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Sample records for advanced medical therapies

  1. Advances in medical therapies for Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tritos, Nicholas A; Biller, Beverly M K

    2012-02-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a heterogeneous disorder of diverse etiologies, leading to cortisol excess. Endogenous CS is caused by tumors secreting adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) (either eutopically or ectopically), cortisol, or very rarely corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Definitive therapy of endogenous CS optimally involves tumor resection. Indications for medical therapy include acutely ill patients in preparation for surgery, those for whom surgery is not indicated (such as patients with unknown tumor location or unresectable lesions, and patients unfit for surgery for medical reasons), or patients who remain hypercortisolemic postoperatively. In the current article, the published literature has been reviewed to summarize data on medical therapies used in CS. Several agents are either used "off label" or being studied as potential therapies for CS. Medications suppressing adrenal steroidogenesis currently in use include ketoconazole, metyrapone, mitotane, or etomidate. In addition, the investigational agent LCI699 is under study. Centrally acting agents, which suppress ACTH secretion, include cabergoline, octreotide, as well as the investigational agents pasireotide, bexarotene, and lapatinib, which are being studied in patients with pituitary tumors. Mifepristone, a type 2 glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, was recently approved by the FDA as a new therapy for CS. Although not definitive at present, medical therapies have an important role in the management of CS patients. It is anticipated that understanding the pathogenesis of these tumors at a molecular level may spawn the development of rationally designed, highly efficacious medical therapies for CS in the future.

  2. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    ScienceCinema

    Tijana Rajh

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology – an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

  3. Medical and surgical therapy for advanced chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Word, Ronnie

    2010-12-01

    Venous ulceration is the most serious consequence of chronic venous insufficiency. The disease has been known for more than 3.5 millennia with wound care centers established as early as 1500 bc. Unfortunately, still today it is a very poorly managed medical condition by most physicians despite that a great deal has been learned about the pathogenesis and treatment for venous ulcerations. We find that many wound care clinics treat the wound and not the cause of the problem. In this article, we review the basic pathophysiology of advanced chronic venous insufficiency and review the most up-to-date information with regard to medical therapy and different options of surgical therapy to address the underlying venous pathology responsible for chronic ulcers.

  4. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  5. Encountering Challenges with the EU Regulation on Advance Therapy Medical Products.

    PubMed

    Mansnérus, Juli

    2015-12-01

    This article aims at analysing how well the Advanced Therapy Medical Product Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 (ATMP Regulation) meets the needs of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMES), academia and public tissue establishments developing advanced therapy medical products (ATMPS). Benefits and shortcomings of the ATMP Regulation are identified, and possible amendments are proposed to accelerate the translation of research into advanced therapies and to facilitate the commercialisation of ATMPS whilst ensuring safety. It was set up as a lex specialis to ensure the free movement of ATMPS within the EU in order to facilitate their access to the internal market and to foster the competitiveness of European pharmaceutical companies, while guaranteeing the highest level protection of public health. Since the adoption of the ATMP Regulation in late 2008, only 5 ATMPS have been granted marketing authorisations thus far. Hence, there is a need to analyse whether the ATMP Regulation meets its objectives.

  6. Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation vs Best Medical Therapy for Patients With Advanced Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Frances M.; Follett, Kenneth; Stern, Matthew; Hur, Kwan; Harris, Crystal; Marks, William J.; Rothlind, Johannes; Sagher, Oren; Reda, Domenic; Moy, Claudia S.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Burchiel, Kim; Hogarth, Penelope; Lai, Eugene C.; Duda, John E.; Holloway, Kathryn; Samii, Ali; Horn, Stacy; Bronstein, Jeff; Stoner, Gatana; Heemskerk, Jill; Huang, Grant D.

    2010-01-01

    Context Deep brain stimulation is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD), although there are few randomized trials comparing treatments, and most studies exclude older patients. Objective To compare 6-month outcomes for patients with PD who received deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy. Design, Setting, and Patients Randomized controlled trial of patients who received either deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy, stratified by study site and patient age (<70 years vs ≥70 years) at 7 Veterans Affairs and 6 university hospitals between May 2002 and October 2005. A total of 255 patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≥2 while not taking medications) were enrolled; 25% were aged 70 years or older. The final 6-month follow-up visit occurred in May 2006. Intervention Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (n=60) or globus pallidus (n=61). Patients receiving best medical therapy (n=134) were actively managed by movement disorder neurologists. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was time spent in the “on” state (good motor control with unimpeded motor function) without troubling dyskinesia, using motor diaries. Other outcomes included motor function, quality of life, neurocognitive function, and adverse events. Results Patients who received deep brain stimulation gained a mean of 4.6 h/d of on time without troubling dyskinesia compared with 0 h/d for patients who received best medical therapy (between group mean difference, 4.5 h/d [95% CI, 3.7-5.4 h/d]; P<.001). Motor function improved significantly (P<.001) with deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy, such that 71% of deep brain stimulation patients and 32% of best medical therapy patients experienced clinically meaningful motor function improvements (≥5 points). Compared with the best medical therapy group, the deep brain stimulation group experienced significant improvements in the summary measure of quality of life and on 7 of 8 PD

  7. Targeted medical therapy of biliary tract cancer: Recent advances and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Höpfner, Michael; Schuppan, Detlef; Scherübl, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The limited efficacy of cytotoxic therapy for advanced biliary tract and gallbladder cancers emphasizes the need for novel and more effective medical treatment options. A better understanding of the specific biological features of these neoplasms led to the development of new targeted therapies, which take the abundant expression of several growth factors and cognate tyrosine kinase receptors into account. This review will briefly summarize the status and future perspectives of antiangiogenic and growth factor receptor-based pharmacological approaches for the treatment of biliary tract and gallbladder cancers. In view of multiple novel targeted approaches, the rationale for innovative therapies, such as combinations of growth factor (receptor)-targeting agents with cytotoxic drugs or with other novel anticancer drugs will be highlighted. PMID:19084910

  8. Impact of advanced medical therapy for the outcome of an adult patient with Eisenmenger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ereminienė, Eglė; Kinderytė, Marija; Miliauskas, Skaidrius

    2017-01-01

    Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) is the most severe form of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with congenital heart disease. It is an extremely devastating condition with a serious impact on patients' life. Classical therapy of ES remains directed to avoid complications, such as erythrocytosis, treatment of congestive heart failure, prevention of infection, and secondary haematological abnormalities such as iron deficiency and coagulation disorders. However, the only effective treatment is heart-lung transplantation; still, morbidity and mortality after transplantation remain substantially high. Furthermore, waiting lists for heart-lung transplantation are long. Recent studies examining the use of advanced medical treatment in patients with ES have shown that it may have beneficial effects in patients with ES; however, additional studies need to be done to confirm its efficacy and appropriate clinical use. A 41-year-old female admitted to the Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences due to progressive dyspnea on minimal effort, heart failure symptoms leading to NYHA functional class III-IV. After clinical and instrumental investigations, ES secondary to unrepaired patent ductus arteriosus with severe PAH was diagnosed. Treatment with sildenafil was initiated together with the standard pharmacological therapy, and the patient was added to the waiting list for the heart and lung transplantation. After 24 months of stable condition, her clinical status deteriorated, and combination therapy (sildenafil and ambrisentan) was initiated. Clinical symptoms and exercise capacity improved, and she has been stable for 4 years thereafter. Our experience of the management of an adult patient with ES showed the benefits of treatment with advanced therapy with pulmonary vasodilators that improved the patient's quality of life and delayed the need for heart and lung transplantation.

  9. Establishment and Implementation of a Required Medication Therapy Management Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gilliam, Eric; Thompson, Megan; Griend, Joseph Vande

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To develop a community pharmacy-based medication therapy management (MTM) advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) that provides students with skills and knowledge to deliver entry-level pharmacy MTM services. Design. The University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences (SSPPS) partnered with three community pharmacy chains to establish this three-week, required MTM APPE. Students completed the American Pharmacists Association MTM Certificate Course prior to entering the APPE. Students were expected to spend 90% or more of their time at this experience working on MTM interventions, using store MTM platforms. Assessment. All 151 students successfully completed this MTM APPE, and each received a passing evaluation from their preceptor. Preceptor evaluations of students averaged above four (entry-level practice) on a five-point Likert scale. The majority of students reported engagement in MTM services for more than 80% of the time on site. Students’ self-reporting of their ability to perform MTM interventions improved after participation in the APPE. Conclusion. The SSPPS successfully implemented a required MTM APPE, preparing students for entry-level delivery of MTM services. PMID:28381896

  10. [Report from the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT). Pitfalls on the way from concept to medical treatment with advanced therapy medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Reiss, M; Büttel, I C; Schneider, C K

    2011-07-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are highly innovative and complex medicines. They comprise gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). With the European Regulation on ATMP that came into force in 2008, a consolidated regulatory framework was created, where the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) plays a central role. This article discusses pitfalls and challenges that the CAT has experienced in its discussions of various procedures. Often ATMPs are developed by small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) which also face nonscientific challenges. The CAT wishes to meet these challenges on a scientific and regulatory level during its 2010-2015 work program.

  11. A randomised trial of lung sealant versus medical therapy for advanced emphysema.

    PubMed

    Come, Carolyn E; Kramer, Mordechai R; Dransfield, Mark T; Abu-Hijleh, Muhanned; Berkowitz, David; Bezzi, Michela; Bhatt, Surya P; Boyd, Michael B; Cases, Enrique; Chen, Alexander C; Cooper, Christopher B; Flandes, Javier; Gildea, Thomas; Gotfried, Mark; Hogarth, D Kyle; Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; Leeds, William; Liesching, Timothy; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Marquette, Charles; Mularski, Richard A; Pinto-Plata, Victor M; Pritchett, Michael A; Rafeq, Samaan; Rubio, Edmundo R; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Stratakos, Grigoris; Sy, Alexander; Tsai, Larry W; Wahidi, Momen; Walsh, John; Wells, J Michael; Whitten, Patrick E; Yusen, Roger; Zulueta, Javier J; Criner, Gerard J; Washko, George R

    2015-09-01

    Uncontrolled pilot studies demonstrated promising results of endoscopic lung volume reduction using emphysematous lung sealant (ELS) in patients with advanced, upper lobe predominant emphysema. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ELS in a randomised controlled setting.Patients were randomised to ELS plus medical treatment or medical treatment alone. Despite early termination for business reasons and inability to assess the primary 12-month end-point, 95 out of 300 patients were successfully randomised, providing sufficient data for 3- and 6-month analysis.57 patients (34 treatment and 23 control) had efficacy results at 3 months; 34 (21 treatment and 13 control) at 6 months. In the treatment group, 3-month lung function, dyspnoea, and quality of life improved significantly from baseline when compared to control. Improvements persisted at 6 months with >50% of treated patients experiencing clinically important improvements, including some whose lung function improved by >100%. 44% of treated patients experienced adverse events requiring hospitalisation (2.5-fold more than control, p=0.01), with two deaths in the treated cohort. Treatment responders tended to be those experiencing respiratory adverse events.Despite early termination, results show that minimally invasive ELS may be efficacious, yet significant risks (probably inflammatory) limit its current utility.

  12. Medical therapy for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, S B

    2000-07-01

    Last year was not a banner year for developments in medical therapy for ulcerative colitis. In contrast to the expansion of therapies for Crohn disease, treatment for ulcerative colitis was evolutionary, at best, leading many patients to seek alternative medical approaches. Nevertheless, there have been advances in the application of aminosalicylates and immune modifiers for ulcerative colitis. Additional, nonconventional approaches include nicotine, probiotics, dietary therapies, and heparins. Several novel approaches have arisen from animal models, including additional means of inhibiting nuclear factor-kappaB and targeting of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

  13. Advanced Accelerators for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Koyama, Kazuyoshi

    We review advanced accelerators for medical applications with respect to the following key technologies: (i) higher RF electron linear accelerator (hereafter “linac”); (ii) optimization of alignment for the proton linac, cyclotron and synchrotron; (iii) superconducting magnet; (iv) laser technology. Advanced accelerators for medical applications are categorized into two groups. The first group consists of compact medical linacs with high RF, cyclotrons and synchrotrons downsized by optimization of alignment and superconducting magnets. The second group comprises laser-based acceleration systems aimed of medical applications in the future. Laser plasma electron/ion accelerating systems for cancer therapy and laser dielectric accelerating systems for radiation biology are mentioned. Since the second group has important potential for a compact system, the current status of the established energy and intensity and of the required stability are given.

  14. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Plöckinger, U.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs), dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided. PMID:22550484

  15. Tailoring Therapies in Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Puckett, Carrie; Mudd, James O

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure effects millions of people throughout the world and is a growing epidemic with a significant impact on the economics and systems of care delivery. The goal of therapy in advanced heart failure is to improve quality of life and prolong survival. Standard medical therapies may require tailoring as advanced therapies are considered in the context of patient and caregiver goals. The aim of this review is to summarize concepts for tailored medical therapy and monitoring in advanced heart failure and discuss the importance of tailoring systems of care and shared decision making in advanced heart failure.

  16. Combination goserelin and tamoxifen therapy in premenopausal advanced breast cancer: a multicentre study by the ITMO group. Italian Trials in Medical Oncology.

    PubMed Central

    Buzzoni, R.; Biganzoli, L.; Bajetta, E.; Celio, L.; Fornasiero, A.; Mariani, L.; Zilembo, N.; Di Bartolomeo, M.; Di Leo, A.; Arcangeli, G.

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested that tamoxifen may improve the efficacy of medical castration with luteinising hormone-releasing hormone analogues, but very few data have so far been published concerning the clinical and endocrinological activity of this therapeutic modality. In this phase II multicentre trial conducted by the Italian Trials in Medical Oncology group (ITMO), 64 premenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive or unknown breast cancer were treated with monthly s.c. injections of goserelin 3.6 mg, in association with a tamoxifen daily dose of 20 mg, as first-line therapy for their advanced disease. All of the patients were evaluable for efficacy and there was an overall response rate of 41% (95% confidence interval 28-52%), with 7 of the 26 responders achieving complete remission. The median time to response was 4 months (range 2-17), and the median response duration was 13 months (range 6-37 +). Better responses were observed in soft tissues (51%); the response in visceral and bone metastases was respectively 19% and 37%. Serum concentrations of gonadotrophins and oestradiol were significantly decreased by the treatment, oestrogen levels being constantly suppressed to within the range observed in post-menopausal women. No significant change was detected in serum testosterone levels. In our experience, although it was not associated with any increased clinical efficacy, the concurrent use of goserelin and tamoxifen proved to be a feasible approach in the management of premenopausal advanced breast cancer. PMID:7734310

  17. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  18. Medical Yoga Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Medical yoga is defined as the use of yoga practices for the prevention and treatment of medical conditions. Beyond the physical elements of yoga, which are important and effective for strengthening the body, medical yoga also incorporates appropriate breathing techniques, mindfulness, and meditation in order to achieve the maximum benefits. Multiple studies have shown that yoga can positively impact the body in many ways, including helping to regulate blood glucose levels, improve musculoskeletal ailments and keeping the cardiovascular system in tune. It also has been shown to have important psychological benefits, as the practice of yoga can help to increase mental energy and positive feelings, and decrease negative feelings of aggressiveness, depression and anxiety. PMID:28208599

  19. Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Skinner, Heath D; Minsky, Bruce D

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer is controversial. For patients who are candidates for surgical resection, multiple prospective clinical trials have demonstrated the advantages of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. For patients who are medically inoperable, definitive chemoradiation is an alternative approach with survival rates comparable to trimodality therapy. Although trials of dose escalation are ongoing, the standard radiation dose remains 50.4 Gy. Modern radiotherapy techniques such as image-guided radiation therapy with motion management and intensity-modulated radiation therapy are strongly encouraged with a planning objective to maximize conformity to the intended target volume while reducing dose delivered to uninvolved normal tissues.

  20. Mycetoma Medical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma. PMID:25330342

  1. Medical therapy for spermatogenic failure

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Stahl, Peter J; Schlegel, Peter N

    2012-01-01

    Medical treatment of men with primary spermatogenic failure remains largely ineffective in contrast to those with secondary testicular failure. Treatment has been attempted with a multitude of agents ranging from hormones to nutritional supplements (antioxidants). While some studies have demonstrated benefit to some treatments, no treatments have consistently demonstrated efficacy nor has it been possible to reliably identify patients likely to benefit. Idiopathic spermatogenic failure likely results from multiple discrete defects in sperm production that are as yet unidentified. A better understanding of these defects will yield more effective treatment options and appropriate triage of patients to specific therapeutic regimens. This review focuses on the rationale and current evidence for hormonal and antioxidant therapy in medical treatment of male infertility, spermatogenic failure in particular. Although empiric medical therapy for spermatogenic failure has been largely replaced by assisted reproductive techniques, both treatment modalities could play a role, perhaps as combination therapy. PMID:22179517

  2. Recent advances in medical physics.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A; Quick, Harald H

    2011-03-01

    Some of the major interests in medical physics over the last few years have concerned the technical advances in Computed Tomography and high field Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This review discusses the introduction of Dual Source CT and explains how it can not only offer faster data acquisition but also operate with lower radiation doses. This provides enormous benefits for all patients, but for cardiac and pediatric examinations in particular. The advances in MRI at 7 T esla are also impressive, with better signal to noise; cardiac and musculoskeletal applications are discussed; technical improvements are work-in-progress for other applications.

  3. [Advancement of the medical doctorate].

    PubMed

    Baum, C; Förster, R; Schmidt, R E

    2009-08-01

    The medical doctorate and the subsequent advanced research qualification in medicine have an exceptional position within the natural sciences. While, in the German system, graduation to the degree of a medical doctor is often an initiation into scientific practice, the in-depth scientific education of medical doctors may be achieved in various configurations. In recent years, structured programs for doctorates in medicine and natural sciences have found increasing acceptance, following recommendations of national scientific councils ("Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft" and "Hochschulrat"). Hannover Medical School has been offering such programs for a number of years. The StrucMed program increases the quality of medical doctorate studies, typically performed in the third and fourth years of university studies. The Hannover Biomedical Research School (HBRS) combines several programs for a doctorate in natural sciences, creating a platform for an internationally oriented education of post-graduates in various disciplines of life sciences. Evaluating the achievements and career paths of the trainees will contribute to the successful integration of research work in an efficiency-oriented clinical environment.

  4. Medical therapy for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Jani, Niraj; Regueiro, Miguel D

    2002-03-01

    Although newer therapeutic agents are being developed for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, aminosalicylates and corticosteroids remain the mainstay of treatment for UC (Tables 2-5). Patients who do not respond to these agents or become steroid dependent require immunomodulatory therapy or curative surgery. Cyclosporine represents the greatest treatment advance for UC in 10 years. The role of nicotine, heparin, antibiotics, probiotics, and SCFA in the treatment of UC is less clear, but these agents may offer an alternative therapeutic approach for patients intolerant or nonresponsive to standard therapy.

  5. Medication management during electroconvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zolezzi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has demonstrated to be highly effective and safe, even life saving for many psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Most patients who require ECT are also on concurrent pharmacotherapy. As such, the objective of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature focusing on the medications used during an ECT procedure and on the effects of concurrent psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications on the effectiveness and safety of ECT. The review also attempts to summarize the recommendations derived from existing documents to guide pharmacotherapy decisions for patients undergoing ECT. For this purpose, using electronic databases, an extensive search of the current literature was made using ECT and medications or drug classes as keywords. PMID:27143894

  6. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  7. Recent advances in alternative therapies.

    PubMed

    Ziment, I

    2000-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is becoming more popular, and CAM remedies are used instead of, or integrated with, orthodox allopathic therapies by many patients with asthma. Although most CAM remedies may have no discernible effects when analyzed by conventional medical techniques, some double-blind controlled studies do suggest that a meaningful benefit can be obtained with acupunture and homeopathic management in asthma. Herbal medicine is more popular, despite little evidence that the vast majority of herbs for asthma have any useful effects other than a nonspecific expectorant action. Dietary adjustment may benefit a small percentage of patients with asthma, but extreme measures are very rarely indicated. Formal pyschologic approaches can help some patients by reducing anxiety. Although most CAM approaches are harmless, the lack of benefit of many remedies and the potential harm from some of them must be recognized.

  8. Recent advances in the medical treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vorobiof, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the systemic therapy of breast cancer (early and advanced) has changed considerably. For the past 40-50 years, and since the discovery and further therapeutic use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, breast cancer treatment has become the model for the development and success of tailored medical treatment. Much still needs to be done in improving outcomes for all patients with breast cancer, and especially for those who have advanced breast cancer, a challenging area for medical oncologists. Ongoing international clinical trials are currently evaluating new therapeutic approaches and identifying specific biological subsets that could determine a patient's ability to respond to particular chemotherapeutic drugs.

  9. Medication therapy management services: definitions and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Annette N; Martin, Michelle T; Tilton, Jessica J; Touchette, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    In the US, the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 required that Medicare Part D insurers provide medication therapy management (MTM) services (MTMS) to selected beneficiaries, with the goals of providing education, improving adherence, or detecting adverse drug events and medication misuse. These broad goals and variety in MTM programmes available make assessment of these programmes difficult. The objectives of this article are to review the definitions of MTMS proposed by various stakeholders, and to summarize and evaluate the outcomes of MTMS consistent with those that may be offered in Medicare Part D or reimbursed by State Medicaid programmes. MTM programmes are approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Pharmacy, medical and insurance organizations have provided guidelines and definitions for MTM programmes, distinguishing them from other types of community pharmacy activities. MTM has been distinguished from disease state management because of the focus on medications and multiple conditions. It differs from patient counselling because it is delivered independent of dispensing and involves collaboration with patients and providers. There is no consensus on the recommended mode of delivery (i.e. face-to-face or by telephone) for MTM. A MEDLINE search was conducted to identify articles published after 2000 using the search terms 'medication therapy management' and 'medication management'. Studies with outcomes evaluating community-based programmes consistent with MTMS, regardless of MTMS reimbursement source, were included in the review. Seven publications describing four MTMS were identified. For each of the identified articles, we describe the study design, service setting, inclusion criteria and outcomes. An additional three surveys describing multiple MTMS were identified and are summarized. Finally, ongoing efforts by CMS to evaluate the success of MTMS in the US are described. To date, there are limited outcomes available for MTMS

  10. Medical technology advances from space research.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    NASA-sponsored medical R & D programs for space applications are reviewed with particular attention to the benefits of these programs to earthbound medical services and to the general public. Notable among the results of these NASA programs is an integrated medical laboratory equipped with numerous advanced systems such as digital biotelemetry and automatic visual field mapping systems, sponge electrode caps for electroencephalograms, and sophisticated respiratory analysis equipment.

  11. Medical technology advances from space research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    Details of medical research and development programs, particularly an integrated medical laboratory, as derived from space technology are given. The program covers digital biotelemetry systems, automatic visual field mapping equipment, sponge electrode caps for clinical electroencephalograms, and advanced respiratory analysis equipment. The possibility of using the medical laboratory in ground based remote areas and regional health care facilities, as well as long duration space missions is discussed.

  12. Advanced medical video services through context-aware medical networks.

    PubMed

    Doukas, Charalampos N; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Pliakas, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a framework for advanced medical video delivery services, through network and patient-state awareness. Under this scope a context-aware medical networking platform is described. The developed platform enables proper medical video data coding and transmission according to both a) network availability and/or quality and b) patient status, optimizing thus network performance and telediagnosis. An evaluation platform has been developed based on scalable H.264 coding of medical videos. Corresponding results of video transmission over a WiMax network have proved the effectiveness and efficiency of the platform providing proper video content delivery.

  13. Cognitive therapy: a training model for advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Christine E; McDanel, Heather

    2005-05-01

    1. Mental health needs exist in medically underserved areas and can be addressed in nurse-managed, community-based health centers. 2. Cognitive therapy techniques can be used in community-based health centers to intervene and alleviate patients' distress and improve their adherence to treatment. 3. A training program in cognitive therapy can help advanced practice nurses and other health care providers implement the techniques needed to address many behavioral and mental health problems.

  14. Targeted therapies in advanced differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Raquel M; Carneiro, Benedito A; Agulnik, Mark; Kopp, Peter A; Giles, Francis J

    2015-09-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, and its incidence has been rising rapidly over the past 10 years. Although most patients with this disease have an excellent prognosis, a subset develops a more aggressive disease phenotype refractory to conventional therapies. Until recently, there was no effective therapy for these patients. With increasing knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer, novel targeted therapies are being developed for this group of patients. Sorafenib and lenvatinib, small-molecule multikinase inhibitors, were approved for the treatment of progressive, symptomatic, radioactive iodine refractory, advanced differentiated thyroid cancer in 2013 and 2015, respectively. This represents a major innovation in the therapy of patients with advanced thyroid cancer. However, these therapies still have many limitations and further research needs to be pursued with the ultimate goal of providing safe and effective personalized therapy for patients with advanced thyroid cancer.

  15. [Laser radiations in medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Richand, P; Boulnois, J L

    1983-06-30

    The therapeutic effects of various types of laser beams and the various techniques employed are studied. Clinical and experimental research has shown that Helio-Neon laser beams are most effective as biological stimulants and in reducing inflammation. For this reasons they are best used in dermatological surgery cases (varicose ulcers, decubital and surgical wounds, keloid scars, etc.). Infrared diode laser beams have been shown to be highly effective painkillers especially in painful pathologies like postherpetic neuritis. The various applications of laser therapy in acupuncture, the treatment of reflex dermatologia and optic fibre endocavital therapy are presented. The neurophysiological bases of this therapy are also briefly described.

  16. [Recent advances in medical and surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Akira; Koganei, Kazutaka; Tatsumi, Kenji; Futatsuki, Ryo; Kuroki, Hirosuke; Yamada, Kyoko; Arai, Katsuhiko; Fukushima, Tsuneo

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in both medical and surgical treatment of ulcerative colitis have been remarkable. Changes in medical treatment are mainly good results of therapy with the anti-TNF-α antibody, tacrolimus, and those in surgical treatment are an expansion of the surgical indications to include patients with intractable disease, such as treatment refractoriness and chronic corticosteroid dependence, by a better postoperative clinical course after pouch surgery, improred selection of surgical procedures and the timing of surgery in elderly patients. To offer the optimal treatment for patients with ulcerative colitis, new medical therapies should be analyzed from the standpoint of the efficacy and limitations of effect. Long postoperative clinical course of surgical patients including colitic cancer, prevention of postoperative complications should be also analyzed.

  17. Rapid medical advances challenge the tooling industry.

    PubMed

    Conley, B

    2008-01-01

    The requirement for greater performance in smaller spaces has increased demands for product and process innovation in tubing and other medical products. In turn, these developments have placed greater demands on the producers of the advanced tooling for these products. Tooling manufacturers must now continuously design equipment with much tighter tolerances for more sophisticated coextrusions and for newer generations of multilumen and multilayer tubing.

  18. Medical complex for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Anatoly N.; Domanov, Michail S.; Lyabin, Nikolay A.; Chursin, Alexandr D.; Mirza, Sergey Y.; Sukhanov, Viktor B.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Ivanov, Aleksandr I.; Kirilov, Anatoly E.; Rubanov, Sergey N.

    2002-03-01

    Experimental results of initial testing dye-laser 'MLK-02' pumped by a copper vapor laser 'Kulon-10' are presented. Output parameters obtained are the following: average power - 1 and 1.5 W, efficiency - 17.6 and 18.7% at the wavelengths of 670 and 725 nm, respectively. The laser apparatus is supposed to be used for methods of photodynamic therapy.

  19. New medical therapies for heart failure.

    PubMed

    von Lueder, Thomas G; Krum, Henry

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) can rightfully be called the epidemic of the 21(st) century. Historically, the only available medical treatment options for HF have been diuretics and digoxin, but the capacity of these agents to alter outcomes has been brought into question by the scrutiny of modern clinical trials. In the past 4 decades, neurohormonal blockers have been introduced into clinical practice, leading to marked reductions in morbidity and mortality in chronic HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Despite these major advances in pharmacotherapy, our understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms of HF from epidemiological, clinical, pathophysiological, molecular, and genetic standpoints remains incomplete. This knowledge gap is particularly evident with respect to acute decompensated HF and HF with normal (preserved) LVEF. For these clinical phenotypes, no drug has been shown to reduce long-term clinical event rates substantially. Ongoing developments in the pharmacotherapy of HF are likely to challenge our current best-practice algorithms. Novel agents for HF therapy include dual-acting neurohormonal modulators, contractility-enhancing agents, vasoactive and anti-inflammatory peptides, and myocardial protectants. These novel compounds have the potential to enhance our armamentarium of HF therapeutics.

  20. 78 FR 57159 - Scientific Information Request on Medication Therapy Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Scientific Information Request on Medication... scientific information submissions from the public on medication therapy management Scientific information is being solicited to inform our review of Medication Therapy Management, which is currently...

  1. Burns Caused by Medical Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Insensate skin and chronic medical illness such as diabetes mellitus were common risk factors. The scald potential from hydrotherapy in patients with... diabetic or other neuropathy is well document- cd.46.47 A second group at risk arc patients requiring cutaneous, fusciocuraneous, or myocutancous flap...excrcmity burns related to scnsorv loss in diabetes mellitus. 1 fam Pract 1987;24 (2):149-51. 47. Balakrishnan C, Rak TP, Meininger MS. Burns of the

  2. Guide to conservative, medical, and procedural therapies.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R I; Chopra, P; Upshur, C

    2001-11-01

    For patients without a specific diagnosis, treatment of low back pain begins with strategies to avoid re-injury and exacerbation. Most patients benefit from some form of medical therapy, guided by the three-step World Health Organization analgesic ladder. Opioid therapy is appropriate when needed for low back pain, especially in the acute period. Adjuvant medication (eg, an anticonvulsant or antidepressant) may help reduce or eliminate the need for opioid therapy. Side effects are common with opioid medications, although many resolve with time. Patient education in exercise, back protection, nutrition, and sexual concerns is an important component of treatment. Some patients may benefit from referral to a pain center for multidisciplinary management. Those with a structural or mechanical cause of pain may do well with surgery.

  3. Esophageal motility disorders: medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Weiser, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of chest pain and dysphagia are common in the adult population. Most patients initially undergo an evaluation to exclude anatomic causes (ie, esophagitis, stricture) and cardiovascular disease as the etiology of these symptoms. Patients with persistent symptoms may then be referred for specialized testing of the esophagus, including esophageal manometry. Disorders of esophageal motility, which include achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, and ineffective motility are often identified in these patients. Unfortunately, the etiology of these disorders has not been well characterized and the treatment has not been standardized. This review will briefly discuss the impact, etiology, and diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders, and then focus on the medical management of these disorders using evidence from well-designed, prospective studies, where available.

  4. Recent advances in the medical treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vorobiof, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the systemic therapy of breast cancer (early and advanced) has changed considerably. For the past 40–50 years, and since the discovery and further therapeutic use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, breast cancer treatment has become the model for the development and success of tailored medical treatment. Much still needs to be done in improving outcomes for all patients with breast cancer, and especially for those who have advanced breast cancer, a challenging area for medical oncologists. Ongoing international clinical trials are currently evaluating new therapeutic approaches and identifying specific biological subsets that could determine a patient’s ability to respond to particular chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27990275

  5. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  6. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  7. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  8. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  9. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  10. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT...

  11. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT...

  12. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT...

  13. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT...

  14. Advances in Anticancer Immunotoxin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alewine, Christine; Hassan, Raffit

    2015-01-01

    Immunotoxins are a novel class of antibody-conjugated therapeutics currently in clinical development for a variety of malignancies. They consist of an antibody-based targeting domain fused to a bacterial toxin payload for cell killing. Immunotoxins kill cells by inhibiting protein synthesis, a unique mechanism of action that is toxic to both dividing and nondividing cells. Recent advances in the design and administration of immunotoxins are overcoming historical challenges in the field, leading to renewed interest in these therapeutics. PMID:25561510

  15. Advanced cell therapies for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Catarina; Santhagunam, Aruna; Salgueiro, João B; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2015-01-01

    Advanced cell-based therapies are promising approaches for stimulating full regeneration of cartilage lesions. In addition to a few commercially available medicinal products, several clinical and preclinical studies are ongoing worldwide. In preclinical settings, high-quality cartilage tissue has been produced using combination strategies involving stem or progenitor cells, biomaterials, and biomolecules to generate a construct for implantation at the lesion site. Cell numbers and mechanical stimulation of the constructs are not commonly considered, but are important parameters to be evaluated in forthcoming clinical studies. We review current clinical and preclinical studies for advanced therapy cartilage regeneration and evaluate the progress of the field.

  16. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy - Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-09-22

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when 'photoradiation therapy' was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  17. Combination Therapy for Advanced Kaposi Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, adult patients with any form of advanced Kaposi sarcoma will be treated with liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab every 3 weeks for a maximum of six treatments.  Patients who respond to this therapy or have stable disease will rec

  18. Alzheimer's disease: research advances and medical reality.

    PubMed

    Seiguer, Erica

    2005-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease was the eighth-leading cause of death in 2001. There is no cure and no effective treatment. Alzheimer's disease presents policy-makers with several challenges, including the level of funding and direction of federally funded research, as well as the cost pressures on Medicare and Medicaid of long-term care. These challenges will increase in intensity as demographic changes, particularly the aging of baby boomers, take hold. Better prevention of Alzheimer's, advances in therapy, and appropriate care modalities will likely require significant investment.

  19. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  20. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee schedule...

  1. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician...

  2. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee schedule...

  3. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician...

  4. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician...

  5. Antiangiogenic Therapies for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sampat, Keeran R.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a significant cause of death worldwide. HCC is a highly vascular tumor, and proangiogenic cytokines such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and fibroblast growth factor may play crucial roles in this disease. Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor that blocks VEGF and PDGF signaling, was the first systemic therapy to demonstrate improved survival in patients with advanced HCC. Several other drugs targeting VEGF are in development. Because of the anticipation of eventual resistance to anti-VEGF therapies, drugs that also target alternative proangiogenic pathways are being investigated. Recent clinical and preclinical data along with ongoing studies are reviewed. PMID:23576483

  6. Recent advances in the medical treatment of Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Fleseriu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cushing's disease is a condition of hypercortisolism caused by an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. While rare, it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which suggests that early and aggressive intervention is required. The primary, definitive therapy for patients with Cushing's disease in the majority of patients is pituitary surgery, generally performed via a transsphenoidal approach. However, many patients will not achieve remission or they will have recurrences. The consequences of persistent hypercortisolism are severe and, as such, early identification of those patients at risk of treatment failure is exigent. Medical management of Cushing's disease patients plays an important role in achieving long-term remission after failed transsphenoidal surgery, while awaiting effects of radiation or before surgery to decrease the hypercortisolemia and potentially reducing perioperative complications and improving outcome. Medical therapies include centrally acting agents, adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors and glucocorticoid receptor blockers. Furthermore, several new agents are in clinical trials. To normalize the devastating disease effects of hypercortisolemia, it is paramount that successful patient disease management includes individualized, multidisciplinary care, with close collaboration between endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and general surgeons. This commentary will focus on recent advances in the medical treatment of Cushing's, with a focus on newly approved ACTH modulators and glucocorticoid receptor blockers.

  7. Medical training therapy in lumbar syndromes.

    PubMed

    Broll-Zeitvogel, E; Grifka, J; Bauer, J; Roths, P H; Degryse, P

    1999-11-01

    Chronic low back pain can be considered to be one of the most frequently treated and most costly diseases in modern industrial societies. Dysfunctions and imbalances of the spine-supporting muscles increase the risk of low back pain. Consequently preventive treatment and rehabilitation have to aim at preserving and restoring the full capacity of the spine-supporting muscles as well as training coordination and spine-friendly behaviour. In addition to various measures of pain therapy, physiotherapeutic treatment including neuro-physiotherapy, physical treatment (eg electrotherapy), balneotherapy and supportive behavioural training, medical rehabilitation therapy (MRT) ranks among the most effective ways of treating low back pain. MRT applies guidelines and methods of exercise methodology within medically indicated programmes of preventive treatment and rehabilitation. Various objectives of MRT are outlined with special regard to the stages of MRT treatment, emphasizing positive adaptation of the neuro-muscular system in the course of rehabilitation. Physicians are responsible for MRT diagnosis and control. Taking into account the base disorder and the progress of therapy physiotherapists and the physicians in charge determine MRT objectives and treatment strategies.

  8. [Medical training therapy in lumbar syndromes].

    PubMed

    Broll-Zeitvogel, E; Grifka, J; Bauer, J; Roths, P H; Degryse, P

    1999-11-01

    Chronic low back pain can be considered to be one of the most frequently treated and most costly diseases in modern industrial societies. Dysfunctions and imbalances of the spine-supporting muscles increase the risk of low back pain. Consequently preventive treatment and rehabilitation have to aim at preserving and restoring the full capacity of the spine-supporting muscles as well as training coordination and spine-friendly behaviour. In addition to various measures of pain therapy, physiotherapeutic treatment including neuro-physiotherapy, physical treatment (eg electrotherapy), balneotherapy and supportive behavioural training, medical rehabilitation therapy (MRT) ranks among the most effective ways of treating low back pain. MRT applies guidelines and methods of exercise methodology within medically indicated programmes of preventive treatment and rehabilitation. Various objectives of MRT are outlined with special regard to the stages of MRT treatment, emphasizing positive adaptation of the neuro-muscular system in the course of rehabilitation. Physicians are responsible for MRT diagnosis and control. Taking into account the base disorder and the progress of therapy physiotherapists and the physicians in charge determine MRT objectives and treatment strategies.

  9. Microwave resonance therapy in medical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumskoy, L. L.

    1994-08-01

    Consideration is being given to the problems of organizing treatment of patients with quantum medicine methods by Prof. S.P. Sit'ko at 660 hospitals of Ukraine and Russia. Analyzed are teaching of doctors and treatment of 250,000 patients for 82 nozologic cases in 1990 through 1993. In the State of Ukraine, the Government has adopted a State Target-oriented Program of Large- scale Promotion of Microwave Resonance Therapy Into Medical Practice as presented by the Ministry of Health care in 1989. According to the Program, it was planned, during the three year period, to provide MRT rooms in 325 medical institutions. The Program was based on a discovery by Prof. S.P. Sit'ko DSc (Physics & Mathematics), of a new non-morphological structure of man, i.e. an electromagnetic framework that is manifested by eigenfrequencies in the millimeter range and disturbance of which results in disease while repair returns the organism to health. This idea was subjected to national and international expert evaluation. This evaluation was done by a panel of 12 universally acknowledged scientists headed by the founder of the theory of superconductivity, professor of the Liverpool University (Great Britain) h. Frohlich and director of the Madrid medical center Prof. Alzina. The USA was represented by Dr. W. Rogers, chief of the Center of Radiation, Institute of Bioinformation Research. The stated that Professor S.P. Sit'ko and his coworkers had established a new line of inquiry in medicine, i.e. microwave resonance therapy. To implement the State Target-oriented Program, the Government chose the Interbranch Scientific and Engineering Center on Physics of the Alive and Microwave Resonance Therapy 'Vidhuk'.

  10. [Immunotherapies and targeted therapies in medical oncology].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Benoît; Champiat, Stéphane; Loirat, Delphine; Arrondeau, Jennifer; Lemoine, Nathalie; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    New immunotherapies, also called "immune checkpoints", are promising and showed interesting antitumoral activities in particular in advanced setting of melanoma, clear cell renal cancer or non-small cell lung carcinoma. These treatments include ipilimumab, anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1. There is a strong rational for combination of immunotherapies and targeted therapies. This review is dedicated to expose the theorical issues and preclinical data of such combinations. This review examined the impact of immunotherapies on transduction pathways and modification of immunity related to targeted therapies. First clinical data form early drug development studies showed the difficulties observed with such combination and limitating toxicities. Finally, potential interesting combinations are overviewed with an emphasis on sequential treatments.

  11. Systemic Therapies for Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Nitya; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare tumor type, and comprise 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. When nonfunctional (i.e. nonhormone secreting), these tumors generally cause few symptoms and often go unnoticed for several years; for this reason, they are rarely localized at presentation, and are typically diagnosed in the presence of metastatic disease, most commonly to the liver. Although pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors can be less aggressive than other tumor types, the management poses a significant challenge because of the heterogeneous clinical presentations and varying degrees of aggressiveness. The therapy of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors includes a multimodality approach and can often include surgery, liver-directed therapies (i.e. embolization), as well as targeted and cytotoxic systemic treatments. A variety of systemic therapies have been developed for the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. These therapies include somatostatin analogs (octreotide or lanreotide), a select group of cytotoxic chemotherapy agents (alkylating, fluorouracil and platinum drugs), as well as targeted or biologic agents (everolimus and sunitinib). This chapter will review the available systemic therapy options for advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:26614372

  12. CROI 2015: Advances in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Olender, Susan A; Taylor, Barbara S; Wong, Marcia; Wilkin, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections included new and exciting advances in the realm of antiretroviral therapy. The Temprano trial demonstrated benefits from early antiretroviral therapy and isoniazid preventive therapy. Important data on investigational antiretroviral drugs were presented, including tenofovir alafenamide fumarate and BMS-955176, an HIV-1 maturation inhibitor. Novel data on the HIV care continuum from resource-rich and -limited settings highlighted persistent sex- and race-related disparities in care engagement, and the crucial need to bring HIV testing and care into the community to improve engagement across the care continuum. Life expectancy data from resource-limited settings reveal dramatic improvements across sub-Saharan Africa, although people with HIV still live 5 years to 10 years less than those without HIV, and new cost-effectiveness research revealed that the price of antiretroviral therapy itself remains a key driver of cost and cost-effectiveness calculations. Results from the PROMISE trial showed reduced rates of mother-to-child transmission among women who received antiretroviral therapy with 3 drugs compared with women who received zidovudine monotherapy, supporting current World Health Organization guidelines.

  13. Epigenetics Advancing Personalized Nanomedicine in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shujun

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine aims to deliver the right drug to a right patient at the right time. It offers unique opportunities to integrate new technologies and concepts to disease prognosis, diagnosis and therapeutics. While selective personalized therapies are conceptually impressive, the majority of cancer therapies have dismal outcome. Such therapeutic failure could result from no response, drug resistance, disease relapse or severe side effect from improper drug delivery. Nanomedicine, the application of nanotechnology in medicine, has a potential to advance the identification of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and the delivery of right drug to disease sites. Epigenetic aberrations dynamically contribute to cancer pathogenesis. Given the individualized traits of epigenetic biomarkers, epigenetic considerations would significantly refine personalized nanomedicine. This review aims to dissect the interface of personalized medicine with nanomedicine and epigenetics. I will outline the progress and highlight challenges and areas that can be further explored perfecting the personalized health care. PMID:22921595

  14. Advances of gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In the recent past, the gene therapy field has witnessed a remarkable series of successes, many of which have involved primary immunodeficiency diseases, such as X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficiency, chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. While such progress has widened the choice of therapeutic options in some specific cases of primary immunodeficiency, much remains to be done to extend the geographical availability of such an advanced approach and to increase the number of diseases that can be targeted. At the same time, emerging technologies are stimulating intensive investigations that may lead to the application of precise genetic editing as the next form of gene therapy for these and other human genetic diseases. PMID:27508076

  15. Biologic lung volume reduction therapy for advanced homogeneous emphysema.

    PubMed

    Refaely, Y; Dransfield, M; Kramer, M R; Gotfried, M; Leeds, W; McLennan, G; Tewari, S; Krasna, M; Criner, G J

    2010-07-01

    This report summarises phase 2 trial results of biologic lung volume reduction (BioLVR) for treatment of advanced homogeneous emphysema. BioLVR therapy was administered bronchoscopically to 25 patients with homogeneous emphysema in an open-labelled study. Eight patients received low dose (LD) treatment with 10 mL per site at eight subsegments; 17 received high dose (HD) treatment with 20 mL per site at eight subsegments. Safety was assessed in terms of medical complications during 6-month follow-up. Efficacy was assessed in terms of change from baseline in gas trapping, spirometry, diffusing capacity, exercise capacity, dyspnoea and health-related quality of life. There were no deaths or serious medical complications during the study. A statistically significant reduction in gas trapping was observed at 3-month follow-up among HD patients, but not LD patients. At 6 months, changes from baseline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (-8.0+/-13.93% versus +13.8+/-20.26%), forced vital capacity (-3.9+/-9.41% versus +9.0+/-13.01%), residual volume/total lung capacity ratio (-1.4+/-13.82% versus -5.4+/-12.14%), dyspnoea scores (-0.4+/-1.27 versus -0.8+/-0.73 units) and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire total domain scores (-4.9+/-8.3 U versus -12.2+/-12.38 units) were better with HD than with LD therapy. BioLVR therapy with 20 mL per site at eight subsegmental sites may be a safe and effective therapy in patients with advanced homogeneous emphysema.

  16. Advances in medical treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mareomi; Ikeda, Shuntaro; Shigematsu, Yuji

    2014-07-01

    We reviewed the natural history of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The effect of medical treatments on natural history, left ventricular (LV) functions and LV remodeling was also evaluated. Sudden cardiac death and end-stage heart failure are the most serious complications of HCM. Age <30 years and a family history of sudden premature death are risk factors for sudden cardiac death in HCM patients. End-stage heart failure is not a specific additional phenomenon observed in patients with HCM, but is the natural course of the disease in most of those patients. After the occurrence of heart failure, the progression to cardiac death is very rapid. Young age at diagnosis, a family history of HCM, and greater wall thickness are associated with a greater likelihood of developing end-stage heart failure. Neither beta-blockers nor calcium antagonists can prevent this transition. The class Ia antiarrhythmic drugs, disopyramide and cibenzoline are useful for the reduction of LV pressure gradient. Unlike disopyramide, cibenzoline has little anticholinergic activity; therefore, this drug can be easily adapted to long-term use. In addition to the reduction in LV pressure gradient, cibenzoline can improve LV diastolic dysfunction, and induce regression of LV hypertrophy in patients with HCM. A decrease in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration through the activation of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger associated with cibenzoline therapy is likely to be closely related with the improvement in HCM-related disorders. It is possible that cibenzoline can prevent the progression from typical HCM to end-stage heart failure.

  17. FOREWORD: Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy 2011 Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2012-10-01

    Although physical treatments play a central role in cancer therapy, SI-traceable metrology has only been established for some of them. Several forms of treatment currently used (particularly intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hadron therapy, high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) and brachytherapy) suffer from the limited metrological support, which restricts the success of these techniques. Recognizing this deficit, the European Union identified metrology for health as one of the first four Targeted Programmes in the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) running from 2008 to 2011. This programme included two EMRP projects addressing metrology for cancer therapy: project T2.J06 dealing with brachytherapy project T2.J07 dealing with external beam cancer therapy using ionizing radiation and high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound. Primary measurement standards applicable to modern treatment conditions were developed under both projects, together with measurement techniques which are meant as a basis for future protocols for dosimetry, treatment planning and monitoring. In order to provide a platform for the presentation of current developments in clinical measurement techniques for cancer therapy, together with the achievements of both projects, an international Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy (CAMCT) was held from 29 November to 1 December 2011 at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig, Germany. The main sessions of the conference: Primary and secondary standards of absorbed dose to water for IMRT and brachytherapy, 3D dose distributions and treatment planning for IMRT and brachytherapy, Hadron therapy (protons and carbon ions), High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU), were geared to the main foci of the projects. Metrologists and medical physicists from countries all over the world attended the conference and made it into a forum for the exchange of information and expertise

  18. Medical therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2007.

    PubMed

    Ingenito, Edward P

    2007-01-01

    Medical treatment for patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has evolved significantly over the past 2 decades. Current World Health Organization recommendations suggest a stepwise approach to therapy depending upon disease severity. As-needed use of short-acting bronchodilators is recommended for patients with mild disease. Scheduled dosing of bronchodilators is recommended for patients with more advanced disease. Inhaled beta-agonists and anti-cholinergic agents in combination have proved to be more effective than either agent alone. Long-acting preparations are associated with better disease control and have not been associated with tachyphylaxis. Inhaled corticosteroids are useful for reducing the frequency of exacerbations in patients who experience one or more episodes per year. Oxygen therapy is clearly beneficial in patients with advanced COPD and chronic respiratory failure, and its potential benefits in less severe disease are currently being studied. Pulmonary rehabilitation benefits patients with mild-to-severe disease, although the greatest benefits have been demonstrated in those with moderate COPD. New ultra-long-acting inhaled bronchodilators, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and retinoids intended to promote tissue regeneration are currently being evaluated in clinical trials as future therapeutic agents.

  19. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T

    2012-12-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behaviour and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumour treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume.

  20. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behavior and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumor treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume. PMID:23582916

  1. Emerging medical devices for minimally invasive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D; Ng, Kelvin S; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2014-02-01

    The past decade has seen the first wave of cell-based therapeutics undergo clinical trials with varying degrees of success. Although attention is increasingly focused on clinical trial design, owing to spiraling regulatory costs, tools used in delivering cells and sustaining the cells' viability and functions in vivo warrant careful scrutiny. While the clinical administration of cell-based therapeutics often requires additional safeguarding and targeted delivery compared with traditional therapeutics, there is significant opportunity for minimally invasive device-assisted cell therapy to provide the physician with new regenerative options at the point of care. Herein we detail exciting recent advances in medical devices that will aid in the safe and efficacious delivery of cell-based therapeutics.

  2. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  3. Medical Advances in Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Randell A.

    2011-01-01

    This volume is the first of a two-part special issue detailing state of the art practice in medical issues around child sexual abuse. The six articles in this issue explore methods for medical history evaluation, the rationale for when sexual examinations should take place, specific hymenal findings that suggest a child has been sexually abused,…

  4. Maintaining medical independence in advanced age.

    PubMed

    Barber, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Juneteenth Day celebrates June 19, 1865, when Major General Granger landed in Texas with news that the Civil War had ended and that slaves were now free (History of Juneteenth, n.d.). Similarly, this article brings you news that patients are free to make their own medical decisions. American law now guarantees the right of all patients to make their own such decisions. Thus, this article introduces the concept of medical policy statements, a new way for patients to give instructions to medical professionals.

  5. Medical advances in child sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Randell A

    2011-09-01

    This volume is the first of a two-part special issue detailing state of the art practice in medical issues around child sexual abuse. The six articles in this issue explore methods for medical history evaluation, the rationale for when sexual examinations should take place, specific hymenal findings that suggest a child has been sexually abused, the healing of genital injuries, approaches to interpretation of medical findings, and the neurological harm of sexual abuse. From the initial history to the process of the medical examination, the mechanics of what a genital examination might show, and the neurobiological consequences, it is demonstrated that the harm of sexual abuse is has more effect on the brain than the genital area.

  6. Advances in scintillators for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loef, Edgar V.; Shah, Kanai S.

    2014-09-01

    A review is presented of some recent work in the field of inorganic scintillator research for medical imaging applications, in particular scintillation detectors for Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

  7. Image analysis in medical imaging: recent advances in selected examples.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, G

    2010-01-01

    Medical imaging has developed into one of the most important fields within scientific imaging due to the rapid and continuing progress in computerised medical image visualisation and advances in analysis methods and computer-aided diagnosis. Several research applications are selected to illustrate the advances in image analysis algorithms and visualisation. Recent results, including previously unpublished data, are presented to illustrate the challenges and ongoing developments.

  8. Advanced Medical Technology and Network Systems Research (Medical Vanguard Program)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    physical symptoms associated with the spectrum of illnesses known as Chronic Multi-symptom Illnesses (e.g., Fibromyalgia , Chronic Fatigue, and Gulf War...Telemedicine for Rehabilitation Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) has been found to be efficacious in the treatment of people who need to manage multiple

  9. The perfect marriage: solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing in medical family therapy.

    PubMed

    Stermensky, Gage; Brown, Kristina S

    2014-01-01

    Medical family therapy has many potential uses in behavioral medicine and primary care. Current research was reviewed to determine the most advantageous way to apply solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as a perfect marriage in medical family therapy. An extensive literature review was done in the following databases for medical family therapy: Proquest, EBSCO, Medline, and PsychInfo. The search resulted in 86 relevant articles, of which 46 of the most recent were selected for review. Medical family therapy lacks current research that supports solution-focused therapy or motivational interviewing. However, evidence supports the use of solution-focused therapy as a brief format, as well as the closely related intervention, motivational interviewing. While medical family therapy presents many hopeful possibilities in the fields of behavioral medicine, psychology, and marriage and family therapy, little evidence currently exists for the most effective implementation. This review found evidence supporting solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as the perfect marriage of the collaborative team approaches for the future implementation and use of specific interventions in medical family therapy.

  10. The Perfect Marriage: Solution-Focused Therapy and Motivational Interviewing in Medical Family Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stermensky, Gage; Brown, Kristina S.

    2014-01-01

    Medical family therapy has many potential uses in behavioral medicine and primary care. Current research was reviewed to determine the most advantageous way to apply solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as a perfect marriage in medical family therapy. An extensive literature review was done in the following databases for medical family therapy: Proquest, EBSCO, Medline, and PsychInfo. The search resulted in 86 relevant articles, of which 46 of the most recent were selected for review. Medical family therapy lacks current research that supports solution-focused therapy or motivational interviewing. However, evidence supports the use of solution-focused therapy as a brief format, as well as the closely related intervention, motivational interviewing. While medical family therapy presents many hopeful possibilities in the fields of behavioral medicine, psychology, and marriage and family therapy, little evidence currently exists for the most effective implementation. This review found evidence supporting solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as the perfect marriage of the collaborative team approaches for the future implementation and use of specific interventions in medical family therapy. PMID:25657948

  11. [Audit: medical record documentation among advanced cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Elise; Chirac, Anne; Rhondali, Wadih; Ruer, Murielle; Chabloz, Claire; Filbet, Marilène

    2014-02-01

    Medical record documentation of cancer inpatients is a core component of continuity of care. The main goal of the study was an assessment of medical record documentation in a palliative care unit (PCU) using a targeted clinical audit based on deceased inpatients' charts. Stage 1 (2010): a clinical audit of medical record documentation assessed by a list of items (diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, power of attorney directive, advance directives). Stage 2 (2011): corrective measures. Stage 3 (2012): re-assessment with the same items' list after six month. Forty cases were investigated during stage 1 and 3. After the corrective measures, inpatient's medical record documentation was significantly improved, including for diagnosis (P = 0.01), diseases extension and treatment (P < 0.001). Our results highlighted the persistence of a weak rate of medical record documentation for advanced directives (P = 0.145).

  12. Medical therapy in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Book, Wendy M; Shaddy, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common late complication in adults with congenital heart defects, both repaired and unrepaired. The onset of clinical heart failure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Some patients with congenital heart disease may benefit from medications shown to improve survival in the population with acquired heart failure, but these same therapies may be of no benefit to other patients. Further studies are needed to better guide the choice of medical therapies.

  13. Combination treatment including targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; Wang, Anqiang; Zhang, Haohai; Yang, Xiaobo; Wan, Xueshuai; Lu, Xin; Sang, Xinting; Zhao, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Management of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, has presented a therapeutic challenge over past decades. Most patients with advanced HCC and a low possibility of surgical resection have limited treatment options and no alternative but to accept local or palliative treatment. In the new era of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of molecular targeted agents (MTAs) have been applied in the treatment of advanced HCC. However, mono-targeted therapy has shown disappointing outcomes in disease control, primarily because of tumor heterogeneity and complex cell signal transduction. Because incapacitation of a single target is insufficient for cancer suppression, combination treatment for targeted therapy has been proposed and experimentally tested in several clinical trials. In this article, we review research studies aimed to enhance the efficacy of targeted therapy for HCC through combination strategies. Combination treatments involving targeted therapy for advanced HCC are compared and discussed. PMID:27626176

  14. Advanced ultrasound probes for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Douglas G.; Smith, L. Scott

    2012-05-01

    New medical ultrasound probe architectures and materials build upon established 1D phased array technology and provide improved imaging performance and clinical value. Technologies reviewed include 1.25D and 1.5D arrays for elevation slice thickness control; electro-mechanical and 2D array probes for real-time 3D imaging; catheter probes for imaging during minimally-invasive procedures; single-crystal piezoelectric materials for greater frequency bandwidth; and cMUT arrays using silicon MEMS in place of piezo materials.

  15. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Yielder, Jill; Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  16. The Importance of Teacher Involvement in Medication Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joseph B.; Katsiyannis, Antonis

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been a steady increase in the use of medication therapy to help control student behavior within schools. While psychotropic medications do not "cure" mental illnesses, they have demonstrated efficacy in helping children function better at school and within their home environment. However, it is important…

  17. Evolving medical therapies for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Russell D

    2002-12-01

    Therapies for patients with ulcerative colitis have, until recently, been limited in scope and efficacy. New formulations of mesalamine and corticosteroids have challenged the older therapies with respect to both efficacy and safety. The application of 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine for steroid-refractory disease and maintenance of remission has resulted in studies of other candidate immunomodulatory agents. Biologic therapies targeting tumor necrosis factor, adhesion molecules, or other cytokines are under intense scrutiny as potential disease-altering agents that may even replace currently available products. Other approaches, including such wide-ranging products as heparin, nicotine, and probiotics, suggest that control of ulcerative colitis may require an individualized approach for each patient.

  18. Medical physics aspects of particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Jäkel, Oliver

    2009-11-01

    Charged particle beams offer an improved dose conformation to the target volume when compared with photon radiotherapy, with better sparing of normal tissue structures close to the target. In addition, beams of heavier ions exhibit a strong increase of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg peak when compared with the entrance region. These physical and biological properties make ion beams more favourable for radiation therapy of cancer than photon beams. As a consequence, particle therapy with protons and heavy ions has gained increasing interest worldwide. This contribution summarises the physical and biological principles of charged particle therapy with ion beams and highlights some of the developments in the field of beam delivery, the principles of treatment planning and the determination of absorbed dose in ion beams. The clinical experience gathered so far with carbon ion therapy is briefly reviewed.

  19. Astronomy helps advance medical diagnosis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    Effective treatment of cancer relies on the early detection and removal of cancerous cells. Unfortunately, this is when they are hardest to spot. In the case of breast cancer, now the most prevalent form of cancer in the United Kingdom, cancer cells tend to congregate in the lymph nodes, from where they can rapidly spread throughout the rest of the body. Current medical equipment can give doctors only limited information on tissue health. A surgeon must then perform an exploratory operation to try to identify the diseased tissue. If that is possible, the diseased tissue will be removed. If identification is not possible, the doctor may be forced to take away the whole of the lymphatic system. Such drastic treatment can then cause side effects, such as excessive weight gain, because it throws the patient's hormones out of balance. Now, members of the Science Payloads Technology Division of the Research and Science Support Department, at ESA's science, technology and engineering research centre (ESTEC) in the Netherlands, have developed a new X-ray camera that could make on-the-spot diagnoses and pinpoint cancerous areas to guide surgeons. Importantly, it would be a small device that could be used continuously during operations. "There is no photography involved in the camera we envisage. It will be completely digital, so the surgeon will study the whole lymphatic system and the potentially cancerous parts on his monitor. He then decides which parts he removes," says Dr. Tone Peacock, Head of the Science Payloads Technology Division. The ESA team were trying to find a way to make images using high-energy X-rays because some celestial objects give out large quantities of X-rays but little visible light. To see these, astronomers need to use X-ray cameras. Traditionally, this has been a bit of a blind spot for astronomers. ESA's current X-ray telescope, XMM-Newton, is in orbit now, observing low energy, so-called 'soft' X-rays. European scientists have always wanted to

  20. MO-FG-BRC-00: Joint AAPM-ESTRO Symposium: Advances in Experimental Medical Physics.

    PubMed

    Berbeco, Ross; Ionascu, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Experimental research in medical physics has expanded the limits of our knowledge and provided novel imaging and therapy technologies for patients around the world. However, experimental efforts are challenging due to constraints in funding, space, time and other forms of institutional support. In this joint ESTRO-AAPM symposium, four exciting experimental projects from four different countries are highlighted. Each project is focused on a different aspect of radiation therapy. From the USA, we will hear about a new linear accelerator concept for more compact and efficient therapy devices. From Canada, we will learn about novel linear accelerator target design and the implications for imaging and therapy. From France, we will discover a mature translational effort to incorporate theranostic nanoparticles in MR-guided radiation therapy. From Germany, we will find out about a novel in-treatment imaging modality for particle therapy. These examples of high impact, experimental medical physics research are representative of the diversity of such efforts that are on-going around the globe. J. Robar, Research is supported through collaboration with Varian Medical Systems and Brainlab AGD. Westerly, This work is supported by the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. COI: NONEK. Parodi, Part of the presented work is supported by the DFG (German Research Foundation) Cluster of Excellence MAP (Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics) and has been carried out in collaboration with IBA.

  1. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  2. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  3. Advances in molecular preclinical therapy mediated by imaging.

    PubMed

    Greco, Adelaide; Albanese, Sandra; Auletta, Luigi; DE Carlo, Flavia; Salvatore, Marco; Howard, Candace M; Claudio, Pier P

    2017-03-01

    Several advances have been made toward understanding the biology of cancer and most of them are due to robust genetic studies that led to the scientific recognition that although many patients have the same type of cancer their tumors may have harbored different molecular alterations. Personalized therapy and the development of advanced techniques of preclinical imaging and new murine models of disease are emerging concepts that are allowing mapping of disease markers in vivo and in some cases also receptor targeted therapy. Aim of this review is to illustrate some emerging models of disease that allow patient tumor implantation in mice for subsequent drug testing and advanced approaches for therapy mediated by preclinical imaging. In particular we discuss targeted therapy mediated by high frequency ultrasound and magnetic resonance, two emerging techniques in molecular preclinical therapy.

  4. Advancement and prospects of tumor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qing-Tao; Liu, He; Zhang, Zhen-Zhu; Huang, Wen-Lin

    2011-03-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most attractive fields in tumor therapy. In past decades, significant progress has been achieved. Various approaches, such as viral and non-viral vectors and physical methods, have been developed to make gene delivery safer and more efficient. Several therapeutic strategies have evolved, including gene-based (tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes, antiangiogenic genes, cytokine and oxidative stress-based genes) and RNA-based (antisense oligonucleotides and RNA interference) approaches. In addition, immune response-based strategies (dendritic cell- and T cell-based therapy) are also under investigation in tumor gene therapy. This review highlights the progress and recent developments in gene delivery systems, therapeutic strategies, and possible clinical directions for gene therapy.

  5. Implementing cognitive behavioral therapy in specialty medical settings.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Weisberg, Risa B

    2014-11-01

    This article is an introduction to the second issue of a two-part Special Series on integrating cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) into medical settings. The first issue focused on integrating CBT into primary care, and this issue focuses on implementing CBT in other specialty medical settings, including cancer treatment, HIV care, and specialized pediatric medical clinics. Models for treatment delivery to improve ease of implementation are also discussed, including telehealth and home-delivered treatment. The six articles in this series provide examples of how to transport CBT techniques that are largely designed for implementation in outpatient mental health settings to specialized medical settings, and discuss unique considerations and recommendations for implementation.

  6. [Psychiatric advance directives--medical models into psychiatric medicine].

    PubMed

    Mautner, Sigal; Lachman, Max; Kaplan, Zeev; Shalev, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Since the year 2005, in the field of general medicine, the legislature in Israel determined ways to implement medically advanced directives according to the power of the law. Different states in the world had implemented parallel legislation for patients who suffer from mental illness. Psychiatric Advance Directives is a legitimate document which is valid in Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, England and in 25 countries in the U.S.A. Psychiatric advance directives (PAD's) allow competent persons, through advance instructions, to state their preferences for future mental health treatment in the event of an incapacitating psychiatric crisis. Self Determination Theory, Self Care and Autonomy are dominant supportive approaches in the creation of Psychiatric Advance Directives. Research conducted on psychiatric advance directives shows positive potential benefits for mental health clients, therapists and psychiatrists. More research in that area must be conducted. Psychiatric advance directives are currently developed and implemented with the cooperation of the Tauber Foundation and the Beer Sheva Mental Health Center. This is the first step in learning of effective ways to use this intervention in Israel and change perceptions toward a positive connection between medical efficiency and client preferences.

  7. Recent advances in fetal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Suzanne M K; Rahim, Ahad A; Chan, Jerry K Y; David, Anna L; Peebles, Donald M; Coutelle, Charles; Waddingtont, Simon N

    2011-04-01

    Over the first decade of this new millennium gene therapy has demonstrated clear clinical benefits in several diseases for which conventional medicine offers no treatment. Clinical trials of gene therapy for single gene disorders have recruited predominantly young patients since older subjects may have suffered irrevocablepathological changes or may not be available because the disease is lethal relatively early in life. The concept of fetal gene therapy is an extension of this principle in that diseases in which irreversible changes occur at or beforebirth can be prevented by gene supplementation or repair in the fetus or associated maternal tissues. This article ccnsiders the enthusiasm and skepticism held for fetal gene therapy and its potential for clinical application. It coversa spectrum of candidate diseases for fetal gene therapy including Pompe disease, Gaucher disease, thalassemia, congenital protein C deficiency and cystic fibrosis. It outlines successful and not-so-successful examples of fetal gene therapy in animal models. Finally the application and potential of fetal gene transfer as a fundamental research tool for developmental biology and generation of somatic transgenic animals is surveyed.

  8. Medical Yoga Therapy.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Ina

    2017-02-10

    Medical yoga is defined as the use of yoga practices for the prevention and treatment of  medical conditions. Beyond the physical elements of yoga, which are important and effective for  strengthening  the  body,  medical  yoga  also  incorporates  appropriate  breathing  techniques,  mindfulness, and meditation in order to achieve the maximum benefits. Multiple studies have  shown that yoga can positively impact the body in many ways, including helping to regulate blood  glucose levels, improve musculoskeletal ailments and keeping the cardiovascular system in tune. It  also has been shown to have important psychological benefits, as the practice of yoga can help to  increase mental energy and positive feelings, and decrease negative feelings of aggressiveness,  depression and anxiety.

  9. Contemporary medical therapy for polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lanham, M S M; Lebovic, D I; Domino, S E

    2006-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a multi-system endocrinopathy with long-term metabolic and cardiovascular health consequences. Patients typically present due to symptoms of irregular menstruation, hair growth, or infertility; however, recent management options are aimed at further treating underlying glucose-insulin abnormalities as well as androgen excess for proactive control of symptoms. By a 2003 international consensus conference, diagnosis is made by two out of three criteria: chronic oligoovulation or anovulation after excluding secondary causes, clinical or biochemical evidence of hyperandrogenism (but not necessarily hirsutism due to inter-patient variability in hair follicle sensitivity), and radiological evidence of polycystic ovaries. Traditional medical treatment options include oral contraceptive pills, cyclic progestins, ovulation induction, and anti-androgenic medications (aldosterone antagonist, 5alpha-reductase antagonist, and follicle ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor). Recent pharmacotherapies include insulin-sensitizing medications metformin and two thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone/Avandia and pioglitazone/Actos), a CYP19 aromatase inhibitor (letrozole/Femara), and statins to potentially lower testosterone levels.

  10. Clinical trials update: Medical management of advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Major, Maureen A

    2003-12-01

    Selection of treatment for metastatic breast cancer depends on several factors: the status of estrogen receptors or progesterone receptors on breast cancer cells and the expression levels of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2. The presence of estrogen or progesterone receptors typically indicates slower-growing tumors that may be amenable to hormonal manipulation, which provides significant disease control while offering a better toxicity profile than conventional chemotherapy. The understanding of hormonal therapies in patients with postmenopausal metastatic breast cancer has advanced greatly in the past several decades. Aromatase inhibitors, although used initially as second-line therapy, recently have proved to be as effective as tamoxifen, if not superior to it, as first-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer. New data also suggest that letrozole provides significantly better objective responses than anastrozole as second-line therapy. Exemestane, a steroidal aromatase inhibitor, is an effective third-line therapy. Fulvestrant, an estrogen receptor antagonist with no known agonist effect, provides a new option for hormonal therapy. For patients with metastatic breast cancer and overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 on tumor cells, the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab is the preferred option, either in combination with paclitaxel as first-line treatment, or as a single agent for second-line therapy. By extending the sequence of hormonal therapy, disease progression and the need for chemotherapy may be significantly delayed, potentially extending patient survival rates and improving quality of life.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome: innovative medical approaches in military medicine.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Erik B; Varney, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    After a radiological or nuclear event, acute radiation syndrome (ARS) will present complex medical challenges that could involve the treatment of hundreds to thousands of patients. Current medical doctrine is based on limited clinical data and remains inadequate. Efforts to develop medical innovations that address ARS complications are unlikely to be generated by industry because of market uncertainties specific to this type of injury. A prospective strategy could be the integration of cellular therapy to meet the medical demands of ARS. The most clinically advanced cellular therapy to date is the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Results of currently published investigations describing MSC safety and efficacy in a variety of injury and disease models demonstrate the unique qualities of this reparative cell population in adapting to the specific requirements of the damaged tissue in which the cells integrate. This report puts forward a rationale for the further evaluation of MSC therapy to address the current unmet medical needs of ARS. We propose that the exploration of this novel therapy for the treatment of the multivariate complications of ARS could be of invaluable benefit to military medicine.

  12. Plasmonic nanoprobes: from chemical sensing to medical diagnostics and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Fales, Andrew M.; Griffin, Guy D.; Khoury, Christopher G.; Liu, Yang; Ngo, Hoan; Norton, Stephen J.; Register, Janna K.; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Yuan, Hsiangkuo

    2013-10-01

    This article provides an overview of the development and applications of plasmonics-active nanoprobes in our laboratory for chemical sensing, medical diagnostics and therapy. Molecular Sentinel nanoprobes provide a unique tool for DNA/RNA biomarker detection both in a homogeneous solution or on a chip platform for medical diagnostics. The possibility of combining spectral selectivity and high sensitivity of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) process with the inherent molecular specificity of nanoprobes provides an important multiplex diagnostic modality. Gold nanostars can provide an excellent multi-modality platform, combining two-photon luminescence with photothermal therapy as well as Raman imaging with photodynamic therapy. Several examples of optical detection using SERS and photonics-based treatments are presented to illustrate the usefulness and potential of the plasmonic nanoprobes for theranostics, which seamlessly combines diagnostics and therapy.

  13. Advances in photodynamic therapy assisted by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Kotulska, Malgorzata; Kulbacka, Julita; Saczko, Jolanta

    2013-03-01

    Low invasive therapies of cancer are directed toward the methods that target selectively on carcinoma cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a therapeutic modality in which combination of a photosensitizer, light, and oxygen renders reactive oxygen species (ROS) which cause damage to a tumor tissue. Each of these factors is not toxic in itself and the effect of therapy results from high uptake of a photosensitizer by carcinoma cells and directed tumor irradiation by light. Realization of the therapy depends on efficient transport of the photosensitizer across the membrane and intracellular accumulation of the drug. Depending on the treatment conditions and the uptake mechanism, sensitizers can potentially reach different intracellular concentrations and different cellular effects can be triggered. Transport efficacy can be significantly augmented by applying electric pulses to plasma membrane, which opens transient non-selective hydrophilic nanopores as additional pathways across lipid membranes. Electroporation (EP) has been utilized to facilitate drug uptake in electrochemotherapy (ECT) and has been tested in combination with PDT. In the review, we described effects of PDT and electrophotodynamic therapy (EPDT) on carcinoma and healthy cells, studied in vitro and vivo. The comparison of different drugs has been applied to tests considering the enhancement of their cytotoxicity, selectivity, and additional effects caused by electroporation.

  14. Gantry for medical particle therapy facility

    DOEpatents

    Trbojevic, Dejan [Wading River, NY

    2012-05-08

    A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing fixed field magnets.

  15. Gantry for medical particle therapy facility

    DOEpatents

    Trbojevic, Dejan

    2013-04-23

    A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of superconducting, variable field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of variable field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing variable field magnets.

  16. Paperless medical physics QA in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Yau, S; White, S; Wilfert, L

    2012-06-01

    Physics quality assurance (QA) is an integral part of a medical physicist's role in the radiotherapy centre. Management of physics QA documents is an issue with a long-term accumulation. Storage space, archive administration and paper consumption are just some of the difficulties faced by physicists. Plotting trends and drawing meaningful conclusions from these results can be challenging using traditional QA methods. Remote checking of QA within a hospital network can also be problematic. The aim of this project is introduce a paperless QA system that will provide solutions to many of these issues.

  17. Advancing host-directed therapy for tuberculosis:

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chul-Su

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) drug-development strategies, a wide range of candidate host-directed therapies (HDT)s-including new and repurposed drugs, biologics, and cellular therapies-have been proposed to accelerate eradication of infection and overcome the problems associated with current treatment regimens. By investigating the interaction between macrophages and the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), we uncovered that infection-induced signaling pathways suggest possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic modalities for TB that target the intracellular signaling pathways permitting the replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). PMID:28357397

  18. Medical and alternative therapies in urinary tract stone disease.

    PubMed

    Yuvanc, Ercan; Yilmaz, Erdal; Tuglu, Devrim; Batislam, Ertan

    2015-11-06

    Nephrolithiasis is a serious problem for both patients and the health system. Recurrence stands out as a significant problem in urinary system stone disease, the prevalence of which is increasing gradually. If recurrence is not prevented, patients may go through recurrent operations due to nephrolithiasis. While classical therapeutic options are available for all stone types, the number of randomized controlled studies and extensive meta-analyses focusing on their efficiency are inadequate. Various alternative therapeutic options to these medical therapies also stand out in recent years. The etiology of urolithiasis is multifactorial and not always related to nutritional factors. Nutrition therapy seems to be useful, either along with pharmacological therapy or as a monotherapy. General nutrition guidelines are useful in promoting public health and developing nutrition plans that reduce the risk or attenuate the effects of diseases affected by nutrition. Nutrition therapy involves the evaluation of a patient's nutritional state and intake, the diagnosis of nutrition risk factors, and the organization and application of a nutrition program. The main target is the reduction or prevention of calculus formation and growth via decreasing lithogenic risk factors and increasing lithogenic inhibitors in urine. This review focuses briefly on classical medical therapy, along with alternative options, related diets, and medical expulsive therapy.

  19. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  20. Advanced Imaging and Robotics Technologies for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamune, Ken; Hong, Jaesung

    2011-10-01

    Due to the importance of surgery in the medical field, a large amount of research has been conducted in this area. Imaging and robotics technologies provide surgeons with the advanced eye and hand to perform their surgeries in a safer and more accurate manner. Recently medical images have been utilized in the operating room as well as in the diagnostic stage. If the image to patient registration is done with sufficient accuracy, medical images can be used as "a map" for guidance to the target lesion. However, the accuracy and reliability of the surgical navigation system should be sufficiently verified before applying it to the patient. Along with the development of medical imaging, various medical robots have also been developed. In particular, surgical robots have been researched in order to reach the goal of minimal invasiveness. The most important factors to consider are determining the demand, the strategy for their use in operating procedures, and how it aids patients. In addition to the above considerations, medical doctors and researchers should always think from the patient's point of view. In this article, the latest medical imaging and robotic technologies focusing on surgical applications are reviewed based upon the factors described in the above.

  1. Couching for cataract: advanced medical achievements of China in 1976?

    PubMed

    Fan, Ka-wai

    2011-01-01

    Cataracts have been a common disease in China for centuries. As early as the Tang dynasty, physicians of Chinese medicine had developed 'jin pi shu', a method of couching, to cure the disease. In 1976, a new method, invented by Tang Youzhi, was acknowledged as one of the most advanced medical achievements in communist China. This paper explores the significance of Tang's method for Mao Zedong's China. Tang's method achieved two goals set by Chairman Mao for medical and health policies: to serve rural China and to integrate Chinese and Western medicine.

  2. New Players for Advanced Prostate Cancer and the Rationalisation of Insulin-Sensitising Medication

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Jennifer H.; Sarkar, Phoebe L.; Lubik, Amy A.; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are recognised risk factors for the development of some cancers and, increasingly, predict more aggressive disease, treatment failure, and cancer-specific mortality. Many factors may contribute to this clinical observation. Hyperinsulinaemia, dyslipidaemia, hypoxia, ER stress, and inflammation associated with expanded adipose tissue are thought to be among the main culprits driving malignant growth and cancer advancement. This observation has led to the proposal of the potential utility of “old players” for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome as new cancer adjuvant therapeutics. Androgen-regulated pathways drive proliferation, differentiation, and survival of benign and malignant prostate tissue. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) exploits this dependence to systemically treat advanced prostate cancer resulting in anticancer response and improvement of cancer symptoms. However, the initial therapeutic response from ADT eventually progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which is currently incurable. ADT rapidly induces hyperinsulinaemia which is associated with more rapid treatment failure. We discuss current observations of cancer in the context of obesity, diabetes, and insulin-lowering medication. We provide an update on current treatments for advanced prostate cancer and discuss whether metabolic dysfunction, developed during ADT, provides a unique therapeutic window for rapid translation of insulin-sensitising medication as combination therapy with antiandrogen targeting agents for the management of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23573093

  3. New Advanced Technologies in Stem Cell Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Pittsburgh, PA, USA. 8Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Center, Cellular and Molecular Arrhythmia Research Program, Department of Medicine, School...function and reduce ventricular arrhythmias (145). Preclinical studies are beginning to test PSC cell therapy in large-animal models of heart dis- ease...been ob- served (148). However, a transient increase in ventricular arrhythmias has occurred, raising a potential safety concern. Transplantation of hu

  4. Medical therapy of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, K R; Isenberg, J I

    1992-04-01

    The gastric duodenal mucosa normally is protected from the damaging effects of gastric acid and pepsin by ill-defined mechanisms. Ulcers may arise when there is an imbalance between the aggressive and defensive factors that renders the mucosa susceptible to damage. A variety of factors have been identified that may favor the development of peptic ulcers, but no single pathophysiologic defect applies in all ulcer patients. In duodenal ulcers, gastric acid hypersecretion is observed in as many as one third of patients; however, most patients with duodenal ulcers secrete normal amounts of gastric acid. Decreased mucosal bicarbonate secretion may be important in at least some duodenal ulcer patients. Use of NSAIDs may cause either gastric or duodenal ulcers, probably through the inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis and disruption of mucosal defenses. Finally, a recently identified bacterium, H. pylori, causes a chronic gastritis that is found in the overwhelming majority of patients with duodenal ulcers and non-NSAID-associated gastric ulcers. This bacterium may play a pivotal role in ulcer pathogenesis and, especially, in ulcer recurrences. A number of drugs of proved efficacy are available for the treatment of acute duodenal and gastric ulcers. The H2 receptor antagonists administered once daily remain the mainstay of ulcer therapy because of their efficacy, ease of use, and excellent safety profile. More thorough and long-lasting acid inhibition is afforded by the H+/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor omeprazole. This agent also promotes more rapid ulcer healing, but in most patients, this minor advantage may not justify the higher cost. It is not known whether more rapid healing will translate into lower ulcer complication rates. Until further data are available, this drug may be preferable in patients with large or complicated ulcers. In patients with refractory ulcers, omeprazole is clearly superior to other available agents. Agents that promote mucosal defense

  5. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy as an Adjunct to Pre-hospital Advanced Trauma Life Support.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Keith

    2011-12-01

    Most commercial diving operations and naval operations have 24/7, on-site availability of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to perform routine surface decompression or immediate treatment of arterial gas embolism or decompression sickness. Availability and prompt use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the field for treatment of divers with dysbaric conditions has demonstrated its efficacy in acute, co-morbid conditions such as acute exsanguination, blast injury, crush injury, and cardiopulmonary arrest affecting those same divers. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy applied in these cases has demonstrated its utility to augment the efficacy of conventional, pre-hospital advanced cardiac life support and advanced trauma life support. Case studies gleaned from actual experience with the diving industry illustrate the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in these conditions. The unexpectedly favorable results have been replicated by controlled laboratory animal studies. The deck decompression or saturation multiplace chambers used by offshore diving operations can easily and quickly be converted for use as medical field resuscitative units. Lightweight and mobile hyperbaric chambers can be outfitted for use in ambulances or helicopters to address civilian street injury or military "far-forward" injury. These transport chambers are compact in design to be efficient transport stretchers designed to hold both the patient and the medical support clinician. It is hoped that hyperbaric oxygen therapy will gain an increasing role as an adjunct to pre-hospital advanced cardiac life support and advanced trauma life support resuscitative efforts as a low-cost, high-yield intervention. In this regard HBO as applied to ATLS/ACLS in civilian and military medical systems may be a productive, disruptive new application of technology.

  6. Anti-angiogenic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Gastric and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Tzong; Oh, Do-Youn; Ryu, Min-Hee; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Yeo, Winnie; Carlesi, Roberto; Cheng, Rebecca; Kim, Jongseok; Orlando, Mauro; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2017-01-03

    Despite advancements in therapy for advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancers, their prognosis remains dismal. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer growth and metastasis, and recent studies indicate that pharmacologic blockade of angiogenesis is a promising approach to therapy. In this systematic review, we summarize current literature on the clinical benefit of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric cancer. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed and conference proceedings including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress. Included studies aimed to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer. Each trial investigated at least one of the following endpoints: overall survival, progression-free survival/time to progression, and/or objective response rate. Our search yielded 139 publications. Forty-two met the predefined inclusion criteria. Included studies reported outcomes with apatinib, axitinib, bevacizumab, orantinib, pazopanib, ramucirumab, regorafenib, sorafenib, sunitinib, telatinib, and vandetanib. Second-line therapy with ramucirumab and third-line therapy with apatinib are the only anti-angiogenic agents so far shown to significantly improve survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Overall, agents that specifically target the vascular endothelial growth factor ligand or receptor have better safety profile compared to multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  7. Nanovector-based therapies in advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chang-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer has been largely disappointing owing to the unfavorable pharmacokinetic profile and poor penetration of current chemotherapeutic agents ,as well as the fragile patient population with compromised tolerance to toxic chemotherapies. Nanovectors can provide passive drug delivery through abnormal tumor neo-vasculature microanatomy or active targeting via binding to receptors or macromolecules associated with the tumor. In such a manner, nanovector-based therapy may not only modulate the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic agents but also provide new treatment options in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. In this article, we present the rationale and currently available clinical results of nanovector-based therapies to highlight the potential use of this class of agent in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:22811849

  8. Progress in systemic therapy of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin-Lei; Qin, Shu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Primary liver cancer, mainly consisting of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is one of common malignancies worldwide, and prevalent among the Chinese population. A diagnosis of early stage HCC has proven to be very difficult because of its insidious feature in onset and development. At the time of diagnosis, most HCC cases are locally advanced and/or distant metastatic, which results in difficulty to be treated and poor prognosis. For advanced HCC, systemic therapy is frequently adopted as an important palliative method. In recent years, clinical studies and observations have often reported about systemic anti-cancer therapy of advanced HCC, including molecular target therapy, systemic chemotherapy and immunotherapy. In this article, we review these treatment modalities to provide a reference for clinicians. PMID:27547002

  9. Advanced therapies for the treatment of hemophilia: future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Monogenic diseases are ideal candidates for treatment by the emerging advanced therapies, which are capable of correcting alterations in protein expression that result from genetic mutation. In hemophilia A and B such alterations affect the activity of coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively, and are responsible for the development of the disease. Advanced therapies may involve the replacement of a deficient gene by a healthy gene so that it generates a certain functional, structural or transport protein (gene therapy); the incorporation of a full array of healthy genes and proteins through perfusion or transplantation of healthy cells (cell therapy); or tissue transplantation and formation of healthy organs (tissue engineering). For their part, induced pluripotent stem cells have recently been shown to also play a significant role in the fields of cell therapy and tissue engineering. Hemophilia is optimally suited for advanced therapies owing to the fact that, as a monogenic condition, it does not require very high expression levels of a coagulation factor to reach moderate disease status. As a result, significant progress has been possible with respect to these kinds of strategies, especially in the fields of gene therapy (by using viral and non-viral vectors) and cell therapy (by means of several types of target cells). Thus, although still considered a rare disorder, hemophilia is now recognized as a condition amenable to gene therapy, which can be administered in the form of lentiviral and adeno-associated vectors applied to adult stem cells, autologous fibroblasts, platelets and hematopoietic stem cells; by means of non-viral vectors; or through the repair of mutations by chimeric oligonucleotides. In hemophilia, cell therapy approaches have been based mainly on transplantation of healthy cells (adult stem cells or induced pluripotent cell-derived progenitor cells) in order to restore alterations in coagulation factor expression. PMID:23237078

  10. The aging woman: the role of medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilken-Jensen, C; Ottesen, B

    2003-09-01

    The growth of the postmenopausal population demands a change in the medical profession's approach to health and disease. Especially in the developed world, lifespan is increasing, and at the age of 60 the majority of women will still have at least 20 years to live. There will, therefore, be an increasing need for health programs that lead to more years of disability free life. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is but one example of the dilemmas medical therapy of the aging woman poses. In the sixties, estrogen was considered a wonder drug, effective for a multitude of postmenopausal problems and illnesses. Recent research has placed this notion into a more balanced perspective, emphasizing that every medical treatment should be based on evidence. It is therefore worrisome if the decline in the use of HRT is followed by an increased use of alternative medicine with mostly undocumented effects.

  11. Human mycoses and advances in antifungal therapy.

    PubMed

    Fromtling, R A

    2001-04-01

    The 11th Focus on Fungal Infections meeting was held in Washington, D.C., U.S.A., March 1416, 2001. At the conference, there were well-attended sessions that focused on the pathogenesis and therapy of fungal disease. This report focuses on new information on fungal incidence and pathogenesis as well as on the in vitro and clinical experience of established antifungal drugs (fluconazole, itraconazole, amphotericin B, liposomal formulations of amphotericin B, terbinafine) and the newer antifungal compounds approved for use (e.g., caspofungin) and in development (the new-generation azoles: voriconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and the candins, micafungin and anidulafungin).

  12. Recent advances in neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction to cancer radiotherapy (Neutron Capture therapy, or NCT) has intrigued investigators since the discovery of the neutron. This paper briefly summarizes data describing recently developed boronated compounds with evident tumor specificity and extended biological half-lives. The implication of these compounds to NCT is evaluated in terms of Therapeutic Gain (TG). The optimization of NCT using band-pass filtered beams is described, again in terms of TG, and irradiation times with these less intense beams are estimated. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. [Medical therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2007-06-17

    The therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases is based on 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASAs) that are the forefront of treatment of mild-to-moderate active disease and maintenance; steroids are used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe active disease; immunosuppressives and sometimes antibiotics in moderate-to-severe disease; maintenance and for the treatment of selected complications. The last few years have witnessed a significant change in the treatment of Crohn's disease. Based on evidence from new clinical studies and recent meta-analyses, the role of and indications for conventional therapy have been reassessed. The 5-ASAs are nowadays less frequently used in both active disease and maintenance therapy. Instead, budesonide has been introduced in the treatment of mild-to-moderate ileal disease. Besides the modest use of 5-ASAs, steroids are prescribed for active colonic disease. Immunosuppressives, especially azathioprine, are more commonly used in moderate-to-severe disease as well as in maintenance. The preferred maintenance regimen following medically- and surgically-induced remission, in addition to relationship between medical and surgical therapies, has also changed. The recent introduction of new "biological" therapy represents a major, promising change in the therapy of resistant and penetrating disease.

  14. Advances in Pediatric Intravenous Iron Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be very common worldwide. Intravenous (IV) iron is an infrequently used therapeutic option in children with IDA despite numerous studies in adults and several small but notable pediatric studies showing efficacy and safety. Presently, the availability of newer IV iron products allows for replacement of the total iron deficit at a single setting. These products appear safer compared to the high molecular weight iron dextrans of the past. Herein, we review the medical literature and suggest that front line use of IV iron should be strongly considered in diseases associated with IDA in children.

  15. Surgical therapy in advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Ettore; Colombo, Tiziano; Fratto, Pasquale; Russo, Claudio; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Frigerio, Maria

    2003-05-08

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) affects about 1% of adults in the United States and is a contributing factor in >250,000 deaths per year. In an increasingly elderly population, the surgical treatment of CHF made great progress during the past 3 decades, consuming enormous health care resources. Heart transplantation is still the most effective therapy for end-stage heart disease, with the 10-year survival rate after transplantation approaching 50%. Efforts to increase the supply of donor organs have failed to improve the shortage, underscoring the crucial need for alternatives to cardiac allotransplantation. Alternative surgical options to end-stage heart transplantation are rapidly evolving. Left ventricular assist devices have been used as a bridge to heart transplantation for patients who otherwise might die awaiting a new heart. There is also continued interest in the use of these devices either to bridge patients to full recovery or to destination therapy, without the need for heart replacement. Left ventricular reconstruction, including the Batista and Dor procedures, along with mitral valve repair, cardiomyoplasty, and extreme coronary artery bypass graft surgery, are now being increasingly performed as alternative options. The history, status, and personal experience of surgical treatment of end-stage heart disease are discussed.

  16. The transthyretin amyloidoses: advances in therapy.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, Simon; Ackermann, Elizabeth; Gillmore, Julian

    2015-08-01

    There are two forms of transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis: non-hereditary and hereditary. The non-hereditary form (ATTRwt) is caused by native or wild-type TTR and was previously referred to as senile systemic amyloidosis. The hereditary form (ATTRm) is caused by variant TTR which results from a genetic mutation of TTR. The predominant effect of ATTRwt amyloidosis is on the heart, with patients having a greater left ventricular wall thickness at presentation than the devastating form which is light chain (AL) amyloidosis. ATTRm amyloidosis is broadly split into two categories: a type that predominantly affects the nervous system (often called familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP)) and one with a predilection for the heart (often called familial amyloid cardiomyopathy (FAC)). Approximately half of all TTR mutations known to express a clinical phenotype cause a cardiomyopathy. Since the introduction of orthotopic liver transplantation for ATTRm amyloidosis in 1991, several additional therapies have been developed. These therapies aim to provide a reduction or elimination of TTR from the plasma (through genetic approaches), stabilisation of the TTR molecule (to prevent deposition) and dissolution of the amyloid matrix. We describe the latest developments in these approaches to management, many of which are also applicable to wild-type amyloidosis.

  17. Recent advances in therapy for sexual offenders

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This report focuses on recent policy, and academic and clinical developments in the therapeutic management of sex offenders, including the need for more robust assessment and risk management protocols. Information is provided on current thinking about psychological and pharmacological interventions. Meta-analytic studies clearly indicate that cognitive behavioural and relapse prevention programmes are the most effective intervention, but there is a small amount of literature suggesting that pharmacological treatments may have some utility. With advances in our understanding of the neural substrates of deviant sexual arousal we may be able to develop and trial novel neuropharmacological agents that target dysfunctional neurochemical circuits in this field. PMID:20948736

  18. [Medical therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases: ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2007-06-24

    There are fewer significant changes in the medical therapy of ulcerative colitis (UC) compared to Crohn's disease. The most important factors that determine therapy are disease extent and severity. 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASA) constitute the treatment of choice in mild-to-moderate UC. The efficacy of new compounds (e.g. mesalazine) is only mildly improved compared to sulphasalazine; however, their use has become more frequent due to a more favorable side effects profile. Topical medication is more effective in proctitis and distal colitis, and the combination of topical and orally-administered drugs is superior to oral therapy alone also in extensive disease. Thus, this latter regimen should be considered for cases where the escalation of treatment is required. Systemic steroids still represent the first line therapy in acute, severe UC, while in patients who do not respond to steroids, cyclosporine and infliximab should be considered as a second line therapy and as alternatives for colectomy. Maintenance treatment is indicated in all UC cases. 5-ASA compounds are suggested as first line maintenance therapy with the optimal dose still being under investigation. Topical compounds are effective also for maintenance in distal colitis or proctitis, if accepted by the patients. Immunosuppressives, especially azathioprine, should be considered in chronically active, steroid dependent or resistant patients. According to recent publications, azathioprine is almost equally effective in UC and CD. The question of chemoprevention is important during maintenance. There are increasing data supporting the notion that aminosalicylates may lower the risk for UC-associated colorectal cancer. The most important changes in the management of UC are the more frequent use of topical aminosalicylates and azathioprine, the availability of infliximab in severe UC, and increasing use of aminosalicylates for chemoprevention of colorectal carcinoma. Furthermore, adequate attention is needed to

  19. Concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Deng, Weiye; Cao, Xiaoci; Shi, Xiaoming; Zhao, Huanfen; Duan, Zheping; Lv, Bonan; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Apatinib is a novel anti-angiogenic agent targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, which is effective in patients with chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer. There are no reports of concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: we present the first published report of a 70-year-old male patient with advanced gastric cancer who received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy after failure of oxaliplatin and S-1 chemotherapy. Interventions and Outcomes: The patient received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy and was followed up 7 months after therapy without disease progress, 14 months later indicated extensive metastasis and this patient died of pulmonary infection. Lessons: Elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer may benefit from concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy when chemotherapy is not tolerated or successful. Further studies are needed to investigate the clinical outcomes and toxicities associated with concurrent apatinib and radiation therapy in gastric cancer. PMID:28248891

  20. Targeted nanosystems: Advances in targeted dendrimers for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimers possess discrete highly compact nanostructures constituted of successive branched layers. Soon after the inception of dendrimers, recognition of their tunable structures and biologically favorable properties provoked a great enthusiasm in delving deeply into the utility of dendrimers for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. One of the most important nanotechnology applications is the development of nanomedicines for targeted cancer therapies. Tremendous success in targeted therapies has been achieved with the use of dendrimer-based nanomedicines. This article provides a concise review on latest advances in the utility of dendrimers in immunotherapies and hormone therapies. PMID:26706410

  1. Advances in sickle cell therapies in the hydroxyurea era.

    PubMed

    Field, Joshua J; Nathan, David G

    2014-12-16

    In the hydroxyurea era, insights into mechanisms downstream of erythrocyte sickling have led to new therapeutic approaches for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Therapies have been developed that target vascular adhesion, inflammation and hemolysis, including innovative biologics directed against P-selectin and invariant natural killer T cells. Advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplant and gene therapy may also provide more opportunities for cures in the near future. Several clinical studies are underway to determine the safety and efficacy of these new treatments. Novel approaches to treat SCD are desperately needed, since current therapies are limited and rates of morbidity and mortality remain high.

  2. [Advances in measles virus for cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Duo; Zhao, Zheng-yan

    2015-07-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a novel cancer therapy. Vaccine-attenuated strains of measles virus(MV)is an ideal candidate for oncolytic virotherapy which has an excellent safety record. Vaccine-attenuated MV uses CD46 and Nectin-4 molecule as major entry receptors into cells. Vaccine-attenuated MV can selectively infect and kill a wide variety of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. With the development of molecular cloning, scientists have successfully rescued cDNA of vaccine-attenuated MV and increased its oncolytic efficiency with molecular engineering techniques. Phase I clinical trials of virotherapy for ovarian cancer and multiple myeloma with vaccine-attenuated MV are underway. The preliminary results indicate the promising antitumor potential of vaccine-attenuated MV.

  3. Implementing cognitive behavioral therapy in specialty medical settings

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Jessica F.; Weisberg, Risa B.

    2016-01-01

    This article is an introduction to the second issue of a two-part Special Series on integrating cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) into medical settings. The first issue focused on integrating CBT into primary care, and this issue focuses on implementing CBT in other specialty medical settings, including cancer treatment, HIV care, and specialized pediatric medical clinics. Models for treatment delivery to improve ease of implementation are also discussed, including telehealth and home-delivered treatment. The six articles in this series provide examples of how to transport CBT techniques that are largely designed for implementation in outpatient mental health settings to specialized medical settings, and discuss unique considerations and recommendations for implementation. PMID:27471371

  4. Treating prolactinoma and psychosis: medication and cognitive behavioural therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, DH; Sutterland, AL; Otten, J; Becker, HE; Drent, ML; van der Gaag, M; Birchwood, M; de Haan, L

    2011-01-01

    The patient in this case report had two severe medical conditions that require oppositional treatment: prolactinoma and psychosis. A prolactinoma is a benign tumour of the pituitary gland that produces prolactin. Dopamine agonist medication is the first-line treatment in patients with prolactinoma. The psychotic symptoms started after a dosage increase of a dopamine D2-receptor agonist. Several antipsychotic medications were tried with and without the dopamine D2-receptor agonist, but severe command hallucinations remained. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was added which reduced the impact of the hallucinations to a great extent, indicating that CBT can have an additional positive effect in prolactinoma patients with psychosis that shows incomplete recovery after antipsychotic medication. Future research should be aimed at the severe and prolonged side effects of dopamine agonists in the treatment of prolactinoma patients with multiple risk factors for a psychotic decompensation. PMID:22715200

  5. Treating prolactinoma and psychosis: medication and cognitive behavioural therapy.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D H; Sutterland, A L; Otten, J; Becker, H E; Drent, M L; van der Gaag, M; Birchwood, M; de Haan, L

    2011-02-09

    The patient in this case report had two severe medical conditions that require oppositional treatment: prolactinoma and psychosis. A prolactinoma is a benign tumour of the pituitary gland that produces prolactin. Dopamine agonist medication is the first-line treatment in patients with prolactinoma. The psychotic symptoms started after a dosage increase of a dopamine D2-receptor agonist. Several antipsychotic medications were tried with and without the dopamine D2-receptor agonist, but severe command hallucinations remained. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was added which reduced the impact of the hallucinations to a great extent, indicating that CBT can have an additional positive effect in prolactinoma patients with psychosis that shows incomplete recovery after antipsychotic medication. Future research should be aimed at the severe and prolonged side effects of dopamine agonists in the treatment of prolactinoma patients with multiple risk factors for a psychotic decompensation.

  6. Cardiac gene therapy: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Mason, Daniel; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Krishnan, Harini Venkata; Sant, Shilpa

    2015-10-10

    Gene therapy has the potential to serve as an adaptable platform technology for treating various diseases. Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in the developed world and genetic modification is steadily becoming a more plausible method to repair and regenerate heart tissue. Recently, new gene targets to treat cardiovascular disease have been identified and developed into therapies that have shown promise in animal models. Some of these therapies have advanced to clinical testing. Despite these recent successes, several barriers must be overcome for gene therapy to become a widely used treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we evaluate specific genetic targets that can be exploited to treat cardiovascular diseases, list the important delivery barriers for the gene carriers, assess the most promising methods of delivering the genetic information, and discuss the current status of clinical trials involving gene therapies targeted to the heart.

  7. Radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukiyama, I.; Akine, Y.; Kajiura, Y.; Ogino, T.; Yamashita, K.; Egawa, S.; Hijikata, J.; Kitagawa, T.

    1988-07-01

    A retrospective study of 75 patients with advanced inoperable gastric cancers, referred to the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1962 and 1982, was performed. According to the Borrmann classification based on X ray findings, Type 1 was found in 3 patients, Type 2 in 5, Type 3 in 40, and Type 4 in 15. Twelve patients could not be classified. The histological type was papillary adenocarcinoma in 7 patients, tubular adenocarcinoma in 23, mucinous carcinoma in 6, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 14, signet ring cell carcinoma in 12 and others in 13. The site of remote metastasis in 19 patients was Virchow's lymph node in 8 patients, Douglas pouch in 3, liver and lung in 2 each and others in 4. All patients were treated by a either telecobalt 60 unit or a linear accelerator using 6 Mv photon and the total dose to primary lesion was 4000 cGy in 5 weeks to 7000 cGy in 8-9 weeks. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 6 patients or 8.0%, partial response (PR) in 46 or 61.3%, and no change (NC) in 23 or 30.7%. The response rate based on the sum of CR and PR was about 70%. The 50% survival period in months was 26.5, 7.3, and 3.2, respectively for patients with CR, PR, and NC. For the response of advanced gastric cancer to chemotherapy in the National Cancer Center Hospital, the combined use of UFT and Mitomycin C gave the highest rate, 46%. As for as local response is concerned, the response rate to radiation was 70%, a better result than that of chemotherapy alone.

  8. Role of medication therapy management in preexposure prophylaxis therapy for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Kelli W; Woodard, Laresa M; Woodard, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Patient medication adherence is a long-standing problem and is one that raises serious issues for patient health, public health, and health care quality. Medication nonadherence costs the US economy an estimated US$290 billion in avoidable medical spending every year. One of the most costly health conditions is HIV disease, which continues to be a serious health issue for parts of the world. About 34 million people are living with HIV around the world. With the emerging preventative treatment against HIV, known as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), come concerns surrounding the potential impact of nonadherence to this newly approved medication therapy. Nonadherence to antiretroviral treatments are commonly the root cause for patients not reaching their treatment goals, putting them at risk of progression and worsening of their disease and complications, such as increased risk of opportunistic infections. Therefore, it is essential to improve antiretroviral medication adherence. By identifying members who are nonadherent to their prescribed antiretroviral medications and working collaboratively with patients, physicians, and pharmacists, Medication Therapy Management (MTM) can potentially increase medication adherence by helping patients identify, resolve, and prevent issues that may affect their decision not to take a medication as intended.

  9. Advances in Anti-IgE Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Arzu Didem

    2015-01-01

    Omalizumab depletes free IgE in the blood and interstitial space and inhibits IgE binding to FcεRI on basophils, mast cells, and dendritic cells. We stopped omalizumab treatment after four years. Recurrences of urticaria symptoms were found to be higher in patients with chronic urticaria than recurrences of asthmatic symptoms in severe persistent asthma patients. For the very first time, we used omalizumab in symptomatic therapy of recurrent laryngeal oedema and urticaria attacks in a patient with postoperative pulmonary carcinoid tumor for eight months. During the four years of follow-up, no recurrence was noted in pulmonary carcinoid tumor. Control PET CT results revealed normal findings. After omalizumab treatment, laryngeal oedema and urticaria symptoms were decreased. The most common adverse reaction from omalizumab is injection site induration, injection site itching, injection site pain, and bruising but the package insert contains warnings regarding parasitic infections. While there are no reports of fatal anaphylaxis as a result of omalizumab, some cases have been serious and potentially life-threatening. Therefore, the FDA requires that people receiving omalizumab be monitored in the physician's office for a period of time after their injections. PMID:26075226

  10. Advances in Oncolytic Virus Therapy for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Haseley, Amy; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher; Chaudhury, Abhik Ray; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization grossly classifies the various types of astrocytomas using a grade system with grade IV gliomas having the worst prognosis. Oncolytic virus therapy is a novel treatment option for GBM patients. Several patents describe various oncolytic viruses used in preclinical and clinical trials to evaluate safety and efficacy. These viruses are natural or genetically engineered from different viruses such as HSV-1, Adenovirus, Reovirus, and New Castle Disease Virus. While several anecdotal studies have indicated therapeutic advantage, recent clinical trials have revealed the safety of their usage, but demonstration of significant efficacy remains to be established. Oncolytic viruses are being redesigned with an interest in combating the tumor microenvironment in addition to defeating the cancerous cells. Several patents describe the inclusion of tumor microenvironment modulating genes within the viral backbone and in particular those which attack the tumor angiotome. The very innovative approaches being used to improve therapeutic efficacy include: design of viruses which can express cytokines to activate a systemic antitumor immune response, inclusion of angiostatic genes to combat tumor vasculature, and also enzymes capable of digesting tumor extra cellular matrix (ECM) to enhance viral spread through solid tumors. As increasingly more novel viruses are being tested and patented, the future battle against glioma looks promising. PMID:19149710

  11. Factors that Predict Who Takes Advanced Courses in Cognitive Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pehlivanidis, Artemios

    2007-01-01

    Training in Cognitive Therapy (CT) includes theoretical and didactic components combined with clinical supervision. An introductory course in CT might satisfy training needs in psychotherapy and help in the selection of those trainees who wish to continue to an advanced training level. Predictors of success at such an introductory course have been…

  12. Advances in Child Behavior Therapy: Applications and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazdin, Alan E.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews advances in child behavior therapy by illustrating the range of problems treated and the techniques and accomplishments that have emerged. Discusses training of parents, teachers, peers, and children themselves in behavior change techniques, as well as general implications of therapeutic developments for enhancing child welfare. (GC)

  13. Creating conditions for the success of the French industrial advanced therapy sector.

    PubMed

    Lirsac, Pierre Noel; Blin, Olivier; Magalon, Jérémy; Angot, Pierre; de Barbeyrac, Estelle; Bilbault, Pascal; Bourg, Elisabeth; Damour, Odile; Faure, Patrick; Ferry, Nicolas; Garbil, Bénédicte; Larghero, Jérôme; Nguon, Marina; Pattou, François; Thumelin, Stéphane; Yates, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Although the European Union merely followed the initiatives of the United States and Japan by introducing special regimes for orphan medicinal products, it has introduced a special status for a new category of biological medicinal products, advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), adopting specific associated regulations. European Regulation (which constitutes the highest legal instrument in the hierarchy of European law texts) [EC] No. 1394/2007, published in 2007, uses this term to define somatic cell therapy medicinal products, tissue-engineered products, and gene therapy medicinal products, possibly combined with medical devices. The stated objective was two-fold: both to promote their industrialization and market access, while guaranteeing a high level of health protection for patients. Since publication of the regulation, few marketing authorizations have been granted in Europe, and these have not been accompanied by commercial success. However, certain recent studies show that this is a growing sector and that France remains the leading European nation in terms of clinical trials. This round table brought together a panel of representatives of French public and private protagonists from the advanced therapy sector. The discussions focused on the conditions to ensure the success of translational research and, more generally, the French advanced therapy sector. These enabled a number of obstacles to be identified, which once lifted, by means of recommendations, would facilitate the development and success of this sector.

  14. Monitoring of girls undergoing medical therapy for isosexual precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, M M; Hernanz-Schulman, M; Genieser, N B; Sklar, C A; Fefferman, N R; David, R

    1994-07-01

    We evaluated the use of sonography in monitoring the efficacy of suppressive therapy with a gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue in girls being treated for isosexual precocious puberty. Ten girls 5 to 9 years of age underwent serial sonography and hormonal stimulation tests on the same day. Sonographic trends of decreasing ovarian volume and uterine length indicated early suppression even when absolute values were above threshold. Changes in ovarian volume were the most sensitive predictor of pituitary-gonadal suppression. Sonography is a sensitive and accurate method of monitoring medical therapy; ovarian volume and analysis of interval change are the most sensitive barometers of change.

  15. Medical and dietary therapy for kidney stone prevention.

    PubMed

    Gul, Zeynep; Monga, Manoj

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of kidney stone disease is increasing, and newer research is finding that stones are associated with several serious morbidities. These facts suggest that emphasis needs to be placed not only on stone treatment but also stone prevention. However, there is a relative dearth of information on dietary and medical therapies to treat and avoid nephrolithiasis. In addition, studies have shown that there are many misconceptions among both the general community and physicians about how stones should be managed. This article is meant to serve as a review of the current literature on dietary and drug therapies for stone prevention.

  16. Nonadherence to Medication Therapy in Haemodialysis Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Saurav; Castelino, Ronald L.; Lioufas, Nicole M.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R.

    2015-01-01

    Background End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients are often prescribed multiple medications. Together with a demanding weekly schedule of dialysis sessions, increased number of medicines and associated regimen complexity pre-dispose them at high risk of medication nonadherence. This review summarizes existing literature on nonadherence and identifies factors associated with nonadherence to medication therapy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Methods A comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews covering the period from 1970 through November 2014 was performed following a predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Reference lists from relevant materials were reviewed. Data on study characteristics, measures of nonadherence, prevalence rates and factors associated with nonadherence were collected. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines was followed in conducting this systematic review. Results Of 920 relevant publications, 44 were included. The prevalence of medication nonadherence varied from 12.5% to 98.6%, with widespread heterogeneity in measures and definitions employed. Most common patient-related factors significantly associated with nonadherence were younger age, non-Caucasian ethnicity, illness interfering family life, being a smoker, and living single and being divorced or widowed. Similarly, disease-related factors include longevity of haemodialysis, recurrent hospitalization, depressive symptoms and having concomitant illness like diabetes and hypertension. Medication-related factors such as daily tablet count, total pill burden, number of phosphate binders prescribed and complexity of medication regimen were also associated with poor adherence. Conclusions A number of patient-, disease-, and medication-related factors are associated with medication nonadherence in haemodialysis patients. Clinicians should be aware of such factors so that

  17. 76 FR 48169 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... following public meeting: ``Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical... multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application and public...

  18. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  19. The medical and surgical therapy of pseudofolliculitis barbae.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman-Shah, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Pseudofolliculitis barbae (PFB) is a common, chronic, inflammatory skin disorder seen mainly in individuals with curly hair. This condition is seen most frequently in black men who shave their beards but may also be seen in women of all races who wax or shave the axillary and pubic skin. The etiology of PFB is multifactorial, and heretofore a cure has been considered impossible for those desiring a clean-shaven face. The following article serves to discuss the current medical and surgical therapies available for this condition. Medical treatments for this condition include various combinations of topical antibiotics, corticosteroids, and retinoids. In the surgical arena, laser therapy has revolutionized the treatment of PFB and has enabled cure for the first time for those plagued by this disorder and for whom a beardless face is acceptable.

  20. Advances in Vitiligo: An Update on Medical and Surgical Treatments.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Alexander B; Sideris, Andrew; Hadi, Ali; Elbuluk, Nada

    2017-01-01

    Vitiligo is one of the most common cutaneous disorders of depigmentation. Although its underlying causes are still being studied and no definitive cure currently exists, recent research has provided insight into pathogenic mechanisms and new treatment options. Objective: The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the medical and surgical therapies for vitiligo with emphasis on the most recent treatment modalities. Design: This review was conducted through a literature search using PubMed and the National institutes of Health's clinicalTrials.gov databases from January 2010 to July 2015. This yielded 86 studies, 12 of which were excluded, and 74 of which were reviewed. Results: Recent studies and ongoing clinical trials indicate that there are many promising new medical and surgical treatment modalities for this chronic condition. Conclusion: A combination of traditional and newer treatments may work synergistically to provide additional improvement in patients' disease state and quality of life.

  1. Advances in Vitiligo: An Update on Medical and Surgical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Alexander B.; Sideris, Andrew; Hadi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Vitiligo is one of the most common cutaneous disorders of depigmentation. Although its underlying causes are still being studied and no definitive cure currently exists, recent research has provided insight into pathogenic mechanisms and new treatment options. Objective: The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview of the medical and surgical therapies for vitiligo with emphasis on the most recent treatment modalities. Design: This review was conducted through a literature search using PubMed and the National institutes of Health’s clinicalTrials.gov databases from January 2010 to July 2015. This yielded 86 studies, 12 of which were excluded, and 74 of which were reviewed. Results: Recent studies and ongoing clinical trials indicate that there are many promising new medical and surgical treatment modalities for this chronic condition. Conclusion: A combination of traditional and newer treatments may work synergistically to provide additional improvement in patients’ disease state and quality of life. PMID:28210378

  2. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology.

  3. The Role of Medical Therapy for Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Abdul Q; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2015-07-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) is a lethal complication of portal hypertension and should be suspected in every patient with liver cirrhosis who presents with upper gastrointestinal bleed. AVH-related mortality has decreased in the last few decades from 40% to 15%-20% due to advances in the general and specific management of variceal hemorrhage. This review summarizes current management of AVH and prevention of recurrent hemorrhage with a focus on pharmacologic therapy.

  4. Advances in Medical Management of Early Stage and Advanced Breast Cancer: 2015.

    PubMed

    Witherby, Sabrina; Rizack, Tina; Sakr, Bachir J; Legare, Robert D; Sikov, William M

    2016-01-01

    Standard management of early stage and advanced breast cancer has been improved over the past few years by knowledge gained about the biology of the disease, results from a number of eagerly anticipated clinical trials and the development of novel agents that offer our patients options for improved outcomes or reduced toxicity or both. This review highlights recent major developments affecting the systemic therapy of breast cancer, broken down by clinically relevant patient subgroups and disease stage, and briefly discusses some of the ongoing controversies in the treatment of breast cancer and promising therapies on the horizon.

  5. Nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy: Recent advances, challenges, and strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-12-01

    Compared to conventional treatments, gene therapy offers a variety of advantages for cancer treatment including high potency and specificity, low off-target toxicity, and delivery of multiple genes that concurrently target cancer tumorigenesis, recurrence, and drug resistance. In the past decades, gene therapy has undergone remarkable progress, and is now poised to become a first line therapy for cancer. Among various gene delivery systems, nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their desirable characteristics including low toxicity profiles, well-controlled and high gene delivery efficiency, and multi-functionalities. This review provides an overview on gene therapeutics and gene delivery technologies, and highlight recent advances, challenges and insights into the design and the utility of nanoparticles in gene therapy for cancer treatment.

  6. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: a review of medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Kozuch, Patricia L; Hanauer, Stephen B

    2008-01-21

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. While a cure remains elusive, both can be treated with medications that induce and maintain remission. With the recent advent of therapies that inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha the overlap in medical therapies for UC and CD has become greater. Although 5-ASA agents have been a mainstay in the treatment of both CD and UC, the data for their efficacy in patients with CD, particularly as maintenance therapy, are equivocal. Antibiotics may have a limited role in the treatment of colonic CD. Steroids continue to be the first choice to treat active disease not responsive to other more conservative therapy; non-systemic steroids such as oral and rectal budesonide for ileal and right-sided CD and distal UC respectively are also effective in mild-moderate disease. 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and its prodrug azathioprine are steroid-sparing immunomodulators effective in the maintenance of remission of both CD and UC, while methotrexate may be used in both induction and maintenance of CD. Infliximab and adalimumab are anti-TNF agents approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of Crohn's disease, and infliximab is also approved for the treatment of UC.

  7. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: A review of medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kozuch, Patricia L; Hanauer, Stephen B

    2008-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. While a cure remains elusive, both can be treated with medications that induce and maintain remission. With the recent advent of therapies that inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha the overlap in medical therapies for UC and CD has become greater. Although 5-ASA agents have been a mainstay in the treatment of both CD and UC, the data for their efficacy in patients with CD, particularly as maintenance therapy, are equivocal. Antibiotics may have a limited role in the treatment of colonic CD. Steroids continue to be the first choice to treat active disease not responsive to other more conservative therapy; non-systemic steroids such as oral and rectal budesonide for ileal and right-sided CD and distal UC respectively are also effective in mild-moderate disease. 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and its prodrug azathioprine are steroid-sparing immunomodulators effective in the maintenance of remission of both CD and UC, while methotrexate may be used in both induction and maintenance of CD. Infliximab and adalimumab are anti-TNF agents approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of Crohn's disease, and infliximab is also approved for the treatment of UC. PMID:18200659

  8. Combined medication and cognitive therapy for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Newman, Michelle G; Rickels, Karl; Gallop, Robert; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Hamilton, Jessica L; Ring-Kurtz, Sarah; Pastva, Amy M

    2011-12-01

    The current study assessed efficacy of combined cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and venlafaxine XR compared to venlafaxine XR alone in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) within settings where medication is typically offered as the treatment for this disorder. Patients with DSM-IV-diagnosed GAD who were recently enrolled in a long-term venlafaxine XR study were randomly offered (n=77), or not offered (n=40), the option of adding 12 sessions of CBT. Of those offered CBT, 33% (n=26) accepted and attended at least one treatment session. There were no differences between the combined treatment group and the medication only group on primary or secondary efficacy measures in any of the sample comparisons. Many patients who present in medical/psychopharmacology settings seeking treatment for GAD decline the opportunity to receive adjunctive treatment. Of those that receive CBT, there appears to be no additional benefit of combined treatment compared to venlafaxine XR alone.

  9. Advances in intravesical therapy for urinary tract disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Kashyap, Mahendra; Hensley, Harvey; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intravesical therapy is a valuable option in the clinical management of urinary tract disorders such as interstitial cystitis/ painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and refractory overactive bladder. This review will cover the latest advances in this field using polymer and liposomes as delivery platform for drugs, protein and nucleic acids. Areas covered This review summarizes the significance of intravesical therapy for lower urinary tract disorders. The recent advancement of liposomes as a drug delivery platform for botulinum toxin, tacrolimus and small interfering RNA is discussed. The importance of polymers forming indwelling devices and hydrogels are also discussed, where all preparations improved efficacy parameters in rodent models. Clinical experience of treating IC/PBS with indwelling devices and liposomes are summarized and preclinical evidence about the downregulation of target gene expression in rodent bladder with liposomes complexed with siRNA is also reviewed. Expert opinion There have been several advances in the field of intravesical therapy for improving clinical outcomes. One of the most promising research avenues is the repurposing of drugs, given previously by other routes of administration, such as tacrolimus. Intravesical therapy also opens up novel therapeutic targets with improved efficacy and safety for underactive bladder. PMID:26479968

  10. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  11. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  12. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  13. Recent advances in massage therapy--a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, S-L; Qi, W; Li, H; Wang, Y-F; Yang, X-F; Li, Z-M; Lu, Q; Cong, D-Y

    2015-10-01

    Massage therapy is one of the most widely accepted alternative form of medicine helping patients suffering from varied pathological states including arthritis, anxiety, sleep problems, pain management and injury repair. Besides this, it is one of the safest forms of alternative medicine and has become favorite among various health care professionals. However, there is still a lot of debate is going in medical world pertaining to its certain use in modern medicine. So, the present review shall enlighten all the latest aspects of massage therapy in current medicine.

  14. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Karen; Jasperse, Marieke; Herst, Patries; Yielder, Jill

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board.

  15. Medical update and potential advances in the treatment of pediatric intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Nader N; Mezoff, Adam G; Carter, Beth A; Cole, Conrad R

    2012-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) and intestinal failure are chronic malabsorption disorders with considerable nutritional and growth consequences in children. Intestinal failure occurs when the functional gastrointestinal mass is reduced even if there is normal anatomical gastrointestinal length. A number of management strategies are often utilized to achieve successful intestinal rehabilitation and maintain adequate nutrition to avoid intestinal transplant. These strategies include minimizing the effect of parenteral associated liver disease, limiting catheter complications, and treating bacterial overgrowth in the remaining small intestine. In addition, there continues to be significant research interest in enhancing intestinal adaptation with targeted therapies. The purpose of this review is to discuss current perspectives and to highlight recent medical advances in novel investigational therapies.

  16. Advances in the medical management of paediatric IBD.

    PubMed

    Aloi, Marina; Nuti, Federica; Stronati, Laura; Cucchiara, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    IBD includes two classic entities, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and a third undetermined form (IBD-U), characterized by a chronic relapsing course resulting in a high rate of morbidity and impaired quality of life. Children with IBD are vulnerable in terms of growth failure, malnutrition and emotional effects. The aims of therapy have now transitioned from symptomatic control to the achievement of mucosal healing and deep remission. This type of therapy has been made possible by the advent of disease-modifying drugs, such as biologic agents, which are capable of interrupting the inflammatory cascade underlying IBD. Biologic agents are generally administered in patients who are refractory to conventional therapies. However, there is growing support that such agents could be used in the initial phases of the disease, typically in paediatric patients, to interrupt and cease the inflammatory process. Until several years ago, most therapeutic programmes in paediatric patients with IBD were borrowed from adult trials, whereas paediatric studies were often retrospective and uncontrolled. However, guidelines on therapeutic management of paediatric IBD and controlled, prospective, randomized trials including children with IBD have now been published. Here, the current knowledge concerning treatment options for children with IBD are reported. We also highlight the effectiveness and safety of new therapeutic advances in these paediatric patients.

  17. Predicting relapse following medical therapy for Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Wilson, R.; Pearson, D.W.; Cuthbert, G.F.; Jenkins, C.; Caine, S.; Thomson, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In 40 patients with Graves' disease (35 female, 5 male; mean age at presentation = 38 yrs) the authors examined the ability of thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake and serum thyroid stimulating immunoglobins (TSI) to identify patients who would relapse after a course of medical therapy. Serum TSI and 20 minute thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake were estimated every 3 months during a 12 month course of carbimazole and tri iodothyronine. TSI levels were estimated by inhibition of receptor binding and expressed as an index (normal value <25). 17 patients (Group 1) remained biochemically euthyroid for at least 1 year after cessation of therapy. 23 (Group II) developed recurrent thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid hormone level did not differ between Groups I and II at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake did not differ significantly in the two groups at presentation and overlap of values persisted throughout therapy. 3 patients had undetectable TSI levels at presentation and throughout follow-up. In the remaining 37, TSI levels at presentation were significantly higher in Group II and all 7 patients with initial values >80 relapsed. After 12 months therapy a TSI level of >25 was present in 1 Group I patient and 16 Group II patients who had detectable TSI at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake was a poor predictor of relapse of thyrotoxicosis. A very high TSI level at presentation (>80) was associated with relapse. An abnormal TSI on completion of 12 months medical therapy had a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 94% for prediction of relapse of thyrotoxicosis in the subsequent year.

  18. [Economic perspectives of the research on advanced therapies].

    PubMed

    Pamo Larrauri, Jose María

    2014-11-03

    Since a new advanced therapy medicinal product is discovered until finally allowed its sale in the domestic market, it has to overcome a series of stages. Biomedical research is the first phase, currently its situation is encouraging to the increase in the number of clinical trials in Spain and in the rest of the world, despite the economic situation and the various difficulties that have faced the pharmaceutical laboratories. The next phase consists in obtaining the authorization of marketing of the European Medicines Agency. After authorization, will attempt to set a fair and moderate price for inclusion in the list of health provision of Social Security. A price for a drug that provides added value to health and society, a price that is generated profits for the pharmaceutical companies that hope to make up for the years of work and investment. Commitment to advanced therapy must be clear and forceful, to fund ongoing research projects and encouraging their creation with economic aid.

  19. Major Changes in Systemic Therapy for Advanced Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John A

    2016-05-01

    Over the past 5 years, a host of new agents have radically changed the therapeutic landscape in advanced melanoma; gone are the days when the only active agents were interferon and dacarbazine. Nearly 25 years ago, few patients with stage IV melanoma reached 2-year survival; today, these survival curves have risen substantially. At the NCCN 21st Annual Conference, John A. Thompson, MD, discussed updates with longer duration of patient follow-up for immune checkpoint therapies. He also reviewed some of the newer approvals in advanced melanoma, including the combination of ipilimumab and nivolumab, high-dose ipilimumab, the oncolytic virus therapy talimogene laherparepvec, and the molecularly targeted combination of the BRAF and MEK inhibitors vemurafenib and cobimetinib.

  20. The effects of human interest framing in television news coverage of medical advances.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyehyun

    2013-01-01

    The last few decades have witnessed the increasing dissemination of information on medical advances such as new medical treatments and prevention/diagnosis technologies through television news. To engage lay audiences with complex information, medical journalists often personalize news stories about medical advances by exemplifying individual patients and their personal experiences. This study investigates the effects of this journalistic technique, which is referred to as human interest framing, on audiences. The results of an experiment provide empirical evidence that the human interest framing of medical news stories can increase audiences' involvement in those stories and facilitate their positive perception of medical advances.

  1. Pituitary-directed medical therapy in Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Petersenn, Stephan; Fleseriu, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery remains the first line therapy in Cushing's disease, but a large number of patients will not be cured or disease will recur over time. Repeat pituitary surgery, bilateral adrenalectomy, and radiation have limitations with respect to efficacy and/or side effects. Therefore, there is a clear need for an effective medical treatment. The studies reviewed here suggest a role for pituitary-directed therapies, applying multireceptor ligand somatostatin analogs like pasireotide or second-generation dopamine agonists. Retinoic acid has been also studied in a small prospective study. These compounds target ACTH-secretion at the pituitary level and possibly inhibit corticotrope proliferation. Specific side effects of these compounds need to be considered, especially when used as long-term therapy. These novel approaches could provide options for treatment of patients in whom surgery has failed or is not possible, and while awaiting effects of radiation therapy. Preoperative use to decrease cortisol excess, potentially reducing perioperative complications, needs to be further studied.

  2. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Berkvens, P.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Bravin, A.; Adam, J. F.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Deman, P.; Vautrin, M.

    2010-07-23

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT).The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  3. Materials Advances for Next-Generation Ingestible Electronic Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Electronic medical implants have collectively transformed the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, but have many inherent limitations. Electronic implants require invasive surgeries, operate in challenging microenvironments, and are susceptible to bacterial infection and persistent inflammation. Novel materials and nonconventional device fabrication strategies may revolutionize the way electronic devices are integrated with the body. Ingestible electronic devices offer many advantages compared with implantable counterparts that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies ranging from gastrointestinal infections to diabetes. This review summarizes current technologies and highlights recent materials advances. Specific focus is dedicated to next-generation materials for packaging, circuit design, and on-board power supplies that are benign, nontoxic, and even biodegradable. Future challenges and opportunities are also highlighted.

  4. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Rastall, David Pw; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme's substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood-brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field.

  5. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  6. Medical Advances and Racial/ethnic Disparities in Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tehranifar, Parisa; Neugut, Alfred I.; Phelan, Jo C.; Link, Bruce G.; Liao, Yuyan; Desai, Manisha; Terry, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although advances in early detection and treatment of cancer improve overall population survival, these advances may not benefit all population groups equally, and may heighten racial/ethnic (R/E) differences in survival. METHODS We identified cancer cases in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, who were ≥ 20 years and diagnosed with one invasive cancer in 1995–1999 (n=580,225). We used 5-year relative survival rates (5Y-RSR) to measure the degree to which mortality from each cancer is amenable to medical interventions (amenability index). We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate survival differences between each R/E minority group relative to whites, by the overall amenability index, and three levels of amenability (non-amenable, partly and mostly amenable cancers, corresponding to cancers with 5Y-RSR <40%, 40–69% and ≥ 70%, respectively), adjusting for gender, age, disease stage and county-level poverty concentration. RESULTS As amenability increased, R/E differences in cancer survival increased for African Americans, American Indians/Native Alaskans and Hispanics relative to whites. For example, the hazard rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) for African Americans vs. whites from non-amenable, partly amenable and mostly amenable cancers were 1.05 (1.03, 1.07), 1.38 (1.34,1.41), and 1.41 (1.37, 1.46), respectively. Asians/Pacific Islanders had similar or longer survival relative to whites across amenability levels; however, several subgroups experienced increasingly poorer survival with increasing amenability. CONCLUSIONS Cancer survival disparities for most R/E minority populations widen as cancers become more amenable to medical interventions. Efforts in developing cancer control measures must be coupled with specific strategies for reducing the expected disparities. PMID:19789367

  7. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced or metastatic chordoma patients: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lebellec, Loïc; Aubert, Sébastien; Zaïri, Fahed; Ryckewaert, Thomas; Chauffert, Bruno; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Chordomas, derived from undifferentiated notochordal remnants, represent less than 4% of bone primary tumors. Despite surgery followed by radiotherapy, local and metastatic relapses are frequent. In case of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas, medical treatment is frequently discussed. While chemotherapy is ineffective, it would appear that some molecular targeted therapies, in particular imatinib, could slow down the tumor growth in case-reports, retrospective series, and phase I or II trials. Nineteen publications, between January 1990 and September 2014, have been found describing the activity of these targeted therapies. A systematic analysis of these publications shows that the best objective response with targeted therapies was stabilization in 52 to 69% of chordomas. Given the indolent course of advanced chordoma and because of the absence of randomized trial, the level of evidence to treat chordomas with molecular therapy is low (level III), whatever the drug. Furthermore, we could not draw firm conclusion on the activity of imatinib. Other putative targets have also been described. Therefore, further clinical trials are expected, especially with these targets. Nevertheless, it seems essential, in those future studies, to consider the naturally slow course of the disease.

  8. Collaborative drug therapy management and comprehensive medication management-2015.

    PubMed

    McBane, Sarah E; Dopp, Anna L; Abe, Andrew; Benavides, Sandra; Chester, Elizabeth A; Dixon, Dave L; Dunn, Michaelia; Johnson, Melissa D; Nigro, Sarah J; Rothrock-Christian, Tracie; Schwartz, Amy H; Thrasher, Kim; Walker, Scot

    2015-04-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) previously published position statements on collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM) in 1997 and 2003. Since 2003, significant federal and state legislation addressing CDTM has evolved and expanded throughout the United States. CDTM is well suited to facilitate the delivery of comprehensive medication management (CMM) by clinical pharmacists. CMM, defined by ACCP as a core component of the standards of practice for clinical pharmacists, is designed to optimize medication-related outcomes in collaborative practice environments. New models of care delivery emphasize patient-centered, team-based care and increasingly link payment to the achievement of positive economic, clinical, and humanistic outcomes. Hence clinical pharmacists practicing under CDTM agreements or through other privileging processes are well positioned to provide CMM. The economic value of clinical pharmacists in team-based settings is well documented. However, patient access to CMM remains limited due to lack of payer recognition of the value of clinical pharmacists in collaborative care settings and current health care payment policy. Therefore, the clinical pharmacy discipline must continue to establish and expand its use of CDTM agreements and other collaborative privileging mechanisms to provide CMM. Continued growth in the provision of CMM by appropriately qualified clinical pharmacists in collaborative practice settings will enhance recognition of their positive impact on medication-related outcomes.

  9. Treatment of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension: The Role of Medical Therapy and Balloon Pulmonary Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Timothy M.; Poch, David S.; Auger, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a potentially curable disease when treated with pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE). However, even at experienced surgical centers, nearly one-third of patients with CTEPH will be deemed inoperable for reasons including distal disease, comorbidities, or out-of-proportion pulmonary hypertension. It is in these patients with inoperable CTEPH that pulmonary hypertension (PH)-targeted medical therapy and balloon pulmonary angioplasty have potential therapeutic value. Previous unblinded cohort trials have assessed PH-targeted medical therapy in various subpopulations of CTEPH patients using epoprostenol, treprostinil, sildenafil, bosentan, and iloprost, each demonstrating measurable pulmonary hemodynamic effects. However, riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, is the first FDA-approved therapy for inoperable CTEPH to demonstrate both an improvement in functional capabilities (6-minute walk time) as well as significant gains in secondary pulmonary hemodynamic end points in a large placebo-controlled trial. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty is an interventional procedure using telescoping catheters placed in the pulmonary arteries, through which wires and balloons are used to mechanically disrupt chronic clot material and relieve pulmonary vascular obstruction. Contemporary case series from multiple centers worldwide have demonstrated pulmonary hemodynamic improvement with this approach. As a result of these advances, patients with inoperable CTEPH who had few options as recently as 5 years ago now have alternatives with emerging evidence of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28289495

  10. Advancing polymeric delivery systems amidst a nucleic acid therapy renaissance

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Paul A.; Pun, Suzie H.; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid therapeutics are attracting renewed interest due to recent clinical advances and product approvals. Most leading programs use chemical conjugates, or viral vectors in the case of gene therapy, while several use no delivery system at all. Polymer systems, which have been at the periphery of this renaissance, often involve greater molecular complexity than competing approaches, which must be justified by their advantages. Advanced analytical methods, along with biological tools for characterizing biotransformation and intracellular trafficking, are increasingly being applied to nucleic acid delivery systems including those based on polymers. These frontiers of investigation create the opportunity for an era where highly defined polymer compositions are optimized based on mechanistic insights in a way that has not been previously possible, offering the prospect of greater differentiation from alternatives. This will require integrated collaboration between polymer scientists and those from other disciplines. PMID:24683504

  11. Geographic Medical History: Advances in Geospatial Technology Present New Potentials in Medical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruque, F. S.; Finley, R. W.

    2016-06-01

    Genes, behaviour, and the environment are known to be the major risk factors for common diseases. When the patient visits a physician, typical questions include family history (genes) and lifestyle of the patient (behaviour), but questions concerning environmental risk factors often remain unasked. It is ironic that 25 centuries ago Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine, noted the importance of environmental exposure in medical investigation as documented in his classic work, "Airs, Waters, Places", yet the practice of routinely incorporating environmental risk factors is still not in place. Modern epigenetic studies have found that unhealthy lifestyle and environmental factors can cause changes to our genes that can increase disease risk factors. Therefore, attempting to solve the puzzle of diseases using heredity and lifestyle alone will be incomplete without accounting for the environmental exposures. The primary reason why environmental exposure has not yet been a routine part of the patient's medical history is mostly due to our inability to provide clinicians useful measures of environmental exposures suitable for their clinical practices. This presentation will discuss advances in geospatial technology that show the potential to catalyse a paradigm shift in medical practice and health research by allowing environmental risk factors to be documented as the patient's "Geographic Medical History". In order to accomplish this we need information on: a) relevant spatiotemporal environmental variables, and b) location of the individual in that person's dynamic environment. Common environmental agents that are known to interact with genetic make-up include air pollutants, mold spores, pesticides, etc. Until recently, the other component, location of an individual was limited to a static representation such as residential or workplace location. Now, with the development of mobile technology, changes in an individual's location can be tracked in real time if

  12. Home Healthcare Medical Devices: Infusion Therapy - Getting the Most Out of Your Pump

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Consumer Devices Brochure - Home Healthcare Medical Devices: Infusion Therapy - Getting the Most Out of Your Pump ... therapy. What do you do before using your infusion pump? Read your pump's Instructions for Use and ...

  13. Advances in medical revascularisation treatments in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Asadi, H; Yan, B; Dowling, R; Wong, S; Mitchell, P

    2014-01-01

    Urgent reperfusion of the ischaemic brain is the aim of stroke treatment and there has been ongoing research to find a drug that can promote vessel recanalisation more completely and with less side effects. In this review article, the major studies which have validated the use and safety of tPA are discussed. The safety and efficacy of other thrombolytic and anticoagulative agents such as tenecteplase, desmoteplase, ancrod, tirofiban, abciximab, eptifibatide, and argatroban are also reviewed. Tenecteplase and desmoteplase are both plasminogen activators with higher fibrin affinity and longer half-life compared to alteplase. They have shown greater reperfusion rates and improved functional outcomes in preliminary studies. Argatroban is a direct thrombin inhibitor used as an adjunct to intravenous tPA and showed higher rates of complete recanalisation in the ARTTS study with further studies which are now ongoing. Adjuvant thrombolysis techniques using transcranial ultrasound are also being investigated and have shown higher rates of complete recanalisation, for example, in the CLOTBUST study. Overall, development in medical therapies for stroke is important due to the ease of administration compared to endovascular treatments, and the new treatments such as tenecteplase, desmoteplase, and adjuvant sonothrombolysis are showing promising results and await further large-scale clinical trials.

  14. Medical factors influencing decision making regarding radiation therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dilaveri, Christina A; Sandhu, Nicole P; Neal, Lonzetta; Neben-Wittich, Michelle A; Hieken, Tina J; Mac Bride, Maire Brid; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Ghosh, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important and effective adjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Numerous health conditions may affect medical decisions regarding tolerance of breast radiation therapy. These factors must be considered during the decision-making process after breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer. Here, we review currently available evidence focusing on medical conditions that may affect the patient–provider decision-making process regarding the use of radiation therapy. PMID:25429241

  15. Integrating Medication Therapy Management Education into a Core Pharmacy Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Poole, Traci M; Kodali, Leela; Pace, Adam C

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To describe the design of a core course directed at improving confidence and competence of students to perform medication therapy management (MTM) services. Design. Using the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) certificate training program framework, a core course was developed to teach MTM concepts to third-year student pharmacists. Using deep learning and authentic assignments, course instructors attempted to improve student confidence and readiness to provide MTM services. Assessment. Student ability to meet course objectives was evaluated by examinations and the APhA MTM program self-assessment. Students had an overall success rate of 93% on all three assessments. Student perceptions of confidence, competence, and importance of performing MTM services were measured using a survey instrument with 56 Likert-type items. Students completing both surveys reported significantly increased confidence and competence. Conclusion. Integrating MTM-specific education into the core curriculum increased student pharmacists' perceived competence and confidence to perform MTM services.

  16. Integrating Medication Therapy Management Education into a Core Pharmacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Leela; Pace, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe the design of a core course directed at improving confidence and competence of students to perform medication therapy management (MTM) services. Design. Using the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) certificate training program framework, a core course was developed to teach MTM concepts to third-year student pharmacists. Using deep learning and authentic assignments, course instructors attempted to improve student confidence and readiness to provide MTM services. Assessment. Student ability to meet course objectives was evaluated by examinations and the APhA MTM program self-assessment. Students had an overall success rate of 93% on all three assessments. Student perceptions of confidence, competence, and importance of performing MTM services were measured using a survey instrument with 56 Likert-type items. Students completing both surveys reported significantly increased confidence and competence. Conclusion. Integrating MTM-specific education into the core curriculum increased student pharmacists’ perceived competence and confidence to perform MTM services. PMID:27293237

  17. [Device-aided therapies in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, A A

    2016-01-01

    Advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) is a consequence of the severe neurodegenerative process and are characterized by the development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, aggravation of non-motor symptoms. Treatment with peroral and transdermal drugs can't provide an adequate control of PD symptoms and quality-of-life of the patients at this stage of disease. Currently, three device-aided therapies: deep brain stimulation (DBS), intrajejunal infusion of duodopa, subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine can be used in treatment of patients with advanced stages of PD. Timely administration of device-aided therapies and right choice of the method determine, to a large extent, the efficacy and safety of their use. Despite the high efficacy of all three methods with respect to the fluctuation of separate symptoms, each method has its own peculiarities. The authors reviewed the data on the expediency of using each method according to the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms, patient's age, PD duration, concomitant pathology and social support of the patients.

  18. New possibilities for cancer therapy with advances in cancer immunology.

    PubMed

    MacLean, G D; Longenecker, B M

    1994-04-01

    There has been progress over the last decade in addressing three questions: Are there cancer-associated antigens that could be targets for immunotherapy? Can the human immune system recognize cancer-associated antigens? Can an anti-cancer immune response affect cancer cells and lead to increased survival? Results from animal model studies have been interpreted by optimists as encouraging, and by pessimists as being irrelevant to human cancer. Earlier studies on "cancer vaccines" utilized heterogeneous cell extracts of cell components. Monoclonal antibodies have enabled identification of relevant cancer-associated antigens or epitopes, such as the ganglioside GM2, the carbohydrates TF and STn, and the peptide sequences of MUC-1. In parallel with research on immune adjuvants and measures designed to inhibit suppressor activity, these epitopes are being tested for their potential in the immunotherapy of solid tumors. It is clear that some of these cancer-associated epitopes are immunogenic in humans. Mixed responses may relate to cancer heterogeneity and may indicate the importance of multi-epitopic vaccines. Responses are encouraging, but are they relevant? Prolonged disease stability challenges us to re-think the goals of cancer therapy. Recent advances in the knowledge of the effect of cytokines on tumor antigen expression and the regulation of the immune response, coupled with advances in active specific immunotherapy, provide hope that biomodulation may become an important part of the therapy of solid tumors in the next century.

  19. Recent advances in medical imaging: anatomical and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Grignon, Bruno; Mainard, Laurence; Delion, Matthieu; Hodez, Claude; Oldrini, Guillaume

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to present an overview of the most important recent advances in medical imaging and their potential clinical and anatomical applications. Dramatic changes have been particularly observed in the field of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Computed tomography (CT) has been completely overturned by the successive development of helical acquisition, multidetector and large area-detector acquisition. Visualising brain function has become a new challenge for MRI, which is called functional MRI, currently based principally on blood oxygenation level-dependent sequences, which could be completed or replaced by other techniques such as diffusion MRI (DWI). Based on molecular diffusion due to the thermal energy of free water, DWI offers a spectrum of anatomical and clinical applications, ranging from brain ischemia to visualisation of large fibrous structures of the human body such as the anatomical bundles of white matter with diffusion tensor imaging and tractography. In the field of X-ray projection imaging, a new low-dose device called EOS has been developed through new highly sensitive detectors of X-rays, allowing for acquiring frontal and lateral images simultaneously. Other improvements have been briefly mentioned. Technical principles have been considered in order to understand what is most useful in clinical practice as well as in the field of anatomical applications. Nuclear medicine has not been included.

  20. Evaluating cost benefits of combination therapies for advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ivar S.; Zacherle, Emily; Blanchette, Christopher M.; Zhang, Jie; Yin, Wes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although a number of monoimmunotherapies and targeted therapies are available to treat BRAF+ advanced melanoma, response rates remain relatively low in the range of 22–53% with progression-free survival (PFS) in the range of 4.8–8.8 months. Recently, combination targeted therapies have improved response rates to about 66–69%, PFS to 11.0–12.6 months and overall survival (OS) to 25.1–25.6 months. While combination immunotherapies have improved response rates of 67 compared with 19–29% with monotherapies and improved PFS of 11.7 compared with 4.4–5.8 months with monotherapies, the OS benefit is yet to be established in phase 3 trials. As healthcare costs continue to rise, US payers have a predominant interest in assessing the value of available treatments. Therefore, a cost-benefit model was developed to evaluate the value of treating BRAF+ advanced melanoma with two combination therapies: nivolumab + ipilimumab (N+I) and dabrafenib + trametinib (D+T). Scope: The model was used to estimate total costs, total costs by expenditure category, cost per month of PFS and cost per responder for the payer, and societal perspectives of treating advanced melanoma patients with the BRAF V600 mutation using combination targeted therapy (D+T) or combination immunotherapy (N+I). The model followed patients from initiation of treatment to the point of progression or death. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the robustness of the results and to understand the dispersion of simulated results. Findings: Based on a hypothetical payer with one million covered lives, it was expected that fourteen metastatic melanoma patients with the BRAF V600 mutation would be treated each year. Cost-benefit with N+I and D+T was simulated from the payer perspective. The cost per month of PFS for N+I was $22,162, while that for D+T was $17,716 (−$4,446 cost difference); the cost per responder for N+I was $388,746 and that for D+T was

  1. Machine learning approach to optimizing combined stimulation and medication therapies for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamir, Reuben R.; Dolber, Trygve; Noecker, Angela M.; Walter, Benjamin L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic region is an established therapy for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, patients often require time-intensive postoperative management to balance their coupled stimulation and medication treatments. Given the large and complex parameter space associated with this task, we propose that clinical decision support systems (CDSS) based on machine learning algorithms could assist in treatment optimization. Objective Develop a proof-of-concept implementation of a CDSS that incorporates patient-specific details on both stimulation and medication. Methods Clinical data from 10 patients, and 89 post-DBS surgery visits, were used to create a prototype CDSS. The system was designed to provide three key functions: 1) information retrieval; 2) visualization of treatment, and; 3) recommendation on expected effective stimulation and drug dosages, based on three machine learning methods that included support vector machines, Naïve Bayes, and random forest. Results Measures of medication dosages, time factors, and symptom-specific preoperative response to levodopa were significantly correlated with postoperative outcomes (p<0.05) and their effect on outcomes was of similar magnitude to that of DBS. Using those results, the combined machine learning algorithms were able to accurately predict 86% (12/14) of the motor improvement scores at one year after surgery. Conclusions Using patient-specific details, an appropriately parameterized CDSS could help select theoretically optimal DBS parameter settings and medication dosages that have potential to improve the clinical management of PD patients. PMID:26140956

  2. Effects of Qi therapy (external Qigong) on symptoms of advanced cancer: a single case study.

    PubMed

    Lee, M S; Yang, S H; Lee, K K; Moon, S-R

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Qi therapy (external Qigong) in the management of symptoms of advanced cancer in a man. We used a single case study design to evaluate the effectiveness of Qi therapy (external Qigong) in a 35-year-old man with advanced cancer (Stage IV) involving metastases in the stomach, lung and bone (Karnofsky performance scale: KPS, 40: requires special care and assistance, disabled). Treatment involved six days of pre-assessment, eight treatment sessions on alternate days over 16 days, and a two-week follow-up phase. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess the patient's self-reported symptoms of cancer over the intervention and follow-up periods. Following treatment, VAS scores' analysis revealed beneficial effects on pain, vomiting, dyspnoea, fatigue, anorexia, insomnia, daily activity and psychological calmness. These improvements were maintained over the two-week follow-up phase. After the first Qi therapy session, the patient discontinued medication and could sit by himself; after the fourth session, the patient was able to walk and use the toilet without assistance (improvement in KPS: 70: care for self, unable to perform normal activity or to do active work). Although limited by the single case study approach, our results support previous studies on this topic and provide reasons to conduct controlled clinical trials.

  3. Glucose Addiction in Cancer Therapy: Advances and Drawbacks.

    PubMed

    Granja, Sara; Pinheiro, Céline; Reis, Rui Manuel; Martinho, Olga; Baltazar, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    While normal differentiated cells primarily use mitochondrial respiration to generate the required energy for cellular processes, most cancer cells rely on glycolysis, even in sufficient oxygen conditions. This phenomenon is known as the "Warburg effect" or aerobic glycolysis and the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells towards this altered energy metabolism is currently recognized as one of the "hallmarks of cancer". Aerobic glycolysis underlies the rapid growth of tumor cells, with high rates of glucose consumption and lactic acid production, leading to cellular acidosis. Metabolic reprogramming renders cancer cells dependent on specific metabolic enzymes or pathways that could be exploited in cancer therapy. The development of treatments that target tumor glucose metabolism is receiving renewed attention, with several drugs targeting metabolic pathways currently in clinical trials. The search for suitable targets, however, is limited by the high plasticity of the metabolic network that can induce compensatory routes. Deregulated glucose metabolism is a prominent feature associated with resistance to classical chemotherapy or oncogene-targeted therapies, strengthening the clinical potential of combining these therapies with glycolysis inhibitors. The aim of this review is to compare the advances of different therapeutic strategies targeting the glucose "addiction" of tumor cells, highlighting their potential as effective weapons against cancer. We further discuss recent evidence for the involvement of glucose metabolism as a compensatory response to the use of drugs that target different signaling pathways, where the combination with glycolysis inhibitors could prove extraordinarily useful.

  4. Advances in stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SUN, RONGRONG; LI, XIANCHI; LIU, MIN; ZENG, YI; CHEN, SHUANG; ZHANG, PEYING

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the primary cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, and represents a group of disorders associated with the loss of cardiac function. Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathologic mechanisms of the disease, the majority of the currently available therapies remain at best palliative, since the problem of cardiac tissue loss has not yet been addressed. Indeed, few therapeutic approaches offer direct tissue repair and regeneration, whereas the majority of treatment options aim to limit scar formation and adverse remodeling, while improving myocardial function. Of all the existing therapeutic approaches, the problem of cardiac tissue loss is addressed uniquely by heart transplantation. Nevertheless, alternative options, particularly stem cell therapy, has emerged as a novel and promising approach. This approach involves the transplantation of healthy and functional cells to promote the renewal of damaged cells and repair injured tissue. Bone marrow precursor cells were the first cell type used in clinical studies, and subsequently, preclinical and clinical investigations have been extended to the use of various populations of stem cells. This review addresses the present state of research as regards stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease. PMID:27220939

  5. Advance in Photosensitizers and Light Delivery for Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Il; Li, Jia Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The brief history of photodynamic therapy (PDT) research has been focused on photosensitizers (PSs) and light delivery was introduced recently. The appropriate PSs were developed from the first generation PS Photofrin (QLT) to the second (chlorins or bacteriochlorins derivatives) and third (conjugated PSs on carrier) generations PSs to overcome undesired disadvantages, and to increase selective tumor accumulation and excellent targeting. For the synthesis of new chlorin PSs chlorophyll a is isolated from natural plants or algae, and converted to methyl pheophorbide a (MPa) as an important starting material for further synthesis. MPa has various active functional groups easily modified for the preparation of different kinds of PSs, such as methyl pyropheophorbide a, purpurin-18, purpurinimide, and chlorin e6 derivatives. Combination therapy, such as chemotherapy and photothermal therapy with PDT, is shortly described here. Advanced light delivery system is shown to establish successful clinical applications of PDT. Phtodynamic efficiency of the PSs with light delivery was investigated in vitro and/or in vivo. PMID:23423543

  6. Challenges to Integrating Pharmacogenetic Testing into Medication Therapy Management

    PubMed Central

    Allen LaPointe, Nancy M.; Moaddeb, Jivan

    2015-01-01

    Background Some have proposed the integration of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing into medication therapy management (MTM) to enable further refinement of treatment(s) to reduce risk of adverse responses and improve efficacy. PGx testing involves the analysis of genetic variants associated with therapeutic or adverse response and may be useful in enhancing the ability to identify ineffective and/or harmful drugs or drug combinations. This “enhanced” MTM might also reduce patient concerns about side effects and increase confidence that the medication is effective, addressing two key factors that impact patient adherence - concern and necessity. However, the feasibility and effectiveness of the integration of PGx testing into MTM in clinical practice has not yet been determined. Objectives In this paper, we consider some of the challenges to the integration and delivery of PGx testing in MTM services. What is already known about this subject While the addition of pharmacogenetic testing has been suggested, little literature exists exploring the challenges or feasibility of doing so. PMID:25803768

  7. Anonymization of DICOM electronic medical records for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne; Jones, Timothy; Swerdloff, Stuart; Newhauser, Warren; Cilia, Mark; Carver, Robert; Halloran, Andy; Zhang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) and treatment plans are used in research on patient outcomes and radiation effects. In many situations researchers must remove protected health information (PHI) from EMRs. The literature contains several studies describing the anonymization of generic Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) files and DICOM image sets but no publications were found that discuss the anonymization of DICOM radiation therapy plans, a key component of an EMR in a cancer clinic. In addition to this we were unable to find a commercial software tool that met the minimum requirements for anonymization and preservation of data integrity for radiation therapy research. The purpose of this study was to develop a prototype software code to meet the requirements for the anonymization of radiation therapy treatment plans and to develop a way to validate that code and demonstrate that it properly anonymized treatment plans and preserved data integrity. We extended an open-source code to process all relevant PHI and to allow for the automatic anonymization of multiple EMRs. The prototype code successfully anonymized multiple treatment plans in less than 1min/patient. We also tested commercial optical character recognition (OCR) algorithms for the detection of burned-in text on the images, but they were unable to reliably recognize text. In addition, we developed and tested an image filtering algorithm that allowed us to isolate and redact alpha-numeric text from a test radiograph. Validation tests verified that PHI was anonymized and data integrity, such as the relationship between DICOM unique identifiers (UID) was preserved.

  8. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  10. Clinical Effectiveness of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Versus Medical Therapy Alone Among Patients With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Khazanie, Prateeti; Hammill, Bradley G.; Qualls, Laura G.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Hammill, Stephen C.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Peterson, Pamela N.; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2014-01-01

    Background— Cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) reduces morbidity and mortality among selected patients with heart failure in clinical trials. The effectiveness of this therapy in clinical practice has not been well studied. Methods and Results— We compared a cohort of 4471 patients from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry’s Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Registry hospitalized primarily for heart failure and who received CRT-D between April 1, 2006, and December 31, 2009, to a historical control cohort of 4888 patients with heart failure without CRT-D from the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry (ADHERE) hospitalized between January 1, 2002, and March 31, 2006. Both registries were linked with Medicare claims to evaluate longitudinal outcomes. We included patients from the ICD Registry with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35% and QRS duration ≥120 ms who were admitted for heart failure. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare outcomes with and without CRT-D after adjustment for important covariates. After multivariable adjustment, CRT-D was associated with lower 3-year risks of death (hazard ratio, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.48–0.56; P<0.001), all-cause readmission (hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.65–0.73; P<0.001), and cardiovascular readmission (hazard ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.56–0.64; P<0.001). The association of CRT-D with mortality did not vary significantly among subgroups defined by age, sex, race, QRS duration, and optimal medical therapy. Conclusions— CRT-D was associated with lower risks of mortality, all-cause readmission, and cardiovascular readmission than medical therapy alone among patients with heart failure in community practice. PMID:25227768

  11. Case Study: Successful Medication Withdrawal Using Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for a Preadolescent with OCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallinen, Bethany J.; Nangle, Douglas W.; O'Grady, April C.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the addition of manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy to a medication regimen of clomipramine and fluoxetine and the withdrawal of medication during cognitive-behavioral therapy. The participant was an 11-year-old girl with symptoms of obsessive thoughts about germs and illness and…

  12. Work Unit Determination for Staffing Requirements in Occupational Therapy within Army Medical Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    As an indicator of manpower productivity in Occupational Therapy clinics at Army MTFs, the clinic visit has been used. However, in recent years...medical records, chart audits, peer review, and the need for additional records and reports have all impacted on the occupational therapist’s time. Thus...Medical Treatment Facility); Manpower utilization; Health care, Occupational therapy clinic manpower staffing.

  13. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and...; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. A class 104 license will be issued, to an..., manufacture, produce, transfer, acquire, possess, or use. (a) A utilization facility for use in...

  14. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and...; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. A class 104 license will be issued, to an..., manufacture, produce, transfer, acquire, possess, or use. (a) A utilization facility for use in...

  15. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and...; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. A class 104 license will be issued, to an..., manufacture, produce, transfer, acquire, possess, or use. (a) A utilization facility for use in...

  16. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and...; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. A class 104 license will be issued, to an..., manufacture, produce, transfer, acquire, possess, or use. (a) A utilization facility for use in...

  17. 10 CFR 50.21 - Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and development facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Class 104 licenses; for medical therapy and research and...; for medical therapy and research and development facilities. A class 104 license will be issued, to an..., manufacture, produce, transfer, acquire, possess, or use. (a) A utilization facility for use in...

  18. Advancing the cellular and molecular therapy for intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Daisuke; Grad, Sibylle

    2015-04-01

    The healthy intervertebral disc (IVD) fulfils the essential function of load absorption, while maintaining multi-axial flexibility of the spine. The interrelated tissues of the IVD, the annulus fibrosus, the nucleus pulposus, and the cartilaginous endplate, are characterised by their specific niche, implying avascularity, hypoxia, acidic environment, low nutrition, and low cellularity. Anabolic and catabolic factors balance a slow physiological turnover of extracellular matrix synthesis and breakdown. Deviations in mechanical load, nutrient supply, cellular activity, matrix composition and metabolism may initiate a cascade ultimately leading to tissue dehydration, fibrosis, nerve and vessel ingrowth, disc height loss and disc herniation. Spinal instability, inflammation and neural sensitisation are sources of back pain, a worldwide leading burden that is challenging to cure. In this review, advances in cell and molecular therapy, including mobilisation and activation of endogenous progenitor cells, progenitor cell homing, and targeted delivery of cells, genes, or bioactive factors are discussed.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis therapy: advances from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-In; Brahn, Ernest

    2010-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with significant functional disability and morbidity. Treatment with conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs has substantial limitations including partial efficacy and poor tolerability. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of RA over the past decade have fostered development of targeted therapies and greatly expanded the available treatment options. Several of the therapeutic targets identified by recent studies have been translated into effective therapeutic agents, and many additional agents are currently under active development. In this article, we review the biologic agents that have made successful transitions from bench to bedside as well as the biologic and small molecule agents that are at various stages of development in human trials.

  20. [Anticoagulant therapy clinic: moving towards Advanced Nursing Practice].

    PubMed

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Parrado Borrego, Gema; Rodríguez González, José; Caparrós Miranda, Isabel S; Vargas Lirio, M Isabel; Ortiz Fernández, Primitiva

    2014-01-01

    There is currently around one million people receiving oral anticoagulants in Spain. The drug most used is acenocoumarol, which requires coagulation monitoring to ensure that the patient is within its normal therapeutic range. Patients usually start this treatment in a hospital clinic and, when they are stabilised, they are referred to primary care, where they are followed-up by their community nurses. The usual practice is that nurses are responsible for changes in the dose when the patients are outside the range. This practice is not performed by hospital nurses, despite having sufficient experience and knowledge to adequately manage these types of patients. An Advanced Nursing Practice model has been introduced into the Haematology management unit of the Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga. This involves various aspects of attention and care of patients on anticoagulant therapy, and includes adjusting the doses of their treatment following a catalogue of therapeutic and diagnostic ranges.

  1. Advances in behavioral-cognitive therapy of social phobia.

    PubMed

    Marks, I M

    1995-01-01

    Behavioral-cognitive therapy is a cost-effective treatment for social phobia. The doctor's role is to teach the patient how to do successful self-exposure. The clinician acts as a guide and monitor; there is no need to waste time accompanying the patient into the phobic situation. The patient first reads a self-exposure manual to learn how to confront panic-evoking social cues for prolonged period without avoidance until habituation sets in. This might require an hour daily of self-exposure over weeks or months. As patients habituate to social cues to which they have exposed themselves, they arrange exposure to fresh cues until they become used to all. The patient tracks progress by recording completed exposure-homework tasks in a daily diary. In instances where it is technically difficult to do regular exposure, the patient carries out imagined tape-recorded exposure in his/her own voice. The therapist can briefly help the patient role-play such exposure. Rational role-play enhances outcome of body dysmorphic disorder or delusional disorder somatic type with prominent social phobia. Cognitive therapy can be useful. Most social phobics improve with behavioral-cognitive treatment without medication. When patients have low mood, concurrent antidepressants can be synergistic.

  2. Non-CPAP therapies in obstructive sleep apnoea: mandibular advancement device therapy.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Marie; Verbraecken, Johan; Randerath, Winfried

    2012-05-01

    Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) represent the main non-continuous positive airway pressure (non-CPAP) therapy for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The aim of the European Respiratory Society Task Force was to review the evidence in favour of MAD therapy. Effects of tongue-retaining devices are not included in this report. Custom-made MADs reduce apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) and daytime sleepiness compared with placebo devices. CPAP more effectively diminishes AHI, while increasing data suggest fairly similar outcomes in relation to symptoms and cardiovascular health from these treatments. Patients often prefer MADs to CPAP. Milder cases and patients with a proven increase in upper airway size as a result of mandibular advancement are most likely to experience treatment success with MADs. A custom-made device titrated from an initial 50% of maximum mandibular advancement has been recommended. More research is needed to define the patients who will benefit from MAD treatment compared with CPAP, in terms of the effects on sleep-disordered breathing and on other diseases related to OSA. In conclusion, MADs are recommended for patients with mild to moderate OSA (Recommendation Level A) and for those who do not tolerate CPAP. The treatment must be followed up and the device adjusted or exchanged in relation to the outcome.

  3. Contributions of medical family therapy to the changing health care system.

    PubMed

    Doherty, William J; McDaniel, Susan H; Hepworth, Jeri

    2014-09-01

    Medical family therapy is a form of professional practice that uses a biopsychosocial approach and systemic family therapy principles in the collaborative treatment of individuals and families dealing with medical problems. It emerged out of the experience of family therapists working in primary medical care settings in the 1980s and 1990s. This article describes how contemporary medical family therapy can contribute to a transformed health care system in four areas: the patient experience of health care, the health of the population, the containment of health care costs, and enhanced practice environments.

  4. Medication reconciliation and therapy management in dialysis-dependent patients: need for a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Pai, Amy Barton; Cardone, Katie E; Manley, Harold J; St Peter, Wendy L; Shaffer, Rachel; Somers, Michael; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2013-11-01

    Patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis have highly complex medication regimens and disproportionately higher total cost of care compared with the general Medicare population. As shown by several studies, dialysis-dependent patients are at especially high risk for medication-related problems. Providing medication reconciliation and therapy management services is critically important to avoid costs associated with medication-related problems, such as adverse drug events and hospitalizations in the ESRD population. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 included an unfunded mandate stipulating that medication therapy management be offered to high-risk patients enrolled in Medicare Part D. Medication management services are distinct from the dispensing of medications and involve a complete medication review for all disease states. The dialysis facility is a logical coordination center for medication management services, like medication therapy management, and it is likely the first health care facility that a patient will present to after a care transition. A dedicated and adequately trained clinician, such as a pharmacist, is needed to provide consistent, high-quality medication management services. Medication reconciliation and medication management services that could consistently and systematically identify and resolve medication-related problems would be likely to improve ESRD patient outcomes and reduce total cost of care. Herein, this work provides a review of available evidence and recommendations for optimal delivery of medication management services to ESRD patients in a dialysis facility-centered model.

  5. Clinical Advancements in the Targeted Therapies against Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nagórniewicz, Beata; Prakash, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis, characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins leading to liver dysfunction, is a growing cause of mortality worldwide. Hepatocellular damage owing to liver injury leads to the release of profibrotic factors from infiltrating inflammatory cells that results in the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Upon activation, HSCs undergo characteristic morphological and functional changes and are transformed into proliferative and contractile ECM-producing myofibroblasts. Over recent years, a number of therapeutic strategies have been developed to inhibit hepatocyte apoptosis, inflammatory responses, and HSCs proliferation and activation. Preclinical studies have yielded numerous targets for the development of antifibrotic therapies, some of which have entered clinical trials and showed improved therapeutic efficacy and desirable safety profiles. Furthermore, advancements have been made in the development of noninvasive markers and techniques for the accurate disease assessment and therapy responses. Here, we focus on the clinical developments attained in the field of targeted antifibrotics for the treatment of liver fibrosis, for example, small molecule drugs, antibodies, and targeted drug conjugate. We further briefly highlight different noninvasive diagnostic technologies and will provide an overview about different therapeutic targets, clinical trials, endpoints, and translational efforts that have been made to halt or reverse the progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:27999454

  6. Liquid biopsy: ready to guide therapy in advanced prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Miriam; Stenzl, Arnulf; Bedke, Jens; Chi, Kim N; Black, Peter C; Todenhöfer, Tilman

    2016-12-01

    The identification of molecular markers associated with response to specific therapy is a key step for the implementation of personalised treatment strategies in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Only in a low proportion of patients biopsies of metastatic tissue are performed. Circulating tumour cells (CTC), cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and RNA offer the potential for non-invasive characterisation of disease and molecular stratification of patients. Furthermore, a 'liquid biopsy' approach permits longitudinal assessments, allowing sequential monitoring of response and progression and the potential to alter therapy based on observed molecular changes. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration using the CellSearch© platform correlates with survival. Recent studies on the presence of androgen receptor (AR) variants in CTC have shown that such molecular characterisation of CTC provides a potential for identifying patients with resistance to agents that inhibit the androgen signalling axis, such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. New developments in CTC isolation, as well as in vitro and in vivo analysis of CTC will further promote the use of CTC as a tool for retrieving molecular information from advanced tumours in order to identify mechanisms of therapy resistance. In addition to CTC, nucleic acids such as RNA and cfDNA released by tumour cells into the peripheral blood contain important information on transcriptomic and genomic alterations in the tumours. Initial studies have shown that genomic alterations of the AR and other genes detected in CTC or cfDNA of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer correlate with treatment outcomes to enzalutamide and abiraterone. Due to recent developments in high-throughput analysis techniques, it is likely that CTC, cfDNA and RNA will be an important component of personalised treatment strategies in the future.

  7. Opportunities for Regenerative Rehabilitation and Advanced Technologies in Physical Therapy: Perspective From Academia.

    PubMed

    Norland, Ryan; Muchnick, Matthew; Harmon, Zachary; Chin, Tiffany; Kakar, Rumit Singh

    2016-04-01

    As rehabilitation specialists, physical therapists must continue to stay current with advances in technologies to provide appropriate rehabilitation protocols, improve patient outcomes, and be the preferred clinician of choice. To accomplish this vision, the physical therapy profession must begin to develop a culture of lifelong learning at the early stages of education and clinical training in order to embrace cutting-edge advancements such as stem cell therapies, tissue engineering, and robotics, to name a few. The purposes of this article are: (1) to provide a current perspective on faculty and graduate student awareness of regenerative rehabilitation concepts and (2) to advocate for increased integration of these emerging technologies within the doctor of physical therapy (DPT) curriculum. An online survey was designed to gauge awareness of principles in regenerative rehabilitation and to determine whether the topic was included and assessed in doctoral curricula. The survey yielded 1,006 responses from 82 DPT programs nationwide and indicated a disconnect in familiarity with the term "regenerative rehabilitation" and awareness of the inclusion of this material in the curriculum. To resolve this disconnect, the framework of the curriculum can be used to integrate new material via guest lecturers, interdisciplinary partnerships, and research opportunities. Successfully mentoring a generation of clinicians and rehabilitation scientists who incorporate new medical knowledge and technology into their own clinical and research practice depends greatly on sharing the responsibility among graduate students, professors, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), and DPT programs. Creating an interdisciplinary culture and integrating regenerative medicine and rehabilitation concepts into the curriculum will cultivate individuals who will be advocates for interprofessional behaviors and will ensure that the profession meets the goals stated in APTA Vision 2020.

  8. Medication therapy management: why it no longer should be considered optional.

    PubMed

    Molokwu, Ogochukwu Chidozie; Nkansah, Nancy Twum

    2009-08-01

    Medications are the primary therapeutic intervention in many health care settings. As prescription drug use continues to grow, and medication therapies become more complex, our health care systems have become more prone to medication errors and adverse drug events. Medication Therapy Management services provided by pharmacists have been shown to help reduce medication errors, adverse drug events, and costs. Such services need to be integrated into the health care system and not be regarded as optional. This article is intended to provide pharmacists, pharmacy leaders, and health care policymakers the information needed to broach this topic at the health care policy level.

  9. Optimal management for alcoholic liver disease: Conventional medications, natural therapy or combination?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Sun; Ong, Madeleine; Qu, Xianqin

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is the principal factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is defined by histological lesions on the liver that can range from simple hepatic steatosis to more advanced stages such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure. As one of the oldest forms of liver injury known to humans, ALD is still a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality and the burden is exerting on medical systems with hospitalization and management costs rising constantly worldwide. Although the biological mechanisms, including increasing of acetaldehyde, oxidative stress with induction of cytochrome p450 2E1, inflammatory cytokine release, abnormal lipid metabolism and induction of hepatocyte apoptosis, by which chronic alcohol consumption triggers serious complex progression of ALD is well established, there is no universally accepted therapy to prevent or reverse. In this article, we have briefly reviewed the pathogenesis of ALD and the molecular targets for development of novel therapies. This review is focused on current therapeutic strategies for ALD, including lifestyle modification with nutrition supplements, available pharmacological drugs and new agents that are under development, liver transplantation, application of complementary medicines, and their combination. The relevant molecular mechanisms of each conventional medication and natural agent have been reviewed according to current available knowledge in the literature. We also summarized efficacy vs safety on conventional and herbal medicines which are specifically used for the prevention and treatment of ALD. Through a system review, this article highlighted that the combination of pharmaceutical drugs with naturally occurring agents may offer an optimal management for ALD and its complications. It is worthwhile to conduct large-scale, multiple centre clinical trials to further prove the safety and benefits for

  10. Combined androgen deprivation therapy and radiation therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: a randomised, phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Warde, Padraig; Mason, Malcolm; Ding, Keyue; Kirkbride, Peter; Brundage, Michael; Cowan, Richard; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Sanders, Karen; Kostashuk, Edmund; Swanson, Greg; Barber, Jim; Hiltz, Andrea; Parmar, Mahesh KB; Sathya, Jinka; Anderson, John; Hayter, Charles; Hetherington, John; Sydes, Matthew R; Parulekar, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Whether the addition of radiation therapy (RT) improves overall survival in men with locally advanced prostate cancer managed with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is unclear. Our aim was to compare outcomes in such patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods Patients with: locally advanced (T3 or T4) prostate cancer (n=1057); or organ-confined disease (T2) with either a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration more than 40 ng/mL (n=119) or PSA concentration more than 20 ng/mL and a Gleason score of 8 or higher (n=25), were randomly assigned (done centrally with stratification and dynamic minimisation, not masked) to receive lifelong ADT and RT (65–69 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles, 45 Gy to the pelvic nodes). The primary endpoint was overall survival. The results presented here are of an interim analysis planned for when two-thirds of the events for the final analysis were recorded. All efficacy analyses were done by intention to treat and were based on data from all patients. This trial is registered at controlledtrials.com as ISRCTN24991896 and Clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00002633. Results Between 1995 and 2005, 1205 patients were randomly assigned (602 in the ADT only group and 603 in the ADT and RT group); median follow-up was 6·0 years (IQR 4·4–8·0). At the time of analysis, a total of 320 patients had died, 175 in the ADT only group and 145 in the ADT and RT group. The addition of RT to ADT improved overall survival at 7 years (74%, 95% CI 70–78 vs 66%, 60–70; hazard ratio [HR] 0·77, 95% CI 0·61–0·98, p=0·033). Both toxicity and health-related quality-of-life results showed a small effect of RT on late gastrointestinal toxicity (rectal bleeding grade >3, three patients (0·5%) in the ADT only group, two (0·3%) in the ADT and RT group; diarrhoea grade >3, four patients (0·7%) vs eight (1·3%); urinary toxicity grade >3, 14 patients (2·3%) in both groups). Interpretation The benefits of combined

  11. 75 FR 48356 - Advancing the Development of Medical Products Used In the Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advancing the Development of Medical Products Used In the... ``Advancing the Development of Medical Products Used in the Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Neglected... the development of medical products (drugs, biological products, and medical devices) used in...

  12. Recent advances in the rational design of silica-based nanoparticles for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niut, Yuting; Popatt, Amirali; Yu, Meihua; Karmakar, Surajit; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-10-01

    Gene therapy has attracted much attention in modern society and provides a promising approach for treating genetic disorders, diseases and cancers. Safe and effective vectors are vital tools to deliver genetic molecules to cells. This review summarizes recent advances in the rational design of silica-based nanoparticles and their applications in gene therapy. An overview of different types of genetic agents available for gene therapy is provided. The engineering of various silica nanoparticles is described, which can be used as versatile complexation tools for genetic agents and advanced gene therapy. Several challenges are raised and future research directions in the area of gene therapy using silica-based nanoparticles are proposed.

  13. Advanced biomatrix designs for regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Park, C H; Perez, R A; Lee, H Y; Jang, J H; Lee, H H; Wall, I B; Shi, S; Kim, H W

    2014-12-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that causes loss of the tooth-supporting apparatus, including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. A broad range of treatment options is currently available to restore the structure and function of the periodontal tissues. A regenerative approach, among others, is now considered the most promising paradigm for this purpose, harnessing the unique properties of stem cells. How to make full use of the body's innate regenerative capacity is thus a key issue. While stem cells and bioactive factors are essential components in the regenerative processes, matrices play pivotal roles in recapitulating stem cell functions and potentiating therapeutic actions of bioactive molecules. Moreover, the positions of appropriate bioactive matrices relative to the injury site may stimulate the innate regenerative stem cell populations, removing the need to deliver cells that have been manipulated outside of the body. In this topical review, we update views on advanced designs of biomatrices-including mimicking of the native extracellular matrix, providing mechanical stimulation, activating cell-driven matrices, and delivering bioactive factors in a controllable manner-which are ultimately useful for the regenerative therapy of periodontal tissues.

  14. Low cost biological lung volume reduction therapy for advanced emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Bakeer, Mostafa; Abdelgawad, Taha Taha; El-Metwaly, Raed; El-Morsi, Ahmed; El-Badrawy, Mohammad Khairy; El-Sharawy, Solafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR), using biological agents, is one of the new alternatives to lung volume reduction surgery. Objectives To evaluate efficacy and safety of biological BLVR using low cost agents including autologous blood and fibrin glue. Methods Enrolled patients were divided into two groups: group A (seven patients) in which autologous blood was used and group B (eight patients) in which fibrin glue was used. The agents were injected through a triple lumen balloon catheter via fiberoptic bronchoscope. Changes in high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) volumetry, pulmonary function tests, symptoms, and exercise capacity were evaluated at 12 weeks postprocedure as well as for complications. Results In group A, at 12 weeks postprocedure, there was significant improvement in the mean value of HRCT volumetry and residual volume/total lung capacity (% predicted) (P-value: <0.001 and 0.038, respectively). In group B, there was significant improvement in the mean value of HRCT volumetry and (residual volume/total lung capacity % predicted) (P-value: 0.005 and 0.004, respectively). All patients tolerated the procedure with no mortality. Conclusion BLVR using autologous blood and locally prepared fibrin glue is a promising method for therapy of advanced emphysema in term of efficacy, safety as well as cost effectiveness. PMID:27536091

  15. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  16. Advanced Medical Technology Capacity Building and the Medical Mentoring Event: A Unique Application of SOF Counterinsurgency Medical Engagement Strategies.

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Dan; Tate, Charmaine; Wey, Pierre-Francois; Batjom, Emmanuel; Nicholas, Thomas A; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    Background The Medical Civic Assistance Program (MEDCAP) is a military commander?s tool developed during the Vietnam War to gain access to and positively influence an indigenous population through the provision of direct medical care provided by military medical personnel, particularly in Counter Insurgency Operations (COIN). An alternative to MEDCAPs is the medical seminar (MEDSEM). The MEDSEM uses a Commander?s military medical assets to share culturally appropriate medical information with a defined indigenous population in order to create a sustainable training resource for the local population?s health system. At the heart of the MEDSEM is the ?train the trainer? concept whereby medical information is passed to indigenous trainers who then pass that information to an indigenous population. The MEDSEM achieves the Commander?s objectives of increasing access and influence with the population through a medical training venue rather than direct patient care. Previous MEDSEMS conducted in Afghanistan by military forces focused on improvement of rural healthcare through creation of Village Health Care Workers. This model can also be used to engage host nation (HN) medical personnel and improve medical treatment capabilities in population centers. The authors describe a modification of the MEDSEM, a Medical Mentorship (MM), conducted in November 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan, at the Afghan National Army (ANA) National Medical Hospital. This training was designed to improve intubation skills in Afghan National Army Hospitals by ANA medical providers, leave residual training capability, and build relationships within the institution that not only assist the institution, but can also be leveraged to foster Commanders? objectives, such as health and reconstruction initiatives and medical partnering for indigenous corps and medical forces described below. Methods We, the authors, developed a culturally appropriate endotracheal intubation training package including a Dari and

  17. [Application of advanced engineering technologies to medical and rehabilitation fields].

    PubMed

    Fujie, Masakatsu

    2012-07-01

    The words "Japan syndrome" can now be heard increasingly through the media. Facing the approach of an elderly-dominated society, Robot Technology(RT)is expected to play an important role in Japan's medical, rehabilitation, and daily support fields. The industrial robot, which has already spread through the world with a great success in certain isolated environments by doing the work which is specialized for the thing with the hard known characteristic. By comparison, in the medical and rehabilitation fields, environments always change intricately, and individual characteristics differ from person to person. Furthermore, there are many times when a robot will be asked to directly interact with people. Moreover, the relation between a robot and a person turns into a relation which should involve contact flexibly according to a situation, and also turns into a relation which should avoid contact. In our group, we have so far developed practical rehabilitation and medical robots which can respond to difficulties such as environmental change and individual specificity. In developing rehabilitation robots, it is especially important to consider intuitive operability and individual differences. In addition, in developing medical robots, it is important to replace the experimental knowledge of surgeons to the mechanical quantitative properties. In this article, we introduce some practical examples of rehabilitation and medical robots interweaving several detailed technologies we have so far developed.

  18. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of an Advance Organizer in a Medical Microbiology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slock, James A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    An advance organizer is a set of conceptual statements about the unifying ideas of a topic in terms already familiar to the learner. A study is reported that sought to determine whether two presentations of an advance organizer for a unit on pathogenic bacteria would result in increasing medical students' knowledge and ability to solve problems in…

  19. Insight into team competence in medical, nursing and respiratory therapy students.

    PubMed

    Sigalet, Elaine L; Donnon, Tyrone L; Grant, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information for educators about levels of competence in teams comprised of medical, nursing and respiratory therapy students after receiving a simulation-based team-training (SBT) curriculum with and without an additional formalized 30-min team-training (TT) module. A two-group pre- and post-test research design was used to evaluate team competence with respect to leadership, roles and responsibilities, communication, situation awareness and resource utilization. All scenarios were digitally recorded and evaluated using the KidSIM Team Performance Scale by six experts from medicine, nursing and respiratory therapy. The lowest scores occurred for items that reflected situation awareness. All teams improved their aggregate scores from Time 1 to Time 2 (p < 0.05). Student teams in the intervention group achieved significantly higher performance scores at Time 1 (Cohen's d = 0.92, p < 0.001) and Time 2 (d = 0.61, p < 0.01). All student teams demonstrated significant improvement in their ability to work more effectively by Time 2. The results suggest that situational awareness is an advanced expectation for the undergraduate student team. The provision of a formalized TT module prior to engaging student teams in a simulation-based TT curriculum led to significantly higher performances at Time 1 and 2.

  20. 20 CFR 220.179 - Exceptions to medical improvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the review process, the annuitant will be asked about any medical or vocational therapy that he or... evidence shows that the annuitant is the beneficiary of advances in medical or vocational therapy or technology (related to his or her ability to work). Advances in medical or vocational therapy or...

  1. 20 CFR 220.179 - Exceptions to medical improvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of the review process, the annuitant will be asked about any medical or vocational therapy that he or... evidence shows that the annuitant is the beneficiary of advances in medical or vocational therapy or technology (related to his or her ability to work). Advances in medical or vocational therapy or...

  2. 20 CFR 220.179 - Exceptions to medical improvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of the review process, the annuitant will be asked about any medical or vocational therapy that he or... evidence shows that the annuitant is the beneficiary of advances in medical or vocational therapy or technology (related to his or her ability to work). Advances in medical or vocational therapy or...

  3. The potential harm of oxygen therapy in medical emergencies.

    PubMed

    Cornet, Alexander D; Kooter, Albertus J; Peters, Mike J L; Smulders, Yvo M

    2013-04-18

    In medical emergencies, supplemental oxygen is often administrated routinely. Most paramedics and physicians believe that high concentrations of oxygen are life-saving 1. Over the last century, however, a plethora of studies point to possible detrimental effects of hyperoxia induced by supplemental oxygen in a variety of medical emergencies. This viewpoint provides a historical overview and questions the safety of routine high-dose oxygen administration and is based on pathophysiology and (pre)clinical findings in various medical emergencies.

  4. The expanding role of the clinical haematologist in the new world of advanced therapy medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Lowdell, Mark W; Thomas, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) represent the current pinnacle of 'patient-specific medicines' and will change the nature of medicine in the near future. They fall into three categories; somatic cell-therapy products, gene therapy products and cells or tissues for regenerative medicine, which are termed 'tissue engineered' products. The term also incorporates 'combination products' where a human cell or tissue is combined with a medical device. Plainly, many of these new medicines share similarities with conventional haematological stem cell transplant products and donor lymphocyte infusions as well as solid organ grafts and yet ATMPs are regulated as medicines and their development has remained predominantly in academic settings and within specialist centres. However, with the advent of commercialisation of dendritic cell vaccines, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells and genetically modified autologous haematopoietic stem cells to cure single gene-defects in β-thalassaemia and haemophilia, the widespread availability of these therapies needs to be accommodated. Uniquely to ATMPs, the patient or an allogeneic donor is regularly part of the manufacturing process. All of the examples given above require procurement of blood, bone marrow or an apheresate from a patient as a starting material for manufacture. This can only occur in a clinical facility licensed for the procurement of human cells for therapeutic use and this is likely to fall to haematology departments, either as stem cell transplant programmes or as blood transfusion departments, to provide under a contract with the company that will manufacture and supply the final medicine. The resource implications associated with this can impact on all haematology departments, not just stem cell transplant units, and should not be under-estimated.

  5. Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

  6. Treatment algorithm in 2014 for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: therapy selection by tumour histology and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Manegold, Christian

    2014-09-01

    The availability of antineoplastic monoclonal antibodies, small molecules and newer cytotoxics such as pemetrexed, the EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib, gefitinib, afatinib as well as the anti-angiogenic bevacizumab and the ALK-inhibitor crizotinib has recently changes the treatment algorithm of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Decision making in 2014 is characterized by customizing therapy, by selecting a specific therapeutic regimen based on the histotype and the genotype of the tumour. This refers to first-line induction therapy and maintenance therapy as well, but also to subsequent lines of therapy since anti-neoplastic drugs and regimens used upfront clinically influence the selection of agents/regimes considered for second-/third-line treatment. Consequently, therapy customization through tumour histology and molecular markers has significantly influenced the work of pathologists around the globe and the process of obtaining an extended therapeutically relevant tumour diagnosis. Not only histological sub-typing became standard but molecular information is also considered of increasing importance for treatment selection. Routine molecular testing in certified laboratories must be established, and the diagnostic process should ideally be performed under the guidance of evidence based recommendation. The process of investigating and implementing medical targeting in lung cancer therefore, requires advanced diagnostic techniques and expertise and because of its large dimension is costly and influenced by the limitation of financial and clinical resources.

  7. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  8. Advance medical directives: a proposed new approach and terminology from an Islamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Al-Jahdali, Hamdan; Baharoon, Salim; Al Sayyari, Abdullah; Al-Ahmad, Ghiath

    2013-05-01

    Advance directives are specific competent consumers' wishes about future medical plans in the event that they become incompetent. Awareness of a patient's autonomy particularly, in relation to their right to refuse or withdraw treatment, a right for the patient to die from natural causes and interest in end of life issues were among the main reasons for developing and legalizing advance medical directives in developed countries. However, in many circumstances cultural and religious aspects are among many factors that can hamper implementation of advance directives. Islam and Muslims in general have a good understanding of death and dying. Islam allows the withholding or withdrawal of treatments in some cases where the intervention is considered futile. However, there is lack of literature and debate about such issues from an Islamic point of view. This article provides the Islamic perspective with regards to advance medical directive with the hope that it will generate more thoughts and evoke further discussion on this important topic.

  9. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for HIV Medication Adherence and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safren, Steven A.; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Pickard, Robert; Otto, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    For patients with HIV, depression is a common, distressing condition that can interfere with a critical self-care behavior--adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The present study describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment designed to integrate cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression with our previously tested approach to improving adherence to…

  10. The Role of Behavior Therapy in Teaching Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agras, W. Stewart

    1971-01-01

    The relationship between three behavior therapies and the experimental behavioral sciences is examined. It is concluded that behavior therapy is one of the few media within which the relevance of the experimental behavioral sciences to clinical medicine can be demonstrated. (Author)

  11. Therapy 101: A Psychotherapy Curriculum for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboul-Fotouh, Frieda; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This pilot project, designed and taught by a resident, created a curriculum to introduce medical students to the practice of psychotherapy. Medical students who are knowledgeable about psychotherapy can become physicians who are able to refer patients to psychotherapeutic treatments. A search of the literature did not identify a…

  12. [Research advances on medical genetics in China in 2015].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanfeng; Han, Yubo; Cao, Pengbo; Meng, Jinfeng; Li, Haibei; Qin, Geng; Zhang, Feng; Jin, Guangfu; Yang, Yong; Wu, Lingqian; Ping, Jie; Zhou, Gangqiao

    2016-05-01

    Steady progress has been achieved in the medical genetics in China in 2015, as numerous original researches were published in the world's leading journals. Chinese scientists have made significant contributions to various fields of medical genetics, such as pathogenicity of rare diseases, predisposition of common diseases, somatic mutations of cancer, new technologies and methods, disease-related microRNAs (miRNAs), disease-related long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), disease-related competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs), disease-related RNA splicing and molecular evolution. In these fields, Chinese scientists have gradually formed the tendency, from common variants to rare variants, from single omic analyses to multipleomics integration analyses, from genetic discovery to functional confirmation, from basic research to clinical application. Meanwhile, the findings of Chinese scientists have been drawn great attentions of international peers. This review aims to provide an overall picture of the front in Chinese medical genetics, and highlights the important findings and their research strategy.

  13. Patterns of Complementary and Alternative Medical Therapy Use in Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Helen H. L.; Smith, Ronald G.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy use in children with chronic illnesses is higher than in children in the general population. In this study, we investigated patterns of CAM therapy use in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD, n = 50) as compared to a control population of children…

  14. Computational cardiology: how computer simulations could be used to develop new therapies and advance existing ones

    PubMed Central

    Trayanova, Natalia A.; O'Hara, Thomas; Bayer, Jason D.; Boyle, Patrick M.; McDowell, Kathleen S.; Constantino, Jason; Arevalo, Hermenegild J.; Hu, Yuxuan; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the latest developments in computational cardiology. It focuses on the contribution of cardiac modelling to the development of new therapies as well as the advancement of existing ones for cardiac arrhythmias and pump dysfunction. Reviewed are cardiac modelling efforts aimed at advancing and optimizing existent therapies for cardiac disease (defibrillation, ablation of ventricular tachycardia, and cardiac resynchronization therapy) and at suggesting novel treatments, including novel molecular targets, as well as efforts to use cardiac models in stratification of patients likely to benefit from a given therapy, and the use of models in diagnostic procedures. PMID:23104919

  15. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.

    1999-07-06

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy is disclosed. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention. 5 figs.

  16. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Nigg, David W.; Wemple, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

  17. Survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the pretargeted versus targeted therapy eras.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengxiang; Wong, Yu-Ning; Armstrong, Katrina; Haas, Naomi; Subedi, Prasun; Davis-Cerone, Margaret; Doshi, Jalpa A

    2016-02-01

    Between December 2005 and October 2009, FDA approved six targeted therapies shown to significantly extend survival for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in clinical trials. This study aimed to examine changes in survival between the pretargeted and targeted therapy periods in advanced RCC patients in a real-world setting. Utilizing the 2000-2010 SEER Research files, a pre-post study design with a contemporaneous comparison group was employed to examine differences in survival outcomes for patients diagnosed with advanced RCC (study group) or advanced prostate cancer (comparison group, for whom no significant treatment innovations happened during this period) across the pretargeted therapy era (2000-2005) and the targeted therapy era (2006-2010). RCC patients diagnosed in the targeted therapy era (N = 6439) showed improved survival compared to those diagnosed in the pretargeted therapy era (N = 7231, hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death: 0.86, P < 0.01), while the change between the pre-post periods was not significant for advanced prostate cancer patients (HR: 0.97, P = 0.08). Advanced RCC patients had significantly larger improvements in overall survival compared to advanced prostate cancer patients (z = 4.31; P < 0.01). More detailed year-to-year analysis revealed greater survival improvements for RCC in the later years of the posttargeted period. Similar results were seen for cause-specific survival. Subgroup analyses by nephrectomy status, age, and gender showed consistent findings. Patients diagnosed with advanced RCC during the targeted therapy era had better survival outcomes than those diagnosed during the pretargeted therapy era. Future studies should examine the real-world survival improvements directly associated with targeted therapies.

  18. POTENTIAL OF HERBAL MEDICINES IN MODERN MEDICAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hakim Mohammed

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses in this paper the potentialities of Herbal medicine in modern therapy. Also he throws some light on the importance of natural drugs which bring about cure without generation side-effects. PMID:22557447

  19. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  20. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  1. Prolactinomas, Cushing's disease and acromegaly: debating the role of medical therapy for secretory pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are associated with a variety of clinical manifestations resulting from excessive hormone secretion and tumor mass effects, and require a multidisciplinary management approach. This article discusses the treatment modalities for the management of patients with a prolactinoma, Cushing's disease and acromegaly, and summarizes the options for medical therapy in these patients. First-line treatment of prolactinomas is pharmacotherapy with dopamine agonists; recent reports of cardiac valve abnormalities associated with this class of medication in Parkinson's disease has prompted study in hyperprolactinemic populations. Patients with resistance to dopamine agonists may require other treatment. First-line treatment of Cushing's disease is pituitary surgery by a surgeon with experience in this condition. Current medical options for Cushing's disease block adrenal cortisol production, but do not treat the underlying disease. Pituitary-directed medical therapies are now being explored. In several small studies, the dopamine agonist cabergoline normalized urinary free cortisol in some patients. The multi-receptor targeted somatostatin analogue pasireotide (SOM230) shows promise as a pituitary-directed medical therapy in Cushing's disease; further studies will determine its efficacy and safety. Radiation therapy, with medical adrenal blockade while awaiting the effects of radiation, and bilateral adrenalectomy remain standard treatment options for patients not cured with pituitary surgery. In patients with acromegaly, surgery remains the first-line treatment option when the tumor is likely to be completely resected, or for debulking, especially when the tumor is compressing neurovisual structures. Primary therapy with somatostatin analogues has been used in some patients with large extrasellar tumors not amenable to surgical cure, patients at high surgical risk and patients who decline surgery. Pegvisomant is indicated in patients who have not responded to

  2. Old medications and new targeted therapies in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Vivek; Denton, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    SSc is a multiorgan disease with significant morbidity that is associated with poor health-related quality of life. Treatment of this condition is often organ based and non-curative. However, there are newer, potentially disease-modifying therapies available to treat certain aspects of the disease. This review focuses on old and new therapies in the management of SSc in clinical practice. PMID:25065013

  3. An art therapy in-service program model for medical students and residents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rebecca Beers

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the author's experience implementing an art therapy in-service program into the training of medical students and residents in an urban hospital teaching facility. Emphasis is placed on specific aspects of planning and implementation, including formal and informal assessment, as well as methods of engaging medical students in art therapy experientials relevant to their experience as helping professionals. Benefits and challenges encountered throughout the process are also discussed. This paper is based on a presentation given at the 36th annual American Art Therapy Association conference.

  4. Tremor reduction by subthalamic nucleus stimulation and medication in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Blahak, Christian; Wöhrle, Johannes C; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Grips, Eva; Weigel, Ralf; Hennerici, Michael G; Krauss, Joachim K

    2007-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has proved to be effective for tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of the recent studies used only clinical data to analyse tremor reduction. The objective of our study was to quantify tremor reduction by STN DBS and antiparkinsonian medication in elderly PD patients using an objective measuring system. Amplitude and frequency of resting tremor and re-emergent resting tremor during postural tasks were analysed using an ultrasound-based measuring system and surface electromyography. In a prospective study design nine patients with advanced PD were examined preoperatively off and on medication, and twice postoperatively during four treatment conditions: off treatment, on STN DBS, on medication, and on STN DBS plus medication. While both STN DBS and medication reduced tremor amplitude, STN DBS alone and the combination of medication and STN DBS were significantly superior to pre- and postoperative medication. STN DBS but not medication increased tremor frequency, and off treatment tremor frequency was significantly reduced postoperatively compared to baseline. These findings demonstrate that STN DBS is highly effective in elderly patients with advanced PD and moderate preoperative tremor reduction by medication. Thus, with regard to the advanced impact on the other parkinsonian symptoms, STN DBS can replace thalamic stimulation in this cohort of patients. Nevertheless, medication was still effective postoperatively and may act synergistically. The significantly superior efficacy of STN DBS on tremor amplitude and its impact on tremor frequency in contrast to medication might be explained by the influence of STN DBS on additional neural circuits independent from dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  5. Medical advances in the treatment of postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ducloy-Bouthors, Anne-Sophie; Susen, Sophie; Wong, Cynthia A; Butwick, Alex; Vallet, Benoit; Lockhart, Evelyn

    2014-11-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Recent advances in the management of severe bleeding for trauma patients may provide insight into PPH management, but must be applied with caution considering the significant differences between trauma and obstetric patients. In this review, we summarized evidence for current management strategies for patients with major obstetric hemorrhage, including (1) rapid laboratory assessment of coagulopathy, (2) early transfusion of plasma and high plasma-to-red blood cell transfusion ratios in massive PPH, and (3) use of tranexamic acid and fibrinogen concentrates in the setting of PPH complicated by coagulopathy.

  6. Present and future evolution of advanced breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Although the introduction of novel therapies and drug combinations has improved the prognosis of metastatic breast cancer, the disease remains incurable. Increased knowledge of the biology and the molecular alterations in breast cancer has facilitated the design of targeted therapies. These agents include receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (epidermal growth factor receptor family), intracellular signaling pathways (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin) angiogenesis inhibitors and agents that interfere with DNA repair (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors). In the present review, we present the most promising studies of these new targeted therapies and novel combinations of targeted therapies with cytotoxic agents. PMID:21050422

  7. [Advance of neurogenic erectile dysfunction therapy by stem cells].

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Jian; Zhu, Guang-You

    2010-06-01

    Neurogenic erectile dysfunction (NED) commonly results from erectile nerve damage. Recent researches have focused on the preclinical study of stem cell-based therapies targeted at repairing and protecting nervi erigentes. In this paper, researches of NESCs, MDSCs, ASCs and MSCs in NED are reviewed. Early studies have demonstrated that stem cells and gene modified stem cells were effective to the therapy of ED, even likely to cure ED. Stem cells are expected to be applied in the clinical therapy of NED. Stem cells as a new therapy technique will bring up a new challenge in forensic clinical medicine.

  8. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Margalit, Danielle N.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)-conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique. There

  9. An update on the role of medical treatment including antioxidant therapy in varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Harshit; Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele-associated male infertility has classically been managed using surgery or assisted reproductive techniques. With increasing evidence of oxidative stress as a pathophysiological factor in varicocele-associated infertility, medical therapy especially antioxidants might become a treatment option with lower risks. We reviewed the existing literature on the role of various medical agents in the management of male infertility attributed to varicoceles. Medical therapy is typically evaluated in three different situations such as (a) comparison of two drugs or one drug with placebo, (b) comparison of drugs versus surgery, and (c) comparison of drugs as adjuvant therapy with surgery versus drug therapy alone. Due to heterogeneity of data and lack of well-conducted studies, there is insufficient data to recommend routine use of medical therapy for men with varicocele-associated infertility and surgery remains the treatment of choice. Pregnancy and live birth rates are usually not reported in most studies and mere improvement in sperm parameters or antioxidant capacity is insufficient to support its routine use. Antioxidant therapy is a potential option due to its theoretical benefit, data from preclinical studies, and lack of major side effects. Adjuvant therapy with antioxidants after surgical repair of varicocele may improve the outcome and is a potential area for further research. PMID:26763549

  10. Steady advance of stem cell therapies: report from the 2011 World Stem Cell Summit, Pasadena, California, October 3-5.

    PubMed

    Swan, Melanie

    2011-12-01

    Stem cell research and related therapies (including regenerative medicine and cellular therapies) could have a significant near-term impact on worldwide public health and aging. One reason is the industry's strong linkage between policy, science, industry, and patient advocacy, as was clear in the attendance and programming at the 7(th) annual World Stem Cell Summit held in Pasadena, California, October 3-5, 2011. A special conference session sponsored by the SENS Foundation discussed how stem cell therapies are being used to extend healthy life span. Stem cells are useful not only in cell-replacement therapies, but also in disease modeling, drug discovery, and drug toxicity screening. Stem cell therapies are currently being applied to over 50 diseases, including heart, lung, neurodegenerative, and eye disease, cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Dozens of companies are developing therapeutic solutions that are in different stages of clinical use and clinical trials. Some high-profile therapies include Dendreon's Provenge for prostate cancer, Geron's first-ever embryonic stem cell trials for spinal cord injury, Fibrocell's laViv cellular therapy for wrinkles, and well-established commercial skin substitutes (Organogenesis' Apligraf and Advanced BioHealing's Dermagraft). Stem cell policy issues under consideration include medical tourism, standards for large-scale stem cell manufacturing, and lingering ethical debates over the use of embryonic stem cells. Contemporary stem cell science advances include a focus on techniques for the direct reprogramming of cells from one lineage to another without returning to pluripotency as an intermediary step, improved means of generating and characterizing induced pluripotent cells, and progress in approaches to neurodegenerative disease.

  11. A Research Agenda to Advance the Coordination of Care for General Medical and Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Amity E; Rubinsky, Anna D; Fernandez, Anne C; Hahm, Hyeouk Chris; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2017-04-01

    The separation of addiction care from the general medical care system has a negative impact on patients' receipt of high-quality medical care. Clinical and policy-level strategies to improve the coordination of addiction care and general medical care include identifying and engaging patients with unhealthy substance use in general medical settings, providing effective chronic disease management of substance use disorders in primary care, including patient and family perspectives in care coordination, and implementing pragmatic models to pay for the coordination of addiction and general medical care. This Open Forum discusses practice and research recommendations to advance the coordination of general medical and addiction care. The discussion is based on the proceedings of a national meeting of experts in 2014.

  12. Improvement with ongoing Enzyme Replacement Therapy in advanced late-onset Pompe disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura E; Koeberl, Dwight D; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; DeArmey, Stephanie M; Mackey, Joanne; Kishnani, Priya S

    2008-12-01

    Benefits of enzyme replacement therapy with Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa), anecdotally reported in late-onset Pompe disease, range from motor and pulmonary improvement in less severely affected patients, to stabilization with minimal improvement in those with advanced disease. We report a case of a 63-year-old patient with significant morbidity who made notable motor and pulmonary function gains after two years on therapy. Thus, improvements in those with advanced disease may be possible after long-term treatment.

  13. Advanced ESPI-based medical instruments for otolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castracane, James; Conerty, M.; Cacace, Anthony T.; Gardner, Glendon M.; Miller, Mitchell B.; Parnes, Steven M.

    1993-05-01

    Optical fibers have long been used for visual inspection inside the human body for medical diagnoses and treatment. By making use of sophisticated optical interferometric and ultra- small imaging techniques, combined with automated image processing, it is possible to extract significantly increased information for more accurate medical diagnoses. With support from NIH under the SBIR program, we have been developing a range of such instruments. One of these supported by the NIDCD is capable of providing detailed spatial information on the vibratory response of the tympanic membrane (TM). This instrument involves the examination of the TM by means of high speed electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI). This provides a real time view of the vibration patterns of the TM for clinical diagnosis. This Interferometric Otoscope consists of mode conserving fiber optics, miniature diode lasers and high speed solid state detector arrays. We present the current status of the research including holography and ESPI of TM models and excised temporal bone preparations. A second instrument, also developed with support from NIDCD, is for application to the larynx. This system is also ESPI based but will incorporate features for direct vocal cord (VC) examination. By careful examination of the vibratory response of the VC during phonation, the characteristics of the mucosal wave may be examined. Adynamic regions of the cords can signal the start of lesions or cysts. Results of surgery can be evaluated in a quantitative manner. The design of a clinical prototype and preliminary electro-optic experiments on excised larynges and VC models will be presented.

  14. Advances in gene therapy for ADA-deficient SCID.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro

    2002-10-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was the first inherited disease treated with gene therapy. The pilot gene therapy studies demonstrated the safety, therapeutic potential and limitations of ADA gene transfer into hematopoietic cells using retroviral vectors. This review describes the latest progress in ADA-SCID dinical trials using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). PBL gene therapy was able to restore T-cell functions after discontinuation of ADA enzyme replacement therapy, but only partially corrected the purine metabolic defect. The development of improved HSC gene transfer protocols, combined with low intensity conditioning, allowed full correction of the immunological and metabolic ADA defects, with clinic benefit. These results have important implications for future applications of gene therapy in other disorders involving the hemapoietic system.

  15. The current format and ongoing advances of medical education in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gishen, Kriya; Ovadia, Steven; Arzillo, Samantha; Avashia, Yash; Thaller, Seth R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the current system of medical education along with the advances that are being made to support the demands of a changing health care system. American medical education must reform to anticipate the future needs of a changing health care system. Since the dramatic transformations to medical education that followed the publication of the Flexner report in 1910, medical education in the United States has largely remained unaltered. Today, the education of future physicians is undergoing modifications at all levels: premedical education, medical school, and residency training. Advances are being made with respect to curriculum design and content, standardized testing, and accreditation milestones. Fields such as plastic surgery are taking strides toward improving resident training as the next accreditation system is established. To promote more efficacious medical education, the American Medical Association has provided grants for innovations in education. Likewise, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlined 6 core competencies to standardize the educational goals of residency training. Such efforts are likely to improve the education of future physicians so that they are able to meet the future needs of American health care.

  16. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events.

  17. Advances in Gene Therapy for Diseases of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Lolita; Khanna, Hemant; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, huge progress has been made with regard to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases of the eye. Such knowledge has led to the development of gene therapy approaches to treat these devastating disorders. Challenges regarding the efficacy and efficiency of therapeutic gene delivery have driven the development of novel therapeutic approaches, which continue to evolve the field of ocular gene therapy. In this review article, we will discuss the evolution of preclinical and clinical strategies that have improved gene therapy in the eye, showing that treatment of vision loss has a bright future. PMID:27178388

  18. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Michael A; Simon, Elias D; Little, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment.

  19. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Michael A.; Simon, Elias D.; Little, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment. PMID:27517036

  20. Advances in wearable technology and its medical applications.

    PubMed

    Bonato, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The concept of monitoring individuals in the home and community settings was introduced more than 50 years ago, when Holter monitoring was proposed (in the late 1940s) and later adopted (in the 1960s) as a clinical tool. However, technologies to fully enable such vision were lacking and only sporadic and rather obtrusive monitoring techniques were available for several decades. Over the past decade, we have witnessed a great deal of progress in the field of wearable sensors and systems. Advances in this field have finally provided the tools to implement and deploy technology with the capabilities required by researchers in the field of patients' home monitoring. These technologies provide the tools to achieve early diagnosis of diseases such as congestive heart failure, prevention of chronic conditions such as diabetes, improved clinical management of neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease, and the ability to promptly respond to emergency situations such as seizures in patients with epilepsy and cardiac arrest in subjects undergoing cardiovascular monitoring. Current research efforts are focused on the development of systems enabling clinical applications. The current focus on developing and deploying wearable systems targeting specific clinical applications has the potential of leading to clinical adoption within the next five to ten years.

  1. Advanced illumination control algorithm for medical endoscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Ricardo M.; Wäny, Martin; Santos, Pedro; Morgado-Dias, F.

    2015-05-01

    CMOS image sensor manufacturer, AWAIBA, is providing the world's smallest digital camera modules to the world market for minimally invasive surgery and one time use endoscopic equipment. Based on the world's smallest digital camera head and the evaluation board provided to it, the aim of this paper is to demonstrate an advanced fast response dynamic control algorithm of the illumination LED source coupled to the camera head, over the LED drivers embedded on the evaluation board. Cost efficient and small size endoscopic camera modules nowadays embed minimal size image sensors capable of not only adjusting gain and exposure time but also LED illumination with adjustable illumination power. The LED illumination power has to be dynamically adjusted while navigating the endoscope over changing illumination conditions of several orders of magnitude within fractions of the second to guarantee a smooth viewing experience. The algorithm is centered on the pixel analysis of selected ROIs enabling it to dynamically adjust the illumination intensity based on the measured pixel saturation level. The control core was developed in VHDL and tested in a laboratory environment over changing light conditions. The obtained results show that it is capable of achieving correction speeds under 1 s while maintaining a static error below 3% relative to the total number of pixels on the image. The result of this work will allow the integration of millimeter sized high brightness LED sources on minimal form factor cameras enabling its use in endoscopic surgical robotic or micro invasive surgery.

  2. [Ozone therapy in the advanced stages of arteriosclerosis obliterans].

    PubMed

    Romero Valdés, A; Menéndez Cepero, S; Gómez Moraleda, M; Ley Pozo, J

    1993-01-01

    Fifteen patients with atherosclerosis obliterans at the lower limbs, no candidates to revascularizing surgery were submitted to ozone therapy. An improvement statistically significant was noticed in the treatment groups since amputation ratio decreased (26.7%) and the need of pain's surgery procedures (13.3%) in comparison with the control group (46.7 and 26.7% respectively). Ozone therapy is considered as a good way in the management of the atherosclerosis with obliteration in late period.

  3. Advanced Interventional Therapy for Radiation-Induced Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with dyspnea, aortic stenosis, and coronary artery disease—typical side effects of radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. A poor candidate for surgery, she underwent successful high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention and subsequent transcatheter aortic valve replacement. This report highlights some of the cardiovascular-specific sequelae of radiation therapy for cancer treatment; in addition, possible directions for future investigations are discussed. PMID:27547140

  4. Electron beam ion sources for use in second generation synchrotrons for medical particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Zschornack, G; Ritter, E; Schmidt, M; Schwan, A

    2014-02-01

    Cyclotrons and first generation synchrotrons are the commonly applied accelerators in medical particle therapy nowadays. Next generation accelerators such as Rapid Cycling Medical Synchrotrons (RCMS), direct drive accelerators, or dielectric wall accelerators have the potential to improve the existing accelerator techniques in this field. Innovative accelerator concepts for medical particle therapy can benefit from ion sources which meet their special requirements. In the present paper we report on measurements with a superconducting Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIS-SC, under the aspect of application in combination with RCMS as a well proven technology. The measurements indicate that this ion source can offer significant advantages for medical particle therapy. We show that a superconducting EBIS can deliver ion pulses of medically relevant ions such as protons, C(4 +) and C(6 +) ions with intensities and frequencies required for RCMS [S. Peggs and T. Satogata, "A survey of Hadron therapy accelerator technology," in Proceedings of PAC07, BNL-79826- 2008-CP, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA, 2007; A. Garonna, U. Amaldi et al., "Cyclinac medical accelerators using pulsed C(6 +)/H2(+) ion sources," in Proceedings of EBIST 2010, Stockholm, Sweden, July 2010]. Ion extraction spectra as well as individual ion pulses have been measured. For example, we report on the generation of proton pulses with up to 3 × 10(9) protons per pulse and with frequencies of up to 1000 Hz at electron beam currents of 600 mA.

  5. Fostering a culture of interprofessional education for radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, Charlotte Miller, Seth; Church, Jessica; Chen, Ronald C.; Muresan, Petronella A.; Adams, Robert D.

    2014-04-01

    A less-studied aspect of radiation therapy and medical dosimetry education is experiential learning through attendance at interprofessional conferences. University of North Carolina radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students regularly attended morning conferences and daily pretreatment peer review, including approximately 145 hours of direct interaction with medical attending physicians and residents, medical physicists, and other faculty. We herein assessed the effect of their participation in these interprofessional conferences on knowledge and communication. The students who graduated from our radiation therapy and medical dosimetry programs who were exposed to the interprofessional education initiative were compared with those who graduated in the previous years. The groups were compared with regard to their knowledge (as assessed by grades on end-of-training examinations) and team communication (assessed via survey). The results for the 2 groups were compared via exact tests. There was a trend for the examination scores for the 2012 cohort to be higher than for the 2007 to 2011 groups. Survey results suggested that students who attended the interprofessional education sessions were more comfortable speaking with attending physicians, residents, physicists, and faculty compared with earlier students who did not attend these educational sessions. Interprofessional education, particularly vertical integration, appears to provide an enhanced educational experience both in regard to knowledge (per the examination scores) and in building a sense of communication (via the survey results). Integration of interprofessional education into radiation therapy and medical dosimetry educational programs may represent an opportunity to enrich the learning experience in multiple ways and merits further study.

  6. Fostering a culture of interprofessional education for radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Charlotte; Miller, Seth; Church, Jessica; Chen, Ronald C; Muresan, Petronella A; Adams, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    A less-studied aspect of radiation therapy and medical dosimetry education is experiential learning through attendance at interprofessional conferences. University of North Carolina radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students regularly attended morning conferences and daily pretreatment peer review, including approximately 145 hours of direct interaction with medical attending physicians and residents, medical physicists, and other faculty. We herein assessed the effect of their participation in these interprofessional conferences on knowledge and communication. The students who graduated from our radiation therapy and medical dosimetry programs who were exposed to the interprofessional education initiative were compared with those who graduated in the previous years. The groups were compared with regard to their knowledge (as assessed by grades on end-of-training examinations) and team communication (assessed via survey). The results for the 2 groups were compared via exact tests. There was a trend for the examination scores for the 2012 cohort to be higher than for the 2007 to 2011 groups. Survey results suggested that students who attended the interprofessional education sessions were more comfortable speaking with attending physicians, residents, physicists, and faculty compared with earlier students who did not attend these educational sessions. Interprofessional education, particularly vertical integration, appears to provide an enhanced educational experience both in regard to knowledge (per the examination scores) and in building a sense of communication (via the survey results). Integration of interprofessional education into radiation therapy and medical dosimetry educational programs may represent an opportunity to enrich the learning experience in multiple ways and merits further study.

  7. Conceptualisation of the characteristics of advanced practitioners in the medical radiation professions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tony; Harris, Jillian; Woznitza, Nick; Maresse, Sharon; Sale, Charlotte

    2015-09-15

    Professions grapple with defining advanced practice and the characteristics of advanced practitioners. In nursing and allied health, advanced practice has been defined as ‘a state of professional maturity in which the individual demonstrates a level of integrated knowledge, skill and competence that challenges the accepted boundaries of practice and pioneers new developments in health care’. Evolution of advanced practice in Australia has been slower than in the United Kingdom, mainly due to differences in demography, the health system and industrial relations. This article describes a conceptual model of advanced practitioner characteristics in the medical radiation professions, taking into account experiences in other countries and professions. Using the CanMEDS framework, the model includes foundation characteristics of communication, collaboration and professionalism, which are fundamental to advanced clinical practice. Gateway characteristics are: clinical expertise, with high level competency in a particular area of clinical practice; scholarship and teaching, including a masters qualification and knowledge dissemination through educating others; and evidence-based practice, with judgements made on the basis of research findings, including research by the advanced practitioner. The pinnacle of advanced practice is clinical leadership, where the practitioner has a central role in the health care team, with the capacity to influence decision making and advocate for others, including patients. The proposed conceptual model is robust yet adaptable in defining generic characteristics of advanced practitioners, no matter their clinical specialty. The advanced practice roles that evolve to meet future health service demand must focus on the needs of patients, local populations and communities.

  8. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  9. Intralipid Emulsion Rescue Therapy: Emerging Therapeutic Indications in Medical Practice.

    PubMed

    Muller, Sam H; Diaz, James H; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-01-01

    Intralipid emulsion therapy is well-established for the treatment of local-anesthetic systemic toxicities. In recent years, its role has expanded as an important therapeutic agent in the reversal of other types of drug overdoses, including certain types of antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiarrhythmics, and calcium channel blockers. A literature review identified thirty-one case reports including forty-nine separate drug overdose cases involving ten separate drug classes which were successfully reversed with Intralipid. The present clinical case study describes an elderly unresponsive woman refractory to conventional treatments after ingesting a potentially lethal amount of 5.6 grams of diltiazem in a suicide attempt. After treatment with Intralipid over a twenty-four hour period, the patient's hemodynamic and metabolic derangements were corrected and stabilized completely. Intralipid emulsion rescue therapy provides another potential strategy for the reversal of many drug toxicities, most likely by providing a lipid layer safety net for drug overdose by passive diffusion. Clinicians are urged to embrace an expanded role of Intralipid emulsion rescue therapy, not only for local anesthetic drug toxicities, but also for other lipophilic drug overdoses.

  10. Graphene-based nanovehicles for photodynamic medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Dong, Haiqing; Li, Yongyong; Shi, Donglu

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and its derivatives such as graphene oxide (GO) have been widely explored as promising drug delivery vehicles for improved cancer treatment. In this review, we focus on their applications in photodynamic therapy. The large specific surface area of GO facilitates efficient loading of the photosensitizers and biological molecules via various surface functional groups. By incorporation of targeting ligands or activatable agents responsive to specific biological stimulations, smart nanovehicles are established, enabling tumor-triggering release or tumor-selective accumulation of photosensitizer for effective therapy with minimum side effects. Graphene-based nanosystems have been shown to improve the stability, bioavailability, and photodynamic efficiency of organic photosensitizer molecules. They have also been shown to behave as electron sinks for enhanced visible-light photodynamic activities. Owing to its intrinsic near infrared absorption properties, GO can be designed to combine both photodynamic and photothermal hyperthermia for optimum therapeutic efficiency. Critical issues and future aspects of photodynamic therapy research are addressed in this review. PMID:25848263

  11. Argon gas: a potential neuroprotectant and promising medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Argon is a noble gas element that has demonstrated narcotic and protective abilities that may prove useful in the medical field. The earliest records of argon gas have exposed its ability to exhibit narcotic symptoms at hyperbaric pressures greater than 10 atmospheres with more recent evidence seeking to display argon as a potential neuroprotective agent. The high availability and low cost of argon provide a distinct advantage over using similarly acting treatments such as xenon gas. Argon gas treatments in models of brain injury such as in vitro Oxygen-Glucose-Deprivation (OGD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), as well as in vivo Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO) have largely demonstrated positive neuroprotective behavior. On the other hand, some warning has been made to potential negative effects of argon treatments in cases of ischemic brain injury, where increases of damage in the sub-cortical region of the brain have been uncovered. Further support for argon use in the medical field has been demonstrated in its use in combination with tPA, its ability as an organoprotectant, and its surgical applications. This review seeks to summarize the history and development of argon gas use in medical research as mainly a neuroprotective agent, to summarize the mechanisms associated with its biological effects, and to elucidate its future potential. PMID:24533741

  12. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. Methods: A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Results: Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Conclusion: Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment. PMID:27375698

  13. Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of Jaws: A Low-Level Laser Therapy and Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Case Approach

    PubMed Central

    Minamisako, Mariana Comparotto; Lisboa, Mariáh Luz; Mariela Rodríguez Cordeiro, Mabel; Grando, Liliane Janete

    2016-01-01

    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) can be considered an inability of the alveolar bone to respond to an injury, which frequently leads to severe local and systemic complications. Once the problem is installed, dentist must use all therapeutic approaches recommended. This manuscript reports a successful management of MRONJ handled with antibiotics, conservative debridement, low-level laser therapy (LLLT), and photodynamic therapy (PDT) up to 12 months. As healing of MRONJ may be very slow, combined therapeutic approaches are required. Besides the recommended conventional treatment protocol, LLLT and PDT are important tools to contribute to healing and improvement of patient's quality of life. PMID:27668100

  14. The advance of poststructuralism and its influence on family therapy.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Victoria C

    2014-09-01

    Postmodernism began to influence family therapy very early in the 1980s with articles referencing postmodern ideas, focusing on meaning and multiplicity. With the appearance of narrative therapy on the scene in the 1990s there was a shift toward poststructural thinking, which refined the movement and politicized the clinical work. Even with a bit of a backlash, whether because this was a new idea or it somehow threatened a positivistic culture, a poststructural view has continued to have effects on family therapy. This article explores the variety of influences: the expansion of narrative ideas, the innovation of Madsen's collaborative helping, and also more nuanced effects. I argue that a poststructural view has effectively changed how many family therapists think and may also be subtly influencing how they might work.

  15. Advances in biodegradable nanomaterials for photothermal therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao-Feng; Wang, Shun-Hao; Yu, Ying-Jie; Shen, He-Yun; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Hui-Ling; Wang, Hai; Li, Lin-Lin; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal cancer therapy is an alternative to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. With the development of nanophotothermal agents, this therapy holds immense potential in clinical translation. However, the toxicity issues derived from the fact that nanomaterials are trapped and retained in the reticuloendothelial systems limit their biomedical application. Developing biodegradable photothermal agents is the most practical route to address these concerns. In addition to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, various internal and external stimuli play key roles on nanomaterials uptake, transport, and clearance. In this review, we summarized novel nanoplatforms for photothermal therapy; these nanoplatforms can elicit stimuli-triggered degradation. We focused on the recent innovative designs endowed with biodegradable photothermal agents under different stimuli, including enzyme, pH, and near-infrared (NIR) laser. PMID:27807498

  16. Incorporating VEGF-targeted therapy in advanced urothelial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sujata; Srinivas, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Patients with relapsed or refractory urothelial carcinoma (UC) have poor prognosis coupled with few options for systemic treatment. The role of angiogenesis in the evolution of cancers has been established, and studies have shown that it plays a key role in the pathogenesis of UC. Many targeted agents have been used in phase I–II trials for the treatment of UC, with encouraging but modest results. Recently, studies combining angiogenesis inhibitors with other chemotherapeutic agents were able to achieve objective responses higher than most commonly used second-line therapies in UC. Future efforts in investigating these therapies in UC rely on identification of biomarkers and other predictors of response to anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:28203296

  17. Advancements in Tumor Targeting Strategies for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Luderer, Micah John; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality that utilizes the nuclear capture reaction of epithermal neutrons by boron-10 resulting in a localized nuclear fission reaction and subsequent cell death. Since cellular destruction is limited to approximately the diameter of a single cell, primarily only cells in the neutron field with significant boron accumulation will be damaged. However, the emergence of BNCT as a prominent therapy has in large part been hindered by a paucity of tumor selective boron containing agents. While L-boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate are the most commonly investigated clinical agents, new agents are desperately needed due to their suboptimal tumor selectivity. This review will highlight the various strategies to improve tumor boron delivery including: nucleoside and carbohydrate analogs, unnatural amino acids, porphyrins, antibody-dendrimer conjugates, cationic polymers, cell-membrane penetrating peptides, liposomes and nanoparticles.

  18. Advances in biodegradable nanomaterials for photothermal therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Chao-Feng; Wang, Shun-Hao; Yu, Ying-Jie; Shen, He-Yun; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Hui-Ling; Wang, Hai; Li, Lin-Lin; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Photothermal cancer therapy is an alternative to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. With the development of nanophotothermal agents, this therapy holds immense potential in clinical translation. However, the toxicity issues derived from the fact that nanomaterials are trapped and retained in the reticuloendothelial systems limit their biomedical application. Developing biodegradable photothermal agents is the most practical route to address these concerns. In addition to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, various internal and external stimuli play key roles on nanomaterials uptake, transport, and clearance. In this review, we summarized novel nanoplatforms for photothermal therapy; these nanoplatforms can elicit stimuli-triggered degradation. We focused on the recent innovative designs endowed with biodegradable photothermal agents under different stimuli, including enzyme, pH, and near-infrared (NIR) laser.

  19. TH-F-202-03: Advances in MRI for Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cai, J

    2016-06-01

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Acute Radiation Syndrome: Innovative Medical Approaches in Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-30

    lymphoblastic leukemia: a randomized phase III trial. Blood. 1995;86(2):444–50. 36. Hu KX, Sun QY, Guo M, Ai HS. The radiation protection and therapy effects of...Literature 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome: innovative medical...MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13

  1. [TCM/aciipuncture therapy and medical insurance support in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Tian, Kaiyu; Yuan, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Based on the expeienes in th acdemic exchanges in Switzerland and relevant data, the development of TCM/acupuncture in Switzerland, Swiss medical insurance system and the acceptance to TCM/acupuncture were introduced in the paper. The case analysis was applied to explain the reimbursement, proportion and additional conditions of Obligatory Basic Insurance and Supplementary Alternative Insurance on TCM/acupuncture; Additionally, in the paper, the certification and registration from EMR, ASCA and NVS for the TCM physician were introduced, which is required to the recognition by insurance companies. All of these provide the guarantee for the positive development of TCM/acupuncture in Switzerland.

  2. Impact of advanced autonomous non-medical practitioners in emergency care: protocol for a scoping study

    PubMed Central

    Sujan, Mark; Howard-Franks, Hannah; Swann, Garry; Soanes, Kirsti; Pope, Catherine; Crouch, Robert; Staniszewska, Sophie; Maxwell, Elaine; Huang, Huayi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Emergency care services are looking for new models of care delivery to deal with changing patient demographics and increased pressures. It has been suggested that advanced non-medical practitioners might be valuable for delivering such new models of care. However, it is not clear what the impact of the deployment of advanced non-medical practitioners in emergency care is. This scoping study addresses the following research question: What is known from the literature about the different types of impact of the deployment of advanced (autonomous) non-medical practitioners in emergency care? Methods and analysis A scoping study will be undertaken to examine and map the impact of the deployment of advanced non-medical practitioners in emergency care. The scoping study follows the methodology proposed by Arksey and O'Malley. Searches will be carried out on databases of peer-reviewed literature and other sources to systematically identify and characterise the literature. Papers will be screened using a 2-stage process to identify the most relevant literature. Papers will be screened by title and abstract, followed by full-text review. Data abstraction and synthesis will be performed using a narrative thematic analysis. Ethics and dissemination We will communicate the findings to Health Education England, NHS Improvement and the Royal College of Emergency Medicine through existing links provided by members of the project team. We anticipate that the findings will also be of interest to other similar organisations internationally. By identifying gaps in the research literature, we anticipate that the study will generate recommendations for informing future high-quality research studies about the impact of advanced non-medical practitioners in emergency care as well as in other settings. The research findings will be submitted for publication to relevant peer-reviewed journals as well as professional magazines. The scoping study uses only previously published

  3. Advances in nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: Review

    PubMed Central

    Wędrychowicz, Andrzej; Zając, Andrzej; Tomasik, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic, life-long, and relapsing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there are no complete cure possibilities, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy may induce remission of the disease. Malnutrition and specific nutritional deficiencies are frequent among IBD patients, so the majority of them need nutritional treatment, which not only improves the state of nutrition of the patients but has strong anti-inflammatory activity as well. Moreover, some nutrients, from early stages of life are suspected as triggering factors in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. Both parenteral and enteral nutrition is used in IBD therapy, but their practical utility in different populations and in different countries is not clearly established, and there are sometimes conflicting theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD. This review presents the actual data from research studies on the influence of nutrition on the etiopathogenesis of IBD and the latest findings regarding its mechanisms of action. The use of both parenteral and enteral nutrition as therapeutic methods in induction and maintenance therapy in IBD treatment is also extensively discussed. Comparison of the latest research data, scientific theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD, and different opinions about them are also presented and discussed. Additionally, some potential future perspectives for nutritional therapy are highlighted. PMID:26811646

  4. Sex Therapy: Advances in Paradigms, Nomenclature, and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althof, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author reviews the historical paradigms that have influenced the treatment of sexual problems, changes in the diagnostic nomenclature, and recent innovations in sex therapy. Methods: The author reviews the literature and provides expert opinion. Results: The author gives a historical overview of how theoretical models of…

  5. Drug discovery in advanced prostate cancer: translating biology into therapy.

    PubMed

    Yap, Timothy A; Smith, Alan D; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Workman, Paul; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-10-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is associated with a poor prognosis and poses considerable therapeutic challenges. Recent genetic and technological advances have provided insights into prostate cancer biology and have enabled the identification of novel drug targets and potent molecularly targeted therapeutics for this disease. In this article, we review recent advances in prostate cancer target identification for drug discovery and discuss their promise and associated challenges. We review the evolving therapeutic landscape of CRPC and discuss issues associated with precision medicine as well as challenges encountered with immunotherapy for this disease. Finally, we envision the future management of CRPC, highlighting the use of circulating biomarkers and modern clinical trial designs.

  6. Advances in bone marrow stem cell therapy for retinal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Park, Susanna S; Moisseiev, Elad; Bauer, Gerhard; Anderson, Johnathon D; Grant, Maria B; Zam, Azhar; Zawadzki, Robert J; Werner, John S; Nolta, Jan A

    2017-01-01

    The most common cause of untreatable vision loss is dysfunction of the retina. Conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma remain leading causes of untreatable blindness worldwide. Various stem cell approaches are being explored for treatment of retinal regeneration. The rationale for using bone marrow stem cells to treat retinal dysfunction is based on preclinical evidence showing that bone marrow stem cells can rescue degenerating and ischemic retina. These stem cells have primarily paracrine trophic effects although some cells can directly incorporate into damaged tissue. Since the paracrine trophic effects can have regenerative effects on multiple cells in the retina, the use of this cell therapy is not limited to a particular retinal condition. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells are being explored in early clinical trials as therapy for various retinal conditions. These bone marrow stem cells include mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear cells and CD34(+) cells. Autologous therapy requires no systemic immunosuppression or donor matching. Intravitreal delivery of CD34(+) cells and mononuclear cells appears to be tolerated and is being explored since some of these cells can home into the damaged retina after intravitreal administration. The safety of intravitreal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has not been well established. This review provides an update of the current evidence in support of the use of bone marrow stem cells as treatment for retinal dysfunction. The potential limitations and complications of using certain forms of bone marrow stem cells as therapy are discussed. Future directions of research include methods to optimize the therapeutic potential of these stem cells, non-cellular alternatives using extracellular vesicles, and in vivo high-resolution retinal imaging to detect cellular changes in the retina following cell therapy.

  7. [An advanced metastatic breast cancer patient successfully treated with combination therapy including docetaxel, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (TAC) as salvage therapy].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasushi; Takayama, Tetsuji; Sagawa, Tamotsu; Sato, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Kumiko; Takahashi, Shou; Abe, Seiichiro; Iyama, Satoshi; Murase, Kazuyuki; Kato, Junji; Niitsu, Yoshiro

    2008-03-01

    We reported here a case of advanced breast cancer successfully treated with combination therapy including docetaxel, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (TAC) as salvage therapy. A 56-year-old male was referred to our hospital for treatment of recurrent metastatic breast cancer. When he was admitted, his general condition was poor due to massive intraperitoneal metastasis. We administered TAC chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m(2), doxorubicin 50 mg/m(2), and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m(2), every 3 weeks). During chemotherapy, he showed no major adverse effects except grade 3 neutropenia, which could be easily managed with G-CSF administration. Metastatic lesions almost disappeared after 4 cycles of TAC. TAC therapy was considered to be acceptable as salvage therapy for a metastatic male breast cancer patient.

  8. Origination of Medical Advance Directives Among Nursing Home Residents With and Without Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xueya; Cram, Peter; Li, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nursing home residents with serious mental illness need a high level of general medical and end-of-life services. This study tested whether persons with serious mental illness are as likely as other nursing home residents to make informed choices about treatments through medical advance care plans. Methods Secondary analyses were conducted with data from a 2004 national survey of nursing home residents with serious mental illness (N=1,769) and without (N=11,738). Bivariate and multivariate analyses determined differences in documented advance care plans, including living wills; “do not resuscitate” and “do not hospitalize” orders; and orders concerning restriction of feeding tube, medication, or other treatments. Results The overall rates of having any of the four advance care plans were 57% and 68% for residents with and without serious mental illness, respectively (p<.001). Residents with serious mental illness also showed lower rates for individual advance care plans. In a multivariate analysis that adjusted for resident and facility characteristics (N=1,174 nursing homes) as well as survey procedures, serious mental illness was associated with a 24% reduced odds of having any advance directives (adjusted odds ratio=.76, 95% confidence interval=.66–.87, p<.001). Similar results were found for individual documented plans. Conclusions Among U.S. nursing home residents, those with serious mental illness were less likely than others to have written medical advance directives. Future research is needed to help understand both resident factors (such as inappropriate behaviors, impaired communication skills, and disrupted family support) and provider factors (including training, experience, and attitude) that underlie this finding. PMID:21209301

  9. Empirical medical therapy in idiopathic male infertility: Promise or panacea?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hung

    2014-01-01

    Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility and in 25% of cases, the etiology of male infertility is unknown. Effective treatments are well-established for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, male accessory gland infection, retrograde ejaculation, and positive antisperm antibody. However, the appropriate treatment for idiopathic male infertility is unclear. Empirical medical treatment (EMT) has been used in men with idiopathic infertility and can be divided into two categories based on the mode of action: hormonal treatment and antioxidant supplementation. Hormonal medications consist of gonadotropins, androgens, estrogen receptor blockers, and aromatase inhibitors. Antioxidants such as vitamins, zinc, and carnitines have also been widely used to reduce oxidative stress-induced spermatozoa damage. Although scientifically acceptable evidence of EMT is limited because of the lack of large, randomized, controlled studies, recent systematic reviews with meta-analyses have shown that the administration of gonadotropins, anti-estrogens, and oral antioxidants results in a significant increase in the live birth rate compared with control treatments. Therefore, all physicians who treat infertility should bear in mind that EMT can improve semen parameters and subsequent fertility potential through natural intercourse. PMID:25309854

  10. Does the degree of advancement during functional appliance therapy matter?

    PubMed

    Rabie, A Bakr M; Al-Kalaly, Abdullah

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of varied degrees of mandibular advancement on condylar growth. Three hundred and thirty five 35-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 10 experimental groups (n = 10) and five control groups (n = 5) for analysis of new bone formation and 10 experimental groups (n = 14) and five control groups (n = 14) for molecular analysis. The experimental animals were fitted with bite-jumping appliance to advance the mandible 2 and 4 mm. The rats were sacrificed on days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 30. A computer-assisted image analysing system was used to assess the quantity of new condylar bone formation. Molecular analysis utilizing real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the different levels of mRNA expression of different growth markers in the condyle. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), with a Bonferroni multiple comparison test, showed significantly more newly formed bone in the 4 mm group compared with the 2 mm and control groups on days 21 and 30 (P < 0.05). Most of the examined growth markers demonstrated a significant increase during the 4 mm advancement (P < 0.05). Indian hedgehog (Ihh) mRNA showed a 7- and 5-fold change, parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) a 5.2- and 3-fold change and type II collagen a 9.6- and 3.7-fold change in the 4 and 2 mm advancement groups, respectively. Varied degrees of mandibular advancement result in different quantities of new bone formation and levels of expression of growth members: Ihh, PTHrP, and type II collagen.

  11. Does the degree of advancement during functional appliance therapy matter?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kalaly, Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of varied degrees of mandibular advancement on condylar growth. Three hundred and thirty five 35-day-old female Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into 10 experimental groups (n = 10) and five control groups (n = 5) for analysis of new bone formation and 10 experimental groups (n = 14) and five control groups (n = 14) for molecular analysis. The experimental animals were fitted with bite-jumping appliance to advance the mandible 2 and 4 mm. The rats were sacrificed on days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 30. A computer-assisted image analysing system was used to assess the quantity of new condylar bone formation. Molecular analysis utilizing real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the different levels of mRNA expression of different growth markers in the condyle. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), with a Bonferroni multiple comparison test, showed significantly more newly formed bone in the 4 mm group compared with the 2 mm and control groups on days 21 and 30 (P < 0.05). Most of the examined growth markers demonstrated a significant increase during the 4 mm advancement (P < 0.05). Indian hedgehog (Ihh) mRNA showed a 7- and 5-fold change, parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) a 5.2- and 3-fold change and type II collagen a 9.6- and 3.7-fold change in the 4 and 2 mm advancement groups, respectively. Varied degrees of mandibular advancement result in different quantities of new bone formation and levels of expression of growth members: Ihh, PTHrP, and type II collagen. PMID:18343894

  12. Minimally invasive eyelid care in dermatology: medical, laser, and cosmetic therapies.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Ramin; Pfeiffer, Margaret L; Tsoukas, Maria

    2015-01-01

    There is a high demand for facial aesthetic enhancement, and the periorbital region is one of the first areas to show signs of aging. Many nonsurgical therapies exist to tackle these problems. These therapies are becoming more efficacious while reducing postprocedural recovery time. The goal is to restore the natural youthful appearance rather than to create an effect that differs from the patient's appearance earlier in life. Eyelid care, and cosmetic dermatology in general, intends to restore balance and symmetry. We discuss the initial consultation, relevant anatomy for the dermatologist, and medical, laser and cosmetic therapies.

  13. Complementary and alternative medical therapies for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wendy; Newmark, Sanford

    2007-12-01

    Complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies are commonly used by parents for their children who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorders. The use of these therapies is well documented, yet the evidence of the safety and efficacy of these treatments in children is limited. This article describes the current evidence-based CAM therapies for ADHD and autism, focusing on nutritional interventions; natural health products, including essential fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and other health supplements; biofeedback; and reducing environmental toxins. The CAM evidence in ADHD is addressed, as is the CAM literature in autism.

  14. The AIDS crisis and the medical-legal implications of transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L J

    1991-06-01

    An increased awareness of the potential to be harmed by blood transfusions has come with the AIDS crisis. Patients and health care providers alike are concerned with the complications of a transfusion, and various alternatives to traditional transfusion therapy have emerged. They include autologous transfusions, directed donations, and outright refusals of transfusion therapy. This article examines the medical-legal considerations that accompany a decision to transfuse. Various legal theories used in cases where persons injured by transfusions have sought legal redress and the outcomes of those cases will be examined. The question of whether directed donations are a reasonable alternative to traditional transfusion therapy will also be explored.

  15. Emerging therapies for patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Julio; Briones, Javier; Sierra, Jorge

    2009-09-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia is a common lymphoid malignancy with a variable clinical course. While some patients never require treatment or can be managed effectively with palliative chemotherapy, others experience early disease progression and death. The development of new prognostic markers has helped in the identification of patients with high risk disease, even among those diagnosed at early stage. Recent prospective trials have established chemo-immunotherapy combinations as the new standard of care for CLL patients requiring therapy. Unfortunately, patients whose tumour cells have certain genomic aberrations, such as a chromosome 17 deletion, have a disease that is frequently refractory to conventional therapy and should have their treatment tailored accordingly. Younger patients with high risk disease should be referred for allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation if they have an appropriate donor. For the remaining high risk patients, a number of new compounds are emerging, which could lead to further improvement in their outcome.

  16. Advances in Non-Viral DNA Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hardee, Cinnamon L.; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio Milenka; Hornstein, Benjamin D.; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Uses of viral vectors have thus far eclipsed uses of non-viral vectors for gene therapy delivery in the clinic. Viral vectors, however, have certain issues involving genome integration, the inability to be delivered repeatedly, and possible host rejection. Fortunately, development of non-viral DNA vectors has progressed steadily, especially in plasmid vector length reduction, now allowing these tools to fill in specifically where viral or other non-viral vectors may not be the best options. In this review, we examine the improvements made to non-viral DNA gene therapy vectors, highlight opportunities for their further development, address therapeutic needs for which their use is the logical choice, and discuss their future expansion into the clinic. PMID:28208635

  17. Recent Advances in Antiviral Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Tamori, Akihiro; Enomoto, Masaru; Kawada, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major worldwide health problem. Chronic infection induces continuous inflammation in the liver, progression of hepatic fibrosis, eventual cirrhosis, and possible hepatocellular carcinoma. Eradication of the virus is one of the most important treatment aims. A number of promising new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have been developed over the past 10 years. Due to their increased efficacy, safety, and tolerability, interferon-free oral therapies with DAAs have been approved for patients with HCV, including those with cirrhosis. This review introduces the characteristics and results of recent clinical trials of several DAAs: NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B inhibitors. DAA treatment failure and prognosis after DAA therapy are also discussed. PMID:27022210

  18. Impact of a medication therapy management intervention targeting medications associated with falling: Results of a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mott, David A.; Martin, Beth; Breslow, Robert; Michaels, Barb; Kirchner, Jeff; Mahoney, Jane; Margolis, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The use of fall risk–increasing drugs (FRIDs) by older adults is one factor associated with falling, and FRID use is common among older adults. A targeted medication therapy management intervention focused on FRID use that included prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) medications, along with follow-up telephone calls was designed. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this pilot study was to examine preliminary effects of a medication therapy management (MTM) intervention focused on FRIDs provided by a community pharmacist to older adults. DESIGN Randomized, controlled trial. SETTING One community pharmacy. PARTICIPANTS Eighty older adults who completed a fall prevention workshop. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The main outcome measures were the rate of discontinuing FRIDs, the proportion of older adults falling, and the number of falls. A secondary outcome was the acceptance rate of medication recommendations by patients and prescribers. RESULTS Thirty-eight older adults received the targeted MTM intervention. Of the 31 older adults using a FRID, a larger proportion in the intervention group had FRID use modified relative to controls (77% and 28%, respectively; P < 0.05). There were no significant changes between the study groups in the risk and rate of falling. Medication recommendations in the intervention group had a 75% acceptance rate by patients and prescribers. CONCLUSION A targeted MTM intervention provided by a community pharmacist and focused on FRID use among older adults was effective in modifying FRID use. This result supports the preliminary conclusion that community pharmacists can play an important role in modifying FRID use among older adults. PMID:26802916

  19. Advancing the science for active surveillance: rationale and design for the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership.

    PubMed

    Stang, Paul E; Ryan, Patrick B; Racoosin, Judith A; Overhage, J Marc; Hartzema, Abraham G; Reich, Christian; Welebob, Emily; Scarnecchia, Thomas; Woodcock, Janet

    2010-11-02

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 mandated that the FDA develop a system for using automated health care data to identify risks of marketed drugs and other medical products. The Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership is a public-private partnership among the FDA, academia, data owners, and the pharmaceutical industry that is responding to the need to advance the science of active medical product safety surveillance by using existing observational databases. The Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership's transparent, open innovation approach is designed to systematically and empirically study critical governance, data resource, and methodological issues and their interrelationships in establishing a viable national program of active drug safety surveillance by using observational data. This article describes the governance structure, data-access model, methods-testing approach, and technology development of this effort, as well as the work that has been initiated.

  20. Improving medical graduates’ training in palliative care: advancing education and practice

    PubMed Central

    Head, Barbara A; Schapmire, Tara J; Earnshaw, Lori; Chenault, John; Pfeifer, Mark; Sawning, Susan; Shaw, Monica A

    2016-01-01

    The needs of an aging population and advancements in the treatment of both chronic and life-threatening diseases have resulted in increased demand for quality palliative care. The doctors of the future will need to be well prepared to provide expert symptom management and address the holistic needs (physical, psychosocial, and spiritual) of patients dealing with serious illness and the end of life. Such preparation begins with general medical education. It has been recommended that teaching and clinical experiences in palliative care be integrated throughout the medical school curriculum, yet such education has not become the norm in medical schools across the world. This article explores the current status of undergraduate medical education in palliative care as published in the English literature and makes recommendations for educational improvements which will prepare doctors to address the needs of seriously ill and dying patients. PMID:26955298

  1. Improving medical graduates' training in palliative care: advancing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Head, Barbara A; Schapmire, Tara J; Earnshaw, Lori; Chenault, John; Pfeifer, Mark; Sawning, Susan; Shaw, Monica A

    2016-01-01

    The needs of an aging population and advancements in the treatment of both chronic and life-threatening diseases have resulted in increased demand for quality palliative care. The doctors of the future will need to be well prepared to provide expert symptom management and address the holistic needs (physical, psychosocial, and spiritual) of patients dealing with serious illness and the end of life. Such preparation begins with general medical education. It has been recommended that teaching and clinical experiences in palliative care be integrated throughout the medical school curriculum, yet such education has not become the norm in medical schools across the world. This article explores the current status of undergraduate medical education in palliative care as published in the English literature and makes recommendations for educational improvements which will prepare doctors to address the needs of seriously ill and dying patients.

  2. Mind-Body Therapies: Evidence and Implications in Advanced Oncology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mayden,, Kelley D.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom control. Traditional training has not been structured to provide advanced practitioners with an in-depth knowledge of the clinical applications of mind-body therapies. The aim of this article is to acquaint the reader with common mind-body modalities (meditation/mindfulness-based stress reduction, relaxation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, support groups, and aromatherapy) and to examine important evidence in support of or against their clinical application. PMID:25031967

  3. Mind-body therapies: evidence and implications in advanced oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Mayden, Kelley D

    2012-11-01

    The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom control. Traditional training has not been structured to provide advanced practitioners with an in-depth knowledge of the clinical applications of mind-body therapies. The aim of this article is to acquaint the reader with common mind-body modalities (meditation/mindfulness-based stress reduction, relaxation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, support groups, and aromatherapy) and to examine important evidence in support of or against their clinical application.

  4. Military medical advances resulting from the conflict in Korea, Part II: Historic clinical accomplishments.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael S

    2012-04-01

    Throughout the recorded history of civilization, there has been armed conflict. Warfare has been associated with advances in care for the wounded. Many of these advances when shown effective on the battlefield become incorporated into civilian health care. It is a laboratory where there is unfortunately much clinical material and presents opportunity for the creative, curious, and innovative. This article reviews the medical advances that resulted from the Korean War. There were notable advances in neurosurgery, vascular surgery, and plastic surgery. Tools from prior wars were rediscovered, dusted off, and used to stop combat losses from psychiatric trauma. A treatment was developed for cleft lip by a plastic surgeon, thus giving hope to young lives. War is a disruptive, destructive, and harrowing experience--but can lead to improvements in care for the wounded and these developments can improve the lives of people everywhere.

  5. Medical Family Therapy for a Woman with End-stage Crohn's Disease and Her Son.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Susan H.; Harkness, Jennifer L.; Epstein, Ronald M.

    2001-01-01

    Medical family therapy grew out of the experiences of family therapists working with other professionals to provide comprehensive, integrated healthcare for patients. This is the story of one such patient and provides an account of the experience through quotes from videotaped sessions and electronic mail communications that occurred throughout…

  6. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... D plan, a drug utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an...

  7. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... D plan, a drug utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an...

  8. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... D plan, a drug utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an...

  9. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an MTMP as described in...

  10. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an MTMP as described in...

  11. Teaching Electroconvulsive Therapy to Medical Students: Effects of Instructional Method on Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnell, Ronald L.; Duk, Anthony D.; Christison, George W.; Haviland, Mark G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of learning about electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) via live observation to learning via an instructional videotape. Method: During their psychiatry clerkship, 122 medical students were randomized using these two educational methods, and their ECT knowledge and attitudes were assessed during the first and last weeks…

  12. 78 FR 61363 - Correction-Scientific Information Request on Medication Therapy Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Correction--Scientific Information Request on Medication Therapy Management The original date of publication for this Federal Register notice was...

  13. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module III. Shock and Fluid Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on shock and fluid therapy is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) body fluids, electrolytes and their effect on the body, and the general principles of fluid and acid base balances; (2) characteristics of…

  14. A Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depressed Adolescents Receiving Antidepressant Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Gregory; DeBar, Lynn; Lynch, Frances; Powell, James; Gale, John; O'Connor, Elizabeth; Ludman, Evette; Bush, Terry; Lin, Elizabeth H. B.; Von Korff, Michael; Hertert, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To test a collaborative-care, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) program adjunctive to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in HMO pediatric primary care. Method: A randomized effectiveness trial comparing a treatment-as-usual (TAU) control condition consisting primarily of SSRI medication delivered outside the…

  15. Prediction of Response to Medication and Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Jay C.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Gallop, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial found nearly equivalent response rates for antidepressant medications and cognitive therapy in a sample of moderate to severely depressed outpatients. In this article, the authors seek to identify the variables that were associated with response across both treatments as well as variables that predicted…

  16. A Study of Mathematics Needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Keith J.

    A study was conducted to determine what mathematics skills were needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy. Data obtained from studies, course outlines, textbooks, and reports were used to construct a 79-item mathematics skill questionnaire. This questionnaire was administered to employers,…

  17. Comparing Two Cooperative Small Group Formats Used with Physical Therapy and Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Eon, Marcel; Proctor, Peggy; Reeder, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    This study compared "Structured Controversy" (a semi-formal debate like small group activity) with a traditional open discussion format for medical and physical therapy students. We found that those students who had participated in Structured Controversy changed their personal opinion on the topic more than those who were in the Open Discussion…

  18. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux before and after medical therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1981-07-01

    Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is a quantitative technique that can be employed to detect and quantitate gastroesophageal reflux before and after the application of therapeutic modalities, including change in body position, bethanechol, atropine, antacids, and antacid-alginate compounds. Five groups of 10-15 patients each were studied before and after using each therapeutic modality and before and after atropine. The results were compared to the patient's symptomatology and to the acid reflux test. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy was performed following oral administration of 300 microCi 99mTc-sulfur colloid in 300 ml acidified orange juice. Thirty-second gamma camera images were obtained as the gastroesophageal gradient was increased from approximately 10 to 35 mm Hg at 5 mm Hg increments using an inflatable abdominal binder. Data were processed using a digital computer. Reflux was reduced by change in position from recumbent to upright, and by the use of subcutaneous bethanechol, oral antacid, or oral antacidalginate compound. Atropine increased reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is more sensitive than fluoroscopy, correlates well with clinical symptomatology, and is a reliable and convenient technique for the quantitative estimation of reflux before and after therapy.

  19. Recent advances in targeted therapy for Ewing sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Pishas, Kathleen I.; Lessnick, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive, poorly differentiated neoplasm of solid bone that disproportionally afflicts the young. Despite intensive multi-modal therapy and valiant efforts, 70% of patients with relapsed and metastatic Ewing sarcoma will succumb to their disease. The persistent failure to improve overall survival for this subset of patients highlights the urgent need for rapid translation of novel therapeutic strategies. As Ewing sarcoma is associated with a paucity of mutations in readily targetable signal transduction pathways, targeting the key genetic aberration and master regulator of Ewing sarcoma, the EWS/ETS fusion, remains an important goal. PMID:27635231

  20. Recent advances of sonodynamic therapy in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guo-Yun; Liu, Yang; Chen, Bo-Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Yin-Song; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is an emerging approach that involves a combination of low-intensity ultrasound and specialized chemical agents known as sonosensitizers. Ultrasound can penetrate deeply into tissues and can be focused into a small region of a tumor to activate a sonosensitizer which offers the possibility of non-invasively eradicating solid tumors in a site-directed manner. In this article, we critically reviewed the currently accepted mechanisms of sonodynamic action and summarized the classification of sonosensitizers. At the same time, the breath of evidence from SDT-based studies suggests that SDT is promising for cancer treatment. PMID:27807500

  1. Recent Advances of Stem Cell Therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuxi; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Xin; Ghazaryan, Emma; Li, Ying; Xie, Jianan; Su, Guanfang

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited retinal disorders characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors and eventually leads to retina degeneration and atrophy. Until now, the exact pathogenesis and etiology of this disease has not been clear, and many approaches for RP therapies have been carried out in animals and in clinical trials. In recent years, stem cell transplantation-based attempts made some progress, especially the transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This review will provide an overview of stem cell-based treatment of RP and its main problems, to provide evidence for the safety and feasibility for further clinical treatment. PMID:25141102

  2. The charisma and deception of reparative therapies: when medical science beds religion.

    PubMed

    Grace, André P

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I examine the history and resurgence of interest in sexual reorientation or reparative therapies. I begin with a critique of the contemporary "ex-gay" movement, interrogating Exodus as the prototype of a politico-religious transformational ministry that works to "cure" homosexuals, and examine how Exodus utilizes ex-gay testimony to deceive harried homosexuals looking for escape from the effects of internalized and cultural homophobia. Next, I investigate how reparative therapies function as orthodox treatments that charismatically meld conservative religious perspectives with medical science to produce a pseudoscience promising to treat homosexuality effectively. In this regard, I assess the ongoing debate regarding gay-affirming versus reparative therapies by first looking at the history of medicalizing homosexuality and then surveying the debate spurred by Robert L. Spitzer's research. I conclude with a consideration of research needed to measure whether efficacious change in sexual orientation is possible.

  3. M-health medical video communication systems: an overview of design approaches and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Panayides, A S; Pattichis, M S; Constantinides, A G; Pattichis, C S

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of the new, High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard, combined with wide deployment of 4G wireless networks, will provide significant support toward the adoption of mobile-health (m-health) medical video communication systems in standard clinical practice. For the first time since the emergence of m-health systems and services, medical video communication systems can be deployed that can rival the standards of in-hospital examinations. In this paper, we provide a thorough overview of today's advancements in the field, discuss existing approaches, and highlight the future trends and objectives.

  4. LLNL medical and industrial laser isotope separation: large volume, low cost production through advanced laser technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Scheibner, K. F.; Shaw, M.; Wilder, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of this LDRD project was to demonstrate the technical and economical feasibility of applying laser isotope separation technology to the commercial enrichment (>lkg/y) of stable isotopes. A successful demonstration would well position the laboratory to make a credible case for the creation of an ongoing medical and industrial isotope production and development program at LLNL. Such a program would establish LLNL as a center for advanced medical isotope production, successfully leveraging previous LLNL Research and Development hardware, facilities, and knowledge.

  5. Knowledge translation in the emergency medical services: a research agenda for advancing prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Cone, David C

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about knowledge translation in the practice of out-of-hospital medicine. It is generally accepted that much work is needed regarding "getting the evidence straight" in emergency medical services, given the substantial number of interventions that are performed regularly in the field but lack meaningful scientific support. Additional attention also needs to be given to "getting the evidence used," because there is some evidence that evidence-based practices are being incompletely or incorrectly applied in the field. In an effort to help advance a research agenda for knowledge translation in emergency medical services, nine recommendations are put forth to help address the problems identified.

  6. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Acute Treatment of Adults with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimidjian, Sona; Hollon, Steven D.; Dobson, Keith S.; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Addis, Michael E.; Gallop, Robert; McGlinchey, Joseph B.; Markley, David K.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Atkins, David C.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is considered the current standard for severe depression, and cognitive therapy is the most widely investigated psychosocial treatment for depression. However, not all patients want to take medication, and cognitive therapy has not demonstrated consistent efficacy across trials. Moreover, dismantling designs have…

  7. [Advances in medical care for extremely low birth weight infants worldwide].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhang, Qian-Shen

    2013-08-01

    Dramatic advances in neonatal medicine over recent decades have resulted in decreased mortality and morbidity rates for extremely low birth weight infants. However, the survival of these infants is associated with short- and long-term morbidity, including severe intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, nosocomial infection and necrotizing enterocolitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and adverse long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae. This article reviewed the latest advances in the medical care for extremely low birth weight infants including survival rate, ethical issues and short- and long-term morbidity, domestically and abroad.

  8. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) in advanced inoperable bronchial carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghissi, Keyvan; Dixon, Kate; Stringer, Mark R.; Brown, Stanley B.

    1996-12-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of PDT to: Palliate symptoms, control disease and extend survival in patients with advanced inoperable cancer. Subject and Method: 55 Males and 23 females aged between 45-81 years (mean 66 years) with inoperable and advanced lung cancer with > 5O. obstructive lesions of the main, lobar or segmental bronchi. Patients had pre-treatment routine clinical radiological, functional and endoscopic assessment with proven histological diagnosis. Protocol of PDT was; Intravenous injection of 2 mg/Kg bodyweight Polyhaematoporphyrin (equivalent to Photofrin) or Photofrin followed 24-72 hours later by illumination of tumour using 630 nm light (Oxford Laser) delivered via an optical fibre with end diffuser. Treatments were carried out under general anaesthesia as a day case procedure. Patients were rebronchoscoped for debridement/retreatment 4-7 days later. Results: There was no treatment related mortality. Two patients developed mild photosensitivity reaction. All patients showed symptomatic improvement with good initial functional and radiological amelioration. Every patient responded to treatment. Seven patients had complete response and negative histology for 3-12 months. After the first treatment average Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) improvement was 0.5 litres and 0.4 litres respectively. Twenty five percent of patients (nr 19) survived more than 2 years, 10'. (nr=8) between 1-2 years and the remaining 51 patients less than a year. Conclusion: PDT should be considered as a therapeutic modality for all stages of lung cancer and is an excellent treatment modality for palliation in advanced bronchial malignancies.

  9. Conceptualisation of the characteristics of advanced practitioners in the medical radiation professions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tony; Harris, Jillian; Woznitza, Nick; Maresse, Sharon; Sale, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Professions grapple with defining advanced practice and the characteristics of advanced practitioners. In nursing and allied health, advanced practice has been defined as ‘a state of professional maturity in which the individual demonstrates a level of integrated knowledge, skill and competence that challenges the accepted boundaries of practice and pioneers new developments in health care’. Evolution of advanced practice in Australia has been slower than in the United Kingdom, mainly due to differences in demography, the health system and industrial relations. This article describes a conceptual model of advanced practitioner characteristics in the medical radiation professions, taking into account experiences in other countries and professions. Using the CanMEDS framework, the model includes foundation characteristics of communication, collaboration and professionalism, which are fundamental to advanced clinical practice. Gateway characteristics are: clinical expertise, with high level competency in a particular area of clinical practice; scholarship and teaching, including a masters qualification and knowledge dissemination through educating others; and evidence-based practice, with judgements made on the basis of research findings, including research by the advanced practitioner. The pinnacle of advanced practice is clinical leadership, where the practitioner has a central role in the health care team, with the capacity to influence decision making and advocate for others, including patients. The proposed conceptual model is robust yet adaptable in defining generic characteristics of advanced practitioners, no matter their clinical specialty. The advanced practice roles that evolve to meet future health service demand must focus on the needs of patients, local populations and communities. PMID:26451243

  10. Advances in endonasal low intensity laser irradiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian-Ling; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Liu, Song-hao

    2005-07-01

    Endonasal low intensity laser therapy (ELILT) began in China in 1998. Now in China it is widely applied to treat hyperlipidemia and brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, insomnia, poststroke depression, intractable headache, ache in head or face, cerebral thrombosis, acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease, migraine, brain lesion and mild cognitive impairment. There are four pathways mediating EILILT, Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells. Two unhealth acupoints of Yangming channal inside nose might mediate the one as is low intensity laser acupuncture. Unbalance autonomic nervous systems might be modulated. Blood cells might mediate the one as is intravascular low intensity laser therapy. These three pathways are integrated in ELILT so that serum amyloid β protein, malformation rate of erythrocyte, CCK-8, the level of viscosity at lower shear rates and hematocrit, or serum lipid might decrease, and melanin production/SOD activity or β endorphin might increase after ELILT treatment. These results indicate ELILT might work, but it need to be verified by randomized placebo-controlled trial.

  11. Targeted Therapies for Advanced Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yunyun; Ludwig, Joseph; Janku, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of adolescent and young adult patients battling metastatic Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumours (ESFT) remains less than 30% despite the development of systemic therapies. In the era of personalized medicine, novel molecular targets have been tested in preclinical or clinical settings in ESFT. In this review, we focus on early clinical and translational research that identified multiple molecular targets, including IGF-1R; mTOR; tyrosine kinase inhibitors; EWS-FLI1-related targets, and others. Overall, novel targeted therapies demonstrated modest efficacy; however pronounced and durable antineoplastic responses have been observed in small subsets of treated patients, for example with IGF-1R antibodies. Identifying outcome-predicting biomarkers and overcoming treatment resistance remain major challenges. Due to the rarity of ESFT, multi-institutional collaboration efforts of clinicians, basic and translational scientists are needed in order to understand biology of therapeutic response or resistance, which can lead to development of novel therapeutic methods and improved patient outcomes. PMID:25869102

  12. Advances in Overcoming Immune Responses following Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Carol H.

    2012-01-01

    Both Clinical trials and pre-clinical experiments for hemophilia gene therapy showed that it is important to overcome potential immune responses against gene transfer vectors and/or transgene products to ensure the success of gene therapy. Recently various approaches have been investigated to prevent or modulate such responses. Gene transfer vectors have been specifically engineered and immunosuppressive regimens have been administered to avoid or manipulate the immune responses against the vectors. In order to prevent cytotoxic lymphocyte or antibody formation induced by transgene expression, novel approaches have been developed, including methods to manipulate antigen presentation, development of variant genes encoding less immunogenic proteins or gene transfer protocols to evade immune responses, as well as immunosuppressive strategies to target either T and/or B cell responses. Most of these successful protocols involve the induction of activated regulatory T cells to create a regulatory immune environment during tolerance induction. Recent development of these strategies to evade vector-specific immune responses and induce long-term immune tolerance specific to the transgene product will be discussed. PMID:22737594

  13. Nanoparticulate drug delivery platforms for advancing bone infection therapies

    PubMed Central

    Uskoković, Vuk; Desai, Tejal A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The ongoing surge of resistance of bacterial pathogens to antibiotic therapies and the consistently aging median member of the human race signal an impending increase in the incidence of chronic bone infection. Nanotechnological platforms for local and sustained delivery of therapeutics hold the greatest potential for providing minimally invasive and maximally regenerative therapies for this rare but persistent condition. Areas covered Shortcomings of the clinically available treatment options, including poly(methyl methacrylate) beads and calcium sulfate cements, are discussed and their transcending using calcium-phosphate/polymeric nanoparticulate composites is foreseen. Bone is a composite wherein the weakness of each component alone is compensated for by the strength of its complement and an ideal bone substitute should be fundamentally the same. Expert opinion Discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo bioactivity assessments is highlighted, alongside the inherent imperfectness of the former. Challenges entailing the cross-disciplinary nature of engineering a new generation of drug delivery vehicles are delineated and it is concluded that the future for the nanoparticulate therapeutic carriers belongs to multifunctional, synergistic and theranostic composites capable of simultaneously targeting, monitoring and treating internal organismic disturbances in a smart, feedback fashion and in direct response to the demands of the local environment. PMID:25109804

  14. Molecular Profiling-Selected Therapy for Treatment of Advanced Pancreaticobiliary Cancer: A Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Epelbaum, Ron; Shacham-Shmueli, Einat; Klein, Baruch; Agbarya, Abed; Brenner, Baruch; Brenner, Ronen; Gez, Eliahu; Golan, Talia; Hubert, Ayala; Purim, Ofer; Temper, Mark; Tepper, Ella; Voss, Andreas; Russell, Kenneth; Dvir, Addie; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Stemmer, Salomon M; Geva, Ravit

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter cohort study assessed the impact of molecular profiling (MP) on advanced pancreaticobiliary cancer (PBC). The study included 30 patients treated with MP-guided therapy after failing ≥ 1 therapy for advanced PBC. Treatment was considered as having benefit for the patient if the ratio between the longest progression-free survival (PFS) on MP-guided therapy and the PFS on the last therapy before MP was ≥ 1.3. The null hypothesis was that ≤ 15% of patients gain such benefit. Overall, ≥ 1 actionable (i.e., predictive of response to specific therapies) biomarker was identified/patient. Immunohistochemistry (the most commonly used method for guiding treatment decisions) identified 1-6 (median: 4) actionable biomarkers per patient. After MP, patients received 1-4 (median: 1) regimens/patient (most commonly, FOLFIRI/XELIRI). In a decision-impact analysis, of the 27 patients for whom treatment decisions before MP were available, 74.1% experienced a treatment decision change in the first line after MP. Twenty-four patients were evaluable for clinical outcome analysis; in 37.5%, the PFS ratio was ≥ 1.3. In one-sided exact binomial test versus the null hypothesis, P = 0.0015; therefore, the null hypothesis was rejected. In conclusion, our analysis demonstrated the feasibility, clinical decision impact, and potential clinical benefits of MP-guided therapy in advanced PBC.

  15. Molecular Profiling-Selected Therapy for Treatment of Advanced Pancreaticobiliary Cancer: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Epelbaum, Ron; Shacham-Shmueli, Einat; Klein, Baruch; Agbarya, Abed; Brenner, Baruch; Brenner, Ronen; Gez, Eliahu; Golan, Talia; Hubert, Ayala; Purim, Ofer; Temper, Mark; Tepper, Ella; Voss, Andreas; Russell, Kenneth; Dvir, Addie; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Stemmer, Salomon M.; Geva, Ravit

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter cohort study assessed the impact of molecular profiling (MP) on advanced pancreaticobiliary cancer (PBC). The study included 30 patients treated with MP-guided therapy after failing ≥1 therapy for advanced PBC. Treatment was considered as having benefit for the patient if the ratio between the longest progression-free survival (PFS) on MP-guided therapy and the PFS on the last therapy before MP was ≥1.3. The null hypothesis was that ≤15% of patients gain such benefit. Overall, ≥1 actionable (i.e., predictive of response to specific therapies) biomarker was identified/patient. Immunohistochemistry (the most commonly used method for guiding treatment decisions) identified 1–6 (median: 4) actionable biomarkers per patient. After MP, patients received 1–4 (median: 1) regimens/patient (most commonly, FOLFIRI/XELIRI). In a decision-impact analysis, of the 27 patients for whom treatment decisions before MP were available, 74.1% experienced a treatment decision change in the first line after MP. Twenty-four patients were evaluable for clinical outcome analysis; in 37.5%, the PFS ratio was ≥1.3. In one-sided exact binomial test versus the null hypothesis, P = 0.0015; therefore, the null hypothesis was rejected. In conclusion, our analysis demonstrated the feasibility, clinical decision impact, and potential clinical benefits of MP-guided therapy in advanced PBC. PMID:26161408

  16. Advances in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Genomics, Biomarkers, and Antiplatelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Emanuele; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Stolen, Craig; Taylor, Angela; Barton, Paul J.; Bartunek, Jozef; Iaizzo, Paul; Judge, Daniel P.; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie; Blaxall, Burns C.; Terzic, Andre; Hall, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The Journal provides the clinician and scientist with the latest advances in discovery research, emerging technologies, pre-clinical research design and testing, and clinical trials. We highlight advances in areas of induced pluripotent stem cells, genomics, biomarkers, multi-modality imaging and antiplatelet biology and therapy. The top publications are critically discussed and presented along with anatomical reviews and FDA insight to provide context. PMID:24659088

  17. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events.

  18. [Advances in the research of effects of music therapy on pain and anxiety in burn patients].

    PubMed

    Jinyi, Li; Yungui, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Pain and anxiety engender major psychic problems during all phases of treatment for burn patients. Analgesic alone does not allay these problems satisfactorily in these patients. Music therapy, as an important complementary and alternative therapy, has been widely used in multiple medical fields. However, its positive effect on alleviation of pain and anxiety in burn patients is undefined. The objective of this review is to summarize the feasibility, application fields, methods, and the effectiveness of music therapy in allaying pain and anxiety of burn patients during the whole course of treatment.

  19. Recent Advances in the Medical Treatment of Recurrent or Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumbla, Rekha A; Figlin, Robert A; Posadas, Edwin M

    2017-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) historically has had limited treatment options in the metastatic setting but in the last decade, a significant arsenal of new therapies has emerged. Specifically, targeted anti-angiogenic therapies through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition and immunotherapy through PD-1 inhibition have become the foundation of metastatic RCC treatment increasing not only progression-free survival but also an improved overall survival with improved toxicity profiles compared with older therapies such as IL-2 and interferon. With the development of these newer medications, the optimal sequence and pairing of treatments is not yet well understood but important studies are ongoing as this information will allow for more effective and safe treatment of patients.

  20. New advances in the mesenchymal stem cells therapy against skin flaps necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fu-Gui; Tang, Xiu-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), multipotential cells that reside within the bone marrow, can be induced to differentiate into various cells, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, vascular endothelial progenitor cells, and other cell types. MSCs are being widely studied as potential cell therapy agents due to their angiogenic properties, which have been well established by in vitro and in vivo researches. Within this context, MSCs therapy appears to hold substantial promise, particularly in the treatment of conditions involving skin grafts, pedicle flaps, as well as free flaps described in literatures. The purpose of this review is to report the new advances and mechanisms underlying MSCs therapy against skin flaps necrosis. PMID:25258671

  1. Endocrine therapy for hormone treatment-naïve advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Miguel; Lopez-Tarruella, Sara; Gilarranz, Yolanda Jerez

    2016-08-01

    A proportion of patients with hormone receptor-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer will not have received prior endocrine therapy. However, there are limited clinical data specifically in these patients. We conducted a review of randomized phase II and III clinical studies of anastrozole, letrozole, exemestane, palbociclib, and fulvestrant to determine the evidence base supporting use of specific endocrine therapies in this patient population. From our findings, there is a paucity of clinical studies in patients with endocrine therapy-naïve disease; however, it appears that first-line treatment effects are consistent between patients who have and have not received prior endocrine treatment.

  2. Advances in antiplatelet therapy for acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Hussain; Ruparelia, Neil

    2012-07-01

    Admissions to emergency care centres with acute coronary syndromes remain one of the principal burdens on healthcare systems in the Western world. Early pharmacological treatment in these patients is crucial, lessening the impact on both morbidity and mortality, with the cornerstone of management being antiplatelet agents. While aspirin and clopidogrel have been the drugs of choice for nearly a decade, an array of newer, more potent antiplatelet agents are now available or in late stage development. Data are rapidly gathering suggesting these agents have superior anti-ischaemic properties, improving patient outcomes, but that for some agents increased vigilance and appropriate patient selection may be necessary to guard against bleeding complications. In this review, the authors aim to deliver an overview of the changing field of antiplatelet therapy and provide information about the relative risks and benefits of these newer agents, many of which will be entering widespread clinical use imminently.

  3. Advanced optical techniques for monitoring dosimetric parameters in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Buhong; Qiu, Zhihai; Huang, Zheng

    2012-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the generation of highly reactive singlet oxygen through interactions of photosensitizer, light and molecular oxygen. PDT has become a clinically approved, minimally invasive therapeutic modality for a wide variety of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The main dosimetric parameters for predicting the PDT efficacy include the delivered light dose, the quantification and photobleaching of the administrated photosensitizer, the tissue oxygen concentration, the amount of singlet oxygen generation and the resulting biological responses. This review article presents the emerging optical techniques that in use or under development for monitoring dosimetric parameters during PDT treatment. Moreover, the main challenges in developing real-time and noninvasive optical techniques for monitoring dosimetric parameters in PDT will be described.

  4. The Fontan Patient: Inconsistencies in Medication Therapy Across Seven Pediatric Heart Network Centers

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Page A. W.; McCrindle, Brian W.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Atz, Andrew M.; Hsu, Daphne T.; Lu, Minmin; Margossian, Renee; Williams, Richard V.

    2011-01-01

    Patients who have undergone the Fontan procedure are at risk for thrombosis, ventricular dysfunction, and valve regurgitation, but data to guide the medical treatment and prevention of these adverse outcomes in this population are lacking. This analysis examined medication usage among Fontan patients by putative indication and by study center. The medical history and current medications of 546 Fontan subjects, ages 6–18 years, were assessed in a Pediatric Heart Network multicenter cross-sectional study. Cardiac imaging was performed within 3 months of enrollment. The majority of the subjects (64%) were taking two or more medications. Antithrombotics were taken by 86% of those with a history of stroke, thrombosis, or both and 67% of those without such a history (P = 0.01). Conversely, 14% of those with a history of stroke, thrombosis, or both were taking no antithrombotic. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) therapy was independently associated with moderate or severe atrioventricular valve regurgitation (P = 0.004), right ventricular morphology (P < 0.001), and shorter time since Fontan (P = 0.004) but not with ventricular systolic dysfunction. Glycoside therapy and diuretic therapy each was associated with older age at Fontan (P = 0.001 and P = 0.023, respectively) and a history of post-Fontan arrhythmia (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively) but not with ventricular systolic dysfunction. Medication use rates varied widely among the centers, even with controls for center differences in patient characteristics. Prospective therapeutic trials are needed to guide the medical treatment of Fontan patients. PMID:20938655

  5. Integrated Medical Information Technology System (IMITS): Information and Clinical Technologies for the Advancement of Healthcare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-31

    Communications in Medicine ( DICOM ) standard interfaces allow communication between the DRDWA and various PACS vendors throughout the Air Force. This...Final Report: FY05 IMITS: Information and Clinical Technologies for the Advancement of Healthcare Page 15  DICOM standardization ensures...interoperability with all existing DICOM capable imaging repositories and future additions to the Air Force medical imaging initiative. The Air Force maintains a

  6. Advanced search of the electronic medical record: augmenting safety and efficiency in radiology.

    PubMed

    Zalis, Michael; Harris, Mitchell

    2010-08-01

    The integration of electronic medical record (EMR) systems into clinical practice has been spurred by general consensus and recent federal incentives and is set to become a standard feature of clinical practice in the US. We discuss how the addition of advanced search capabilities to the EMR can improve the radiologist's ability to integrate contextual data into workflows associated with both for diagnostic and interventional procedures.

  7. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medical (CAM) Therapies Among Youth with Mental Health Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Kathi J; Gardiner, Paula; Birdee, Gurjeet S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies is common among adults with mental health concerns, but little is known about CAM use among adolescents with mental health concerns. Methods Data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey were analyzed for youth from 7–17 years old. The study focused on three common mental health conditions: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety, and depression. CAM use was identified by criteria from the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NIH NCCAM). Results In a sample of 5651 individuals, representing seven million youth, with one or more mental health concerns in the past 12 months, 28.9% used one or more types of CAM excluding vitamins/minerals. In contrast, only 11.6% of those without mental health concerns reported CAM use (P<0.05). Among youth with one or more mental health conditions, the most commonly used CAM therapies were mind-body therapies (16.3%) and biologically-based therapies (11%); use was higher for therapies that could be directly accessed (18.6%), than for therapies delivered in groups (11.8%) or through a health professional (10.2%). In the multivariable regression model, demographic factors significantly associated with CAM use were higher household income, higher parental education, having other chronic health conditions, use of prescription medications, and difficulty affording mental health counseling. Conclusion Readily accessible CAM therapies are commonly used by youth with ADHD, depression, and anxiety, particularly those who have co-morbid chronic health conditions, take prescription medications, and difficulty affording counseling. Clinicians can use this data to guide inquiries and counseling. Researchers should explore the longitudinal relationship between access to coordinated care within a medical home and use of CAM therapies among youth with mental health concerns. What’s New Use of CAM is

  8. Advanced carcinoma of the stomach treated with definitive proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, S.; Kawanishi, N.; Fukutomi, H.; Osuga, T.; Iijima, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kitagawa, T. )

    1990-04-01

    We report the case of a 72-yr-old man who suffered from severe chronic emphysema with poor pulmonary function, and who had advanced cancer of the stomach. Proton beam radiotherapy was applied to the lesion, since surgery was contraindicated. The total dose to the stomach lesion was 61 Gy in 7 wk. The tumor on the stomach regressed, with flattening of the round wall of the lesion. The reactive changes of the proton beam radiotherapy, based on the histopathological examination, revealed extensive tumor necrosis and sparing of vital architecture of normal tissue around the irradiated tumor tissue. Only small clusters of vital or devitalized tumor cells with less than approximately 5% of the whole tumor tissue remained after treatment. We suggest that a high dose of radiation delivered by well-defined proton field could result in an improved therapeutic outcome without undue risk of injury to normal tissue.

  9. Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home.

    PubMed

    Fex, Angelika; Flensner, Gullvi; Ek, Anna-Christina; Söderhamn, Olle

    2011-12-01

    Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home An increased number of chronically ill adults perform self-care while using different sorts of advanced medical technology at home. This hermeneutical study aimed to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home. Eleven next of kin to adults performing self-care at home, either using long-term oxygen from a cylinder or ventilator, or performing peritoneal or haemodialysis, were interviewed. The qualitative interviews were analysed using a Gadamerian methodology. The main interpretation explained the meaning as rhythmical patterns of connectedness versus separation, and of sorrow versus reconciliation. Dependence on others was shown in the need for support from healthcare professionals and significant others. In conclusion, next of kin took considerable responsibility for dependent-care. All next of kin were positive to the idea of bringing the technology home, even though their own needs receded into the background, while focusing on the best for the patient. The results were discussed in relation to dependent-care and transition, which may have an influence on the self-care of next of kin and patients. The study revealed a need for further nursing attention to next of kin in this context.

  10. End-of-life discontinuation of destination therapy with cardiac and ventilatory support medical devices: physician-assisted death or allowing the patient to die?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die." Discussion Advances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body are used for permanent support of respiration. Clinical studies have shown that destination therapy with ventricular assist devices improves patient survival compared to medical management, but at the cost of a substantial alteration in end-of-life trajectories. The moral and legal assessment of the appropriateness and permissibility of complying with a patient's request to electively discontinue destination therapy in a life-terminating act in non-futile situations has generated controversy. Some argue that complying with this request is ethically justified because patients have the right to request withdrawal of unwanted treatment and be allowed to die of preexisting disease. Other commentators reject the argument that acceding to an elective request for death by discontinuing destination therapy is 'allowing a patient to die' because of serious flaws in interpreting the intention, causation, and moral responsibility of the ensuing death. Summary Destination therapy with cardiac and/or ventilatory medical devices replaces native physiological functions and successfully treats a preexisting disease. We posit that discontinuing cardiac and/or ventilatory support at the request of a patient or surrogate can be viewed as allowing the patient to die if--and only if--concurrent lethal pathophysiological conditions are present that are unrelated to those functions already supported by medical devices in

  11. Advances in hemorrhagic stroke therapy: conventional and novel approaches.

    PubMed

    Lapchak, Paul A; Araujo, Dalia M

    2007-09-01

    Treatments for spontaneous intracerebral, thrombolytic-induced and intraventricular hemorrhages (IVH) are still at the preclinical or early clinical investigational stages. There has been some renewed interest in the use of surgical evacuation surgery or thrombolytics to remove hematomas, but these techniques can be used only for specific types of brain bleeding. The STICH (Surgical Trial in Intracerebral Haemorrhage) clinical trials should provide some insight into the potential for such techniques to counteract hematoma-induced damage and subsequently, morbidity and mortality. More recently, clinical trials (ATACH [Antihypertensive Treatment in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage] and INTERACT [Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trial]) have begun testing whether or not regulating blood pressure affects the well-being of hemorrhage patients, but the findings thus far have not conclusively demonstrated a positive result. More promising trials, such as the early stage CHANT (Cerebral Hemorrhagic And NXY-059 Treatment) and the late stage FAST (Factor VIIa for Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke Treatment), have addressed whether or not manipulating oxidative stress and components of the blood coagulation cascade can achieve an improved prognosis following spontaneous hemorrhages. However, CHANT was halted prematurely because although it showed that the spin trap agent NXY-059 was safe, it also demonstrated that the drug was ineffective in treating acute ischemic stroke. In addition, the recombinant activated factor VII FAST trial recently concluded with only modestly positive results. Despite a beneficial effect on the primary end point of reducing hemorrhage volume, controlling the coagulation cascade with recombinant factor VIIa did not decrease the mortality rate. Consequently, Novo Nordisk has abandoned further development of the drug for the treatment of intracerebral hemorrhaging. Even though progress in hemorrhage therapy that successfully reduces the

  12. Primary radiation therapy for locally advanced breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, T.; Hayes, D.F.; Cady, B.; Parker, L.; Osteen, R.; Silver, B.; Recht, A.; Come, S.; Henderson, I.C.; Harris, J.R.

    1987-09-15

    The optimal local-regional treatment for patients with Stage III breast cancer has not been determined. To evaluate the effectiveness of radiation therapy as local treatment for such patients, the results of 192 patients (five with bilateral disease) treated with radiation therapy without mastectomy between July 1, 1968 and December 31, 1981 were reviewed. Excisional biopsy (gross tumor removal) was performed in only 54 of the 197 breasts. Patients typically received 4500 to 5000 cGy in 5 weeks to the breast and draining lymph nodes; a local boost to areas of gross disease was delivered to 157 patients. Multi-agent chemotherapy was given to 53 patients. The median follow-up was 65 months. The actuarial probability of survival for the entire group was 41% at 5 years and 23% at 10 years. The probability of relapse-free survival (RFS) was 30% at 5 years and 19% at 10 years. The addition of multi-agent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly improved 5-year RFS (40% versus 26%, P = 0.02). The 5-year survival rate was 51% for patients who received adjuvant multi-agent chemotherapy and 38% for patients who did not (P = 0.16). The actuarial rate of local-regional tumor control (not censored for distant failure) for all patients was 73% at 5 years and 68% at ten years, and the crude incidence of local-regional control was 78%. Local-regional tumor control was principally influenced by radiation dose. Patients who received 6000 cGy or greater to the primary site had a better 5-year rate of control in the breast than did patients who received less than 6000 cGy (83% versus 70%, P = 0.06). Significant complications were seen in 15 patients (8%); these included moderate or severe arm edema in six patients and brachial plexopathy in four patients. Cosmetic results at last evaluation were excellent or good in 56% of evaluable patients, fair in 25%, and poor in 19%.

  13. Surviving with Lung Cancer: Medication-Taking and Oral Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    WICKERSHAM, Karen E.; HAPP, Mary Beth; BENDER, Catherine M.; ENGBERG, Sandra J.; TARHINI, Ahmad; ERLEN, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) improve survival for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, medication-taking implications are unknown. We used grounded theory to explore the process of medication-taking for NSCLC patients receiving oral EGFRIs. Thirty-two interviews were conducted for 13 participants purposively selected for gender, race/ethnicity, age, time in therapy, dose reductions, and therapy discontinuation and theoretically sampled for age and health insurance carrier. The study produced a grounded theory, Surviving with Lung Cancer, in which participants framed EGFRI therapy within recognition of NSCLC as a life-limiting illness without cure. Medication-taking was a “window” into participants’ process of surviving with metastatic cancer that included deciding and preparing to take EGFRIs and treating lung cancer as a chronic condition. Our results contribute to understanding how NSCLC patients view themselves in the context of a life-limiting illness and support development of a theoretically-based intervention to improve medication-taking with EGFRIs. PMID:24702721

  14. Mathematical Modelling and Tuberculosis: Advances in Diagnostics and Novel Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Zwerling, Alice; Shrestha, Sourya; Dowdy, David W.

    2015-01-01

    As novel diagnostics, therapies, and algorithms are developed to improve case finding, diagnosis, and clinical management of patients with TB, policymakers must make difficult decisions and choose among multiple new technologies while operating under heavy resource constrained settings. Mathematical modelling can provide helpful insight by describing the types of interventions likely to maximize impact on the population level and highlighting those gaps in our current knowledge that are most important for making such assessments. This review discusses the major contributions of TB transmission models in general, namely, the ability to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of TB. We focus particularly on those elements that are important to appropriately understand the role of TB diagnosis and treatment (i.e., what elements of better diagnosis or treatment are likely to have greatest population-level impact) and yet remain poorly understood at present. It is essential for modellers, decision-makers, and epidemiologists alike to recognize these outstanding gaps in knowledge and understand their potential influence on model projections that may guide critical policy choices (e.g., investment and scale-up decisions). PMID:26556559

  15. Nanotechnology-Based Photodynamic Therapy: Concepts, Advances, and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Jain, Nitin K; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photoactive process that uses the combination of photosensitizers (PSs) and specific wavelengths of light for the treatment of solid tumors and other diseases. PDT received increased attention after regulatory approval of several photosensitizing drugs and light applicators worldwide. With the advent of newer PSs, the role of PDT in the treatment of cancer and other diseases has been revolutionized. In addition, various targeting strategies developed for site-specific delivery of PSs will be helpful for avoiding phototoxicity to normal tissues. Receptor-mediated targeted PDT approaches using nanocarriers offer the opportunity of enhancing photodynamic efficiency by directly targeting diseased cells and tissues. At present, clinical application of PDT is well established in medicine and surgery. Successfully used in dermatology, urology, gastroenterology, and neurosurgery, PDT has also seen much progress in basic sciences and clinical photodynamics in recent years. Currently, the use of PDT is just beginning, and more research must be performed to prove its therapeutic efficacy. However, nontoxic compounds involved in PDT provide a certain hope that it will evolve to be an effective mechanism for combating chronic diseases.

  16. Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Barry; Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-08-15

    Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and, in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant.

  17. Anti-angiogenic therapies for advanced esophago-gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Elisa; Sclafani, Francesco; Cunningham, David

    2014-01-01

    Neo-vascularization is a vital process for tumor growth and development which involves the interaction between tumor cells and stromal endothelial cells through several growth factors and membranous receptors which ultimately activate pro-angiogenic intracellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of angiogenesis has become a standard treatment option for several tumor types including colorectal cancer, glioblastoma and ovarian cancer. In gastric cancer, the therapeutic role of anti-angiogenic agents is more controversial. Bevacizumab and ramucirumab, two monoclonal antibodies, which target vascular endothelial growth factor-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, respectively, have been demonstrated antitumor activity in patients with tumors of the stomach or esophagogastric junction. However, especially for bevacizumab, this antitumor activity has not consistently translated into a survival advantage over standard treatment in randomized trials. In this article, we provide an overview of the role of angiogenesis in gastric cancer and discuss the results of clinical trials that investigated safety and effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapies in this disease. A review of the literature has been done using PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov website and the ASCO Annual Meeting Library. PMID:25538401

  18. Complex antithrombotic therapy: determinants of patient preference and impact on medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Neena S; Naik, Aanand D; Street, Richard L; Castillo, Diana L; Deswal, Anita; Richardson, Peter A; Hartman, Christine M; Shelton, George; Fraenkel, Liana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose For years, older patients have been prescribed multiple blood-thinning medications (complex antithrombotic therapy [CAT]) to decrease their risk of cardiovascular events. These therapies, however, increase risk of adverse bleeding events. We assessed patient-reported trade-offs between cardioprotective benefit, gastrointestinal bleeding risk, and burden of self-management using adaptive conjoint analysis (ACA). As ACA could be a clinically useful tool to obtain patient preferences and guide future patient-centered care, we examined the clinical application of ACA to obtain patient preferences and the impact of ACA on medication adherence. Patients and methods An electronic ACA survey led 201 respondents through medication risk–benefit trade-offs, revealing patients’ preferences for the CAT risk/benefit profile they valued most. The post-ACA prescription regimen was categorized as concordant or discordant with elicited preferences. Adherence was measured using VA pharmacy refill data to measure persistence of use prior to and 1 year following preference-elicitation. Additionally, we analyzed qualitative interviews of 56 respondents regarding their perception of the ACA and the preference elicitation experience. Results Participants prioritized 5-year cardiovascular benefit over preventing adverse events. Medication side effects, medication-associated activity restrictions, and regimen complexity were less important than bleeding risk and cardioprotective benefit. One year after the ACA survey, a 15% increase in adherence was observed in patients prescribed a preference-concordant CAT strategy. An increase of only 6% was noted in patients prescribed a preference-discordant strategy. Qualitative interviews showed that the ACA exercise contributed to increase inpatient activation, patient awareness of preferences, and patient engagement with clinicians about treatment decisions. Conclusion By working through trade-offs, patients actively clarified their

  19. Effectiveness of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ando, Michiyo; Kira, Haruko; Hayashida, Shigeru; Ito, Sayoko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese patients with advanced cancer. Patients learned mindfulness practices and then made art to express their feelings in the first session. After receiving instruction on practicing mindfulness 2 weeks later, they participated in a second…

  20. Advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a review of current treatment strategies and developing therapies

    PubMed Central

    Teague, Andrea; Lim, Kian-Huat

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest solid malignancies. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of presentation and, unfortunately, this severely limits the number of patients who can undergo surgical resection, which offers the only chance for cure. Recent therapeutic advances for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer have extended overall survival, but prognosis still remains grim. Given that traditional chemotherapy is ineffective in curing advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, current research is taking a multidirectional approach in the hopes of developing more effective treatments. This article reviews the major clinical trial data that is the basis for the current chemotherapy regimens used as first- and second-line treatments for advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We also review the current ongoing clinical trials, which include the use of agents targeting the oncogenic network signaling of K-Ras, agents targeting the extracellular matrix, and immune therapies. PMID:25755680

  1. Therapeutic Antioxidant Medical Gas

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Atsunori; Sugimoto, Ryujiro; Billiar, Timothy R; McCurry, Kenneth R

    2009-01-01

    Medical gases are pharmaceutical gaseous molecules which offer solutions to medical needs and include traditional gases, such as oxygen and nitrous oxide, as well as gases with recently discovered roles as biological messenger molecules, such as carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulphide. Medical gas therapy is a relatively unexplored field of medicine; however, a recent increasing in the number of publications on medical gas therapies clearly indicate that there are significant opportunities for use of gases as therapeutic tools for a variety of disease conditions. In this article, we review the recent advances in research on medical gases with antioxidant properties and discuss their clinical applications and therapeutic properties. PMID:19177183

  2. [Advances of molecular targeted therapy in squamous cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Shucai

    2013-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4)-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lung cancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  3. Plasmid DNA gene therapy by electroporation: principles and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsufumi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2011-12-01

    Simple plasmid DNA injection is a safe and feasible gene transfer method, but it confers low transfection efficiency and transgene expression. This non-viral gene transfer method is enhanced by physical delivery methods, such as electroporation and the use of a gene gun. In vivo electroporation has been rapidly developed over the last two decades to deliver DNA to various tissues or organs. It is generally considered that membrane permeabilization and DNA electrophoresis play important roles in electro-gene transfer. Skeletal muscle is a well characterized target tissue for electroporation, because it is accessible and allows for long-lasting gene expression ( > one year). Skin is also a target tissue because of its accessibility and immunogenicity. Numerous studies have been performed using in vivo electroporation in animal models of disease. Clinical trials of DNA vaccines and immunotherapy for cancer treatment using in vivo electroporation have been initiated in patients with melanoma and prostate cancer. Furthermore, electroporation has been applied to DNA vaccines for infectious diseases to enhance immunogenicity, and the relevant clinical trials have been initiated. The gene gun approach is also being applied for the delivery of DNA vaccines against infectious diseases to the skin. Here, we review recent advances in the mechanism of in vivo electroporation, and summarize the findings of recent preclinical and clinical studies using this technology.

  4. Long-term results of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingtai; Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Dongbing; Tian, Yantao; Li, Yexiong; Feng, Qinfu; Zhang, Zhihui; Jiang, Qinglong; Zhang, Shuisheng; Tang, Xiaolong; Huang, Xianghui; Chu, Yunmian; Zhang, Jianghu; Sun, Yuemin; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Chengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess prognostic benefits of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment after IOERT. A retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data was conducted at the Cancer Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Cancer Center. Two hundred forty-seven consecutive patients with nonmetastatic LAPC who underwent IOERT between January 2008 and May 2015 were identified and included in the study. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the day of IOERT. Prognostic factors were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40%, 14%, and 7.2%, respectively, with a median OS of 9.0 months. On multivariate analysis, an IOERT applicator diameter < 6 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47–0.97), no intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.32–0.66), and receipt of postoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy (HR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04–0.25) were significantly associated with improved OS. Pain relief after IOERT was achieved in 111 of the 117 patients, with complete remission in 74 and partial remission in 37. Postoperative complications rate and mortality were 14.0% and 0.4%, respectively. Nonmetastatic LAPC patients with smaller size tumors could achieve positive long-term survival outcomes with a treatment strategy incorporating IOERT and postoperative adjuvant treatment. Chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy might be a recommended adjuvant treatment strategy for well-selected cases. Intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy should not be recommended for patients with nonmetastatic LAPC. PMID:27661028

  5. Molecular targeted therapy in the treatment of advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Kumarakulasinghe, Nesaretnam Barr; van Zanwijk, Nico; Soo, Ross A

    2015-04-01

    Historically, patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with chemotherapy alone, but a therapeutic plateau has been reached. Advances in the understanding of molecular genetics have led to the recognition of multiple molecularly distinct subsets of NSCLC. This in turn has led to the development of rationally directed molecular targeted therapy, leading to improved clinical outcomes. Tumour genotyping for EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement has meant chemotherapy is no longer given automatically as first-line treatment but reserved for when patients do not have a 'druggable' driver oncogene. In this review, we will address the current status of clinically relevant driver mutations and emerging new molecular subsets in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and the role of targeted therapy and mechanisms of acquired resistance to targeted therapy.

  6. Uncommon gastrointestinal bleeding during targeted therapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma: A report of four cases

    PubMed Central

    FUJIHARA, SHINTARO; MORI, HIROHITO; KOBARA, HIDEKI; NISHIYAMA, NORIKO; AYAKI, MAKI; OHATA, RYO; UEDA, NOBUFUMI; SUGIMOTO, MIKIO; KAKEHI, YOSHIYUKI; MASAKI, TSUTOMU

    2015-01-01

    Clinically available targeted agents to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) include sunitinib, sorafenib and temsirolimus. Sorafenib and sunitinib have been associated with bleeding in selected trials, but clinical and endoscopic characteristics of gastrointestinal bleeding are not well described. Herein, we report four cases of advanced RCC in which endoscopic hemostasis effectively resolved high-grade, life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding that occurred during targeted therapy. Although stomatitis and mucositis have occurred during targeted therapies, life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding is less common. In these four patients, the origins of gastrointestinal bleeding were identified, and complete endoscopic hemostasis was achieved. Endoscopies revealed variable characteristics including angiodysplasia, multiple gastric ulcers and oozing bleeding of the normal mucosa. Although the most effective diagnostic and treatment strategies are disputed, endoscopic examinations are best performed before starting targeted therapies. Additionally, these patients should be monitored even for rare life-threatening events. PMID:26722259

  7. Update on targeted therapies for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: nivolumab in context

    PubMed Central

    Le, Alexander D; Alzghari, Saeed K; Jean, Gary W; La-Beck, Ninh M

    2017-01-01

    While the initial treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) usually relies on surgical resection followed by systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, recent advances in understanding of NSCLC biology and immunology have spurred the development of numerous targeted therapies. In particular, a class of immune modulatory drugs targeting the immune checkpoint pathways has demonstrated remarkable durable remissions in a select minority of advanced NSCLC patients, potentially heralding the elusive “cancer cure”. This review focuses on the clinical evidence for one of these agents, nivolumab, and clarifies the role of this drug in the context of the other targeted therapies currently available for the treatment of NSCLC. We also discuss the impact of nivolumab on patient quality of life and health economics. PMID:28260909

  8. Combining and sequencing medication and cognitive-behaviour therapy for childhood anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Courtney P; Ginsburg, Golda S

    2008-04-01

    Despite the absence of data on the efficacy of combination therapy (i.e., psychosocial and medication) for the treatment of anxiety disorders in youths, clinicians in clinical practice often utilize this treatment approach. This paper discusses issues related to sequencing, combining, and integrating cognitive behavioural and pharmacological interventions for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. We briefly summarize the empirical evidence for mono and combination therapy and raise a variety of issues that should be considered when making treatment decisions. Finally, we present an integrated treatment model to facilitate the delivery of a comprehensive treatment approach across care providers. These suggestions are geared toward optimizing clinical outcomes for anxious youths.

  9. Improving medication compliance of a patient with schizophrenia through collaborative behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Heinssen, Robert K

    2002-03-01

    Introduction by the column editors: Numerous factors influence a patient's decision to accept or reject prescribed medications, including the patient's personal values, environmental conditions, and the quality of the patient-physician relationship (1). Guidelines for evaluating and managing noncompliance with medication regimens by patients with schizophrenia take this multidimensional perspective into account, emphasizing functional assessment of nonadherence behaviors and individualized behavior-change strategies to secure and maintain the patient's cooperation (2). Moreover, a collaborative approach to planning pharmacotherapy is required to ensure medication compliance, with a particular emphasis on linking the positive effects of medications with the patient's personal goals and desires for better functioning and quality of life (3). The following case study illustrates the application of principles for enhancing medication compliance in the treatment of a woman diagnosed as having schizophrenia, paranoid type. Strategies presented by Dr. Heinssen include collaborative treatment contracts, analysis of adherence behaviors, and techniques for boosting medication cues and reinforcers in the patient's home. The therapy described was provided in the Life Skills partial hospitalization and psychiatric rehabilitation program, a multidisciplinary, multilevel outpatient service of the now-closed Chestnut Lodge Hospital in Rockville, Maryland. The program integrated medical, social-learning, and cognitive-behavioral interventions for psychosis within a psychiatric rehabilitation framework.

  10. Advances in the management of melanoma: targeted therapy, immunotherapy and future directions.

    PubMed

    Dean, Emma; Lorigan, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Metastatic melanoma is an aggressive, immunogenic and molecularly heterogeneous disease for which most patients require systemic treatment. Recently, significant clinical breakthroughs have revolutionized the treatment of advanced melanoma, leading to the licensing of ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, and vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor used in patients whose tumors contain a V600 mutation in the BRAF gene. This recent success has led to optimism and momentum has gathered with updated trial results from these therapies, next-generation compounds that target validated molecular pathways and novel agents that are mechanistically distinct. This review summarizes the recent advances and updated results since the licensing of vemurafenib and ipilimumab, the benefits and limitations of these agents, future strategies to improve upon existing treatments and overcome acquired resistance, in-progress and future clinical trials, as well as novel therapeutic targets, pathways and therapies that hold promise in advancing clinical benefit.

  11. Targeted genetic and viral therapy for advanced head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-I; Chang, Ju-Fang; Kirn, David H; Liu, Ta-Chiang

    2009-06-01

    Head and neck cancers usually present with advanced disease and novel therapies are urgently needed. Genetic therapy aims at restoring malfunctioned tumor suppressor gene(s) or introducing proapoptotic genes. Oncolytic virotherapeutics induce multiple cycles of cancer-specific virus replication, followed by oncolysis, virus spreading and infection of adjacent cancer cells. Oncolytic viruses can also be armed to express therapeutic transgene(s). Recent advances in preclinical and clinical studies are revealing the potential of both therapeutic classes for advanced head and neck cancers, including the approval of two products (Gendicine and H101) by a governmental agency. This review summarizes the available clinical data to date and discusses the challenges and future directions.

  12. Endovascular therapy for advanced post-thrombotic syndrome: Proceedings from a multidisciplinary consensus panel

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Suresh; Kahn, Susan R; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Comerota, Anthony J; Parpia, Sameer; Meleth, Sreelatha; Earp, Diane; Williams, Rick; Sista, Akhilesh K; Marston, William; Rathbun, Suman; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Razavi, Mahmood K; Jaff, Michael R; Kearon, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and chronic iliac vein obstruction suffer major physical limitations and impairment of health-related quality of life. Currently there is a lack of evidence-based treatment options for these patients. Early studies suggest that imaging-guided, catheter-based endovascular therapy can eliminate iliac vein obstruction and saphenous venous valvular reflux, resulting in reduced PTS severity; however, these observations have not been rigorously validated. A multidisciplinary expert panel meeting was convened to plan a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate endovascular therapy for the treatment of advanced PTS. This article summarizes the findings of the panel, and is expected to assist in developing a National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trial and other studies to improve the care of patients with advanced PTS. PMID:27247235

  13. Safety and Benefit of Discontinuing Statin Therapy in the Setting of Advanced, Life-Limiting Illness

    PubMed Central

    Kutner, Jean S.; Blatchford, Patrick J.; Taylor, Don H.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Bull, Janet H.; Fairclough, Diane L.; Hanson, Laura C.; LeBlanc, Thomas W.; Samsa, Greg P.; Wolf, Steven; Aziz, Noreen M.; Currow, David C.; Ferrell, Betty; Wagner-Johnston, Nina; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Cleary, James F.; Dev, Sandesh; Goode, Patricia S.; Kamal, Arif H.; Kassner, Cordt; Kvale, Elizabeth A.; McCallum, Janelle G.; Ogunseitan, Adeboye B.; Pantilat, Steven Z.; Portenoy, Russell K.; Prince-Paul, Maryjo; Sloan, Jeff A.; Swetz, Keith M.; Von Gunten, Charles F.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE For patients with limited prognosis, some medication risks may outweigh the benefits, particularly when benefits take years to accrue; statins are one example. Data are lacking regarding the risks and benefits of discontinuing statin therapy for patients with limited life expectancy. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety, clinical, and cost impact of discontinuing statin medications for patients in the palliative care setting. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This was a multicenter, parallel-group, unblinded, pragmatic clinical trial. Eligibility included adults with an estimated life expectancy of between 1 month and 1 year, statin therapy for 3 months or more for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, recent deterioration in functional status, and no recent active cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomized to either discontinue or continue statin therapy and were monitored monthly for up to 1 year. The study was conducted from June 3, 2011, to May 2, 2013. All analyses were performed using an intent-to-treat approach. INTERVENTIONS Statin therapy was withdrawn from eligible patients who were randomized to the discontinuation group. Patients in the continuation group continued to receive statins. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outcomes included death within 60 days (primary outcome), survival, cardiovascular events, performance status, quality of life (QOL), symptoms, number of nonstatin medications, and cost savings. RESULTS A total of 381 patients were enrolled; 189 of these were randomized to discontinue statins, and 192 were randomized to continue therapy. Mean (SD) age was 74.1 (11.6) years, 22.0% of the participants were cognitively impaired, and 48.8% had cancer. The proportion of participants in the discontinuation vs continuation groups who died within 60 days was not significantly different (23.8% vs 20.3%; 90% CI, −3.5% to 10.5%; P = .36) and did not meet the noninferiority end point. Total QOL was better for the group

  14. Suggested Minimum Data Set for Speech Therapy Centers Affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Damanabi, Shahla; Abdolnejad, Shawbo; Karimi, Gelavizh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The minimum data considered as a conceptual framework, based on the achievement of effectiveness indicators and it ensures to access of precise and clear health data. The aims of the present study were identified and proposed a data element set of speech therapy centers affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Material and Methods: This study that was cross – sectional type, performed in 9 speech therapy clinic from medical university in 2014. Firstly, the minimum data elements set evaluated using the check list in these centers. Using the findings from the first step and survey of internal and external documentation forms, designed a questionnaire containing a minimum data speech therapy files and it shared between 36 Speech therapy experts using 5 options of Likert scale. Validity of questionnaire was examined through its validity and reliability of content by retest. For data analysis, data processing was performed using descriptive statistics by SPSS21 software. Results: The minimum data set for speech therapy were divided into two categories: clinical and administrative data. The Name and surname, date of birth, gender, address, telephone number, date of admission and the number of treatments, the patient’s complaint, the time of occurrence of injury or disorder, reason and age of disease considered as the most important elements for management data and health history. For the most important elements of clinical information were selected Short-term and long-term aims and development of speech history. Conclusion: The design and implementation of suitable data collection of speech therapy for gathering of data, we recommended planning for the control and prevention of speech disorders to providing high quality and good care of patient in speech therapy centers. PMID:26483600

  15. Military medical advances resulting from the conflict in Korea, Part I: Systems advances that enhanced patient survival.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael S

    2012-04-01

    The Korean War started several years after the World War II had ended and no recognition of the threat or preparation was made for this possibility. The military and its medical service had been downsized after World War II and had to quickly ramp up to meet the surprise attack. The war provided the laboratory for trials and experimentation with the new technological developments of the era. The Korean conflict led to numerous advances in medical systems and patient care. The Mobile Army Surgical Hospital came of age, and was instrumental in saving many lives. Helicopters saw their first regular use as flying ambulances to take the injured to definitive care in a timely fashion. The national blood banking program was rapidly geared up and new techniques such as plastic bags for collection and delivery resulted. Body armor was developed that would allow mobility while offering protection and was widely used for the first time. Each of these systems improvements saved the lives of soldiers in combat and were soon to be used in the civilian sector to save and improve lives around the world.

  16. A urinary test procedure for identification of cannabidiol in patients undergoing medical therapy with marijuana

    PubMed Central

    Wertlake, Paul T; Henson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as Schedule I, drugs having no accepted medical value. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana. This conflict inhibits physicians from prescribing marijuana and the systematic study of marijuana in medical care. This study concerns the use of the clinical laboratory as a resource for physicians recommending cannabidiol (CBD) to patients, or for patients using medical marijuana. Marijuana containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is psychoactive. CBD is not psychoactive. CBD is reported to have medical benefit for seizure control, neurologic disorders including multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain and pain associated with cancer. Use of opiates leads to increasing dosage over time that may cause respiratory depression. The Medical Board of California has termed this a serious public health crisis of addiction, overdose, and death. Is it feasible that CBD might alleviate persistent, severe pain and therefore diminished opiate use? Further study is needed to determine medical effectiveness of CBD including the effect on concurrent opiate therapy due to competition for receptor sites. This study is the application of a gas chromatography mass spectrometry procedure adapted for use in our laboratory, to detect CBD in urine. The intended use is as a tool for physicians to assess that marijuana being used by a patient is of a composition likely to be medically effective. A law ensuring physicians freedom from federal prosecution would provide confidence essential to formal study of medical uses of marijuana and treatment of clinical problems. Detection of CBD in a urine sample would be a convenient test for such confirmation. PMID:26929665

  17. A urinary test procedure for identification of cannabidiol in patients undergoing medical therapy with marijuana.

    PubMed

    Wertlake, Paul T; Henson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana is classified by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as Schedule I, drugs having no accepted medical value. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana. This conflict inhibits physicians from prescribing marijuana and the systematic study of marijuana in medical care. This study concerns the use of the clinical laboratory as a resource for physicians recommending cannabidiol (CBD) to patients, or for patients using medical marijuana. Marijuana containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is psychoactive. CBD is not psychoactive. CBD is reported to have medical benefit for seizure control, neurologic disorders including multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain and pain associated with cancer. Use of opiates leads to increasing dosage over time that may cause respiratory depression. The Medical Board of California has termed this a serious public health crisis of addiction, overdose, and death. Is it feasible that CBD might alleviate persistent, severe pain and therefore diminished opiate use? Further study is needed to determine medical effectiveness of CBD including the effect on concurrent opiate therapy due to competition for receptor sites. This study is the application of a gas chromatography mass spectrometry procedure adapted for use in our laboratory, to detect CBD in urine. The intended use is as a tool for physicians to assess that marijuana being used by a patient is of a composition likely to be medically effective. A law ensuring physicians freedom from federal prosecution would provide confidence essential to formal study of medical uses of marijuana and treatment of clinical problems. Detection of CBD in a urine sample would be a convenient test for such confirmation.

  18. In-depth Medical Nutrition Therapy for a Woman with Diabetes: From Pregnancy to Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes in pregnancy is associated with higher rates of miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, preterm labor, and fetal malformation. To prevent these obstetric and perinatal complications, women with diabetes have to control levels of blood sugar, both prior to and during pregnancy. Thus, individualized medical nutrition therapy for each stage of pregnancy is essential. We provided in-depth medical nutrition therapy to a 38-year-old pregnant woman with diabetes at all stages of pregnancy up to delivery. She underwent radiation therapy after surgery for breast cancer and was diagnosed with diabetes. At the time of diagnosis, her glycated hemoglobin level was 8.3% and she was planning her pregnancy. She started taking an oral hypoglycemic agent and received education regarding the management of diabetes and preconception care. She became pregnant while maintaining a glycated hemoglobin level of less than 6%. We provided education program for diabetes management during the pregnancy, together with insulin therapy. She experienced weight loss and ketones were detected; furthermore, she was taking in less than the recommended amount of foods for the regulation of blood sugar levels. By giving emotional support, we continued the counseling and achieved not only glycemic control but also instilled an appreciation of the importance of appropriate weight gain and coping with difficulties. Through careful diabetes management, the woman had a successful outcome for her pregnancy, other than entering preterm labor at 34 weeks. This study implicated that the important things in medical nutrition therapy for pregnant women with diabetes are frequent follow-up care and emotional approach through the pregnancy process. PMID:27812519

  19. New Advanced Technologies to Provide Decentralised and Secure Access to Medical Records: Case Studies in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Bourquard, Karima; Boire, Jean-Yves; de Vlieger, Paul; Maigne, Lydia; Breton, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The main problem for health professionals and patients in accessing information is that this information is very often distributed over many medical records and locations. This problem is particularly acute in cancerology because patients may be treated for many years and undergo a variety of examinations. Recent advances in technology make it feasible to gain access to medical records anywhere and anytime, allowing the physician or the patient to gather information from an “ephemeral electronic patient record”. However, this easy access to data is accompanied by the requirement for improved security (confidentiality, traceability, integrity, ...) and this issue needs to be addressed. In this paper we propose and discuss a decentralised approach based on recent advances in information sharing and protection: Grid technologies and watermarking methodologies. The potential impact of these technologies for oncology is illustrated by the examples of two experimental cases: a cancer surveillance network and a radiotherapy treatment plan. It is expected that the proposed approach will constitute the basis of a future secure “google-like” access to medical records. PMID:19718446

  20. Evaluation of factors contributed in nonadherence to medication therapy in children asthma.

    PubMed

    Mirsadraee, Raheleh; Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Movahedi, Masoud; Behniafard, Nasrin; Nasiri, Rasoul

    2012-03-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic inflammatory disorders in children. Nonadherence to medical therapy is a major cause of poor clinical outcome the objective of this study was evaluating factors, which are resulted in nonadherence to medical therapy in children with asthma.In this descriptive study, 150 children with asthma and nonadherent to medication therapy were enrolled. General information and probable causes of nonadherence were recorded in self-report questionnaire and data were analyzed. In our study, 57.3% of children were male. Approximately 43%of children belonged to age group 6-9 years old. Prevalence of probable causes of nonadherence to treatment were concern about treatment expenses(34.7%) ,fear of cardiac complications(34.7%), concern about drug dependency(38.7%), belief to growth inhibition(30.7%) and fear of osteopenia (32%). There was statistically significant reverse association between treatment with multi-drug regimens and concern about bone mineral abnormalities, cardiac complications and drug dependency (p=0.0001, 0.014 and 0.012 respectively). In addition, there was a significant association between mild asthma and fear about drug dependency (p=0.001).According to our results, factors such as prolonged duration of treatment, various therapeutic regimens, and receiving multiple drugs before diagnosis of asthma pose the highest frequencies for nonadherence.

  1. Phase 1 Study of Erlotinib Plus Radiation Therapy in Patients With Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, C. Hope; Deep, Nicholas L.; Nabell, Lisle; Carroll, William R.; Desmond, Renee; Clemons, Lisa; Spencer, Sharon; Magnuson, J. Scott; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity profile of erlotinib therapy combined with postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, prospective, phase 1 open-label study of erlotinib with radiation therapy to treat 15 patients with advanced cutaneous head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Toxicity data were summarized, and survival was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The majority of patients were male (87%) and presented with T4 disease (93%). The most common toxicity attributed to erlotinib was a grade 2-3 dermatologic reaction occurring in 100% of the patients, followed by mucositis (87%). Diarrhea occurred in 20% of the patients. The 2-year recurrence rate was 26.7%, and mean time to cancer recurrence was 10.5 months. Two-year overall survival was 65%, and disease-free survival was 60%. Conclusions: Erlotinib and radiation therapy had an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. The disease-free survival in this cohort was comparable to that in historical controls.

  2. Cognitive behavior therapy for chronic insomnia occurring within the context of medical and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael T; Huang, Mary I; Manber, Rachel

    2005-07-01

    Insomnia is a pervasive problem for many patients suffering from medical and psychiatric conditions. Even when the comorbid disorders are successfully treated, insomnia often fails to remit. In addition to compromising quality of life, untreated insomnia may also aggravate and complicate recovery from the comorbid disease. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has an established efficacy for primary insomnia, but less is known about its efficacy for insomnia occurring in the context of medical and psychiatric conditions. The purpose of this article is to present a rationale for using CBT-I in medical and psychiatric disorders, review the extant outcome literature, highlight considerations for adapting CBT-I procedures in specific populations, and suggest directions for future research. Outcome studies were identified for CBT-I in mixed medical and psychiatric conditions, cancer, chronic pain, HIV, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and alcoholism. Other disorders discussed include: bipolar disorder, eating disorders, generalized anxiety, and obsessive compulsive disorder. The available data demonstrate moderate to large treatment effects (Cohen's d, range=0.35-2.2) and indicate that CBT-I is a promising treatment for individuals with medical and psychiatric comorbidity. Although the literature reviewed here is limited by a paucity of randomized, controlled studies, the available data suggest that by improving sleep, CBT-I might also indirectly improve medical and psychological endpoints. This review underscores the need for future research to test the efficacy of adaptations of CBT-I to disease specific conditions and symptoms.

  3. Immune‐mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) and biologic therapy: a medical revolution

    PubMed Central

    Kuek, Annabel; Hazleman, Brian L; Östör, Andrew J K

    2007-01-01

    Targeted biologic therapies have revolutionised treatment of immune‐mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) due to their efficacy, speed of onset and tolerability. The discovery that clinically unrelated conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease, share similar immune dysregulation has led to a shift in the management of IMIDs from one of organ‐based symptom relief to mechanism‐based treatment. The fact that anticytokine therapy has been effective in treating multiple orphan inflammatory conditions confirms the IMID paradigm. In this review we examine the biologic agents currently licensed for use in the US and Europe: infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, rituximab, abatacept, anakinra, alefacept and efalizumab. We also discuss the rationale behind the management of IMIDs using rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis as examples. For the medical profession, IMID represents a breakthrough in the way pathology is classified. In this burgeoning era of biologic therapy the prospect of complete disease remission is conceivable. PMID:17403952

  4. Dawn of Advanced Molecular Medicine: Nanotechnological Advancements in Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Shaffer, Travis M.; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role not only in our everyday life (with all its benefits and dangers) but also in medicine. Nanoparticles are to date the most intriguing option to deliver high concentrations of agents specifically and directly to cancer cells; therefore, a wide variety of these nanomaterials has been developed and explored. These span the range from simple nanoagents to sophisticated smart devices for drug delivery or imaging. Nanomaterials usually provide a large surface area, allowing for decoration with a large amount of moieties on the surface for either additional functionalities or targeting. Besides using particles solely for imaging purposes, they can also carry as a payload a therapeutic agent. If both are combined within the same particle, a theranostic agent is created. The sophistication of highly developed nanotechnology targeting approaches provides a promising means for many clinical implementations and can provide improved applications for otherwise suboptimal formulations. In this review we will explore nanotechnology both for imaging and therapy to provide a general overview of the field and its impact on cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:25271430

  5. Advanced data visualization and sensor fusion: Conversion of techniques from medical imaging to Earth science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Richard C.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Pelizzari, Charles; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    1993-01-01

    Hughes Aircraft Company and the University of Chicago propose to transfer existing medical imaging registration algorithms to the area of multi-sensor data fusion. The University of Chicago's algorithms have been successfully demonstrated to provide pixel by pixel comparison capability for medical sensors with different characteristics. The research will attempt to fuse GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite), AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), and SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) sensor data which will benefit a wide range of researchers. The algorithms will utilize data visualization and algorithm development tools created by Hughes in its EOSDIS (Earth Observation SystemData/Information System) prototyping. This will maximize the work on the fusion algorithms since support software (e.g. input/output routines) will already exist. The research will produce a portable software library with documentation for use by other researchers.

  6. The effect of locoregional therapies in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Spivack, John H.; Berger, Yaniv; Heskel, Marina; Aycart, Samantha N.; Sweeney, Robert; Edwards, Martin P.; Labow, Daniel M.; Kim, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims It is unknown whether the addition of locoregional therapies (LRTx) to sorafenib improves prognosis over sorafenib alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LRTx in this population. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients with advanced HCC as defined by extrahepatic metastasis, lymphadenopathy >2 cm, or gross vascular invasion. Sorafenib therapy was required for inclusion. Survival of patients who received LRTx after progression to advanced stage was compared to those who did not receive LRTx. Results Using an intention to treat analysis of 312 eligible patients, a propensity weighted proportional hazards model demonstrated LRTx as a predictor of survival (HR = 0.505, 95% CI: 0.407–0.628; P < 0.001). The greatest benefit was seen in patients with the largest tumor burden (HR = 0.305, 95% CI: 0.236–0.393; P < 0.01). Median survival in the sorafenib arm was 143 days (95% CI: 118–161) vs. 247 days (95% CI: 220–289) in the sorafenib plus LRTx arm (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate a survival benefit with the addition of LRTx to sorafenib for patients with advanced HCC. These findings should prompt a prospective clinical trial to further assess the role of LRTx in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:27154804

  7. Recent advances in the development of Raman spectroscopy for deep non-invasive medical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Matousek, Pavel; Stone, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has recently undergone major advances in the area of deep non-invasive characterisation of biological tissues. The progress stems from the development of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) and renaissance of transmission Raman spectroscopy permitting the assessment of diffusely scattering samples at depths several orders of magnitude deeper than possible with conventional Raman spectroscopy. Examples of emerging applications include non-invasive diagnosis of bone disease, cancer and monitoring of glucose levels. This article reviews this fast moving field focusing on recent developments within the medical area.

  8. Comparison of advance medical directive inquiry and documentation for hospital inpatients in three medical services: implications for policy changes.

    PubMed

    Anunobi, Echezona; Detweiler, Mark B; Sethi, Roopa; Thomas, Reena; Lutgens, Brian; Detweiler, Jonna G

    2015-01-01

    Following the introduction of the Patient Self-Determination Act of 1990, the Veterans Health Administration developed its own advance medical directive (AMD) policy, which most recently states that documentation is mandatory for all hospital patients in all settings. The object of this study was to assess the effectiveness of AMD documentation at a local Veterans Affairs Medical Center. AMD documentation was compared among three inpatient services: surgery, medicine, and psychiatry. Retrospective in nature, 594 inpatient cases were compared. Results revealed that, overall, the rate of AMD documentation was 37.7%. AMD documentation on surgery was statistically more frequent (45.6%) than for either medicine (33.2%) or psychiatry (34.5%). The difference between the numbers of days to AMD documentation for all three services was not statistically significant. While there was no statistically significant difference across gender, Caucasians had AMDs documented more frequently than African Americans (p < .001). Logistic regression reveals that social worker and physician intervention, not patient-specific variables, are the primary predictors of AMD incidence. Policy makers may need to consider the realities of hospital care, especially in emergency settings, and be more specific in the steps of implementation of the policy in the evenings, weekends, and holidays. True adherence to policy implementation may require hospital administrators to increase staff and educational efforts so that the concept of AMD communication and documentation is completely explained to all staff and patients. Policy should include an electronic record reminder that is renewed every 3 years and provisions for accommodating patients who arrive on weekends and holidays, with special awareness of the particular communication needs of minority groups. The study conclusions are that further inquiry is needed to understand these policy nuances to enable the Veterans Affairs Administration to

  9. Community-based treatment of advanced HIV disease: introducing DOT-HAART (directly observed therapy with highly active antiretroviral therapy).

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, P.; Léandre, F.; Mukherjee, J.; Gupta, R.; Tarter, L.; Kim, J. Y.

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) overtook tuberculosis (TB) as the world's leading infectious cause of adult deaths. In affluent countries, however, AIDS mortality has dropped sharply, largely because of the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Antiretroviral agents are not yet considered essential medications by international public health experts and are not widely used in the poor countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) takes its greatest toll. Arguments against the use of HAART have mainly been based on the high cost of medications and the lack of the infrastructure necessary for using them wisely. We re- examine these arguments in the setting of rising AIDS mortality in developing countries and falling drug prices, and describe a small community-based treatment programme based on lessons gained in TB control. With the collaboration of Haitian community health workers experienced in the delivery of home-based and directly observed treatment for TB, an AIDS-prevention project was expanded to deliver HAART to a subset of HIV patients deemed most likely to benefit. The inclusion criteria and preliminary results are presented. We conclude that directly observed therapy (DOT) with HAART, "DOT-HAART", can be delivered effectively in poor settings if there is an uninterrupted supply of high-quality drugs. PMID:11799447

  10. [Immunomodulator Intensification of Etioropic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Pulmonary Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kolomiets, V M; Abramov, A V; Rachina, N V; Rubleva, N V

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at possible increase of the therapy efficacy in patients with advanced tuberculosis by including immunomodulators to the treatment schemes. The data concerning 6034 patients with advanced tuberculosis, mainly fibrocavernous tuberculosis of the lungs, were analysed. Four groups of the patients were randomized. In group 1 the management of the patients included etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures with the use of Cycloferon. The group 2 patients in addition to the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures were given Omega-3. In group 3 the management included the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures. In group 4 the etioropic therapy was used alone. The analysis showed that 3419 patients had primary pulmonary tuberculosis, 340 patients had relapsing tuberculosis and 2275 patients had long-term process. The etiotropic therapy efficacy was estimated after an intensive phase of not more than 3 months. In the cases with Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance and some other unfavourable factors it was estimated after a 5-month intensive phase. The results confirmed that inclusion of immunomodulators to the treatment schemes allowed to increase the therapy efficacy and the patients' adherence to the treatment, as well as to shorten the period of the bacteria carriage. Thus, the use of Cycloferon in the schemes of the treatment of the patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis allowed to shorten the period of the pathogen carriage (as well as the drug resistant forms) in 94.1 ± 3.33% of the patients in spite of concomitant diseases. The effect of Cycloferon in such cases was likely due to both its direct immunoprotective action and the improvement of the general state of the patients and their higher adherence to the treatment.

  11. Medication Adherence Pattern and Factors affecting Adherence in Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shakya Shrestha, S; Bhandari, M; Thapa, S R; Shrestha, R; Poudyal, R; Purbey, B; Gurung, R B

    2016-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the most common chronic bacterial infection worldwide affecting approximately half of the world's population. A number of screening tests as well as complex multi-drug therapies are available for the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection. However, the optimum eradication rates of H. pylori infection can only be achieved if adherence to drug therapy is higher. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to determine the factors leading to poor adherence to obtain successful treatment outcomes. Objective To determine the medication adherence pattern in patients with H. pylori infection and assess the factors associated with non-adherence to the prescribed drug therapy. Method Patients meeting the inclusion criteria who were confirmed as H. pylori positive by rapid urease test (histopathology) and/ or stool antigen test and those under H. pylori eradication therapy were considered. Informed consent was taken from the patients or from the patient party in incapacitated patients. They were then interviewed using structured questionnaire. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 20 and a p-value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Result Among the 70 participants included in this study, 57.10% (n=40) of them were males. The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 42.36 years (±17.93). Higher number (85.70% (n=60)) of the patients were adherent to the recommended medication. Forgetfulness was the reason for missing dose in a majority (80% (n=8)) of the nonadherent patients. A highly significant association (p<0.05) was observed between adherence and absence of symptomatic relief. However, there was no statistically significant association (p>0.05) between patients' adherence to gender, age, literacy, and the prescribed treatment regimen. Conclusion Majority of the patients with H. pylori infection were adherent to medication. Forgetfulness was the major reason for missing dose in the non

  12. Skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients: advances in therapy and management: part II. Management of skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Zwald, Fiona O'Reilly; Brown, Marc

    2011-08-01

    The management of skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients is a challenge to both the dermatologist and transplant physician. Part II of this continuing medical education review offers an approach to the management of this increasing problem. The importance of specialty dermatology clinics providing access to transplant patients, frequent skin cancer screening, patient education, and multidisciplinary care is discussed. The management of low risk squamous cell carcinoma with topical therapies, photodynamic therapy, systemic retinoids, and capecitabine is reviewed. Revision of immunosuppression in the management of high-risk patients is discussed in association with the potential role of sentinel lymph node biopsy for aggressive disease. Finally, management of in-transit and metastatic squamous cell carcinoma is reviewed, with a discussion of the role of more recent innovative therapies, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in advanced squamous cell carcinoma in solid organ transplant recipients.

  13. But does it do any good? Measuring the impact of music therapy on people with advanced dementia: (Innovative practice).

    PubMed

    Gold, Karen

    2014-03-01

    This article describes the impact of music therapy upon a group of nine people with advanced dementia in a hospital setting. It demonstrates how the impact of music therapy was measured using the case notes completed by nursing and care staff and how these notes suggested that music therapy had a positive effect on the mood and behaviour on eight of the nine people receiving music therapy.

  14. [Meglumine acridonacetate and complex therapy of patients with newly identified advanced pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Pravada, N S; Budritskiĭ, A M; Sukhanov, D S

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and immunological efficacy of meglumine acridonacetate (cycloferon) tablets was evaluated in complex treatment of patients with newly diagnosed advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. It was shown that the use of cycloferon according to our scheme increased the efficacy of the therapy (earlier disappearance of the disease symptoms and bacteria isolation, shorter-terms of cavern healing, more pronounced positive radiographic dynamics vs. the patients under the etiotropic therapy). The use of cycloferon normalized the number of gamma interferon receptors, increased the gamma interferon serum levels, reduced the incidence of the side effects (liver damage) due to the use of TB drugs. Such a use of cycloferon was cost effective. The use of sycloferon is possible in the complex treatment of outpatients with advanced pulmonary tuberculosis.

  15. Hospital Exemption for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products: Issue in Application in the European Union Member States.

    PubMed

    Ivaskiene, Tatjana; Mauricas, Mykolas; Ivaska, Justinas

    2017-01-01

    Regulation (EC) 1394/2007 of the European Parliament and the Council on advanced therapy medicinal products and amending Directive 2001/83/EC and Regulation (EC) No 726/2004 allowed the use of non - authorized advanced therapy medicinal products under the certain circumstances. This socalled hospital exemption rule needs to be applied in the each Member State of the European Union individually and for this purpose Member States should provide national procedures and control measures. The aim of this article is to clear up the criteria for hospital exemption listed in Regulation (EC) 1394/2007 and to contrast the difference in implementing hospital exemption rule into national legal regimes on examples of the United Kingdom, Lithuania and Poland.

  16. Effect of Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy on the Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Raunio, Antti; Sipilä, Kirsi; Raustia, Aune

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Mandibular advancement device therapy is effectively used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, but also several side effects in the masticatory system have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders connected to mandibular advancement device therapy. Material and Methods The material consisted of 15 patients (9 men and 6 women, mean age 51.1 years, range 21 to 70 years) diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Subjective symptoms and clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMD) signs were recorded at the beginning of the treatment (baseline) and at 1-month, 3-month, 6-month and 24-month follow-ups. The degree of TMD was assessed using the anamnestic (Ai) and the clinical dysfunction index (Di) of Helkimo. For assessing the effect of TMD the patients were divided in discontinuing and continuing groups. Results According to Ai and Di, the severity of TMD remained unchanged during the follow-up in most of the patients. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) crepitation was found more frequently in discontinuing patients at all follow-ups. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05) at the six-month follow-up. Masticatory muscle pain during palpation was a frequent clinical sign at the baseline and during the follow-up period but the difference between discontinuing and continuing patients was not significant. Conclusions It seems that signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders do not necessarily increase during long-term mandibular advancement device therapy. However, it seems that patients with clinically assessed temporomandibular joint crepitation may discontinue their mandibular advancement device therapy due to temporomandibular disorders. PMID:24422023

  17. An Intervention to Control Vasomotor Symptoms for Advanced PC Patients on Hormone Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-14

    develop a breathing exercise application for the iPod touch platform; and (2) assess the feasibility and acceptability of this intervention among...advanced prostate cancer survivors on hormone therapy. To reach these goals, we have developed an application, titled “2Breathe,” for Apple’s iPod Touch...2Breathe and 2Play programs on the iPod Touch for its usability; 2) refined recruitment strategies with our collaborators at the VA; 3) successfully

  18. [Advance of researches on thyroid tissues autotransplantation and embryonic stem cell transplantation in therapy of hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Ma, Quanfu; Kuang, Anren

    2008-10-01

    Patients with irreversible hypothyroidism require lifelong levo-thyroxin ( L-T4) replacement therapy, which makes them feel discomfortable. With the development of the thyroid tissues autotransplantation and embryonic stem cell (ESC), this would be a more physiological approach to the treatment of irreversible hypothyroidism. The animal experiments and human clinical trials on thyroid tissues autotransplantation have shown that the autograft can survive and function. The advanced researches have demonstrated that ESC can differentiate into thyroid follicular cells.

  19. A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0434 TITLE: A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER...oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) can significantly enhance the anti-tumor effect of the virus. Three specific aims have been proposed and they are: 1

  20. Medical Therapy for Rheumatic Heart Disease: Is it time to be Proactive rather than Reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Rajamannan, Nalini M.; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Moura, Luis; Zamorano, José L.; Rosenhek, Raphael A.; Best, Patricia JM.; Lloyd, Margaret A.; Rocha-Gonçalves, F.; Chandra, Sarat; Alfieri, Ottavio; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Tornos, Pilar; Baliga, Ragavendra R; Wang, Andrew; Bashore, Thomas; Ramakrishnan, S; Spargias, Konstantinos; Shuvy, Mony; Beeri, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Bahl, Vinay; Pierard, Luc A.; Maurer, Gerald; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H.; Chopra, H. K.; Pandian, Natesa G.

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is well known to be an active inflammatory process which develops progressive calcification and leaflet thickening over time. The potential for statin therapy in slowing the progression of valvular heart disease is still controversial. Retrospective studies have shown that medical therapy is beneficial for patients with calcific aortic stenosis and recently for rheumatic valve disease. However, the prospective randomized clinical trials have been negative to date. This article discusses the epidemiologic risk factors, basic science, retrospective and prospective studies in valvular heart disease and a future clinical trial to target RHD with statin therapy to slow the progression of this disease. Recent epidemiological studies have revealed the risk factors associated with valvular disease include male gender, smoking, hypertension and elevated serum cholesterol and are similar to the risk factors for vascular atherosclerosis. An increasing number of models of experimental hypercholesterolemia demonstrate features of atherosclerosis in the aortic valve (AV), which are similar to the early stages of vascular atherosclerotic lesions. Calcification, the end stage process of the disease, must be understood as a prognostic indicator in the modification of this cellular process before it is too late. This is important in calcific aortic stenosis as well as in rheumatic valve disease. There are a growing number of studies that describe similar pathophysiologic molecular markers in the development of rheumatic valve disease as in calcific aortic stenosis. In summary, these findings suggest that medical therapies may have a potential role in patients in the early stages of this disease process to slow the progression of RHD affecting the valves. This review will summarize the potential for statin therapy for this patient population. PMID:19729684

  1. Medical therapy for rheumatic heart disease: is it time to be proactive rather than reactive?

    PubMed

    Rajamannan, Nalini M; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; Moura, Luis; Zamorano, Jose L; Rosenhek, Raphael A; Best, Patricia Jm; Lloyd, Margaret A; Rocha-Goncalves, F; Chandra, Sarat; Alfieri, Ottavio; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Tornos, Pilar; Baliga, Ragavendra R; Wang, Andrew; Bashore, Thomas; Ramakrishnan, S; Spargias, Konstantinos; Shuvy, Mony; Beeri, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Bahl, Vinay; Pierard, Luc A; Maurer, Gerald; Nicolosi, Gian Luigi; Rahimtoola, Shahbudin H; Chopra, K; Pandian, Natesa G

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD) is well known to be an active inflammatory process which develops progressive calcification and leaflet thickening over time. The potential for statin therapy in slowing the progression of valvular heart disease is still controversial. Retrospective studies have shown that medical therapy is beneficial for patients with calcific aortic stenosis and recently for rheumatic valve disease. However, the prospective randomized clinical trials have been negative to date. This article discusses the epidemiologic risk factors, basic science, retrospective and prospective studies in valvular heart disease and a future clinical trial to target RHD with statin therapy to slow the progression of this disease. Recent epidemiological studies have revealed the risk factors associated with valvular disease include male gender, smoking, hypertension and elevated serum cholesterol and are similar to the risk factors for vascular atherosclerosis. An increasing number of models of experimental hypercholesterolemia demonstrate features of atherosclerosis in the aortic valve (AV), which are similar to the early stages of vascular atherosclerotic lesions. Calcification, the end stage process of the disease, must be understood as a prognostic indicator in the modification of this cellular process before it is too late. This is important in calcific aortic stenosis as well as in rheumatic valve disease. There are a growing number of studies that describe similar pathophysiologic molecular markers in the development of rheumatic valve disease as in calcific aortic stenosis. In summary, these findings suggest that medical therapies may have a potential role in patients in the early stages of this disease process to slow the progression of RHD affecting the valves. This review will summarize the potential for statin therapy for this patient population.

  2. Advancing Competency-Based Medical Education: A Charter for Clinician-Educators.

    PubMed

    Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Van Melle, Elaine; Ten Cate, Olle; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Chan, Ming-Ka; Frank, Jason R; Snell, Linda S

    2016-05-01

    The International Competency-Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators have been working since 2009 to promote understanding of competency-based medical education (CBME) and accelerate its uptake worldwide. This article presents a charter, supported by a literature-based rationale, which is meant to provide a shared mental model of CBME that will serve as a path forward in its widespread implementation.At a 2013 summit, the ICBME Collaborators laid the groundwork for this charter. Here, the fundamental principles of CBME and professional responsibilities of medical educators in its implementation process are described. The authors outline three fundamental principles: (1) Medical education must be based on the health needs of the populations served; (2) the primary focus of education and training should be the desired outcomes for learners rather than the structure and process of the educational system; and (3) the formation of a physician should be seamless across the continuum of education, training, and practice.Building on these principles, medical educators must demonstrate commitment to teaching, assessing, and role modeling the range of identified competencies. In the clinical setting, they must provide supervision that balances patient safety with the professional development of learners, being transparent with stakeholders about level of supervision needed. They must use effective and efficient assessment strategies and tools for basing transition decisions on competence rather than time in training, empowering learners to be active participants in their learning and assessment. Finally, advancing CBME requires program evaluation and research, faculty development, and a collaborative approach to realize its full potential.

  3. Total skin electron beam therapy as palliative treatment for cutaneous manifestations of advanced, therapy-refractory cutaneous lymphoma and leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To retrospectively access the outcome and toxicity of a total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) in patients with cutaneous lymphoma (CL) or leukemia. Patients and methods Treatment results of 25 patients (median age 63 years; 5 female, 20 male) with cutaneous manifestations of advanced and therapy-refractory CL (n = 21; T-cell lymphomas n = 18, B-cell lymphomas n = 3) stage IIB-IV or leukemia (n = 4; AML n = 2, CLL n = 1, PDC n = 1) treated between 1993 and 2010 were reviewed. All patients were symptomatic. The median total dose was 29Gy, applied in 29 fractions of median 1 Gy each. Results The median follow-up was 10 months. Palliation was achieved in 23 patients (92%). A clinical complete response was documented in 13 (52%) and a partial response in 10 patients (40%). The median time to skin progression was 5 months (range 1–18 months) and the actuarial one-year progression-free survival 35%. The median overall survival (OS) after the initiation of TSEBT was 10 months (range 1–46 months) and the actuarial one-year OS 45%. TSEBT related acute adverse events (grade 1 or 2) were observed in all patients during the treatment period. An acute grade 3 epitheliolysis developed in eight patients (32%). Long-term adverse events as a hyperpigmentation of the skin (grade 1 or 2) were documented in 19 patients (76%), and a hypohidrosis in seven patients (28%). Conclusion For palliation of symptomatic cutaneous manifestations of advanced cutaneous lymphoma or leukemia, total skin electron beam therapy is an efficient and well tolerated considerable treatment option. PMID:22838493

  4. Gender Disparities Across the Spectrum of Advanced Cardiac Therapies: Real or Imagined?

    PubMed

    Bogaev, Roberta C

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease has been responsible for more deaths in women than in men each year since 1985. This review discusses federal laws that have influenced the inclusion of women in research and reporting sex-specific differences, then addresses gender differences and gender disparities in four areas of clinical cardiovascular medicine: coronary heart disease, valvular heart disease, electrophysiology, and heart failure. The prevalence of disease in women is highlighted, the clinical characteristics of women at the time of referral for advanced therapies are reviewed, and the clinical outcomes of women are discussed. With the emergence of new technology such as smaller devices and less invasive procedures, more women are being referred for advanced therapies. However, a gap in awareness and diagnosis remains, contributing to later referrals for women. Women who do undergo advanced therapies often have more comorbidities and worse outcomes than men. A call is made to increase awareness, educate healthcare providers, and report more sex-specific data to resolve these gender disparities.

  5. Audience responses to television news coverage of medical advances: The mediating role of audience emotions and identification.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyehyun

    2015-08-01

    Exemplifying a real person in news stories has become a popular journalistic technique to describe an event or issue. With the frequent appearance of medical news reports in local television in recent years, this news presentation style is widely believed to help audiences better engage in and understand complex medical information and to influence their perceptions and judgments. In terms of television news coverage of medical advances, this study investigates how audiences respond to embedded human examples (mainly patients who experience benefits from the advances) and to overall news stories, and how such responses are related to their perception of portrayed medical advances. The experimental results indicate that news stories with a human example were more likely to intensify the audience's positive emotions than those without, which in turn influenced favorable perceptions of the described medical advance. In addition, the extent to which the audience identified with a human example (in particular, sympathy) mediated the relationship between the audience's involvement in the news story and its perception of the portrayed medical advance.

  6. The effect of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel infusion long-term therapy on motor complications in advanced Parkinson's disease: a multicenter Romanian experience.

    PubMed

    Băjenaru, O; Ene, A; Popescu, B O; Szász, J A; Sabău, M; Mureşan, D F; Perju-Dumbrava, L; Popescu, C D; Constantinescu, A; Buraga, I; Simu, M

    2016-04-01

    Chronic treatment with oral levodopa is associated with an increased frequency of motor complications in the late stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Continuous administration of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG-Duodopa(®), Abbott Laboratories), which has been available in Romania since 2009, represents an option for treating patients with advanced PD. Our primary objective was to report changes in motor complications after initiation of LCIG therapy. The secondary objectives were as follows: to determine the impact of LCIG therapy on the daily levodopa dose variation before/and after LCIG, to collect patient self-assessments of quality of life (QoL), and to study the overall tolerability and safety of LCIG administration. A retrospective analysis (2009-2013) of LCIG therapy and the experience in nine neurology centers in Romania was performed. The impact of LCIG therapy was evaluated by analyzing changes in motor fluctuations, dyskinesia and the patients' QoL after initiating therapy. The safety of LCIG therapy was estimated by noting agent-related adverse events (AEs) and medical device-related AEs. In the 113 patients included, we observed a significant improvement in PD symptoms after initiation of LCIG therapy. The "on" period increased, with a mean value of 6.14 h, and the dyskinesia period was reduced, with a mean value of 29.4 %. The quantified non-motor symptoms subsided. The patients exhibited significant improvements in QoL scores. There were few AEs and few cases of LCIG therapy discontinuation. LCIG is an important and available therapeutic option for managing patients with advanced PD.

  7. Systemic treatment and targeted therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, El Mehdi; Essadi, Ismail; M’rabti, Hind; Touyar, Anass; Errihani, PR Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignancy of global importance: it is the sixth most common cancer and the third most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Despite decades of efforts by many investigators, systemic chemotherapy or hormone therapy has failed to demonstrate improved survival in patients with HCC.. Ongoing studies are evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of combining Sorafenib with erlotinib and other targeted agents or chemotherapy. Aims: On the basis of placebo-controlled, randomized phase III trials, Sorafenib has shown improved survival benefits in advanced HCC and has set a new standard for future clinical trials. The successful clinical development of Sorafenib in HCC has ushered in the era of molecularly targeted agents in this disease, which is discussed in this educational review. Material and Methods: Many molecularly targeted agents that inhibit angiogenesis, epidermal growth factor receptor, and mammalian target of rapamycin are at different stages of clinical development in advanced HCC. Future research should continue to unravel the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis and to identify key relevant molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Identification and validation of potential surrogate and predictive biomarkers hold promise to individualize patients’ treatment to maximize clinical benefit and minimize the toxicity and cost of targeted agents. Results: Systemic therapy with various classes of agents, including hormone and cytotoxic agents, has provided no or marginal benefits. Improved understanding of the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis, coupled with the arrival of many newly developed molecularly targeted agents, has provided the unique opportunity to study some of these novel agents in advanced HCC. Conclusions: The demonstration of improved survival benefits by Sorafenib in advanced HCC has ushered in the era of molecular-targeted therapy in this disease, with many agents

  8. Advances in drug delivery and medical imaging using colloidal lyotropic liquid crystalline dispersions.

    PubMed

    Mulet, Xavier; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2013-03-01

    The overarching goal of this feature article is to review the recent developments in the field of drug delivery specifically involving colloidal lyotropic liquid crystalline dispersions. The development of advanced particles for drug delivery applications is regarded as the next necessary step in the advancement of nanomedicine. An outline of the state of the art in preparation and application of self-assembled nanoparticles to drug delivery and medical imaging is presented. The basic concepts for controlling the nature of the internal structure of particles by tuning the self-assembly properties of small molecule amphiphiles is covered. Theranostics is an exciting emerging area for this colloidal material class, and the types of therapeutic compounds and medical imaging agents that can be incorporated as well as their methods of preparation are described. The stabilisation and biocompatibility of the colloidal dispersions are also discussed. Finally an overview of lesion-specific active and passive targeting is presented. Exploiting such a multi-functional drug delivery platform is essential to not only the next generation delivery of bioactive molecules but also in the creation of new diagnostic tools.

  9. Molecular pathogenesis of vestibular schwannomas: insights for the development of novel medical therapies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig; Igarashi, Suzu; Jacob, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VS), benign intracranial tumors originating from the vestibulocochlear nerve, usually present with hearing loss, tinnitus, and balance dysfunction. Rarely, however, if untreated, these neoplasms can cause significant patient compromise - resulting in facial paralysis, brainstem compression, and even death. Those with vestibular schwannomas currently choose between surgery and stereotactic radiation therapy as available treatment options. Unfortunately, no medical therapies are presently U.S. Food & Drug Administration approved, representing an urgent and unmet clinical need. Recent breakthroughs in research have discovered key cell surface receptors and intracellular signaling pathways that drive vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, proliferation, and survival. A number of promising inhibitors targeting these signaling molecules have also now shown efficacy in preclinical VS cell culture models and animal experiments, with some recently entering human clinical trials. In this review, we summarize ErbB receptor signaling, PDGF receptors, MAP kinase signaling, AKT, p21-activated kinase signaling, mTOR, and VEGF signaling in the context of vestibular schwannoma drug development efforts worldwide. Today, it is truly an exciting time as our specialty stands on the verge of major breakthroughs in the development of medical therapies for VS.

  10. Opioid therapy for chronic low back pain: prescribing considerations for advanced practice registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Lall, Maureen Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common, disabling, and costly condition, and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) must carefully evaluate patients before considering long-term opioid therapy as a management strategy. APRNs should refer patients suspected of having a serious condition, or identifiable etiology, for specialist evaluation, as many patients improve with physical therapy, interventional pain management procedures, or surgical intervention. For patients unresponsive to nonopioid treatment, APRNs with an understanding of opioids, and the experience to assess and manage the risks of opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, may consider long-term opioid therapy as part of a multimodal management plan. Such prescribing necessitates careful patient selection; informed consent; prudent opioid dosing and titration; and monitoring for response to treatment, adverse effects, and aberrant drug-taking behavior. Treatment and regulatory guidelines can assist APRNs in providing safe and effective care to patients with chronic low back pain.

  11. The consequences of using advanced physical assessment skills in medical and surgical nursing: A hermeneutic pragmatic study

    PubMed Central

    Zambas, Shelaine I.; Smythe, Elizabeth A.; Koziol-Mclain, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives The aim of this study was to explore the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills on medical and surgical wards. Background Appropriate, accurate, and timely assessment by nurses is the cornerstone of maintaining patient safety in hospitals. The inclusion of “advanced” physical assessment skills such as auscultation, palpation, and percussion is thought to better prepare nurses for complex patient presentations within a wide range of clinical situations. Design This qualitative study used a hermeneutic pragmatic approach. Method Unstructured interviews were conducted with five experienced medical and surgical nurses to obtain 13 detailed narratives of assessment practice. Narratives were analyzed using Van Manen's six-step approach to identify the consequences of the nurse's use of advanced assessment skills. Results The consequences of using advanced assessment skills include looking for more, challenging interpretations, and perseverance. The use of advanced assessment skills directs what the nurse looks for, what she sees, interpretation of the findings, and her response. It is the interpretation of what is seen, heard, or felt within the full context of the patient situation, which is the advanced skill. Conclusion Advanced assessment skill is the means to an accurate interpretation of the clinical situation and contributes to appropriate diagnosis and medical management in complex patient situations. Relevance to clinical practice The nurse's use of advanced assessment skills enables her to contribute to diagnostic reasoning within the acute medical and surgical setting. PMID:27607193

  12. Efficacy of switching therapy of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuan-Chi; Kang, Chih-Hsiung; Chiang, Po-Hui

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of switching therapy with a second-line luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogue after prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression for advanced prostate cancer. We enrolled 200 patients, from December 2005 to September 2013, with nodal positive, metastatic prostate cancer or disease progression after definite treatment receiving continuous LHRH analogue therapy with monthly depot leuprorelin(sc) acetate 3.75 mg/vial (LA) or goserelin acetate(sc) 3.6 mg/vial (GA). If the patients had castration-resistant prostate cancer, the treatment choice of switching therapy (from LA to GA or from GA to LA) prior to starting chemotherapy was given. The LH, testosterone level, and PSA change were recorded. The records showed that there were 127 patients receiving LA as initial ADT therapy, whereas the other 73 patients were in GA therapy. A total of 92 patients received LHRH analogue switching therapy (54 patients switched from LA to GA and 38 switched from GA to LA). The effect of LH and testosterone reduction prior to and after switching therapy was comparable between the two groups, and increased PSA level after 3 months of treatment was seen in both groups (median PSA: 15.7-67.7 ng/mL in the LA to GA group; 15.2-71.4 ng/mL in the GA to LA group). This study concluded that switching therapy for patients with PSA progression after ADT has no efficacy of further PSA response.

  13. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Prevention of Relapse and Recurrence in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Keith S.; Hollon, Steven D.; Dimidjian, Sona; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Gallop, Robert J.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2008-01-01

    This study followed treatment responders from a randomized controlled trial of adults with major depression. Patients treated with medication but withdrawn onto pill-placebo had more relapse through 1 year of follow-up compared to patients who received prior behavioral activation, prior cognitive therapy, or continued medication. Prior…

  14. Augmenting Antidepressant Medication Treatment of Depressed Women with Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples: A Randomized Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Wayne H.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.; Golden, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to evaluate adding emotionally focused therapy for couples (EFT) to antidepressant medication in the treatment of women with major depressive disorder and comorbid relationship discord. Twenty-four women and their male partners were randomized to 6 months of medication management alone (MM) or MM augmented with EFT (MM +…

  15. A decade of building massage therapy services at an academic medical center as part of a healing enhancement program.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nancy J; Cutshall, Susanne M; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Hauschulz, Jennifer L; Ristau, Crystal R; Thomley, Barb S; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-02-01

    The use of complementary and integrative medicine therapies is steadily becoming an integral part of health care. Massage therapy is increasingly offered to hospitalized patients for various conditions to assist with the management of common symptoms such as pain, anxiety, and tension. This article summarizes a decade of building the massage therapy service at a large tertiary care medical center, from the early pilot studies and research to the current program offerings, and the hopes and dreams for the future.

  16. Prospective comparative study on cost-effectiveness of subthalamic stimulation and best medical treatment in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Valldeoriola, Francesc; Morsi, Ossama; Tolosa, Eduardo; Rumià, Jordi; Martí, Maria José; Martínez-Martín, Pablo

    2007-11-15

    This is an open, prospective, longitudinal study designed to compare two cohorts of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease during 1 year, one undergoing bilateral subthalamic stimulation (STN-DBS) and the other receiving the best medical treatment (BMT), with respect to the clinical effects observed and the medical expenses produced. Assessments were done by using clinical measures and a generic health related quality of life scale. A questionnaire was used to collect direct healthcare resources. As a measure of cost-effectiveness, we calculated life years gained adjusted by health-related quality of life (QALY) and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Clinical and demographic variables of both groups were comparable at baseline. Total UPDRS scores improved from 50.5 +/- 3.6 to 28.5 +/- 3.8 in STN-DBS patients and worsened from 44.3 +/- 3.3 to 54.2 +/- 4 in the control group. Pharmacological costs in the operated patients were 3,799 +/- 940 euro, while in the BMT group the costs were 13,208 +/- 4,966 euro. Other medical costs were 1,280 +/- 720 euro in the STN-DBS group and 4,017 +/- 2,962 euro in BMT patients. Nondirect medical costs were 4,079 +/- 1,289 in operated patients and 2,787 +/- 1,209 euro in the BMT group. Mean QALYs were 0.7611 +/- 0.03 in STN-DBS and 0.5401 +/- 0.06 in BMT patients. In STN-DBS patients, the ICER needed to obtain an improvement of one point in the total UPDRS score was of 239.8 euro and the ICER/QALY was of 34,389 euro. Cost-effectiveness parameters were mostly related to the degree of clinical improvement and the reduction of pharmacological costs after STN-DBS. An ICER of 34,389 euro/QALY is within appropriate limits to consider subthalamic stimulation as an efficient therapy.

  17. Recent Surgical and Medical Advances in the Treatment of Dupuytren’s Disease - A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    R, Mafi; S, Hindocha; W, Khan

    2012-01-01

    Dupuytren’s disease (DD) is a type of fibromatosis which progressively results in the shortening and thickening of the fibrous tissue of the palmar fascia. This condition which predominantly affects white-northern Europeans has been identified since 1614. DD can affect certain activities of daily living such as face washing, combing hair and putting hand in a glove. The origin of Dupuytren’s contracture is still unknown, but there are a number of treatments that doctors have come across throughout the years. Historically surgery has been the mainstay treatment for DD but not the only one. The objective is to make a structured review of the most recent advances in treatment of DD including the surgical and medical interventions. We have looked at the most relevant published articles regarding the various treatment options for DD. This review has taken 55 articles into consideration which have met the inclusion criteria. The most recent treatments used are multi-needle aponeurotomy, extensive percutaneous aponeurotomy and lipografting, injecting collagenase Clostridium histolyticum, INF-gamma and shockwave therapy as well as radiotherapy. Each of these treatments has certain advantages and drawbacks and cannot be used for every patient. In order to prevent this condition, spending more time and money in the topic is required to reach better and more consistent treatments and ultimately to eradicate this disease. PMID:22431952

  18. Recent Surgical and Medical Advances in the Treatment of Dupuytren's Disease - A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    R, Mafi; S, Hindocha; W, Khan

    2012-01-01

    Dupuytren's disease (DD) is a type of fibromatosis which progressively results in the shortening and thickening of the fibrous tissue of the palmar fascia. This condition which predominantly affects white-northern Europeans has been identified since 1614. DD can affect certain activities of daily living such as face washing, combing hair and putting hand in a glove. The origin of Dupuytren's contracture is still unknown, but there are a number of treatments that doctors have come across throughout the years. Historically surgery has been the mainstay treatment for DD but not the only one. The objective is to make a structured review of the most recent advances in treatment of DD including the surgical and medical interventions. We have looked at the most relevant published articles regarding the various treatment options for DD. This review has taken 55 articles into consideration which have met the inclusion criteria. The most recent treatments used are multi-needle aponeurotomy, extensive percutaneous aponeurotomy and lipografting, injecting collagenase Clostridium histolyticum, INF-gamma and shockwave therapy as well as radiotherapy. Each of these treatments has certain advantages and drawbacks and cannot be used for every patient. In order to prevent this condition, spending more time and money in the topic is required to reach better and more consistent treatments and ultimately to eradicate this disease.

  19. Recognizing Advanced Heart Failure and Knowing Your Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advanced Heart Failure and Knowing Your Options Updated:Mar 25,2016 Understanding the Medical Situation Having advanced ... them less able to dispose of sodium and water. If the kidneys fail, renal replacement therapy, such ...

  20. Philip King Brown and Arequipa Sanatorium: early occupational therapy as medical and social experiment.

    PubMed

    Harley, Lilas; Schwartz, Kathleen Barker

    2013-01-01

    Historical inquiry enriches occupational therapy practice by identifying enduring values and inspiring future excellence. This study presents for the first time the pioneering life and work of Philip King Brown, a San Francisco physician who used occupation to treat the physical, mental, and social effects of tuberculosis (TB) at Arequipa Sanatorium, the institution he founded in 1911. Through textual analysis of the Arequipa Sanatorium Records, this article evaluates and defends Brown's assertion that his institution was medically and socially experimental. The Arequipa Sanatorium promoted occupational therapy by demonstrating its viability in the treatment of TB, the era's most critical health threat. It also put into practice the ideals of holism, humanism, and occupational justice that resonate within the profession today. Finally, Arequipa provided an example of how an occupation program can change the public perception of disability.

  1. Gene therapy for blindness.

    PubMed

    Sahel, José-Alain; Roska, Botond

    2013-07-08

    Sight-restoring therapy for the visually impaired and blind is a major unmet medical need. Ocular gene therapy is a rational choice for restoring vision or preventing the loss of vision because most blinding diseases originate in cellular components of the eye, a compartment that is optimally suited for the delivery of genes, and many of these diseases have a genetic origin or genetic component. In recent years we have witnessed major advances in the field of ocular gene therapy, and proof-of-concept studies are under way to evaluate the safety and efficacy of human gene therapies. Here we discuss the concepts and recent advances in gene therapy in the retina. Our review discusses traditional approaches such as gene replacement and neuroprotection and also new avenues such as optogenetic therapies. We conjecture that advances in gene therapy in the retina will pave the way for gene therapies in other parts of the brain.

  2. Complementary and alternative medical therapy utilization by people with chronic fatiguing illnesses in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jones, James F; Maloney, Elizabeth M; Boneva, Roumiana S; Jones, Ann-Britt; Reeves, William C

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic fatiguing illnesses, including chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Previous clinical reports addressed the utilization of health care provided to patients with CFS by a variety of practitioners with other than allopathic training, but did not examine the spectrum of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used. This study was designed to measure CAM therapy use by persons with fatiguing illnesses in the United States population. Methods During a random-digit dialing survey to estimate the prevalence of CFS-like illness in urban and rural populations from different geographic regions of the United States, we queried the utilization of CAM including manipulation or body-based therapies, alternative medical systems, mind-body, biologically-based, and energy modalities. Results Four hundred forty fatigued and 444 non-fatigued persons from 2,728 households completed screening. Fatigued subjects included 53 persons with prolonged fatigue, 338 with chronic fatigue, and 49 with CFS-like illness. Mind-body therapy (primarily personal prayer and prayer by others) was the most frequently used CAM across all groups. Among women, there was a significant trend of increasing overall CAM use across all subgroups (p-trend = 0.003). All categories of CAM use were associated with significantly poorer physical health scores, and all but one (alternative medicine systems) were associated with significantly poorer mental health scores. People with CFS-like illness were significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (chiropractic and massage) than non-fatigued participants (OR = 2.52, CI = 1.32, 4.82). Use of body-based therapies increased significantly in a linear trend across subgroups of non-fatigued, prolonged fatigued, chronic fatigued, and CFS-like subjects (p-trend = 0.002). People with chronic fatigue were also significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (OR = 1.52, CI = 1.07, 2.16) and mind

  3. Oral targeted therapies: managing drug interactions, enhancing adherence and optimizing medication safety in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liewer, Susanne; Huddleston, Ashley N

    2015-04-01

    The advent of newer, targeted oral chemotherapy medications such as small molecule kinase inhibitors, ibrutinib and idelalisib, has created additional options for the treatment of lymphoma. The targeted nature of these agents offers many patient-identified advantages over older, intravenously administered chemotherapy regimens such as ease of self-administration and an increased sense of independence. However, newer oral agents also present unique challenges not previously experienced with older therapies that may affect safety, efficacy and patient adherence. In this article, we review oral agents for the treatment of lymphoma, how to evaluate and manage drug-drug and drug-food interactions with concomitant oral medications, and issues with patient adherence as well as methods to determine adherence for oral chemotherapy.

  4. Physical evaluation system to determine medical risk and indicated dental therapy modifications.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, F M; Malamed, S F

    1979-08-01

    The physical evaluation system allows the practitioner to rapidly classify each patient according to medical risk and thus to provide dental treatment comfortably and safely. The evaluation system serves as a guide to the level of dental therapy, deisions of management, and modification of treatment for the medically compromised patient. Extensive use of the ADA physical status classification system in dentistry would allow meaningful studies of morbidity and mortality that are related to various management protocols and could conceivably have an impact on insurance schedules associated with psychosedation modalities and general anethesia on an out patient basis. A physical evaluation system cannot substitute for knowledge and good judgment. Recommended categories of physical status and modification of treatment should not be considered as absolutes, but as guides. Wheras the guidelines may appear to be inflexible, they should not be considered as such. Deviation from recommendations is often justified and is expected.

  5. Successful surgical drainage and aggressive medical therapy in a preterm neonate with Bacillus cereus meningitis.

    PubMed

    Drazin, Doniel; Lehman, Deborah; Danielpour, Moise

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus cereus meningitis is a rare disease with a very high mortality rate in neonates. The authors present the rare case of a premature infant with B. cereus bacteremia and subsequent intracranial abscesses. In addition to aggressive medical therapy, surgical drainage was performed via a left frontal mini-craniotomy. At 15 months of age, the patient had mild developmental delay, cortical blindness, and sensorineural hearing loss. The clinical case is described and difficulties in the management of B. cereus meningoencephalitis in infants are discussed.

  6. Policies pertaining to complementary and alternative medical therapies in a random sample of 39 academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael H; Sandler, Lynne; Hrbek, Andrea; Davis, Roger B; Eisenberg, David M

    2005-01-01

    This research documents policies in 39 randomly selected academic medical centers integrating complementary and alternative medical (CAM) services into conventional care. Twenty-three offered CAM services-most commonly, acupuncture, massage, dietary supplements, mind-body therapies, and music therapy. None had written policies concerning credentialing practices or malpractice liability. Only 10 reported a written policy governing use of dietary supplements, although three sold supplements in inpatient formularies, one in the psychiatry department, and five in outpatient pharmacies. Thus, few academic medical centers have sufficiently integrated CAM services into conventional care by developing consensus-written policies governing credentialing, malpractice liability, and dietary supplement use.

  7. Effect of Combination Cholesterol-Lowering Therapy and Triglyceride-Lowering Therapy on Medical Costs in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Gregory A; Reynolds, Kristi; Olufade, Temitope; Kimes, Teresa M; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen; Sapp, Daniel S; Anzalone, Deborah; Fortmann, Stephen P

    2017-02-01

    High triglyceride (TG) levels among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with higher medical costs. We analyzed the economic impact of TG-lowering therapies and whether the association between medical costs and therapy differed according to TG reduction. We conducted an observational cohort study of 184,932 patients with diabetes mellitus who had a TG measurement between January 2012 and June 2013 and a second TG measurement 3 to 15 months later. We identified 4 therapy groups (statin monotherapy, TG-specific monotherapy, statin/TG-specific combination therapy, or no therapy) and stratified those groups by percent change in TG (increased ≥5%, change of ≤4.9%, decreased 5% to 29%, decreased ≥30%). We compared change in medical costs between the year before and after therapy, adjusted for demographic and clinical characteristics. Of the 184,932 total patients, 143,549 (77.6%) received statin monotherapy, 900 (0.5%) received TG-specific monotherapy, 1,956 (1.1%) received statin and TG-specific combination therapy, and 38,527 (20.8%) received no prescription lipid agents. After covariate adjustment, statin/TG-specific agent recipients had a mean 1-year total cost reduction of $1,110. The greatest cost reduction was seen among statin/TG-specific combination therapy patients who reduced TG levels by ≥30% (-$2,859). Statin monotherapy patients who reduced TG by ≥30% also had a large reduction in adjusted costs (-$1,079). In conclusion, we found a substantial economic benefit to treating diabetic patients with statin/TG-specific combination lipid therapy compared with monotherapy of either type or no lipid pharmacotherapy. A TG reduction of ≥30% produced a particularly large reduction in 1-year medical costs.

  8. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jonathan; Xu, Beibei; Yeung, Heidi N.; Roeland, Eric J.; Martinez, Maria Elena; Le, Quynh-Thu; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  9. CHAMP: Cognitive behaviour therapy for health anxiety in medical patients, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Abnormal health anxiety, also called hypochondriasis, has been successfully treated by cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in patients recruited from primary care, but only one pilot trial has been carried out among those attending secondary medical clinics where health anxiety is likely to be more common and have a greater impact on services. The CHAMP study extends this work to examine both the clinical and cost effectiveness of CBT in this population. Method/Design The study is a randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms and equal randomization of 466 eligible patients (assuming a 20% drop-out) to an active treatment group of 5-10 sessions of cognitive behaviour therapy and to a control group. The aim at baseline, after completion of all assessments but before randomization, was to give a standard simple explanation of the nature of health anxiety for all participants. Subsequently the control group was to receive whatever care might usually be available in the clinics, which is normally a combination of clinical assessment, appropriate tests and reassurance. Those allocated to the active treatment group were planned to receive between 5 and 10 sessions of an adapted form of cognitive behaviour therapy based on the Salkovskis/Warwick model, in which a set of treatment strategies are chosen aimed at helping patients understand the factors that drive and maintain health anxiety. The therapy was planned to be given by graduate research workers, nurses or other health professionals trained for this intervention whom would also have their competence assessed independently during the course of treatment. The primary outcome is reduction in health anxiety symptoms after one year and the main secondary outcome is the cost of care after two years. Discussion This represents the first trial of adapted cognitive behaviour therapy in health anxiety that is large enough to test not only the clinical benefits of treatment but also whether the cost of

  10. Cognitive-behavior therapy singly and combined with medication for persistent insomnia: Impact on psychological and daytime functioning.

    PubMed

    Morin, Charles M; Beaulieu-Bonneau, Simon; Bélanger, Lynda; Ivers, Hans; Sánchez Ortuño, Montserrat; Vallières, Annie; Savard, Josée; Guay, Bernard; Mérette, Chantal

    2016-12-01

    While impairment of daytime functioning due to poor sleep is often the main determinant for seeking treatment, few studies have examined the clinical impact of insomnia therapies on daytime outcomes. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT), alone and combined with medication, on various indices of daytime and psychological functioning. Participants were 160 individuals with chronic insomnia who received CBT alone or CBT plus medication (zolpidem) for an initial six-week therapy, followed by an extended six-month therapy. Participants treated with CBT initially received maintenance CBT or no additional treatment and those treated with combined therapy initially continued with CBT plus intermittent medication (prn) or CBT without medication (taper). Measures of anxiety and depressive symptoms, fatigue, quality of life, and perceived impact of sleep difficulties on various indices of daytime functioning were completed at baseline, after each treatment stage, and at six-month follow-up. Following acute treatment, significant improvements of fatigue, quality of life (mental component), anxiety, and depression were obtained in the CBT alone condition but not in the combined CBT plus medication condition. Following extended treatment, further improvements were noted for the subgroup receiving extended CBT relative to that with no additional treatment, and for the subgroup receiving CBT and intermittent medication relative to that with CBT but no medication. Improvements were well maintained at the 6-month follow-up. These findings indicate that insomnia-specific therapy is effective at improving daytime and psychological functioning in the short term, and that maintenance therapy produces an added value to optimize long-term outcomes.

  11. In utero stem cell transplantation and gene therapy: rationale, history, and recent advances toward clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Almeida-Porada, Graça; Atala, Anthony; Porada, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput molecular testing have made it possible to diagnose most genetic disorders relatively early in gestation with minimal risk to the fetus. These advances should soon allow widespread prenatal screening for the majority of human genetic diseases, opening the door to the possibility of treatment/correction prior to birth. In addition to the obvious psychological and financial benefits of curing a disease in utero, and thereby enabling the birth of a healthy infant, there are multiple biological advantages unique to fetal development, which provide compelling rationale for performing potentially curative treatments, such as stem cell transplantation or gene therapy, prior to birth. Herein, we briefly review the fields of in utero transplantation (IUTx) and in utero gene therapy and discuss the biological hurdles that have thus far restricted success of IUTx to patients with immunodeficiencies. We then highlight several recent experimental breakthroughs in immunology, hematopoietic/marrow ontogeny, and in utero cell delivery, which have collectively provided means of overcoming these barriers, thus setting the stage for clinical application of these highly promising therapies in the near future. PMID:27069953

  12. Ganciclovir Antiviral Therapy in Advanced Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: An Open Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Egan, J. J.; Adamali, H. I.; Lok, S. S.; Stewart, J. P.; Woodcock, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesis. Repeated epithelial cell injury secondary to viruses such as Epstein Barr and subsequent dysfunctional repair may be central to the pathogenesis of IPF. In this observational study, we evaluated whether a combination of standard and anti-viral therapy might have an impact on disease progression. Methods. Advanced IPF patients who failed standard therapy and had serological evidence of previous EBV, received ganciclovir (iv) at 5 mg/kg twice daily. Forced vital capacity (FVC), shuttle walk test, DTPA scan and prednisolone dose were measured before and 8 weeks post-treatment. Results. Fourteen patients were included. After ganciclovir, eight patients showed improvement in FVC and six deteriorated. The median reduction of prednisolone dose was 7.5 mg (44%). Nine patients were classified “responders” of whom four showed an improvement in all four criteria, while three of the five “non-responders” showed no response in any of the criteria. Responders showed reduction in prednisolone dosage (P = .02) and improved DTPA clearance (P = .001). Conclusion. This audit outcome suggests that 2-week course of ganciclovir (iv) may attenuate disease progression in a subgroup of advanced IPF patients. These observations do not suggest that anti-viral treatment is a substitute for the standard care, however, suggests the need to explore the efficacy of ganciclovir as adjunctive therapy in IPF. PMID:21660226

  13. Transcatheter Arterial Infusion Therapy in the Treatment of Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, Keiko; Nagata, Yasushi; Itoh, Tuyoshi; Okajima, Kaoru; Murata, Rumi; Takagi, Takehisa; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1999-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of transcatheter arterial infusion (TAI) therapy in 18 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: The drugs infused were epirubicin 60 mg, mitomycin C 20 mg, and 5-fluorouracil 500 mg. The efficacy of TAI was evaluated by a tumor marker (CA19-9), computed tomography (CT) findings, and postoperative histopathological specimens. Results: In 10 of 15 cases, the tumor marker level was decreased after TAI therapy. In 6 of 14 cases, CT showed a decrease in the tumor size, and in 1 case, the tumor disappeared completely. In 6 cases the tumor could be resected. Necrosis, fibrosis, and degeneration of cancer cells were seen in 3 of 4 cases for whom a histopathological evaluation was done. The median survival was 11 months. In 17 patients back pain was the chief complaint, and was reduced to a self-controlled level in 10 patients following TAI therapy. No major complications were encountered. Conclusion: TAI appears to be an effective palliative treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer.

  14. Communication training for advanced medical students improves information recall of medical laypersons in simulated informed consent talks – a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Informed consent talks are mandatory before invasive interventions. However, the patients’ information recall has been shown to be rather poor. We investigated, whether medical laypersons recalled more information items from a simulated informed consent talk after advanced medical students participated in a communication training aiming to reduce a layperson’s cognitive load. Methods Using a randomized, controlled, prospective cross-over-design, 30 5th and 6th year medical students were randomized into two groups. One group received communication training, followed by a comparison intervention (early intervention group, EI); the other group first received the comparison intervention and then communication training (late intervention group, LI). Before and after the interventions, the 30 medical students performed simulated informed consent talks with 30 blinded medical laypersons using a standardized set of information. We then recorded the number of information items the medical laypersons recalled. Results After the communication training both groups of medical laypersons recalled significantly more information items (EI: 41 ± 9% vs. 23 ± 9%, p < .0001, LI 49 ± 10% vs. 35 ± 6%, p < .0001). After the comparison intervention the improvement was modest and significant only in the LI (EI: 42 ± 9% vs. 40 ± 9%, p = .41, LI 35 ± 6% vs. 29 ± 9%, p = .016). Conclusion Short communication training for advanced medical students improves information recall of medical laypersons in simulated informed consent talks. PMID:23374907

  15. Prospects For and Progress Towards Laser-Driven Particle Therapy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T. E.; Schramm, U.; Burris-Mog, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kraft, S. D.; Zeil, K.; Bussmann, M.; Gaillard, S.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Kluge, T.; Schmidt, B.; Sobiella, M.; Sauerbrey, R.; Baumann, M.; Enghardt, W.; Pawelke, J.; Flippo, K.; Harres, K.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.

    2010-11-04

    Recent advances in laser-ion acceleration have motivated research towards laser-driven compact accelerators for medical therapy. Realizing laser-ion acceleration for medical therapy will require adapting the medical requirements to the foreseeable laser constraints, as well as advances in laser-acceleration physics, beam manipulation and delivery, real-time dosimetry, treatment planning and translational research into a clinical setting.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Wounds: The Spectrum from Basic to Advanced Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Viñas, Marta; Falanga, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Almost 7 million Americans have chronic cutaneous wounds and billions of dollars are spent on their treatment. The number of patients with nonhealing wounds keeps increasing worldwide due to an ever-aging population, increasing number of obese and diabetic patients, and cardiovascular disease. Recent Advances: Advanced treatments for difficult wounds are needed. Therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is attractive due to their differentiating potential, their immunomodulating properties, and their paracrine effects. Critical Issues: New technologies (including growth factors and skin substitutes) are now widely used for stimulating wound healing. However, in spite of these advances, the percentage of complete wound closure in most clinical situations is around 50–60%. Moreover, there is a high rate of wound recurrence. Future Directions: Recently, it has been demonstrated that MSCs speed up wound healing by decreasing inflammation, by promoting angiogenesis, and by decreasing scarring. However, there are some potential limitations to successful MSC therapy. These limitations include the need to improve cell delivery methods, cell viability, heterogeneity in MSC preparations, and suboptimal wound bed preparation. Further large, controlled clinical trials are needed to establish the safety of MSCs before widespread clinical application. PMID:27076993

  17. Molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ANTONELLI, GIOVANNA; LIBRA, MASSIMO; PANEBIANCO, VINCENZO; RUSSO, ALESSIA ERIKA; VITALE, FELICE VITO; COLINA, PAOLO; D'ANGELO, ALESSANDRO; ROSSELLO, ROSALBA; FERRAÙ, FRANCESCO

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in men and women. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, >50% of patients are >65 years old. Through an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lung oncogenesis, molecular-targeted approaches have become an essential element for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. As the toxicity profiles of the techniques are definitely more favorable compared with chemotherapy, they are particularly attractive for use in elderly patients, who are potentially more susceptible to the toxicity of systemic oncological therapies. However, studies on the activity of molecular-targeted agents in this aged patient setting are much more limited compared with those in their younger counterparts. In the present review, the literature on molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC is discussed. It is concluded that bevacizumab should be reserved only for highly select elderly patients with advanced NSCLC when the clinician deems it useful in the face of acceptable toxicities. In elderly patients with advanced epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive NSCLC, erlotinib and gefitinib appear to repeat the same favorable performance as that documented on a larger scale in the overall population of patients with activating mutations. A good toxicity profile is also confirmed for active molecules on different pathways, such as crizotinib. PMID:26870160

  18. The advanced therapy classification procedure. Overview of experience gained so far.

    PubMed

    Voltz-Girolt, C; Celis, P; Boucaumont, M; D'Apote, L; Pinheiro, M-H; Papaluca-Amati, M

    2011-07-01

    The classification procedure, introduced by the European Regulation on advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), has received a tremendous interest from companies, academic and public sponsors developing ATMPs. This procedure gives companies the opportunity to verify whether or not the product they are developing can be considered an ATMP and can therefore benefit from the new regulatory pathway introduced in the European Union for these types of medicinal products. This procedure is optional, free of charge and may take place at any stage of the development of an ATMP in advance of applying for a marketing authorisation. In case of doubt, briefing meetings organised by the European Medicines Agency Innovation Task Force may help preparing for an ATMP classification and are a starting point for the interactions between the Agency and the developers of ATMPs. This article reviews the advantages of the classification procedure for both the developers of ATMPs and the European regulatory network. Since the introduction of this procedure and up to 10 November 2010, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) has finalised 38 applications for classification.

  19. Molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Giovanna; Libra, Massimo; Panebianco, Vincenzo; Russo, Alessia Erika; Vitale, Felice Vito; Colina, Paolo; D'Angelo, Alessandro; Rossello, Rosalba; Ferraù, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in men and women. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, >50% of patients are >65 years old. Through an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lung oncogenesis, molecular-targeted approaches have become an essential element for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. As the toxicity profiles of the techniques are definitely more favorable compared with chemotherapy, they are particularly attractive for use in elderly patients, who are potentially more susceptible to the toxicity of systemic oncological therapies. However, studies on the activity of molecular-targeted agents in this aged patient setting are much more limited compared with those in their younger counterparts. In the present review, the literature on molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC is discussed. It is concluded that bevacizumab should be reserved only for highly select elderly patients with advanced NSCLC when the clinician deems it useful in the face of acceptable toxicities. In elderly patients with advanced epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive NSCLC, erlotinib and gefitinib appear to repeat the same favorable performance as that documented on a larger scale in the overall population of patients with activating mutations. A good toxicity profile is also confirmed for active molecules on different pathways, such as crizotinib.

  20. Comparative effectiveness of combined therapy inhibiting EGFR and VEGF pathways in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of 16 phase II/III randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shangli; Wu, Tongwei; Yan, Guangyue; Cheng, Sijin; Cui, Kang; Xi, Ying; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Wang

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims Combined therapy inhibiting EGFR and VEGF pathways is becoming a promising therapy in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), however, with controversy. The study aims to compare the efficacy of combined inhibition therapy versus control therapy (including placebo, single EGFR inhibition and single VEGF inhibition) in patients with advanced NSCLC. Materials and Methods An adequate literature search in EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) was conducted. Phase II or III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared effectiveness between combined inhibition therapy and control therapy in patients with advanced NSCLC were eligible. The endpoint was overall response rate (ORR), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Sixteen phase II or III RCTs involving a total of 7,109 patients were included. The results indicated that the combined inhibition therapy significantly increased the ORR (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.36-1.87, p<0.00001; I2 = 36%) when compared to control therapy. In the subgroup analysis, the combined inhibition therapy clearly increased the ORR (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.60-2.60, p<0.00001; I2 = 0%) and improved the PFS (HR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.71-0.85, p<0.00001;I2 = 0%) when compared with the placebo, and similar results was detected when compared with the single EGFR inhibition in terms of ORR (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.12-1.74, p = 0.003; I2 = 30%) and PFS (HR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.67-0.81, p<0.0001; I2 = 50%). No obvious difference was found between the combined inhibition therapy and single VEGF inhibition in term of ORR, however, combined inhibition therapy significantly decreased the PFS when compared to the single VEGF inhibition therapy (HR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.34-2.17, p<0.0001; I2 = 50%). Besides, no significant difference was observed between the combined inhibition therapy

  1. Medical borderlands: engineering the body with plastic surgery and hormonal therapies in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Alexander; Sanabria, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores medical borderlands where health and enhancement practices are entangled. It draws on fieldwork carried out in the context of two distinct research projects in Brazil on plastic surgery and sex hormone therapies. These two therapies have significant clinical overlap. Both are made available in private and public healthcare in ways that reveal the class dynamics underlying Brazilian medicine. They also have an important experimental dimension rooted in Brazil's regulatory context and societal expectations placed on medicine as a means for managing women's reproductive and sexual health. Off-label and experimental medical use of these treatments is linked to experimental social use: how women adopt them to respond to the pressures, anxieties and aspirations of work and intimate life. The paper argues that these experimental techniques are becoming morally authorized as routine management of women's health, integrated into mainstream Ob-Gyn healthcare, and subtly blurred with practices of cuidar-se (self-care) seen in Brazil as essential for modern femininity. PMID:25175295

  2. Impact of medical therapy on atheroma volume measured by different cardiovascular imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Sinno, Mohamad C N; Al-Mallah, Mouaz

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease that affects most vascular beds. The gold standard of atherosclerosis imaging has been invasive intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Newer noninvasive imaging modalities like B-mode ultrasound, cardiac computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to assess these vascular territories with high accuracy and reproducibility. These imaging modalities have lately been used for the assessment of the atherosclerotic plaque and the response of its volume to several medical therapies used in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease. To study the impact of these medications on atheroma volume progression or regression, imaging modalities have been used on a serial basis providing a unique opportunity to monitor the effect these antiatherosclerotic strategies exert on plaque burden. As a result, studies incorporating serial IVUS imaging, quantitative coronary angiography (QCA), B-mode ultrasound, electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging have all been used to evaluate the impact of therapeutic strategies that modify cholesterol and blood pressure on the progression/regression of atherosclerotic plaque. In this review, we intend to summarize the impact of different therapies aimed at halting the progression or even result in regression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease evaluated by different imaging modalities.

  3. [Medical borderlands: engineering the body with plastic surgery and hormonal therapies in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Alexander; Sanabria, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores medical borderlands where health and enhancement practices are entangled. It draws on fieldwork carried out in the context of two distinct research projects in Brazil on plastic surgery and sex hormone therapies. These two therapies have significant clinical overlap. Both are made available in private and public healthcare in ways that reveal the class dynamics underlying Brazilian medicine. They also have an important experimental dimension rooted in Brazil's regulatory context and societal expectations placed on medicine as a means for managing women's reproductive and sexual health. Off-label and experimental medical use of these treatments is linked to experimental social use: how women adopt them to respond to the pressures, anxieties and aspirations of work and intimate life. The paper argues that these experimental techniques are becoming morally authorized as routine management of women's health, integrated into mainstream Ob-Gyn healthcare, and subtly blurred with practices of cuidar-se (self-care) seen in Brazil as essential for modern femininity.

  4. Simulation and virtual reality in medical education and therapy: a protocol.

    PubMed

    Roy, Michael J; Sticha, Deborah L; Kraus, Patricia L; Olsen, Dale E

    2006-04-01

    Continuing medical education has historically been provided primarily by didactic lectures, though adult learners prefer experiential or self-directed learning. Young physicians have extensive experience with computer-based or "video" games, priming them for medical education--and treating their patients--via new technologies. We report our use of standardized patients (SPs) to educate physicians on the diagnosis and treatment of biological and chemical warfare agent exposure. We trained professional actors to serve as SPs representing exposure to biological agents such as anthrax and smallpox. We rotated workshop participants through teaching stations to interview, examine, diagnose and treat SPs. We also trained SPs to simulate a chemical mass casualty (MASCAL) incident. Workshop participants worked together to treat MASCAL victims, followed by discussion of key teaching points. More recently, we developed computer-based simulation (CBS) modules of patients exposed to biological agents. We compare the strengths and weaknesses of CBS vs. live SPs. Finally, we detail plans for a randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of virtual reality (VR) exposure therapy compared to pharmacotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is associated with significant disability and healthcare costs, which may be ameliorated by the identification of more effective therapy.

  5. Effects of Medical Resonance Therapy Music on patients with psoriasis and neurodermatitis--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lazaroff, I; Shimshoni, R

    2000-01-01

    Stress medicine has shown that emotional disharmony can be a substantial factor for skin diseases. The harmonisation of the emotional status and a corresponding reduction of stress hormones by the Medical Resonance Therapy Music (MRT-Music) as shown in other studies (1,2,3,4) inspired us to investigate its benefits for patients with psoriasis vulgaris and neurodermatitis (neurodermatitis constitutionalis atopica). Over a period of 14 days we measured the parameters of blood pressure, heart rate, stimulus to scratch and the degree of sickness in two, respectively four groups of 68 patients in total: two experimental groups (psoriasis/neurodermatitis) and two control groups. All patients received the normal treatment of our hospital, the experimental groups were additionally treated with 3 x 30 minutes of MRT-Music per day, while the controls were asked to somehow relax during this time. In the experimental groups the measurements showed a reduction of blood pressure and heart rate and revealed an enhanced reduction of the stimulus to scratch and an enhanced reduction in the degree of sickness. Interestingly the effects of MRT-Music were stronger with the psoriasis patients than with the neurodermatitis patients. The results of this pilot study convinced us to offer the treatment with the Medical Resonance Therapy Music to all our patients.

  6. Advances in induced pluripotent stem cells, genomics, biomarkers, and antiplatelet therapy highlights of the year in JCTR 2013.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Emanuele; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Stolen, Craig; Taylor, Angela; Barton, Paul J; Bartunek, Jozef; Iaizzo, Paul; Judge, Daniel P; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie; Blaxall, Burns C; Terzic, Andre; Hall, Jennifer L

    2014-07-01

    The Journal provides the clinician and scientist with the latest advances in discovery research, emerging technologies, preclinical research design and testing, and clinical trials. We highlight advances in areas of induced pluripotent stem cells, genomics, biomarkers, multimodality imaging, and antiplatelet biology and therapy. The top publications are critically discussed and presented along with anatomical reviews and FDA insight to provide context.

  7. Fiscal strain and access to opiate substitution therapy at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, Robert; Leslie, Douglas; Woody, George

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between institutional fiscal strain and the availability of opiate substitution therapy (eg, methadone maintenance), an effective but relatively expensive treatment for heroin addiction. An observational design was used to examine the association of changes in funding and changes in provision for treating opiate addiction at 29 VA Medical Centers (VAMCs). We hypothesized that VAMCs experiencing greater fiscal strain would show reduced availability of opiate substitution treatment. Administrative records from each of 29 VAMCs that provided opiate substitution therapy in both Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 and FY 1999 were used to measure changes in the availability of this service, ie, the percent change in total patients treated, annual visits per patient, and total services delivered. Institutional fiscal strain was measured by the percent decline in per capita funding at four levels at each VAMC: the entire medical center, all mental health programs, all substance abuse programs (inpatient and outpatient), and outpatient substance abuse programs alone. The total number of patients receiving opiate substitution increased from 5,549 in FY 1995 to 6,884 in FY 1999 (24%), annual visits per patient decreased by 16%, and the total number of units of services increased by 4%. There were no significant relationships between changes in the delivery of opiate substitution services and changes in per capita funding at any of the four institutional levels. No new programs were started during these years. Although no new programs were started, the availability of opiate substitution therapy at VA facilities with existing programs was maintained over a five-year period regardless of local funding changes, although at somewhat reduced intensity.

  8. Beyond HER2: recent advances and future directions in targeted therapies in esophagogastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Esophagogastric cancers (EGCa) are a leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide. It has been recognized that they represent heterogenous diseases based on histology and anatomy. However, it is also increasingly evident that these are diverse malignancies based on genetic alterations, and this is increasingly making these diseases amenable to targeted therapies. While epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mTOR inhibitors have failed to prove effective in the treatment of advanced EGCa, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inihibitor have now been demonstrated to improve survival, at least in the 2nd line setting of adenocarcinomas. Other promising approaches are being investigated, including targeted therapies such as MET and FGFR inhibitors, as well as immunotherapy and agents that may affect synthetic lethality. PMID:27747090

  9. ADVANCED MR IMAGING METHODS FOR PLANNING AND MONITORING RADIATION THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH HIGH GRADE GLIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Janine M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    This review explores how the integration of advanced imaging methods with high quality anatomic images significantly improves the characterization, target definition, assessment of response to therapy, and overall management of patients with high-grade glioma. Metrics derived from diffusion, perfusion, and susceptibility weighted MR imaging in conjunction with MR spectroscopic imaging, allows us to characterize regions of edema, hypoxia, increased cellularity, and necrosis within heterogeneous tumor and surrounding brain tissue. Quantification of such measures may provide a more reliable initial representation of tumor delineation and response to therapy than changes in the contrast enhancing or T2 lesion alone and have a significant impact on targeting resection, planning radiation, and assessing treatment effectiveness. In the long-term, implementation of these imaging methodologies can also aid in the identification of recurrent tumor and its differentiation from treatment-related confounds and facilitate the detection of radiation-induced vascular injury in otherwise normal appearing brain tissue. PMID:25219809

  10. Lenvatinib therapy for the treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Glen, Hilary

    2016-10-01

    Despite advances in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) treatments, patients eventually progress and develop resistance to therapies targeting a single pathway. Lenvatinib inhibits VEGFR1-3, FGFR1-4, PDGFRβ, RET and KIT proto-oncogenes. In a randomized, Phase II trial evaluating patients with mRCC who had progressed after one prior VEGF-targeted therapy, progression-free survival was significantly improved with lenvatinib alone or in combination with everolimus versus everolimus alone. This review summarizes the clinical development of lenvatinib in mRCC, and how simultaneous targeting of multiple pathways involved in carcinogenesis and/or therapeutic resistance may improve patient outcomes. Lenvatinib plus everolimus may be a promising second-line treatment in patients with mRCC.

  11. Molecularly targeted therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma - a drug development crisis?

    PubMed Central

    Thillai, Kiruthikah; Ross, Paul; Sarker, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fastest growing cause of cancer related death globally. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only drug proven to improve outcomes in patients with advanced disease offering modest survival benefit. Although comprehensive genomic mapping has improved understanding of the genetic aberrations in hepatocellular cancer (HCC), this knowledge has not yet impacted clinical care. The last few years have seen the failure of several first and second line phase III clinical trials of novel molecularly targeted therapies, warranting a change in the way new therapies are investigated in HCC. Potential reasons for these failures include clinical and molecular heterogeneity, trial design and a lack of biomarkers. This review discusses the current crisis in HCC drug development and how we should learn from recent trial failures to develop a more effective personalised treatment paradigm for patients with HCC. PMID:26909132

  12. Building Irish families through surrogacy: medical and judicial issues for the advanced reproductive technologies

    PubMed Central

    Sills, Eric Scott; Healy, Clifford M

    2008-01-01

    Surrogacy involves one woman (surrogate mother) carrying a child for another person/s (commissioning person/couple), based on a mutual agreement requiring the child to be handed over to the commissioning person/couple following birth. Reasons for seeking surrogacy include situations where a woman has non-functional or absent reproductive organs, or as a remedy for recurrent pregnancy loss. Additionally, surrogacy may find application in any medical context where pregnancy is contraindicated, or where a couple consisting of two males seek to become parents through oocyte donation. Gestational surrogacy is one of the main issues at the forefront of bioethics and the advanced reproductive technologies, representing an important challenge to medical law. This analysis reviews the history of surrogacy and clinical and legal issues pertaining to this branch of reproductive medicine. Interestingly, the Medical Council of Ireland does not acknowledge surrogacy in its current practice guidelines, nor is there specific legislation addressing surrogacy in Ireland at present. We therefore have developed a contract-based model for surrogacy in which, courts in Ireland may consider when confronted with a surrogacy dispute, and formulated a system to resolve any potential dispute arising from a surrogacy arrangement. While the 2005 report by the Commission on Assisted Human Reproduction (CAHR) is an expert opinion guiding the Oireachtas' development of specific legislation governing assisted human reproduction and surrogacy, our report represents independent scholarship on the contractual elements of surrogacy with particular focus on how Irish courts might decide on surrogacy matters in a modern day Ireland. This joint medico-legal collaborative also reviews the contract for services arrangement between the commissioning person/s and the surrogate, and the extent to which the contract may be enforced. PMID:18983640

  13. Accelerated fractionation radiation therapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, P.G.; Gemer, L.S. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors treated 14 patients who had advanced head and neck cancer with an accelerated fractionation schedule of irradiation consisting of two fractions given 6 hours apart. In the morning a volume of 1.7 Gy was given to an area that encompassed the entire tumor, enlarged lymph nodes, and all areas at risk for microscopic disease. Six hours later, 1.1 Gy was given to an area that included only the tumor and any enlarged lymph nodes, with a 2-cm margin. The treatment was well tolerated; of the 13 patients who completed therapy, six did not require a break in therapy, and seven patients did. The median rest period was 2 days. There was no grade 4 toxicity. Grade 3 toxicity included skin changes (one case), mucositis (two), dysphagia (two), weight loss (three), and a decrease in the hemoglobin level (one case). The response rate in the 13 who completed therapy was 13/13 (100%); 11 of the 13 (83%) had a complete response. Only one of the 11 who achieved a complete response had failure at the primary site. At a median follow-up of 24 months, the absolute survival was 7/13 (54%) and the corrected survival was 7/10 (70%). This technique permits radiation therapy to be given on an accelerated schedule without a planned break in treatment. The overall response rate and survival at 2 years was excellent.

  14. Predicting compliance for mandible advancement splint therapy in 96 obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Tuula; Arte, Sirpa; Bachour, Adel; Bäck, Leif; Mäkitie, Antti

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of choice in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Mandible advancement splint (MAS) offers an option for patients with mild or moderate OSA, who refuse or are unable to tolerate CPAP. The aim of the study was to find predictive factors in OSA for MAS therapy. The study group comprised 96 consecutive OSA patients who were sent for MAS therapy during 2008. Data were collected on the patients' general and dental condition, diagnosis, and treatment for OSA. Panoramic and cephalometric radiographs were analysed. The treatment compliance rate and problems with the use of the MAS were recorded. This rate was 57% and the significant affecting factors were protrusion of the mandible with MAS during the adaptation to the appliance as well as shorter maxillary and mandible lengths. The compliance of the MAS therapy was best in patients with short maxilla and mandible, which should be taken into consideration when planning MAS therapy for OSA patients. Finally, a sleep study should be part of the follow-up in this patient population.

  15. Discovering knowledge on pediatric fluid therapy and dysnatremias from quantitative data found in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Pham, Steve L; Bickel, Jonathan P; Moritz, Michael L; Levin, James E

    2010-11-13

    It is accepted that intravenous fluid (IVF) therapy can result in hospital-acquired dysnatremias in pediatric patients, with associated morbidity and mortality. There is interest in improving IVF therapy to prevent dysnatremias, but the optimal approach is controversial. In this study, we develop Natremia Deviation and Intravenous Renderer (NaDIR), a tool that preprocesses large volumes of electronic medical record data obtained from an academic pediatric hospital in order to analyze (1) IVF therapy, (2) the epidemiology of dysnatremias, and (3) the impact of IVFs on changes in serum sodium (ΔS(Na)). We then applied NaDIR to 3,256 inpatient records over a 3 month period, which revealed (1) a 19.9% incidence of dysnatremias, (2) a significant increase in lengths of stay associated with dysnatremias, and (3) a novel linear relationship between ΔS(Na) and IVF tonicity. This demonstrates that EMR data that can be readily analyzed to discover epidemiologic and predictive knowledge.

  16. The proton therapy nozzles at Samsung Medical Center: A Monte Carlo simulation study using TOPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Kim, Jinsung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Ahn, Sunghwan; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    To expedite the commissioning process of the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC), we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation model of the proton therapy nozzles by using TOol for PArticle Simulation (TOPAS). At SMC proton therapy center, we have two gantry rooms with different types of nozzles: a multi-purpose nozzle and a dedicated scanning nozzle. Each nozzle has been modeled in detail following the geometry information provided by the manufacturer, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. For this purpose, the novel features of TOPAS, such as the time feature or the ridge filter class, have been used, and the appropriate physics models for proton nozzle simulation have been defined. Dosimetric properties, like percent depth dose curve, spreadout Bragg peak (SOBP), and beam spot size, have been simulated and verified against measured beam data. Beyond the Monte Carlo nozzle modeling, we have developed an interface between TOPAS and the treatment planning system (TPS), RayStation. An exported radiotherapy (RT) plan from the TPS is interpreted by using an interface and is then translated into the TOPAS input text. The developed Monte Carlo nozzle model can be used to estimate the non-beam performance, such as the neutron background, of the nozzles. Furthermore, the nozzle model can be used to study the mechanical optimization of the design of the nozzle.

  17. Antidepressant Medication Augmented With Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Petkus, Andrew J.; White, Kamila S.; Nguyen, Hoang; Kornblith, Sander; Andreescu, Carmen; Zisook, Sidney; Lenze, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Generalized anxiety disorder is common among older adults and leads to diminished health and cognitive functioning. Although antidepressant medications are efficacious, many elderly individuals require augmentation treatment. Furthermore, little is known about maintenance strategies for older people. The authors examined whether sequenced treatment combining pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) boosts response and prevents relapse in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. Method Participants were individuals at least 60 years of age with generalized anxiety disorder (N=73) who were recruited from outpatient clinics at three sites. Participants received 12 weeks of open-label escitalopram and were then randomly assigned to one of four conditions:16 weeks of escitalopram (10–20 mg/day) plus modular CBT, followed by 28 weeks of maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram alone, followed by maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram plus CBT, followed by pill placebo; and escitalopram alone, followed by placebo. Results Escitalopram augmented with CBT increased response rates on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire but not on the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale compared with escitalopram alone. Both escitalopram and CBT prevented relapse compared with placebo. Conclusions This study demonstrates effective strategies for treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in older adults. The sequence of antidepressant medication augmented with CBT leads to worry reduction in the short-term. Continued medication prevents relapse, but for many individuals, CBT would allow sustained remission without requiring long-term pharmacotherapy. PMID:23680817

  18. Antidepressant medication augmented with cognitive-behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder in older adults.

    PubMed

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Petkus, Andrew J; White, Kamila S; Nguyen, Hoang; Kornblith, Sander; Andreescu, Carmen; Zisook, Sidney; Lenze, Eric J

    2013-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Generalized anxiety disorder is common among older adults and leads to diminished health and cognitive functioning. Although antidepressant medications are efficacious, many elderly individuals require augmentation treatment. Furthermore, little is known about maintenance strategies for older people. The authors examined whether sequenced treatment combining pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) boosts response and prevents relapse in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder. METHOD Participants were individuals at least 60 years of age with generalized anxiety disorder (N=73) who were recruited from outpatient clinics at three sites. Participants received 12 weeks of open-label escitalopram and were then randomly assigned to one of four conditions: 16 weeks of escitalopram (10-20 mg/day) plus modular CBT, followed by 28 weeks of maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram alone, followed by maintenance escitalopram; escitalopram plus CBT, followed by pill placebo; and escitalopram alone, followed by placebo. RESULTS Escitalopram augmented with CBT increased response rates on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire but not on the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale compared with escitalopram alone. Both escitalopram and CBT prevented relapse compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates effective strategies for treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in older adults. The sequence of antidepressant medication augmented with CBT leads to worry reduction in the short-term. Continued medication prevents relapse, but for many individuals, CBT would allow sustained remission without requiring long-term pharmacotherapy.

  19. Clinical response of advanced cancer patients to cellular immunotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hasumi, Kenichiro; Aoki, Yukimasa; Wantanabe, Ryuko; Mann, Dean L

    2013-01-01

    Patients afflicted with advanced cancers were treated with the intratumoral injection of autologous immature dendritic cells (iDCs) followed by activated T-cell infusion and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A second round of iDCs and activated T cells was then administered to patients after the last radiation cycle. This complete regimen was repeated for new and recurring lesions after 6 weeks of follow-up. One year post therapy, outcome analyses were performed to evaluate treatment efficacy. Patients were grouped according to both the number and size of tumors and clinical parameters at treatment initiation, including recurrent disease after standard cancer therapy, Stage IV disease, and no prior therapy. Irrespective of prior treatment status, 23/37 patients with ≤ 5 neoplastic lesions that were ≤ 3 cm in diameter achieved complete responses (CRs), and 5/37 exhibited partial responses (PRs). Among 130 individuals harboring larger and more numerous lesions, CRs were observed in 7/74 patients that had received prior SCT and in 2/56 previously untreated patients. Some patients manifested immune responses including an increase in CD8+CD56+ lymphocytes among circulating mononuclear cells in the course of treatment. To prospectively explore the therapeutic use of these cells, CD8+ cells were isolated from patients that had been treated with cellular immunotherapy and IMRT, expanded in vitro, and injected into recurrent metastatic sites in 13 individuals who underwent the same immunoradiotherapeutic regimens but failed to respond. CRs were achieved in 34 of 58 of such recurrent lesions while PRs in 17 of 58. These data support the expanded use of immunoradiotherapy in advanced cancer patients exhibiting progressive disease. PMID:24349874

  20. Exceptional Response to Systemic Therapy in Advanced Metastatic Gastric Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion; Manning, Maria A; Carroll, John E; Xiu, Joanne; Smaglo, Brandon G; Mikhail, Sameh; Salem, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas represent one of the top five most common types of cancer worldwide. Despite significant advancement, it is still not known which first-line chemotherapy option is best matched to an individual patient. The vast advances in molecular biology have led to the discovery of many potential predictive biomarkers, such as HER-2 neu, thymidylate synthase (TS), excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and topoisomerase-1 (TOPO1). These markers could allow us to select treatment based on an individual’s tumor profile, resulting in an improvement of outcome. Our report highlights two patients with metastatic gastric cancer that achieved an exceptional response with traditional therapy and provides insights into the future perspectives of molecular profile-directed chemotherapy. PMID:26918225

  1. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy for advanced carcinoma of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Lipsztein, R.; Kredentser, D.; Dottino, P.; Goodman, H.M.; Dalton, J.F.; Bloomer, W.D.; Cohen, C.

    1987-12-01

    Ten patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix received induction chemotherapy with cis-platinum, mitomycin-C, vincristine, and bleomycin (BOMP) over a 5 week period, followed by radiotherapy with concomitant weekly cisplatinum. Two patients were FIGO stage I-B barrel-shaped, five were stage II-B, and three were III-B. All patients responded to induction chemotherapy with five complete and five partial responses. At the completion of radiation therapy, nine patients had negative biopsies. One patient never reached a complete response and died of distant metastasis. Another underwent total exenteration for a central recurrence and was found to have microscopic paraaortic lymph node involvement. A third recurred in the parametrium. Two patients with barrel-shaped tumors underwent extrafascial hysterectomies; both had negative specimens and tolerated surgery well. Although follow-up is short, this new approach for advanced carcinoma of the cervix yielded excellent results and was well tolerated.

  2. Advancement of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in solid organ transplantation (MISOT).

    PubMed

    Hoogduijn, Martin J; Popp, Felix C; Grohnert, Anja; Crop, Meindert J; van Rhijn, Marieke; Rowshani, Ajda T; Eggenhofer, Elke; Renner, Philipp; Reinders, Marlies E; Rabelink, Ton J; van der Laan, Luc J W; Dor, Frank J M F; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Genever, Paul G; Lange, Claudia; Durrbach, Antoine; Houtgraaf, Jaco H; Christ, Bruno; Seifert, Martina; Shagidulin, Murat; Donckier, Vincent; Deans, Robert; Ringden, Olle; Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Bartholomew, Amelia; Schlitt, Hans J; Weimar, Willem; Baan, Carla C; Dahlke, Marc H

    2010-07-27

    There is evolving interest in the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in solid organ transplantation. Pre-clinical transplantation models show efficacy of MSC in prolonging graft survival and a number of clinical studies are planned or underway. At a recent meeting of the MISOT consortium (MSC In Solid Organ Transplantation) the advances of these studies were evaluated and mechanisms underlying the potential effects of MSC discussed. Continued discussion is required for definition of safety and eventually efficacy endpoints for MSC therapy in solid organ transplantation.

  3. Cartilage tissue engineering: recent advances and perspectives from gene regulation/therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuei-Chang; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2015-05-01

    Diseases in articular cartilages affect millions of people. Despite the relatively simple biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages, the self-repair ability of cartilage is limited. Successful cartilage tissue engineering requires intricately coordinated interactions between matrerials, cells, biological factors, and phycial/mechanical factors, and still faces a multitude of challenges. This article presents an overview of the cartilage biology, current treatments, recent advances in the materials, biological factors, and cells used in cartilage tissue engineering/regeneration, with strong emphasis on the perspectives of gene regulation (e.g., microRNA) and gene therapy.

  4. Outcomes of Basic Versus Advanced Life Support for Out-of-Hospital Medical Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Sanghavi, Prachi; Jena, Anupam B.; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most Medicare patients seeking emergency medical transport are treated by ambulance providers trained in advanced life support (ALS). Evidence supporting the superiority of ALS over basic life support (BLS) is limited, but some studies suggest ALS may harm patients. Objective To compare outcomes after ALS and BLS in out-of-hospital medical emergencies. Design Observational study with adjustment for propensity score weights and instrumental variable analyses based on county-level variations in ALS use. Setting Traditional Medicare. Patients 20% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries from nonrural counties between 2006 and 2011 with major trauma, stroke, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), or respiratory failure. Measurements Neurologic functioning and survival to 30 days, 90 days, 1 year, and 2 years. Results Except in cases of AMI, patients showed superior unadjusted outcomes with BLS despite being older and having more comorbidities. In propensity score analyses, survival to 90 days among patients with trauma, stroke, and respiratory failure was higher with BLS than ALS (6.1 percentage points [95% CI, 5.4 to 6.8 percentage points] for trauma; 7.0 percentage points [CI, 6.2 to 7.7 percentage points] for stroke; and 3.7 percentage points [CI, 2.5 to 4.8 percentage points] for respiratory failure). Patients with AMI did not exhibit differences in survival at 30 days but had better survival at 90 days with ALS (1.0 percentage point [CI, 0.1 to 1.9 percentage points]). Neurologic functioning favored BLS for all diagnoses. Results from instrumental variable analyses were broadly consistent with propensity score analyses for trauma and stroke, showed no survival differences between BLS and ALS for respiratory failure, and showed better survival at all time points with BLS than ALS for patients with AMI. Limitation Only Medicare beneficiaries from nonrural counties were studied. Conclusion Advanced life support is associated with substantially higher mortality

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiation therapy for cancer. The first component of this treatment is the preferential localization of the stable isotope {sup 10}B in tumor cells by targeting with boronated compounds. The tumor and surrounding tissue is then irradiated with a neutron beam resulting in thermal neutron/{sup 10}B reactions ({sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li) resulting in the production of localized high LET radiation from alpha and {sup 7}Li particles. These products of the neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells, but of short range so that the majority of the ionizing energy released is microscopically confined to the vicinity of the boron-containing compound. In principal it should be possible with BNCT to selectively destroy small nests or even single cancer cells located within normal tissue. It follows that the major improvements in this form of radiation therapy are going to come largely from the development of boron compounds with greater tumor selectivity, although there will certainly be advances made in neutron beam quality as well as the possible development of alternative sources of neutron beams, particularly accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams.

  6. From discovery to approval of an advanced therapy medicinal product-containing stem cells, in the EU.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Graziella; Lambiase, Alessandro; Macaluso, Claudio; Pocobelli, Augusto; Deng, Sophie; Cavallini, Gian Maria; Esteki, Roza; Rama, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In 1997, the human corneal epithelium was reconstructed in vitro and transplanted on patients. Later, it became a routine treatment, before regulations considered advanced therapy medicinal products and drugs on the same lines. Manufacturing, before and after good manufacturing practice setting, was established in different facilities and the clinical application in several hospitals. Advanced therapy medicinal products, including stem cells, are unique products with different challenges than other drugs: some uncertainties, in addition to benefit, cannot be avoided. This review will focus on all recent developments in the stem cell-based corneal therapy.

  7. [Maxillomandibular advancement surgery as an optional therapy for patiens with severe obstructive sleep apnoea].

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, M H T; Apperloo, R C; de Lange, J

    2013-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common chronic disorder which often requires lifelong treatment. Its prevalence in the Netherlands is estimated to be around 300.000 people. In this study 12 patients with severe OSA were treated with maxillomandibular advancement surgery between 2011 and 2012. The mean advancement during surgery was 8.7 mm and the mean postoperative admission was 4 days. All patients underwent polysomnography at 3 months. Three months after surgical treatment, the apnoea-hypopnea index had decreased with 74.9% (57.3 to 14.4). The subjective sleepiness of the patients had also decreased with a mean of 57.5%. The literature indicates comparable results in patients with severe OSAS, specifically a reduction of the apnoea-hypopnea index of 80-90%. Considering the successful results following maxillomandibular advancement surgery, this therapy is an appropriate alternative for patients who cannot cope with 'continuous positive airway pressure' or patients who want a permanent therapeutic solution. Further research is recommended to achieve higher levels ofevidence for maxillomandibular advancement surgery in patients with OSA.

  8. Phase I Trial of Adenovirus-Mediated IL-12 Gene Transduction in Patients with Recurrent Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Following Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    radiation therapy who are presently not on hormonal therapy. An important part of the screening process is a needle biopsy of the prostate to confirm the...has been amended (see below) to also include patients who had their locally advanced prostate cancer treated with hormonal ablative therapy...the lack of effective therapies for men who have failed definitive radiotherapy or who have locally advanced cancer despite hormone ablative therapy

  9. Long-term effect of a short interprofessional education interaction between medical and physical therapy students.

    PubMed

    Sytsma, Terin T; Haller, Elizabeth P; Youdas, James W; Krause, David A; Hellyer, Nathan J; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2015-01-01

    Medicine is increasingly focused on team-based practice as interprofessional cooperation leads to better patient care. Thus, it is necessary to teach teamwork and collaboration with other health care professionals in undergraduate medical education to ensure that trainees entering the workforce are prepared to work in teams. Gross anatomy provides an opportunity to expose students to interprofessional education (IPE) early in their training. The purpose of this study is to describe an IPE experience and report if the experience has lasting influence on the participating students. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) questionnaire was administered to first year medical (MD) and physical therapy (PT) students at Mayo Medical School and Mayo School of Health Sciences. Results demonstrated an openness on the part of the students to IPE. Interprofessional education experiences were incorporated into gross anatomy courses in both medical and PT curricula. The IPE experiences included a social event, peer-teaching, and collaborative clinical problem-solving sessions. These sessions enhanced gross anatomy education by reinforcing previous material and providing the opportunity to work on clinical cases from the perspective of two healthcare disciplines. After course completion, students again completed the RIPLS. Finally, one year after course completion, students were asked to provide feedback on their experience. The post-curricular RIPLS, similar to the pre-curricular RIPLS, illustrated openness to IPE from both MD and PT students. There were however, significant differences in MD and PT perceptions of roles and responsibilities. One-year follow-up indicated long-term retention of lessons learned during IPE.

  10. Using Natural Language Processing and Network Analysis to Develop a Conceptual Framework for Medication Therapy Management Research.

    PubMed

    Ogallo, William; Kanter, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a theory derivation process used to develop a conceptual framework for medication therapy management (MTM) research. The MTM service model and chronic care model were selected as parent theories. Review article abstracts targeting medication therapy management in chronic disease care were retrieved from Ovid Medline (2000-2016). Unique concepts in each abstract were extracted using MetaMap and their pairwise cooccurrence determined. The information was used to construct a network graph of concept co-occurrence that was analyzed to identify content for the new conceptual model. 142 abstracts were analyzed. Medication adherence is the most studied drug therapy problem and co-occurred with concepts related to patient-centered interventions targeting self-management. The enhanced model consists of 65 concepts clustered into 14 constructs. The framework requires additional refinement and evaluation to determine its relevance and applicability across a broad audience including underserved settings.

  11. Using Natural Language Processing and Network Analysis to Develop a Conceptual Framework for Medication Therapy Management Research

    PubMed Central

    Ogallo, William; Kanter, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a theory derivation process used to develop a conceptual framework for medication therapy management (MTM) research. The MTM service model and chronic care model were selected as parent theories. Review article abstracts targeting medication therapy management in chronic disease care were retrieved from Ovid Medline (2000-2016). Unique concepts in each abstract were extracted using MetaMap and their pairwise cooccurrence determined. The information was used to construct a network graph of concept co-occurrence that was analyzed to identify content for the new conceptual model. 142 abstracts were analyzed. Medication adherence is the most studied drug therapy problem and co-occurred with concepts related to patient-centered interventions targeting self-management. The enhanced model consists of 65 concepts clustered into 14 constructs. The framework requires additional refinement and evaluation to determine its relevance and applicability across a broad audience including underserved settings. PMID:28269895

  12. A Recent Advance in Image-Guided Locoregional Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yaoping; Zhai, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths. Hepatic resection and liver transplantation are considered to be the preferred treatment for HCC. However, as novel therapeutic options such as image-guided locoregional therapies have emerged and been refined, the manner in which HCC is treated has changed dramatically compared with what it was considered just 2 decades earlier. Summary This study reviews the current results of various image-guided locoregional therapies for treating HCC, especially focusing on thermal ablative and transarterial techniques. Key Message Advances in image-guided locoregional therapies, including local ablative therapy and transarterial therapy, have led to a major breakthrough in the management of HCC. Both survival rates and cure rates of patients with HCC have improved markedly since the introduction of these techniques. Practical Implications Radiofrequency ablation is currently considered as an alternative to surgical resection for patients with early-stage HCC. A newer technique of ablation such as microwave ablation is increasingly being used, especially for large HCC. Transarterial chemoembolization has become a standard care for asymptomatic patients with multinodular tumors in intermediate-stage disease, and transarterial radioembolization has become the method of choice in HCC cases with portal vein thrombosis. Moreover, combination treatment modalities, such as thermal-based ablation combined with transarterial chemoembolization or 125I seed implant brachytherapy, may further broaden their clinical indications for HCC. Moreover, use of localized radiation in combination with thermal ablation has been reported to improve tumor control and long-term survival. PMID:27904861

  13. [Combined therapy of locally advanced squamous epithelial cancers in the area of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Fountzilas, G; Daniilidis, J; Kalogera-Fountzila, A; Apostolidis, T; Vritsios, A; Tourkantonis, A

    1988-04-01

    In an effort to improve treatment results in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck, we designed a multimodality treatment programme consisting of three cycles of inductive chemotherapy, after 2-3 weeks loco-regional therapy (surgery and/or radiotherapy), two more cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with the same regimen were given finally. The chemotherapeutic regimen included cis-platinum 100 mg/m2 on day 1, 5-fluorouracil 100 mg/m2 on days 2-6 as a continuous infusion, bleomycin 15 units on days 15, 29; mitomycin-C 4 mg/m2 on day 2 and hydroxyurea 100 mg/m2 on days 22-26. From August 1984 onwards, 37 patients entered in this study. The group included 31 men and 6 women with a medium age of 54 (18-71) and a performance status of 80 (60-90). Primary sites were nasopharynx (13), oropharynx (5), hypopharynx (3), sinus (3), ethmoids (2), tongue (2), floor of the mouth (2), larynx (6) and unknown (1). 25 patients received 3 cycles of induction therapy whereas 22 completed the whole treatment programme. Following induction therapy, 28% of the patients demonstrated histologically confirmed CR, 40% PR and 32% SD, while after the full multimodality therapy 59% demonstrated CR, 36% PR and 5% SD. Follow-up is 9-36 months. Actual survival at 3 years is 80% for those with a CR post loco-regional therapy. Toxicities were leukopenia (40%), thrombocytopenia (20%), anaemia (40%), nausea and vomiting (60%), stomatitis (52%) diarrhoea (16%) and alopecia (79%). There was one death related to chemotherapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Therapeutic strategies for combined-modality therapy of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: rationale for consolidation docetaxel therapy.

    PubMed

    Gandara, David R; Vallières, Eric; Gaspar, Laurie E; Kelly, Karen; Albain, Kathy S; Herbst, Roy S; Lara, Primo N; Mack, Philip; Gumerlock, Paul H; Crowley, John J

    2005-12-01

    Currently, there is no accepted standard of care for locally advanced and surgically unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer. Typically, treatment for patients with good performance status consists of a combination of chemotherapy and thoracic radiation therapy (RT), but the integration of these modalities and the respective dose schedules vary considerably. Herein, we review the rationale for a treatment paradigm employing consolidation docetaxel therapy after concurrent chemotherapy/RT and the results of recent clinical trials using this approach.

  15. 76 FR 71982 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices; Public Meeting; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices'' that published in... highly multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application...

  16. WE-D-BRD-01: Innovation in Radiation Therapy Delivery: Advanced Digital Linac Features

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, L; Wong, J; Li, R

    2014-06-15

    Last few years has witnessed significant advances in linac technology and therapeutic dose delivery method. Digital linacs equipped with high dose rate FFF beams have been clinically implemented in a number of hospitals. Gated VMAT is becoming increasingly popular in treating tumors affected by respiratory motion. This session is devoted to update the audience with these technical advances and to present our experience in clinically implementing the new linacs and dose delivery methods. Topics to be covered include, technical features of new generation of linacs from different vendors, dosimetric characteristics and clinical need for FFF-beam based IMRT and VMAT, respiration-gated VMAT, the concept and implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT), beam level imaging and onboard image guidance tools. Emphasis will be on providing fundamental understanding of the new treatment delivery and image guidance strategies, control systems, and the associated dosimetric characteristics. Commissioning and acceptance experience on these new treatment delivery technologies will be reported. Clinical experience and challenges encountered during the process of implementation of the new treatment techniques and future applications of the systems will also be highlighted. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of emerging digital linacs and summarize their key geometric and dosimetric features. SPORT as an emerging radiation therapy modality specifically designed to take advantage of digital linacs. Discuss issues related to the acceptance and commissioning of the digital linacs and FFF beams. Describe clinical utility of the new generation of digital linacs and their future applications.

  17. [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of a neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced and high risk prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenböck, Sarah M.; Knieling, Anna; Souvatzoglou, Michael; Kurth, Jens; Steiger, Katja; Eiber, Matthias; Esposito, Irene; Retz, Margitta; Kübler, Hubert; Gschwend, Jürgen E.; Schwaiger, Markus; Krause, Bernd J.; Thalgott, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have shown promising results of neoadjuvant therapy in prostate cancer (PC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response monitoring after combined neoadjuvant docetaxel chemotherapy and complete androgen blockade in locally advanced and high risk PC patients. Results In [11C]Choline PET/CT there was a significant decrease of SUVmax and SUVmean (p = 0.004, each), prostate volume (p = 0.005) and PSA value (p = 0.003) after combined neoadjuvant therapy. MRI showed a significant prostate and tumor volume reduction (p = 0.003 and 0.005, respectively). Number of apoptotic cells was significantly higher in prostatectomy specimens of the therapy group compared to pretherapeutic biopsies and the control group (p = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively). Methods 11 patients received two [11C]Choline PET/CT and MRI scans before and after combined neoadjuvant therapy followed by radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. [11C]Choline uptake, prostate and tumor volume, PSA value (before/after neoadjuvant therapy) and apoptosis (of pretherapeutic biopsy/posttherapeutic prostatectomy specimens of the therapy group and prostatectomy specimens of a matched control group without neoadjuvant therapy) were assessed and tested for differences and correlation using SPSS. Conclusions The results showing a decrease in choline uptake after combined neoadjuvant therapy (paralleled by regressive and apoptotic changes in histopathology) confirm the potential of [11C]Choline PET/CT to monitor effects of neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced and high risk PC patients. Further studies are recommended to evaluate its use during the course of neoadjuvant therapy for early response assessment. PMID:27572317

  18. First human treatment with investigational rhGUS enzyme replacement therapy in an advanced stage MPS VII patient.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joyce E; Volpe, Linda; Bullaro, Josephine; Kakkis, Emil D; Sly, William S

    2015-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII, Sly syndrome) is a very rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS), which is required for the degradation of three glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate. Progressive accumulation of these GAGs in lysosomes leads to increasing dysfunction in numerous tissues and organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been used successfully for other MPS disorders, but there is no approved treatment for MPS VII. Here we describe the first human treatment with recombinant human GUS (rhGUS), an investigational therapy for MPS VII, in a 12-year old boy with advanced stage MPS VII. Despite a tracheostomy, nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure, and oxygen therapy, significant pulmonary restriction and obstruction led to oxygen dependence and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels in the 60-80mmHg range, eventually approaching respiratory failure (ETCO2 of 100mmHg) and the need for full-time ventilation. Since no additional medical measures could improve his function, we implemented experimental ERT by infusing rhGUS at 2mg/kg over 4h every 2 weeks for 24 weeks. Safety was evaluated by standard assessments and observance for any infusion associated reactions (IARs). Urinary GAG (uGAG) levels, pulmonary function, oxygen dependence, CO2 levels, cardiac valve function, liver and spleen size, and growth velocity were assessed to evaluate response to therapy. rhGUS infusions were well tolerated. No serious adverse events (SAEs) or IARs were observed. After initiation of rhGUS infusions, the patient's uGAG excretion decreased by more than 50%. Liver and spleen size were reduced within 2 weeks of the first infusion and reached normal size by 24 weeks. Pulmonary function appeared to improve during the course of treatment based on reduced changes in ETCO2 after off-ventilator challenges and a reduced oxygen requirement. The patient regained the

  19. Final Report of the Intergroup Randomized Study of Combined Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Plus Radiotherapy Versus Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Alone in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Malcolm D.; Parulekar, Wendy R.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Brundage, Michael; Kirkbride, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Cowan, Richard; Kostashuk, Edmund C.; Anderson, John; Swanson, Gregory; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Hayter, Charles; Jovic, Gordana; Hiltz, Andrea; Hetherington, John; Sathya, Jinka; Barber, James B.P.; McKenzie, Michael; El-Sharkawi, Salah; Souhami, Luis; Hardman, P.D. John; Chen, Bingshu E.; Warde, Padraig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have previously reported that radiotherapy (RT) added to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) improves survival in men with locally advanced prostate cancer. Here, we report the prespecified final analysis of this randomized trial. Patients and Methods NCIC Clinical Trials Group PR.3/Medical Research Council PR07/Intergroup T94-0110 was a randomized controlled trial of patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Patients with T3-4, N0/Nx, M0 prostate cancer or T1-2 disease with either prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of more than 40 μg/L or PSA of 20 to 40 μg/L plus Gleason score of 8 to 10 were randomly assigned to lifelong ADT alone or to ADT+RT. The RT dose was 64 to 69 Gy in 35 to 39 fractions to the prostate and pelvis or prostate alone. Overall survival was compared using a log-rank test stratified for prespecified variables. Results One thousand two hundred five patients were randomly assigned between 1995 and 2005, 602 to ADT alone and 603 to ADT+RT. At a median follow-up time of 8 years, 465 patients had died, including 199 patients from prostate cancer. Overall survival was significantly improved in the patients allocated to ADT+RT (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.85; P < .001). Deaths from prostate cancer were significantly reduced by the addition of RT to ADT (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.61; P < .001). Patients on ADT+RT reported a higher frequency of adverse events related to bowel toxicity, but only two of 589 patients had grade 3 or greater diarrhea at 24 months after RT. Conclusion This analysis demonstrates that the previously reported benefit in survival is maintained at a median follow-up of 8 years and firmly establishes the role of RT in the treatment of men with locally advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25691677

  20. Development and Evaluation of an Integrated Basic Combat/Advanced Individual Training Program for Medical Corpsmen (MOS 91A10).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Joseph S.; And Others

    The Human Resources Research Organization undertook this study to determine experimentally the effect of integrating the Basic Combat Training (BCT) and the Advanced Individual Training (AIT) sequence of instruction for conscientious objector (CO) being trained as a Medical Corpsman (MOS 91A10). Other objectives were to develop an improved AIT…