therapy for each stage of pregnancy is essential. We provided in-depth medical nutrition therapy to a 38-year-old pregnant woman with diabetes at all stages of pregnancy up to delivery. She underwent radiation therapy after surgery for breast cancer and was diagnosed with diabetes. At the time of diagnosis, her glycated hemoglobin level was 8.3% and she was planning her pregnancy. She started taking an oral hypoglycemic agent and received education regarding the management of diabetes and preconception care. She became pregnant while maintaining a glycated hemoglobin level of less than 6%. We provided education program for diabetes management during the pregnancy, together with insulin therapy. She experienced weight loss and ketones were detected; furthermore, she was taking in less than the recommended amount of foods for the regulation of blood sugar levels. By giving emotional support, we continued the counseling and achieved not only glycemic control but also instilled an appreciation of the importance of appropriate weight gain and coping with difficulties. Through careful diabetes management, the woman had a successful outcome for her pregnancy, other than entering preterm labor at 34 weeks. This study implicated that the important things in medical nutrition therapy for pregnant women with diabetes are frequent follow-up care and emotional approach through the pregnancy process. PMID:27812519

  6. Surgical management of Gorham-Stout disease of the pelvis refractory to medical and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Karim, S Mohammed; Colman, Matthew C; Cipriani, Nicole A; Nielsen, G Petur; Schwab, Joseph H; Hornicek, Francis J

    2015-11-01

    Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) is a rare condition characterized by spontaneous idiopathic bone resorption that can affect any part of the skeleton. Treatment is aimed at halting osteolysis and alleviating complications associated with bone loss. Often this can be achieved via observation and supportive management, medical treatment, and/or radiation therapy. We report a case of GSD of the pelvis that was refractory to medical and radiation therapy and was managed successfully with surgery. A 30-year-old man presented to our clinic 3 years after being diagnosed at an outside institution with GSD of the pelvis that was managed with medical treatments and radiation therapy. Despite aggressive, multimodality treatment, he was unable to ambulate without crutches and was in significant pain. The patient opted for intralesional surgery and spinopelvic fusion. Sixteen months after surgery, the patient had only mild pain and was able to ambulate with a cane. Very few cases have been reported of GSD involving the pelvis that necessitated surgical management. Significant functional impairment can occur as a result of pelvic osteolysis, and traditional management strategies focused on halting resorption may not be adequate. Surgical stabilization of the affected areas is an important treatment strategy for patients who have exhausted other options.

  7. Cognitive behavioural therapy for medically unexplained physical symptoms: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Speckens, A. E.; van Hemert, A. M.; Spinhoven, P.; Hawton, K. E.; Bolk, J. H.; Rooijmans, H. G.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the additional effect of cognitive behavioural therapy for patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms in comparison with optimised medical care. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial with follow up assessments six and 12 months after the baseline evaluation. SETTING--General medical outpatient clinic in a university hospital. SUBJECTS--An intervention group of 39 patients and a control group of 40 patients. INTERVENTIONS--The intervention group received between six and 16 sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy. Therapeutic techniques used included identification and modification of dysfunctional automatic thoughts and behavioural experiments aimed at breaking the vicious cycles of the symptoms and their consequences. The control group received optimised medical care. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The degree of change, frequency and intensity of the presenting symptoms, psychological distress, functional impairment, hypochondriacal beliefs and attitudes, and (at 12 months of follow up) number of visits to the general practitioner. RESULTS--At six months of follow up the intervention group reported a higher recovery rate (odds ratio 0.40; 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 1.00), a lower mean intensity of the physical symptoms (difference -1.2; -2.0 to -0.3), and less impairment of sleep (odds ratio 0.38; 0.15 to 0.94) than the controls. After adjustment for coincidental baseline differences the intervention and control groups also differed with regard to frequency of the symptoms (0.32; 0.13 to 0.77), limitations in social (0.35; 0.14 to 0.85) and leisure (0.36; 0.14 to 0.93) activities, and illness behaviour (difference -2.5; -4.6 to -0.5). At 12 months of follow up the differences between the groups were largely maintained. CONCLUSION--Cognitive behavioural therapy seems to be a feasible and effective treatment in general medical patients with unexplained physical symptoms. PMID:7496281

  8. Experience with fast neutron therapy for locally advanced sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, R.; Hussey, D.H.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.; Martin, R.G.; Peters, L.J.; Sinkovics, J.G.

    1980-03-01

    Between October 1972 and April 1978, 34 patients with locally advanced sarcomas were treated with fast neutrons using the Texas A and M variable energy cyclotron. The clinical material included 29 patients with soft tissue sarcomas, 4 with chondrosarcomas, and one with an osteosarcoma. The best results were achieved for patients with soft tissue sarcomas; 69% (20/29) had local control of their tumor. Only one of 4 patients with chondrosarcomas was classified as having local tumor control, and one patient with osteosarcoma had persistent disease. With most fractionation schedules, local tumor control was superior for patients who received doses greater than 6500 rad/sub eq/ (2100 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). The incidence of major complications was notably increased when maximum radiation doses of 7500 rad/sub eq/ or greater were administered (2400 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). In patients who underwent subsequent surgery, healing was satisfactory if the maximum radiation dose was limited to 4500 to 5500 rad/sub eq/(1450 to 1775 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons).

  9. A urinary test procedure for identification of cannabidiol in patients undergoing medical therapy with marijuana.

    PubMed

    Wertlake, Paul T; Henson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as Schedule I, drugs having no accepted medical value. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana. This conflict inhibits physicians from prescribing marijuana and the systematic study of marijuana in medical care. This study concerns the use of the clinical laboratory as a resource for physicians recommending cannabidiol (CBD) to patients, or for patients using medical marijuana. Marijuana containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is psychoactive. CBD is not psychoactive. CBD is reported to have medical benefit for seizure control, neurologic disorders including multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain and pain associated with cancer. Use of opiates leads to increasing dosage over time that may cause respiratory depression. The Medical Board of California has termed this a serious public health crisis of addiction, overdose, and death. Is it feasible that CBD might alleviate persistent, severe pain and therefore diminished opiate use? Further study is needed to determine medical effectiveness of CBD including the effect on concurrent opiate therapy due to competition for receptor sites. This study is the application of a gas chromatography mass spectrometry procedure adapted for use in our laboratory, to detect CBD in urine. The intended use is as a tool for physicians to assess that marijuana being used by a patient is of a composition likely to be medically effective. A law ensuring physicians freedom from federal prosecution would provide confidence essential to formal study of medical uses of marijuana and treatment of clinical problems. Detection of CBD in a urine sample would be a convenient test for such confirmation. PMID:26929665

  10. A urinary test procedure for identification of cannabidiol in patients undergoing medical therapy with marijuana

    PubMed Central

    Wertlake, Paul T; Henson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as Schedule I, drugs having no accepted medical value. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana. This conflict inhibits physicians from prescribing marijuana and the systematic study of marijuana in medical care. This study concerns the use of the clinical laboratory as a resource for physicians recommending cannabidiol (CBD) to patients, or for patients using medical marijuana. Marijuana containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is psychoactive. CBD is not psychoactive. CBD is reported to have medical benefit for seizure control, neurologic disorders including multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain and pain associated with cancer. Use of opiates leads to increasing dosage over time that may cause respiratory depression. The Medical Board of California has termed this a serious public health crisis of addiction, overdose, and death. Is it feasible that CBD might alleviate persistent, severe pain and therefore diminished opiate use? Further study is needed to determine medical effectiveness of CBD including the effect on concurrent opiate therapy due to competition for receptor sites. This study is the application of a gas chromatography mass spectrometry procedure adapted for use in our laboratory, to detect CBD in urine. The intended use is as a tool for physicians to assess that marijuana being used by a patient is of a composition likely to be medically effective. A law ensuring physicians freedom from federal prosecution would provide confidence essential to formal study of medical uses of marijuana and treatment of clinical problems. Detection of CBD in a urine sample would be a convenient test for such confirmation. PMID:26929665

  11. A urinary test procedure for identification of cannabidiol in patients undergoing medical therapy with marijuana.

    PubMed

    Wertlake, Paul T; Henson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as Schedule I, drugs having no accepted medical value. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana. This conflict inhibits physicians from prescribing marijuana and the systematic study of marijuana in medical care. This study concerns the use of the clinical laboratory as a resource for physicians recommending cannabidiol (CBD) to patients, or for patients using medical marijuana. Marijuana containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is psychoactive. CBD is not psychoactive. CBD is reported to have medical benefit for seizure control, neurologic disorders including multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain and pain associated with cancer. Use of opiates leads to increasing dosage over time that may cause respiratory depression. The Medical Board of California has termed this a serious public health crisis of addiction, overdose, and death. Is it feasible that CBD might alleviate persistent, severe pain and therefore diminished opiate use? Further study is needed to determine medical effectiveness of CBD including the effect on concurrent opiate therapy due to competition for receptor sites. This study is the application of a gas chromatography mass spectrometry procedure adapted for use in our laboratory, to detect CBD in urine. The intended use is as a tool for physicians to assess that marijuana being used by a patient is of a composition likely to be medically effective. A law ensuring physicians freedom from federal prosecution would provide confidence essential to formal study of medical uses of marijuana and treatment of clinical problems. Detection of CBD in a urine sample would be a convenient test for such confirmation.

  12. HER Story: The Next Chapter in HER-2-Directed Therapy for Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Anil A.; Rayson, Daniel; McLeod, Deanna; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Boileau, Jean-François; Gelmon, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Untreated human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2)-positive advanced breast cancer (ABC) is an aggressive disease, associated with a poor prognosis and short overall survival. HER-2-directed therapy prolongs both time to disease progression and overall survival when combined with chemotherapy and has become the standard of care for those with HER-2-positive breast cancer in the early and advanced settings. Despite the remarkable therapeutic impact HER-2-directed therapy has had on disease outcomes, some patients with HER-2-positive disease will have primary resistant disease and others will respond initially but will eventually have progression, underscoring the need for other novel therapeutic options. This article reviews recent phase III trial data and discusses a practical approach to sequencing of HER-2-directed therapy in patients with HER-2-positive ABC. The significant cumulative survival gains seen in these trials are slowly reshaping the landscape of HER-2-positive ABC outcomes. PMID:24212500

  13. Long-term results of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingtai; Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Dongbing; Tian, Yantao; Li, Yexiong; Feng, Qinfu; Zhang, Zhihui; Jiang, Qinglong; Zhang, Shuisheng; Tang, Xiaolong; Huang, Xianghui; Chu, Yunmian; Zhang, Jianghu; Sun, Yuemin; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Chengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess prognostic benefits of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment after IOERT. A retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data was conducted at the Cancer Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Cancer Center. Two hundred forty-seven consecutive patients with nonmetastatic LAPC who underwent IOERT between January 2008 and May 2015 were identified and included in the study. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the day of IOERT. Prognostic factors were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40%, 14%, and 7.2%, respectively, with a median OS of 9.0 months. On multivariate analysis, an IOERT applicator diameter < 6 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47–0.97), no intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.32–0.66), and receipt of postoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy (HR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04–0.25) were significantly associated with improved OS. Pain relief after IOERT was achieved in 111 of the 117 patients, with complete remission in 74 and partial remission in 37. Postoperative complications rate and mortality were 14.0% and 0.4%, respectively. Nonmetastatic LAPC patients with smaller size tumors could achieve positive long-term survival outcomes with a treatment strategy incorporating IOERT and postoperative adjuvant treatment. Chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy might be a recommended adjuvant treatment strategy for well-selected cases. Intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy should not be recommended for patients with nonmetastatic LAPC. PMID:27661028

  14. Safety and Benefit of Discontinuing Statin Therapy in the Setting of Advanced, Life-Limiting Illness

    PubMed Central

    Kutner, Jean S.; Blatchford, Patrick J.; Taylor, Don H.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Bull, Janet H.; Fairclough, Diane L.; Hanson, Laura C.; LeBlanc, Thomas W.; Samsa, Greg P.; Wolf, Steven; Aziz, Noreen M.; Currow, David C.; Ferrell, Betty; Wagner-Johnston, Nina; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Cleary, James F.; Dev, Sandesh; Goode, Patricia S.; Kamal, Arif H.; Kassner, Cordt; Kvale, Elizabeth A.; McCallum, Janelle G.; Ogunseitan, Adeboye B.; Pantilat, Steven Z.; Portenoy, Russell K.; Prince-Paul, Maryjo; Sloan, Jeff A.; Swetz, Keith M.; Von Gunten, Charles F.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE For patients with limited prognosis, some medication risks may outweigh the benefits, particularly when benefits take years to accrue; statins are one example. Data are lacking regarding the risks and benefits of discontinuing statin therapy for patients with limited life expectancy. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety, clinical, and cost impact of discontinuing statin medications for patients in the palliative care setting. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This was a multicenter, parallel-group, unblinded, pragmatic clinical trial. Eligibility included adults with an estimated life expectancy of between 1 month and 1 year, statin therapy for 3 months or more for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, recent deterioration in functional status, and no recent active cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomized to either discontinue or continue statin therapy and were monitored monthly for up to 1 year. The study was conducted from June 3, 2011, to May 2, 2013. All analyses were performed using an intent-to-treat approach. INTERVENTIONS Statin therapy was withdrawn from eligible patients who were randomized to the discontinuation group. Patients in the continuation group continued to receive statins. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outcomes included death within 60 days (primary outcome), survival, cardiovascular events, performance status, quality of life (QOL), symptoms, number of nonstatin medications, and cost savings. RESULTS A total of 381 patients were enrolled; 189 of these were randomized to discontinue statins, and 192 were randomized to continue therapy. Mean (SD) age was 74.1 (11.6) years, 22.0% of the participants were cognitively impaired, and 48.8% had cancer. The proportion of participants in the discontinuation vs continuation groups who died within 60 days was not significantly different (23.8% vs 20.3%; 90% CI, −3.5% to 10.5%; P = .36) and did not meet the noninferiority end point. Total QOL was better for the group

  15. [Recurrence and survival rate of advanced gastric cancer after preoperative intraarterial EAP I injection therapy].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Taniguchi, H; Miyata, K; Koyama, H; Tanaka, H; Ueshima, Y; Okano, S; Oguro, A; Itoh, A; Sawai, K

    1993-08-01

    In our department, curative operations were performed for 32 patients with advanced gastric cancer from April 1989 to August 1990. Preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy with etoposide (100 mg), pirarubicin (20 mg) and cisplatin (20 mg) was given 18 patients. Recurrence and survival rate were investigated. The survival rate of patients with preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy 45 months after operation was 59.2%, while that of patients without preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy was 75.8%. There were no significant differences between these two groups. Three lymph node recurrences were seen in patients with preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy (recurrence rate, 16.7%). Four recurrences were observed in patients without preoperative injection therapy (peritoneal dissemination 2, liver 1, local 1; recurrence rate, 28.6%). We earlier reported that preoperative intra-arterial cisplatin (40 or 60 mg) injection therapy may reduce the incidence of lymph node recurrence and liver metastasis but may not be effective to prevent postoperative peritoneal recurrence, while no peritoneal dissemination was observed in patients with preoperative intra-arterial EAP I injection therapy. Thus, it was concluded that further study of combination and dose of anti-cancer drug may improve effectiveness of preoperative intra-arterial injection therapy for gastric cancer.

  16. Lung volume reduction therapies for advanced emphysema: an update.

    PubMed

    Berger, Robert L; Decamp, Malcolm M; Criner, Gerard J; Celli, Bartolome R

    2010-08-01

    Observational and randomized studies provide convincing evidence that lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves symptoms, lung function, exercise tolerance, and life span in well-defined subsets of patients with emphysema. Yet, in the face of an estimated 3 million patients with emphysema in the United States, < 15 LVRS operations are performed monthly under the aegis of Medicare, in part because of misleading reporting in lay and medical publications suggesting that the operation is associated with prohibitive risks and offers minimal benefits. Thus, a treatment with proven potential for palliating and prolonging life may be underutilized. In an attempt to lower risks and cost, several bronchoscopic strategies (bronchoscopic emphysema treatment [BET]) to reduce lung volume have been introduced. The following three methods have been tested in some depth: (1) unidirectional valves that allow exit but bar entry of gas to collapse targeted hyperinflated portions of the lung and reduce overall volume; (2) biologic lung volume reduction (BioLVR) that involves intrabronchial administration of a biocompatible complex to collapse, inflame, scar, and shrink the targeted emphysematous lung; and (3) airway bypass tract (ABT) or creation of stented nonanatomic pathways between hyperinflated pulmonary parenchyma and bronchial tree to decompress and reduce the volume of oversized lung. The results of pilot and randomized pivotal clinical trials suggest that the bronchoscopic strategies are associated with lower mortality and morbidity but are also less efficient than LVRS. Most bronchoscopic approaches improve quality-of-life measures without supportive physiologic or exercise tolerance benefits. Although there is promise of limited therapeutic influence, the available information is not sufficient to recommend use of bronchoscopic strategies for treating emphysema. PMID:20682529

  17. [Use of complimentary medical therapies in HIV/AIDS in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Brauchli, P; Reuteler, I; Bürki, B; Saller, R

    1996-07-27

    The aim of the present survey was to evaluate the incidence and spectrum of complementary therapies among HIV-infected persons in Switzerland. Under the auspices of the SATG (Swiss Aids Treatment Group), a 13-page questionnaire was created to gather data on socio-demographics, stage of HIV infection, current regimes on opportunistic infections and antiretroviral medication, current and past use of complementary treatments, and reasons for choosing and terminating complementary therapies. Approximately 640 questionnaires in French and German were distributed among HIV-infected subjects. Distributing organizations were People with Aids (P.W.A.), the University Hospital Zurich and the regional "Aids-Hilfe" institutions. With 129 questionnaires returned, the feedback was about 20%. More than 80% of participants used at least one complementary therapy. Each person currently used four therapies (median) from a spectrum of more than 60 specific complementary treatments. The following treatments were used by more than 25% of respondents: vitamins, special diets, food supplements, physical exercise, meditation, phytotherapy, homeopathy, and psychotherapy. 47% of participants took either antiretroviral medication, prophylaxis against opportunistic infections, or both.

  18. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  19. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  20. Endovascular therapy for advanced post-thrombotic syndrome: Proceedings from a multidisciplinary consensus panel.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Suresh; Kahn, Susan R; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Comerota, Anthony J; Parpia, Sameer; Meleth, Sreelatha; Earp, Diane; Williams, Rick; Sista, Akhilesh K; Marston, William; Rathbun, Suman; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Razavi, Mahmood K; Jaff, Michael R; Kearon, Clive

    2016-08-01

    Patients with advanced post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and chronic iliac vein obstruction suffer major physical limitations and impairment of health-related quality of life. Currently there is a lack of evidence-based treatment options for these patients. Early studies suggest that imaging-guided, catheter-based endovascular therapy can eliminate iliac vein obstruction and saphenous venous valvular reflux, resulting in reduced PTS severity; however, these observations have not been rigorously validated. A multidisciplinary expert panel meeting was convened to plan a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate endovascular therapy for the treatment of advanced PTS. This article summarizes the findings of the panel, and is expected to assist in developing a National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trial and other studies to improve the care of patients with advanced PTS.

  1. Endovascular therapy for advanced post-thrombotic syndrome: Proceedings from a multidisciplinary consensus panel

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Suresh; Kahn, Susan R; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Comerota, Anthony J; Parpia, Sameer; Meleth, Sreelatha; Earp, Diane; Williams, Rick; Sista, Akhilesh K; Marston, William; Rathbun, Suman; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Razavi, Mahmood K; Jaff, Michael R; Kearon, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and chronic iliac vein obstruction suffer major physical limitations and impairment of health-related quality of life. Currently there is a lack of evidence-based treatment options for these patients. Early studies suggest that imaging-guided, catheter-based endovascular therapy can eliminate iliac vein obstruction and saphenous venous valvular reflux, resulting in reduced PTS severity; however, these observations have not been rigorously validated. A multidisciplinary expert panel meeting was convened to plan a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate endovascular therapy for the treatment of advanced PTS. This article summarizes the findings of the panel, and is expected to assist in developing a National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trial and other studies to improve the care of patients with advanced PTS. PMID:27247235

  2. Attitudes towards and barriers to writing advance directives amongst cancer patients, healthy controls, and medical staff

    PubMed Central

    Sahm, S; Will, R; Hommel, G

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: After years of public discussion too little is still known about willingness to accept the idea of writing an advance directive among various groups of people in EU countries. We investigated knowledge about and willingness to accept such a directive in cancer patients, healthy controls, physicians, and nursing staff in Germany. Methods: Cancer patients, healthy controls, nursing staff, and physicians (n = 100 in each group) were surveyed by means of a structured questionnaire. Results: Only 18% and 19% of the patients and healthy controls respectively, and 10% of the medical staff had written an advance directive. However, 50–81% of those surveyed indicated that they wished to write one. This intention was associated with deteriorating health (p < 0.001). Only 29% of the healthy controls and 43% of the patients knew about the possibility of appointing a health care proxy. A majority in all groups believed that advance directives may influence the course of treatment (79–85%), yet half of those surveyed in all groups fear that patients could be pressurised into writing an advance directive, and 38–65% thought that relatives could abuse such documents. Conclusions: Only a minority of the participants had written an advance directive and knew about the possibility of authorising a health care proxy. Deteriorating health was associated with increasing willingness to make a directive. Despite a majority belief that advance directives may influence treatment at the end of life, other factors limit their employment, such as fear of abuse. PMID:16076965

  3. Adherence to Antihypertensive Therapy and Elevated Blood Pressure: Should We Consider the Use of Multiple Medications?

    PubMed Central

    Hedna, Khedidja; Hakkarainen, Katja M.; Gyllensten, Hanna; Jönsson, Anna K.; Andersson Sundell, Karolina; Petzold, Max; Hägg, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Background Although a majority of patients with hypertension require a multidrug therapy, this is rarely considered when measuring adherence from refill data. Moreover, investigating the association between refill non-adherence to antihypertensive therapy (AHT) and elevated blood pressure (BP) has been advocated. Objective Identify factors associated with non-adherence to AHT, considering the multidrug therapy, and investigate the association between non-adherence to AHT and elevated BP. Methods A retrospective cohort study including patients with hypertension, identified from a random sample of 5025 Swedish adults. Two measures of adherence were estimated by the proportion of days covered method (PDC≥80%): (1) Adherence to any antihypertensive medication and, (2) adherence to the full AHT regimen. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to investigate the association between sociodemographic factors (age, sex, education, income), clinical factors (user profile, number of antihypertensive medications, healthcare use, cardiovascular comorbidities) and non-adherence. Moreover, the association between non-adherence (long-term and a month prior to BP measurement) and elevated BP was investigated. Results Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication was higher among persons < 65 years (Odds Ratio, OR 2.75 [95% CI, 1.18–6.43]) and with the lowest income (OR 2.05 [95% CI, 1.01–4.16]). Non-adherence to the full AHT regimen was higher among new users (OR 2.04 [95% CI, 1.32–3.15]), persons using specialized healthcare (OR 1.63, [95% CI, 1.14–2.32]), and having multiple antihypertensive medications (OR 1.85 [95% CI, 1.25–2.75] and OR 5.22 [95% CI, 3.48–7.83], for 2 and ≥3 antihypertensive medications, respectively). Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication a month prior to healthcare visit was associated with elevated BP. Conclusion Sociodemographic factors were associated with non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication while clinical

  4. Conjunctival modifications induced by medical and surgical therapies in patients with glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Mastropasqua, Leonardo; Agnifili, Luca; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Fasanella, Vincenzo

    2013-02-01

    Lowering intra-ocular pressure, either medically or surgically, is the proven strategy to control glaucoma, though profound changes to the ocular surface and conjunctiva are caused. Toxicity and allergy initiated by medical therapy induce modifications, which progressively worsen with the length of treatment and number of drugs. Conjunctival changes lead to symptoms of ocular surface disease, reduced quality of life, reduced therapeutic compliance and increased risk of surgical failure. Surgery modifies conjunctiva by inducing bleb formation in fistulizing techniques, and by activating secondary aqueous humour outflow pathways, such as trans-scleral routes, in both filtration and bleb-less approaches. The use of unpreserved medications, limitation of intra-operative conjunctival damage and development of bleb-less surgery are advisable.

  5. CELL THERAPY FOR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC REPAIR: ADVANCING CELL THERAPY FROM BENCH TO CLINICS

    PubMed Central

    Benneker, L.M.; Andersson, G.; Iatridis, J.C.; Sakai, D.; Härtl, R.; Ito, K.; Grad, S.

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a major cause of pain and disability; yet therapeutic options are limited and treatment often remains unsatisfactory. In recent years, research activities have intensified in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated encourageing results. Nonetheless, the translation of new biological therapies into clinical practice faces substantial barriers. During the symposium “Where Science meets Clinics”, sponsored by the AO Foundation and held in Davos, Switzerland, from September 5–7, 2013, hurdles for translation were outlined, and ways to overcome them were discussed. With respect to cell therapy for IVD repair, it is obvious that regenerative treatment is indicated at early stages of disc degeneration, before structural changes have occurred. It is envisaged that in the near future, screening techniques and non-invasive imageing methods will be available to detect early degenerative changes. The promises of cell therapy include a sustained effect on matrix synthesis, inflammation control, and prevention of angio- and neurogenesis. Discogenic pain, originating from “black discs” or annular injury, prevention of adjacent segment disease, and prevention of post-discectomy syndrome were identified as prospective indications for cell therapy. Before such therapy can safely and effectively be introduced into clinics, the identification of the patient population and proper standardisation of diagnostic parameters and outcome measurements are indispensable. Furthermore, open questions regarding the optimal cell type and delivery method need to be resolved in outline order to overcome the safety concerns implied with certain procedures. Finally, appropriate large animal models and well-designed clinical studies will be required, particularly addressing safety aspects. PMID:24802611

  6. Treatment of advanced head and neck cancer: multiple daily dose fractionated radiation therapy and sequential multimodal treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, M; Browde, S; Bezwoda, W R; de Moor, N G; Derman, D P

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients with advanced head and neck cancer were entered into a randomised trial comparing chemotherapy (DDP + bleomycin) alone, multiple daily fractionated radiation therapy, and multimodality therapy consisting of chemotherapy plus multiple fractionated radiation therapy. Multimodal therapy gave a significantly higher response rate (69%) than either single-treatment modality. The use of a multiple daily dose fractionation allowed radiation therapy to be completed over 10 treatment days, and the addition of chemotherapy to the radiation treatment did not significantly increase toxicity. Patients receiving multimodal therapy also survived significantly longer (median 50 weeks) than those receiving single-modality therapy (median 24 weeks).

  7. Interventional therapy procedures assisted by medical imaging and simulation. The experience of U 703 Inserm (Lille France).

    PubMed

    Vermandel, M; Betrouni, N; Rousseau, J; Dubois, P

    2007-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, minimally invasive techniques have been increasingly used in ever more and diversified fields of application. These techniques have some shared characteristics (predominant role of medical imaging, intensive use of new communication technologies, a multidisciplinary medical and scientific framework, etc.) but also shared specific problems (high-tech tools unfamiliar to the medical users, a major and long period of time for technological development, unavailability of training systems, difficulties in obtaining regulatory approval). For a long time, our Laboratory of Medical Physics (U 703 Inserm) has developed an innovative research activity in biomedical engineering in the field of assisted therapy, medical imaging and medical simulation. This paper presents the general context of interventional therapy procedures assisted by image and simulation and describes our scientific activities based on realistic objectives close to medical practice.

  8. Teaching Advanced Leadership Skills in Community Service (ALSCS) to medical students.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Adam O; Calleson, Diane; Bearman, Rachel; Steiner, Beat D; Frasier, Pamela Y; Slatt, Lisa

    2009-06-01

    Inadequate access to health care, lack of health insurance, and significant health disparities reflect crises in health care affecting all of society. Training U.S. physicians to possess not only clinical expertise but also sufficient leadership skills is essential to solve these problems and to effectively improve health care systems. Few models in the undergraduate medical curriculum exist for teaching students how to combine needed leadership competencies with actual service opportunities.The Advanced Leadership Skills in Community Service (ALSCS) selective developed in response to the shortage of leadership models and leadership training for medical students. The ALSCS selective is designed specifically to increase students' leadership skills, with an emphasis on community service. The selective integrates classroom-based learning, hands-on application of learned skills, and service learning. More than 60 medical students have participated in the selective since inception. Short-term outcomes demonstrate an increase in students' self-efficacy around multiple dimensions of leadership skills (e.g., fundraising, networking, motivating others). Students have also successfully completed more than a dozen leadership and community service projects. The selective offers an innovative model of a leadership-skills-based course that can have a positive impact on leadership skill development among medical school students and that can be incorporated into the medical school curriculum.

  9. Competence of medical students in communicating drug therapy: Value of role-play demonstrations

    PubMed Central

    Tayem, Yasin I.; Altabtabaei, Abdulaziz S.; Mohamed, Mohamed W.; Arrfedi, Mansour M.; Aljawder, Hasan S.; Aldebous, Fahad A.; James, Henry; Al Khaja, Khalid A. J.; Sequeira, Reginald P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study used role-play demonstrations to train medical students to communicate drug therapy and evaluated the perceptions on this instructional approach. Materials and Methods: The second-year medical students who attended a prescription writing session (n = 133), participated in this study. Prescription communication was introduced by using role-play demonstrations. Participant's perceptions were explored by a self-administered questionnaire and focus group discussion. The academic achievement of attendees and nonattendees was compared with an objective structured performance evaluation (OSPE) station that tested students’ competence in this skill. Results: Most attendees responded to the questionnaire (81.2%). Almost all respondents expressed their desire to have similar demonstrations in other units. A large proportion of participants reported that role-play demonstrations helped them develop their communication skills, in general, confidence to communicate drug-related information in a prescription, and the ability to explain the aim of drug therapy to patients. Most trainees thought also that they developed skills to communicate instructions on drug use including drug dose, frequency of administration, duration of therapy, adverse drug reactions, and warnings. During the focus group interviews, students thought that role-play was useful but would be more beneficial if conducted frequently in small group as part of the curriculum implementation. The majority of students also reported improved competence in writing a complete prescription. Analysis of attendees and nonattendees grades in the OSPE showed that the former scored higher than the latter group (P = 0.016). Conclusions: Role-play demonstrations were well accepted by medical students and led to the development of their competence in communicating drug therapy to patients. PMID:26997720

  10. [Physical therapy, orthosis and occupational therapy in medical and surgical rheumatologic hand diseases].

    PubMed

    Dumitrache, Alina; Sanchez, Katherine; Esnouf, Servane; Roren, Alexandra; Vidal, Jean; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine

    2013-12-01

    Hand pathology can cause functional disability and deterioration in the quality of life by altering the grip and therefore, it requires a complex approach by a multidisciplinary team, including physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Orthoses are an important part of the treatment of these pathologies. A thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of lesions and their risk of progression to deformities is required for an appropriate use. Their fabrication by a specialized therapist and also their monitoring assure a good compliance. Their effectiveness depends on the patient adherence, for which information and education are essential. The role of physiotherapist is to establish a personalised rehabilitation program, including passive and active exercises and also the prevention of joint stiffness. The main goal after surgery is to initiate an early active motion in order to decrease the risk of adhesions without compromising the suture by the use of a splint. The role of occupational therapist is important all along the treatment period, from the early rehabilitation to the moment of return to home environment. The literature search shows that there is a lack of good methodological clinical studies in order to assess the effectiveness and the costs of this medical treatment.

  11. Capecitabine (Xeloda) improves medical resource use compared with 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin in a phase III trial conducted in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Twelves, C; Boyer, M; Findlay, M; Cassidy, J; Weitzel, C; Barker, C; Osterwalder, B; Jamieson, C; Hieke, K

    2001-03-01

    Standard therapy for advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer consists of 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin (5-FU/LV) administered intravenously (i.v.). Capecitabine (Xeloda), an oral fluoropyrimidine carbamate which is preferentially activated by thymidine phosphorylase in tumour cells, mimics continuous 5-FU and is a recently developed alternative to i.v. 5-FU/LV. The choice of oral rather than intravenous treatment may affect medical resource use because the two regimens do not require the same intensity of medical intervention for drug administration, and have different toxicity profiles. Here we examine medical resource use in the first-line treatment of colorectal cancer patients with capecitabine compared with those receiving the Mayo Clinic regimen of 5-FU/LV. In a prospective, randomised phase III clinical trial, 602 patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer recruited from 59 centres worldwide were randomised to treatment with either capecitabine or the Mayo regimen of 5-FU/LV. In addition to clinical efficacy and safety endpoints, data were collected on hospital visits required for drug administration, hospital admissions, and drugs and unscheduled consultations with physicians required for the treatment of adverse events. Capecitabine treatment in comparison to 5-FU/LV in advanced colorectal carcinoma resulted in superior response rates (26.6% versus 17.9%, P=0.013) and improved safety including less stomatitis and myelosuppression. Capecitabine patients required substantially fewer hospital visits for drug administration than 5-FU/LV patients. Medical resource use analysis showed that patients treated with capecitabine spent fewer days in hospital for the management of treatment related adverse events than did patients treated with 5-FU/LV. In addition, capecitabine reduced the requirement for expensive drugs, in particular antimicrobials fluconazole and 5-HT3-antagonists to manage adverse events. As anticipated with an oral home-based therapy

  12. Medical therapy for rheumatic heart disease: is it time to be proactive rather than reactive?

    PubMed

    Rajamannan, Nalini M; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Moura, Luis; Zamorano, Jose L; Rosenhek, Raphael A; Best, Patricia Jm; Lloyd, Margaret A; Rocha-Goncalves, F; Chandra, Sarat; Alfieri, Ottavio; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Tornos, Pilar; Baliga, Ragavendra R; Wang, Andrew; Bashore, Thomas; Ramakrishnan, S; Spargias, Konstantinos; Shuvy, Mony; Beeri, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Bahl, Vinay; Pierard, Luc A; Maurer, Gerald; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H; Chopra, K; Pandian, Natesa G

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is well known to be an active inflammatory process which develops progressive calcification and leaflet thickening over time. The potential for statin therapy in slowing the progression of valvular heart disease is still controversial. Retrospective studies have shown that medical therapy is beneficial for patients with calcific aortic stenosis and recently for rheumatic valve disease. However, the prospective randomized clinical trials have been negative to date. This article discusses the epidemiologic risk factors, basic science, retrospective and prospective studies in valvular heart disease and a future clinical trial to target RHD with statin therapy to slow the progression of this disease. Recent epidemiological studies have revealed the risk factors associated with valvular disease include male gender, smoking, hypertension and elevated serum cholesterol and are similar to the risk factors for vascular atherosclerosis. An increasing number of models of experimental hypercholesterolemia demonstrate features of atherosclerosis in the aortic valve (AV), which are similar to the early stages of vascular atherosclerotic lesions. Calcification, the end stage process of the disease, must be understood as a prognostic indicator in the modification of this cellular process before it is too late. This is important in calcific aortic stenosis as well as in rheumatic valve disease. There are a growing number of studies that describe similar pathophysiologic molecular markers in the development of rheumatic valve disease as in calcific aortic stenosis. In summary, these findings suggest that medical therapies may have a potential role in patients in the early stages of this disease process to slow the progression of RHD affecting the valves. This review will summarize the potential for statin therapy for this patient population.

  13. Medical Therapy for Rheumatic Heart Disease: Is it time to be Proactive rather than Reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Moura, Luis; Zamorano, José L.; Rosenhek, Raphael A.; Best, Patricia JM.; Lloyd, Margaret A.; Rocha-Gonçalves, F.; Chandra, Sarat; Alfieri, Ottavio; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Tornos, Pilar; Baliga, Ragavendra R; Wang, Andrew; Bashore, Thomas; Ramakrishnan, S; Spargias, Konstantinos; Shuvy, Mony; Beeri, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Bahl, Vinay; Pierard, Luc A.; Maurer, Gerald; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H.; Chopra, H. K.; Pandian, Natesa G.

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is well known to be an active inflammatory process which develops progressive calcification and leaflet thickening over time. The potential for statin therapy in slowing the progression of valvular heart disease is still controversial. Retrospective studies have shown that medical therapy is beneficial for patients with calcific aortic stenosis and recently for rheumatic valve disease. However, the prospective randomized clinical trials have been negative to date. This article discusses the epidemiologic risk factors, basic science, retrospective and prospective studies in valvular heart disease and a future clinical trial to target RHD with statin therapy to slow the progression of this disease. Recent epidemiological studies have revealed the risk factors associated with valvular disease include male gender, smoking, hypertension and elevated serum cholesterol and are similar to the risk factors for vascular atherosclerosis. An increasing number of models of experimental hypercholesterolemia demonstrate features of atherosclerosis in the aortic valve (AV), which are similar to the early stages of vascular atherosclerotic lesions. Calcification, the end stage process of the disease, must be understood as a prognostic indicator in the modification of this cellular process before it is too late. This is important in calcific aortic stenosis as well as in rheumatic valve disease. There are a growing number of studies that describe similar pathophysiologic molecular markers in the development of rheumatic valve disease as in calcific aortic stenosis. In summary, these findings suggest that medical therapies may have a potential role in patients in the early stages of this disease process to slow the progression of RHD affecting the valves. This review will summarize the potential for statin therapy for this patient population. PMID:19729684

  14. Dawn of advanced molecular medicine: nanotechnological advancements in cancer imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Shaffer, Travis M; Thorek, Daniel L J; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role not only in our everyday life (with all its benefits and dangers) but also in medicine. Nanoparticles are to date the most intriguing option to deliver high concentrations of agents specifically and directly to cancer cells; therefore, a wide variety of these nanomaterials has been developed and explored. These span the range from simple nanoagents to sophisticated smart devices for drug delivery or imaging. Nanomaterials usually provide a large surface area, allowing for decoration with a large amount of moieties on the surface for either additional functionalities or targeting. Besides using particles solely for imaging purposes, they can also carry as a payload a therapeutic agent. If both are combined within the same particle, a theranostic agent is created. The sophistication of highly developed nanotechnology targeting approaches provides a promising means for many clinical implementations and can provide improved applications for otherwise suboptimal formulations. In this review we will explore nanotechnology both for imaging and therapy to provide a general overview of the field and its impact on cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:25271430

  15. Dawn of Advanced Molecular Medicine: Nanotechnological Advancements in Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Shaffer, Travis M.; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role not only in our everyday life (with all its benefits and dangers) but also in medicine. Nanoparticles are to date the most intriguing option to deliver high concentrations of agents specifically and directly to cancer cells; therefore, a wide variety of these nanomaterials has been developed and explored. These span the range from simple nanoagents to sophisticated smart devices for drug delivery or imaging. Nanomaterials usually provide a large surface area, allowing for decoration with a large amount of moieties on the surface for either additional functionalities or targeting. Besides using particles solely for imaging purposes, they can also carry as a payload a therapeutic agent. If both are combined within the same particle, a theranostic agent is created. The sophistication of highly developed nanotechnology targeting approaches provides a promising means for many clinical implementations and can provide improved applications for otherwise suboptimal formulations. In this review we will explore nanotechnology both for imaging and therapy to provide a general overview of the field and its impact on cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:25271430

  16. Position of the American Dietetic Association: integration of medical nutrition therapy and pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    2003-10-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that the application of medical nutrition therapy (MNT) and lifestyle counseling as a part of the Nutrition Care Process is an integral component of the medical treatment for management of specific disease states and conditions and should be the initial step in the management of these situations. If optimal control cannot be achieved with MNT alone and concurrent pharmacotherapy is required, then The Association promotes a team approach to care for clients receiving concurrent MNT and pharmacotherapy and encourages active collaboration among dietetics professionals and other members of the health care team. There are a number of medical conditions, many of them chronic, that will respond to MNT and, therefore, MNT should be the first intervention for these conditions. In addition to being a vital element of the optimal management and control of these conditions, MNT is also a cost-effective method of management. However, because of the long-term nature of these conditions, concurrent pharmacotherapy may become necessary to achieve or maintain optimal control. In cases where this is necessary, MNT should continue to be an integral component of the therapy because it may complement or enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of pharmacotherapy, thereby reducing or eliminating the need for multiple medications. The utilization of a coordinated multidisciplinary team approach is critical to the success of the concurrent use of MNT and pharmacotherapy because of the long-term duration of the treatments, the necessity of monitoring compliance and effectiveness, and the likelihood of multiple medication-nutrient interactions.

  17. Community-based treatment of advanced HIV disease: introducing DOT-HAART (directly observed therapy with highly active antiretroviral therapy).

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, P.; Léandre, F.; Mukherjee, J.; Gupta, R.; Tarter, L.; Kim, J. Y.

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) overtook tuberculosis (TB) as the world's leading infectious cause of adult deaths. In affluent countries, however, AIDS mortality has dropped sharply, largely because of the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Antiretroviral agents are not yet considered essential medications by international public health experts and are not widely used in the poor countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) takes its greatest toll. Arguments against the use of HAART have mainly been based on the high cost of medications and the lack of the infrastructure necessary for using them wisely. We re- examine these arguments in the setting of rising AIDS mortality in developing countries and falling drug prices, and describe a small community-based treatment programme based on lessons gained in TB control. With the collaboration of Haitian community health workers experienced in the delivery of home-based and directly observed treatment for TB, an AIDS-prevention project was expanded to deliver HAART to a subset of HIV patients deemed most likely to benefit. The inclusion criteria and preliminary results are presented. We conclude that directly observed therapy (DOT) with HAART, "DOT-HAART", can be delivered effectively in poor settings if there is an uninterrupted supply of high-quality drugs. PMID:11799447

  18. New advanced technologies to provide decentralised and secure access to medical records: case studies in oncology.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Bourquard, Karima; Boire, Jean-Yves; de Vlieger, Paul; Maigne, Lydia; Breton, Vincent

    2009-08-07

    The main problem for health professionals and patients in accessing information is that this information is very often distributed over many medical records and locations. This problem is particularly acute in cancerology because patients may be treated for many years and undergo a variety of examinations. Recent advances in technology make it feasible to gain access to medical records anywhere and anytime, allowing the physician or the patient to gather information from an "ephemeral electronic patient record". However, this easy access to data is accompanied by the requirement for improved security (confidentiality, traceability, integrity, ...) and this issue needs to be addressed. In this paper we propose and discuss a decentralised approach based on recent advances in information sharing and protection: Grid technologies and watermarking methodologies. The potential impact of these technologies for oncology is illustrated by the examples of two experimental cases: a cancer surveillance network and a radiotherapy treatment plan. It is expected that the proposed approach will constitute the basis of a future secure "google-like" access to medical records.

  19. New Advanced Technologies to Provide Decentralised and Secure Access to Medical Records: Case Studies in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Bourquard, Karima; Boire, Jean-Yves; de Vlieger, Paul; Maigne, Lydia; Breton, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The main problem for health professionals and patients in accessing information is that this information is very often distributed over many medical records and locations. This problem is particularly acute in cancerology because patients may be treated for many years and undergo a variety of examinations. Recent advances in technology make it feasible to gain access to medical records anywhere and anytime, allowing the physician or the patient to gather information from an “ephemeral electronic patient record”. However, this easy access to data is accompanied by the requirement for improved security (confidentiality, traceability, integrity, ...) and this issue needs to be addressed. In this paper we propose and discuss a decentralised approach based on recent advances in information sharing and protection: Grid technologies and watermarking methodologies. The potential impact of these technologies for oncology is illustrated by the examples of two experimental cases: a cancer surveillance network and a radiotherapy treatment plan. It is expected that the proposed approach will constitute the basis of a future secure “google-like” access to medical records. PMID:19718446

  20. Cell therapy, advanced materials, and new approaches to acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Yevzlin, Alexander S; Humes, H David

    2009-12-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common clinical syndrome characterized by an abrupt deterioration in kidney function, resulting in abnormalities in volume-regulatory, metabolic-regulatory, excretory, and endocrine functions. Despite decades of improvements in the provision of intensive care, and specifically in the provision of renal replacement therapy, the morbidity and mortality associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) remain extremely high. This article highlights novel cell therapies, advanced materials, and approaches to AKI with the aim of illuminating a potential path for future basic, translational, and clinical research using these novel modalities.

  1. [Immunomodulator Intensification of Etioropic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Pulmonary Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kolomiets, V M; Abramov, A V; Rachina, N V; Rubleva, N V

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at possible increase of the therapy efficacy in patients with advanced tuberculosis by including immunomodulators to the treatment schemes. The data concerning 6034 patients with advanced tuberculosis, mainly fibrocavernous tuberculosis of the lungs, were analysed. Four groups of the patients were randomized. In group 1 the management of the patients included etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures with the use of Cycloferon. The group 2 patients in addition to the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures were given Omega-3. In group 3 the management included the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures. In group 4 the etioropic therapy was used alone. The analysis showed that 3419 patients had primary pulmonary tuberculosis, 340 patients had relapsing tuberculosis and 2275 patients had long-term process. The etiotropic therapy efficacy was estimated after an intensive phase of not more than 3 months. In the cases with Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance and some other unfavourable factors it was estimated after a 5-month intensive phase. The results confirmed that inclusion of immunomodulators to the treatment schemes allowed to increase the therapy efficacy and the patients' adherence to the treatment, as well as to shorten the period of the bacteria carriage. Thus, the use of Cycloferon in the schemes of the treatment of the patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis allowed to shorten the period of the pathogen carriage (as well as the drug resistant forms) in 94.1 ± 3.33% of the patients in spite of concomitant diseases. The effect of Cycloferon in such cases was likely due to both its direct immunoprotective action and the improvement of the general state of the patients and their higher adherence to the treatment.

  2. The effect of locoregional therapies in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Spivack, John H.; Berger, Yaniv; Heskel, Marina; Aycart, Samantha N.; Sweeney, Robert; Edwards, Martin P.; Labow, Daniel M.; Kim, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims It is unknown whether the addition of locoregional therapies (LRTx) to sorafenib improves prognosis over sorafenib alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LRTx in this population. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients with advanced HCC as defined by extrahepatic metastasis, lymphadenopathy >2 cm, or gross vascular invasion. Sorafenib therapy was required for inclusion. Survival of patients who received LRTx after progression to advanced stage was compared to those who did not receive LRTx. Results Using an intention to treat analysis of 312 eligible patients, a propensity weighted proportional hazards model demonstrated LRTx as a predictor of survival (HR = 0.505, 95% CI: 0.407–0.628; P < 0.001). The greatest benefit was seen in patients with the largest tumor burden (HR = 0.305, 95% CI: 0.236–0.393; P < 0.01). Median survival in the sorafenib arm was 143 days (95% CI: 118–161) vs. 247 days (95% CI: 220–289) in the sorafenib plus LRTx arm (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate a survival benefit with the addition of LRTx to sorafenib for patients with advanced HCC. These findings should prompt a prospective clinical trial to further assess the role of LRTx in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:27154804

  3. But does it do any good? Measuring the impact of music therapy on people with advanced dementia: (Innovative practice).

    PubMed

    Gold, Karen

    2014-03-01

    This article describes the impact of music therapy upon a group of nine people with advanced dementia in a hospital setting. It demonstrates how the impact of music therapy was measured using the case notes completed by nursing and care staff and how these notes suggested that music therapy had a positive effect on the mood and behaviour on eight of the nine people receiving music therapy.

  4. But does it do any good? Measuring the impact of music therapy on people with advanced dementia: (Innovative practice).

    PubMed

    Gold, Karen

    2014-03-01

    This article describes the impact of music therapy upon a group of nine people with advanced dementia in a hospital setting. It demonstrates how the impact of music therapy was measured using the case notes completed by nursing and care staff and how these notes suggested that music therapy had a positive effect on the mood and behaviour on eight of the nine people receiving music therapy. PMID:24339096

  5. A modern literature review of carbon monoxide poisoning theories, therapies, and potential targets for therapy advancement.

    PubMed

    Roderique, Joseph D; Josef, Christopher S; Feldman, Michael J; Spiess, Bruce D

    2015-08-01

    The first descriptions of carbon monoxide (CO) and its toxic nature appeared in the literature over 100 years ago in separate publications by Drs. Douglas and Haldane. Both men ascribed the deleterious effects of this newly discovered gas to its strong interaction with hemoglobin. Since then the adverse sequelae of CO poisoning has been almost universally attributed to hypoxic injury secondary to CO occupation of oxygen binding sites on hemoglobin. Despite a mounting body of literature suggesting other mechanisms of injury, this pathophysiology and its associated oxygen centric therapies persists. This review attempts to elucidate the remarkably complex nature of CO as a gasotransmitter. While CO's affinity for hemoglobin remains undisputed, new research suggests that its role in nitric oxide release, reactive oxygen species formation, and its direct action on ion channels is much more significant. In the course of understanding the multifaceted character of this simple molecule it becomes apparent that current oxygen based therapies meant to displace CO from hemoglobin may be insufficient and possibly harmful. Approaching CO as a complex gasotransmitter will help guide understanding of the complex and poorly understood sequelae and illuminate potentials for new treatment modalities.

  6. Endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer: Standard techniques and recent advances in ESD

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Keiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now a well-known endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer. ESD was introduced to resect large specimens of early gastric cancer in a single piece. ESD can provide precision of histologic diagnosis and can also reduce the recurrence rate. However, the drawback of ESD is its technical difficulty, and, consequently, it is associated with a high rate of complications, the need for advanced endoscopic techniques, and a lengthy procedure time. Various advances in the devices and techniques used for ESD have contributed to overcoming these drawbacks. PMID:24914364

  7. Advances in Cell and Gene-based Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Mayumi; Sinn, Patrick L; McCray Jr, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disease characterized by airway infection, inflammation, remodeling, and obstruction that gradually destroy the lungs. Direct delivery of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene to airway epithelia may offer advantages, as the tissue is accessible for topical delivery of vectors. Yet, physical and host immune barriers in the lung present challenges for successful gene transfer to the respiratory tract. Advances in gene transfer approaches, tissue engineering, and novel animal models are generating excitement within the CF research field. This review discusses current challenges and advancements in viral and nonviral vectors, cell-based therapies, and CF animal models. PMID:22371844

  8. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Prevention of Relapse and Recurrence in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Keith S.; Hollon, Steven D.; Dimidjian, Sona; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Gallop, Robert J.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2008-01-01

    This study followed treatment responders from a randomized controlled trial of adults with major depression. Patients treated with medication but withdrawn onto pill-placebo had more relapse through 1 year of follow-up compared to patients who received prior behavioral activation, prior cognitive therapy, or continued medication. Prior…

  9. Augmenting Antidepressant Medication Treatment of Depressed Women with Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples: A Randomized Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Wayne H.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.; Golden, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to evaluate adding emotionally focused therapy for couples (EFT) to antidepressant medication in the treatment of women with major depressive disorder and comorbid relationship discord. Twenty-four women and their male partners were randomized to 6 months of medication management alone (MM) or MM augmented with EFT (MM +…

  10. Advanced data visualization and sensor fusion: Conversion of techniques from medical imaging to Earth science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Richard C.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Pelizzari, Charles; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    1993-01-01

    Hughes Aircraft Company and the University of Chicago propose to transfer existing medical imaging registration algorithms to the area of multi-sensor data fusion. The University of Chicago's algorithms have been successfully demonstrated to provide pixel by pixel comparison capability for medical sensors with different characteristics. The research will attempt to fuse GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite), AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), and SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) sensor data which will benefit a wide range of researchers. The algorithms will utilize data visualization and algorithm development tools created by Hughes in its EOSDIS (Earth Observation SystemData/Information System) prototyping. This will maximize the work on the fusion algorithms since support software (e.g. input/output routines) will already exist. The research will produce a portable software library with documentation for use by other researchers.

  11. Bone marrow derived stem cells in regenerative medicine as advanced therapy medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Astori, Giuseppe; Soncin, Sabrina; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Siclari, Francesco; Sürder, Daniel; Turchetto, Lucia; Soldati, Gianni; Moccetti, Tiziano

    2010-05-15

    Bone marrow derived stem cells administered after minimal manipulation represent an important cell source for cell-based therapies. Clinical trial results, have revealed both safety and efficacy of the cell reinfusion procedure in many cardiovascular diseases. Many of these early clinical trials were performed in a period before the entry into force of the US and European regulation on cell-based therapies. As a result, conflicting data have been generated on the effectiveness of those therapies in certain conditions as acute myocardial infarction. As more academic medical centers and private companies move toward exploiting the full potential of cell-based medicinal products, needs arise for the development of the infrastructure necessary to support these investigations. This review describes the regulatory environment surrounding the production of cell based medicinal products and give practical aspects for cell isolation, characterization, production following Good Manufacturing Practice, focusing on the activities associated with the investigational new drug development.

  12. [Triple therapy in cirrhotic patients and those with advanced fibrosis: relevant aspects in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Albillos, Agustín; Luis Calleja, José; Molina, Esther; Planas, Ramon; Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Turnes, Juan; Hernández-Guerra, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The first-line option in the treatment of patients with advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis due to genotype 1 hepatitis C virus is currently triple therapy with boceprevir/telaprevir and pegylated interferon-ribavirin. However, certain limitations could constitute a barrier to starting treatment or achieving sustained viral response in these patients. These limitations include the patient's or physician's perception of treatment effectiveness in routine clinical practice-which can weight against the decision to start treatment-, the advanced stage of the disease with portal hypertension and comorbidity, treatment interruption due to poor adherence, and adverse effects, mainly anemia. In addition, it is now possible to identify patients who could benefit from a shorter therapeutic regimen with a similar cure rate. This review discusses these issues and their possible effect on the use of triple therapy. PMID:25907434

  13. Trimodality Therapy for an Advanced Thymic Carcinoma With Both Aorta and Vena Cava Invasion.

    PubMed

    Momozane, Tohru; Inoue, Masayoshi; Shintani, Yasushi; Funaki, Soichiro; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Minami, Masato; Shirakawa, Yukitoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Okumura, Meinoshin

    2016-08-01

    A case of locally advanced thymic carcinoma that was successfully resected with the great vessels after chemoradiation therapy is reported. A 57-year-old man with Masaoka stage III thymic carcinoma received two cycles of cisplatin/docetaxel and 60 Gy irradiation. The response was stable disease with 19% size reduction, and a radical resection with the ascending aorta and superior vena cava with the patient under circulatory arrest with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient has been free of disease for 28 months. Trimodality therapy with use of a cardiovascular surgical procedure might be a valuable option in locally advanced thymic carcinoma. PMID:27449450

  14. Selective androgen receptor modulators as improved androgen therapy for advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2014-11-01

    Androgens were at one time a therapeutic mainstay in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. Despite comparable efficacy, SERMs and aromatase inhibitors eventually became the therapies of choice due to in part to preferred side-effect profiles. Molecular characterization of breast tumors has revealed an abundance of androgen receptor expression but the choice of an appropriate androgen receptor ligand (agonist or antagonist) has been confounded by multiple conflicting reports concerning the role of the receptor in the disease. Modern clinical efforts have almost exclusively utilized antagonists. However, the recent clinical development of selective androgen receptor modulators with greatly improved side-effect profiles has renewed interest in androgen agonist therapy for advanced breast cancer.

  15. Recent Advances in Upconversion Nanoparticles-Based Multifunctional Nanocomposites for Combined Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gan; Zhang, Xiao; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-12-16

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have the ability to generate ultraviolet or visible emissions under continuous-wave near-infrared (NIR) excitation. Utilizing this special luminescence property, UCNPs are approved as a new generation of contrast agents in optical imaging with deep tissue-penetration ability and high signal-to-noise ratio. The integration of UCNPs with other functional moieties can endow them with highly enriched functionalities for imaging-guided cancer therapy, which makes composites based on UCNPs emerge as a new class of theranostic agents in biomedicine. Here, recent progress in combined cancer therapy using functional nanocomposites based on UCNPs is reviewed. Combined therapy referring to the co-delivery of two or more therapeutic agents or a combination of different treatments is becoming more popular in clinical treatment of cancer because it generates synergistic anti-cancer effects, reduces individual drug-related toxicity and suppresses multi-drug resistance through different mechanisms of action. Here, the recent advances of combined therapy contributed by UCNPs-based nanocomposites on two main branches are reviewed: i) photodynamic therapy and ii) chemotherapy, which are the two most widely adopted therapies of UCNPs-based composites. The future prospects and challenges in this emerging field will be also discussed.

  16. The effect of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel infusion long-term therapy on motor complications in advanced Parkinson's disease: a multicenter Romanian experience.

    PubMed

    Băjenaru, O; Ene, A; Popescu, B O; Szász, J A; Sabău, M; Mureşan, D F; Perju-Dumbrava, L; Popescu, C D; Constantinescu, A; Buraga, I; Simu, M

    2016-04-01

    Chronic treatment with oral levodopa is associated with an increased frequency of motor complications in the late stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Continuous administration of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG-Duodopa(®), Abbott Laboratories), which has been available in Romania since 2009, represents an option for treating patients with advanced PD. Our primary objective was to report changes in motor complications after initiation of LCIG therapy. The secondary objectives were as follows: to determine the impact of LCIG therapy on the daily levodopa dose variation before/and after LCIG, to collect patient self-assessments of quality of life (QoL), and to study the overall tolerability and safety of LCIG administration. A retrospective analysis (2009-2013) of LCIG therapy and the experience in nine neurology centers in Romania was performed. The impact of LCIG therapy was evaluated by analyzing changes in motor fluctuations, dyskinesia and the patients' QoL after initiating therapy. The safety of LCIG therapy was estimated by noting agent-related adverse events (AEs) and medical device-related AEs. In the 113 patients included, we observed a significant improvement in PD symptoms after initiation of LCIG therapy. The "on" period increased, with a mean value of 6.14 h, and the dyskinesia period was reduced, with a mean value of 29.4 %. The quantified non-motor symptoms subsided. The patients exhibited significant improvements in QoL scores. There were few AEs and few cases of LCIG therapy discontinuation. LCIG is an important and available therapeutic option for managing patients with advanced PD. PMID:26699635

  17. Effect of Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy on the Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Raunio, Antti; Sipilä, Kirsi; Raustia, Aune

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Mandibular advancement device therapy is effectively used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, but also several side effects in the masticatory system have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders connected to mandibular advancement device therapy. Material and Methods The material consisted of 15 patients (9 men and 6 women, mean age 51.1 years, range 21 to 70 years) diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Subjective symptoms and clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMD) signs were recorded at the beginning of the treatment (baseline) and at 1-month, 3-month, 6-month and 24-month follow-ups. The degree of TMD was assessed using the anamnestic (Ai) and the clinical dysfunction index (Di) of Helkimo. For assessing the effect of TMD the patients were divided in discontinuing and continuing groups. Results According to Ai and Di, the severity of TMD remained unchanged during the follow-up in most of the patients. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) crepitation was found more frequently in discontinuing patients at all follow-ups. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05) at the six-month follow-up. Masticatory muscle pain during palpation was a frequent clinical sign at the baseline and during the follow-up period but the difference between discontinuing and continuing patients was not significant. Conclusions It seems that signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders do not necessarily increase during long-term mandibular advancement device therapy. However, it seems that patients with clinically assessed temporomandibular joint crepitation may discontinue their mandibular advancement device therapy due to temporomandibular disorders. PMID:24422023

  18. The New Radiation Therapy Clinical Practice: The Emerging Role of Clinical Peer Review for Radiation Therapists and Medical Dosimetrists

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Robert D.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Pawlicki, Todd; Hayman, James; Church, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    The concept of peer review for radiation therapists and medical dosimetrists has been studied very little in radiation oncology practice. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze the concept of peer review in the clinical setting for both radiation therapists and medical dosimetrists. The literature reviewed both the percentages and causes of radiation therapy deviations. The results indicate that peer review can be both implemented and evaluated into both the radiation therapist and medical dosimetrist clinical practice patterns.

  19. The new radiation therapy clinical practice: the emerging role of clinical peer review for radiation therapists and medical dosimetrists.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert D; Marks, Lawrence B; Pawlicki, Todd; Hayman, James; Church, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    The concept of peer review for radiation therapists and medical dosimetrists has been studied very little in radiation oncology practice. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze the concept of peer review in the clinical setting for both radiation therapists and medical dosimetrists. The literature reviewed both the percentages and causes of radiation therapy deviations. The results indicate that peer review can be both implemented and evaluated into both the radiation therapist and medical dosimetrist clinical practice patterns. PMID:21055612

  20. Herbal pharmacology and medical therapy in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Lasagna, L

    1975-12-01

    A scientific delegation visited the People's Republic of China for the purpose of assessing the current status of herbal pharmacology and medicine there. China is attempting to wed traditional and Western medicine so as to take advantage of the potential contributions of both. This wedding seems possible at the empiric level despite theoretical contradictions. Traditional remedies are widely prescribed, but the actual impact of such medication on disease is difficult to assess, because of the failure of the Chinese up until now to evaluate such remedies by modern clinical trial methodology. All Western drugs are readily available in China, and indeed are manufactured for export as well as for use within the country. The current chinese approach to the patient-doctor relation, and some novel ideas with regard to both medical and surgical therapy pose provocative questions for Western physicians.

  1. Herbal pharmacology and medical therapy in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Lasagna, L

    1975-12-01

    A scientific delegation visited the People's Republic of China for the purpose of assessing the current status of herbal pharmacology and medicine there. China is attempting to wed traditional and Western medicine so as to take advantage of the potential contributions of both. This wedding seems possible at the empiric level despite theoretical contradictions. Traditional remedies are widely prescribed, but the actual impact of such medication on disease is difficult to assess, because of the failure of the Chinese up until now to evaluate such remedies by modern clinical trial methodology. All Western drugs are readily available in China, and indeed are manufactured for export as well as for use within the country. The current chinese approach to the patient-doctor relation, and some novel ideas with regard to both medical and surgical therapy pose provocative questions for Western physicians. PMID:1200537

  2. Physical evaluation system to determine medical risk and indicated dental therapy modifications.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, F M; Malamed, S F

    1979-08-01

    The physical evaluation system allows the practitioner to rapidly classify each patient according to medical risk and thus to provide dental treatment comfortably and safely. The evaluation system serves as a guide to the level of dental therapy, deisions of management, and modification of treatment for the medically compromised patient. Extensive use of the ADA physical status classification system in dentistry would allow meaningful studies of morbidity and mortality that are related to various management protocols and could conceivably have an impact on insurance schedules associated with psychosedation modalities and general anethesia on an out patient basis. A physical evaluation system cannot substitute for knowledge and good judgment. Recommended categories of physical status and modification of treatment should not be considered as absolutes, but as guides. Wheras the guidelines may appear to be inflexible, they should not be considered as such. Deviation from recommendations is often justified and is expected.

  3. Disparity implications of the Medicare medication therapy management eligibility criteria: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Kiraat D; Shih, Ya-Chen T; Brown, Lawrence M; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Wan, Jim Y; Wang, Junling

    2013-04-01

    The emphasis on eliminating racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare has received national attention, with various policy initiatives addressing this problem and proposing solutions. However, in the current economic era requiring tight monetary constraints, emphasis is increasingly being placed on economic efficiency, which often conflicts with the equality doctrine upon which many policies have been framed. The authors' review aims to highlight the disparity implications of one such policy provision - the predominantly utilization-based eligibility criteria for medication therapy management services under Medicare Part D - by identifying studies that have documented racial and ethnic disparities in health status and the use of and spending on prescription medications. Future design and evaluation of various regulations and legislations employing utilization-based eligibility criteria must use caution in order to strike an equity-efficiency balance. PMID:23570431

  4. [Pharmacological tolerance to medical therapy of organophosphate poisoning and ways of tolerance management].

    PubMed

    Iudin, M A; Bykov, V N; Chepur, S V; Sarana, A M; Tsygan, V N; Anokhin, A G

    2014-05-01

    Authors consider causes of low efficiency of antidote therapy and ways of pharmacological tolerance management during medical treatment of organophosphate poisoning. One of the promising ways is a preventive antidote on the base of enzyme agents and allosteric modulators of a cholinesterase activity. Authors showed a expediency of a study of new acetylcholinesterase reactivators, its compositions and ways of drug delivery. Authors specified ways of searching for anticonvulsants from classes of quick-closing benzodiatines and NMDA-antagonists. Authors defined ways of improvement of methods of special antidotes delivery with targeted transport system. Authors made an assumption about the necessity of symptomatic treatment.

  5. Growth hormone therapy for Prader-Willi and Down syndromes: a post-modern medical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Lantos, J D

    2000-04-01

    Post-modernism means the end of traditional certainties. In this paper, growth hormone (GH) is conceptualized as a post-modern medical therapy. It is used in the treatment of conditions that are not traditional diseases, for indications that are not precisely defined. Down syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome represent two clinical conditions in which GH can possibly be used. It is argued that the difference between the two syndromes instructs us as to the principles that might guide appropriate use of GH in the future. In particular, for children, the more GH treatment can be shown to produce benefits other than increased height, the more justifiable its use will be.

  6. Developing treatment and control conditions in a clinical trial of massage therapy for advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marlaine; Kutner, Jean; Hemphill, Linnea; Yamashita, Traci; Felton, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the challenges faced by a research team in developing treatment and control conditions in a study of the efficacy of massage therapy for advanced cancer. Five design considerations were addressed related to developing a massage therapy protocol: (1) dosage, that is, the number, spacing and length of treatments; (2) type of massage therapy; (3) degree to which the protocol for the treatment is standardized; (4) qualifications of the persons providing the treatment; and (5) conditions under which the treatment is provided. Five criteria for structuring the control condition of the study are elaborated: (1) equivalency of contact; (2) similarity of form; (3) minimum adverse or negative effects; (4) expectancy of therapeutic benefit; and (5) minimum therapeutic benefit.

  7. Stem cell therapies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Recent advances and prospects for the future

    PubMed Central

    Lunn, J. Simon; Sakowski, Stacey A.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal disease involving the loss of motor neurons. Although the mechanisms responsible for motor neuron degeneration in ALS remain elusive, the development of stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of ALS has gained widespread support. Here, we review the types of stem cells being considered for therapeutic applications in ALS, and emphasize recent preclinical advances that provide supportive rationale for clinical translation. We also discuss early trials from around the world translating cellular therapies to ALS patients, and offer important considerations for future clinical trial design. Although clinical translation is still in its infancy, and additional insight into the mechanisms underlying therapeutic efficacy and the establishment of long-term safety are required, these studies represent an important first step towards the development of effective cellular therapies for the treatment of ALS. PMID:24448926

  8. Concise review: Stem cell therapies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: recent advances and prospects for the future.

    PubMed

    Lunn, J Simon; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2014-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal disease involving the loss of motor neurons. Although the mechanisms responsible for motor neuron degeneration in ALS remain elusive, the development of stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of ALS has gained widespread support. Here, we review the types of stem cells being considered for therapeutic applications in ALS, and emphasize recent preclinical advances that provide supportive rationale for clinical translation. We also discuss early trials from around the world translating cellular therapies to ALS patients, and offer important considerations for future clinical trial design. Although clinical translation is still in its infancy, and additional insight into the mechanisms underlying therapeutic efficacy and the establishment of long-term safety are required, these studies represent an important first step toward the development of effective cellular therapies for the treatment of ALS.

  9. Pemetrexed Maintenance Therapy Following Bevacizumab-Containing First-Line Chemotherapy in Advanced Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xu-Quan; Zhou, Lei; Sun, Xin-Dong; Yu, Jin-Ming; Meng, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a lethal disease with poor prognosis. The combination of cisplatin and pemetrexed has been confirmed as the standard of care for nonoperable MPM. Data have shown that the adoption of pemetrexed maintenance therapy (PMT) following first-line treatment appears extremely promising. We describe a 57-year-old man diagnosed as advanced MPM. We treated this patient with PMT after first-line cisplatin-based bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy and residual tumor disappeared after 6 course of PMT. A perfect response and a long progression-free survival (PFS) were reached with tumor mass disappearing and 14 months duration of PFS. This case suggests that adding bevacizumab to standard first-line chemotherapy is feasible and that PMT could be promising and useful for treating advanced MPM. We further entail a review of the literature on the first-line treatment, continuation maintenance therapy, switch maintenance therapy, and second-line treatment of patients with advanced MPM. PMID:27057918

  10. Comparison of surgical septal myectomy to medical therapy alone in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and syncope.

    PubMed

    Orme, Nicholas M; Sorajja, Paul; Dearani, Joseph A; Schaff, Hartzell V; Gersh, Bernard J; Ommen, Steve R

    2013-02-01

    The presence of syncope despite medical therapy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is considered an indication for surgical myectomy; however, no study has examined the long-term effects on recurrent syncope and survival after surgery in these patients. We examined 239 patients with HC and a history of syncope who had undergone surgical myectomy (mean age 48 ± 17 years; 56% men). The patients were age- and gender-matched to patients with HC and syncope who were treated medically without myectomy (mean age 51 ± 16 years; 59% men). The median follow-up period was 4.7 years (0.8, 11.3). The recurrence rate of syncope was 11% in the myectomy patients and 40% in the medical group (p <0.0001). Multiple episodes of syncope, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, and recent syncope were identified as baseline predictors of recurrent syncope. Survival free of all-cause mortality was greater for patients who had undergone surgical myectomy than for the medically treated patients (10-year estimate 82 ± 4% vs 69 ± 4%; p = 0.01). In conclusion, surgical myectomy in patients with HC and a history of syncope was associated with a reduction in recurrent syncope and increased survival.

  11. Using an Advance Organizer to Improve Knowledge Application by Medical Students in Computer-Based Clinical Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahn, Corrie G.; Blanchaer, Marcel C.

    1986-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of using the advance organizer as a device to improve medical students' understanding of a clinical case simulation on the microcomputer and to enhance performance on a posttest. Advance organizers were found to be effective and most consistent with Mayer's assimilation theory. (MBR)

  12. Management of advanced bladder cancer in the era of targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Soave, A; Engel, O; Von Amsberg, G; Becker, A; Dahlem, R; Shariat, S F; Fisch, M; Rink, M

    2015-06-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is the standard treatment of advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). Unfortunately, systemic chemotherapy is ineffective in a significant number of patients, while side effects occur frequently. Detailed molecular-genetic investigations revealed a broad heterogeneity of underlying genomic mutations in UCB and led to the detection of cancer-specific therapeutic targets. These findings may allow a more tailored and individualized patient-based therapy, focusing on specific genomic variations, which may cause chemo-resistance in patients progressing or relapsing after standard chemotherapy. Targeted therapies hold the potential to be more effective in inhibiting cancer cell growth and progression, as well as to cause fewer side effects. While targeted therapies have been successfully established in the treatment of various malignancies including renal cell carcinoma, the clinical impact of these modern treatment strategies still remains unsettled for UCB. In this review, we comprehensively summarize the most current and relevant findings on targeted therapy in advanced and metastatic UCB, elucidating chances and limitations and discussing future perspectives.

  13. Advancing Competency-Based Medical Education: A Charter for Clinician-Educators.

    PubMed

    Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Van Melle, Elaine; Ten Cate, Olle; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Chan, Ming-Ka; Frank, Jason R; Snell, Linda S

    2016-05-01

    The International Competency-Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators have been working since 2009 to promote understanding of competency-based medical education (CBME) and accelerate its uptake worldwide. This article presents a charter, supported by a literature-based rationale, which is meant to provide a shared mental model of CBME that will serve as a path forward in its widespread implementation.At a 2013 summit, the ICBME Collaborators laid the groundwork for this charter. Here, the fundamental principles of CBME and professional responsibilities of medical educators in its implementation process are described. The authors outline three fundamental principles: (1) Medical education must be based on the health needs of the populations served; (2) the primary focus of education and training should be the desired outcomes for learners rather than the structure and process of the educational system; and (3) the formation of a physician should be seamless across the continuum of education, training, and practice.Building on these principles, medical educators must demonstrate commitment to teaching, assessing, and role modeling the range of identified competencies. In the clinical setting, they must provide supervision that balances patient safety with the professional development of learners, being transparent with stakeholders about level of supervision needed. They must use effective and efficient assessment strategies and tools for basing transition decisions on competence rather than time in training, empowering learners to be active participants in their learning and assessment. Finally, advancing CBME requires program evaluation and research, faculty development, and a collaborative approach to realize its full potential.

  14. Advancing Competency-Based Medical Education: A Charter for Clinician-Educators.

    PubMed

    Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Van Melle, Elaine; Ten Cate, Olle; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Chan, Ming-Ka; Frank, Jason R; Snell, Linda S

    2016-05-01

    The International Competency-Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators have been working since 2009 to promote understanding of competency-based medical education (CBME) and accelerate its uptake worldwide. This article presents a charter, supported by a literature-based rationale, which is meant to provide a shared mental model of CBME that will serve as a path forward in its widespread implementation.At a 2013 summit, the ICBME Collaborators laid the groundwork for this charter. Here, the fundamental principles of CBME and professional responsibilities of medical educators in its implementation process are described. The authors outline three fundamental principles: (1) Medical education must be based on the health needs of the populations served; (2) the primary focus of education and training should be the desired outcomes for learners rather than the structure and process of the educational system; and (3) the formation of a physician should be seamless across the continuum of education, training, and practice.Building on these principles, medical educators must demonstrate commitment to teaching, assessing, and role modeling the range of identified competencies. In the clinical setting, they must provide supervision that balances patient safety with the professional development of learners, being transparent with stakeholders about level of supervision needed. They must use effective and efficient assessment strategies and tools for basing transition decisions on competence rather than time in training, empowering learners to be active participants in their learning and assessment. Finally, advancing CBME requires program evaluation and research, faculty development, and a collaborative approach to realize its full potential. PMID:26675189

  15. Rethinking end-points for bone-targeted therapy in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez García, Susana; Clemons, Mark; Amir, Eitan

    2016-08-01

    The principal objective for any medical therapy is to improve either the duration of life and/or its quality. Metastases in bone can lead to clinically defined events termed skeletal-related events (SREs) which are a quantifiable measure of skeletal morbidity. Avoidance and/or delay of SREs have become the principal objective in trials exploring the efficacy of bone-targeted therapy in patients with skeletal metastases. Despite reductions in the frequency or rate of SRE occurrence, trials of bone-targeted therapy have failed to show any effect on either progression-free or overall survival when compared with placebo or other bone-targeting agents. Similarly, trials of bone-targeted therapy have not shown consistent effects on quality of life. The validity of SRE-based primary outcome measures in cancer clinical trials is therefore, questionable. More novel end-point selection for trials of bone-targeted therapy seems warranted. Composite measures comprising occurrence of symptomatic skeletal events and patient reported outcomes may be an effective solution and warrants further investigation. PMID:27299662

  16. Audience responses to television news coverage of medical advances: The mediating role of audience emotions and identification.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyehyun

    2015-08-01

    Exemplifying a real person in news stories has become a popular journalistic technique to describe an event or issue. With the frequent appearance of medical news reports in local television in recent years, this news presentation style is widely believed to help audiences better engage in and understand complex medical information and to influence their perceptions and judgments. In terms of television news coverage of medical advances, this study investigates how audiences respond to embedded human examples (mainly patients who experience benefits from the advances) and to overall news stories, and how such responses are related to their perception of portrayed medical advances. The experimental results indicate that news stories with a human example were more likely to intensify the audience's positive emotions than those without, which in turn influenced favorable perceptions of the described medical advance. In addition, the extent to which the audience identified with a human example (in particular, sympathy) mediated the relationship between the audience's involvement in the news story and its perception of the portrayed medical advance.

  17. Attributes of advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity.

    PubMed

    Cady, Rhonda G; Kelly, Anne M; Finkelstein, Stanley M; Looman, Wendy S; Garwick, Ann W

    2014-01-01

    Care coordination is an essential component of the pediatric health care home. This study investigated the attributes of relationship-based advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity enrolled in a tertiary hospital-based health care home. Retrospective review of 2,628 care coordination episodes conducted by telehealth over a consecutive 3-year time period for 27 children indicated that parents initiated the majority of episodes and the most frequent reason was acute and chronic condition management. During this period, care coordination episodes tripled, with a significant increase (p < .001) between years 1 and 2. The increased episodes could explain previously reported reductions in hospitalizations for this group of children. Descriptive analysis of a program-specific survey showed that parents valued having a single place to call and assistance in managing their child's complex needs. The advanced practice registered nurse care coordination model has potential for changing the health management processes for children with medical complexity.

  18. A Review of Pharmacological Interactions Between HIV or HCV Medications and Opioid Agonist Therapy: Implications and Management for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Moody, David E.; Altice, Frederick L.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Friedland, Gerald H.

    2014-01-01

    Global access to opioid agonist therapy and HIV/HCV treatment is expanding but when used concurrently, problematic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions may occur. Review of articles from 1966 into 2012 in Medline using the following keywords: HIV, AIDS, HIV therapy, HCV, HCV therapy, antiretroviral therapy, HAART, drug interactions, methadone, and buprenorphine. Additionally, abstracts from national and international meetings and a review of conference proceedings were conducted; selected reports were reviewed as well. The metabolism of both opioid and antiretroviral therapies, description of their known interactions, and clinical implications and management of these interactions are reviewed. Important pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions affecting either methadone or HIV medications have been demonstrated within each class of antiretroviral agents. Drug interactions between methadone, buprenorphine and HIV medications are known and may have important clinical consequences. Clinicians must be alert to these interactions and have a basic knowledge regarding their management. PMID:23656339

  19. Medical borderlands: engineering the body with plastic surgery and hormonal therapies in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Alexander; Sanabria, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores medical borderlands where health and enhancement practices are entangled. It draws on fieldwork carried out in the context of two distinct research projects in Brazil on plastic surgery and sex hormone therapies. These two therapies have significant clinical overlap. Both are made available in private and public healthcare in ways that reveal the class dynamics underlying Brazilian medicine. They also have an important experimental dimension rooted in Brazil's regulatory context and societal expectations placed on medicine as a means for managing women's reproductive and sexual health. Off-label and experimental medical use of these treatments is linked to experimental social use: how women adopt them to respond to the pressures, anxieties and aspirations of work and intimate life. The paper argues that these experimental techniques are becoming morally authorized as routine management of women's health, integrated into mainstream Ob-Gyn healthcare, and subtly blurred with practices of cuidar-se (self-care) seen in Brazil as essential for modern femininity.

  20. Impact of medical therapy on atheroma volume measured by different cardiovascular imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Sinno, Mohamad C N; Al-Mallah, Mouaz

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease that affects most vascular beds. The gold standard of atherosclerosis imaging has been invasive intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Newer noninvasive imaging modalities like B-mode ultrasound, cardiac computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to assess these vascular territories with high accuracy and reproducibility. These imaging modalities have lately been used for the assessment of the atherosclerotic plaque and the response of its volume to several medical therapies used in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease. To study the impact of these medications on atheroma volume progression or regression, imaging modalities have been used on a serial basis providing a unique opportunity to monitor the effect these antiatherosclerotic strategies exert on plaque burden. As a result, studies incorporating serial IVUS imaging, quantitative coronary angiography (QCA), B-mode ultrasound, electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging have all been used to evaluate the impact of therapeutic strategies that modify cholesterol and blood pressure on the progression/regression of atherosclerotic plaque. In this review, we intend to summarize the impact of different therapies aimed at halting the progression or even result in regression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease evaluated by different imaging modalities. PMID:20672024

  1. Medical borderlands: engineering the body with plastic surgery and hormonal therapies in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Alexander; Sanabria, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores medical borderlands where health and enhancement practices are entangled. It draws on fieldwork carried out in the context of two distinct research projects in Brazil on plastic surgery and sex hormone therapies. These two therapies have significant clinical overlap. Both are made available in private and public healthcare in ways that reveal the class dynamics underlying Brazilian medicine. They also have an important experimental dimension rooted in Brazil's regulatory context and societal expectations placed on medicine as a means for managing women's reproductive and sexual health. Off-label and experimental medical use of these treatments is linked to experimental social use: how women adopt them to respond to the pressures, anxieties and aspirations of work and intimate life. The paper argues that these experimental techniques are becoming morally authorized as routine management of women's health, integrated into mainstream Ob-Gyn healthcare, and subtly blurred with practices of cuidar-se (self-care) seen in Brazil as essential for modern femininity. PMID:25175295

  2. Impact of Medical Therapy on Atheroma Volume Measured by Different Cardiovascular Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Sinno, Mohamad C. N.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease that affects most vascular beds. The gold standard of atherosclerosis imaging has been invasive intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Newer noninvasive imaging modalities like B-mode ultrasound, cardiac computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to assess these vascular territories with high accuracy and reproducibility. These imaging modalities have lately been used for the assessment of the atherosclerotic plaque and the response of its volume to several medical therapies used in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease. To study the impact of these medications on atheroma volume progression or regression, imaging modalities have been used on a serial basis providing a unique opportunity to monitor the effect these antiatherosclerotic strategies exert on plaque burden. As a result, studies incorporating serial IVUS imaging, quantitative coronary angiography (QCA), B-mode ultrasound, electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging have all been used to evaluate the impact of therapeutic strategies that modify cholesterol and blood pressure on the progression/regression of atherosclerotic plaque. In this review, we intend to summarize the impact of different therapies aimed at halting the progression or even result in regression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease evaluated by different imaging modalities. PMID:20672024

  3. Concurrent cisplatin, 5-FU, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roof, Kevin S. . E-mail: kroof@sero.net; Coen, John; Lynch, Thomas J.; Wright, Cameron; Fidias, Panos; Willett, Christopher G.; Choi, Noah C.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: Phase I-II data regarding neoadjuvant cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), paclitaxel, and radiation (PFT-R) from our institution demonstrated encouraging pathologic complete response (pCR) rates. This article updates our experience with PFT-R, and compares these results to our experience with cisplatin, 5-FU, and radiation therapy (PF-R) in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: We searched the Massachusetts General Hospital cancer registry for esophageal cancer patients treated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy between 1994-2002. Records of patients treated with curative, neoadjuvant therapy were examined for chemotherapeutic regimen. Outcomes of patients treated with PF-R or PFT-R were assessed for response to therapy, toxicity, and survival. Results: A total of 177 patients were treated with neoadjuvant therapy with curative intent; 164 (93%) received PF-R (n = 81) or PFT-R (n = 83). Median overall survival was 24 months. After a median follow-up of 54 months for surviving patients, 3-year overall survival was 40% with no significant difference between PF-R (39%) and PFT-R (42%). Conclusions: Our findings failed to demonstrate an improvement in pCR or survival with PFT-R vs. PF-R. These results do not support this regimen of concurrent neoadjuvant PFT-R in esophageal cancer, and suggest that further investigations into alternative regimens and novel agents are warranted.

  4. Uncertainty in medicine: meanings of menopause and hormone replacement therapy in medical textbooks.

    PubMed

    Niland, Patricia; Lyons, Antonia C

    2011-10-01

    Menopause is understood, portrayed, and experienced in diverse ways. The dominant biomedical perspective medicalizes menopause as a biological 'hormone deficiency' requiring 'treatment' with hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Alternative perspectives view menopause as discursively located within particular socio-historical times and places, or privilege women's embodied experiences of menopause. We argue that the meanings of menopause and HRT should be debated within a context where the biological and the social, or the body and culture, intersect. The present study examined international medical student textbooks as sites of current biomedical knowledge, communicated for a new generation of health professionals. We undertook a Foucauldian discourse analysis on eight widely-used, international medical textbooks across physiology, pathology and pharmacology subject areas to identify the ways in which menopause and HRT are portrayed. Our results showed that menopause continues to be represented through dominant culturally infused 'failure' discourses and is portrayed as a 'precursor to disease' with HRT as the treatment. However, this knowledge is somewhat destabilized by a discourse of 'uncertainty and speculation' regarding the physiology of menopause and the potential effects of HRT. Knowledge about menopause, osteoporosis, and HRT was constructed as tentative, but the 'quest' for new knowledge was constructed as on the verge of 'exciting discoveries'. We argue that bio-social understandings of menopause and HRT, and their medical uncertainties, need to be addressed in medical curricula to ensure that doctors engage with midlife women in appropriate and positive ways, especially given the increased call for women's involvement in decision-making at this time.

  5. Adjunctive psychotropic medications during electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of depression, mania, and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Haskett, Roger F; Loo, Colleen

    2010-09-01

    Current guidelines regarding concomitant antidepressants during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are inconsistent. Although the American Psychiatric Association Task Force on ECT discouraged combination antidepressant treatment, owing to the minimal evidence for enhanced efficacy and concern about increased adverse effects, combination treatment is recommended and considered routine for many practitioners in the United States and other parts of the world. Considering the increasing levels of treatment resistance among patients referred for ECT and the high relapse rate after acute ECT, the role of concomitant antidepressant pharmacotherapy during ECT should be reevaluated. More research, however, is needed to explore the impact of administering specific antidepressants during acute and maintenance ECT (M-ECT), on antidepressant efficacy and cognitive adverse effects. This will require appropriately controlled studies of ECT medication combinations that include attention to a range of cognitive function measures and clinical response. In addition, the role of combination ECT and psychotropic medication in the treatment of mania and schizophrenia continues to receive attention, particularly in those patients who have shown inadequate responses to psychotropic medication alone. Although there is insufficient evidence to support the routine addition of antipsychotic medications to ECT during the treatment of acute mania, the literature suggests that it is unnecessary to discontinue antipsychotic medication when ECT is added to the treatment of a manic patient that has been unresponsive to pharmacological treatment. Despite the lack of well-controlled studies, the existing literature suggests that combination ECT and antipsychotic treatment is a useful option for patients with schizophrenia who are unresponsive to pharmacological interventions alone, and its adverse effect profile does not seem different from that seen with ECT alone.

  6. The consequences of using advanced physical assessment skills in medical and surgical nursing: A hermeneutic pragmatic study

    PubMed Central

    Zambas, Shelaine I.; Smythe, Elizabeth A.; Koziol-Mclain, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives The aim of this study was to explore the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills on medical and surgical wards. Background Appropriate, accurate, and timely assessment by nurses is the cornerstone of maintaining patient safety in hospitals. The inclusion of “advanced” physical assessment skills such as auscultation, palpation, and percussion is thought to better prepare nurses for complex patient presentations within a wide range of clinical situations. Design This qualitative study used a hermeneutic pragmatic approach. Method Unstructured interviews were conducted with five experienced medical and surgical nurses to obtain 13 detailed narratives of assessment practice. Narratives were analyzed using Van Manen's six-step approach to identify the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills. Results The consequences of using advanced assessment skills include looking for more, challenging interpretations, and perseverance. The use of advanced assessment skills directs what the nurse looks for, what she sees, interpretation of the findings, and her response. It is the interpretation of what is seen, heard, or felt within the full context of the patient situation, which is the advanced skill. Conclusion Advanced assessment skill is the means to an accurate interpretation of the clinical situation and contributes to appropriate diagnosis and medical management in complex patient situations. Relevance to clinical practice The nurse's use of advanced assessment skills enables her to contribute to diagnostic reasoning within the acute medical and surgical setting. PMID:27607193

  7. Recent Surgical and Medical Advances in the Treatment of Dupuytren's Disease - A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    R, Mafi; S, Hindocha; W, Khan

    2012-01-01

    Dupuytren's disease (DD) is a type of fibromatosis which progressively results in the shortening and thickening of the fibrous tissue of the palmar fascia. This condition which predominantly affects white-northern Europeans has been identified since 1614. DD can affect certain activities of daily living such as face washing, combing hair and putting hand in a glove. The origin of Dupuytren's contracture is still unknown, but there are a number of treatments that doctors have come across throughout the years. Historically surgery has been the mainstay treatment for DD but not the only one. The objective is to make a structured review of the most recent advances in treatment of DD including the surgical and medical interventions. We have looked at the most relevant published articles regarding the various treatment options for DD. This review has taken 55 articles into consideration which have met the inclusion criteria. The most recent treatments used are multi-needle aponeurotomy, extensive percutaneous aponeurotomy and lipografting, injecting collagenase Clostridium histolyticum, INF-gamma and shockwave therapy as well as radiotherapy. Each of these treatments has certain advantages and drawbacks and cannot be used for every patient. In order to prevent this condition, spending more time and money in the topic is required to reach better and more consistent treatments and ultimately to eradicate this disease.

  8. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jonathan; Xu, Beibei; Yeung, Heidi N.; Roeland, Eric J.; Martinez, Maria Elena; Le, Quynh-Thu; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  9. The proton therapy nozzles at Samsung Medical Center: A Monte Carlo simulation study using TOPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Kim, Jinsung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Ahn, Sunghwan; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    To expedite the commissioning process of the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC), we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation model of the proton therapy nozzles by using TOol for PArticle Simulation (TOPAS). At SMC proton therapy center, we have two gantry rooms with different types of nozzles: a multi-purpose nozzle and a dedicated scanning nozzle. Each nozzle has been modeled in detail following the geometry information provided by the manufacturer, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. For this purpose, the novel features of TOPAS, such as the time feature or the ridge filter class, have been used, and the appropriate physics models for proton nozzle simulation have been defined. Dosimetric properties, like percent depth dose curve, spreadout Bragg peak (SOBP), and beam spot size, have been simulated and verified against measured beam data. Beyond the Monte Carlo nozzle modeling, we have developed an interface between TOPAS and the treatment planning system (TPS), RayStation. An exported radiotherapy (RT) plan from the TPS is interpreted by using an interface and is then translated into the TOPAS input text. The developed Monte Carlo nozzle model can be used to estimate the non-beam performance, such as the neutron background, of the nozzles. Furthermore, the nozzle model can be used to study the mechanical optimization of the design of the nozzle.

  10. Use of complementary and alternative medical therapy by patients with primary brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Terri S; Gilbert, Mark R

    2008-05-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing. CAM includes mind-body interventions, biologically based therapies, energy therapies, and body-based methods. Primary brain tumors arise within the brain and have a poor prognosis when malignant. Even patients with benign tumors suffer neurologic and systemic symptoms as a result of the tumor or its treatment. CAM is used by 30% of brain tumor patients, who often do not report its use to their physician. Herbal medicines may affect the metabolism of prescribed medications or produce adverse effects that may be attributed to other causes. In patients with systemic cancer, mind-body modalities such as meditation and relaxation therapy have been shown to be helpful in reducing anxiety and pain; acupuncture and hypnotherapy may also reduce both pain and nausea. Recent preclinical studies have reported that ginseng, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Angelica sinensis may promote apoptosis of tumor cells or exercise antiangiogenic effects. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of CAM on symptom control or tumor growth in this vulnerable patient population.

  11. Medical therapy reduces microbiota diversity and evenness in surgically recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cindy M.; Soldanova, Katerina; Nordstrom, Lora; Dwan, Michael G.; Moss, Owain L.; Contente-Cuomo, Tania L.; Keim, Paul; Price, Lance B.; Lane, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis is a highly prevalent and heterogeneous condition frequently treated with antibiotics and corticosteroid therapy. However, the effect of medical therapy on sinus microbiota remains unknown. Methods We enrolled CRS participants (n = 6) with patent maxillary antrostomies and active mucosal inflammation, who had not received antibiotics or corticosteroids in the previous eight weeks. A pre- and post-treatment maxillary sinus swab was collected, from which DNA was extracted, pyrosequenced, and analyzed using Naïve Bayesian Classifier and ecological analyses. Results Four participants showed significant improvement in endoscopic appearance. The shifts in microbiota in response to therapy were highly individualized. There was no single common microbiota profile among participants with similar clinical outcomes, but overall there was significant decrease in microbiota diversity (t(5) = 2.05, p = 0.10) and evenness (t(5) = 2.28, p = 0.07) after treatment. Conclusions Our findings strongly correlate with earlier studies that examined the impact of antibiotics on human microbiota. We observed that post-treatment, participants frequently became colonized by taxa that are less susceptible to the prescribed antibiotics. Our findings highlight the challenge in seeking generalizable diagnostic and therapeutic options in CRS, particularly regarding microbiological response and outcomes. PMID:23843343

  12. Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease: medications, surgery, or endoscopic therapy? (Current status and trends).

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xu-ting; Kavic, Stephen M; Park, Adrian E

    2005-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common chronic disorder in the Western world. The basic cause of GERD has been well characterized--the fundamental defect is a loss of integrity of the gastroesophageal barrier. What is less clear is the most appropriate means of addressing this reflux. GERD has a variety of symptoms, ranging from typical presentations of heartburn and regurgitation (without esophagitis) to atypical presentations, such as severe erosive esophagitis and its associated complications. Because of its symptomatic diversity, physicians may select from a variety of therapeutic approaches. Medical therapy aims at decreasing acidity by suppressing proton secretion and has been well established. Available medications include antacids and alginates, H2-receptor antagonists, motility agents, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Antireflux surgery, commonly performed laparoscopically, aims at reinforcing and repairing the defective barrier through plication of the gastric fundus. The earliest performed successful procedures were the Nissen and Toupet fundoplications, to which several modifications have since been made. It has been demonstrated in preliminary studies and long-term outcomes of such open surgery and preliminary studies of such laparoscopic surgery that antireflux surgery is an effective approach, with overall outcomes superior to those achieved with medications. The precise indications for the surgical treatment of patients with GERD, however, remain controversial. In recent years, endoscopic intraluminal antireflux approaches have attracted the attention of physicians, surgeons, and commercial companies, especially after the approval of two endoscopic intraluminal methods by the United States FDA in 2000. The common element is prevention of acid reflux by construction of a functional or controlled barrier in the lower esophageal sphincter zone. Three main methods are currently employed: endoscopic intraluminal valvuloplasty, endoscopic

  13. Metacognitive therapy (MCT+) in patients with psychosis not receiving antipsychotic medication: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Balzan, Ryan P.; Galletly, Cherrie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychotherapies for psychosis typically aim to develop an awareness of the implausible content of a delusion or target the underlying cognitive biases (i.e., problematic thinking styles, such as hasty decisions and illusory control) that foster and maintain delusional beliefs. A recently designed individual-based treatment entitled metacognitive therapy (MCT+) combines these two approaches. Emerging evidence suggests individualized MCT+, when used concurrently with antipsychotic medication, may be an effective psychological treatment for reducing delusional symptoms. However, it remains to be tested whether MCT+ can be effective in patients with active delusions who are not currently receiving psychotropic drugs. Method: We present two cases (one patient with schizophrenia and the other with delusional disorder) experiencing active delusions who underwent 4-weeks of intensive MCT+, without concurrent antipsychotic medication (minimum 6-months unmedicated). Baseline and 6-week follow-up data are presented on a variety of measures assessing delusion symptom severity (i.e., PANSS, PSYRATS, SAPS), clinical insight, and cognitive bias propensity. Results: After 4-weeks of MCT+, both patients showed substantial reduction in delusional symptoms, reported improved clinical insight, and were less prone to making illusory correlations. Conclusions: The presented case studies provide preliminary evidence for the feasibility of MCT+ in treating patients not taking, or resistant to, antipsychotic medication. PMID:26217283

  14. Antidepressant medication augmented with cognitive-behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder in older adults.

    PubMed

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Petkus, Andrew J; White, Kamila S; Nguyen, Hoang; Kornblith, Sander; Andreescu, Carmen; Zisook, Sidney; Lenze, Eric J

    2013-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Generalized anxiety disorder is common among older adults and leads to diminished health and cognitive functioning. Although antidepressant medications are efficacious, many elderly individuals require augmentation treatment. Furthermore, little is known about maintenance strategies for older people. The authors examined whether sequenced treatment combining pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) boosts response and prevents relapse in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. METHOD Participants were individuals at least 60 years of age with generalized anxiety disorder (N=73) who were recruited from outpatient clinics at three sites. Participants received 12 weeks of open-label escitalopram and were then randomly assigned to one of four conditions: 16 weeks of escitalopram (10-20 mg/day) plus modular CBT, followed by 28 weeks of maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram alone, followed by maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram plus CBT, followed by pill placebo; and escitalopram alone, followed by placebo. RESULTS Escitalopram augmented with CBT increased response rates on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire but not on the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale compared with escitalopram alone. Both escitalopram and CBT prevented relapse compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates effective strategies for treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in older adults. The sequence of antidepressant medication augmented with CBT leads to worry reduction in the short-term. Continued medication prevents relapse, but for many individuals, CBT would allow sustained remission without requiring long-term pharmacotherapy. PMID:23680817

  15. Antidepressant Medication Augmented With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Petkus, Andrew J.; White, Kamila S.; Nguyen, Hoang; Kornblith, Sander; Andreescu, Carmen; Zisook, Sidney; Lenze, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Generalized anxiety disorder is common among older adults and leads to diminished health and cognitive functioning. Although antidepressant medications are efficacious, many elderly individuals require augmentation treatment. Furthermore, little is known about maintenance strategies for older people. The authors examined whether sequenced treatment combining pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) boosts response and prevents relapse in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. Method Participants were individuals at least 60 years of age with generalized anxiety disorder (N=73) who were recruited from outpatient clinics at three sites. Participants received 12 weeks of open-label escitalopram and were then randomly assigned to one of four conditions:16 weeks of escitalopram (10–20 mg/day) plus modular CBT, followed by 28 weeks of maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram alone, followed by maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram plus CBT, followed by pill placebo; and escitalopram alone, followed by placebo. Results Escitalopram augmented with CBT increased response rates on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire but not on the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale compared with escitalopram alone. Both escitalopram and CBT prevented relapse compared with placebo. Conclusions This study demonstrates effective strategies for treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in older adults. The sequence of antidepressant medication augmented with CBT leads to worry reduction in the short-term. Continued medication prevents relapse, but for many individuals, CBT would allow sustained remission without requiring long-term pharmacotherapy. PMID:23680817

  16. In utero stem cell transplantation and gene therapy: rationale, history, and recent advances toward clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Almeida-Porada, Graça; Atala, Anthony; Porada, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput molecular testing have made it possible to diagnose most genetic disorders relatively early in gestation with minimal risk to the fetus. These advances should soon allow widespread prenatal screening for the majority of human genetic diseases, opening the door to the possibility of treatment/correction prior to birth. In addition to the obvious psychological and financial benefits of curing a disease in utero, and thereby enabling the birth of a healthy infant, there are multiple biological advantages unique to fetal development, which provide compelling rationale for performing potentially curative treatments, such as stem cell transplantation or gene therapy, prior to birth. Herein, we briefly review the fields of in utero transplantation (IUTx) and in utero gene therapy and discuss the biological hurdles that have thus far restricted success of IUTx to patients with immunodeficiencies. We then highlight several recent experimental breakthroughs in immunology, hematopoietic/marrow ontogeny, and in utero cell delivery, which have collectively provided means of overcoming these barriers, thus setting the stage for clinical application of these highly promising therapies in the near future. PMID:27069953

  17. Advance Care Planning and HIV Infection in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sangarlangkarn, Aroonsiri; Merlin, Jessica S; Tucker, Rodney O; Kelley, Amy S

    In the era of antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection has become a chronic illness with associated multimorbidity, and practitioners are faced with an emerging population of HIV-infected patients with evolving needs for advance care planning (ACP), defined as communication between individuals and their proxies to plan for future health care decisions. This article provides a review of original research studies on ACP in HIV-infected adults in the era of antiretroviral therapy (1996-present) from PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO. Eleven studies conducted between 1996 and 2015 met the selection criteria, with study sizes ranging from 9 to 2864 participants. Most studies consisted of white men in outpatient settings and had poorly defined definitions of ACP. Prevalence of ACP was variable (36%-54% had end-of-life communication, 8%-47% had advance directives). Lack of ACP was most commonly associated with low income, followed by lower severity of illness, low education level, black or Hispanic race, female sex, younger age, injection drug use, and social isolation. Practitioners reported limited time or energy and inadequate preparation or training as barriers to ACP. Existing literature on ACP in the era of antiretroviral therapy is limited, but shows that ACP prevalence in HIV-infected individuals is variable depending on socioeconomic factors, severity of illness, and practitioner resources and training. More research is needed to increase ACP among HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27398771

  18. Boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiation therapy for cancer. The first component of this treatment is the preferential localization of the stable isotope {sup 10}B in tumor cells by targeting with boronated compounds. The tumor and surrounding tissue is then irradiated with a neutron beam resulting in thermal neutron/{sup 10}B reactions ({sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li) resulting in the production of localized high LET radiation from alpha and {sup 7}Li particles. These products of the neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells, but of short range so that the majority of the ionizing energy released is microscopically confined to the vicinity of the boron-containing compound. In principal it should be possible with BNCT to selectively destroy small nests or even single cancer cells located within normal tissue. It follows that the major improvements in this form of radiation therapy are going to come largely from the development of boron compounds with greater tumor selectivity, although there will certainly be advances made in neutron beam quality as well as the possible development of alternative sources of neutron beams, particularly accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams.

  19. Nitroreductase gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: insights and advances toward clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elsie M; Little, Rory F; Mowday, Alexandra M; Rich, Michelle H; Chan-Hyams, Jasmine V E; Copp, Janine N; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V; Ackerley, David F

    2015-10-15

    This review examines the vast catalytic and therapeutic potential offered by type I (i.e. oxygen-insensitive) nitroreductase enzymes in partnership with nitroaromatic prodrugs, with particular focus on gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT; a form of cancer gene therapy). Important first indications of this potential were demonstrated over 20 years ago, for the enzyme-prodrug pairing of Escherichia coli NfsB and CB1954 [5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. However, it has become apparent that both the enzyme and the prodrug in this prototypical pairing have limitations that have impeded their clinical progression. Recently, substantial advances have been made in the biodiscovery and engineering of superior nitroreductase variants, in particular development of elegant high-throughput screening capabilities to enable optimization of desirable activities via directed evolution. These advances in enzymology have been paralleled by advances in medicinal chemistry, leading to the development of second- and third-generation nitroaromatic prodrugs that offer substantial advantages over CB1954 for nitroreductase GDEPT, including greater dose-potency and enhanced ability of the activated metabolite(s) to exhibit a local bystander effect. In addition to forging substantial progress towards future clinical trials, this research is supporting other fields, most notably the development and improvement of targeted cellular ablation capabilities in small animal models, such as zebrafish, to enable cell-specific physiology or regeneration studies.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Wounds: The Spectrum from Basic to Advanced Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Viñas, Marta; Falanga, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Almost 7 million Americans have chronic cutaneous wounds and billions of dollars are spent on their treatment. The number of patients with nonhealing wounds keeps increasing worldwide due to an ever-aging population, increasing number of obese and diabetic patients, and cardiovascular disease. Recent Advances: Advanced treatments for difficult wounds are needed. Therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is attractive due to their differentiating potential, their immunomodulating properties, and their paracrine effects. Critical Issues: New technologies (including growth factors and skin substitutes) are now widely used for stimulating wound healing. However, in spite of these advances, the percentage of complete wound closure in most clinical situations is around 50–60%. Moreover, there is a high rate of wound recurrence. Future Directions: Recently, it has been demonstrated that MSCs speed up wound healing by decreasing inflammation, by promoting angiogenesis, and by decreasing scarring. However, there are some potential limitations to successful MSC therapy. These limitations include the need to improve cell delivery methods, cell viability, heterogeneity in MSC preparations, and suboptimal wound bed preparation. Further large, controlled clinical trials are needed to establish the safety of MSCs before widespread clinical application. PMID:27076993