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Sample records for advanced metastatic renal

  1. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor's underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α). The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients.

  2. Sequence of treatment in locally advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Stefanie; Gillessen, Silke

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of drugs that have shown activity in advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has led to a debate on the optimal sequence of treatments. There is agreement on recommending targeted agents as the standard of care in this disease. Uncertainty, however, remains on the best first-line drug choice. Physicians and patients may select sunitinib, bevacizumab in combination with interferon-alpha (IFN-α), pazopanib, or—in poor risk patients—temsirolimus. There are also a variety of therapies with proven efficacy on hand in the second-line setting: sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib, and everolimus. While most randomized RCC trials assessed progression free survival (PFS) as primary endpoint, some agents were shown to improve median overall survival (OS), and given in sequence they have extended the life expectancy of RCC patients from 13 months in the cytokine era to over 30 months. Despite the progress made, there are sobering aspects to the oncologic success story in RCC, as the new treatments do not obtain an objective response or disease stabilization (SD) in all patients. There are also as yet no predictors to select patients who might benefit and those who are primary resistant to specific drugs, and ultimately almost all patients will experience disease progression. Bearing inevitable treatment failure in mind, availability of further drugs and switching therapy while the patient is in a condition to continue pharmacotherapy is essential. Of note, depending on the setting, only 33-59% of patients receive second-line treatment. In this review we present data on first-, second-, and third-line treatment in RCC, and discuss the difficulties in their interpretation in the context of treatment sequence. We summarize biological aspects and discuss mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy and their implications for treatment selection. PMID:26816832

  3. Cytoreductive nephrectomy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chery, Lisly J; Karam, Jose A; Wood, Christopher G

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma is increasing, with up to one-third of patients presenting with metastatic disease. Combination therapy is used to prolong survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, which carries a poor prognosis. Although two pivotal phase 3 trials have demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy after cytoreductive nephrectomy for metastatic disease, for now, targeted therapy has replaced immunotherapy as the preferred systemic treatment in these patients. Two ongoing phase 3 trials are evaluating the role of cytoreductive nephrectomy prior to targeted therapy. Proper patient selection is paramount in achieving successful outcomes. PMID:27673288

  4. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  5. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Atar, Yavuz; Topaloglu, Ilhan; Ozcan, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx, nasal cavity, and paranasal sinuses can be misdiagnosed as primary malignant or benign diseases. A 33-year-old male attended our outpatient clinic complaining of difficulty breathing through the nose, bloody nasal discharge, postnasal drop, snoring, and discharge of phlegm. Endoscopic nasopharyngeal examination showed a vascularized nasopharyngeal mass. Under general anesthesia, multiple punch biopsies were taken from the nasopharynx. Pathologically, the tumor cells had clear cytoplasm and were arranged in a trabecular pattern lined by a layer of endothelial cells. After the initial pathological examination, the pathologist requested more information about the patient's clinical status. A careful history revealed that the patient had undergone left a nephrectomy for a kidney mass diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma 3 years earlier. Subsequently, nasopharyngeal metastatic renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining with CD10 and vimentin. Radiotherapy was recommended for treatment. PMID:23924557

  6. Duodenal bleeding from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-04-20

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

  7. Duodenal Bleeding from Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested. PMID:21577373

  8. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y C

    2016-04-15

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  9. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  10. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with renal vein involvement.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Hatsuko; Miura, Katsutoshi; Baba, Megumi; Nagata, Masao; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi

    2015-02-01

    The common sites of breast cancer metastases include bones, lung, brain, and liver. Renal metastasis from the breast is rare. We report a case of breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with extension into the renal vein. A 40-year-old woman had undergone left mastectomy for breast cancer at the age of 38. A gastric tumor, which was later proved to be metastasis from breast cancer, was detected by endoscopy. Computed tomography performed for further examination of the gastric tumor revealed a large left renal tumor with extension into the left renal vein. It mimicked a primary renal tumor. Percutaneous biopsy of the renal tumor confirmed metastasis from breast cancer. Surgical intervention of the stomach and the kidney was avoided, and she was treated with systemic chemotherapy. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney may present a solitary renal mass with extension into the renal vein, which mimics a primary renal tumor.

  11. Pazopanib for the first-line treatment of patients with advanced and/or metastatic renal cell carcinoma : a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Kilonzo, Mary; Hislop, Jenni; Elders, Andrew; Fraser, Cynthia; Bissett, Donald; McClinton, Samuel; Mowatt, Graham; Vale, Luke

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of pazopanib hydrochloride (GlaxoSmithKline) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of the drug for the first-line treatment of advanced and/or metastatic renal cell carcinoma, as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. The Aberdeen Health Technology Assessment Group were commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article provides a description of the company submission, the ERG review and NICE's subsequent decisions. The objective of this paper is to summarize the independent review and critique of the evidence submitted for the consideration of the NICE Appraisal Committee and NICE's subsequently issued guidance. The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology based upon the manufacturer's submission to NICE. The ERG also independently searched for relevant evidence and modified the manufacturer's decision analytic model to examine the impact of altering some of the key assumptions. For progression-free survival (PFS), there was a statistically significant longer survival for pazopanib compared with placebo (as assessed by the ERG, based upon the original manufacturer submission with a clinical cut-off date of 23 May 2008) [median 11.1 vs. 2.8 months; hazard ratio (HR) 0.40; 95 % CI 0.27, 0.60]. Data from the indirect comparison suggested that pazopanib had a greater survival than interferon alpha (IFN-α) [HR 0.512; 95 % CI 0.326, 0.802] but provided no evidence of any difference compared with sunitinib (HR 0.949; 95 % CI 0.575, 1.568). With regard to overall survival, 64 % (n = 99) of patients in the pazopanib arm and 63 % (n = 49) of patients in the placebo arm had died and a total of 51 % (n = 40) of placebo patients had crossed over to receive pazopanib. Although data were provided on an intention-to-treat basis, crossover between therapies

  12. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC): a rapid autopsy report of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Udager, Aaron M; Alva, Ajjai; Chen, Ying-Bei; Siddiqui, Javed; Lagstein, Amir; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E; Chinnaiyian, Arul M; Mehra, Rohit

    2014-04-01

    Rapid ("warm") autopsies of patients with advanced metastatic cancer provide invaluable insight into the natural history, pathobiology, and morphology of advanced and treatment-resistant tumors. Here, we report a rapid autopsy case of a hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) patient with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-the first such case described for either a primary renal tumor or HLRCC-related cancer. Mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene underlie HLRCC, a rare syndrome involving cutaneous and uterine leiomyomata and aggressive kidney tumors. Loss of heterozygosity at the wild-type FH gene locus results in profound cellular metabolic derangement, "pseudohypoxic" upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)-dependent transcription, and aberrant protein succination; these molecular changes drive oncogenesis of kidney tumors in HLRCC patients. The current index patient had a high-grade RCC with classic morphologic features of HLRCC, including large nuclei with prominent eosinophilic nucleoli and perinucleolar clearing. In addition, this patient's RCC demonstrated extensive sarcomatoid and rhabdoid features-morphologies not previously well described in HLRCC-associated kidney tumors. Here, we report the extent of metastatic dissemination and supplement this unique tumor morphology with mitochondrial enzyme histochemistry and extended immunohistochemical analysis. Tumor cells strongly expressed PAX8, vimentin, CD10, and the HIF target GLUT1 and showed increased nuclear p53 accumulation; the expression of other RCC markers was negative. We also detail microscopic tubular epithelial changes in the grossly uninvolved ipsilateral renal parenchyma and demonstrate sporadic, aberrant upregulation of the HIF targets GLUT1 and CAIX in dysplastic peritumoral tubules. PMID:24625422

  13. The role of pharmacogenomics in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Daniel; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; Cruz, Josefina; Sepulveda, Juan Manuel; Sáez, María Isabel; Sáenz, Maribel; Paz-Ares, Luís

    2012-09-01

    Pharmacogenomics is the study of how variation in the genetic background affects an individual's response to a specific drug and/or its metabolism. Using knowledge about the genes which produce the enzymes that metabolize a specific drug, a physician may decide to raise or lower the dose, or even change to a different drug. Targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors has led to a substantial improvement in the standard of care for patients with advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Although few studies have identified biomarkers that predict the response of targeted drugs in the treatment of metastatic RCC, some associations have been found. Several studies have identified genetic polymorphisms with implications in the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of TKIs and mTOR inhibitors and which are associated with a prolonged progression-free survival and/or overall survival in patients with metastatic RCC. Among the genes of interest, we should consider IL8, FGFR2, VEGFA, FLT4, and NR1I2. In this review, we discuss single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with outcome and toxicity following targeted therapies and provide recommendations for future trials to facilitate the use of SNPs in personalized therapy for this disease.

  14. First-line therapy for treatment-naive patients with advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a systematic review of published randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Takyar, Shweta; Diaz, Jose; Sehgal, Manu; Sapunar, Francisco; Pandha, Hardev

    2016-06-01

    In the recent years, a number of targeted therapies have been approved for first-line treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. A systematic review was conducted to assess the clinical efficacy, safety and effect of all first-line treatments evaluated to date on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A systematic search of Embase, Cochrane and MEDLINE databases was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (1980-2015) evaluating any targeted therapy/immunotherapy against placebo or any other targeted intervention/immunotherapy in treatment-naive patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Conference proceedings from major cancer congresses (2007-2015) were handsearched. Sixteen randomized controlled trials were identified, mostly phase III. Overall, targeted therapies were associated with either improved [sunitinib, bevacizumab+interferon α (IFNα) and temsirolimus] or comparable (sorafenib) progression-free survival (PFS) versus IFNα monotherapy. Sunitinib demonstrated comparable PFS and overall survival to pazopanib, comparable PFS to sorafenib and shorter PFS compared with bevacizumab+IFNα (although no conclusions were made with regard to superiority/inferiority). Compared with sorafenib, tivozanib demonstrated a significantly longer PFS, and both tivozanib and axitinib demonstrated higher response rates. Nintedanib demonstrated comparable PFS and overall survival to sunitinib in a phase II trial. Temsirolimus, sunitinib and sorafenib treatment led to better HRQoL versus IFNα; pazopanib was associated with better HRQoL versus sunitinib. No direct meta-analyses or indirect treatment comparison analysis were undertaken because of noncomparability of the trials. In general, targeted therapies demonstrated favourable clinical efficacy and improved HRQoL compared with IFNα monotherapy. The newer therapies, tivozanib and axitinib (but not nintedanib), appeared to exhibit greater clinical benefit (response rate) than older tyrosine

  15. Acute cholecystitis or metastatic renal cell carcinoma? a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, L H; Coffman, L M

    1996-05-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is known to metastasize to many different organ systems. Lung and bone are clearly the most common sites of metastasis, but the symptoms at presentation may simulate those of other diseases of the organ system involved. The patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma described here had symptoms of acute cholecystitis.

  16. Trial Watch: Therapeutic vaccines in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Combe, Pierre; de Guillebon, Eleonore; Thibault, Constance; Granier, Clémence; Tartour, Eric; Oudard, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Despite the renaissance of cancer immunotherapy, no novel immunotherapy has been approved for the treatment of renal cell cancer (RCC) since the availability of recombinant cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-α). All vaccine trials have failed to meet their endpoints although they have highlighted potential predictive biomarkers (e.g., pre-existing immune response, hematological parameters, tumor burden). Recent advances in immunomodulatory therapies have prompted the study of combination treatments targeting the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment consisting of regulatory T-cells (Treg), myeloid suppressor cells, and cytokines. Approaches under investigation are use of inhibitors to curb the overexpression of immune checkpoint ligands by tumor cells (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1/PD-L1) and exploiting the immunomodulatory effects of anti-angiogenic agents that are the current standard of metastatic RCC care. Phase III trials are focusing on the possible synergy between therapeutic vaccines (e.g., IMA-901 and AGS-003) and anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:26155388

  17. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Douglas Magno; Pontes, Flavia Sirotheau Correa; Miyahara, Ligia Akiko Ninokata; Guerreiro, Marcella Yasmin Reis; de Almeida, Maria Clara Lopes; Pontes, Helder Antonio Rebelo; Pinto, Decio Dos Santos

    2016-09-01

    Metastases to the oral cavity are extremely rare events, representing less than 1% of all malignant oral tumors. Renal cell carcinoma constitutes about 3% of solid tumors in adults, and it is the most frequent kidney neoplasm, representing about 90% of kidney malignancies. Due to the silent growth of this neoplasm, most patients have no symptoms and the diagnosis is belated, usually after metastases. The present study reports an additional patient of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the oral cavity regarding the clinical and pathologic features. PMID:27607131

  18. Multiple metastatic renal cell carcinoma isolated to pancreas.

    PubMed

    Comunoğlu, Cem; Altaca, Gülüm; Demiralay, Ebru; Moray, Gökhan

    2012-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastases to the pancreas are reported to be rare. Isolated multiple pancreatic metastases are even rarer. We report a 68-year-old asymptomatic male patient who presented with multiple metastatic nodular lesions in the pancreas demonstrated by computerized tomography 3.5 years after radical nephrectomy performed for clear cell RCC. Spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy was performed. Gross examination revealed five well-demarcated tumoral nodules in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. Histopathological examination revealed clusters of epithelial clear cells, immunohistochemically positive for CD10 and vimentin, and negative for CK19 and chromogranin, supporting a diagnosis of metastatic RCC. The patient has remained well at 29 months post-resection, in agreement with recent experience that radical resection for multiple isolated metastatic nodular lesions can achieve improved survival and better quality of life.

  19. [Systemic therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Maute, Luise; Bergmann, Lothar

    2016-04-01

    In metastatic ccRCC , the treatment options in 1st line treatment are still the tyrosinkinase inhibitors (TKI) pazopanib and sunitinib, for patients with low or intermediate risk additionally IFNα/bevacizumab and for high risk patients the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. In 2nd line following cytokine therapy, axitinib or pazopanib and following TKI /VEGF directed therapy axitinib or everolimus may be administered. New upcoming agents in RCC are the PD1 antibody nivolumab and the multikinase inhibitor Cabozantinib, which both showed an OS advantage compared to everolimus. After marketing authorization in Europe, these agents should therefore be preferred in 2nd and 3rd line therapy. Further agents are under investigation. PMID:27031198

  20. A Study of Varlilumab (Anti-CD27) and Sunitinib in Patients With Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Carcinoma, Renal Cell; Kidney Diseases; Kidney Neoplasms; Urogenital Neoplasms; Urologic Diseases; Urologic Neoplasms; Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Clear-cell Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

  1. Targeted therapy for cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and treatment in the community.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2006-05-01

    This report of a case of cytokine-refractory metastatic, clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presents some current issues related to use of targeted therapy in the community. Due to the different mechanisms of cytostatic vs. cytotoxic agents, traditional response assessments may not always apply in deciding when to either continue or stop treatment. While community physicians may increasingly focus more on duration of response, symptom relief, and how well patients tolerate treatment, there is a clear need for validated surrogate markers of biologic activity and response, as well as randomized trials that directly compare some of the targeted therapies being applied in advanced RCC.

  2. [Three Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction Associated with Targeted Therapy of Sorafenib for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma : Case Report].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kimiaki; Takai, Manabu; Kawata, Kei; Horie, Kengo; Kikuchi, Mina; Kato, Taku; Mizutani, Kosuke; Seike, Kensaku; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Deguchi, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) used for advanced renal cell carcinoma. Treatment with sorafenib prolongs progression-free survival in patients with advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. However, in spite of its therapeutic efficacy, sorafenib causes a wide range of adverse events. Cardiovascular adverse events have been observed when sorafenib was used with targeted agents. Although these adverse events like hypertension, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac ischemia or infarction were manageable with standard medical therapies in most cases, some had a poor clinical outcome. We report three cases of acute myocardial infarction associated with sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26497860

  3. [Three Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction Associated with Targeted Therapy of Sorafenib for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma : Case Report].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kimiaki; Takai, Manabu; Kawata, Kei; Horie, Kengo; Kikuchi, Mina; Kato, Taku; Mizutani, Kosuke; Seike, Kensaku; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Deguchi, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) used for advanced renal cell carcinoma. Treatment with sorafenib prolongs progression-free survival in patients with advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. However, in spite of its therapeutic efficacy, sorafenib causes a wide range of adverse events. Cardiovascular adverse events have been observed when sorafenib was used with targeted agents. Although these adverse events like hypertension, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac ischemia or infarction were manageable with standard medical therapies in most cases, some had a poor clinical outcome. We report three cases of acute myocardial infarction associated with sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  4. Recommendations from the Spanish Oncology Genitourinary Group for the treatment of metastatic renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; Calvo, Emiliano; Castellano, Daniel; Climent, Miguel Angel; Esteban, Emilio; García del Muro, Xavier; González-Larriba, José Luis; Maroto, Pablo; Trigo, José Manuel

    2009-03-01

    For almost the last two decades, interleukin-2 and interferon-alpha have been the only systemic treatment options available for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, in recent years, five new targeted therapies namely sunitinib, sorafenib, temsirolimus, everolimus and bevacizumab have demonstrated clinical activity in these patients. With the availability of new targeted agents that are active in this disease, there is a need to continuously update the treatment algorithm of the disease. Due to the important advances obtained, the Spanish Oncology Genitourinary Group (SOGUG) has considered it would be useful to review the current status of the disease, including the genetic and molecular biology factors involved, the current predicting models for development of metastases as well as the role of surgery, radiotherapy and systemic therapies in the early- or late management of the disease. Based on this previous work, a treatment algorithm was developed.

  5. Systemic Therapy for Metastatic Non-Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Recent Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Simon; Matrana, Marc; Tsang, Christopher; Atkinson, Bradley; Choueiri, Toni K.; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) encompasses a heterogeneous group of histological subtypes of which clear-cell RCC (CCRCC) is the most common comprising more than 70–80% of all cases. Papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) is the next most common comprising 10–15% of cases. PRCC is refractory to chemotherapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. Insights into the biology of clear-cell RCC have identified multiple pathways associated with the pathogenesis and progression of this cancer. This has led to the development of multiple agents targeting these pathways including the small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors sorafenib, sunitinib and pazopanib, the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab and the mTOR inhibitors temsirolimus and everolimus. These drugs have shown significant clinical benefits in randomised trials in advanced CCRCC and have become the standard of care for most patients. With the exception of temsirolimus, phase III trials tested these agents in patients with clear-cell histology, and therefore, their efficacy in non-clear cell RCC is unclear. To date, there is no established effective therapy for patients with advanced non-clear cell RCC (NCCRCC). This review will focus on the treatment options of metastatic NCCRCC. PMID:21763971

  6. Characterization of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in paired primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma specimens

    PubMed Central

    Baine, Marina K.; Turcu, Gabriela; Zito, Christopher R.; Adeniran, Adebowale J.; Camp, Robert L.; Chen, Lieping

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most chemo- and radio-resistant malignancies, with poor associated patient survival if the disease metastasizes. With recent advances in immunotherapy, particularly with PD-1/PD-L1 blockade, outcomes are improving, but a substantial subset of patients does not respond to the new agents. Identifying such patients and improving the therapeutic ratio has been a challenge, although much effort has been made to study PD-1/PD-L1 status in pre-treatment tumor. However, tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) content might also be predictive of response, and our goal was to characterize TIL content and PD-L1 expression in RCC tumors from various anatomic sites. Utilizing a quantitative immunofluorescence technique, TIL subsets were examined in matched primary and metastatic specimens. In metastatic specimens, we found an association between low CD8+ to Foxp3+ T-cell ratios and high levels of PD-L1. High PD-L1-expressing metastases were also found to be associated with tumors that were high in both CD4+ and Foxp3+ T-cell content. Taken together these results provide the basis for combining agents that target the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway with agonist of immune activation, particularly in treating RCC metastases with unfavorable tumor characteristics and microenvironment. In addition, CD8+ TIL density and CD8:Foxp3 T-cell ratio were higher in primary than metastatic specimens, supporting the need to assess distant sites for predictive biomarkers when treating disseminated disease. PMID:26317902

  7. p63 immunohistochemistry differentiates salivary gland oncocytoma and oncocytic carcinoma from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Jonathan B; Hoschar, Aaron P; Dvorakova, Mari; Parwani, Anil V; Barnes, E Leon; Seethala, Raja R

    2007-12-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can pose diagnostic challenges in the head and neck often resembling benign and malignant oncocytic lesions. Immunohistochemical panels have been reported to help with this differential but are not entirely specific or sensitive. We have noticed that p63 routinely stains salivary gland oncocytomas but not metastatic RCC. Nineteen oncocytomas, 9 cases of oncocytosis, 9 oncocytic carcinomas and 16 head and neck metastatic RCC were studied. Morphologic features evaluated were cytoplasmic character (clear versus oncocytic), Fuhrman nuclear grade, mitotic rate, growth pattern, presence of lumens/blood lakes and stromal characteristics. Tumors were stained with antibodies to p63, renal cell carcinoma marker (RCCm), CD10, and vimentin. Eight benign oncocytic tumors (29%) had clear cell features while 6 metastatic RCC (37%) had oncocytic features. Median Fuhrman nuclear grade was 2 in oncocytoma and oncocytosis and 3 both oncocytic carcinoma and metastatic RCC. Mitotic rates were only significantly different between benign oncocytic tumors and metastatic RCC. All oncocytomas had lumina compared to half of metastatic RCC, all of which also demonstrated blood lakes. Seven benign oncocytic tumors (25%) and 5 oncocytic carcinomas (56%) had RCC-like vascular stroma. All primary salivary gland tumors were positive for p63, predominately in basal cell-type distribution. None of the metastatic RCC was positive. RCCm was entirely specific but lacked sensitivity for metastatic RCC while CD10 and vimentin showed variable sensitivity and specificity. While clinical history and morphology usually are adequate, demonstration of p63 staining can definitively exclude metastatic RCC from the differential diagnosis of similar appearing tumors in salivary glands, namely oncocytoma and oncocytic carcinoma, with 100% specificity and sensitivity. While RCCm, CD10, and vimentin performed adequately, they were significantly less reliable than p63 with both

  8. Prognostic factors and risk classifications for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Nobuo; Abe, Takashige

    2015-10-01

    The introduction of molecular-targeted therapy has made dramatical changes to treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Currently, there are four vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors and two mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in Japan. For the appropriate clinical use of these molecular-targeted drugs, the identification of prognostic and/or predictive factors in patients who received these drugs is required. Although molecular biological and genetic factors that determine the prognosis of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have been reported, most of these factors are problematic in that the number of patients analyzed was small. In contrast, clinicopathological prognostic factors, including the practice of cytoreductive nephrectomy, pathological findings, metastatic sites and metastasectomy, and abnormal inflammatory response, have been identified by analyzing a relatively large number of patients. Several prognostic classification models that were developed by combining these clinicopathological factors are widely used in not only clinical trials, but also routine clinical practice. However, the quality of these prognostic models is considered to be insufficient regarding prognostic prediction of metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients and, thus, requires further improvements. Recently, basic and clinical studies have been extensively carried out for the identification of promising informative markers and for understanding molecular mechanisms of resistance to molecular-targeted drugs in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients. The present review considers ongoing translational research efforts on clinicopathological, molecular biological, and genetic prognostic and/or predictive factors for metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients in the era of molecular-targeted therapy, and discusses the clinical implications of these findings.

  9. Targeted Therapies: Bevacizumab and interferon-alpha in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2009-05-01

    Rini and colleagues provide additional data on bevacizumab and interferon-alpha in clear-cell carcinoma of the kidney; a comparison of these results with the findings from contemporary trials suggests that bevacizumab and interferon-alpha is another clinically useful treatment option for patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma.

  10. Indications for surgery in advanced/metastatic GIST.

    PubMed

    Ford, Samuel J; Gronchi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are a relatively rare entity and often present as a locally advanced tumour or with metastatic disease. Complete surgical resection is the only means of cure in localised disease; however, imatinib therapy has greatly advanced the management of GIST and is established as both an adjunct to surgery in high-risk cases and as principle therapy in metastatic disease. Surgery in advanced GIST has undergone a renaissance in recent years with the potential for a combined treatment approach with either neoadjuvant imatinib in locally advanced primary disease or as an adjunct to imatinib in those with metastases or recurrent disease. Neoadjuvant imatinib can render a locally advanced primary GIST resectable, allow less invasive procedures or promote preservation of function, especially if the tumour is located in an anatomically difficult position. The role of surgery in metastatic or recurrent disease is more controversial and case selection is critical. The potential benefit is difficult to quantify, although surgery may have a limited favourable impact on progression-free survival and overall survival for those patients whose disease is responding to imatinib or those with limited focal progression. Patients with imatinib resistant disease should not be offered surgery unless as an emergency where palliative intervention may be justified. PMID:27318456

  11. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as Painful Chewing Successfully Treated with Combined Nivolumab and Sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Fade; Abdallah, Al-Ola; Arnaoutakis, Konstantinos; Makhoul, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the head and neck is rare. It is the third-most common cause of distant metastasis to the head and neck, after breast cancer and lung cancer. Several drugs are available to treat metastatic RCC including high-dose interleukin and targeted therapy. Immunotherapy with nivolumab was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a second-line treatment for patients with metastatic RCC. Case Presentation: We present a case of metastatic RCC in a 71-year-old man with a single complaint of a 1-year history of pain while chewing food. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography showed diffuse metastatic disease. Nivolumab, off-label use before its recent FDA approval, was combined with sunitinib and resulted in an excellent and ongoing response. Discussion: RCC is the third-most common cause of distant metastasis to the head and neck. The patient described in this case did not have any symptoms commonly seen in RCC, such as painless hematuria, weight loss, anorexia, fatigue, or anemia, despite the bulk of his disease. The other important aspect of this case is the almost complete response of his metastatic disease to the combination of nivolumab and sunitinib that was used off label before the FDA issued the approval. Future clinical trials should look at combining immunotherapy with targeted therapy in metastatic RCC. PMID:27352410

  12. Recent advances in the management of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ana M.; Nanus, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have significantly improved over the past few years with the recent approval of two new agents resulting in prolonged progression-free and overall survival. PMID:27019698

  13. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer of the Urinary Tract

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  14. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  15. Radiation therapy in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Onufrey, V.; Mohiuddin, M.

    1985-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the kidney is an unusual tumor, both in its biological behavior and in its response to radiation treatment. Historically, these tumors have been considered to be radioresistant, and the role of radiation therapy remains questionable in the primary management of this disease. However, radiation treatment is routinely used in the palliation of metastatic lesions for relief of symptoms. Therefore, we have undertaken a review of our experience in the treatment of this disease to determine the effectiveness of radiation in its palliation. From 1956 to 1981, 125 patients with metastatic lesions from hypernephroma have been treated in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Most patients were referred for relief of bone pain (86), brain metastasis (12), spinal cord compression (9), and soft tissue masses (18). Total doses varied from 2000 rad to a maximum of 6000 rad. Response to treatment was evaluated on the basis of relief of symptoms, either complete, partial or no change. Our results indicate a significantly higher response rate of 65% for total doses equal to or greater than a TDF of 70, as compared to 25% for doses lower than a TDF of 70. No difference in response was observed either for bone or soft tissue metastasis or visceral disease. This leads us to believe that metastatic lesions from adenocarcinomas of the kidney should be treated to higher doses to obtain maximum response rates. Analysis of these results are presented in detail.

  16. Multiple Metastatic Deposits in the Head and Neck Region from a Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ishak, Azlan Iskandar; Md Pauzi, Suria Hayati; Masir, Noraidah; Goh, Bee See

    2010-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presenting with multiple deposits in the head and neck region is unusual. It is not uncommon for a RCC to metastasise to a distant site after years of a tumour-free period, but most of it would be expected to have a single site of deposit. We report a rare case of a patient who had a nephrectomy 10 years earlier for RCC and presented with tumours in the frontal sinus and posterior pharyngeal wall. Radiological imaging and histology confirmed metastatic RCC at both sites. PMID:22135565

  17. Multiple metastatic deposits in the head and neck region from a renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Azlan Iskandar; Md Pauzi, Suria Hayati; Masir, Noraidah; Goh, Bee See

    2010-10-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presenting with multiple deposits in the head and neck region is unusual. It is not uncommon for a RCC to metastasise to a distant site after years of a tumour-free period, but most of it would be expected to have a single site of deposit. We report a rare case of a patient who had a nephrectomy 10 years earlier for RCC and presented with tumours in the frontal sinus and posterior pharyngeal wall. Radiological imaging and histology confirmed metastatic RCC at both sites. PMID:22135565

  18. Metastatic clear cell variant of renal cell carcinoma of the mandible: Review and case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajaz; Jahan, Shahi; Najar, Latief; Hassan, Shahid; Mohammad, Manzoor

    2016-01-01

    A case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the mandible is reported. A 22-year-old man consulted us for hypoesthesia of the right lower lip. Panorama X-ray film showed a radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular body. A diagnosis of a metastatic tumor to the mandible from the right kidney was made after evaluation by computed tomography and bone scan with Tc99 methyl diphosphonate which also revealed multiple bone metastases. Histologically diagnosis was clear cell variant of RCC. Patient has been put on radiotherapy for symptomatic treatment and a molecularly targeted drug. The therapy effectively stopped the progressive growth of oral and other metastatic lesions. The quality of life is relatively well maintained with tolerable adverse effects. The patient is still on our follow-up with an improved quality of life. PMID:27563625

  19. Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to the tongue: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Altuntaş, Ozan; Petekkaya, İbrahim; Süslü, Nilda; Güllü, İbrahim

    2015-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastatic to the head and neck region is quite rare. This report describes a case of RCC metastatic to the oral tongue presenting initially with a renal mass that evaded diagnosis by biopsy examination of the primary lesion and was eventually established as a papillary type RCC by lingual biopsy examination. The tongue mass progressed rapidly despite chemotherapy with interferon-α2b, caused difficulties with oral food intake, and thus necessitated removal by partial glossectomy. Treatment alternatives for lingual RCC metastasis include surgical resection for major functional impairment, risk of airway compromise, or massive hemorrhage. Radiotherapy might be useful and should be considered for specific patients. Lingual metastasis from RCC usually predicts poor survival.

  20. Balancing treatment efficacy, toxicity and complication risk in elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    van den Brom, R R H; van Es, S C; Leliveld, A M; Gietema, J A; Hospers, G A P; de Jong, I J; de Vries, E G E; Oosting, S F

    2016-05-01

    The number of elderly patients with renal cell carcinoma is rising. Elderly patients differ from their younger counterparts in, among others, higher incidence of comorbidity and reduced organ function. Age influences outcome of surgery, and therefore has to be taken into account in elderly patients eligible for cytoreductive nephrectomy. Over the last decade several novel effective drugs have become available for the metastatic setting targeting angiogenesis and mammalian target of rapamycin. Immune checkpoint blockade with a programmed death 1 antibody has recently been shown to increase survival and further studies with immune checkpoint inhibitors are ongoing. In this review we summarize the available data on efficacy and toxicity of existing and emerging therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the elderly. Where possible, we provide evidence-based recommendations for treatment choices in elderly. PMID:27123882

  1. Prognostic factors for survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: update 2008.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2009-05-15

    A variety of prognostic factor models to predict survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have been developed. Diverse populations of patients with variable treatments have been used for these analyses. A variety of clinical, pathologic, and molecular factors have been studied, but current models use predominantly easily obtained clinical factors. These approaches are reviewed, and current approaches to further refine and develop these techniques are reviewed.

  2. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa masquerading as a salivary gland neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, Ranjini; Nayal, Bhavna; Kantipudi, Swarna; Ray, Satadru

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the oral cavity is a rare occurrence with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) being the third most common tumor to metastasize to this location. Buccal mucosa is rarely involved and in the absence of a known primary, such lesions pose a diagnostic challenge to the pathologist. The histomorphological features may mimic a primary salivary gland neoplasm adding to the dilemma. We present one such case of metastatic RCC of the buccal mucosa.

  3. Transcatheter embolization of advanced renal cell carcinoma with radioactive seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; deKernion, J.B.

    1981-11-01

    Advanced renal cell carcinoma was treated by transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds. There were 14 patients with nonresectable or metastatic disease (stage IV) and 8 with stage II tumors treated. In 8 patients the tumor was implanted with radon seeds, complemented by 2,500 rad of external beam therapy, and 10 were treated by embolization with 125iodine seeds. The total dose delivered ranged form 1,600 to 14,000 rad. Several patients also had intra-arterial chemotherapy. Survival was improved over previously reported studies: 13 of 22 (59 per cent) at risk for 2 years and 5 of 15 (33 per cent) for 5 years. Distant metastases did not resolve but significant local palliation was achieved. Tumor size decreased in all patients, 8 of whom subsequently underwent nephrectomy. Other local effects included pain control (10 per cent), weight gain (75 per cent) and control of hemorrhage (88 per cent). Toxicity was minimal and consisted of mild nausea or pain. This approach, using a low energy emitter, allows selective high dose radiation of the tumor, while sparing the adjacent normal tissues. In contrast to renal artery occlusion with inert embolic material, subsequent nephrectomy in patients with disseminated disease is not necessary. Transcatheter embolization with radioactive seeds should be considered a reasonable palliative procedure in patients with nonresectable primary renal cell carcinoma.

  4. PET in the management of locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Grootjans, Willem; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Troost, Esther G C; Visser, Eric P; Oyen, Wim J G; Bussink, Johan

    2015-07-01

    Despite considerable improvements in the treatment options for advanced-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), disease-specific survival remains poor. With the aim of improving patient outcome, the treatment paradigm of locally advanced NSCLC has shifted from solely radiotherapy towards combined and intensified treatment approaches. Also, treatment for patients with stage IV (oligo)metastatic NSCLC has evolved rapidly, with therapeutic options that include a number of targeted agents, surgery, and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. However, personalizing treatment to the individual patient remains difficult and requires monitoring of biological parameters responsible for treatment resistance to facilitate treatment selection, guidance, and adaptation. PET is a well-established molecular imaging platform that enables non-invasive quantification of many biological parameters that are relevant to both local and systemic therapy. With increasing clinical evidence, PET has gradually evolved from a purely diagnostic tool to a multifunctional imaging modality that can be utilized for treatment selection, adaptation, early response monitoring, and follow up in patients with NSCLC. Herein, we provide a comprehensive overview of the available clinical data on the use of this modality in this setting, and discuss future perspectives of PET imaging for the clinical management of patients with locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC.

  5. Dynamic epigenetic changes to VHL occur with sunitinib in metastatic clear cell renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Grant D.; Powles, Thomas; Van Neste, Christophe; Meynert, Alison; O'Mahony, Fiach; Laird, Alexander; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Trooskens, Geert; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim; Harrison, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) hinders biomarker development in metastatic clear cell renal cancer (mccRCC). Epigenetic relative to genetic ITH or the presence of consistent epigenetic changes following targeted therapy in mccRCC have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine methylome/genetic ITH and to evaluate specific epigenetic and genetic changes associated with sunitinib therapy. Patients and methods Multi-region DNA sampling performed on sequential frozen pairs of primary tumor tissue from 14 metastatic ccRCC patients, in the Upfront Sunitinib (SU011248) Therapy Followed by Surgery in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cancer: a Pilot Phase II Study (SuMR; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01024205), at presentation (biopsy) and after 3-cycles of 50mg sunitinib (nephrectomy). Untreated biopsy and nephrectomy samples before and after renal artery ligation were controls. Ion Proton sequencing of 48 key ccRCC genes, and MethylCap-seq DNA methylation analysis was performed, data was analysed using the statistical computing environment R. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed complete methylome clustering of biopsy and three nephrectomy samples for each patient (14/14 patients). For mutational status, untreated biopsy and all treated nephrectomy samples clustered together in 8/13 (61.5%) patients. The only methylation target significantly altered following sunitinib therapy was VHL promoter region 7896829 which was hypermethylated with treatment (FDR=0.077, P<0.001) and consistent for all patients (pre-treatment 50% patients had VHL mutations, 14% patients VHL hypermethylation). Renal artery ligation did not affect this result. No significant differences in driver or private mutation count was found with sunitinib treatment. Conclusions Demonstration of relative methylome homogeneity and consistent VHL hypermethylation, after sunitinib, may overcome the hurdle of ITH present at other molecular levels for

  6. Subcutaneous nephrovesical bypass: Treatment for ureteral obstruction in advanced metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUNYAN; WANG, GONGCHENG; HOU, PEIJIN; ZHUANG, HAIJUN; YANG, XIAOSONG; GU, SHUO; WANG, HENGBING; JI, LU; XU, ZONGYUAN; MENG, JUNSONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the value of subcutaneous nephrovesical bypass (SNVB) for the treatment of ureteral obstruction due to pelvic metastatic disease. SNVB stents (n=30) were implanted in 24 patients with advanced metastatic disease between January 2008 and December 2012. Urinalysis, serum creatinine (SCr), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), quality of life (QoL) scores, and renal ultrasonography were evaluated at follow-up. The SNVB procedures were successful in all 24 patients. Patient follow-ups occurred at an average of 10.6 months. Preoperative hydronephrosis was eliminated in 16 cases (53.3%) and reduced in the remaining patients. Following surgery, SCr levels reduced significantly from 256±46 to 124±23 μmol/l (P<0.001). GFRs increased from 25±4.8 to 45±5.3 ml/min (P<0.01). The mean QoL scores were 3.4±1.4 preoperatively and 7.6±1.0 postoperatively (P<0.001). The results showed that SNVB is a minimally invasive, effective and safe procedure for patients with ureteral obstruction resulting from advanced malignant disease. As an alternative procedure to percutaneous nephrostomy, SNVB offers patients a better QoL. PMID:25435997

  7. Synergistic antitumor responses by combined GITR activation and sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nengwang; Fu, Shuai; Xu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yi; Hao, Junwen; Zhang, Aimin; Wang, Baocheng

    2016-01-15

    Sunitinib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the frontline therapy for renal and gastrointestinal cancers. In view of its well-documented proapoptotic and immunoadjuvant properties, we speculate that combination of Sunitinib and immunotherapy would provide a synergistic antitumor effect. Here, we report that a remarkably synergistic antitumor responses elicited by the combined treatment of Sunitinib and an agonistic antibody against glucocorticoid-induced TNFR related protein (GITR) in a model of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Sunitinib significantly increased the infiltration, activation, and proliferation and/or cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells and NK cells in liver metastatic foci when combined with the anti (α)-GITR agonist, which was associated with treatment-induced prominent upregulation of Th1-biased immune genes in the livers from mice receiving combined therapy versus single treatment. Sunitinib/α-GITR treatment also markedly promoted the maturation, activation and cytokine production of liver-resident macrophages and DCs compared with that achieved by α-GITR or Sunitinib treatment alone in mice. Cell depletion experiments demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells, NK cells and macrophage infiltrating liver metastatic foci all contribute to the antitumor effect induced by combined treatment. Furthermore, mechanistic investigation revealed that Sunitinib treatment reprograms tumor-associated macrophages toward classically activated or "M1" polarization upon GITR stimulation and consequently mounts an antitumor CD8(+) T and NK cell response via inhibiting STAT3 activity. Thus, our findings provide a proof of concept that Sunitinib can synergize with α-GITR treatment to remodel the tumor immune microenvironment to trigger regressions of an established metastatic cancer. PMID:26239999

  8. Novel therapeutic options for second-line therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    VON KLOT, CHRISTOPH-A. J.; MERSEBURGER, AXEL S.; KUCZYK, MARKUS A.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has gained a variety of therapeutic options since the introduction of targeted therapy, starting in 2007. The basic molecular mechanisms included predominantly the targeting of vascular endothelial growth factor or the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin. Recently, results from two randomized controlled trials, the CheckMate-25 and the METEOR trial, regarding therapy for RCC in the second-line setting have been published. In the present review, the current status of second-line therapy in mRCC is discussed, together with results from the two newly introduced substances, nivolumab and cabozantinib. PMID:27313856

  9. The Impact of Low Serum Sodium on Treatment Outcome of Targeted Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Database Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Schutz, Fabio A.B.; Xie, Wanling; Donskov, Frede; Sircar, Monica; McDermott, David F.; Rini, Brian I.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Pal, Sumanta Kumar; Srinivas, Sandy; Kollmannsberger, Christian; North, Scott A.; Wood, Lori A.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Tan, Min-Han; Mackenzie, Mary J.; Lee, Jae Lyun; Rha, Sun-Young; Yuasa, Takeshi; Heng, Daniel Y.C.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia has been associated with poor survival in many solid tumors and more recently found to be of prognostic and predictive value in metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) patients treated with immunotherapy. Objective To investigate the influence of baseline hyponatremia in mRCC patients treated with targeted therapy in the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium. Design, setting, and participants Data on 1661 patients treated with first-line vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) targeted therapy for mRCC were available from 18 cancer centers to study the impact of hyponatremia (serum sodium level <135 mmol/l) on clinical outcomes. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis The primary objective was overall survival (OS) and secondary end points included time to treatment failure (TTF) and the disease control rate (DCR). The chi-square test was used to compare the DCR in patients with and without hyponatremia. OS and TTF were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method and differences between groups were examined by the log-rank test. Multivariable logistic regression (for DCR) and Cox regression (for OS and TTF) were undertaken adjusted for prognostic risk factors. Results and limitations Median OS after treatment initiation was 18.5 mo (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.5–19.8 mo), with 552 (33.2%) of patients remaining alive on a median follow-up of 22.1 mo. Median baseline serum sodium was 138 mmol/l (range: 122–159 mmol/l), and hyponatremia was found in 14.6% of patients. On univariate analysis, hyponatremia was associated with shorter OS (7.0 vs 20.9 mo), shorter TTF (2.9 vs 7.4 mo), and lower DCR rate (54.9% vs 78.8%) (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons). In multivariate analysis, these effects remain significant (hazard ratios: 1.51 [95% CI, 1.26–1.80] for OS, and 1.57 [95% CI, 1.34–1.83] for TTF; odds ratio: 0.50 [95% CI, 34–0.72] for DCR; adjusted p < 0.001). Results

  10. Management of inferior vena cava tumor thrombus in locally advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Psutka, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma is accompanied by intravascular tumor thrombus in up to 10% of cases, of which nearly one-third of patients also have concurrent metastatic disease. Surgical resection in the form of radical nephrectomy and caval thrombectomy represents the only option to obtain local control of the disease and is associated with durable oncologic control in approximately half of these patients. The objective of this clinical review is to outline the preoperative evaluation for, and operative management of patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma with venous tumor thrombi involving the inferior vena cava. Cornerstones of the management of these complex patients include obtaining high-quality imaging to characterize the renal mass and tumor thrombus preoperatively, with further intraoperative real-time evaluation using transesophageal echocardiography, careful surgical planning, and a multidisciplinary approach. Operative management of patients with high-level caval thrombi should be undertaken in high-volume centers by surgical teams with capacity for bypass and invasive intraoperative monitoring. In patients with metastatic disease at presentation, cytoreductive nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy may be safely performed with simultaneous metastasectomy if possible. In the absence of level one evidence, neoadjuvant targeted therapy should continue to be viewed as experimental and should be employed under the auspices of a clinical trial. However, in patients with significant risk factors for postoperative complications and mortality, and especially in those with metastatic disease, consultation with medical oncology and frontline targeted therapy may be considered. PMID:26445601

  11. Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma

  12. Metastatic Calcinosis of Aortic Valve Secondary to Renal Failure Mimicking Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Masroor A.; Chardon, Guillermo Juan Morell

    2016-01-01

    End stage renal disease has a list of consequences, cardiovascular being the most common. Inefficient dialysis can cause significant deposition of calcium all over the body, including heart valves making heart function impaired. We illustrate a case of 38-year-old female with end stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis. The patient had been complaining of pain and swelling of the right hand for the last few months and had been seen by hand surgeon and was admitted electively for the biopsy of hand lesions. Before her planned surgery, she developed severe shortness of breath. Urgent echocardiogram revealed severe aortic regurgitation and large vegetation on the aortic valve. Infective endocarditis was suspected but blood cultures were negative for any microorganism and the patient did not meet the Duke criteria. Because of her hemodynamic instability immediate mechanical valve replacement surgery was performed. The pathology report showed extensive calcification and myxoid degeneration. No infectious agent was found. Later on, biopsy of her hand lesions showed extensive calcification with macrophages and giant cells. No atypia or malignancy was identified. This is a rare case of the metastatic calcinosis of aortic valve secondary to renal failure mimicking aortic valve infective endocarditis. PMID:27738529

  13. Fluorescence in situ hybridization as an adjunct tool in the diagnosis of primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma in fine needle aspiration specimens.

    PubMed

    Kos, Zuzana; Williams, Phillip A; Belanger, Eric C; Mai, Kien T

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the role of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the diagnosis of primary renal neoplasms and lesions suspicious for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Consecutive fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) of 39 renal masses and 41 metastatic tumours suspicious for renal cell origin were assessed with an immunohistochemical panel for CK7, RCC antigen, CD10, AMACR, PAX8, vimentin, and CD117. In addition, FISH was performed using probes for chromosomes 1p, 3p, 7, 17, X, and Y. A total of 31 of 39 primary renal masses and 33 of 41 metastatic tumors suspicious for renal origin demonstrated typical cytological and immunohistochemical (IHC) features of subtypes of renal neoplasms (40 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 20 papillary RCC, and 4 renal oncocytomas). FISH analysis of 15 randomly selected cases each of primary and metastatic lesions revealed chromosomal abnormalities consistent with the diagnosis in 73% of these cases. Of 8 primary renal masses demonstrating atypical microscopic features and noncontributory IHC profiles, FISH was helpful in subtyping 5 (62%) of these lesions (2 clear cell RCC, 1 solid variant of oncocytic papillary RCC, 1 mixed clear cell and papillary RCC, and 1 chromophobe RCC with papillary architecture). Of 8 metastatic tumors clinically suspicious for renal cell origin and supportive, but nondiagnostic IHC, FISH revealed supportive chromosomal changes in 6 (75%) cases. In conclusion FISH analysis on FNAB material, even with limited tissue, may be contributory to the diagnosis and subtyping of RCC in diagnostically challenging biopsies. PMID:24692327

  14. High-resolution profiling of histone h3 lysine 36 trimethylation in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ho, T H; Park, I Y; Zhao, H; Tong, P; Champion, M D; Yan, H; Monzon, F A; Hoang, A; Tamboli, P; Parker, A S; Joseph, R W; Qiao, W; Dykema, K; Tannir, N M; Castle, E P; Nunez-Nateras, R; Teh, B T; Wang, J; Walker, C L; Hung, M-C; Jonasch, E

    2016-03-24

    Mutations in SETD2, a histone H3 lysine trimethyltransferase, have been identified in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC); however it is unclear if loss of SETD2 function alters the genomic distribution of histone 3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) in ccRCC. Furthermore, published epigenomic profiles are not specific to H3K36me3 or metastatic tumors. To determine if progressive SETD2 and H3K36me3 dysregulation occurs in metastatic tumors, H3K36me3, SETD2 copy number (CN) or SETD2 mRNA abundance was assessed in two independent cohorts: metastatic ccRCC (n=71) and the Cancer Genome Atlas Kidney Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma data set (n=413). Although SETD2 CN loss occurs with high frequency (>90%), H3K36me3 is not significantly impacted by monoallelic loss of SETD2. H3K36me3-positive nuclei were reduced an average of ~20% in primary ccRCC (90% positive nuclei in uninvolved vs 70% positive nuclei in ccRCC) and reduced by ~60% in metastases (90% positive in uninvolved kidney vs 30% positive in metastases) (P<0.001). To define a kidney-specific H3K36me3 profile, we generated genome-wide H3K36me3 profiles from four cytoreductive nephrectomies and SETD2 isogenic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing and RNA sequencing. SETD2 loss of methyltransferase activity leads to regional alterations of H3K36me3 associated with aberrant RNA splicing in a SETD2 mutant RCC and SETD2 knockout cell line. These data suggest that during progression of ccRCC, a decline in H3K36me3 is observed in distant metastases, and regional H3K36me3 alterations influence alternative splicing in ccRCC.

  15. The Wide Experience of the Sequential Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lambea, Julio; Anido, Urbano; Etxániz, Olatz; Flores, Luis; Montesa, Álvaro; Sepúlveda, Juan Manuel; Esteban, Emilio

    2016-11-01

    Sequential targeted therapies are the standard of care for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Several drugs are available for patients whose disease progresses while they receive initial tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy; these include nivolumab (an inhibitor of PD-1 receptor), everolimus (an inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin) or additional TKIs. Until now, there has been no clinical evidence to support the use of one strategy versus another, so investigators and physicians rely on experience, judgement and findings from molecular analyses to select the appropriate treatment. However, with the arrival of nivolumab and cabozantinib that provide an overall survival higher than other alternative treatments, therapeutic strategies may have changed. Here, we discuss findings from preclinical and clinical studies that might help clinicians to choose the optimal treatment approach for patients with mRCC who progress to initial therapy. PMID:27613167

  16. Identification and validation of dysregulated metabolic pathways in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    White, Nicole M A; Newsted, Daniel W; Masui, Olena; Romaschin, Alexander D; Siu, K W Michael; Yousef, George M

    2014-03-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is a devastating disease with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 9 % and low response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Targeted therapies have slightly improved patient survival, but are only effective in a small subset of patients, who eventually develop resistance. A better understanding of pathways contributing to tumor progression and metastasis will allow for the development of novel targeted therapies and accurate prognostic markers. We performed extensive bioinformatics coupled with experimental validation on proteins dysregulated in mRCC. Gene ontology analysis showed that many proteins are involved in oxidation reduction, metabolic processes, and signal transduction. Pathway analysis showed metabolic pathways are altered in mRCC including glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, the citric acid cycle, and the pentose phosphate pathway. RT-qPCR analysis showed that genes involved in the citric acid cycle were downregulated in metastatic RCC while genes of the pentose phosphate pathway were overexpressed. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that most of the 198 proteins altered in mRCC clustered together and many were involved in glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism. We identified 29 reported regions of chromosomal aberrations in metastatic disease that correlate with the direction of protein dysregulation in mRCC. Furthermore, 36 proteins dysregulated in mRCC are predicted to be targets of metastasis-related miRNAs. A more comprehensive understanding of the pathways dysregulated in metastasis can be useful for the development of new therapies and novel prognostic markers. Also, multileveled analyses provide a unique "snapshot" of the molecular "environment" in RCC with prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  17. Final results from the large sunitinib global expanded-access trial in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gore, M E; Szczylik, C; Porta, C; Bracarda, S; Bjarnason, G A; Oudard, S; Lee, S-H; Haanen, J; Castellano, D; Vrdoljak, E; Schöffski, P; Mainwaring, P; Hawkins, R E; Crinò, L; Kim, T M; Carteni, G; Eberhardt, W E E; Zhang, K; Fly, K; Matczak, E; Lechuga, M J; Hariharan, S; Bukowski, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: We report final results with extended follow-up from a global, expanded-access trial that pre-regulatory approval provided sunitinib to metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients, ineligible for registration-directed trials. Methods: Patients ⩾18 years received oral sunitinib 50 mg per day on a 4-weeks-on–2-weeks-off schedule. Safety was assessed regularly. Tumour measurements were scheduled per local practice. Results: A total of 4543 patients received sunitinib. Median treatment duration and follow-up were 7.5 and 13.6 months. Objective response rate was 16% (95% confidence interval (CI): 15–17). Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 9.4 months (95% CI: 8.8–10.0) and 18.7 months (95% CI: 17.5–19.5). Median PFS in subgroups of interest: aged ⩾65 years (33%), 10.1 months; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ⩾2 (14%), 3.5 months; non-clear cell histology (12%), 6.0 months; and brain metastases (7%), 5.3 months. OS was strongly associated with the International Metastatic Renal-Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium prognostic model (n=4065). The most common grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events were thrombocytopenia (10%), fatigue (9%), and asthenia, neutropenia, and hand–foot syndrome (each 7%). Conclusion: Final analysis of the sunitinib expanded-access trial provided a good opportunity to evaluate the long-term side effects of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor used worldwide in mRCC. Efficacy and safety findings were consistent with previous results. PMID:26086878

  18. [Molecular biological foundation of targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Lai, Chong; Teng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing. Radical cure by surgery can only be achieved in patients with early stage tumors. How to precisely use antineoplastic agents after surgery is an important problem to be solved. Most metastatic RCCs are pathologically identified as clear cell RCC (ccRCC), thus to develop agents targeting ccRCC is critical. Most clinically available targeted therapies are based on targeting some spots in specific pathways; or based on targeting new anti-tumor mechanisms, such as programmed death-1(PD-1), antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) and stem cells. There is still no targeted therapy having definite effect to most RCC patients. Only von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway so far has been confirmed to be related to ccRCC development and progression; the inactivation of VHL gene causes many significant downstream gene changes. The key proteins involved in VHL pathway may be potential therapeutic targets for ccRCC. In this article, we review the current progress of targeted therapy for RCC, focus on the molecular characteristics of ccRCC, its relation to VHL pathway, the potential therapeutic targets and future clinical application for metastatic ccRCC. PMID:27045248

  19. Titanocenes: Cytotoxic and Anti-angiogenic Chemotherapy Against Advanced Renal-Cell Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Megan; Tacke, Matthias

    6-Substituted fulvenes are interesting and easily accessible starting materials for the synthesis of novel-substituted titanocenes via reductive dimerisation, carbolithiation or hydridolithiation reactions, which are followed by a transmetallation reaction with titanium tetrachloride in the latter two cases. Depending on the substitution pattern, these titanocenes prove to be bioorganometallic anticancer drugs, which have significant potential against advanced or metastatic renal-cell cancer. Patients bearing these stages of kidney cancer have a poor prognosis so far and therefore real progress in the area of metal-based anticancer drugs may come from this simple and effective synthetic approach.

  20. Predictive markers in advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Michaelson, M Dror; Stadler, Walter M

    2013-08-01

    Predictive markers of response to therapy are increasingly important in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) due to the proliferation of treatment options in recent years. Different types of potential predictive markers may include clinical, toxicity-based, serum, tissue, and radiologic biomarkers. Clinical factors are commonly used in overall prognostic models of RCC but have limited utility in predicting response to therapy. Correlation between development of particular toxicities and response to therapy has been noted, such as the correlation between hypertension and response to angiogenesis-targeted therapy. Serum and tissue biomarkers will be covered in detail elsewhere, but factors such as serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and circulating cytokines show promise in this regard. Finally, baseline or early treatment radiology studies may have predictive ability for longer term efficacy, with most studies to date focusing on functional imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and DCE ultrasound (US). The ultimate goal of developing predictive biomarkers is to enable rational and personalized treatment strategies for patients with advanced RCC. PMID:23972709

  1. MET Expression in Primary and Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Implications of Correlative Biomarker Assessment to MET Pathway Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shuch, Brian; Falbo, Ryan; Parisi, Fabio; Adeniran, Adebowale; Kluger, Yuval; Kluger, Harriet M.; Jilaveanu, Lucia B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Inhibitors of the MET pathway hold promise in the treatment for metastatic kidney cancer. Assessment of predictive biomarkers may be necessary for appropriate patient selection. Understanding MET expression in metastases and the correlation to the primary site is important, as distant tissue is not always available. Methods and Results. MET immunofluorescence was performed using automated quantitative analysis and a tissue microarray containing matched nephrectomy and distant metastatic sites from 34 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Correlations between MET expressions in matched primary and metastatic sites and the extent of heterogeneity were calculated. The mean expression of MET was not significantly different between primary tumors when compared to metastases (P = 0.1). MET expression weakly correlated between primary and matched metastatic sites (R = 0.5) and a number of cases exhibited very high levels of discordance between these tumors. Heterogeneity within nephrectomy specimens compared to the paired metastatic tissues was not significantly different (P = 0.39). Conclusions. We found that MET expression is not significantly different in primary tumors than metastatic sites and only weakly correlates between matched sites. Moderate concordance of MET expression and significant expression heterogeneity may be a barrier to the development of predictive biomarkers using MET targeting agents. PMID:26448928

  2. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  3. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma: the first report of unilateral fundus hemorrhage induced by sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kai; Liu, Zhuo Wei; Pan, Wen Tao; Ye, Yun Lin; Yang, Ping; Huang, Yi Chuan; Wu, Zhi Ming; Zhou, Fang Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney tumor with increasing incidence. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) are considered important treatment in the management of metastatic RCC. Some previous studies demonstrated that sorafenib treatment is associated with a significantly increased risk of potentially life-threatening adverse events, like bleeding. But bleeding at the fundus site is the rarest type of hemorrhage. As for TKIs' risk of bleeding, how we distinguish the degree of bleeding and what optimal strategies should we take to manage bleeding, needs to be studied systematically. Results With a long-term exposure (17 months) to sorafenib, he experienced blurred vision in his right eye and was hospitalized. The patient's diagnosis was central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) of the right eye. Unfortunately sorafenib was terminated. Materials and Methods The authors describe the first case of unilateral fundus hemorrhage induced by sorafenib. A 42-year-old man was diagnosed metastatic left RCC, with clinical stage and prognostic risk being assessed as T4N1M1 and intermediate. He received a radical left nephrectomy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, with taking the oral multi-targeted TKI, sorafenib (800 mg daily) from 7 months to 7 days before the surgery and 7 days after the surgery restarting again until the occurrence of fundus hemorrhage. Conclusions In this patient, long-term exposure to sorafenib possibly has increased the risk of fundus hemorrhage. This article provides us a previously undescribed morbidity associated with sorafenib, which reminds us of understanding the risk of bleeding and how this complication might be managed systematically. PMID:27174916

  4. Conditional survival of metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients treated with high-dose interleukin-2

    PubMed Central

    Gill, David M; Stenehjem, David D; Parikh, Kinjal; Merriman, Joseph; Sendilnathan, Arun; Agarwal, Archana M; Hahn, Andrew W; Gupta, Sumati; Tantravahi, Srinivas Kiran; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Conditional survival (CS) is a clinically useful prediction measure which adjusts a patient’s prognosis based on their duration of survival since initiation of therapy. CS has been described in numerous malignancies, and recently described in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) who received vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFTKI) therapy. However, CS has been not reported in the context of mRCC treated with high-dose interleukin-2 therapy (HDIL-2). A total of 176 patients with histologically confirmed metastatic clear cell RCC (mccRCC) treated with HDIL-2 at the University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute from 1988–2012 were evaluated. Using the Heng/IMDC model, they were stratified by performance status and prognostic risk groups. Two-year CS was defined as the probability of surviving an additional two years from initiation of HDIL-2 to 18 months after the start of HDIL-2 at three-month intervals. The median overall survival (OS) was 19.9 months. Stratifying patients into favourable (n = 35; 20%), intermediate (n = 110; 63%), and poor (n = 31; 18%) prognostic groups resulted in median OS of 47.5 (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.35–0.88, p = 0.0106 versus intermediate), 19.6 (HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.10–0.33, p < 0.0001 versus poor), and 8.8 (HR 5.34, 95% CI 3.00–9.62, p < 0.0001 versus favourable) months respectively. Two-year overall CS increased from 43% at therapy initiation to 100% at 18 months. These results have significant ramifications in prognostication. Furthermore, it is important when counseling patients with mccRCC who have completed treatment with HDIL-2 and are in active follow-up. PMID:27729941

  5. Renal histology in polycystic kidney disease with incipient and advanced renal failure.

    PubMed

    Zeier, M; Fehrenbach, P; Geberth, S; Möhring, K; Waldherr, R; Ritz, E

    1992-11-01

    Renal specimens were obtained at surgery or postmortem from patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Patients had either serum creatinine (SCr) below 350 mumol/liter (N = 12) or terminal renal failure (N = 50). Specimens were examined by two independent observers using a carefully validated score system. Mean glomerular diameters were similar in ADPKD patients with early renal failure (176 +/- 38 microns) and in victims of traffic accidents (177 +/- 23 microns), while they were significantly greater in diabetics with comparable renal function (205 +/- 16 microns). Glomerular diameters in ADPKD patients with terminal renal failure (191 +/- 45 microns) and with early renal failure were not significantly different. On average, 29% of glomeruli (17 to 62) were globally sclerosed in early renal failure, and 49% (19 to 93) in terminal renal failure. The proportion of glomeruli with segmental sclerosis was less than 4% in both groups. Marked vascular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy were present in early renal failure, and even more so in terminal renal failure. Interstitial infiltrates were scarce and consisted mainly of CD4 positive lymphocytes and CD68 positive macrophages. Immunestaining with monoclonal renin antibodies showed an increased juxtaglomerular index and expression of renin by arterioles adjacent to cysts, as well as by cyst wall epithelia. The data show more severe vascular and interstitial, but not glomerular, changes in ADPKD with advanced as compared to early renal failure.

  6. Sunitinib in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Recommendations for Management of Noncardiovascular Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnason, Georg; Burnett, Patrick; Creel, Patricia; Davis, Mellar; Dawson, Nancy; Feldman, Darren; George, Suzanne; Hershman, Jerome; Lechner, Thomas; Potter, Amy; Raymond, Eric; Treister, Nathaniel; Wood, Laura; Wu, Shenhong; Bukowski, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The multitargeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitor sunitinib has emerged as one of the standards of care for good- and intermediate-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Although generally associated with acceptable toxicity, sunitinib exhibits a novel and distinct toxicity profile that requires monitoring and management. Fatigue, diarrhea, anorexia, oral changes, hand-foot syndrome and other skin toxicity, thyroid dysfunction, myelotoxicity, and hypertension seem to be the most common and clinically relevant toxicities of sunitinib. Drug dosing and treatment duration are correlated with response to treatment and survival. Treatment recommendations for hypertension have been published but, currently, no standard guidelines exist for the management of noncardiovascular side effects. To discuss the optimal management of noncardiovascular side effects, an international, interdisciplinary panel of experts gathered in November 2009. Existing literature on incidence, severity, and underlying mechanisms of side effects as well as on potential treatment options were carefully reviewed and discussed. On the basis of these proceedings and the thorough review of the existing literature, recommendations were made for the monitoring, prevention, and treatment of the most common noncardiovascular side effects and are summarized in this review. The proactive assessment and consistent and timely management of sunitinib-related side effects are critical to ensure optimal treatment benefit by allowing appropriate drug dosing and prolonged treatment periods. PMID:21490127

  7. Sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: recommendations for management of noncardiovascular toxicities.

    PubMed

    Kollmannsberger, Christian; Bjarnason, Georg; Burnett, Patrick; Creel, Patricia; Davis, Mellar; Dawson, Nancy; Feldman, Darren; George, Suzanne; Hershman, Jerome; Lechner, Thomas; Potter, Amy; Raymond, Eric; Treister, Nathaniel; Wood, Laura; Wu, Shenhong; Bukowski, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The multitargeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitor sunitinib has emerged as one of the standards of care for good- and intermediate-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Although generally associated with acceptable toxicity, sunitinib exhibits a novel and distinct toxicity profile that requires monitoring and management. Fatigue, diarrhea, anorexia, oral changes, hand-foot syndrome and other skin toxicity, thyroid dysfunction, myelotoxicity, and hypertension seem to be the most common and clinically relevant toxicities of sunitinib. Drug dosing and treatment duration are correlated with response to treatment and survival. Treatment recommendations for hypertension have been published but, currently, no standard guidelines exist for the management of noncardiovascular side effects. To discuss the optimal management of noncardiovascular side effects, an international, interdisciplinary panel of experts gathered in November 2009. Existing literature on incidence, severity, and underlying mechanisms of side effects as well as on potential treatment options were carefully reviewed and discussed. On the basis of these proceedings and the thorough review of the existing literature, recommendations were made for the monitoring, prevention, and treatment of the most common noncardiovascular side effects and are summarized in this review. The proactive assessment and consistent and timely management of sunitinib-related side effects are critical to ensure optimal treatment benefit by allowing appropriate drug dosing and prolonged treatment periods.

  8. Cytodiagnosis of a Cutaneous Clear Cell Malignancy: Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma on Chin

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Gyanendra; Chaturvedi, Sunanda; Khan, Shakir Ali

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell type of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is most common urological malignancy. Several diagnostic challenges arise when it presents as a cutaneous nodule, being an uncommon presentation. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of a cutaneous nodule is crucial for distinguishing primary tumours from metastatic tumours because cutaneous metastases represent a terminal stage of illness. Due to considerable overlap of cytomorphological features determination of primary warrants need of detailed clinical history and close inspection of every cytological detail. We report here a case of cutaneous metastasis of RCC on chin in a patient 11 years after nephrectomy. Though there are reports of RCC metastases diagnosed on histology, there are fewer cytology case reports. Cytological differential diagnosis has been discussed for arriving at the final diagnosis in case of clear cell tumours. Early and accurate diagnosis is mandatory for optimal treatment. Cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of RCC is uncommon due to its low suspicion index in cutaneous nodules. More so, it presents late and an unusual sites due to its resemblance to common dermatological diseases. PMID:26894079

  9. Blood glucose levels in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Billemont, B; Medioni, J; Taillade, L; Helley, D; Meric, J B; Rixe, O; Oudard, S

    2008-01-01

    Sunitinib, a multitargeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, extends survival of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumours. Between October 2005 and March 2007, we retrospectively reviewed blood glucose level variations associated with sunitinib therapy in patients treated for mRCC. Nineteen of the patients had type II diabetes. All 19 patients had a decrease in blood glucose level (mean 1.77 mmol l−1) after 4 weeks of treatment. This was followed by re-elevation in the 2-week rest period. After two cycles of sunitinib administration, two patients had stopped blood glucose-lowering drugs whereas five other patients had normalised their blood glucose level. On the basis of pre-clinical data, we hypothesise that several mechanisms could be involved in this process, such as capillary regression of pancreatic islets, IGF-1 modulation through HIF1-α or NF-κB activation. In addition, a decrease of glucose uptake in the context of concomitant gastrointestinal toxicity cannot be excluded. Glycaemic control should be carefully evaluated in diabetic patients treated with sunitinib, and routine monitoring is warranted. PMID:18841151

  10. Treatment Outcome of Low-dose Interleukin-2 Therapy in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Yuta; Izumi, Kouji; Shimura, Yusuke; Aerken, Maolake; Natsagdorji, Ariunbold; Iijima, Masashi; Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Nohara, Takahiro; Narimoto, Kazutaka; Kadono, Yoshifumi; Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Konaka, Hiroyuki; Mizokami, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most fatal urological malignancies. Approximately 30% of patients with RCC have metastasis at initial diagnosis and another 30% have metastasis after radical nephrectomy. Immunotherapy using interferon-α (IFN-α) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) has been the main treatment for metastatic RCC (mRCC) patients, with this therapy being still occasionally recommended. The aims of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose IL-2 and to investigate the prognosis of the patients. Study subjects included 37 patients who were clinically diagnosed with mRCC and received low-dose IL-2 therapy between December 1999 and October 2014. We investigated the relationship between prognosis and clinical features. The median overall survival (OS), that was calculated from the first use of cytokine therapy, was 19.8 months, while the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 3.82 months. PFS was prolonged in patients who received IL-2 as first-line therapy or second-line therapy following IFN-α therapy. IL-2 therapy should be used as a first- or second-line therapy following IFN-α therapy. IL-2 may have a lower response if it is used after molecular-targeted therapy or other treatments. PMID:27630356

  11. Sorafenib with interleukin-2 vs sorafenib alone in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: the ROSORC trial

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, G; Verzoni, E; Bracarda, S; Ricci, S; Sacco, C; Ridolfi, L; Porta, C; Miceli, R; Zilembo, N; Bajetta, E

    2011-01-01

    Background: Preclinical investigations support combining sorafenib with IL-2 in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods: In this open-label, phase II study, 128 patients with mRCC were randomised to receive oral sorafenib, 400 mg twice daily, plus subcutaneous IL-2, 4.5 million international units (MIU) five times per week for 6 in every 8 weeks, or sorafenib alone. After enrolment of the first 40 patients, IL-2 dose was reduced to improve the tolerability. Results: After a median follow-up of 27 months, median progression-free survival (PFS) was 33 weeks with sorafenib plus IL-2, and 30 weeks with sorafenib alone (P=0.109). For patients receiving the initial higher dose of IL-2, median PFS was 43 weeks vs 31 weeks for those receiving the lower dose. The most common adverse events were asthenia, hand–foot syndrome, hypertension, and diarrhoea. Grade 3–4 adverse events were reported for 38 and 25% of patients receiving combination and single-agent treatment, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of sorafenib and IL-2 did not demonstrate improved efficacy vs sorafenib alone. Improvements in PFS appeared greater in patients receiving higher-dose IL-2. PMID:21448165

  12. CRISPR-Mediated VHL Knockout Generates an Improved Model for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Hu, Junhui; Moughon, Diana L.; Liu, Peijun; Lin, Lucia C.; Hermann, Kip; Mangul, Serghei; Guan, Wei; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xu, Hua; Wu, Lily

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is nearly incurable and accounts for most of the mortality associated with RCC. Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) is a tumour suppressor that is lost in the majority of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) cases. Its role in regulating hypoxia-inducible factors-1α (HIF-1α) and -2α (HIF-2α) is well-studied. Recent work has demonstrated that VHL knock down induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In this study we showed that a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock out of VHL in the RENCA model leads to morphologic and molecular changes indicative of EMT, which in turn drives increased metastasis to the lungs. RENCA cells deficient in HIF-1α failed to undergo EMT changes upon VHL knockout. RNA-seq revealed several HIF-1α-regulated genes that are upregulated in our VHL knockout cells and whose overexpression signifies an aggressive form of ccRCC in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) database. Independent validation in a new clinical dataset confirms the upregulation of these genes in ccRCC samples compared to adjacent normal tissue. Our findings indicate that loss of VHL could be driving tumour cell dissemination through stabilization of HIF-1α in RCC. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon can guide the search for more effective treatments to combat mRCC. PMID:27358011

  13. Targeted treatments in advanced renal cell carcinoma: focus on axitinib

    PubMed Central

    Verzoni, Elena; Grassi, Paolo; Testa, Isabella; Iacovelli, Roberto; Biondani, Pamela; Garanzini, Enrico; De Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Antiangiogenesis options have evolved rapidly in the last few years, with an increasing number of agents currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been shown to be very effective for the treatment of metastatic renal cancer cell. Axitinib is a third-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and is currently being developed for the treatment of various malignancies. The pharmacokinetic properties of axitinib may have a selective therapeutic effect, with minimal adverse reactions and enhanced safety. In a large Phase III study of previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib achieved a longer progression-free survival than sorafenib with an acceptable safety profile and good quality of life. This review focuses on the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity of axitinib in the current treatment of renal cell carcinoma. The role of axitinib in the adjuvant and/or neoadjuvant setting needs to be evaluated in further clinical trials. PMID:24715765

  14. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases.

  15. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  16. Vascular endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) regulates advanced metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    DeLisser, Horace; Liu, Yong; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Thor, Ann; Briasouli, Paraskevei; Handumrongkul, Chakrapong; Wilfong, Jonathon; Yount, Garret; Nosrati, Mehdi; Fong, Sylvia; Shtivelman, Emma; Fehrenbach, Melane; Cao, Gaoyuan; Moore, Dan H.; Nayak, Shruti; Liggitt, Denny; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Debs, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Most patients who die from cancer succumb to treatment-refractory advanced metastatic progression. Although the early stages of tumor metastasis result in the formation of clinically silent micrometastatic foci, its later stages primarily reflect the progressive, organ-destructive growth of already advanced metastases. Early-stage metastasis is regulated by multiple factors within tumor cells as well as by the tumor microenvironment (TME). In contrast, the molecular determinants that control advanced metastatic progression remain essentially uncharacterized, precluding the development of therapies targeted against it. Here we show that the TME, functioning in part through platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), drives advanced metastatic progression and is essential for progression through its preterminal end stage. PECAM-1–KO and chimeric mice revealed that its metastasis-promoting effects are mediated specifically through vascular endothelial cell (VEC) PECAM-1. Anti–PECAM-1 mAb therapy suppresses both end-stage metastatic progression and tumor-induced cachexia in tumor-bearing mice. It reduces proliferation, but not angiogenesis or apoptosis, within advanced tumor metastases. Because its antimetastatic effects are mediated by binding to VEC rather than to tumor cells, anti–PECAM-1 mAb appears to act independently of tumor type. A modified 3D coculture assay showed that anti–PECAM-1 mAb inhibits the proliferation of PECAM-1–negative tumor cells by altering the concentrations of secreted factors. Our studies indicate that a complex interplay between elements of the TME and advanced tumor metastases directs end-stage metastatic progression. They also suggest that some therapeutic interventions may target late-stage metastases specifically. mAb-based targeting of PECAM-1 represents a TME-targeted therapeutic approach that suppresses the end stages of metastatic progression, until now a refractory clinical entity. PMID:20926749

  17. Efficacy and Toxicity of Mammalian Target Rapamycin Inhibitors in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma with Renal Insufficiency: The Korean Cancer Study Group GU 14-08

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hyang; Kim, Joo Hoon; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Hyo Song; Heo, Su Jin; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Ho Young; Rha, Sun Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of mammalian target rapamycin inhibitors in Korean patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) with chronic renal insufficiency not requiring dialysis. Materials and Methods Korean patients with mRCC and chronic renal insufficiency not requiring dialysis treated with everolimus or temsirolimus between January 2008 and December 2014 were included. Patient characteristics, clinical outcomes, and toxicities were evaluated. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) durations were evaluated according to the degree of renal impairment. Results Eighteen patients were considered eligible for the study (median age, 59 years). The median glomerular filtration rate was 51.5 mL/min/1.73 m2. The best response was partial response in six patients and stable disease in 11 patients. The median PFS and OS durations were 8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 0 to 20.4) and 32 months (95% CI, 27.5 to 36.5), respectively. The most common non-hematologic and grade 3/4 adverse events included stomatitis, fatigue, flu-like symptoms, and anorexia as well as elevated creatinine level. Conclusion Mammalian target rapamycin inhibitors were efficacious and did not increase toxicity in Korean patients with mRCC and chronic renal insufficiency not requiring dialysis. PMID:26875195

  18. Cost-effectiveness of pazopanib compared with sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Amdahl, J.; Diaz, J.; Park, J.; Nakhaipour, H.R.; Delea, T.E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Canada and elsewhere, pazopanib and sunitinib—tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors—are recommended as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mrcc). A large randomized noninferiority trial of pazopanib versus sunitinib (comparz) demonstrated that the two drugs have similar efficacy; however, patients randomized to pazopanib experienced better health-related quality of life (hrqol) and nominally lower rates of non-study medical resource utilization. Methods The cost-effectiveness of pazopanib compared with sunitinib for first-line treatment of mrcc from a Canadian health care system perspective was evaluated using a partitioned-survival model that incorporated data from comparz and other secondary sources. The time horizon of 5 years was based on the maximum duration of follow-up in the final analysis of overall survival from the comparz trial. Analyses were conducted first using list prices for pazopanib and sunitinib and then by assuming that the prices of sunitinib and pazopanib would be equivalent. Results Based on list prices, expected costs were CA$10,293 less with pazopanib than with sunitinib. Pazopanib was estimated to yield 0.059 more quality-adjusted life-years (qalys). Pazopanib was therefore dominant (more qalys and lower costs) compared with sunitinib in the base case. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, pazopanib was dominant in 79% of simulations and was cost-effective in 90%–100% of simulations at a threshold cost-effectiveness ratio of CA$100,000. Assuming equivalent pricing, pazopanib yielded CA$917 in savings in the base case, was dominant in 36% of probabilistic sensitivity analysis simulations, and was cost-effective in 89% of simulations at a threshold cost-effectiveness ratio of CA$100,000. Conclusions Compared with sunitinib, pazopanib is likely to be a cost-effective option for first-line treatment of mrcc from a Canadian health care

  19. Sunitinib therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma: recommendations for management of side effects

    PubMed Central

    Kollmannsberger, C; Soulieres, D; Wong, R; Scalera, A; Gaspo, R; Bjarnason, G

    2007-01-01

    Sunitinib, a new vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, has demonstrated high activity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and is now widely used for patients with metastatic disease. Although generally well tolerated and associated with a low incidence of common toxicity criteria grade 3 or 4 toxicities, sunitinib exhibits a distinct pattern of novel side effects that require monitoring and management. This article summarizes the most important side effects and proposes recommendations for their monitoring, prevention and treatment, based on the existing literature and on suggestions made by an expert group of Canadian oncologists. Fatigue, diarrhea, anorexia, oral changes, skin toxicity and hypertension seem to be the most clinically relevant toxicities of sunitinib. Fatigue may be partly related to the development of hypothyroidism during sunitinib therapy for which patients should be observed and, if necessary, treated. Hypertension can be treated with standard antihypertensive therapy and rarely requires treatment discontinuation. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia usually do not require intervention, in particular no episodes of neutropenic fever have been reported to date. A decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction is a rare, but potentially life-threatening side effect. Because of its metabolism by cytochrome P450 3A4 a number of drugs can potentially interact with sunitinib. Clinical response and toxicity should be carefully observed when sunitinib is combined with either a cytochrome P450 3A4 inducer or inhibitor and doses adjusted as necessary. Knowledge about side effects, as well as the proactive assessment and consistent management of sunitinib-related side effects, is critical to ensure optimal benefit from sunitinib treatment. PMID:18542784

  20. Macrocytosis during sunitinib treatment predicts progression-free survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kucharz, Jakub; Giza, Agnieszka; Dumnicka, Paulina; Kuzniewski, Marek; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata; Bryniarski, Pawel; Herman, Roma; Zygulska, Aneta Lidia; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    Sunitinib, a multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is a first-line treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in patients in 'low' and 'intermediate' Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Heng risk groups. Disruptions of hematopoiesis, such as anemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia, are typically observed during sunitinib treatment. When it comes to RBC parameters, an increase in mean cell volume (MCV) tends to occur, meeting the criteria for macrocytosis in some patients (MCV > 100 fL). We examined changes in RBC parameters of 27 mRCC patients treated with sunitinib (initial dose of 50 mg/day, 6-week treatment: 4 weeks on, 2 weeks off) and correlated them with progression-free survival time (PFS). Patients who had macrocytosis after 3 treatment cycles had significantly longer PFS than those whose MCV stayed less than 100 fL (not reached vs. 11.2 months, p < 0.001). We also found a correlation between MCV values after the first and third treatment cycles and the risk of progression: HR of 0.9 (0.81-0.99) and 0.76 (0.65-0.90) per 1 fL increase in MCV, respectively. The mechanism of MCV elevation during sunitinib treatment has not yet been fully explained. One of the probable causes is sunitinib's inhibitory influence on c-Kit kinase, as is the case with imatinib. For mRCC patients, this phenomenon could help predict PFS, but since our sample was small, further studies are essential. PMID:27573381

  1. Renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid and sarcomatoid features presented as a metastatic thigh mass with an unusual immunohistochemical profile.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Kandil, Mona; Elshakhs, Soliman; El-Dien, Marwa Serag; Abdallah, Rania

    2014-01-23

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) may metastasize anywhere in the body and sometimes the primary tumor is missing and necessitates extensive investigations to detect. In this report, we describe a case of RCC metastasizing to the thigh in a 70 year old male with a highly pleomorphic morphology suggesting a high grade sarcoma that showed unequivocal positivity for desmin directing the diagnosis for pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma. After completion of 33 cycles of radiotherapy, the patient developed large intraabdominal mass that showed conventional areas of RCC with immunoreactivity for CD10, CK, EMA, carbonic anhydrase IX and vimentin. The tumor cells in other areas resembled that of thigh mass which raised suspicions whether the two masses represented the same tumor or not. Surprisingly, the tumor cells of thigh mass showed diffuse positivity for CD10 and focal expression for CK, EMA and carbonic anhydrase IX. Extensive investigations failed to detect any primary renal lesions. The present case demonstrated that RCC can metastasize to virtually any body site and can have significant morphologic overlap with other non-renal neoplasms. Absence of primary origin of RCC according to radiological and operative data should not hinder the diagnosis of metastatic RCC. RCC with sarcomatoid and rhabdoid features carries aggressive behavior manifested by great metastatic potential and short survival time. PMID:24711903

  2. [Bevacizumab as first-line therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Progression-free survival for 3 years].

    PubMed

    Pichler, R; Horninger, W; Aigner, F; Heidegger, I

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who was diagnosed in 2006 with renal cell cancer (RCC) and had undergone consecutive tumor nephrectomy (clear-cell RCC, Fuhrmann grade II, stage pT3a, R0). Over the years, the patient underwent several surgical and radiological interventions due to various metastatic lesions. This case report describes the 3-year progression-free survival in a patient who underwent first-line therapy with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab. Except for hypertension, the patient does not suffer currently from any other side effects of bevacizumab therapy.

  3. MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy increases the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Shang, Yiman; Gao, Quanli

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising cancer treatment, but its efficacy is restricted by various factors, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In this study, we determine whether chemotherapeutic drugs that reduce MDSC levels enhance the efficacy of CIK cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Fifty-three patients were included in this study; 17 were diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC), 10 with advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), and 26 with metastatic melanoma (MM). These patients were divided into two groups: CIK cell therapy alone and CIK cell therapy combined with chemotherapy. Combining CIK cell therapy and chemotherapy increased 1-year survival rates and median survival times in MRCC and PC patients, but not in MM patients. The disease control rate did not differ between treatment groups for MRCC or MM patients, but was higher in PC patients receiving combined treatment than CIK cell treatment alone. These data suggest that addition of MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy to CIK cell therapy improves survival in MRCC and PC patients. PMID:26716894

  4. Everolimus in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buti, Sebastiano; Leonetti, Alessandro; Dallatomasina, Alice; Bersanelli, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, and its pathogenesis is strictly related to altered cellular response to hypoxia, in which mTOR signaling pathway is implicated. Everolimus, an mTOR serine/threonine kinase inhibitor, represents a therapeutic option for the treatment of advanced RCC. Aim The objective of this article is to review the evidence for the treatment of metastatic RCC with everolimus. Evidence review Everolimus was approved for second- and third-line therapy in patients with advanced RCC according to the results of a Phase III pivotal trial that demonstrated a benefit in median progression-free survival of ~2 months compared to placebo after failure of previous lines of therapy, of which at least one was an anti-VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). The role of this drug in first-line setting has been investigated in Phase II trials, with no significant clinical benefit, even in combination with bevacizumab. Everolimus activity in non-clear cell RCC is supported by two randomized Phase II trials that confirmed the benefit in second-line setting but not in first line. Recently, two randomized Phase III trials (METEOR and CheckMate 025) demonstrated the inferiority of everolimus in second-line setting compared to the TKI cabozantinib and to the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab, respectively. Moreover, a recent Phase II study demonstrated a significant benefit for the second-line combination treatment with everolimus plus lenvatinib (a novel TKI) in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival compared to the single-agent everolimus. Basing on preclinical data, the main downstream effectors of mTOR cascade, S6RP and its phosphorylated form, could be good predictive biomarkers of response to everolimus. The safety profile of the drug is favorable, with a good cost-effectiveness compared to second-line sorafenib or axitinib, and no significant impact on the quality of life of treated

  5. Everolimus in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buti, Sebastiano; Leonetti, Alessandro; Dallatomasina, Alice; Bersanelli, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, and its pathogenesis is strictly related to altered cellular response to hypoxia, in which mTOR signaling pathway is implicated. Everolimus, an mTOR serine/threonine kinase inhibitor, represents a therapeutic option for the treatment of advanced RCC. Aim The objective of this article is to review the evidence for the treatment of metastatic RCC with everolimus. Evidence review Everolimus was approved for second- and third-line therapy in patients with advanced RCC according to the results of a Phase III pivotal trial that demonstrated a benefit in median progression-free survival of ~2 months compared to placebo after failure of previous lines of therapy, of which at least one was an anti-VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). The role of this drug in first-line setting has been investigated in Phase II trials, with no significant clinical benefit, even in combination with bevacizumab. Everolimus activity in non-clear cell RCC is supported by two randomized Phase II trials that confirmed the benefit in second-line setting but not in first line. Recently, two randomized Phase III trials (METEOR and CheckMate 025) demonstrated the inferiority of everolimus in second-line setting compared to the TKI cabozantinib and to the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab, respectively. Moreover, a recent Phase II study demonstrated a significant benefit for the second-line combination treatment with everolimus plus lenvatinib (a novel TKI) in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival compared to the single-agent everolimus. Basing on preclinical data, the main downstream effectors of mTOR cascade, S6RP and its phosphorylated form, could be good predictive biomarkers of response to everolimus. The safety profile of the drug is favorable, with a good cost-effectiveness compared to second-line sorafenib or axitinib, and no significant impact on the quality of life of treated

  6. Repurposing the anti-malarial drug artesunate as a novel therapeutic agent for metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to its attenuation of tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sharon; Lee, Se Jeong; Lim, Joung Eun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still incurable. Artesunate (ART), a well-known anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, exhibits highly selective anti-tumor actions against various tumors through generation of cytotoxic carbon-centered free radical in the presence of free iron. However, the therapeutic efficacy of ART against metastatic RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. In the analysis on a dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 469) and a tissue microarray set from Samsung Medical Center (n = 119) from a cohort of patients with clear cell RCC (ccRCC), up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), which is a well-known predictive marker for ART, was correlated with the presence of distant metastasis and an unfavorable prognosis. Moreover, ART exerted potent selective cytotoxicity against human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, and SN12C-GFP-SRLu2) and sensitized these cells to sorafenib in vitro, and the extent of ART cytotoxicity correlated with TfR1 expression. ART-mediated growth inhibition of human RCC cell lines was shown to result from the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and oncosis-like cell death. Furthermore, ART inhibited cell clonogenicity and invasion of human RCC cells and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these in vitro data, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of ART were also validated in human 786-O xenografts. Taken together, ART is a promising novel candidate for treating human RCC, either alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:26426994

  7. Advanced glycation end products in renal failure: an overview.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, M J; Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J

    2008-12-01

    The article aims to present an overview of the existing knowledge on advanced glycation end products (AGE). They are moieties that bind to proteins, but also lipids and nuclear acids. AGE are formed during glycation and oxidative stress. Accumulation of AGE occurs especially in diabetes and chronic renal failure and plays a major pathogenetic role. The deleterious effects of AGE result from cross-linking of proteins and activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products. AGE accumulation can be noninvasively assessed by the skin autofluorescence reader. In diabetics, the skin autofluorescence predicts cardiac mortality and the occurrence of macro- and microvascular complications. In patients on haemodialysis, skin autofluorescence is highly elevated and predicts mortality. After renal transplantation AGE accumulation is lower than during haemodialysis, but still remains elevated and is a strong risk factor for chronic renal transplant dysfunction. Some of the potential methods to intervene with AGE accumulation are discussed in this article.

  8. Advanced glycation end products in renal failure: an overview.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, M J; Lefrandt, J D; Smit, A J

    2008-12-01

    The article aims to present an overview of the existing knowledge on advanced glycation end products (AGE). They are moieties that bind to proteins, but also lipids and nuclear acids. AGE are formed during glycation and oxidative stress. Accumulation of AGE occurs especially in diabetes and chronic renal failure and plays a major pathogenetic role. The deleterious effects of AGE result from cross-linking of proteins and activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products. AGE accumulation can be noninvasively assessed by the skin autofluorescence reader. In diabetics, the skin autofluorescence predicts cardiac mortality and the occurrence of macro- and microvascular complications. In patients on haemodialysis, skin autofluorescence is highly elevated and predicts mortality. After renal transplantation AGE accumulation is lower than during haemodialysis, but still remains elevated and is a strong risk factor for chronic renal transplant dysfunction. Some of the potential methods to intervene with AGE accumulation are discussed in this article. PMID:19090900

  9. Nivolumab versus Cabozantinib: Comparing Overall Survival in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wiecek, Witold; Karcher, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) affects over 330,000 new patients every year, of whom 1/3 present with metastatic RCC (mRCC) at diagnosis. Most mRCC patients treated with a first-line agent relapse within 1 year and need second-line therapy. The present study aims to compare overall survival (OS) between nivolumab and cabozantinib from two recent pivotal studies comparing, respectively, each one of the two emerging treatments against everolimus in patients who relapse following first-line treatment. Comparison is traditionally carried out using the Bucher method, which assumes proportional hazard. Since OS curves intersected in one of the pivotal studies, models not assuming proportional hazards were also considered to refine the comparison. Four Bayesian parametric survival network meta-analysis models were implemented on overall survival (OS) data digitized from the Kaplan-Meier curves reported in the studies. Three models allowing hazard ratios (HR) to vary over time were assessed against a fixed-HR model. The Bucher method favored cabozantinib, with a fixed HR for OS vs. nivolumab of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: [0.77, 1.54]). However, all models with time-varying HR showed better fits than the fixed-HR model. The log-logistic model fitted the data best, exhibiting a HR for OS initially favoring cabozantinib, the trend inverting to favor nivolumab after month 5 (95% credible interval <1 from 10 months). The initial probability of cabozantinib conferring superior OS was 54%, falling to 41.5% by month 24. Numerical differences in study-adjusted OS estimates between the two treatments remained small. This study evidences that HR for OS of nivolumab vs. cabozantinib varies over time, favoring cabozantinib in the first months of treatment but nivolumab afterwards, a possible indication that patients with poor prognosis benefit more from cabozantinib in terms of survival, nivolumab benefiting patients with better prognosis. More evidence, including real

  10. Nivolumab versus Cabozantinib: Comparing Overall Survival in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wiecek, Witold; Karcher, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) affects over 330,000 new patients every year, of whom 1/3 present with metastatic RCC (mRCC) at diagnosis. Most mRCC patients treated with a first-line agent relapse within 1 year and need second-line therapy. The present study aims to compare overall survival (OS) between nivolumab and cabozantinib from two recent pivotal studies comparing, respectively, each one of the two emerging treatments against everolimus in patients who relapse following first-line treatment. Comparison is traditionally carried out using the Bucher method, which assumes proportional hazard. Since OS curves intersected in one of the pivotal studies, models not assuming proportional hazards were also considered to refine the comparison. Four Bayesian parametric survival network meta-analysis models were implemented on overall survival (OS) data digitized from the Kaplan-Meier curves reported in the studies. Three models allowing hazard ratios (HR) to vary over time were assessed against a fixed-HR model. The Bucher method favored cabozantinib, with a fixed HR for OS vs. nivolumab of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: [0.77, 1.54]). However, all models with time-varying HR showed better fits than the fixed-HR model. The log-logistic model fitted the data best, exhibiting a HR for OS initially favoring cabozantinib, the trend inverting to favor nivolumab after month 5 (95% credible interval <1 from 10 months). The initial probability of cabozantinib conferring superior OS was 54%, falling to 41.5% by month 24. Numerical differences in study-adjusted OS estimates between the two treatments remained small. This study evidences that HR for OS of nivolumab vs. cabozantinib varies over time, favoring cabozantinib in the first months of treatment but nivolumab afterwards, a possible indication that patients with poor prognosis benefit more from cabozantinib in terms of survival, nivolumab benefiting patients with better prognosis. More evidence, including real

  11. Vasoactive intestinal peptide induces oxidative stress and suppresses metastatic potential in human clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Eva; Bajo, Ana M; Schally, Andrew V; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2013-01-30

    Molecular mechanisms involved in progression of clear-cell renal-cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) are poorly understood. A common genetic mutation found in ccRCC is the loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, which contributes to cancer progression and metastasis. We investigated VIP effects on metastatic and angiogenic factors in human VHL-null A498 ccRCC and HK2 renal cells. VIP increased adhesion but decreased expression of metalloproteinases, MMP2 and MMP9, as well as cell migration and VEGF expression and secretion in A498 but not in HK2 cells. VIP enhanced ROS levels and decreased nuclear levels of β-catenin and NFκB p50-subunit in A498 cells, suggesting neuropeptide involvement in the observed decrease of metastatic ability in clear-cell carcinoma. VIP effects in A498 cells were blocked by the VPAC(1/2)-receptor antagonist JV-1-53. In conclusion, present data point to a role of VIP in preventing invasion and metastasis in ccRCCs and support its potential therapeutic usefulness in this disease.

  12. Comparative efficacy and safety of axitinib versus sorafenib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Man, Libo; Li, Guizhong; Huang, Guanglin; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of axitinib and sorafenib in the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Materials and methods Eligible studies were searched from PubMed, Embase, and Future Medicine databases. The pooled hazard ratios and relative risk ratios (RRs) were calculated by using Stata 12.0 software. Results A total of 1,011 patients qualified to participate in this Phase III study that included randomized controlled trials. Meta-analysis results showed that axitinib was more highly and significantly associated with a survival benefit in the independently assessed progression-free survival in comparison to sorafenib. The values of RR of the objective response rate and disease control rate were also significantly different. Results of the analysis of adverse events concerning hypertension and hypothyroidism demonstrated that the values of RR were significantly higher in the axitinib group and lower risks were established in the patients treated with axitinib. Conclusion Therefore, axitinib was a better treatment option for metastatic renal cell carcinoma treatment than sorafenib, especially after failure of prior systemic therapies. This analysis revealed that axitinib had higher risks of hypertension and hypothyroidism and lower risks of rash and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. PMID:27354814

  13. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Lorena; Bronte, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-04-19

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition.Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC.

  14. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition. Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC. PMID:26872372

  15. Gene set enrichment analysis and ingenuity pathway analysis of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed I; Dębski, Konrad J; Dabrowski, Michał; Czarnecka, Anna M; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, genome-wide RNA expression analysis has become a routine tool that offers a great opportunity to study and understand the key role of genes that contribute to carcinogenesis. Various microarray platforms and statistical approaches can be used to identify genes that might serve as prognostic biomarkers and be developed as antitumor therapies in the future. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is a serious, life-threatening disease, and there are few treatment options for patients. In this study, we performed one-color microarray gene expression (4×44K) analysis of the mRCC cell line Caki-1 and the healthy kidney cell line ASE-5063. A total of 1,921 genes were differentially expressed in the Caki-1 cell line (1,023 upregulated and 898 downregulated). Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) approaches were used to analyze the differential-expression data. The objective of this research was to identify complex biological changes that occur during metastatic development using Caki-1 as a model mRCC cell line. Our data suggest that there are multiple deregulated pathways associated with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mccRCC), including integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, IGF-I signaling, CXCR4 signaling, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. The IPA upstream analysis predicted top transcriptional regulators that are either activated or inhibited, such as estrogen receptors, TP53, KDM5B, SPDEF, and CDKN1A. The GSEA approach was used to further confirm enriched pathway data following IPA.

  16. Sapanisertib or Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-31

    High Grade Sarcoma; Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma; Metastatic Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Recurrent Leiomyosarcoma; Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Recurrent Synovial Sarcoma; Recurrent Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Uterine Corpus Leiomyosarcoma

  17. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Ryne C.; Cooper, Sara J.; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S.; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L.; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  18. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Yang, Eddy S; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Ramaker, Ryne C; Cooper, Sara J; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  19. Third generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors and their development in advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis in general and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling axis in particular is a validated target in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Clear-cell carcinoma of the kidney is now recognized as a malignancy that is sensitive to inhibitors of the VEGF pathway. Treatment options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have evolved in dramatic fashion over the past 6 years, and a new paradigm has developed. The cytokines interferon-α and interleukin-2 were previously utilized for therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the United States for the treatment of advanced RCC. Two are tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI's) including sunitinib and recently pazopanib, and the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. The current review examines the evolving data with the next generation of TKI's, axitinib and tivozanib being developed for the treatment of advanced RCC. These agents were synthesized to provide increased target specificity and enhanced target inhibition. The preclinical and clinical data are examined, an overview of the development of these TKI's is provided, and discussion plus speculation concerning their potential roles as RCC therapy is provided.

  20. Recent advances in renal cell carcinoma from a pathological point of view.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Shuji; Oya, Mototsugu; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Kosaka, Takeo; Ishida, Masaru; Kuroda, Naoto; Nagashima, Yoji; Katsube, Ken-Ichi; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent advances in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) from a pathological point of view. Because the genetic features and morphological characteristics have become major criteria for the classification of RCC, special techniques, such as immunohistochemistry, are essential to the differential diagnosis of renal tumors. Metastasis is frequently observed among the RCC patients with curative nephrectomy, and extracellular matrix-degrading enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and heparanase, play a key role in invasion and metastasis of RCC. Snail and Slug, transcription factors of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), accelerate cancer cell invasion through downregulation of E-cadherin and up-regulation of MMP. Therapies targeted at the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway have become the standard treatment of metastatic RCC. Although they lead to tumor shrinkage mainly by inhibiting angiogenesis, they have typically been associated with drug resistance. The mechanism of the resistance remains largely unknown, but complex events including re-activation of angiogenesis, EMT and cancer stem cells, and immune escape are implicated in the refractory response to the therapy. Recent advances of the research on RCC have caused the changes of classification and therapy, and pathologists should take overall view of these as integrated pathology.

  1. Motility Related Actinin Alpha-4 Is Associated with Advanced and Metastatic Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barbolina, Maria V.; Adley, Brian P.; Kelly, David L.; Fought, Angela J.; Scholtens, Denise; Shea, Lonnie D.; Sharon Stack, M.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced and metastatic ovarian cancer is a leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. A more detailed understanding of the factors controlling invasion and metastasis may lead to novel anti-metastatic therapies. To model cellular interactions that occur during intraperitoneal metastasis, comparative cDNA microarray analysis and confirmatory real time RT-PCR were employed to uncover changes in gene expression that may occur in late stage ovarian cancer in response to microenvironmental cues, particularly native three-dimensional collagen I. Gene expression in human ovarian carcinoma tissues was evaluated on the RNA and protein level using real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Cell invasion and migration were evaluated in a collagen invasion assay and a scratch wound assay. Three-dimensional collagen I culture led to differential expression of several genes. The role of actinin alpha-4 (ACTN4), a cytosketeton-associated protein implicated in regulation of cell motility, was examined in detail. ACTN4 RNA and protein expression were associated with advanced and metastatic human ovarian carcinoma. This report demonstrates that a cytoskeletal-associated protein ACTN4 is upregulated by three-dimensional collagen culture conditions, leading to increased invasion and motility of ovarian cancer cells. Expression of ACTN4 in human ovarian tumors was found to be associated with advanced stage disease and peritoneal metastases. PMID:18362906

  2. Review of systemic therapies for locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Arsen; Tan, Carlyn; Tuli, Richard; Hendifar, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer, along with colon cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. Up to a quarter of patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis and 40% will develop metastatic disease. The past 10 years have been extremely exciting in the treatment of both locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer (mRC). With the advent of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, increased numbers of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are surviving longer and some are seeing their tumors shrink to sizes that allow for resection. The advent of biologics and monoclonal antibodies has propelled the treatment of mRC further than many could have hoped. Combined with regimens such as FOLFOX or FOLFIRI, median survival rates have been increased to an average of 23 months. However, the combinations of chemotherapy regimens seem endless for rectal cancer. We will review the major chemotherapies available for locally advanced and mRC as well as regimens currently under investigation such as FOLFOXIRI. We will also review vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors as single agents and in combination with traditional chemotherapy regimens. PMID:25830038

  3. Current management and future directions in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma–a latin american perspective: 10 years in review

    PubMed Central

    Smaletz, Oren

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The worldwide incidence of kidney cancer is estimated at 337,860 new cases per year in the International Agency for Research on Cancer's GLOBOCAN 2012 update, with an estimated 143,369 deaths annually. Over the past 10 years, there have been significant advances in the treatment of advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma, including the development of targeted therapies. Currently recommended first-line treatments include sunitinib, temsirolimus, bevacizumab plus interferon, and pazopanib, or high-dose interleukin-2 or sorafenib for selected patients. Recommended second-line treatments include all of the above agents, as well as everolimus and axitinib. Unfortunately, combination therapies have generally resulted in increased toxicity and little improvement in efficacy. Recent studies focused on identification of predictive biomarkers for responses to specific targeted therapies and have not been successful to date. Despite recent advances in targeted treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, important questions regarding biomarkers of efficacy, and optimal combination and sequencing of agents remain to be answered. This paper reviews literature concerned with first-and second-line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma and will discuss key issues in Latin America. PMID:26689508

  4. Current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer: improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Pedro Nazareth; Muniz, Thiago Pimentel; Miranda, Raelson Rodrigues; Tadokoro, Hakaru; Forones, Nora Manoukian; Monteiro, Ines-de-Paula; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Mello, Ramon Andrade de

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we review the literature on the current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer aimed at improving patient care. We conclude that the key to guiding targeted therapy is individual biomarkers, which are not completely elucidated. HER2 overexpression is the only predictive biomarker currently in use. Furthermore, it is necessary to understand that gastric tumors are heterogeneous; therefore, is impossible to evaluate a novel biological compound without evaluating personal biomarkers. The selection of patients who are able to receive each treatment is paramount for improving advanced gastric cancer survival and reducing unnecessary costs.

  5. What role do combinations of interferon and targeted agents play in the first-line therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2008-12-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are a class of cytokines with pleotropic actions that regulate a variety of cellular activities. Clinical trials with recombinant IFNs (IFN-alpha2a and IFN-alpha2b) have demonstrated clinical activity in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Their efficacy is characterized by a low overall tumor regression rate of < 15%, progression-free survival of 4-5 months, and overall median survival of 10-18 months. This cytokine became the standard of care for patients with metastatic RCC and was then used as the comparator arm in a series of phase II and III clinical trials that have defined a new treatment paradigm for patients with advanced RCC. This paradigm uses the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) sorafenib and sunitinib, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor temsirolimus, and the vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody bevacizumab. These 3 categories of agents were then investigated in combination with IFN-alpha in a series of preclinical and clinical studies. The collective data from these reports suggest the combination of IFN-alpha and bevacizumab is active and has a role in RCC therapy, whereas combinations with the TKIs or mTOR inhibitors have limited efficacy and/or excessive toxicity. The clinical and preclinical studies leading to these conclusions are reviewed herein.

  6. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs): recent insights and advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. PMID:22886480

  7. The Toxicity and Benefit of Various Dosing Strategies for Interleukin-2 in Metastatic Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pachella, Laura A; Madsen, Lydia T; Dains, Joyce E

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy has been used with success in curing meta-static renal cell carcinoma and melanoma in a small minority of patients. However, the benefits can be accompanied by severe toxicity. This review of the literature discusses varying doses of IL-2 and their associated re-sponse rates and the toxicities associated with treatment. The review also explores the maximally beneficial dose with the most tolerable side effects. Although the higher-dose regimens with a more frequent dosing schedule produce higher-grade toxicity, they were found to deliver the most durable and complete responses. It is recommended to use a higher-dose regimen (720,000 IU/kg every 8 hours for a maximum of 15 doses) and provide sup-portive care for toxicity, so patients can have maximal benefit from therapy. PMID:26557408

  8. Management of poor-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma: current approaches, the role of temsirolimus and future directions.

    PubMed

    Porta, Camillo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Larkin, James M G; Hutson, Thomas E

    2016-02-01

    Targeted therapies have substantially improved outcomes in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). As expected, poor-risk patients have the worst outcomes. Temsirolimus is currently the only agent licensed for treatment of poor-risk mRCC patients. It is associated with meaningful improvements in survival and quality of life, highlighting the importance of correctly stratifying risk in mRCC patients so they receive optimal treatment. Currently, data for other targeted therapies in poor-risk patients are relatively sparse. Optimizing outcomes in these patients is the subject of ongoing research, including studies of biomarkers and studies to elucidate the role of nephrectomy and neoadjuvant targeted therapy in poor-risk mRCC patients. The impacts of novel combinations including temsirolimus have also been explored to further improve outcomes.

  9. Complete remission with sunitinib in a poor-risk patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: the fine balance between toxicity and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Modena, Alessandra; Simbolo, Michele; Brunelli, Matteo; Artibani, Walter; Martignoni, Guido; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-04-01

    Sunitinib represents a reasonable therapeutic option for first-line treatment of poor-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma and the treatment should aim at the delicate balance between managing side effects to improve the toxicity profile and patient compliance to treatment while maintaining anticancer efficacy. Achievement of a complete response, although rare, is possible, even in poor-risk patients. Treatment discontinuation represents a viable alternative for both tumour biology and patients' quality of life. To date, no molecular markers have been identified with prognostic and/or predictive value for guiding therapeutic decisions. Further research should aim at gaining in-depth knowledge of renal cell carcinoma biology for a tailored personalized therapy. We report a case of poor-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma, with Von Hippel-Lindau loss of function, which achieved and maintained a complete remission after first-line therapy with sunitinib by using a reduced dosage and a modified schedule of treatment.

  10. [Advanced and Metastatic Lung Cancer – What is new in the Diagnosis and Therapy?].

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Sacha I

    2015-07-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common types of malignancies worldwide. The majority of patients are diagnosed with an incurable advanced/metastatic stage disease. Palliative treatment approaches improve the survival and the quality of life of these patients. Lung cancer is subdivided according to histology and molecular biology. The most important classification separates small cell from non-small cell lung cancer. In the subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer novel treatment approaches coming along with an improved prognosis have been established during the last decade. The current manuscript provides an overview on current treatment options for metastatic lung cancer. Furthermore, an outlook on promising future treatment options is provided.

  11. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Does Not Control Proliferation in Primary Cultures of Human Metastatic Renal Cellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Ilaria; Potenza, Duilio Michele; Bottino, Cinzia; Glasnov, Toma N.; Ferulli, Federica; Mosca, Alessandra; Guerra, Germano; Rosti, Vittorio; Luinetti, Ombretta; Porta, Camillo; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is activated following depletion of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive Ca2+ pool to regulate proliferation in immortalized cell lines established from either primary or metastatic lesions. The molecular nature of SOCE may involve both Stim1, which senses Ca2+ levels within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ reservoir, and a number of a Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membrane, including Orai1, Orai3, and members of the canonical transient receptor (TRPC1–7) family of ion channels. The present study was undertaken to assess whether SOCE is expressed and controls proliferation in primary cultures isolated from secondary lesions of heavily pretreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. SOCE was induced following pharmacological depletion of the ER Ca2+ store, but not by InsP3-dependent Ca2+ release. Metastatic RCC cells express Stim1-2, Orai1–3, and TRPC1–7 transcripts and proteins. In these cells, SOCE was insensitive to BTP-2, 10 µM Gd3+ and Pyr6, while it was inhibited by 100 µM Gd3+, 2-APB, and carboxyamidotriazole (CAI). Neither Gd3+ nor 2-APB or CAI impaired mRCC cell proliferation. Consistently, no detectable Ca2+ signal was elicited by growth factor stimulation. Therefore, a functional SOCE is expressed but does not control proliferation of mRCC cells isolated from patients resistant to multikinase inhibitors. PMID:25126575

  12. Changes in metabolic profile, iron and ferritin levels during the treatment of metastatic renal cancer - A new potential biomarker?

    PubMed

    Golčić, Marin; Petković, Marija

    2016-09-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) develops in approximately 33% of all renal cancer patients. First line treatment of mRCC includes drugs such as sunitinib, temsirolimus and pazopanib, with overall survival now reaching up to 43,6months in patients with favorable-risk metastatic disease. Several side-effects in mRCC treatment, such as hypothyroidism, can be used as positive prognostic factors and indicate good response to therapy. Hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia independent of hypothyroidism are reported as side-effects in temsirolimus treatment and recently in sunitinib treatment, but the exact mechanism and significance of the changes remains elusive. Most likely, metabolic changes are caused by inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a positive target of tumor growth suppression, but also a regulator of iron homeostasis. There are no clinical studies reporting changes in iron and ferritin levels during mRCC biotherapy, but we hypothesize that inhibition of mTOR will also affect iron and ferritin levels. If both lipid and iron changes correlate, there is a high possibility that both changes are primarily caused by mTOR inhibition and the level of change should correlate with the inhibition of mTOR pathway and hence the efficacy of targeted treatment. We lastly hypothesize that mRCC biotherapy causes hypercholesterolemia with a possibly improved cholesterol profile due to increase HDL/LDL ratio, so statins might not have a role as supplementary treatment, whereas a sharp rise in triglyceride levels seems to be the primary target for additional therapy. PMID:27515221

  13. Lymphangitic retroperitoneal carcinomatosis occurring from metastatic sarcomatoid chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alimchandani, Meghna; Lara, Karlena; Tsokos, Maria; Linehan, W M; Merino, Maria J

    2014-03-01

    Forty -five year-old man with left renal mass underwent nephrectomy to reveal 20cm tumor diagnosed as sarcomatoid chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (CRCC). Lymph node metastasis of chromophobe and sarcomatoid components, disseminated tumor in retroperitoneal fat, lymphatic vessels, peri-renal adipose tissue in lymphangitic carcinomatosis pattern were identified. Chromophobe epithelial cells EMA, c-Kit, cytokeratin 7 positive; sarcomatoid cells were CD10, SMA positive with high proliferation index . Chromophobe epithelial cells had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in chromosomes 1p, 1q while sarcomatoid cells had LOH in 3p,1p, 1q. In conclusion, sarcomatoid CRCC has aggressive biologic behavior and potential to metastasize in unusual patterns. PMID:24696789

  14. Phase II trial of 4'-epi-doxorubicin in locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cazap, E; Estevez, R; Bruno, M; Levy, D; Algamiz, C; Chacon, R; Badano, C; Romero, A; Desimone, G; Roca, E

    1988-06-30

    Patients with locally advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma received an i.v. bolus of 4'-epi-doxorubicin, 75/mg/m2/cycle, every 21 days. Partial responses were observed in 5 of 23 evaluable patients (21.7%). Treatment was generally well tolerated and toxicity was mild. The response rate to epirubicin appears to be very similar to that reported for doxorubicin. Larger doses of epirubicin could be safely used in future studies, and further evaluation of epirubicin in phase III trials is indicated.

  15. Efficacy and safety of sorafenib versus sunitinib as first-line treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: largest single-center retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chuanliang; Si, Lu; Li, Siming; Tang, Bixia; Mao, Lili; Lian, Bin; Wang, Xuan; Yan, Xieqiao; Guo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this largest, single-center, retrospective study to determine the efficacy of sorafenib versus sunitinib as first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in Chinese patients to validate the potential data on direct comparison of the efficacy of first-line treatment with sorafenib and sunitinib in the treatment of mRCC. From November 2006 to March 2015, we reviewed medical records from Peking University Cancer Hospital and found 169 patients receiving sorafenib (400 mg orally BID continuously in a 4-week cycle) and 165 patients receiving sunitinib (50 mg orally daily in a 6-week cycle; 4/2 schedule) as the first-line targeted therapy. Median follow-up was 23.0 months. In sorafenib and sunitinib groups, there is no significant difference in progression-free survival (PFS) (9.0 months [95%CI:8.00-12.00] vs 11.0 months [95%CI:9.00-14.00], respectively; P=0.6289) and overall survival (OS) (28.0 months [95%CI:24.00-34.00] vs 28.0 months [95% CI:19.00-33.00], respectively; P=0.979). Subgroup analysis based on Karnofsky performance status (KPS), pathological type, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center score, and metastasis was also conducted. Multivariate analysis revealed that sorafenib treated patients had superior efficacy in patients with a KPS of <90 and significantly better PFS (hazard ratio: 0.460 [95% CI:0.222-0.954]). Most common adverse events were hand-foot skin reaction and thrombocytopenia which were manageable. Overall, no significant differences were seen between sorafenib and sunitinib in the treatment of advanced renal cancer. However, fewer toxicities associated with sorafenib and superior efficacy in subgroups (non-clear cell carcinoma and KPS <90) indicates sorafenib as an effective first-line treatment agent in patients with mRCC. PMID:26894858

  16. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced or metastatic chordoma patients: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lebellec, Loïc; Aubert, Sébastien; Zaïri, Fahed; Ryckewaert, Thomas; Chauffert, Bruno; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Chordomas, derived from undifferentiated notochordal remnants, represent less than 4% of bone primary tumors. Despite surgery followed by radiotherapy, local and metastatic relapses are frequent. In case of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas, medical treatment is frequently discussed. While chemotherapy is ineffective, it would appear that some molecular targeted therapies, in particular imatinib, could slow down the tumor growth in case-reports, retrospective series, and phase I or II trials. Nineteen publications, between January 1990 and September 2014, have been found describing the activity of these targeted therapies. A systematic analysis of these publications shows that the best objective response with targeted therapies was stabilization in 52 to 69% of chordomas. Given the indolent course of advanced chordoma and because of the absence of randomized trial, the level of evidence to treat chordomas with molecular therapy is low (level III), whatever the drug. Furthermore, we could not draw firm conclusion on the activity of imatinib. Other putative targets have also been described. Therefore, further clinical trials are expected, especially with these targets. Nevertheless, it seems essential, in those future studies, to consider the naturally slow course of the disease.

  17. Pazopanib in Metastatic Renal Cancer: A "Real-World" Experience at National Cancer Institute "Fondazione G. Pascale".

    PubMed

    Cecere, Sabrina C; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Della Pepa, Chiara; Di Napoli, Marilena; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Domenico; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maiolino, Piera; Muto, Paolo; Perdonà, Sisto; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Facchini, Gaetano; D'Aniello, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a "real-world" study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS) of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-18.5 months). The median OS (mOS) was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6-39.9 months); the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3 and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (< 3 vs. ≥3), gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR = 0.05 [95% CI, 0.05-0.55], p = 0.01; HR = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.02-0.43], p = 0.002, respectively). A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p = 0.2) and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites < 6 vs. ≥6) (p = 0.08). Worst OS was observed in patients aged ≥70 years old (HR = 6.91 [95% CI, 1.49-31.91], p = 0.01). The treatment was well-tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR = 0.22 [95% CI, 0.05-0.8], p = 0.03). Thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism) seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR = 0.12 [95% CI, 0.02-0.78], p = 0.02). Our results are consistent with those reported in prospective phase

  18. Algorithms in the First-Line Treatment of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma—Analysis Using Diagnostic Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexandra; Cerbone, Linda; Eisen, Tim; Escudier, Bernard; Gillessen, Silke; Grünwald, Viktor; Larkin, James; McDermott, David; Oldenburg, Jan; Porta, Camillo; Rini, Brian; Schmidinger, Manuela; Sternberg, Cora; Putora, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. With the advent of targeted therapies, many treatment options in the first-line setting of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mccRCC) have emerged. Guidelines and randomized trial reports usually do not elucidate the decision criteria for the different treatment options. In order to extract the decision criteria for the optimal therapy for patients, we performed an analysis of treatment algorithms from experts in the field. Materials and Methods. Treatment algorithms for the treatment of mccRCC from experts of 11 institutions were obtained, and decision trees were deduced. Treatment options were identified and a list of unified decision criteria determined. The final decision trees were analyzed with a methodology based on diagnostic nodes, which allows for an automated cross-comparison of decision trees. The most common treatment recommendations were determined, and areas of discordance were identified. Results. The analysis revealed heterogeneity in most clinical scenarios. The recommendations selected for first-line treatment of mccRCC included sunitinib, pazopanib, temsirolimus, interferon-α combined with bevacizumab, high-dose interleukin-2, sorafenib, axitinib, everolimus, and best supportive care. The criteria relevant for treatment decisions were performance status, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center risk group, only or mainly lung metastases, cardiac insufficiency, hepatic insufficiency, age, and “zugzwang” (composite of multiple, related criteria). Conclusion. In the present study, we used diagnostic nodes to compare treatment algorithms in the first-line treatment of mccRCC. The results illustrate the heterogeneity of the decision criteria and treatment strategies for mccRCC and how available data are interpreted and implemented differently among experts. Implications for Practice: The data provided in the present report should not be considered to serve as treatment recommendations for the management of treatment

  19. Exceptional Response to Systemic Therapy in Advanced Metastatic Gastric Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion; Manning, Maria A; Carroll, John E; Xiu, Joanne; Smaglo, Brandon G; Mikhail, Sameh; Salem, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas represent one of the top five most common types of cancer worldwide. Despite significant advancement, it is still not known which first-line chemotherapy option is best matched to an individual patient. The vast advances in molecular biology have led to the discovery of many potential predictive biomarkers, such as HER-2 neu, thymidylate synthase (TS), excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and topoisomerase-1 (TOPO1). These markers could allow us to select treatment based on an individual’s tumor profile, resulting in an improvement of outcome. Our report highlights two patients with metastatic gastric cancer that achieved an exceptional response with traditional therapy and provides insights into the future perspectives of molecular profile-directed chemotherapy. PMID:26918225

  20. The impact of immunohistochemical staining with ezrin-carbonic anhydrase IX and neuropilin-2 on prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Bulent; Gonul, Ipek Isık; Buyukberber, Suleyman; Afsar, Barıs; Gumusay, Ozge; Algın, Efnan; Turan, Nedim; Ozet, Ahmet; Benekli, Mustafa; Coskun, Ugur

    2015-11-01

    The identification of prognostic factors in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents an area of increasing interest. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the prognostic role of carbonic anhydrase-IX, ezrin, and neuropilin in metastatic RCC patients. The expression of several biomarkers were measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 45 patients with advanced stage RCC treated with second-line tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) after failure of interferon-alpha between January 2007 and June 2012. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests were used for analysis of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was employed to identify factors with an independent effect on the survival. Age, ezrin and neuropilin-2 overexpression were found to be statistically significant factors (P < 0.05) for PFS in the univariate analysis. Ezrin and neuropilin-2 overexpression, hemoglobin and albumin level were statistically significant factors (P < 0.05) for OS in the univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that low expression of ezrin and neuropilin-2 was an independent prognostic factor for PFS and OS. The median PFS was 4 months for patients overexpressing neuropilin-2 versus 11 months for those with lower expression of neuropilin-2 (p = 0.033). The median OS was longer in patients with low levels of neuropilin-2 expression (26 months) compared to patients overexpressing neuropilin-2 (13 months) (p = 0.023). Increased expression of ezrin was associated with poor prognosis in patients treated with TKIs targeting VEGF (PFS, 3 vs 7 months; p = 0.012). High ezrin expression was associated with shorter OS (p = 0.009). This is the first study in the literature showing that neuropilin-2 and ezrin are related with prognosis in patients with advanced RCC.

  1. A Molecular Model for Predicting Overall Survival in Patients with Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma: Results from CALGB 90206 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung L.; Halabi, Susan; Li, Ping; Mayhew, Greg; Simko, Jeff; Nixon, Andrew B.; Small, Eric J.; Rini, Brian; Morris, Michael J.; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; George, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Prognosis associated with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) can vary widely. Methods This study used pretreatment nephrectomy specimens from a randomized phase III trial. Expression levels of candidate genes were determined from archival tumors using the OpenArray® platform for TaqMan® RT-qPCR. The dataset was randomly divided at 2:1 ratio into training (n = 221) and testing (n = 103) sets to develop a multigene prognostic signature. Findings Gene expressions were measured in 324 patients. In the training set, multiple models testing 424 candidate genes identified a prognostic signature containing 8 genes plus MSKCC clinical risk factors. In the testing set, the time dependent (td) AUC for a prognostic model containing the 8 genes with and without MSKCC risk factors were 0.72 and 0.69, respectively. The tdAUC for the clinical risk factors alone was 0.61. Additional primary mRCCs from patients with mRCC (n = 12) were sampled in multiple sites and standard deviations of gene expressions within a tumor were used as a measure of heterogeneity. All 8 genes in the final prognostic model met our criteria for minimal heterogeneity. Conclusions A molecular prognostic signature based on 8 genes was developed and is ready for external validation in this patient population and other related settings such as nonmetastatic RCC. PMID:26870806

  2. Predictive Immunohistochemical Markers Related to Drug Selection for Patients Treated with Sunitinib or Sorafenib for Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Wang, Lei; Li, Hongzhao; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yu; Guo, Gang; Liu, Kan; Meng, Qingyu; Zhao, Chaofei; Wang, Dianjun; Song, Zhigang; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug decisions in metastatic renal cell carcinoma are exclusively made on the basis of clinical criteria. We investigated whether these biomarkers (HIF-1α, HIF-2α, CAIX, VEGF, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, PDGFB, PDGFRA, PDGFRB, CD31, CD44, bcl-xL, KIT, p21, CXCR4, PTEN, (CSF)-1R, RET, and FLT-3) can predictive the different effects between sunitinib and sorafenib treatments and are available to guide targeted drug selection. We enrolled all patients who underwent nephrectomy with postoperative sunitinib- or sorafenib-treatment at our institution from 2007 to 2012. Immunohistochemical approach was applied to assess the potential differential effects of immunostainings between sunitinib- and sorafenib-treated groups. We found that patients with high HIF-2α, CD31 expression showed greater relative PFS and OS benefit and patients with high CAIX expression presented greater relative OS benefit from sunitinib than from sorafenib, patients with high VEGFR1 or PDGFRB expression levels exhibited worse relative PFS benefit from sunitinib than from sorafenib. Namely high HIF-2α, CD31, and CAIX expression levels along with low VEGFR1 and PDGFRB expression levels improved the benefit of sunitinib treatment compared with sorafenib treatment. These results can identify whether patients can benefit more from sunitinib or sorafenib for drug selection guidance, eventually with precision medicine. PMID:27488093

  3. Cabozantinib versus everolimus in advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choueiri, Toni K.; Escudier, Bernard; Powles, Thomas; Mainwaring, Paul; Rini, Brian I.; Donskov, Frede; Hammers, Hans; Hutson, Thomas E.; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Peltola, Katriina; Roth, Bruce J.; Bjarnason, Georg A.; Géczi, Lajos; Keam, Bhumsuk; Moroto, Pablo; Heng, Daniel Y. C.; Schmidinger, Manuela; Kantoff, Philip W.; Borgman, Anne; Hessel, Colin; Scheffold, Christian; Schwab, Gisela M.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Motzer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cabozantinib is an oral small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) as well as MET and AXL; each has been implicated in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathobiology or development of resistance to antiangiogenic drugs. This randomized open-label phase 3 trial evaluated the efficacy of cabozantinib compared to everolimus in RCC patients who progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. Methods The trial randomized 658 patients to receive cabozantinib at a dose of 60 mg daily, or everolimus at a dose of 10 mg daily. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Secondary efficacy endpoints were overall survival and objective response rate. Results Median progression-free survival was 7.4 months with cabozantinib and 3.8 months with everolimus. The risk of progression or death was 42% lower with cabozantinib compared to everolimus (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45 to 0.75; P < 0.001). Objective response rates were 21% with cabozantinib and 5% with everolimus (P < 0.001). A planned interim analysis showed that overall survival was improved with cabozantinib (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.89; P = 0.005) but did not cross the significance boundary. Adverse events (grade 3 or 4, regardless of causality) were reported in 74% of cabozantinib patients and 65% of everolimus patients. Discontinuation of study treatment for adverse events occurred in 9.1% of cabozantinib patients and 10% of everolimus patients. Conclusions Cabozantinib improved progression-free survival compared to everolimus in RCC patients who progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. PMID:26406150

  4. Phase II Etirinotecan Pegol in Refractory Brain Metastases & Advanced Lung Cancer / Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  5. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Role of Chemotherapy in Advanced and Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (NET)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew H.; Lee, Adrian; Li, Bob T.; Lumba, Sumit; Clarke, Stephen J.; Samra, Jaswinder; Pavlakis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives In the era of somatostatin analogues and targeted therapies, the role of chemotherapy in NET remains largely undefined. This systematic review aimed to assess the effect of chemotherapy on response rates (RR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity compared to other chemotherapies/systemic therapies or best supportive care in patients with advanced or metastatic NET. Methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1946 to 2015 were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE, other databases and conference proceedings. Review of abstracts, quality assessment and data abstraction were performed independently by two investigators. Meta-analyses were conducted using Mantel-Haenszel analysis with random-effects modelling. Results Six RCTs comparing standard streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouacil (STZ/5FU) chemotherapy to other chemotherapy regimens, and 2 comparing this to interferon (IFN) were included. Only 1 study was considered at low risk of bias. STZ/5-FU was no different to other chemotherapies in response rate [RR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72–1.27], PFS (RR 0.95; CI 0.81–1.13), or OS (RR 1.03; CI 0.77–1.39). IFN may produce higher response than STZ/5FU (RR 0.20; CI 0.04–1.13), but event rates were small and survival was no different. Interferon was associated with higher overall haematological (RR 0.47; CI 0.27–0.82) and lower overall renal toxicity (RR 3.61; CI 1.24–10.51). Conclusion Strong evidence is lacking in the area of chemotherapy in neuroendocrine tumors. There is currently no evidence that one chemotherapeutic regimen is significantly better than the other, nor is interferon better than chemotherapy. There is an urgent need to design RCTs comparing modern chemotherapy to other agents in NET. PMID:27362760

  6. Pazopanib: a multikinase inhibitor with activity in advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-05-01

    Treatment options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have changed dramatically, and a new paradigm has evolved. IFN-alpha and IL-2 were previously mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the USA for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three of these new agents are multitargeted kinase inhibitors, including sunitinib, sorafenib, and recently pazopanib, two target the mTOR (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with IFN-alpha) that targets VEGF. Sunitinib has emerged as the standard of care for treatment-naive RCC patients, with the recently approved bevacizumab and IFN-alpha combination providing an additional option for this population. The recent approval of pazopanib, based on the results from sequential Phase II and III clinical trials demonstrating improved overall response rates and progression-free survival, provides yet another option for front-line therapy. The current article examines the pazopanib preclinical and clinical data, provides an overview of the development of this tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and provides some speculation concerning its role in RCC therapy.

  7. Case study of a chaplain's spiritual care for a patient with advanced metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Rhonda S

    2011-01-01

    The case study seeks to describe an oncology chaplain's pastoral relationship with a 64-year-old woman with advanced metastatic breast cancer. The patient's distress was complicated by a history of anxiety and other chronic medical conditions. Approximately 16 pastoral encounters occurred during the last year of the patient's life. The patient, chaplain, and the pastoral conversations are presented as well as a retrospective assessment of them. The chaplain's interventions were appropriate for the patient's spiritual needs, particularly in regard to her fear of death, loneliness, grief that her life was "too short" and estrangement from her inherited faith tradition, with observable benefits for the patient. The oncology chaplain has a distinctive role in the healthcare team as one who can meet the patient at the point of their spiritual need, provide appropriate interventions and, thereby, ameliorate the distress, particularly in regard to death anxiety, peace of mind, and issues of meaning.

  8. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  9. CPI-613 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  10. ICON 2013: practical consensus recommendations for hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative advanced or metastatic breastcancer.

    PubMed

    Parikh, P M; Gupta, S; Dawood, S; Rugo, H; Bhattacharyya, G S; Agarwal, A; Chacko, R; Sahoo, T P; Babu, G; Agarwal, S; Munshi, A; Goswami, C; Smruti, B K; Bondarde, S; Desai, C; Rajappa, S; Somani, N; Singh, M; Nimmagadda, R; Pavitran, K; Mehta, A; Parmar, V; Desai, S; Nair, R; Doval, D

    2014-01-01

    The management of hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative breast cancer patients with advanced or metastatic disease is a common problem in India and other countries in this region. This expert group used data from published literature, practical experience, and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists, to arrive at practical consensus recommendations for use by the community oncologists.

  11. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Developing After Restart of Sunitinib Therapy for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Toyoshima, Yuta; Inoue, Takeshi; Kagebayashi, Yoriaki; Samma, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old Japanese man had started molecular-targeted therapy with sunitinib for lymph node metastasis 5 years after nephrectomy for left renal cell carcinoma (clear cell carcinoma, G2, pT2N0M0). He was transported to our emergency department because of generalized tonic-clonic seizure, vision loss, and impaired consciousness with acute hypertension after 8 cycles of treatment (2 years after the initiation of sunitinib therapy, including a drug withdrawal period for one year). MRI of the brain (FLAIR images) showed multiple high-intensity lesions in the white matter of the occipital and cerebellar lobes, dorsal brain stem, and left thalamus. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome caused by sunitinib was suspected. In addition to the immediate discontinuation of sunitinib therapy, the administration of antihypertensive agents and anticonvulsants improved the clinical symptoms without neurological damage. Physicians should be aware that sunitinib causes reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. The early recognition of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is critical to avoid irreversible neurological damage. PMID:27795711

  12. Metastatic cholangiocellular carcinoma and renal adenocarcinoma in a golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos).

    PubMed

    Mikaelian, I; Patenaude, R; Girard, C; Martineau, D

    1998-01-01

    A 33-year-old captive male golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) was presented for necropsy with a history of emaciation and depression. The liver was severely distorted by numerous, coalescent, poorly demarcated, white firm nodules. Upon microscopic examination, these masses were found to be infiltrative and were composed of anastomosing tubular structures lined by signet-ring cells piling up in a disorderly fashion. Ultrastructurally, neoplastic cells were characterized by abundant microvilli at their apical pole and by numerous junctional complexes on lateral cell membranes. Based on morphological criteria, this tumour was classified as a poorly differentiated cholangiocellular carcinoma. Metastases were found in kidneys, testes, lungs, air sacs, pericardium, pancreas, adrenals and meninges. Additionally, two (11 and 2 mm) beige nodules were found in the cranial portion of the left kidney. Histological examination revealed locally infiltrative compact masses composed of well-differentiated tubules lined by a tall columnar epithelium without microvilli. These tumours were diagnosed as renal tubular adenocarcinomas. This is believed to be the first case of two simultaneous malignancies reported in a bird of prey. PMID:18484007

  13. Advances in Personalized Targeted Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma and Non-Invasive Tumor Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Klinac, Dragana; Gray, Elin S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive scientific progress in the melanoma field, treatment of advanced stage melanoma with chemotherapeutics and biotherapeutics has rarely provided response rates higher than 20%. In the past decade, targeted inhibitors have been developed for metastatic melanoma, leading to the advent of more personalized therapies of genetically characterized tumors. Here we review current melanoma treatments and emerging targeted molecular therapies. In particular we discuss the mutant BRAF inhibitors Vemurafenib and Dabrafenib, which markedly inhibit tumor growth and advance patients’ overall survival. However this response is almost inevitably followed by complete tumor relapse due to drug resistance hampering the encouraging initial responses. Several mechanisms of resistance within and outside the MAPK pathway have now been uncovered and have paved the way for clinical trials of combination therapies to try and overcome tumor relapse. It is apparent that personalized treatment management will be required in this new era of targeted treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an easily accessible means of monitoring patient relapse and several new approaches are available for the molecular characterization of CTCs. Thus CTCs provide a monitoring tool to evaluate treatment efficacy and early detection of drug resistance in real time. We detail here how advances in the molecular analysis of CTCs may provide insight into new avenues of approaching therapeutic options that would benefit personalized melanoma management. PMID:23515890

  14. Management of metastatic malignant thymoma with advanced radiation and chemotherapy techniques: report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2015-02-25

    Malignant thymomas are rare epithelial neoplasms of the anterior superior mediastinum that are typically invasive in nature and have a higher risk of relapse that may ultimately lead to death. Here we report a case of an advanced malignant thymoma that was successfully treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical resection and subsequently with advanced and novel radiation therapy techniques. A 65-year-old male was diagnosed with a stage IV malignant thymoma with multiple metastatic lesions involving the left peripheral lung and pericardium. Initial neoadjuvant chemotherapy with a cisplatin-based regimen resulted in a partial response allowing the inoperable tumor to become operable. Following surgical resection of the residual disease, the tumor recurred within a year. The patient then underwent a course of targeted three-dimensional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Five years after radiation therapy, the localized soft tissue thickening at the left upper lung anterior pleural space had resolved. Seven years after radiation therapy the tumor mass had completely resolved. No recurrences were seen and the patient is well even 8 years after IMRT/IGRT with a favorable outcome. Chemotherapy with targeted three-dimensional IMRT/IGRT should be considered the primary modality for the management of advanced malignant thymoma patients.

  15. Recent advances in renal hypoxia: insights from bench experiments and computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Layton, Anita T

    2016-07-01

    The availability of oxygen in renal tissue is determined by the complex interactions among a host of processes, including renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting, medullary architecture, Na(+) transport, and oxygen consumption. When this delicate balance is disrupted, the kidney may become susceptible to hypoxic injury. Indeed, renal hypoxia has been implicated as one of the major causes of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of renal hypoxia; some of these studies were published in response to a recent Call for Papers of this journal: Renal Hypoxia. PMID:27147670

  16. Pazopanib in Metastatic Renal Cancer: A “Real-World” Experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Sabrina C.; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Della Pepa, Chiara; Di Napoli, Marilena; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Domenico; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maiolino, Piera; Muto, Paolo; Perdonà, Sisto; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Facchini, Gaetano; D'Aniello, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a “real-world” study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS) of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9–18.5 months). The median OS (mOS) was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6–39.9 months); the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3 and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (< 3 vs. ≥3), gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR = 0.05 [95% CI, 0.05–0.55], p = 0.01; HR = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.02–0.43], p = 0.002, respectively). A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p = 0.2) and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites < 6 vs. ≥6) (p = 0.08). Worst OS was observed in patients aged ≥70 years old (HR = 6.91 [95% CI, 1.49–31.91], p = 0.01). The treatment was well-tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR = 0.22 [95% CI, 0.05–0.8], p = 0.03). Thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism) seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR = 0.12 [95% CI, 0.02–0.78], p = 0.02). Our results are consistent with those reported in

  17. Pazopanib in Metastatic Renal Cancer: A “Real-World” Experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Sabrina C.; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Della Pepa, Chiara; Di Napoli, Marilena; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Domenico; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maiolino, Piera; Muto, Paolo; Perdonà, Sisto; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Facchini, Gaetano; D'Aniello, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a “real-world” study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS) of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9–18.5 months). The median OS (mOS) was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6–39.9 months); the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3 and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (< 3 vs. ≥3), gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR = 0.05 [95% CI, 0.05–0.55], p = 0.01; HR = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.02–0.43], p = 0.002, respectively). A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p = 0.2) and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites < 6 vs. ≥6) (p = 0.08). Worst OS was observed in patients aged ≥70 years old (HR = 6.91 [95% CI, 1.49–31.91], p = 0.01). The treatment was well-tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR = 0.22 [95% CI, 0.05–0.8], p = 0.03). Thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism) seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR = 0.12 [95% CI, 0.02–0.78], p = 0.02). Our results are consistent with those reported in

  18. NCCN Task Force Report: Optimizing Treatment of Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma With Molecular Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Gary R.; Carducci, Michael A.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Esper, Peg; Jonasch, Eric; Kumar, Rashmi; Margolin, Kim A.; Michaelson, M. Dror; Motzer, Robert J.; Pili, Roberto; Roethke, Susan; Srinivas, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma has been substantially improved with administration of the currently available molecularly targeted therapies. However, proper selection of therapy and management of toxicities remain challenging. NCCN convened a multidisciplinary task force panel to address the clinical issues associated with these therapies in attempt to help practicing oncologists optimize patient outcomes. This report summarizes the background data presented at the task force meeting and the ensuing discussion. PMID:21335444

  19. Clinically Non-Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma With Sarcomatoid Dedifferentiation: Natural History and Outcomes after Surgical Resection with Curative Intent

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Megan M.; Wood, Christopher G.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Slack, Rebecca S.; Babaian, Kara N.; Jonasch, Eric; Pagliaro, Lance C.; Compton, Zachary; Tamboli, Pheroze; Sircar, Kanishka; Pisters, Louis L.; Matin, Surena F.; Karam, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid dedifferentiation (sRCC) is an aggressive malignancy associated with a poor prognosis. While existing literature focuses on patients presenting with metastatic disease, characteristics and outcomes for patients with localized disease are not well described. We aimed to evaluate post-nephrectomy characteristics, outcomes, and predictors of survival in patients with sRCC who presented with clinically localized disease. Patients and Methods An IRB-approved review from 1986–2011 identified 77 patients who presented with clinically localized disease, underwent nephrectomy and had sRCC in their primary kidney tumor. Clinical and pathologic variables were captured for each patient. Overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were calculated for all patients and those who had no evidence of disease (NED) following nephrectomy, respectively. Comparisons were made with categorical groupings in proportional hazards regression models for univariable and multivariable analyses. Results OS for the entire cohort (N=77) at 2 years was 50%. A total of 56 (77%) patients of the 73 who were NED following nephrectomy experienced a recurrence, with a median time to recurrence of 26.2 months. On multivariable analysis, tumor stage, pathologically positive lymph nodes, and year of nephrectomy were significant predictors of both OS and RFS. Limitations include the retrospective nature of this study and relatively small sample size. Conclusions Long-term survival for patients with sRCC, even in clinically localized disease is poor. Aggressive surveillance of those who are NED following nephrectomy is essential and further prospective studies evaluating the benefit of adjuvant systemic therapies in this cohort are warranted. PMID:25700975

  20. Association of Angiopoietin-2 and Ki-67 Expression with Vascular Density and Sunitinib Response in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirtti, Tuomas; Ristimäki, Ari; Joensuu, Heikki; Bono, Petri; Saharinen, Pipsa

    2016-01-01

    The Angiopoietin-2 (Ang2, Angpt2) growth factor is a context-dependent antagonist/agonist ligand of the endothelial Tie2 receptor tyrosine kinase and known to promote tumour angiogenesis and metastasis. Angiopoietin antagonists have been tested in clinical cancer trials in combination with VEGF-based anti-angiogenic therapy, including sunitinib, which is widely used as a first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, little is known about Ang2 protein expression in human tumours and the correlation of tumour Ang2 expression with tumour vascularization, tumour cell proliferation and response to anti-angiogenic therapies. Here, we evaluated, using immunohistochemistry, the expression of Ang2, CD31 and the cell proliferation marker Ki-67 in the primary kidney cancer from 136 mRCC patients, who received first-line sunitinib after nephrectomy. Ang2 protein expression was restrained to RCC tumour vessels, and correlated with tumour vascularization and response to sunitinib. High pre-therapeutic Ang2 expression, and more strongly, combined high expression of both Ang2 and CD31, were associated with a high clinical benefit rate (CBR). Low cancer Ki-67 expression, but not Ang2 or CD31 expression, was associated with favourable progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) as compared to patients with high Ki-67 expression (PFS 6.5 vs. 10.6 months, P = 0.009; OS, 15.7 vs. 28.5 months, P = 0.015). In summary, in this study to investigate endothelial Ang2 in mRCC patients treated with first-line sunitinib, high cancer Ang2 expression was associated with the CBR, but not PFS or OS, whereas low Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with long PFS and OS. PMID:27100185

  1. A phase I/II trial of BNC105P with everolimus in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC)

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta; Azad, Arun; Bhatia, Shailender; Drabkin, Harry; Costello, Brian; Sarantopoulos, John; Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Lauer, Richard; Starodub, Alexander; Hauke, Ralph; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Hahn, Noah M.; Sonpavde, Guru; Richey, Stephen; Breen, Timothy; Kremmidiotis, Gabriel; Leske, Annabell; Doolin, Elizabeth; Bibby, David C.; Simpson, Jeremy; Iglesias, Jose; Hutson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose BNC105P inhibits tubulin polymerization, and preclinical studies suggest possible synergy with everolimus. In this phase I/II study, efficacy and safety of the combination were explored in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Experimental Design A phase I study in patients with clear cell mRCC and any prior number of therapies was conducted using a classical 3+3 design to evaluate standard doses of everolimus with increasing doses of BNC105P. At the recommended phase II dose (RP2D), patients with clear cell mRCC and 1-2 prior therapies (including ≥1 VEGF-TKI) were randomized to BNC105P with everolimus (Arm A) or everolimus alone (Arm B). The primary endpoint of the study was 6-month progression-free survival (6MPFS). Secondary endpoints included response rate, PFS, overall survival (OS) and exploratory biomarker analyses. Results In the phase I study (n=15), a dose of BNC105P at 16 mg/m2 with everolimus at 10 mg daily was identified as the RP2D. In the phase II study, 139 patients were randomized, with 69 and 67 evaluable patients in Arms A and B, respectively. 6MPFS was similar in the treatment arms (Arm A: 33.82% v Arm B: 30.30%, P=0.66) and no difference in median PFS was observed (Arm A: 4.7 mos v Arm B: 4.1 mos; P=0.49). Changes in matrix metalloproteinase-9, stem cell factor, sex hormone binding globulin and serum amyloid A protein were associated with clinical outcome with BNC105P. Conclusions Although the primary endpoint was not met in an unselected population, correlative studies suggest several biomarkers that warrant further prospective evaluation. PMID:25788492

  2. Percutaneous Cryoablation of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma for Local Tumor Control: Feasibility, Outcomes, and Estimated Cost-effectiveness for Palliation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun J.; Littrup, Peter J.; Goodrich, Dylan J.; Currier, Brandt P.; Aoun, Hussein D.; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Adam, Barbara; Goodman, Allen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess complications, local tumor recurrences, overall survival (OS), and estimates of cost-effectiveness for multisite cryoablation (MCA) of oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods A total of 60 computed tomography- and/or ultrasound-guided percutaneous MCA procedures were performed on 72 tumors in 27 patients (three women and 24 men). Average patient age was 63 years. Tumor location was grouped according to common metastatic sites. Established surgical selection criteria graded patient status. Median OS was determined by Kaplan–Meier method and defined life-years gained (LYGs). Estimates of MCA costs per LYG were compared with established values for systemic therapies. Results Total number of tumors and cryoablation procedures for each anatomic site are as follows: nephrectomy bed, 11 and 11; adrenal gland, nine and eight; paraaortic, seven and six; lung, 14 and 13; bone, 13 and 13; superficial, 12 and nine; intraperitoneal, five and three; and liver, one and one. A mean of 2.2 procedures per patient were performed, with a median clinical follow-up of 16 months. Major complication and local recurrence rates were 2% (one of 60) and 3% (two of 72), respectively. No patients were graded as having good surgical risk, but median OS was 2.69 years, with an estimated 5-year survival rate of 27%. Cryoablation remained cost-effective with or without the presence of systemic therapies according to historical cost comparisons, with an adjunctive cost-effectiveness ratio of $28,312–$59,554 per LYG. Conclusions MCA was associated with very low morbidity and local tumor recurrence rates for all anatomic sites, with apparent increased OS. Even as an adjunct to systemic therapies, MCA appeared cost-effective for palliation of oligometastatic RCC. PMID:22538119

  3. Heterogeneous drug target expression as possible basis for different clinical and radiological response to the treatment of primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma: suggestions from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Matteo; Santini, Daniele; Massari, Francesco; Conti, Alessandro; Iacovelli, Roberto; Burattini, Luciano; Tortora, Giampaolo; Falconi, Massimo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Metastatic disease occurs in a significant percentage of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and is usually associated with an overall poor prognosis. However, not all of the sites of metastases seem to have the same prognostic significance in patients receiving targeted agents. Indeed, patients with lung-only metastases seem to present a better survival than patients with other sites, whereas liver and bone metastases are associated with a worst prognosis. Some clinical studies suggest that metastatic sites are more responsive than primary tumors. This event may be due to intratumor heterogeneity in terms of somatic mutations, chromosome aberrations, and tumor gene expression, primarily centered around Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway, such as VHL mutations, HIF levels, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) isoforms, and VEGF receptor levels. Nevertheless, these data do not completely explain the discordant biological behavior between primary tumor and metastatic sites. Understanding the causes of this discordance will have profound consequences on translational research and clinical trials in RCC. In this review, we overview current data on the differences between primary RCC and metastases in terms of drug target expression and clinical/radiological response to targeted agents, thus describing the prognostic role of different metastatic sites in RCC patients.

  4. The anti-tumor effect of a polypeptide extracted from Tegillarca granosa Linnaeus on renal metastatic tumor OS-RC-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiaoying; Jiang, Changqing; Liu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal cell carcinoma is a type of malignant tumor often diagnosed in the urinary system. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-tumor effects and mechanisms of a polypeptide, Haishengsu (TG-1), with different concentrations (125, 250, 500 mg/kg) on renal metastatic tumor OS-RC-2 cells. Material and methods We first established the renal metastatic tumor model. After being administered with TG-1, the weight of tumors was measured and the microstructural changes of renal carcinoma OS-RC-2 cells were compared using transmission electron microscopy before and after the therapy. The Ki67 expression in renal carcinoma OS-RC-2 cells was analyzed by RT-PCR and downstream signal molecule caspase-3 was measured by Western blot assay. Results After treatment with different doses of TG-1, the tumor weights in the positive control group and experimental groups were smaller than those in the untreated control group, suggesting that TG-1 could effectively inhibit tumor growth in mice. The transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry results indicated that TG-1 induces tumor cell apoptosis (p < 0.05). The tumor cells exhibited polymorphism changes and chromatin edge clustering. TG-1 also inhibited Ki67 expression and promoted caspase-3 expression in the tumor significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusions TG-1 inhibits the growth of the tumor and induces apoptosis of the tumor cells by inducing caspase-3 expression. The results provide a basis for clinical application of TG-1 in the future. PMID:26322097

  5. miR-155 and miR-484 Are Associated with Time to Progression in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated with Sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Merhautova, Jana; Kovarikova, Alena; Radova, Lenka; Svoboda, Marek; Vyzula, Rostislav; Demlova, Regina; Slaby, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    Background. Sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The main difficulty related to the treatment is the development of drug resistance followed by rapid progression of the disease. We analyzed tumor tissue of sunitinib treated patients in order to find miRNAs associated with therapeutic response. Methods. A total of 79 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma were included in our study. miRNA profiling in tumor tissue samples was performed by TaqMan Low Density Arrays and a group of selected miRNAs (miR-155, miR-374-5p, miR-324-3p, miR-484, miR-302c, and miR-888) was further validated by qRT-PCR. Normalized data were subjected to ROC and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results. We reported decreased tissue levels of miR-155 and miR-484 as significantly associated with increased time to progression (miR-155: median TTP 5.8 versus 12.8 months, miR-484: median TTP 5.8 versus 8.9 months). Conclusion. miR-155 and miR-484 are potentially connected with sunitinib resistance and failure of the therapy. miR-155 is a known oncogene with direct influence on neovascularization. Biological role of miR-484 has to be clarified. Stratification of patients based on miRNA analysis would allow more personalized approach in therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26064968

  6. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Somatostatinoma

  7. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  8. Phase I trial of sunitinib and temsirolimus in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Matthew T.; Millikan, Randall E.; Altinmakas, Emre; Xiao, Lianchun; Wen, Sin Jen; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene O.; Aparicio, Ana; Corn, Paul G.; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical data suggest that anti-VEGF agents plus mTOR inhibitors yield synergistic antitumor effects. A phase I trial using a 3+3 dose escalation design of sunitinib (S) plus temsirolimus (T) was stopped after the first dose pair led to 2 of 3 patients experiencing dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Patients and Methods To explore multiple potential dosing pairs of S and T a 2 stage outcome-adaptive Bayesian dose-finding method was designed. The primary objective was to find the maximum tolerated doses (MTD) of S and T in patients with advanced RCC. A 3-wk treatment cycle consisted of daily S, 2 wks on, 1 wk off, plus weekly T. Results Twenty patients received study drugs; median number of prior therapies 1. Number of patients (S and T doses in mg): 2 (S12.5, T6), 1 (S25, T12.5), 1 (S12.5, T8), 8 (S12.5 alt 25, T9), 2 (S25, T6), 2 (S25 alt 37.5, T6), 2 (S37.5, T6), 2 (S37.5, T8). Six patients required dose reduction, 3 due to grade 3 stomatitis, 2 due to grade 3 thrombocytopenia; mean number of cycles 6.6 ± 5.3, mean time on study 159±120 days. One patient experienced DLT in cycle 1 and was non-evaluable, 1 had a partial response, 16 had stable disease, and 2 had progressive disease (PD) as best response. There were 21 grade 3/4 adverse events but no treatment-related deaths. Conclusions The MTD of S and T were not determined because of premature trial closure. S 37.5 mg/d, 2 wks on, 1 wk off, plus T 8–10 mg weekly are close to MTD. PMID:25465491

  9. Technological advances in renal replacement therapy: five years and beyond.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anjay; Nissenson, Allen R

    2009-12-01

    The worldwide epidemic of chronic kidney disease shows no signs of abating in the near future. Current dialysis forms of renal replacement therapy (RRT), even though successful in sustaining life and improving quality of life somewhat for patients with ESRD, have many limitations that result in still unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. Transplantation is an excellent option but is limited by the scarcity of organs. An ideal form of RRT would mimic the functions of natural kidneys and be transparent to the patient, as well as affordable to society. Recent advances in technology, although generally in early stages of development, might achieve these goals. The application of nanotechnology, microfluidics, bioreactors with kidney cells, and miniaturized sorbent systems to regenerate dialysate makes clinical reality seem closer than ever before. Finally, stem cells hold much promise, both for kidney disease and as a source of tissues and organs. In summary, nephrology is at an exciting crossroad with the application of innovative and novel technologies to RRT that hold considerable promise for the near future.

  10. [Molecular biology of renal cancer: bases for genetic directed therapy in advanced disease].

    PubMed

    Maroto Rey, José Pablo; Cillán Narvaez, Elena

    2013-06-01

    There has been expansion of therapeutic options in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to a better knowledge of the molecular biology of kidney cancers. There are different tumors grouped under the term renal cell carcinoma, being clear cell cancer the most frequent and accounting for 80% of kidney tumors. Mutations in the Von Hippel-Lindau gene can be identified in up to 80% of sporadic clear cell cancer, linking a genetically inheritable disease where vascular tumors are frequent, with renal cell cancer. Other histologic types present specific alterations in molecular pathways, like c-MET in papillary type I tumors, and Fumarase Hydratase in papillary type II tumors. Identification of the molecular alteration for a specific tumor may offer an opportunity for treatment selection based on biomarkers, and, in the future, for developing an engineering designed genetic treatment.

  11. The Relationship Between the Adverse Events and Efficacy of Sorafenib in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Fuli; Wu, Guojun; Zhang, Longlong; Wang, Yangmin; Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qing; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Li, Peijun; Wang, Jian; Lu, Xitao; Yuan, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between the adverse events and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), with a purpose to guide the judgment of efficacy in sorafenib treatment. Eighty-three mRCC patients who received sorafenib therapy at northwest China were studied retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to correlate tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) with adverse event types and grades. Among 83 patients who underwent sorafenib therapy, 2 cases (2.4%) had completed response (CR), 14 cases (16.9%) had partial response (PR), 57 cases (68.7%) had stable disease (SD), and 10 cases (12.0%) developed progressive disease (PD). The median PFS and OS were 15.0 and 29.0 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 1 or 2 adverse events included hand-foot syndrome (68.7%), diarrhea (54.2%), and alopecia (51.8%). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were hand-foot syndrome (6.0%), hypertension (4.8%), and diarrhea (3.6%). The frequency and severity of adverse events correlated with tumor response rate (both with P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed the independent predictors of better PFS included rash (OR 0.307, 95%CI 0.148–0.636, P = 0.001) and diarrhea (OR 0.391, 95%CI 0.169–0.783, P = 0.008). Elevated transaminase was the independent predictor of poor PFS (OR 2.606, 95%CI 1.299–5.532, P = 0.012). For OS, rash (OR 0.473, 95%CI 0.253–0.886, P = 0.019) and diarrhea (OR 0.321, 95%CI 0.171–0.605, P = 0.000) correlated with better OS. Sorafenib-related adverse events are associated with efficacy in patients with mRCC from northwest China. Rash and diarrhea are independent protective factors of both PFS and OS, and elevated transaminase is an independent risk factor of PFS. A large prospective study is warranted. PMID:26656362

  12. Axitinib after Sunitinib in Metastatic Renal Cancer: Preliminary Results from Italian “Real-World” SAX Study

    PubMed Central

    D'Aniello, Carmine; Vitale, Maria G.; Farnesi, Azzurra; Calvetti, Lorenzo; Laterza, Maria M.; Cavaliere, Carla; Della Pepa, Chiara; Conteduca, Vincenza; Crispo, Anna; De Vita, Ferdinando; Grillone, Francesco; Ricevuto, Enrico; De Tursi, Michele; De Vivo, Rocco; Di Napoli, Marilena; Cecere, Sabrina C.; Iovane, Gelsomina; Amore, Alfonso; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Quarto, Giuseppe; Pisconti, Salvatore; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maiolino, Piera; Muto, Paolo; Perdonà, Sisto; Berretta, Massimiliano; Naglieri, Emanuele; Galli, Luca; Cartenì, Giacomo; De Giorgi, Ugo; Pignata, Sandro; Facchini, Gaetano; Rossetti, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Axitinib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) after failure of prior treatment with Sunitinib or cytokine. The present study is an Italian Multi-Institutional Retrospective Analysis that evaluated the outcomes of Axitinib, in second-line treatment of mRCC. The medical records of 62 patients treated with Axitinib, were retrospectively reviewed. The Progression Free Survival (PFS), the Overall Survival (OS), the Objective Response Rate (ORR), the Disease Control Rate (DCR), and the safety profile of axitinib and sunitinib–axitinib sequence, were the primary endpoint. The mPFS was 5.83 months (95% CI 3.93–7.73 months). When patients was stratified by Heng score, mPFS was 5.73, 5.83, 10.03 months according to poor, intermediate, and favorable risk group, respectively. The mOS from the start of axitinib was 13.3 months (95% CI 8.6–17.9 months); the observed ORR and DCR were 25 and 71%, respectively. When stratified patients by subgroups defined by duration of prior therapy with Sunitinib (≤ vs. >median duration), there was a statistically significant difference in mPFS with 8.9 (95% CI 4.39–13.40 months) vs. 5.46 months (95% CI 4.04–6.88 months) for patients with a median duration of Sunitinib >13.2 months. DCR and ORR to previous Sunitinib treatment was associated with longer statistically mPFS, 7.23 (95% CI 3.95–10.51 months, p = 0.01) and 8.67 (95% CI 4.0–13.33 months, p = 0.008) vs. 2.97 (95% CI 0.65–5.27 months, p = 0.01) and 2.97 months (95% CI 0.66–5.28 months, p = 0.01), respectively. Overall Axitinib at standard schedule of 5 mg bid, was well-tolerated. The most common adverse events of all grades were fatig (25.6%), hypertension (22.6%), gastro-intestinal disorders (25.9%), and hypothyroidism (16.1%). The sequence Sunitinib–Axitinib was well-tolerated without worsening in side effects, with a median OS of 34.7 months (95% CI 18.4–51.0 months). Our results are

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Sorafenib Therapy on Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Korean Patients: Results from a Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Han; Kim, Sohee; Nam, Byung-Ho; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Choung Soo; Seo, Ill Young; Kim, Tae Nam; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Seo, Seong Il; Joo, Kwan Joong; Song, Kanghyon; Kwak, Cheol; Chung, Jinsoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sorafenib for Korean patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods A total of 177 mRCC patients using sorafenib as first- (N = 116), second- (N = 43), and third-line (N = 18) therapies were enrolled from 11 Korean centers between 2006 and 2012. The patient characteristics, therapy duration, tumor response, disease control rate, and tolerability were assessed at baseline and at routine follow-ups, and the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) times and rates were analyzed. Results Among all patients, 18 (10.2%) stopped sorafenib treatment for a median of 1.7 weeks, including 15 (8.5%) who discontinued the drug, while 40 (22.6%) and 12 (6.8%) patients required dose reductions and drug interruptions, respectively. Severe adverse events (AEs) or poor compliance was observed in 64 (36.2%) patients, with 118 (7.4%) ≥grade 3 AEs. During the treatment, one myocardial infarction was observed. The number of ≥grade 3 AEs in the first-line sorafenib group was 71 (6.8% of the total 1048 AEs). During a median follow-up of 17.2 months, the radiologically confirmed best objective response rate, disease control rate, median PFS, and median OS were 22.0%, 53.0%, 6.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2–8.9), and 32.6 months (95% CI, 27.3–63.8) for the total 177 sorafenib-treated patients, respectively, and 23.2%, 56.0%, 7.4 months (95% CI, 5.5–10.5), and not reached yet (95% CI, 1.0–31.1) for the first-line sorafenib group, respectively. Conclusions Sorafenib produced tolerable safety, with a ≥grade 3 AE rate of 7.4% and an acceptable disease control rate (53.0%) in Korean mRCC patients. PMID:26308612

  14. New strategies in metastatic melanoma: oncogene-defined taxonomy leads to therapeutic advances.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Keith T; Fisher, David E

    2011-08-01

    The discovery of BRAF and KIT mutations provided the first basis for a molecular classification of cutaneous melanoma on therapeutic grounds. As BRAF-targeted therapy quickly moves toward regulatory approval and incorporation as standard therapy for patients with metastatic disease, proof of concept has also been established for targeting mutated KIT in melanoma. NRAS mutations have long been known to be present in a subset of melanomas and represent an elusive subgroup for targeted therapies. Matching patient subgroups defined by genetic aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and p16/cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) pathways with appropriate targeted therapies has not yet been realized. And, an increasing understanding of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators, most notably MITF, and how they may play a role in melanoma pathophysiology, has provided another axis to approach with therapies. The foundation has been established for individual oncogene targeting, and current investigations seek to understand the intersection of these susceptibilities and other described potential targets and pathways. The melanoma field stands poised to take the lead among cancer subtypes in advancing combination therapy strategies that simultaneously target multiple biologic underpinnings of the disease. PMID:21670085

  15. Advances of Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide, prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) was poor. Development and introduction of biologic agents in treatment of patients with metastatic CRC have brought improved outcomes. Monoclonal antibodies directing epidermal growth factor receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor are main biologic agents currently used in treatment of metastatic CRC. Encouraged by results from many clinical trials demonstrating efficacy of those monoclonal antibodies, the combination therapy with those targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents has been established as the standard therapy for patients with metastatic CRC. However, emergency of resistance to those target agents has limited the efficacy of treatment, and strategies to overcome the resistance are now being investigated by newly developed biological techniques clarifying how to acquire resistance. Here, we introduce mechanisms of action of the biologic agents currently used for treatment of metastatic CRC and several landmark historical clinical studies which have changed the main stream of treatment. The mechanism of resistance to those agents, one of serious problems in treatment metastatic CRC, and ongoing clinical trials to overcome the limitations and improve treatment outcomes will also be presented in this review. PMID:27127793

  16. FOLFIRINOX in Locally Advanced and Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: A Single Centre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, SJ; Mungroop, TH; Heilmann, MN; van Laarhoven, HW; Busch, OR; Molenaar, IQ; Besselink, MG; Wilmink, JW

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: FOLFIRINOX is emerging as new standard of care for fit patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC). However, some of the physicians are reluctant to use FOLFIRINOX due to high toxicity rates reported in earlier studies. We reviewed our experience with FOLFIRINOX in LAPC and MPC, focussing on dose adjustments, toxicity and efficacy. Methods: We reviewed all patients with LAPC or MPC treated with FOLFIRINOX in our institution between April 2011 and December 2015. Unresectability (stage III and IV) was determined by the institution's multidisciplinary team for pancreatic cancer. Results: Fifty patients (18 LAPC and 32 MPC) were enrolled, with a median age of 55 years (IQR 49-66) and WHO performance status of 0/1. FOLFIRINOX was given as first-line treatment in 82% of patients. Dose modifications were applied in 90% of patients. The median number of completed cycles was 8 (IQR 5-9). Grade 3-4 toxicity occurred in 52% and grade 5 toxicity in 2%. The response rate was 25% (12% in LAPC, 32% in MPC). Median overall survival and progression-free survival were 14.8 and 10.3 months in LAPC, and 9.0 and 5.9 months in MPC, respectively. Overall 1- and 2-year survival was 65% and 10% in LAPC and 40% and 5% in MPC. Within the LAPC group, 6 patients (33%) underwent local ablative therapy and 1 patient (6%) a resection, leading to a median survival of 21.8 months. Conclusion: FOLFIRINOX treatment with nearly routine dose modification was associated with acceptable toxicity rates, relatively high response rates and an encouraging overall survival.

  17. Self-perceived competence among medical residents in skills needed to care for patients with advanced dementia versus metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Manu, Erika; Marks, Adam; Berkman, Cathy S; Mullan, Patricia; Montagnini, Marcos; Vitale, Caroline A

    2012-06-01

    To examine medical residents' perceived competence in caring for patients with dementia we conducted an online survey of all 120 second, third and fourth-year residents in Internal Medicine, Medicine/Pediatrics, and Family Medicine at University of Michigan. A structured survey elicited residents' training, experience, confidence, and perceived career needs for skills in estimating prognosis, symptom management, and communication in caring for patients with dementia, compared to patients with metastatic cancer. Among the 61 (51 %) respondents, a majority report lower confidence in assessing prognosis and eliciting treatment wishes in patients with dementia (vs. metastatic cancer), and in performing skills integral to the care of patients with dementia, including the ability to assess caregiver needs, decisional capacity, advise on place of care, and manage agitation, despite viewing these skills as important to their future careers. These findings support the need for enhanced education on optimal care of patients with advanced dementia.

  18. Self-perceived competence among medical residents in skills needed to care for patients with advanced dementia versus metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Manu, Erika; Marks, Adam; Berkman, Cathy S; Mullan, Patricia; Montagnini, Marcos; Vitale, Caroline A

    2012-06-01

    To examine medical residents' perceived competence in caring for patients with dementia we conducted an online survey of all 120 second, third and fourth-year residents in Internal Medicine, Medicine/Pediatrics, and Family Medicine at University of Michigan. A structured survey elicited residents' training, experience, confidence, and perceived career needs for skills in estimating prognosis, symptom management, and communication in caring for patients with dementia, compared to patients with metastatic cancer. Among the 61 (51 %) respondents, a majority report lower confidence in assessing prognosis and eliciting treatment wishes in patients with dementia (vs. metastatic cancer), and in performing skills integral to the care of patients with dementia, including the ability to assess caregiver needs, decisional capacity, advise on place of care, and manage agitation, despite viewing these skills as important to their future careers. These findings support the need for enhanced education on optimal care of patients with advanced dementia. PMID:22477667

  19. A structured review of health utility measures and elicitation in advanced/metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yanni; Wolfram, Verena; Cook, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Health utilities are increasingly incorporated in health economic evaluations. Different elicitation methods, direct and indirect, have been established in the past. This study examined the evidence on health utility elicitation previously reported in advanced/metastatic breast cancer and aimed to link these results to requirements of reimbursement bodies. Methods Searches were conducted using a detailed search strategy across several electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and EconLit databases), online sources (Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the Health Economics Research Center), and web sites of health technology assessment (HTA) bodies. Publications were selected based on the search strategy and the overall study objectives. Results A total of 768 publications were identified in the searches, and 26 publications, comprising 18 journal articles and eight submissions to HTA bodies, were included in the evidence review. Most journal articles derived utilities from the European Quality of Life Five-Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D). Other utility measures, such as the direct methods standard gamble (SG), time trade-off (TTO), and visual analog scale (VAS), were less frequently used. Several studies described mapping algorithms to generate utilities from disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments such as European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Breast Cancer 23 (EORTC QLQ-BR23), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – General questionnaire (FACT-G), and Utility-Based Questionnaire-Cancer (UBQ-C); most used EQ-5D as the reference. Sociodemographic factors that affect health utilities, such as age, sex, income, and education, as well as disease progression, choice of utility elicitation method, and country settings, were identified

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas: A multi-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Pannala, Rahul; Hallberg-Wallace, Karyn M.; Smith, Amber L.; Nassar, Aziza; Zhang, Jun; Zarka, Matthew; Reynolds, Jordan P.; Chen, Longwen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The increasing use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology to examine pancreatic neoplasms has led to an increase in the diagnosis of metastases to the pancreas. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common metastasis to the pancreas. Our study examines 33 cases of metastatic RCC to the pancreas sampled by EUS-FNA from four large tertiary care hospitals. Materials and Methods: We searched the cytopathology database for RCC metastatic to the pancreas diagnosed by EUS-FNA from January 2005 to January 2015. Patient age, history of RCC, nephrectomy history, follow-up postnephrectomy, radiological impression, and EUS-FNA cytologic diagnosis were reviewed. Results: Thirty-three patients were identified. The average age was 67.5 years (range, 49–84 years). Thirty-two patients had a previous documented history of RCC. One patient had the diagnosis of pancreatic metastasis at the same time of the kidney biopsy. Thirty-one patients had been treated with nephrectomy. Twenty-seven patients were being monitored annually by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-five patients had multiple masses by imaging, but 8 patients had a single mass in the pancreas at the time of EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA of 20 cases showed classic morphology of RCC. Thirteen cases had either “atypical” clinical-radiologic features or morphologic overlaps with primary pancreatic neoplasms or other neoplasms. Cell blocks were made on all 13 cases and immunochemical stains confirmed the diagnosis. Conclusions: EUS-FNA cytology is useful for the diagnosis of metastatic RCC to the pancreas. Cytomorphology can be aided with patient history, imaging analyses, cell blocks, and immunochemical stains. PMID:27761149

  1. Imaging characteristic analysis of metastatic spine lesions from breast, prostate, lung, and renal cell carcinomas for surgical planning: Osteolytic versus osteoblastic

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Justin A.; Mendez, Gustavo A.; Ching, Alex; Kubicky, Charlotte Dai; Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgeons treating metastatic spine disease can use computed tomography (CT) imaging to determine whether lesions are osteolytic, osteoblastic, or mixed. This enables treatment that considers the structural integrity of the vertebral body (VB), which is impaired with lytic lesions but not blastic lesions. The authors analyzed CT imaging characteristics of spine metastasis from breast, lung, prostate, and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) to determine the metastasis patterns of each of these common tumors. Methods: The authors identified patients with metastatic spine disease treated during a 3-year period. Variables studied included age, sex, and cancer type. Lesions from breast, lung, prostate, and RCC primary lesions were selected for imaging analysis. Results: Sixty-six patients were identified: 17 had breast metastasis, 14 prostate, 18 lung, and 17 RCC. Breast cancer metastasis involved 33% of VBs with 56%, 20%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Prostate cancer metastasis involved 35% of VBs with 14%, 62%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Lung cancer metastasis involved 13% of VBs with 64%, 33%, and 3% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. RCC metastasis involved 11% of VBs with 91%, 7%, and 2% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed lesions, respectively. Conclusions: To improve surgical planning, we advocate the use of CT prior to surgery to evaluate whether spine metastases are osteolytic or osteoblastic. In cases of osteolytic lesions, the concern is of segmental instability requiring reconstruction and the risk for screw pull out should instrumentation be considered. In cases of osteoblastic lesions, surgeons should consider debulking dense bone. PMID:27274410

  2. Costs of managing adverse events in the treatment of first-line metastatic renal cell carcinoma: bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α2a compared with sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Mickisch, G; Gore, M; Escudier, B; Procopio, G; Walzer, S; Nuijten, M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Bevacizumab plus interferon-α2a (IFN) prolongs progression-free survival to >10 months, which is comparable with sunitinib as first-line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The two regimens have different tolerability profiles; therefore, costs for managing adverse events may be an important factor in selecting therapy. Methods: Costs of managing adverse events affecting patients with metastatic RCC eligible for treatment with bevacizumab plus IFN or sunitinib were evaluated using a linear decision analytical model. Management costs were calculated from the published incidence of adverse events and health-care costs for treating adverse events in the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Italy. Results: Adverse event management costs were higher for sunitinib than for bevacizumab plus IFN. The average cost per patient for the management of grade 3–4 adverse events was markedly lower with bevacizumab plus IFN compared with sunitinib in the United Kingdom (€1475 vs €804), Germany (€1785 vs €1367), France (€2590 vs €1618) and Italy (€891 vs €402). The main cost drivers were lymphopaenia, neutropaenia, thrombocytopaenia, leucopaenia and fatigue/asthaenia for sunitinib; and proteinuria, fatigue/asthaenia, bleeding, anaemia and gastrointestinal perforation for bevacizumab plus IFN. Conclusion: The costs of managing adverse events are lower for bevacizumab plus IFN than for sunitinib. The potential for cost savings should be considered when selecting treatments for RCC. PMID:19920817

  3. Metastatic Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Fliedner, Stephanie M. J.; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pacak, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare chromaffin cell tumors that can often be cured by resection. Although described for the first time in 1886 1, the diagnosis of PGL remains a challenge, because patients do not present with characteristic signs and symptoms. If untreated, PGL can have a devastating outcome due to myocardial infarction, severe hypertension, stroke and/or arrhytmia caused by catecholamine excess. Even after proper diagnosis, the risk of metastatic disease remains. In recent years the opinion that metastatic disease is rare in PGL had to be revised, particularly in patients presenting with extra-adrenal PGL, with a PGL exceeding a size of 5 cm and/or carrying an SDHB germline mutation (especially for children and adolescents). In up to 10 % of patients, metastases are already present at diagnosis of PGL. Measurement of plasma and urinary metanephrine levels has long been used effectively in the diagnosis of PGL. Recently, a dopaminergic phenotype (excess dopamine, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and or methoxytyramine) was recognized as a good indicator for metastatic disease. Vast progress in targeted PET imaging (e.g. 18F-FDA, 18F-FDOPA, 18F-FDG) now allows for reliable early detection of metastatic disease. However, once metastatses are present, treatment options are limited. Survival of patients with metastatic PGL is variable. Depending on the study population the overall 5 year survival is 35–60 %, 2. Here we review recent advances involving findings about the genetic background, the molecular pathogenesis, new diagnostic indicators, pathologic markers and emerging treatment options for metastatic PGL. PMID:21167381

  4. Advances in the Urinary Exosomes in Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Pei; Qin, Yan; Li, Xue-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Cells secrete around 30-100 nm membrane-enclosed vesicles that are released into the extracellular spaceis termed exosomes(EXs). EXs widely present in body fluids and incorporated proteins,nucleic acids that reflect the physiological state of their cells of origin and they may play an important role in cell-to-cell communication in various physiological and disease processes. In this article we review the recent basic and clinical studies in urinary EXs in renal diseases,focusing on their biological characteristics and potential roles as new biological markers,intervention treatment goals,and targeted therapy vectors in renal diseases.However,some issues still exist;in particular,the clinical application of EXs as a liquid biopsy technique warrants further investigations. PMID:27594162

  5. Recent advances in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Moorthi, Ranjani N; Moe, Sharon M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is the term used to describe a constellation of biochemical abnormalities, bone disturbances that may lead to fractures, and extraskeletal calcification in soft tissues and arteries seen in CKD. This review focuses on the noninvasive diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy, the term used exclusively to define the bone pathology associated with CKD. Transiliac bone biopsy and histomorphometry with double-labeled tetracycline or its derivatives remains the gold standard for diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy. However, histomorphometry provides a 'window' into bone only at a single point in time, and is not clinically practical for studying continuous changes in bone morphology. Furthermore, the etiology of fractures in CKD is multifactorial and not fully explained by histomorphometry findings alone. The propensity of a bone to fracture is determined by bone strength, which is affected by bone mass and bone quality; the latter is a term used to describe the structure and composition of bone. Bone quantity is traditionally assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and CT-based methods. Bone quality is more difficult to assess noninvasively, but newer techniques are emerging and are described in this review. Ultimately, the optimal diagnostic strategy for renal osteodystrophy may be a combination of multiple imaging techniques and biomarkers that are specific to each gender and race in CKD, with a goal of predicting fracture risk and optimizing therapy. PMID:23802194

  6. 89Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Donoghue, Joseph A.; Beylergil, Volkan; Lyashchenko, Serge; Ruan, Shutian; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Gonen, Mithat; Lewis, Jason S.; Holland, Jason P.; Cheal, Sarah M.; Reuter, Victor E.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Loda, Massimo F.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Bander, Neil H.; Scher, Howard I.; Morris, Michael J.; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Given the bone tropism of prostate cancer, conventional imaging modalities poorly identify or quantify metastatic disease. 89Zr-huJ591 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed in patients with metastatic prostate cancer to analyze and validate this as an imaging biomarker for metastatic disease. The purpose of this initial study was to assess safety, biodistribution, normal organ dosimetry, and optimal imaging time post-injection for lesion detection. Methods Ten patients with metastatic prostate cancer received 5 mCi of 89Zr-huJ591. Four whole-body scans with multiple whole-body count rate measurements and serum activity concentration measurements were obtained in all patients. Biodistribution, clearance, and lesion uptake by 89Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging was analyzed and dosimetry was estimated using MIRD techniques. Initial assessment of lesion targeting of 89Zr-huJ591 was done. Optimal time for imaging post-injection was determined. Results The dose was well tolerated with mild chills and rigors seen in two patients. The clearance of 89Zr-huJ591 from serum was bi-exponential with biological half-lives of 7 ± 4.5 h (range 1.1–14 h) and 62 ± 13 h (range 51–89 h) for initial rapid and later slow phase. Whole-body biological clearance was 219 ± 48 h (range 153–317 h). The mean whole-body and liver residence time was 78.7 and 25.6 h, respectively. Dosimetric estimates to critical organs included liver 7.7 ± 1.5 cGy/mCi, renal cortex 3.5 ± 0.4 cGy/mCi, and bone marrow 1.2 ± 0.2 cGy/mCi. Optimal time for patient imaging after injection was 7 ± 1 days. Lesion targeting of bone or soft tissue was seen in all patients. Biopsies were performed in 8 patients for a total 12 lesions, all of which were histologically confirmed as metastatic prostate cancer. One biopsy-proven lesion was not positive on 89Zr-huJ591, while the remaining 11 lesions were 89Zr-huJ591 positive. Two biopsy-positive nodal lesions were noted only on 89Zr-huJ591

  7. Vaccination of patients with metastatic renal cancer with modified vaccinia Ankara encoding the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax) given alongside interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert E; Macdermott, Catriona; Shablak, Alaaeldin; Hamer, Caroline; Thistlethwaite, Fiona; Drury, Noel L; Chikoti, Priscilla; Shingler, William; Naylor, Stuart; Harrop, Richard

    2009-05-01

    Approximately 90% of renal cell tumors overexpress the tumor antigen 5T4. The attenuated strain of vaccinia virus, modified vaccinia Ankara, has been engineered to express 5T4 (TroVax). We conducted an open-label phase 1/2 trial in which TroVax was administered alongside interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) to 11 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Antigen-specific cellular and humoral responses were monitored throughout the study, and clinical responses were assessed by measuring the changes in tumor burden by computed tomography scan (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors). The primary objective was to assess the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of TroVax when given alongside IFNalpha. Treatment with TroVax plus IFNalpha was well tolerated with no serious adverse events attributed to TroVax. All 11 patients mounted 5T4-specific antibody responses and 5 (45%) mounted cellular responses. No objective tumor responses were seen, but the overall median time to progression (TTP) of 9 months (range: 2.1 to 26+ mo) was longer than expected for IFNalpha alone. For the 10 clear cell patients the TTP ranged from 3.9 to 26+ months, with a median TTP of 10.4 months. The high frequency of 5T4-specific immune responses and prolonged median TTP for clear cell patients compared with that expected for IFNalpha alone is encouraging and warrants further investigation.

  8. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  9. Management of muscle invasive, locally advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: a literature review with emphasis on the role of surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abufaraj, Mohammad; Gust, Kilian; Moschini, Marco; Foerster, Beat; Soria, Francesco; Mathieu, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Locally advanced (T3b, T4 and N1−N3) and metastatic urothelial bladder cancer (BCa) is a lethal disease with poor survival outcomes. Combination chemotherapy remains the treatment of choice in patients with metastatic disease and an important part of treatment in addition to radical cystectomy (RC) in patients with locally advanced tumour. Approximately half of patients who underwent RC for muscle invasive BCa relapse after surgery with either local recurrence or distant metastasis. This review focuses on the management of muscle invasive, locally advanced and metastatic BCa with emphasis on the role of surgery; to summarize the current knowledge in order to enhance clinical decision-making and counselling process. PMID:27785430

  10. Pembrolizumab for the treatment of PD-L1 positive advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thu Oanh; Ogunniyi, Adebayo; Barbee, Meagan S; Drilon, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of immune checkpoint inhibitors marked an important advancement in the development of cancer therapeutics. Pembrolizumab is a selective humanized IgG4 kappa monoclonal antibody that inhibits the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor, an integral component of immune checkpoint regulation in the tumor microenvironment. The drug is currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of advanced melanoma and metastatic squamous and nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Several published studies demonstrate that single-agent pembrolizumab is safe and has efficacy in patients with NSCLC. Many ongoing protocols are investigating the role of pembrolizumab in combination with other agents in lung cancer and various other cancer types. We review the available data on pembrolizumab in NSCLC and examine the role of potential predictive biomarkers of response to therapy.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF ADVANCED AGE ON THE HEPATIC AND RENAL TOXICITY OF CHLOROFORM

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF ADVANCED AGE ON THE HEPATIC AND RENAL TOXICITY OF CHLOROFORM (CHC13). A McDonald, Y M Sey and J E Simmons. NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC.
    Disinfection, by chlorination or by ozonation followed by treatment with either chlorine or chloramine, of water containi...

  12. Recent advances in cross-sectional renal imaging-an oncologic perspective: the current concepts and the future challenges.

    PubMed

    Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaidis, Paul; Sanyal, Rupan; Bhosale, Priya

    2013-01-01

    Renal imaging remains a critical tool to differentiate and manage benign from malignant renal disorders. Conventional multidetector computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) provide great anatomical details, although lack functional information and specificity. The lack of resolution undermines the functional capabilities of nuclear medicine imaging. Functional MR imaging has shown strong utility in imaging of renal masses, with evolving techniques such as diffusion, perfusion, and blood oxygen level-dependent sequences. At the same time, newer techniques like dual-energy CT and CT perfusion are also showing promise in renal oncologic imaging.This article will discuss the recent advances in MR imaging and CT techniques pertaining to renal oncological applications.

  13. Assessment of survival of patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma after radical cytoreductive nephrectomy versus no surgery: a SEER analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wen-Jun; Zhu, Yao; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purposes To examine the factors related to the choice of cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mCCRCC), and compare the population-based survival rates of patients treated with or without surgery in the modern targeted therapy era. Materials and Methods From 2006 to 2009, patients with mCCRCC were identified from SEER database. The factors that affected patients to be submitted to CN were examined and propensity scores for each patient were calculated. Then patients were matched based upon propensity scores. Univariable and multivariable cox regression models were used to compare survival rates of patients treated with or without surgery. Finally, sensitivity analysis for the cox model on a hazard ratio scale was performed. Results Age, race, tumor size, T stage and N stage were associated with nephrectomy univariablely. After the match based upon propensity scores, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year cancer-specific survival rate estimates were 45.1%, 27.9%, and 21.7% for the no-surgery group vs 70.6%, 52.2%, and 41.7% for the surgery group, respectively (hazard ratio 0.42, 95%CI: 0.35-0.52, log-rank P<0.001). In multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression model, race, T stage, N stage and median household income were significantly associated with survival. Sensitivity analysis on a hazard ratio scale indicated that the hazard ratio might be above 1.00 only when the unknown factor had an opposite effect on survival which was 3-fold than CN. Conclusion The results of our study showed that CN significantly improves the survival of patients with metastatic CCRCC even in the targeted therapy era. PMID:26005970

  14. First-line cetuximab-based chemotherapies for patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Sakata, Kazuya; Okuyama, Masaki; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujii, Hitoshi; Fukuzaki, Takayuki; Morita, Tetsushi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Maski

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. A burgeoning number of studies have demonstrated that the addition of cetuximab to another standard first-line regimen markedly improves the outcome of CRC treatment. However, at present, the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy has not been well described in Japan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of first-line chemotherapies that included cetuximab for patients with advanced or metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) wild-type CRC in Japan. This prospective multicenter observational study was conducted at 13 affiliated medical institutions. A total of 64 patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2013. The patients met the following criteria for eligibility: i) histologically confirmed, advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC; and ii) cetuximab-based chemotherapies administered as a first-line treatment. First-line cetuximab-based treatments were administered as follows: 29 patients (45.3%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin; 14 patients (21.9%) received a combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin; and 10 patients (15.6%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan. The overall response rate (including complete plus partial responses) was 50% (32/64 patients). Initially, 48 lesions were diagnosed as unresectable. Among those, 13 lesions (27.1%) were converted to a resectable status following cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy treatments. The median overall survival time and the progression-free survival time were 1,189 and 359 days, respectively. The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event was neutropenia, which occurred in 20.3% of the patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 skin toxicity was 17.2% (11/64 patients). Cetuximab-based therapies may represent a promising first-line regimen for patients with advanced or

  15. Targeted Therapy in Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (LA-R/M HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Echarri, María José; Lopez-Martin, Ana; Hitt, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other than best supportive care are currently available. Most SCCHN tumours overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This receptor is a tyrosine-kinase membrane receptor that has been implicated in angiogenesis, tumour progression and resistance to different cancer treatments. In this review, we analysed the different drugs and pathways under development to treat SCCHN, especially recurrent/metastatic disease. Until now, the EGFR signalling pathway has been considered the most important target with respect to new drugs; however, new drugs, such as immunotherapies, are currently under study. As new treatments for SCCHN are developed, the influence of therapies with respect to overall survival, progression free survival and quality of life in patients with this disease is changing. PMID:26927178

  16. Key predictive factors for efficacy of axitinib in first-line metastatic renal cell carcinoma: subgroup analysis in Japanese patients from a randomized, double-blind phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yoshihiko; Fukasawa, Satoshi; Oya, Mototsugu; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Shinohara, Nobuo; Habuchi, Tomonori; Rini, Brian I.; Chen, Ying; Bair, Angel H.; Ozono, Seiichiro; Naito, Seiji; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To conduct Japanese subgroup analyses of a randomized, global Phase II study of axitinib with and without dose titration in first-line metastatic renal cell carcinoma and to explore predictive factors for axitinib efficacy in first-line metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Methods The data included 44 Japanese and 169 non-Japanese treatment-naïve patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Patients received twice-daily axitinib 5 mg during a 4-week lead-in period. Patients who met the pre-defined randomization criteria were stratified by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status and randomly assigned (1:1) to axitinib or placebo titration. The primary endpoint was objective response rate; secondary endpoints included progression-free survival and safety. Predictive factors were analyzed using data from all patients. Results The objective response rate (95% confidence interval) was 66% (50–80%) vs. 44% (36–52%) in Japanese and non-Japanese patients, respectively. At the primary analysis, median progression-free survival could not be estimated for Japanese patients, and was 27.6 months (95% confidence interval: 16.6–33.2) in an updated analysis. Hypertension, diarrhea, hand–foot syndrome, dysphonia, hypothyroidism and proteinuria were common adverse events in Japanese patients. Due to a small number of randomized patients, effects of axitinib dose titration could not sufficiently be confirmed among Japanese patients. The multivariate analysis identified time from histopathological diagnosis to treatment and sum of the longest diameter for target lesion at baseline as independent predictive factors for progression-free survival. Conclusions Axitinib is effective and well tolerated as first-line metastatic renal cell carcinoma therapy in Japanese patients. Predictive factors for axitinib efficacy endpoints identified in this setting warrant further investigation. PMID:27572087

  17. Mutation status concordance between primary lesions and metastatic sites of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and the impact of mutation testing methodologies: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, James; Dearden, Simon; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Walker, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Increased understanding of the genetic aetiology of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (aNSCLC) has facilitated personalised therapies that target specific molecular aberrations associated with the disease. Biopsy samples for mutation testing may be taken from primary or metastatic sites, depending on which sample is most accessible, and upon differing diagnostic practices between territories. However, the mutation status concordance between primary tumours and corresponding metastases is the subject of debate. This review aims to ascertain whether molecular diagnostic testing of either the primary or metastatic tumours is equally suitable to determine patient eligibility for targeted therapies. A literature search was performed to identify articles reporting studies of mutations in matched primary and metastatic aNSCLC tumour samples. Clinical results of mutation status concordance between matched primary and metastatic tumour samples from patients with aNSCLC were collated. Articles included in this review (N =26) all reported mutation status data from matched primary and metastatic tumour samples obtained from adult patients with aNSCLC. Generally, substantial concordance was observed between primary and metastatic tumours in terms of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, p16 and p53 mutations. However, some level of discordance was seen in most studies; mutation testing methodologies appeared to play a key role in this, along with underlying tumour heterogeneity. Substantial concordance in mutation status observed between primary and metastatic tumour sites suggests that diagnostic testing of either tumour type may be suitable to determine a patient's eligibility for personalised therapies. As with all diagnostic testing, highly sensitive and appropriately validated mutation analysis methodologies are desirable to ensure accuracy. Additional work is also required to define how much discordance is clinically significant given natural tumour heterogeneity. The ability of both

  18. Advances in understanding the renal transport and toxicity of mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K. ); Lash, L.H. )

    1994-01-01

    As a result of industrialization and changes in the environment during the twentieth century, humans and animals are exposed to numerous chemical forms of mercury, including elemental mercury vapor (Hg[sup 0]), inorganic mercurous (Hg[sup +]) and mercuric (Hg[sup 2+]) compounds, and organic mercuric (R-Hg[sup +] or R-Hg-R; where R represents any organic ligand) compounds. The risk of exposure and subsequent intoxication is of increasing concern because of the steadily increasing deposition of mercury in the environment (Fitzgerald Clarkson, 1991). All forms of mercury have nephrotoxic effects, although disposition and toxicity of mercury in tissues can vary depending on the chemical form of mercury. For example, the initial toxic effects of both elemental mercury and organic forms of mercury are observed in the nervous system. This is due to their lipophilicity, which allows them to cross the blood-brain barrier. At later times, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity can develop. With inorganic mercurous or mercuric salts, the most prominent effect is nephrotoxicity. Until recently, little was known about the mechanisms involved in the nephropathy induced by mercury. The purpose of this article is to review recent data on the intrarenal accumulation and disposition, nephrotoxicity, and target site specificity of mercury, and factors that modify or alter renal injury induced by mercury. 170 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Active Smoking May Negatively Affect Response Rate, Progression-Free Survival, and Overall Survival of Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated With Sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Keizman, Daniel; Gottfried, Maya; Ish-Shalom, Maya; Maimon, Natalie; Peer, Avivit; Neumann, Avivit; Hammers, Hans; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Sinibaldi, Victoria; Pili, Roberto; Hayat, Henry; Kovel, Svetlana; Sella, Avishay; Boursi, Ben; Weitzen, Rony; Mermershtain, Wilmosh; Rouvinov, Keren; Berger, Raanan; Carducci, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Obesity, smoking, hypertension, and diabetes are risk factors for renal cell carcinoma development. Their presence has been associated with a worse outcome in various cancers. We sought to determine their association with outcome of sunitinib treatment in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods. An international multicenter retrospective study of sunitinib-treated mRCC patients was performed. Multivariate analyses were performed to determine the association between outcome and the pretreatment status of smoking, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and other known prognostic factors. Results. Between 2004 and 2013, 278 mRCC patients were treated with sunitinib: 59 were active smokers, 67 were obese, 73 were diabetic, and 165 had pretreatment hypertension. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9 months, and overall survival (OS) was 22 months. Factors associated with PFS were smoking status (past and active smokers: hazard ratio [HR]: 1.17, p = .39; never smokers: HR: 2.94, p < .0001), non-clear cell histology (HR: 1.62, p = .011), pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio >3 (HR: 3.51, p < .0001), use of angiotensin system inhibitors (HR: 0.63, p = .01), sunitinib dose reduction or treatment interruption (HR: 0.72, p = .045), and Heng risk (good and intermediate risk: HR: 1.07, p = .77; poor risk: HR: 1.87, p = .046). Factors associated with OS were smoking status (past and active smokers: HR: 1.25, p = .29; never smokers: HR: 2.7, p < .0001), pretreatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio >3 (HR: 2.95, p < .0001), and sunitinib-induced hypertension (HR: 0.57, p = .002). Conclusion. Active smoking may negatively affect the PFS and OS of sunitinib-treated mRCC. Clinicians should consider advising patients to quit smoking at initiation of sunitinib treatment for mRCC. PMID:24309979

  20. Cixutumumab and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Undifferentiated High Grade Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Childhood Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma With Mixed Embryonal and Alveolar Features; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Malignant Adult Hemangiopericytoma; Malignant Childhood Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

  1. Next-Generation Sequencing and In Silico Analysis Facilitate Prolonged Response to Pazopanib in a Patient With Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andrew W; Giri, Smith; Patel, Dilan; Sluder, Heather; Vanderwalde, Ari; Martin, Mike G

    2015-10-01

    With the advent of widespread tumor genetic profiling, an increased number of mutations with unknown significance are being identified. Often, a glut of uninterpretable findings may confuse the clinician and provide little or inappropriate guidance in therapeutic decision-making. This report describes a method of protein modeling by in silico analysis (ie, using computer simulation) that is easily accessible to the practicing clinician without need for further laboratory analysis, which can potentially serve as a guide in therapeutic decisions based on poorly characterized tumor mutations. An example of this model is given wherein poorly characterized KIT, PDGFRB, and ERBB2 mutations were discovered in a patient with treatment-refractory metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis. The KIT and PDGFRB mutations were predicted to be pathogenic using in silico analysis, whereas the ERBB2 mutation was predicted to be benign. Based on these findings, the patient was treated with pazopanib and achieved a partial response that lasted for 7.5 months. We propose that in silico analysis be explored as a potential means to further characterize genetic abnormalities found by tumor profiling assays, such as next-generation sequencing. PMID:26483058

  2. High Immune Response Rates and Decreased Frequencies of Regulatory T Cells in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients after Tumor Cell Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Pohla, Heike; Buchner, Alexander; Stadlbauer, Birgit; Frankenberger, Bernhard; Stevanovic, Stefan; Walter, Steffen; Frank, Ronald; Schwachula, Tim; Olek, Sven; Kopp, Joachim; Willimsky, Gerald; Stief, Christian G; Hofstetter, Alfons; Pezzutto, Antonio; Blankenstein, Thomas; Oberneder, Ralph; Schendel, Dolores J

    2012-01-01

    Our previously reported phase I clinical trial with the allogeneic gene–modified tumor cell line RCC-26/CD80/IL-2 showed that vaccination was well tolerated and feasible in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients. Substantial disease stabilization was observed in most patients despite a high tumor burden at study entry. To investigate alterations in immune responses that might contribute to this effect, we performed an extended immune monitoring that included analysis of reactivity against multiple antigens, cytokine/chemokine changes in serum and determination of the frequencies of immune suppressor cell populations, including natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cell subsets (MDSCs). An overall immune response capacity to virus-derived control peptides was present in 100% of patients before vaccination. Vaccine-induced immune responses to tumor-associated antigens occurred in 75% of patients, demonstrating the potent immune stimulatory capacity of this generic vaccine. Furthermore, some patients reacted to peptide epitopes of antigens not expressed by the vaccine, showing that epitope-spreading occurred in vivo. Frequencies of nTregs and MDSCs were comparable to healthy donors at the beginning of study. A significant decrease of nTregs was detected after vaccination (p = 0.012). High immune response rates, decreased frequencies of nTregs and a mixed T helper 1/T helper 2 (TH1/TH2)-like cytokine pattern support the applicability of this RCC generic vaccine for use in combination therapies. PMID:23269976

  3. Risk of recurrence and conditional survival in complete responders treated with TKIs plus or less locoregional therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Daniele; Santoni, Matteo; Conti, Alessandro; Procopio, Giuseppe; Verzoni, Elena; Galli, Luca; di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Giorgi, Ugo; De Lisi, Delia; Nicodemo, Maurizio; Maruzzo, Marco; Massari, Francesco; Buti, Sebastiano; Altobelli, Emanuela; Biasco, Elisa; Ricotta, Riccardo; Porta, Camillo; Vincenzi, Bruno; Papalia, Rocco; Marchetti, Paolo; Burattini, Luciano; Berardi, Rossana; Muto, Giovanni; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cascinu, Stefano; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We retrospectively analyzed the risk of recurrence and conditional Disease-Free Survival (cDFS) in 63 patients with complete remission during treatment with tirosin kinase inhibitor (TKI), alone or with local treatment in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. RESULTS 37% patients achieve CR with TKI alone, while 63% with additional loco-regional treatments. 49% patients recurred after CR, with a median Disease free survival of 28.2 months. Patients treated with multimodal approaches present lower rate of recurrence (40% vs 61%) and longer Disease free survival compared to patient treated with TKI alone (16.5 vs 41.9 months, p=0.039).Furthermore the rate of recurrence was higher in patients with brain (88%), pancreatic (71%) and bone metastasis (50%). Patients who continued TKI therapy after complete response had a longer disease free survival than patients who stopped therapy, although the difference was not significant (42.1 vs 25.1 months, p=0.254). 2y-cDFS was better in patients treated with multimodal treatment and who continued TKIs than the other patient arms. CONCLUSIONS The prognostic value of CR depends on the site where was obtained and how was obtained (with or without locoregional treatment). Cessation of TKI should be carefully considered in complete responder patients. PMID:27027342

  4. Circulating biomarkers and outcome from a randomised phase II trial of sunitinib vs everolimus for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Martin H; Chen, David; Marker, Mahtab; Hakimi, A Ari; Lee, Chung-Han; Hsieh, James J; Knox, Jennifer J; Voi, Maurizio; Motzer, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Background: RECORD-3 assessed non-inferiority of progression-free survival (PFS) with everolimus vs sunitinib in previously untreated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Baseline plasma sample collection and randomised design enabled correlation of circulating biomarkers with efficacy. Methods: Samples were analysed for 121 cancer-related biomarkers. Analyses of biomarkers categorised patients as high or low (vs median) to assess association with first-line PFS (PFS1L) for each treatment arm. A composite biomarker score (CBS) incorporated biomarkers potentially predictive of PFS1L with everolimus. Results: Plasma samples from 442 of the 471 randomised patients were analysed. Biomarkers were associated with PFS1L for everolimus alone (29), sunitinib alone (9) or both (12). Everolimus-specific biomarkers (CSF1, ICAM1, IL-18BP, KIM1, TNFRII) with hazard ratio ⩾1.8 were integrated into a CBS (range 0–5). For CBS low (0–3, n=291) vs high (4–5, n=151), PFS1L differed significantly for everolimus but not for sunitinib. There was no significant difference in PFS1L between everolimus and sunitinib in the high CBS patient cohort. Conclusions: Baseline levels of multiple soluble biomarkers correlated with benefit from everolimus and/or sunitinib, independent of clinical risk factors. A similar PFS1L was observed for both treatments among patients with high CBS score. PMID:26908330

  5. Seeking new prognostic and predictive factors in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma – apoptosis-regulating factors

    PubMed Central

    Szczylik, Cezary; Rzepecki, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Kidney cancer, despite the constant upward trend in the incidence of this type of cancer (about 1.5-5.9% per year), is rather rare, representing approximately 2-3% of all adult cancers. Since recently, drugs based on so-called targeted therapy play a decisive role in the treatment of patients with metastatic kidney cancer. Prognostic and predictive factors can significantly contribute to prognosis assessment and the correct classification of patients to specific forms of causal treatment of kidney cancer. In addition to the most commonly used and widely known prognostic factors, grouped in the so-called Motzer model, new prognostic markers of this tumour are being sought. Preliminary reports indicate that there may be a promising role of factors that regulate the cell cycle and apoptosis, and agents from the group of hypoxia-induced proteins. The proliferation markers or proteins related to cellular adhesion can also be relevant. This article presents examples of markers from the first of the above groups of proteins, which on the basis of the performed analyses showed independent prognostic or predictive value in kidney cancer. PMID:23788861

  6. A Rare Case of the Simultaneous, Multifocal, Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Ipsilateral Left Testes, Bladder, and Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kongnyuy, Michael; Lawindy, Samuel; Martinez, Daniel; Parker, Justin; Hall, Mary

    2016-01-01

    We describe the rare case of a 68-year-old gentleman with the history of a hand-assisted laparoscopic left radical nephrectomy for a T2bN0M1 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Seven years after surgery and with clean surveillance imaging for metastasis/recurrence the patient presented with three separate tumors suspicious for malignancy. A bladder lesion was found during workup for hematuria, a stomach lesion during diagnostic endoscopy, and a testicular lesion during self-exam. He underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor, left inguinal orchiectomy, and upper endoscopic ensnarement. All specimens surprisingly showed RCC by histology and immunostaining. These three sites are rare for RCC metastasis and simultaneous presentation is even rarer, further emphasizing the importance of continuous and careful follow-up in this patient population, despite what could appear as complete remission. PMID:26904352

  7. Advances in First-Line Treatment for Patients with HER-2+ Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Mattos-Arruda, Leticia

    2012-01-01

    Background. The prognosis for breast cancer patients overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)-2 has changed with anti–HER-2–targeted therapy. Although anti–HER-2 therapy with trastuzumab and chemotherapy is the standard first-line treatment, the best therapeutic regimen has yet to be defined, and new strategies are evolving. Methods. A literature review of well-established and recently published trials, reviews, and ongoing clinical trials addressing first-line treatment for HER-2+ metastatic breast cancer patients was performed. Results. Taxanes are the agents most commonly used in combination with trastuzumab, but other chemotherapy drugs, such as anthracyclines, vinorelbine, and gemcitabine and triple-combination therapies including platinum compounds, capecitabine, and taxanes have been studied. The combination of aromatase inhibitors with anti–HER-2 therapies is a new therapeutic option for some patients who coexpress HER-2 and hormone receptors, although its activity observed in randomized clinical trials seems to be inferior to that of chemotherapy plus anti–HER-2 therapies. In addition, new anti–HER-2 therapies have shown activity in HER-2+ tumors, both alone and in combination with trastuzumab. Conclusions. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy is the current standard of care for the upfront treatment of HER-2+ breast cancer patients, though other anti–HER-2–targeting agents may appear as new standards in the upcoming years. PMID:22523199

  8. Advances and new perspectives in the treatment of metastatic colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Recondo, Gonzalo Jr; Díaz-Cantón, Enrique; de la Vega, Máximo; Greco, Martin; Recondo, Gonzalo Sr; Valsecchi, Matias E

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade we have witnessed an unprecedented outburst of new treatment approaches for the management of metastatic colon cancer. Anti-angiogenic drugs, epidermal growth factor receptor blockers and multi-kinase inhibitors have all resulted in small but consistent improvement in clinical outcomes. However, this progress has paradoxically leaded us into new challenges. In many cases the clinical development was done in parallel and the lack of head-to-head comparison evolved into circumstances where several valid new “standards of care” are available. Even though desirable in essence, the availability of many options as well as different possible combinations frequently leaves the busy clinician in the difficult situation of having to choose between one or the other, sometimes without solid evidence to support each decision. In addition, progress never stops and new agents are continuously tested. For these reason this review will try to summarize all the clinical trials that constitute the theoretical framework that support our daily practice but will also procure the reader with rational answers to common clinical dilemmas by critically appraising the current literature. Lastly, we will provide with a compilation of promising new agents that may soon become our next line of defense against this deadly disease. PMID:25024813

  9. Prostate-specific antigen doubling time and survival in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Loberg, Robert D; Fielhauer, Jeffery R; Pienta, Brian A; Dresden, Scott; Christmas, Patty; Kalikin, Linda M; Olson, Karin B; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2003-12-29

    The relation between tumor kinetics and disease progression in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) has not been well described. Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer is characterized by detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after treatment and occurs in approximately 30% of patients after therapy for apparent localized disease. An increase in PSA almost always occurs before clinical evidence of disease. The ability to identify early biochemical failure in patients to assess disease aggressiveness and guide changes in treatment needs to be examined. We examined serial PSA data from 249 patients with metastatic disease to assess PSA doubling time (PSADT) in hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC) and HRPC states. In a subset of patients, the relation of PSADT to Gleason score and survival was studied. PSADT decreased from 37.5 +/- 4.5 weeks to 15.6 +/- 1.6 weeks (mean +/- SEM) in patients with HNPC versus HRPC. In this small study, PSADT did not correlate with Gleason score, survival from start of hormonal treatment, length of time receiving hormone therapy, or survival in the HRPC state. The decrease in PSADT with disease state may help provide insight into understanding the biology of late-stage disease.

  10. Tolerability of Therapies Recommended for the Treatment of Hormone Receptor-Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    For women with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer, endocrine therapies, including the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen, the aromatase inhibitors anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane, and the selective estrogen receptor degrader fulvestrant, are recommended in clinical guidelines. The addition of targeted agents such as everolimus or palbociclib to aromatase inhibitors are also recommended as treatment options. Chemotherapy remains an option, although clinical guidelines have recommended these agents be reserved for patients with immediately life-threatening disease or if resistance to endocrine therapy is known or suspected. The present review has consolidated the tolerability profiles of the agents approved for use in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive advanced or metastatic breast cancer based on phase III registration trial data. Endocrine therapies are generally well tolerated, although the addition of targeted therapies to aromatase inhibitors or fulvestrant appears to increase the proportion of patients experiencing adverse events, and palbociclib and chemotherapy appear to be more closely associated with serious adverse events, including neutropenia. PMID:27151773

  11. Critical appraisal of the role of gefitinib in the management of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Chen, Jia-Qi; Dong, Cai-Xia; Weng, Shan-Shan; Huang, Jian-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors can significantly improve clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and sensitive EGFR gene mutations. Gefitinib (Iressa(®)), the first oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown to be more effective and better tolerated than chemotherapy either in first-line or second-line treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC harboring sensitive EGFR mutations. Conversely, among patients with wild-type EGFR, gefitinib is inferior to standard chemotherapy in both the first-line and second-line settings. Further, gefitinib is effective in patients with brain metastases because of its low molecular weight and excellent penetration of the blood-brain barrier. In this review, we summarize the current data from clinical trials with gefitinib and appraise its role in the management of locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC.

  12. Safety and efficacy of sunitinib in patients from Latin America: subanalysis of an expanded access trial in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Carlos H; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Chacón, Matías; Cabrera-Galeana, Paula; Sajben, Peter; Zhang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Background Sunitinib is an approved treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The safety profile and efficacy of sunitinib were confirmed in a global expanded access trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00130897). This report presents a subanalysis of the final trial data from patients in Latin America. Methods Treatment-naïve or previously treated mRCC patients aged ≥18 years received oral sunitinib at a starting dose of 50 mg/day on a 4-weeks-on/2-weeks-off schedule. Treatment continued until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or withdrawal of consent. Safety was assessed regularly, and tumor measurements were scheduled per local practice (using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors). Results In total, 348 patients from Latin America received sunitinib. Overall, 75% of patients had two or more sites of metastatic disease, 28% were aged ≥65 years, 14% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2, 9% had brain metastases, 9% had no prior nephrectomy, and 5% had non-clear cell RCC. Median treatment duration was 8 months, and median follow-up was 15.1 months. In total, 326 patients (94%) discontinued treatment, primarily due to death (41%) or lack of efficacy (22%). Most treatment-related adverse events were of mild to moderate severity (grade 1/2). Mucosal inflammation (reported in 54% of patients), diarrhea (53%), and asthenia (41%) were the most common any-grade treatment-related adverse events. Asthenia (12%), neutropenia (10%), and fatigue and thrombocytopenia (both 9%) were the most common grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events. In total, 311 patients were included for tumor response, of whom eight (3%) had a complete response and 46 (15%) a partial response, yielding an objective response rate of 17%. Median duration of response, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 26.7, 12.1, and 16.9 months, respectively. Conclusion The efficacy and safety profile of sunitinib in patients with m

  13. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  14. Emerging role of tumor-associated macrophages as therapeutic targets in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Amantini, Consuelo; Nabissi, Massimo; Maines, Francesca; Burattini, Luciano; Berardi, Rossana; Santoni, Giorgio; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) derived from peripheral blood monocytes recruited into the renal cell carcinoma (RCC) microenvironment. In response to inflammatory stimuli, macrophages undergo M1 (classical) or M2 (alternative) activation. M1 cells produce high levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-12, IL-23 and IL-6, while M2 cells produce anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10, thus contributing to RCC-related immune dysfunction. The presence of extensive TAM infiltration in RCC microenvironment contributes to cancer progression and metastasis by stimulating angiogenesis, tumor growth, and cellular migration and invasion. Moreover, TAMs are involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition of RCC cancer cells and in the development of tumor resistance to targeted agents. Interestingly, macrophage autophagy seems to play an important role in RCC. Based on this scenario, TAMs represent a promising and effective target for cancer therapy in RCC. Several strategies have been proposed to suppress TAM recruitment, to deplete their number, to switch M2 TAMs into antitumor M1 phenotype and to inhibit TAM-associated molecules. In this review, we summarize current data on the essential role of TAMs in RCC angiogenesis, invasion, impaired anti-tumor immune response and development of drug resistance, thus describing the emerging TAM-centered therapies for RCC patients.

  15. Cutaneous PEComas Express CD10: Implications for the Classification of PEComas and the Differential Diagnosis With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel; Nguyen, Catherine M; Cassarino, David S

    2016-09-01

    Cutaneous perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are peculiar, rare mesenchymal tumors of uncertain lineage. They show a characteristic epithelioid morphology, and they are usually composed of monomorphous clear-to-granular appearing perivascular cells. One of the main differential diagnoses with PEComas is a cutaneous metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). CD10 has been emphasized to be a crucial marker in the diagnosis of metastasis from RCC. Although visceral PEComas have been studied for CD10 expression, primary cutaneous PEComas have not. Although it could be assumed a priori that cutaneous PEComas would stain as their visceral counterpart, there is increasing evidence that cutaneous PEComas could actually be unrelated to PEComas from other organs. In this report, the author's studied three primary cutaneous PEComas, and included CD10 in our immunohistochemical studies. All three PEComas expressed the marker. They conclude that a CD10 clear-cell dermal tumor is not necessarily equivalent to a metastasis from RCC and that additional stains should be added to rule out PEComa, even if the biopsy or the panel of antibodies is limited. PMID:26909587

  16. Improved health-related quality of life of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with a 2 weeks on and 1 week off schedule of sunitinib.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hideaki; Harada, Ken-ichi; Miyazaki, Akira; Fujisawa, Masato

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the significance of changes from the standard dosing schedule of sunitinib, which is 4 weeks of treatment and 2 weeks off (schedule 4/2), to an alternative schedule with 2 weeks of treatment and 1 week off (schedule 2/1), after encountering dose-limiting toxicity in 45 consecutive Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Despite a definitively improved relative dose intensity of sunitinib by changing from schedule 4/2 to 2/1, this difference was not significant. Adverse events (AEs) occurred in all patients on both schedules 4/2 and 2/1; however, the proportion of patients experiencing AEs ≥ grade 3 on schedule 2/1 was significantly lower than that on schedule 4/2. Quality of life (QOL) analysis using SF-36 revealed that all eight scores during schedule 2/1 were more favorable than those during schedule 4/2, and there were significant differences in 2 of the 8 scores between these two schedules. Furthermore, multivariate analyses, which were performed to evaluate the contribution of several AEs on schedule 2/1 to the improvement of each score in SF-36, revealed that fatigue had independent impacts on two scores, despite the lack of an independent association between any scores and the remaining AEs examined. These findings suggest that schedule 2/1 is the optimal dosing schedule of sunitinib against mRCC that balances efficacy and toxicity, since treatment on schedule 2/1 resulted in a markedly improved QOL compared with that on schedule 4/2 by relieving the profile of sunitinib-related AEs.

  17. Assessment of health-related quality of life in Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hideaki; Harada, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Taka-aki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to comprehensively analyze the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This study included 240 Japanese mRCC patients treated with TKIs. We conducted a total of 305 surveys assessing the HRQOL before and 3 months after the introduction of TKIs, including 150, 95 and 60 during treatment with sorafenib, sunitinib and axitinib, respectively, using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, consisting of eight multi-item scales measuring the health status. There were no significant differences in any of the eight scale scores between these 305 surveys conducted before and 3 months after TKI treatment. Two scores in the surveys during axitinib treatment were significantly superior to those during sorafenib treatment; however, no significant differences were noted in any of the remaining scale scores among the surveys during treatment with the three TKIs. Multivariate analyses, which were performed to evaluate the contribution of several factors to each scale score, revealed that the therapeutic efficacy had independent impacts on two scale scores, despite the lack of an independent association between any scores and the remaining factors, including the age, gender, introduced TKI, timing of TKI introduction and degree of adverse events. Collectively, these findings suggest that treatment with TKIs did not result in a significant impairment of the HRQOL in Japanese patients with mRCC; however, patients with unfavorable disease control appeared to fail to achieve a satisfactory HRQOL during treatment with TKIs.

  18. GLI2 expression levels in radical nephrectomy specimens as a predictor of disease progression in patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma following treatment with sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Junya; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in the progression of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (m-ccRCC) as well as the molecular targets of sunitinib, an inhibitor of multiple tyrosine kinases. A total of 39 patients subjected to radical nephrectomy who were diagnosed with m-ccRCC and were subsequently treated with sunitinib were enrolled in the present study. The expression levels of the Hedgehog signaling proteins (GLI1, GLI2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and transforming growth factor-β) and major molecular targets of sunitinib [vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1 and −2, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α and -β] in primary RCC specimens were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. The expression levels of GLI2, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and pre-treatment C-reactive protein as well as the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center risk were identified as significant predictors of progression-free survival (PFS). Of these, only GLI2 expression was independently correlated to PFS according to multivariate analysis. Furthermore, treatment with sunitinib resulted in a marked inhibition of GLI2 expression in the parental human RCC ACHN cell line, but not in ACHN cells with acquired resistance to sunitinib. These findings suggested that GLI2 may be involved in the acquisition of resistance to sunitinib in RCC; thus, it may be useful to consider the expression levels of GLI2 in addition to conventional prognostic parameters when selecting m-ccRCC patients likely to benefit from treatment with sunitinib.

  19. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in human peripheral blood: Optimized quantification in healthy donors and patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Flörcken, Anne; Takvorian, Anna; Singh, Anju; Gerhardt, Anne; Ostendorf, Benjamin Nils; Dörken, Bernd; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells is an important mechanism leading to tolerance against tumors. Phenotypic characterization of MDSC has been established and heterogeneous populations with monocytic or granulocytic features have been characterized. Increased levels of MDSC have been described in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and seem to correlate with an adverse outcome. As MDSC constitute only small populations in peripheral blood of cancer patients, it is highly important to achieve technically optimized conditions for quantification. Different cell preparation techniques--besides freezing and thawing--are potential sources of substantial variation. Our study was focused on an optimized quantification of MDSC in pB of healthy donors and patients with mRCC, in whom major technical sources of variation were analyzed. Whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used for the flow cytometric quantification of MDSC in the pB of mRCC patients and healthy donors. We compared (1) analysis in whole blood vs. PBMC after Ficoll gradient centrifugation and (2) immediate analysis after blood drawing vs. analysis one day later. Finally, in order to evaluate our optimized technical approach, pB of 15 patients with histologically confirmed mRCC under treatment with either sunitinib or sorafenib was analyzed. No difference in the number of MDSC was observed after analysis in whole blood vs. PBMC. In contrast, the time point of analysis was a source of substantial variation (one day later vs. immediate analysis after blood drawing). In conclusion, for optimal analysis of MDSC, immediate analysis of whole blood after blood drawing rather than one day later seems to be most appropriate under the aspect of practical feasibility and reliability. Using this method, we were able to confirm both (a) increased numbers of MDSC in patients with mRCC and (b) a decrease of MDSC under sunitinib therapy. PMID:26462434

  20. GLI2 expression levels in radical nephrectomy specimens as a predictor of disease progression in patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma following treatment with sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Junya; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in the progression of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (m-ccRCC) as well as the molecular targets of sunitinib, an inhibitor of multiple tyrosine kinases. A total of 39 patients subjected to radical nephrectomy who were diagnosed with m-ccRCC and were subsequently treated with sunitinib were enrolled in the present study. The expression levels of the Hedgehog signaling proteins (GLI1, GLI2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and transforming growth factor-β) and major molecular targets of sunitinib [vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1 and −2, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α and -β] in primary RCC specimens were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. The expression levels of GLI2, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and pre-treatment C-reactive protein as well as the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center risk were identified as significant predictors of progression-free survival (PFS). Of these, only GLI2 expression was independently correlated to PFS according to multivariate analysis. Furthermore, treatment with sunitinib resulted in a marked inhibition of GLI2 expression in the parental human RCC ACHN cell line, but not in ACHN cells with acquired resistance to sunitinib. These findings suggested that GLI2 may be involved in the acquisition of resistance to sunitinib in RCC; thus, it may be useful to consider the expression levels of GLI2 in addition to conventional prognostic parameters when selecting m-ccRCC patients likely to benefit from treatment with sunitinib. PMID:27602218

  1. Treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) with CAIX CAR-engineered T-cells-a completed study overview.

    PubMed

    Lamers, Cor H J; Klaver, Yarne; Gratama, Jan W; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno

    2016-06-15

    We studied safety and proof of concept of a phase I/II trial with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The CAR was based on the G250 mAb that recognized an epitope of carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX). Twelve patients with CAIX+ mRCC were treated in three cohorts with a maximum of 10 daily infusions of 2×10(7) to 2×10(9) CAR T-cells. Circulating CAR T-cells were transiently detectable in all patients and maintained antigen-specific immune functions following their isolation post-treatment. Blood cytokine profiles mirrored CAR T-cell presence and in vivo activity. Unfortunately, patients developed anti-CAR T-cell antibodies and cellular immune responses. Moreover, CAR T-cell infusions induced liver enzyme disturbances reaching CTC grades 2-4, which necessitated cessation of treatment in four out of eight patients (cohort 1+2). Examination of liver biopsies revealed T-cell infiltration around bile ducts and CAIX expression on bile duct epithelium, adding to the notion of on-target toxicity. No such toxicities were observed in four patients that were pretreated with G250 mAb (cohort 3). The study was stopped due to the advent of competing treatments before reaching therapeutic or maximum tolerated dose in cohort 3. No clinical responses have been recorded. Despite that, from this trial numerous recommendations for future trials and their immune monitoring could be formulated, such as choice of the target antigen, format and immunogenicity of receptor and how the latter relates to peripheral T-cell persistence. PMID:27284065

  2. Lack of anti-tumour reactivity despite enhanced numbers of circulating natural killer T cells in two patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vyth-Dreese, F A; Sein, J; van de Kasteele, W; Dellemijn, T A M; van den Bogaard, C; Nooijen, W J; de Gast, G C; Haanen, J B A G; Bex, A

    2010-12-01

    Natural killer T (NK T) cells play a central role as intermediates between innate and adaptive immune responses important to induce anti-tumour reactivity in cancer patients. In two of 14 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients, treated with interferon (IFN)-α, we detected significantly enhanced numbers of circulating NK T cells which were typed phenotypically and analysed for anti-tumour reactivity. These NK T cells were T cell receptor (TCR) Vα24/Vβ11(+), 6B11(+) and bound CD1d tetramers. No correlation was observed between NK T frequencies and regulatory T cells (T(regs)), which were also enhanced. NK T cells expressed CD56, CD161, CD45RO and CD69 and were predominantly CD8(+), in contrast to the circulating T cell pool that contained both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, as is found in healthy individuals. It is unlikely that IFN-α triggered the high NK T frequency, as all other patients expressed low to normal NK T numbers. A parallel was observed in IFN-α-related increase in activation of NK T cells with that in conventional T and non-T cells. Normal interleukin (IL)-7, IL-12 and IL-15 plasma levels were found. In one of the patients sporadic NK T cells were detected at the tumour site. α-Galactosylceramide (αGalCer) stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells or isolated NK T cell lines from both patients induced IFN-γ, but no IL-4 and no response towards autologous tumour cells or lysates. The clinical course of disease in both patients was not exceptional with regard to histological subtype and extent of metastatic disease. Therefore, despite a constitutive high peripheral frequency and in vitroαGalCer responsiveness, the NK T cells in the two RCC patients did not show anti-tumour responsiveness.

  3. Acquired Hypothyroidism as a Predictive Marker of Outcome in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated With Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: A Literature-Based Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nearchou, Andreas; Valachis, Antonis; Lind, Pehr; Akre, Olof; Sandström, Per

    2015-08-01

    Hypothyroidism in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) during treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) sunitinib and sorafenib is a well-established side effect. Furthermore, the potential role of hypothyroidism as predictive marker of outcome has been studied but with conflicting results. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to assess the predictive value of hypothyroidism for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with mRCC during TKI therapy. We searched PubMed and the electronic abstract databases of the major international congresses' proceedings to identify all eligible studies that reported a correlation between the development of hypothyroidism during TKI treatment and outcome in patients with mRCC. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for PFS and OS were obtained from these publications and pooled in a meta-analysis. Eleven studies with a total of 500 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. We found no statistical significant difference in PFS between patients who developed hypothyroidism during sunitinib therapy and unaffected patients (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.59-1.13; P = .22; 6 studies; 250 patients). The HR for OS was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.31-0.87; P = .01) for patients who developed hypothyroidism during sunitinib therapy compared with patients who did not (4 studies; 147 patients). The development of hypothyroidism during TKI therapy is not clearly shown to be predictive of efficacy in patients with mRCC. The observed advantage in OS for the patients with acquired hypothyroidism should be interpreted with caution.

  4. Sunitinib as Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in the Management of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking a Glomus Vagale Tumor in the Head and Neck: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Serkan; Somner, Jessica; Rajan, Gunesh P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) of the head and neck with intracranial extension is rare and may pose difficulties to the diagnosis and management. Method We describe a unique case of a 76-year-old man with a metastatic RCC to the neck and lateral skull base with intracranial extension presenting with Collet-Sicard syndrome 8 years after initial diagnosis. The radiologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of a glomus vagale tumor on the basis of clinical and radiologic features. Results Despite radiotherapy, the intracranial extension progressed in size, resulting in early hydrocephalus. Sunitinib, a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was instituted to treat the glomus vagale tumor with a marked reduction in tumor volume and resolution of the early hydrocephalus. The surgical resection of the tumor with its intracranial extension was achieved without additional postoperative morbidity. The histopathologic diagnosis surprisingly demonstrated metastatic RCC. Conclusion We present a case of metastatic RCC to the head and neck region mimicking a glomus vagale tumor and describe the first use of sunitinib as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy to achieve a single-stage radical en bloc resection of the tumor mass. PMID:27247912

  5. Oncotargets in different renal cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Mischo, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell cancer is a heterogeneous group of cancers with different histologic subtypes. The majority of renal tumors in adults are clear cell renal cell carcinomas, which are characterized by von Hippel- Lindau (VHL) gene alterations. Recent advances in defining the genetic landscape of renal cancer has shown the genetic heterogeneity of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) and the presence of at least 3 additional ccRCC tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 3p. Due to inactivation of VHL, renal cancer cells produce the HIF-responsive growth factor VEGF. The PI3K--mTORC1 signaling axis also represents a target for therapy. The new systemic therapies, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, and mTOR inhibitors, aim to suppress angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor as a target. Various VEGF-inhibitors are approved for the treatment of ccRCC and we discuss recent advancements in the treatment of metastatic ccRCC. Other gene alterations have been identified in hereditary cancer syndromes, e.g. FLCN, TSC1, TSC2, TFE3, TFEB, MITF, FH, SDHB, SDHD, MET, and PTEN and we review their role in renal tumor carcinogenesis, prognosis, and targeted therapy. By reviewing the associations between morphologic features and molecular genetics of renal cancer we provide insight into the basis for targeted renal cancer therapy.

  6. Advance Directives and Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders in Patients with Cancer with Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression: Advanced Care Planning Implications

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, J. Lynn; Bianty, Josephine; Konzen, Benedict; Shin, Ki; Bruera, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Communication about end-of-life decisions is crucial. Although patients with metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) have a median survival time of 3 to 6 months, few data are available concerning the presence of advance directives and do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in this population. The objective of this study was to determine presence of advance directives and DNR order among patients with MSCC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed data concerning advance directives for 88 consecutive patients with cancer who had MSCC and required rehabilitation consultation at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from September 20, 2005 to August 29, 2008. We characterized the data using univariate descriptive statistics and used the Fisher exact test to find correlations. Results The mean age of this patient population was 55 years (range, 24–81). Thirty patients (33%) were female. Twenty patients (23%) had a living will, 27 patients (31%) had health care proxies, and 10 patients (11%) had either out-of-hospital DNR order and/or dictated DNR note. The median survival time for these patients was 4.3 months. Conclusion Despite strong evidence showing short survival times for MSCC patients, it seems many of these patients are not aware of the urgency to have an advance directive. This may be an indicator of delayed end-of-life palliative care and suboptimal doctor–patient communication. Using the catastrophic event of a diagnosis of MSCC to trigger communication and initiate palliative care may be beneficial to patients and their families. PMID:20192843

  7. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. PMID:27564279

  8. Effectiveness of very low doses of immunotherapy in advanced renal cell cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Buzio, C.; De Palma, G.; Passalacqua, R.; Potenzoni, D.; Ferrozzi, F.; Cattabiani, M. A.; Manenti, L.; Borghetti, A.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-one nephrectomized patients with metastatic renal cell cancer were treated with recombinant interleukin 2 (rlL-2) and interferon alpha (rIFN alpha). rIL-2 was administered s.c. at a dose of 1 x 10(6) IU m(-2) every 12 h on days 1 and 2, followed by 0.5 x 10(6) IU twice daily on days 3-5; rIFN alpha-2 was given i.m. as 1.8 x 10(6) IU m(-2) on days 3 and 5 of each week for 4 consecutive weeks. The cycle was regularly repeated at 4-month intervals and continued ad libitum in patients showing some response and in patients with progressing disease. Of 20 patients evaluable for treatment response, one (5%) had a complete response and three (15%) showed partial response. Three patients (15%) achieved stable disease and 13 (65%) were evaluated as having progressive disease. The estimated actuarial 44-month survival rate was 44%. Toxicity was limited to WHO grades 1 and 2 only. PMID:9275034

  9. Subgroup Analyses from a Phase 3, Open-Label, Randomized Study of Eribulin Mesylate Versus Capecitabine in Pretreated Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Twelves, Chris; Awada, Ahmad; Cortes, Javier; Yelle, Louise; Velikova, Galina; Olivo, Martin S.; Song, James; Dutcus, Corina E.; Kaufman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE AND METHODS Our secondary analyses compared survival with eribulin versus capecitabine in various patient subgroups from a phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Eligible women aged ≥18 years with advanced/metastatic breast cancer and ≤3 prior chemotherapies (≤2 for advanced/metastatic disease), including an anthracycline and taxane, were randomized 1:1 to intravenous eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 or twice-daily oral capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 on days 1–14 (21-day cycles). RESULTS In the intent-to-treat population (eribulin 554 and capecitabine 548), overall survival appeared longer with eribulin than capecitabine in various subgroups, including patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (15.9 versus 13.5 months, respectively), estrogen receptor-negative (14.4 versus 10.5 months, respectively), and triple-negative (14.4 versus 9.4 months, respectively) disease. Progression-free survival was similar between the treatment arms. CONCLUSIONS Patients with advanced/metastatic breast cancer and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-, estrogen receptor-, or triple-negative disease may gain particular benefit from eribulin as first-, second-, and third-line chemotherapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION (PRIMARY STUDY) This study reports the subgroup analyses of eribulin versus capecitabine from a phase 3, open-label, randomized study (www.clinicaltrials.gov; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00337103). PMID:27398025

  10. [The surgical opportunity in metastatic lesions of renal-cell carcinoma after a response to adjuvant immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Olivier, C; Carballido, J; Lao, A H; Bellido, D; Ramón y Cajal, S; Manzano, L; Ondina, L; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1995-03-01

    Surgical resection of primary lesions and single metastasis can be curative, but surgery, used as the only therapeutic option, is not unanimously accepted in patients with multiple metastasis and, apart from other considerations, there are no established clinical criteria to allow us to predict which patients will benefit from a metastectomy. This study evaluates four patients with advanced RCC. Three had multiple pulmonary metastasis at the time of diagnosis and one presented retroperitoneal mass at 36 months of follow-up. All patients were nephrectomized and received adjuvant immunotherapy with an association of IL-2 and 2b alpha-IFN subcutaneously, obtaining partial response of the disease after two treatment courses. Later, the patients underwent debulking surgery. Two patients are still alive and have no evidence of disease progression at 28 months and 8 months of follow-up. This data and that contrasted with other authors, suggests that surgical management would be a reasonable option in patients who have partially responded to immunotherapy, even though the selection of both candidates and surgical strategy should be considered on an individual basis.

  11. Systematic review of aromatase inhibitors in the first-line treatment for hormone sensitive advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Riemsma, Rob; Forbes, C A; Kessels, A; Lykopoulos, K; Amonkar, M M; Rea, D W; Kleijnen, J

    2010-08-01

    To undertake a systematic review of three first-line treatments (letrozole, anastrozole and exemestane) for hormone sensitive advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) in post-menopausal women. We searched six databases from inception up to January 2009 for relevant trials regardless of language or publication status. Randomised controlled clinical trials assessing the safety and efficacy of first-line AIs for post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+, i.e. ER+ and/or PgR+) with or without ErbB2 (HER2)-positive MBC, who have not received prior therapy for advanced or metastatic disease were included. Where meta-analysis using direct or indirect comparisons was considered unsuitable for some or all of the data, we employed a narrative synthesis method. Four studies (25 papers) met the inclusion criteria. From the available evidence, it was possible to directly compare the three AIs with tamoxifen. In addition, by using a network meta-analysis it was possible to compare the three AIs with each other. Based on direct evidence, letrozole seemed to be significantly better than tamoxifen in terms of time-to-progression (TTP) (HR = 0.70 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.82)), objective response rate (RR = 0.65 (95% CI: 0.52, 0.82)) and quality-adjusted time without symptoms or toxicity (Q-Twist difference = 1.5; P < 0.001). Exemestane seemed significantly superior to tamoxifen in terms of objective response rate (RR = 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.89)). Anastrozole seemed significantly superior to tamoxifen in terms of TTP in one trial (HR = 1.42 (95% CI: 1.15, NR)), but not in the other (HR = 1.01 (95% CI: 0.87, NR)). In terms of adverse events, no significant differences were found between letrozole and tamoxifen. Tamoxifen was associated with significantly more serious adverse events in comparison with exemestane (OR = 0.61 (95% CI: 0.38, 0.97)); while exemestane was associated with significantly more arthralgia in comparison with tamoxifen (OR = 2.33 (95% CI: 1.07, 5

  12. Effect of taurine on advanced glycation end products-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-S. Chuang, L.-Y.; Guh, J.-Y.; Yang, Y.-L.; Hsu, M.-S.

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that advanced glycation end products (AGE) play a major role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Taurine is a well documented antioxidant agent. To explore whether taurine was linked to altered AGE-mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DN, we examined the molecular mechanisms of taurine responsible for inhibition of AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells. We found that AGE (but not non-glycated BSA) caused inhibition of cellular mitogenesis rather than cell death by either necrosis or apoptosis. There were no changes in caspase 3 activity, bcl-2 protein expression, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in BSA, AGE, or the antioxidant taurine treatments in these cells. AGE-induced the Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was markedly blocked by taurine. Furthermore, taurine, the Raf-1 kinase inhibitor GW5074, and the ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 may have the ability to induce cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression from AGE-treated cells. The ability of taurine, GW5074, or PD98059 to inhibit AGE-induced hypertrophy was verified by the observation that it significantly decreased cell size, cellular hypertrophy index, and protein levels of RAGE, p27{sup Kip1}, collagen IV, and fibronectin. The results obtained in this study suggest that taurine may serve as the potential anti-fibrotic activity in DN through mechanism dependent of its Raf-1/ERK inactivation in AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells.

  13. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  14. The Relationship Between the Adverse Events and Efficacy of Sorafenib in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Study from Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Fuli; Wu, Guojun; Zhang, Longlong; Wang, Yangmin; Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qing; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Li, Peijun; Wang, Jian; Lu, Xitao; Yuan, Jianlin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between the adverse events and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), with a purpose to guide the judgment of efficacy in sorafenib treatment.Eighty-three mRCC patients who received sorafenib therapy at northwest China were studied retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to correlate tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) with adverse event types and grades.Among 83 patients who underwent sorafenib therapy, 2 cases (2.4%) had completed response (CR), 14 cases (16.9%) had partial response (PR), 57 cases (68.7%) had stable disease (SD), and 10 cases (12.0%) developed progressive disease (PD). The median PFS and OS were 15.0 and 29.0 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 1 or 2 adverse events included hand-foot syndrome (68.7%), diarrhea (54.2%), and alopecia (51.8%). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were hand-foot syndrome (6.0%), hypertension (4.8%), and diarrhea (3.6%). The frequency and severity of adverse events correlated with tumor response rate (both with P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed the independent predictors of better PFS included rash (OR 0.307, 95%CI 0.148-0.636, P = 0.001) and diarrhea (OR 0.391, 95%CI 0.169-0.783, P = 0.008). Elevated transaminase was the independent predictor of poor PFS (OR 2.606, 95%CI 1.299-5.532, P = 0.012). For OS, rash (OR 0.473, 95%CI 0.253-0.886, P = 0.019) and diarrhea (OR 0.321, 95%CI 0.171-0.605, P = 0.000) correlated with better OS.Sorafenib-related adverse events are associated with efficacy in patients with mRCC from northwest China. Rash and diarrhea are independent protective factors of both PFS and OS, and elevated transaminase is an independent risk factor of PFS. A large prospective study is warranted.

  15. Levels of circulating CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cells correlate with outcome in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Farace, F; Gross-Goupil, M; Tournay, E; Taylor, M; Vimond, N; Jacques, N; Billiot, F; Mauguen, A; Hill, C; Escudier, B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Predicting the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy would be of clinical value in patients (pts) with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). We tested the hypothesis that circulating endothelial cell (CEC), bone marrow-derived CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cell or plasma angiogenic factor levels are associated with clinical outcome in mRCC pts undergoing treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Methods: Fifty-five mRCC pts were prospectively monitored at baseline (day 1) and day 14 during treatment (46 pts received sunitinib and 9 pts received sorafenib). Circulating endothelial cells (CD45−CD31+CD146+7-amino-actinomycin (7AAD)− cells) were measured in 1 ml whole blood using four-color flow cytometry (FCM). Circulating CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor cells were measured in progenitor-enriched fractions by four-color FCM. Plasma VEGF, sVEGFR2, SDF-1α and sVCAM-1 levels were determined by ELISA. Correlations between baseline CEC, CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor cells, plasma factors, as well as day 1–day 14 changes in CEC, CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor, plasma factor levels, and response to TKI, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: No significant correlation between markers and response to TKI was observed. No association between baseline CEC, plasma VEGF, sVEGFR-2, SDF-1α, sVCAM-1 levels with PFS and OS was observed. However, baseline CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor cell levels were associated with PFS (P=0.01) and OS (P=0.006). Changes in this population and in SDF-1α levels between day 1 and day 14 were associated with PFS (P=0.03, P=0.002). Changes in VEGF and SDF-1α levels were associated with OS (P=0.02, P=0.007). Conclusion: Monitoring CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cells, plasma VEGF and SDF-1α levels could be of clinical interest in TKI-treated mRCC pts to predict outcome. PMID:21386843

  16. The Relationship Between the Adverse Events and Efficacy of Sorafenib in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Study from Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Fuli; Wu, Guojun; Zhang, Longlong; Wang, Yangmin; Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qing; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Li, Peijun; Wang, Jian; Lu, Xitao; Yuan, Jianlin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between the adverse events and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), with a purpose to guide the judgment of efficacy in sorafenib treatment.Eighty-three mRCC patients who received sorafenib therapy at northwest China were studied retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to correlate tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) with adverse event types and grades.Among 83 patients who underwent sorafenib therapy, 2 cases (2.4%) had completed response (CR), 14 cases (16.9%) had partial response (PR), 57 cases (68.7%) had stable disease (SD), and 10 cases (12.0%) developed progressive disease (PD). The median PFS and OS were 15.0 and 29.0 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 1 or 2 adverse events included hand-foot syndrome (68.7%), diarrhea (54.2%), and alopecia (51.8%). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were hand-foot syndrome (6.0%), hypertension (4.8%), and diarrhea (3.6%). The frequency and severity of adverse events correlated with tumor response rate (both with P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed the independent predictors of better PFS included rash (OR 0.307, 95%CI 0.148-0.636, P = 0.001) and diarrhea (OR 0.391, 95%CI 0.169-0.783, P = 0.008). Elevated transaminase was the independent predictor of poor PFS (OR 2.606, 95%CI 1.299-5.532, P = 0.012). For OS, rash (OR 0.473, 95%CI 0.253-0.886, P = 0.019) and diarrhea (OR 0.321, 95%CI 0.171-0.605, P = 0.000) correlated with better OS.Sorafenib-related adverse events are associated with efficacy in patients with mRCC from northwest China. Rash and diarrhea are independent protective factors of both PFS and OS, and elevated transaminase is an independent risk factor of PFS. A large prospective study is warranted. PMID:26656362

  17. Evaluation of response from axitinib per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors versus Choi criteria in previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Nott, Louise; Joshi, Abhishek; Kannourakis, George; Tarazi, Jamal; Alam, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Background Axitinib, a selective and potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, was available to patients from Canada and Australia, prior to regulatory approval of axitinib in these countries, for treatment of clear-cell metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) after failure of one prior systemic regimen. Methods This single-arm, open-label study of axitinib evaluated the efficacy, safety, and quality of life (QoL) in patients with mRCC whose disease progressed after one prior systemic first-line regimen. Primary objective was objective response rate evaluated per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and Choi criteria. Progression-free survival, overall survival, safety, and QoL were secondary end points. Due to the small study size, analyses comprised of descriptive statistics. Results Fifteen patients were recruited, five from Canada and ten from Australia, over a limited recruitment period. Thirteen patients received sunitinib as prior therapy. All patients had clear-cell carcinoma, eleven had prior nephrectomy. Liver, lung, and lymph nodes were the most frequent sites of metastases; one patient had brain metastasis. Median time on axitinib was 118.0 days (range: 3.5–645.0 days); estimated survival probability at 12 months was 57.8%. Two (13.3%) patients had objective responses per RECIST versus nine (60.0%) per Choi criteria. Six patients had progressive disease based on RECIST versus three per Choi criteria. Nine (60.0%) events of progression or death occurred by the end of study, and three patients continued to receive the study drug. Fatigue (33%) and diarrhea (20%) were the most common grade ≥3 all-causality, treatment-emergent adverse events. The mean change in European Quality of Life – 5 Dimensions score from baseline to end of treatment was −0.0837. Conclusion The small number of patients and lack of a comparator arm limit the ability to draw definitive conclusions; however, safety and

  18. Dabrafenib for Treating Unresectable, Advanced or Metastatic BRAF V600 Mutation-Positive Melanoma: An Evidence Review Group Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fleeman, Nigel; Bagust, Adrian; Beale, Sophie; Boland, Angela; Dickson, Rumona; Dwan, Kerry; Richardson, Marty; Dundar, Yenal; Davis, Helen; Banks, Lindsay

    2015-09-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturer of dabrafenib, to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of dabrafenib for the treatment of unresectable, advanced or metastatic BRAF V600 mutation-positive melanoma in accordance with the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG) at the University of Liverpool was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article summarizes the ERG's review of the evidence submitted by the company and provides a summary of the Appraisal Committee's (AC) final decision in October 2014. The clinical evidence for dabrafenib was derived from an ongoing phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, international, multicentre clinical trial (BREAK-3) involving 230 patients randomized 2:1 to receive either dabrafenib or dacarbazine. A significant improvement in median progression-free survival (PFS) but not overall survival (OS) was reported in the dabrafenib arm compared with dacarbazine. Vemurafenib is considered a more appropriate comparator than is dacarbazine. The clinical evidence for vemurafenib was derived from a completed phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, international, multicentre clinical trial (BRIM-3) involving 675 patients randomized 1:1 to receive either vemurafenib or dacarbazine. A significant improvement in median PFS and OS was reported in the vemurafenib arm compared with dacarbazine. As there is no direct evidence comparing dabrafenib versus vemurafenib, the company presented an indirect treatment comparison (ITC) that demonstrated no statistical differences between dabrafenib and vemurafenib for PFS or OS. The ERG expressed concerns with the ITC, mainly in relation to the validity of the assumptions underpinning the methodology; the ERG concluded this resulted in findings that are unlikely to be robust or reliable. Dabrafenib and

  19. Effect of Bicarbonate Supplementation on Renal Function and Nutritional Indices in Predialysis Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil

    2014-01-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m2) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m2) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m2, p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m2).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition. PMID:25606047

  20. Pharmacogenetics-Guided Phase I Study of Capecitabine on an Intermittent Schedule in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Ross Andrew; Syn, Nicholas; Lee, Soo-Chin; Wang, Lingzhi; Lim, Xn-Yii; Loh, Marie; Tan, Sing-Huang; Zee, Ying-Kiat; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Chuah, Benjamin; Chan, Daniel; Lim, Siew-Eng; Goh, Boon-Cher; Soong, Richie; Yong, Wei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The FDA-approved starting dosage of capecitabine is 1,250 mg/m2, and market research indicates that U.S. physicians routinely prescribe 1,000 mg/m2. Retrospective analyses however report reduced toxicity and efficacy in a subset of patients with the 3R/3R genotype of the thymidylate synthase gene enhancer region (TSER). This study sought to develop TSER genotype-specific guidelines for capecitabine dosing. Capecitabine was dose-escalated in advanced and/or metastatic cancer patients with TSER 3R/3R (Group A; N = 18) or 2R/2R + 2R/3R (Group B; N = 5) from 1,250 to 1,625 mg/m2 b.i.d., every 2 weeks on/1 week off for up to 8 cycles. Parent and metabolites pharmacokinetics, adverse events, and tumour response were assessed. The maximum tolerated and recommended doses in 3R/3R patients are 1,625 mg/m2 and 1,500 mg/m2. At 1,500 mg/m2, one in nine 3R/3R patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity. Dosing guidelines for 2R/2R + 2R/3R remain undetermined due to poor accrual. The results indicate that 3R/3R patients may be amenable to 1,500 mg/m2 b.i.d. on an intermittent schedule, and is the first to prospectively validate the utility of TSER pharmacogenetic-testing before capecitabine treatment. PMID:27296624

  1. Cetuximab for the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent/metastatic oral cancer: An investigation of distant metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Naruse, Tomofumi; Yanamoto, Souichi; Matsushita, Yuki; Sakamoto, Yuki; Morishita, Kota; Ohba, Seigo; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Yamada, Shin-Ichi; Asahina, Izumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the efficacy and safety of cetuximab therapy for patients with locally advanced (LA) and recurrent/metastatic (R/M) oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), with a specific focus on distant metastases (DMs). Data from 21 patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC treated with cetuximab therapy in our department between December, 2012 and July, 2015 were reviewed. The endpoint was the time-to-progression and the assessments made were tumor response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety. The overall response rate was 57.1%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 33.3%. The overall median PFS and OS were 5.5 and 8.0 months, respectively. For patients with DMs, the overall response rate was 60.0%, with a CR rate of 40.0%. The median PFS and OS were 3.8 and 5.8 months, respectively. In addition, improved 1-year OS was observed following approval of cetuximab, although the differences between the group of patients treated after that time and historical controls were not statistically significantly (P=0.246). Grade 3–4 adverse events included infusion reaction (4 cases), neutropenia, hypophosphatemia, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, liver toxicity and mucositis (1 case each). There was one cetuximab-related death due to interstitial pneumonia. An acne-like rash was observed in all cases, but no grade 3 or 4 rash was reported. Hypomagnesemia was observed in 10 cases. Our results suggest that cetuximab may display significant therapeutic efficacy in patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC, including those with DMs. PMID:27446558

  2. Pharmacogenetics-Guided Phase I Study of Capecitabine on an Intermittent Schedule in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumours.

    PubMed

    Soo, Ross Andrew; Syn, Nicholas; Lee, Soo-Chin; Wang, Lingzhi; Lim, Xn-Yii; Loh, Marie; Tan, Sing-Huang; Zee, Ying-Kiat; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Chuah, Benjamin; Chan, Daniel; Lim, Siew-Eng; Goh, Boon-Cher; Soong, Richie; Yong, Wei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The FDA-approved starting dosage of capecitabine is 1,250 mg/m(2), and market research indicates that U.S. physicians routinely prescribe 1,000 mg/m(2). Retrospective analyses however report reduced toxicity and efficacy in a subset of patients with the 3R/3R genotype of the thymidylate synthase gene enhancer region (TSER). This study sought to develop TSER genotype-specific guidelines for capecitabine dosing. Capecitabine was dose-escalated in advanced and/or metastatic cancer patients with TSER 3R/3R (Group A; N = 18) or 2R/2R + 2R/3R (Group B; N = 5) from 1,250 to 1,625 mg/m(2) b.i.d., every 2 weeks on/1 week off for up to 8 cycles. Parent and metabolites pharmacokinetics, adverse events, and tumour response were assessed. The maximum tolerated and recommended doses in 3R/3R patients are 1,625 mg/m(2) and 1,500 mg/m(2). At 1,500 mg/m(2), one in nine 3R/3R patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity. Dosing guidelines for 2R/2R + 2R/3R remain undetermined due to poor accrual. The results indicate that 3R/3R patients may be amenable to 1,500 mg/m(2) b.i.d. on an intermittent schedule, and is the first to prospectively validate the utility of TSER pharmacogenetic-testing before capecitabine treatment. PMID:27296624

  3. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  4. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products, measured as skin autofluorescence, in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Jasper W L; de Vries, Aiko P J; Lutgers, Helen L; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Huisman, Roel M; van Son, Willem J; de Jong, Paul E; Smit, Andries J

    2005-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate during renal failure and dialysis. Kidney transplantation is thought to reverse this accumulation by restoring renal function. Using a noninvasive and validated autofluorescence reader, we evaluated AGE levels in 285 transplant recipients (mean age, 52 years; range, 41 to 60 years), 32 dialysis patients (mean age, 56 years; range, 43 to 65 years), and 231 normal control subjects (mean age, 51 years; range, 40 to 65 years). Measurements in transplant recipients were performed for a mean of 73 months (range, 32 to 143 months) after transplantation. Dialysis patients were on dialysis therapy for a mean of 42 months (range, 17 to 107 months). Fluorescence was significantly increased in dialysis patients compared with normal control subjects (2.8 vs. 2.0 arbitrary units [a.u.], P < .0001). Although fluorescence levels were significantly decreased in transplant recipients compared with dialysis patients (2.5 vs. 2.8 a.u., P < .0001), fluorescence in transplant recipients was higher than in controls (2.5 vs. 2.0 a.u., P < .0001). In transplant recipients, fluorescence correlated positively with the duration of dialysis prior to transplantation (R = 0.21, P < .0001), and negatively with creatinine clearance (R = -0.34, P < .0001). No correlation was found between time after transplantation and fluorescence in transplant recipients (R = -0.10, P = .10). Fluorescence in dialysis patients was positively correlated with duration of dialysis (R = 0.36, P = .042). Our results, like those of others, suggest that kidney transplantation does not fully correct increased AGE levels found in dialysis patients. The increased AGE levels in kidney transplant recipients cannot be explained by the differences in renal function alone. The availability of a simple, noninvasive method (AGE-Reader) to measure AGE accumulation may be used to monitor AGE accumulation in a clinical setting as well as in a study setting.

  5. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products, measured as skin autofluorescence, in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Jasper W L; de Vries, Aiko P J; Lutgers, Helen L; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Huisman, Roel M; van Son, Willem J; de Jong, Paul E; Smit, Andries J

    2005-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate during renal failure and dialysis. Kidney transplantation is thought to reverse this accumulation by restoring renal function. Using a noninvasive and validated autofluorescence reader, we evaluated AGE levels in 285 transplant recipients (mean age, 52 years; range, 41 to 60 years), 32 dialysis patients (mean age, 56 years; range, 43 to 65 years), and 231 normal control subjects (mean age, 51 years; range, 40 to 65 years). Measurements in transplant recipients were performed for a mean of 73 months (range, 32 to 143 months) after transplantation. Dialysis patients were on dialysis therapy for a mean of 42 months (range, 17 to 107 months). Fluorescence was significantly increased in dialysis patients compared with normal control subjects (2.8 vs. 2.0 arbitrary units [a.u.], P < .0001). Although fluorescence levels were significantly decreased in transplant recipients compared with dialysis patients (2.5 vs. 2.8 a.u., P < .0001), fluorescence in transplant recipients was higher than in controls (2.5 vs. 2.0 a.u., P < .0001). In transplant recipients, fluorescence correlated positively with the duration of dialysis prior to transplantation (R = 0.21, P < .0001), and negatively with creatinine clearance (R = -0.34, P < .0001). No correlation was found between time after transplantation and fluorescence in transplant recipients (R = -0.10, P = .10). Fluorescence in dialysis patients was positively correlated with duration of dialysis (R = 0.36, P = .042). Our results, like those of others, suggest that kidney transplantation does not fully correct increased AGE levels found in dialysis patients. The increased AGE levels in kidney transplant recipients cannot be explained by the differences in renal function alone. The availability of a simple, noninvasive method (AGE-Reader) to measure AGE accumulation may be used to monitor AGE accumulation in a clinical setting as well as in a study setting. PMID:16037252

  6. Use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors after failure of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma undergoing hemodialysis: A single-center experience with four cases.

    PubMed

    Omae, Kenji; Kondo, Tsunenori; Takagi, Toshio; Iizuka, Junpei; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    We retrospectively identified patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis treated with the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors as a second- and/or third-line targeted therapy after treatment failure with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Patient medical records were reviewed to evaluate the response to therapies and treatment-related toxicities. Four patients were identified. All patients had undergone nephrectomy, and one had received immunotherapy before targeted therapy. Two patients had clear cell histology, and the other two had papillary histology. All patients were classified into the intermediate risk group according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center risk model. All patients were treated with everolimus as a second- or third-line therapy, and two patients were treated with temsirolimus as a second- or third-line therapy after treatment failure with sorafenib or sunitinib. The median duration of everolimus therapy was 6.7 months, whereas that of temsirolimus was 9.5 months. All patients had stable disease as the best response during each period of therapy. There were no severe adverse events. The use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in patients who previously failed to respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors appears to be feasible in patients with end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis.

  7. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  8. Rosiglitazone prevents advanced glycation end products-induced renal toxicity likely through suppression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyan; Li, Cai; Li, Xiaokun; Cai, Lu

    2007-04-01

    In the development of diabetic nephropathy, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play a causative role via induction of extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), as a major inhibitor of plasminogen activator that plays an important role in degrading ECM, was found to significantly increase in renal fibrotic diseases. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma prevented diabetic nephropathy. The present study, therefore, was to define whether or not AGE-induced renal ECM accumulation and renal dysfunction are mediated by upregulation of PAI-1 expression and whether or not PPAR-gamma agonist can attenuate these AGE effects via suppressing PAI-1 expression. Rats were given AGEs alone by iv injection at 100 mg/kg daily with or without oral supplementation of PPAR-gamma agonist rosiglitazone (RGZ) at 2 mg/kg daily for 6 weeks. Results showed that AGEs induced a renal ECM accumulation, as shown by increases in periodic acid-Schiff-positive materials, fibronectin, and type IV collagen (Col IV) contents in glomeruli, and a mild renal dysfunction, as shown by an increase in urinary proteins. AGEs also caused an increase in PAI-1 expression and a decrease in plasminogen activator bioactivity in the kidney. Treatment with RGZ significantly ameliorated AGE-induced renal ECM accumulation, proteinuria, and PAI-1 upregulation. Direct exposure of rat mesangial cells to AGEs in vitro induced increases in fibronectin and Col IV syntheses along with an increase in PAI-1 expression, effects significantly attenuated by RGZ. Preincubation of PAI-1 antibody to AGE-treated mesangial cells completely prevented AGE-induced fibronectin and Col IV production. These results suggest that upregulation of PAI-1 expression plays a critical role in AGE-induced renal ECM accumulation. Renal protection of RGZ from AGEs may be associated with the suppression of PAI-1 expression through PPAR-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  9. Cabozantinib in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: design, development, and potential place in the therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Paolo; Verzoni, Elena; Ratta, Raffaele; Mennitto, Alessia; de Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has markedly improved over the last few years with the introduction of several targeted agents in clinical practice. Nevertheless, either primary or secondary resistance to inhibition of VEGF and mTOR pathways has limited the clinical benefit of these systemic treatments. Recently, a better understanding of the involvement of MET and its ligand HGF in many biological processes made this signaling pathway an attractive therapeutic target in oncology, particularly in mRCC. Herein, we review the development of cabozantinib, a recently approved inhibitor of multiple tyrosine kinase receptors, including MET, VEGFRs, and AXL, which has proven to increase progression-free survival and overall survival when compared to everolimus in mRCC patients who had progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. Finally, we discuss the potential role of cabozantinib within the current treatment landscape for mRCC. PMID:27462141

  10. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  11. Vismodegib and Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Chondrosarcoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Conjunctival Kaposi Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Kaposi Sarcoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone

  12. New advances in genitourinary cancer: evidence gathered in 2014.

    PubMed

    Suárez, C; Puente, J; Gallardo, E; Méndez-Vidal, M J; Climent, M A; León, L; Olmos, D; García del Muro, X; González-Billalabeitia, E; Grande, E; Bellmunt, J; Mellado, B; Maroto, P; González del Alba, A

    2015-09-01

    This review provides updated information published in 2014 regarding advances and major achievements in genitourinary cancer. Sections include the best in prostate cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, and germ cell tumors. In the field of prostate cancer, data related to treatment approach of hormone-sensitive disease, castrate-resistant prostate cancer, mechanisms of resistance, new drugs, and molecular research are presented. In relation to renal cancer, relevant aspects in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma, immunotherapy, and molecular research, including angiogenesis and von Hippel-Lindau gene, molecular biology of non-clear cell histologies, and epigenetics of clear renal cell cancer are described. New strategies in the management of muscle-invasive localized bladder cancer and metastatic disease are reported as well as salient findings of biomolecular research in urothelial cancer. Some approaches intended to improve outcomes in poor prognosis patients with metastatic germ cell cancer are also reported. Results of clinical trials in these areas are discussed. PMID:26227584

  13. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Omar M. Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy{sub 10}). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy{sub 10}. Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  14. Inhibition of NA+/H+ Exchanger 1 Attenuates Renal Dysfunction Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Chen, Geng-Rong; Wang, Fu; Xu, Ping; Liu, Li-Ying; Yin, Ya-Ling; Wang, Shuang-Xi

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that sodium hydrogen exchanger 1 (NHE1) is involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. The role of NHE1 in kidney dysfunction induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) remains unknown. Renal damage was induced by AGEs via tail vein injections in rats. Function and morphology of kidney were determined. Compared to vehicle- or BSA-treated rats, AGEs caused abnormalities of kidney structures and functions in rats, accompanied with higher MDA level and lower GSH content. Gene expressions of NHE1 gene and TGF-β1 in the renal cortex and urine were also increased in AGEs-injected rats. Importantly, all these detrimental effects induced by AGEs were reversed by inhibition of NHE1 or suppression of oxidative stress. These pieces of data demonstrated that AGEs may activate NHE1 to induce renal damage, which is related to TGF-β1. PMID:26697498

  15. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M.; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed. PMID:26617515

  16. Oral essential amino acid supplements in children with advanced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Jones, R W; Dalton, N; Start, K; El-Bishti, M M; Chantler, C

    1980-07-01

    The effects on growth, nitrogen balance, and body composition of a protein-restricted diet supplemented with oral essential amino acids (EAA) were studied in seven children with advanced chronic renal failure. The diet was designed to provide minimum protein requirements for height-age, half in unselected form and half as an EAA supplement. Energy from carbohydrate and fat were increased to give a protein/energy ratio of 1.25 G:100 kcal. Nitrogen balance, studied in five children before and after 6 to 8 months of EAA treatment, was improved in each case. intracellular water (total body water minus bromide space) increased in four children but fell in three children during treatment. No significant improvement in growth, expressed as height or height velocity standard deviation scores in relation to bone age, was observed. Serum urea and urea/creatinine ratio fell after institution of EAA treatment, but the fall was not sustained. Although the EAA preparation proved acceptable to the children, dietary assessments indicated that the desired dietary aims were rarely achieved. It is concluded that, in this pediatric age group, the long-term application of a protein restricted diet with EAA supplements is of limited value. PMID:7395791

  17. Left-sided renal colic as a symptom of advanced stomach cancer – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kuciel-Lisieska, Grażyna; Licznerska, Grażyna; Tenderenda, Michał

    2012-01-01

    The typical symptoms of advanced cancer of the stomach are well known in clinical practice. The presented case concerns a patient with symptoms of left-sided renal colic, caused by a malignant tumour involving the ureter, which was diagnosed with a CT scan. The multifocal process, involving the stomach, two parts of the colon, the left ovary and the side of the pelvis, was confirmed only during surgery. The resection or partial resection of the above-mentioned organs involved by the malignant process and reconstruction of the alimentary tract as well as the ureter were performed at time of this operation. The patient's recovery was without any complications. The histopathological findings support the diagnosis of this malignant process as disseminated stomach cancer. In the available literature only two cases of stomach cancer metastasis to the ureter have been described. In both cited examples resection of the ureter with nephrectomy was performed. The review of the literature supports the value of stomach palliative resection in prolonging life and improving quality of life. PMID:23788876

  18. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed.

  19. Oral essential amino acid supplements in children with advanced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Jones, R W; Dalton, N; Start, K; El-Bishti, M M; Chantler, C

    1980-07-01

    The effects on growth, nitrogen balance, and body composition of a protein-restricted diet supplemented with oral essential amino acids (EAA) were studied in seven children with advanced chronic renal failure. The diet was designed to provide minimum protein requirements for height-age, half in unselected form and half as an EAA supplement. Energy from carbohydrate and fat were increased to give a protein/energy ratio of 1.25 G:100 kcal. Nitrogen balance, studied in five children before and after 6 to 8 months of EAA treatment, was improved in each case. intracellular water (total body water minus bromide space) increased in four children but fell in three children during treatment. No significant improvement in growth, expressed as height or height velocity standard deviation scores in relation to bone age, was observed. Serum urea and urea/creatinine ratio fell after institution of EAA treatment, but the fall was not sustained. Although the EAA preparation proved acceptable to the children, dietary assessments indicated that the desired dietary aims were rarely achieved. It is concluded that, in this pediatric age group, the long-term application of a protein restricted diet with EAA supplements is of limited value.

  20. A phase II trial of the BCL-2 homolog domain 3 mimetic AT-101 in combination with docetaxel for recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swiecicki, Paul L.; Bellile, Emily; Sacco, Assuntina G.; Pearson, Alexander T.; Taylor, Jeremy M. G.; Jackson, Trachette L.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Spector, Matthew E.; Shuman, Andrew; Malloy, Kelly; Moyer, Jeffrey; McKean, Erin; McLean, Scott; Sukari, Ammar; Wolf, Gregory T.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Prince, Mark; Bradford, Carol; Carey, Thomas E.; Wang, Shaomeng; Nör, Jacques E.; Worden, Francis P.

    2016-01-01

    Background AT-101 is a BCL-2 Homolog domain 3 mimetic previously demonstrated to have tumoricidal effects in advanced solid organ malignancies. Given the evidence of activity in xenograft models, treatment with AT-101 in combination with docetaxel is a therapeutic doublet of interest in metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Patients and Methods Patients included in this trial had unresectable, recurrent, or distantly metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (R/M HNSCC) not amenable to curative radiation or surgery. This was an open label randomized, phase II trial in which patients were administered AT-101 in addition to docetaxel. The three treatment arms were docetaxel, docetaxel plus pulse dose AT-101, and docetaxel plus metronomic dose AT-101. The primary endpoint of this trial was overall response rate. Results Thirty-five patients were registered and 32 were evaluable for treatment response. Doublet therapy with AT-101 and docetaxel was well tolerated with only 2 patients discontinuing therapy due to treatment related toxicities. The overall response rate was 11% (4 partial responses) with a clinical benefit rate of 74%. Median progression free survival was 4.3 months (range: 0.7–13.7) and overall survival was 5.5 months (range: 0.4–24). No significant differences were noted between dosing strategies. Conclusion Although met with a favorable toxicity profile, the addition of AT-101 to docetaxel in R/M HNSCC does not appear to demonstrate evidence of efficacy. PMID:27225873

  1. Can the bowel substitute for the kidney in advanced renal failure?

    PubMed

    Friedman, Eli A

    2009-08-01

    This Editorial provides a brief commentary exploring the possibilities of the bowel acting as a substitute for kidney function in chronic kidney disease/end stage renal disease. Three concepts are highlighted as potential means by which bowel function can serve as an alternative to renal filtration: oral sorbents, diarrhea therapy and bacterial-enzyme nitrogen recycling within the gut. PMID:19558343

  2. Pemetrexed combined with paclitaxel in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase I-II trial.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, George P; Dimitroulis, John; Toubis, Michael; Katis, Costas; Karaindros, Dimitris; Stathopoulos, John; Koutandos, John

    2007-07-01

    Pemetrexed, a novel multi-targeted agent established for the treatment of mesothelioma, has been under investigation for other malignancies, and in recent years particularly for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present trial we investigated pemetrexed in combination with paclitaxel as front-line treatment in advanced or metastatic NSCLC. Our objectives were to determine the response rate, median and overall survival and toxicity. From April 2005 until May 2006, 51 patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC were enrolled and 48 were considered evaluable. There were 39 males and nine females, median age 62 years (range 37-81 years), one patient stage IIIA N(2), 23 patients, IIIB and 24, stage IV. All patients had a cytologically- or histologically-confirmed diagnosis. Pemetrexed was administered at a standard dose of 500mg/m(2) and paclitaxel at an escalating dose starting at 135mg/m(2), then 150mg/m(2) and ending at a dose of 175mg/m(2); the level was increased every three patients. Both agents were administered on day 1, repeated every 3 weeks for six courses. A 39.6% partial response rate was observed with a median survival of 14 months. Toxicity was mild with 8.3% grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and other very mild hematologic and non-hematologic adverse reactions. The combination of pemetrexed and paclitaxel at doses of 500mg/m(2) and 175mg/m(2), respectively, has been shown to be an effective combination with very limited toxicity. PMID:17382431

  3. Correlation between spontaneous metastatic potential, platelet-aggregating activity of cell surface extracts, and cell surface sialylation in 10 metastatic-variant derivatives of a rat renal sarcoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, E; Salk, P L; Yogeeswaran, G; Karpatkin, S

    1980-01-01

    Several properties of 10 cell lines derived from the polyoma-induced PW20 Wistar-Furth rat renal sarcoma have been examined, including the ability of the tumor cells to metastasize spontaneously from subcutaneous sites in syngeneic hosts, the platelet-aggregating activity of material extracted by urea from the surface of cultured cells, the sialic acid content of the platelet-aggregating material, and the degree of sialylation of cell surface glycoconjugates in cultured cells. A correlation has been observed among all of these parameters. The results suggest a possible link between the degree of cell surface sialylation of tumor cells, their ability to aggregate platelets, and their ability to metastasize. PMID:6933486

  4. Budd-Chiari syndrome in urology: Impact on nephrectomy for advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shirodkar, Samir P.; Soloway, Mark S.; Ciancio, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is a poorly understood entity in urology. It results from obstruction of the hepatic veins and the subsequent complications. It has been infrequently reported to be secondary to hepatic venous obstruction from invasion by an inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombus in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We report the largest known series of patients with RCC and BCS. Patients and Methods: Ten patients presented to a tertiary hospital with locally advanced RCC with IVC tumor thrombus. All were evaluated and had clinical or radiographic evidence of BCS. All underwent nephrectomy, IVC thrombectomy or ligation, and tumor removal from the hepatic veins. The perioperative and pathological factors were measured. These included estimated blood loss (EBL) and transfusions. Inpatient factors including duration of intubation, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and overall length of stay (LOS) were recorded. The tumor-free status was evaluated. Results: The average age was 59 years. No intraoperative deaths occurred. Two intraoperative complications were noted. The mean EBL was 4244 cc; mean surgery length was 8 hours 12 minutes; and the mean ICU stay was nine days. The overall LOS averaged 13.25 days. One patient died postoperatively of sepsis and multisystem organ failure. One patient required reoperation for an abdominal wall hematoma caused by subcutaneous enoxaparin administration. Average follow-up was 28 months. Five patients are alive with no evidence of disease. Conclusions: Budd-Chiari syndrome is a rare entity in urology, with a potential for significant morbidity and mortality. Surgical excision of the primary tumor along with thrombectomy results in alleviation of BCS and improvement in the patient. PMID:22022058

  5. Advanced glycation end products and the progressive course of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Heidland, A; Sebekova, K; Schinzel, R

    2001-10-01

    In experimental and human diabetic nephropathy (DN), it has been shown that advanced glycation end products (AGEs), in particular, carboxymethyl-lysine and pentosidine, accumulate with malondialdehyde in glomerular lesions in relation to disease severity and in the presence of an upregulated receptor for AGE (RAGE) in podocytes. Toxic effects of AGEs result from structural and functional alterations in plasma and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, in particular, from cross-linking of proteins and interaction of AGEs with their receptors and/or binding proteins. In mesangial and endothelial cells, the AGE-RAGE interaction caused enhanced formation of oxygen radicals with subsequent activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha), growth factors (transforming growth factor-beta1 [TGF-beta1], insulin-like growth factor-1), and adhesion molecules (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1). In tubular cells, incubation with AGE albumin was followed by stimulation of the mitogen-activating protein (MAP) kinase pathway and its downstream target, the activating protien-1 (AP-1) complex, TGF-beta1 overexpression, enhanced protein kinase C activity, decreased cell proliferation, and impaired protein degradation rate, in part caused by decreased cathepsin activities. The pathogenic relevance of AGEs was further verified by in vivo experiments in euglycemic rats and mice by the parenteral administration of AGE albumin, leading in the glomeruli to TGF-beta1 overproduction, enhanced gene expression of ECM proteins, and morphological lesions similar to those of DN. Evidence for the pathogenic relevance of AGEs in DN also comes from experimental studies in which the formation and/or action of AGEs was modulated by aminoguanidine, OPB-9195, pyridoxamine, soluble RAGEs, serine protease trypsin, and antioxidants, resulting in improved cell and/or renal function.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Kwon, Young Suk; Labib, Mina; Foran, David J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26609190

  7. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  8. Sorafenib Tosylate With or Without Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage D Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma

  9. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  10. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-28

    Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  11. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Methods According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Conclusions Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies. PMID:26157320

  12. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced or Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Bile Duct or Gallbladder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  13. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy with irinotecan or oxaliplatin-involved regimen for untreated metastatic advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Luhong; Bai, Jianling; Huang, Huaying; Tang, Cuiju; Yang, Jinsong; Zhou, Baoning; Gong, Yongling; Duanmu, Zhong; Chen, Jinfei

    2010-01-01

    A large number of randomized controlled trials involving chemotherapy in the management of advanced colorectal cancer were conducted. 5-FU/LV in combination with irinotecan (IRI) or oxaliplatin (OXA) was used. The aim of the meta-analysis was to compare and evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the two therapeutic approaches for patients with advanced colorectal cancer. A literature search, study selection and assessment, data collection, and analysis were undertaken by two reviewers according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing IRI versus OXA, in combination with 5-FU/LV in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer were performed. Seven studies involving 2,107 patients met the inclusion criteria. The OXA + 5-FU/LV regimen showed a significant increase in survival by lower hazard ratios (HR) [HR 1.28; 95% CI (1.13-1.45)] and was associated with lower toxicities. The OXA + 5-FU/LV regimen was superior or equal to the IRI + 5-FU/LV regimen in prolonging time to progression and median survival. The IRI + 5-FU/LV regimen resulted in higher hazard ratios in nausea vomiting/emesis and diarrhea [HR 1.99, 95% CI (1.19-3.31); HR 1.83, 95% CI (1.38-2.44)] and lower hazard ratios in paresthesia, sensory neuropathy, and thrombocytopenia [HR 0.09, 95% CI (0.03-0.23); HR 0.04 95% CI (0.01-0.13); HR 0.19 95% CI (0.05-0.64)] than the OXA + 5-FU/LV regimen. Compared with IRI, OXA is more appropriate for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer when combined with 5-FU/LV. OXA + 5-FU/LV should be considered as the first-line standard of care for advanced CRC patients.

  14. Advances in Ethical, Social, and Economic Aspects of Chronic Renal Disease in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Arze, S; Paz Zambrana, S

    2016-03-01

    Since 2005, great progress has been made in health care provision to patients with terminal renal failure in Bolivia. Access to dialysis and transplantation is regulated by the Ministry of Health, based on clinical criteria, applied equitably, without favoritism or discrimination based on race, sex, economic means, or political power. Until December 2013, there were no restrictions in dialysis and transplantation in Health Insurance institutions, but they covered only 30% of the population. Now the remaining 70% has access to free dialysis funded by the communities where patients live, with funds coming from the government and taxes on oil products. More than 2,231 people are getting dialysis, reaching a population growth of >60% annually. The number of hemodialysis units has increased by >200% (60 units), making access easier for end-stage renal failure patients. Treatment protocols have been drawn up to guarantee the best quality of life for the patients. The Law on Donation and Transplantation was enacted in 1996, and Supplementary Regulations were enacted in 1997 with various amendments over the past 5 years. A National Transplant Coordination Board, working under the National Renal Health Program, supervises and regulates transplants and promotes deceased-donor transplantation in an attempt to cover the demand for donors. Rules have been drawn up for accreditation of transplant centers and teams to guarantee the best possible conditions and maximum guaranties. Since January 2014, the National Renal Health Program has been providing free kidney transplants from living donors. PMID:27110002

  15. Malignant Pleural Effusion Supernatants Are Substitutes for Metastatic Pleural Tumor Tissues in EGFR Mutation Test in Patients with Advanced Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Nie, Xiaomeng; Xia, Yang; Han, Yiping; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Guanshan; Bai, Chong

    2014-01-01

    Background Though the possibility of using malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) as alternatives for metastatic pleural tumor tissues (MPTTs) in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation test has been examined, due to the lack of studies comparing the results in matching MPEs and MPTTs, the clinical value of MPEs for advanced adenocarcinoma patients with pleural effusions is not confirmed. Methods EGFR mutation statuses in matching MPTTs, MPE supernatants and cell blocks, of 41 patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma as diagnosed by thoracoscopy were analyzed using amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS). Results EGFR mutations were detected in 46.3% (19/41) of MPTTs, 43.9% (18/41) of MPE supernatants and 56.3% (18/32) of MPE cell blocks by ARMS analysis. Generally, the same EGFR statuses were identified in both MPTTs and matching MPE cell blocks of 81.3% patients (26/32), whereas MPTTs and matching MPE supernatants of 87.8% (36/41) patients shared the same EGFR status. Compared with EGFR mutation detection in MPTTs, the sensitivity of EGFR mutation detection in MPE-cell blocks was 87.5% (14/16), specificity was 75.0% (12/16), while the sensitivity of EGFR mutation detection in MPE-supernatants was 84.2% (16/19), specificity was 90.9% (20/22). Conclusions The high concordance of EGFR mutation statuses between MPEs and MPTTs in lung adenocarcinoma patients with pleural metastasis as determined by ARMS analysis suggests that MPEs, particularly MPE supernatants, may be substitutes for MPTTs in EGFR mutation test. PMID:24587142

  16. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses

  17. QUILT-2.014: Gemcitabine and AMG 479 in Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Cancer of Pancreas; Cancer of the Pancreas; Metastases; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Bone Metastases; Endocrine Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Solid Tumors; Advanced Malignancy

  18. The Changes of Lipid Metabolism in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Everolimus: A New Pharmacodynamic Marker?

    PubMed Central

    Pantano, Francesco; Santoni, Matteo; Procopio, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Mimma; Iacovelli, Roberto; Porta, Camillo; Conti, Alessandro; Lugini, Antonio; Milella, Michele; Galli, Luca; Ortega, Cinzia; Guida, Francesco Maria; Silletta, Marianna; Schinzari, Giovanni; Verzoni, Elena; Modica, Daniela; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Rauco, Annamaria; Felici, Alessandra; Ballatore, Valentina; Cascinu, Stefano; Tonini, Giuseppe; Carteni, Giacomo; Russo, Antonio; Santini, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Background Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). We aimed to assess the association between the baseline values and treatmentrelated modifications of total serum cholesterol (C), triglycerides (T), body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose level (FBG) and blood pressure (BP) levels and the outcome of patients treated with everolimus for mRCC. Methods 177 patients were included in this retrospective analysis. Time to progression (TTP), clinical benefit (CB) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results Basal BMI was significantly higher in patients who experienced a CB (p=0,0145). C,T and C+T raises were significantly associated with baseline BMI (p=0.0412, 0.0283 and 0.0001). Median TTP was significantly longer in patients with T raise compared to patients without T (10 vs 6, p=0.030), C (8 vs 5, p=0.042) and C+T raise (10.9 vs 5.0, p=0.003). At the multivariate analysis, only C+T increase was associated with improved TTP (p=0.005). T raise (21.0 vs 14.0, p=0.002) and C+T increase (21.0 vs 14.0, p=0.006) were correlated with improved OS but were not significant at multivariate analysis. Conclusion C+T raise is an early predictor for everolimus efficacy for patients with mRCC. PMID:25885920

  19. Retrospective Study of Metastatic Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Brain with Multivariate Analysis of Prognostic Pre-Treatment Clinical Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ferrel, Ethan A.; Roehrig, Andrew T.; Kaya, Erin A.; Carlson, Jonathan D.; Ling, Benjamin C.; Wagner, Aaron; MacKay, Alexander R.; Call, Jason A.; Demakas, John J.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Cooke, Barton S.; Peressini, Ben; Lee, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) or melanoma have historically had very poor prognoses of less than one year. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) can be an effective treatment for patients with these tumors. This study analyzes the effect of pretreatment prognostic factors on overall survival (OS) for RCC and melanoma patients with metastasis to the brain treated with SRS. A total of 122 patients with brain metastases from either RCC or melanoma were grouped by age at brain metastasis diagnosis, whether they received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in addition to SRS, or they underwent surgical resection, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), number of brain metastases, and primary tumor. Median survival times for melanoma patients and RCC patients were 8.20 ± 3.06 and 12.70 ± 2.63 months, respectively. Patients with >5 metastases had a significantly shorter median survival time (6.60 ± 2.45 months) than the reference group (1 metastasis, 10.70 ± 13.40 months, p = 0.024). Patients with KPS ≤ 60 experienced significantly shorter survival than the reference group (KPS = 90–100), with median survival times of 5.80 ± 2.46 months (p < 0.001) and 45.20 ± 43.52 months, respectively. We found a median overall survival time of 12.7 and 8.2 months for RCC and melanoma, respectively. Our study determined that a higher number of brain metastases (>5) and lower KPS were statistically significant predictors of a lower OS prognosis. PMID:26999120

  20. In-Hospital Economic Burden of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in France in the Era of Targeted Therapies: Analysis of the French National Hospital Database from 2008 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the economic burden of hospitalisations for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), to describe the patterns of prescribing expensive drugs and to explore the impact of geographic and socio-demographic factors on the use of these drugs. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis from the French national hospitals database. Hospital stays for mRCC between 2008 and 2013 were identified by combining the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) codes for renal cell carcinoma (C64) and codes for metastases (C77 to C79). Incident cases were identified out of all hospital stays and followed till December 2013. Descriptive analyses were performed with a focus on hospital stays and patient characteristics. Costs were assessed from the perspective of the French National Health Insurance and were obtained from official diagnosis-related group tariffs for public and private hospitals. Results A total of 15,752 adult patients were hospitalised for mRCC, corresponding to 102,613 hospital stays. Of those patients, 68% were men and the median age at first hospitalisation was 69 years [Min-Max: 18–102]. Over the study period, the hospital mortality rate reached 37%. The annual cost of managing mRCC at hospital varied between 28M€ in 2008 and 42M€ in 2012 and was mainly driven by inpatient costs. The mean annual per capita cost of hospital management of mRCC varied across the study period from 8,993€ (SD: €8,906) in 2008 to 10,216€ (SD: €10,527) in 2012. Analysis of the determinants of prescribing expensive drugs at hospital did not show social or territorial differences in the use of these drugs. Conclusion This study is the first to investigate the in-hospital economic burden of mRCC in France. Results showed that in-hospital costs of managing mRCC are mainly driven by expensive drugs and inpatient costs. PMID:27649305

  1. Medical treatment of renal cancer: new horizons

    PubMed Central

    Greef, Basma; Eisen, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) makes up 2–3% of adult cancers. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in the mid-2000s radically changed the management of RCC. These targeted treatments superseded immunotherapy with interleukin-2 and interferon. The pendulum now appears to be shifting back towards immunotherapy, with the evidence of prolonged overall survival of patients with metastatic RCC on treatment with the anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand monoclonal antibody, nivolumab. Clinical prognostic criteria aid prediction of relapse risk for resected localised disease. Unfortunately, for patients at high risk of relapse, no adjuvant treatment has yet shown benefit, although further trials are yet to report. Clinical prognostic models also have a role in the management of advanced disease; now there is a pressing need for predictive biomarkers to direct therapy. Treatment selection for metastatic disease is currently based on histology, prognostic group and patient preference based on side effect profile. In this article, we review the current medical and surgical management of localised, oligometastatic and advanced RCC, including side effect management and the evidence base for management of poor-risk and non-clear cell disease. We discuss recent results from clinical trials and how these are likely to shape future practice and a renaissance of immunotherapy for renal cell cancer. PMID:27490806

  2. Medical treatment of renal cancer: new horizons.

    PubMed

    Greef, Basma; Eisen, Tim

    2016-08-23

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) makes up 2-3% of adult cancers. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in the mid-2000s radically changed the management of RCC. These targeted treatments superseded immunotherapy with interleukin-2 and interferon. The pendulum now appears to be shifting back towards immunotherapy, with the evidence of prolonged overall survival of patients with metastatic RCC on treatment with the anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand monoclonal antibody, nivolumab. Clinical prognostic criteria aid prediction of relapse risk for resected localised disease. Unfortunately, for patients at high risk of relapse, no adjuvant treatment has yet shown benefit, although further trials are yet to report. Clinical prognostic models also have a role in the management of advanced disease; now there is a pressing need for predictive biomarkers to direct therapy. Treatment selection for metastatic disease is currently based on histology, prognostic group and patient preference based on side effect profile. In this article, we review the current medical and surgical management of localised, oligometastatic and advanced RCC, including side effect management and the evidence base for management of poor-risk and non-clear cell disease. We discuss recent results from clinical trials and how these are likely to shape future practice and a renaissance of immunotherapy for renal cell cancer. PMID:27490806

  3. Pembrolizumab and Ziv-aflibercept in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Metastatic Melanoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  4. Assessment of efficacy, safety and quality of life of 110 patients treated with sunitinib as first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma: experience in real-world clinical practice in Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Akira; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the clinical outcomes of 110 consecutive Japanese patients who received at least two cycles of sunitinib as first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in a routine clinical setting. Initially, 50 mg of sunitinib was administered once daily on a 4 weeks on, followed by 2 weeks off dosing schedule; however, dose modification was required in 102 patients, and the relative dose intensity was 62.6 % throughout this series. As the best responses to sunitinib, 2, 28, 65 and 15 were judged to show a complete response, partial response, stable disease and progressive disease, respectively. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) following the treatment with sunitinib were 7.8 and 33.2 months, respectively. Multivariate analyses of several factors identified the following independent predictors of PFS and OS: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) classification and C-reactive protein (CRP) level for PFS and liver metastasis, MSKCC classification and CRP level for OS. The common adverse events related to sunitinib corresponding to ≥grade 3 were thrombocytopenia in 59, leukopenia in 23, fatigue in 22, hand-foot syndrome in 15 and hypertension in 12. Quality of life (QOL) analysis using 36-Item Short Form revealed no significant differences in any scale scores between surveys performed before and 3 months after the treatment with sunitinib. Collectively, these findings suggest that the introduction of sunitinib as a first-line agent can lead to favorable disease control with acceptable tolerability, resulting in improvement in the prognosis and QOL of Japanese patients with mRCC.

  5. Advanced glycation end products suppress lysyl oxidase and induce bone collagen degradation in a rat model of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Chiharu; Uto, Kenta; Honda, Kazuho; Kato, Yoshiharu; Oda, Hideaki

    2013-11-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a major problem in patients with renal insufficiency. The present study was designed to elucidate the role of bone collagen changes and osteoblast differentiation in a rat model of ROD pathogenesis induced by adenine. Typical characteristics of renal failure, including increased serum urea nitrogen, creatinine, inorganic phosphorus, and intact parathyroid hormone levels, and decreased serum calcium and 1,25(OH)2D3 levels, were observed in adenine-induced rats. Micro-computed tomography analysis of the femur in adenine-induced rats showed decreased bone mineral density and osteoporotic changes, confirmed by the three-point bending test. The cancellous bone histomorphometric parameters of the tibia showed increased osteoblast number, decreased osteoclast surface with peritrabecular fibrosis, and increased osteoid tissue, indicating a severe mineralization disorder similar to clinical ROD. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed irregular alignment and increased diameter of bone collagen fibrils in adenine-induced rats. Protein expression analysis showed greater accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in peritrabecular osteoblasts of adenine-induced rats than in the controls. In contrast, suppressed expression of runt-related transcription factor 2, alkaline phosphatase, secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1), and lysyl oxidase (Lox) mRNA levels, particularly the amount of active LOX protein, were observed. In in-vitro experiments, mineralizing MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells stimulated with AGE-modified bovine serum albumin had attenuated the expression of Spp1 mRNA levels and active LOX protein, with a decrease in extracellular nodules of mineralization. These observations provide clues to ROD pathogenesis, as they indicate that the suppression of osteoblast differentiation and decreased active LOX protein associated with accumulation of AGEs in osteoblasts caused structural abnormalities of bone collagen fibrils and

  6. Gemcitabine alone versus combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin for the treatment of patients with locally advanced and/or metastatic pancreatic carcinoma: a retrospective analysis of multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Inal, A; Kos, F T; Algin, E; Yildiz, R; Dikiltas, M; Unek, I T; Colak, D; Elkiran, E T; Helvaci, K; Geredeli, C; Dane, F; Balakan, O; Kaplan, M A; Durnali, A G; Harputoglu, H; Goksel, G; Ozdemir, N; Buyukberber, S; Gumus, M; Kucukoner, M; Ozkan, M; Uncu, D; Benekli, M; Isikdogan, A

    2012-01-01

    The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer is of advanced disease. Several randomized Phase II and III trials suggest that the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin (GemCis) response rates were higher than Gemcitabine (Gem) alone, however the trials were not enough powered to indicate a statistically significant prolongation of survival in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study is to evaluated the efficiency of Gem alone versus GemCis in patients with locally advanced and/or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma .A total of 406 patients, from fourteen centers were evaluated retrospectively. All patients received Gem or GemCis as first-line treatment between September 2005 to March 2011. Primary end of this study were to evaluate the toxicity, clinical response rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between the arms. There were 156 patients (M: 98, F: 58) in Gem arm and 250 patients (M: 175, F: 75) in the combination arm. Gemcitabin arm patients older than the combination arm ( median 63 vs 57.5, p=0.001). In patients with the combination arm had a higher dose reduction (25.2% vs 11.3%, p=0.001) and dose delay (34% vs 16.8%, p=0.001). Among patients with the combination and Gemcitabin arm gender, diabetes mellitus, performance status, cholestasis, grade, stage did not have a statistically difference (p>0.05). Clinical response rate to the combination arm was higher than the Gem arm (69.0% vs 49.7%, p=0.001). PFS was more favorable in the GemCis arm than Gem alone, but the difference did not attain statistical significance (8.9 vs 6.0, p=0.08). OS was not significantly superior in the GemCis arm (12.0 vs 10.2, p>0.05). Grade III-IV hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity were higher in the combination arm. PFS was more favorable in the GemCis arm than Gem alone, but the difference did not attain statistical significance. OS was not significantly superior in the GemCis arm.

  7. Survival of childhood polycystic kidney disease following renal transplantation: the impact of advanced hepatobiliary disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ira D; Ho, Martin; Hupertz, Vera; Avner, Ellis D

    2003-10-01

    Childhood PKD encompasses the diagnoses of AR and ADPKD, glomerulocystic disease, and syndromes such as tuberous sclerosis or Jeune's syndrome. Given the fact that a majority of PKD children with ESRD carry the diagnosis of ARPKD, natural history studies assessing the long-term prognosis of PKD patients following renal transplantation must focus on morbidity and mortality issues related to complications from congenital hepatic fibrosis. Using the NAPRTCS registry, we analyzed the patient and graft survival rates of 203 PKD patients and 7044 non-PKD patients undergoing renal transplantation between 1987 and 2001. Deceased PKD patients, all with a diagnosis of ARPKD, were further identified and characterized using a special questionnaire submitted to the principal investigators. Overall graft and patient survival rates were not significantly different between PKD and non-PKD patients. No differences in rates of acute rejection or time to first rejection were noted between PKD and non-PKD patients. The relative risk of living longer than 3 yr in the PKD patients was not significantly different from non-PKD patients (RR = 0.70, p = 0.28). Sepsis was identified as a likely factor in the cause of death in nine (64%) ARPKD patients and was comfirmed with a positive blood culture in four patients. Despite similar graft and patient survival rates among PKD and non-PKD children following renal transplantation, our results suggest that ARPKD transplant recipients appear to be at increased risk for sepsis that may be related to hepatic fibrosis and ascending cholangitis. The utility of early liver transplantation in ARPKD patients with significant hepatobiliary disease is discussed.

  8. A single arm phase 1b study of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

    PubMed Central

    Kanesvaran, R.; Watt, K.; Turnbull, J. D.; Armstrong, A. J.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, M.; George, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Everolimus ,an oral inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and sunitinib, an oral inhibitor of VEGF/PDGF receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, have both been shown to provide clinical benefit in patients with advanced RCC. We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with these agents in patients with advanced RCC. Methods We conducted a phase Ib dose escalation trial of sunitinib and everolimus in patients with advanced metastatic RCC. Prior nephrectomy was required, and prior radiation or chemotherapy other than VEGF/mTOR-based therapies was permitted. The primary endpoint was to determine the MTD/recommended phase 2 dose. Results A total of 4 out of a planned 30 subjects were enrolled in this study (M:F= 2:2; mean age 52 years, 50% with KPS <80). The first three patients were enrolled on a 4+2 dosing schedule of daily sunitinib 50 mg and weekly everolimus 30 mg. Mean time on drug was 99 days. One partial response was seen. Toxicities included mucositis, thrombocytopenia, anemia, fatigue, dehydration and hypoglycemia. Due to multiple grade 3–4 toxicities, the protocol was amended to 2+1 dosing of sunitinib 37.5 mg and daily everolimus 5mg. The first patient on this schedule died from multi-organ failure with septic shock after 1 cycle of treatment. Subsequently, the study was closed. Pharmacokinetics results inconclusively suggest that toxicities could be attributed to the drug exposure. Conclusions Combined use of everolimus and sunitinib in the treatment of mRCC was not well tolerated in this small cohort. PMID:26174223

  9. Advances in understanding the role of cardiac glycosides in control of sodium transport in renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Khundmiri, Syed Jalal

    2014-07-01

    Cardiotonic steroids have been used for the past 200 years in the treatment of congestive heart failure. As specific inhibitors of membrane-bound Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, they enhance cardiac contractility through increasing myocardial cell calcium concentration in response to the resulting increase in intracellular Na concentration. The half-minimal concentrations of cardiotonic steroids required to inhibit Na(+)/K(+) ATPase range from nanomolar to micromolar concentrations. In contrast, the circulating levels of cardiotonic steroids under physiological conditions are in the low picomolar concentration range in healthy subjects, increasing to high picomolar levels under pathophysiological conditions including chronic kidney disease and heart failure. Little is known about the physiological function of low picomolar concentrations of cardiotonic steroids. Recent studies have indicated that physiological concentrations of cardiotonic steroids acutely stimulate the activity of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and activate an intracellular signaling pathway that regulates a variety of intracellular functions including cell growth and hypertrophy. The effects of circulating cardiotonic steroids on renal salt handling and total body sodium homeostasis are unknown. This review will focus on the role of low picomolar concentrations of cardiotonic steroids in renal Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity, cell signaling, and blood pressure regulation.

  10. Clinical and molecular prognostic and predictive biomarkers in clear cell renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Kukwa, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Lian, Fei; Szczylik, Cezary

    2014-12-01

    The natural history of clear cell renal cell cancer is highly unpredictable with various progressors and with populations where small renal masses may be accompanied by metastatic disease. Currently, there is a critical need to determine patient risk and optimize treatment regimes. For these patients, molecular markers may offer significant information in terms of prognostic and predictive values, as well as determination of valid therapeutic targets. Until now, only a few of the many identified clear cell renal cell cancer biomarkers have been clinically validated in large cohorts. And only several biomarkers are integrated in predictive or prognostic models. Therefore, a large cohesive effort is required to advance the field of clear cell renal cell cancer prognostic biomarkers through systematic discovery, verification, validation and clinical implementation.

  11. Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Product Ameliorates Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Induced Renal Injury, Inflammation, and Apoptosis via P38/JNK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Gu, Wenyu; Lu, Huan; Liu, Chengying; Yu, Biyun; Xu, Hui; Tang, Yaodong

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) associated chronic kidney disease is mainly caused by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) triggered tissue damage. Receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) and its ligand high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) are expressed on renal cells and mediate inflammatory responses in OSA-related diseases. To determine their roles in CIH-induced renal injury, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), the RAGE neutralizing antibody, was intravenously administered in a CIH model. We also evaluated the effect of sRAGE on inflammation and apoptosis. Rats were divided into four groups: (1) normal air (NA), (2) CIH, (3) CIH+sRAGE, and (4) NA+sRAGE. Our results showed that CIH accelerated renal histological injury and upregulated RAGE-HMGB1 levels involving inflammatory (NF-κB, TNF-α, and IL-6), apoptotic (Bcl-2/Bax), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (phosphorylation of P38, ERK, and JNK) signal transduction pathways, which were abolished by sRAGE but p-ERK. Furthermore, sRAGE ameliorated renal dysfunction by attenuating tubular endothelial apoptosis determined by immunofluorescence staining of CD31 and TUNEL. These findings suggested that RAGE-HMGB1 activated chronic inflammatory transduction cascades that contributed to the pathogenesis of the CIH-induced renal injury. Inhibition of RAGE ligand interaction by sRAGE provided a therapeutic potential for CIH-induced renal injury, inflammation, and apoptosis through P38 and JNK pathways. PMID:27688824

  12. Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Product Ameliorates Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Induced Renal Injury, Inflammation, and Apoptosis via P38/JNK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Gu, Wenyu; Lu, Huan; Liu, Chengying; Yu, Biyun; Xu, Hui; Tang, Yaodong

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) associated chronic kidney disease is mainly caused by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) triggered tissue damage. Receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) and its ligand high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) are expressed on renal cells and mediate inflammatory responses in OSA-related diseases. To determine their roles in CIH-induced renal injury, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), the RAGE neutralizing antibody, was intravenously administered in a CIH model. We also evaluated the effect of sRAGE on inflammation and apoptosis. Rats were divided into four groups: (1) normal air (NA), (2) CIH, (3) CIH+sRAGE, and (4) NA+sRAGE. Our results showed that CIH accelerated renal histological injury and upregulated RAGE-HMGB1 levels involving inflammatory (NF-κB, TNF-α, and IL-6), apoptotic (Bcl-2/Bax), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (phosphorylation of P38, ERK, and JNK) signal transduction pathways, which were abolished by sRAGE but p-ERK. Furthermore, sRAGE ameliorated renal dysfunction by attenuating tubular endothelial apoptosis determined by immunofluorescence staining of CD31 and TUNEL. These findings suggested that RAGE-HMGB1 activated chronic inflammatory transduction cascades that contributed to the pathogenesis of the CIH-induced renal injury. Inhibition of RAGE ligand interaction by sRAGE provided a therapeutic potential for CIH-induced renal injury, inflammation, and apoptosis through P38 and JNK pathways.

  13. Sunitinib benefits patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Findings from clinical trial patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, a common kidney cancer, show they did not have accelerated tumor growth after treatment with sunitinib, in contrast to some study results in animals.

  14. Phosphate Binding with Sevelamer Preserves Mechanical Competence of Bone Despite Acidosis in Advanced Experimental Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jokihaara, Jarkko; Pörsti, Ilkka H.; Sievänen, Harri; Kööbi, Peeter; Kannus, Pekka; Niemelä, Onni; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Järvinen, Teppo L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phosphate binding with sevelamer can ameliorate detrimental histomorphometric changes of bone in chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). Here we explored the effects of sevelamer-HCl treatment on bone strength and structure in experimental CRI. Methods Forty-eight 8-week-old rats were assigned to surgical 5/6 nephrectomy (CRI) or renal decapsulation (Sham). After 14 weeks of disease progression, the rats were allocated to untreated and sevelamer-treated (3% in chow) groups for 9 weeks. Then the animals were sacrificed, plasma samples collected, and femora excised for structural analysis (biomechanical testing, quantitative computed tomography). Results Sevelamer-HCl significantly reduced blood pH, and final creatinine clearance in the CRI groups ranged 30%-50% of that in the Sham group. Final plasma phosphate increased 2.4- to 2.9-fold, and parathyroid hormone 13- to 21-fold in CRI rats, with no difference between sevelamer-treated and untreated animals. In the femoral midshaft, CRI reduced cortical bone mineral density (-3%) and breaking load (-15%) (p<0.05 for all versus Sham), while sevelamer increased bone mineral density (+2%) and prevented the deleterious changes in bone. In the femoral neck, CRI reduced bone mineral density (-11%) and breaking load (-10%), while sevelamer prevented the decrease in bone mineral density (+6%) so that breaking load did not differ from controls. Conclusions In this model of stage 3–4 CRI, sevelamer-HCl treatment ameliorated the decreases in femoral midshaft and neck mineral density, and restored bone strength despite prevailing acidosis. Therefore, treatment with sevelamer can efficiently preserve mechanical competence of bone in CRI. PMID:27658028

  15. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    Renal angiogram; Angiography - kidney; Renal angiography; Renal artery stenosis - arteriography ... Renal arteriography is often needed to help decide on the best treatment after other tests are done ...

  16. Colon carcinoma metastatic to the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, J.W. Jr.; Carter, M.P.; Berens, S.V.; Long, R.F.; Caplan, G.E.

    1986-09-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the thyroid gland rarely is encountered in clinical practice; however, autopsy series have shown that it is not a rare occurrence. A case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with metastases to the thyroid is reported. A review of the literature reveals that melanoma, breast, renal, and lung carcinomas are the most frequent tumors to metastasize to the thyroid. Metastatic disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cold nodules on radionuclide thyroid scans, particularly in patients with a known primary.

  17. Prognostic Value of Quantitative Metabolic Metrics on Baseline Pre-Sunitinib FDG PET/CT in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Barkhodari, Amir; Harshman, Lauren; Srinivas, Sandy; Quon, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate various quantitative metrics on FDG PET/CT for monitoring sunitinib therapy and predicting prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC). Methods Seventeen patients (mean age: 59.0 ± 11.6) prospectively underwent a baseline FDG PET/CT and interim PET/CT after 2 cycles (12 weeks) of sunitinib therapy. We measured the highest maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of all identified lesions (highest SUVmax), sum of SUVmax with maximum six lesions (sum of SUVmax), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) from baseline PET/CT and interim PET/CT, and the % decrease in highest SUVmax of lesion (%Δ highest SUVmax), the % decrease in sum of SUVmax, the % decrease in TLG (%ΔTLG) and the % decrease in MTV (%ΔMTV) between baseline and interim PET/CT, and the imaging results were validated by clinical follow-up at 12 months after completion of therapy for progression free survival (PFS). Results At 12 month follow-up, 6/17 (35.3%) patients achieved PFS, while 11/17 (64.7%) patients were deemed to have progression of disease or recurrence within the previous 12 months. At baseline, PET/CT demonstrated metabolically active cancer in all cases. Using baseline PET/CT alone, all of the quantitative imaging metrics were predictive of PFS. Using interim PET/CT, the %Δ highest SUVmax, %Δ sum of SUVmax, and %ΔTLG were also predictive of PFS. Otherwise, interim PET/CT showed no significant difference between the two survival groups regardless of the quantitative metric utilized including MTV and TLG. Conclusions Quantitative metabolic measurements on baseline PET/CT appears to be predictive of PFS at 12 months post-therapy in patients scheduled to undergo sunitinib therapy for mRCC. Change between baseline and interim PET/CT also appeared to have prognostic value but otherwise interim PET/CT after 12 weeks of sunitinib did not appear to be predictive of PFS. PMID:27123976

  18. Risk factors for sorafenib-induced high-grade skin rash in Japanese patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Narita, Shintaro; Inoue, Takamitsu; Hasunuma, Naoko; Numakura, Kazuyuki; Horikawa, Yohei; Satoh, Shigeru; Notoya, Takeshi; Fujishima, Naohito; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Ohyama, Chikara; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical factors, drug-related genetic polymorphisms, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) types to determine the association with sorafenib-induced high-grade skin rash (HGSR) in Japanese patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A total of 55 patients with advanced RCC treated with sorafenib were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 33 patients were subjected to HLA typing and polymorphism analyses of CYP3A5, ABCB1, ABCC2, and UGT1A1, which are involved in the metabolism and membrane transport of sorafenib. Grade 3 or higher SR developed in 12 (22%), and a higher incidence was observed in female patients than in male patients (40 vs. 15%, P=0.046). The initial dose, initial dose per body weight, and initial dose per body surface area in patients with HGSR were significantly higher than those in patients without HGSR. Patients with the ABCC2 -24CC genotype were at a significantly higher risk of SR than those with the CT genotype (35 vs. 0%, P=0.032). HLA-A*24 was significantly associated with the occurrence of HGSR (P=0.049). Our finding suggested that women, higher initial dose per body weight or body surface area, the ABCC2 -24CC genotype, and HLA-A*24 are associated with the risk of sorafenib-induced HGSR in Japanese RCC patients.

  19. Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin in Metastatic or Unresectable Bladder Cancer With Decreased Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  20. Retrospective Analysis of the Safety and Efficacy of High-dose Interleukin-2 After Prior Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael K. K.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Redman, Bruce G.; Logan, Theodore; Gao, Dexiang; Flaig, Thomas W.; Lewis, Karl; Poust, Jamie; Monk, Paul; Jarkowski, Anthony; Sendilnathan, Arun; Bolden, Marcus; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Olencki, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are the most common first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, high-dose interleukin-2 (HD-IL2) remains the only agent that provides durable complete responses. The optimal sequence of these agents remains uncertain. This retrospective multi-institutional study examined the safety and efficacy of HD-IL2 following TKI therapy. After IRB approval at 7 HD-IL2 centers, data relating to patient, disease, and treatment characteristics among 40 consecutive patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who were treated with HD-IL2 after at least 1 prior TKI therapy were retrospectively collected. The most common cardiac adverse events were grade 3 hypotension and vascular leak syndrome. Six patients (15%) experienced other grade ≥3 cardiac adverse events. There were 2 treatment-related deaths due to congestive heart failure, occurring in 1 patient with short TKI to HD-IL2 interval and another patient with an abnormal baseline cardiac stress test. Best responses included 2 CRs (5%, duration 40+ and 62+ mo), 3 PRs (8%, duration 6, 11, and 24 mo), 13 SD (32%, median duration 12 mo), 20 PD (50%), and 2 not evaluable patients. Median overall survival was 22 months. Administration of HD-IL2 could be safe and effective after TKI therapy; however, careful selection of patients is critical. We recommend baseline cardiac risk factor assessment, screening with both cardiac stress test and echocardiogram, and allowing a TKI to HD-IL2 interval of at least 2 months. PMID:25075565

  1. Non-albuminuric renal disease among subjects with advanced stages of chronic kidney failure related to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Boronat, Mauro; García-Cantón, César; Quevedo, Virginia; Lorenzo, Dionisio L; López-Ríos, Laura; Batista, Fátima; Riaño, Marta; Saavedra, Pedro; Checa, María D

    2014-03-01

    Urinary albumin excretion has been consistently found to be normal in a significant number of subjects with early stages of diabetic kidney disease. This study was aimed to estimate the prevalence and characteristics of non-albuminuric chronic kidney disease associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus among subjects who reach advanced stages of renal failure. Study population was composed of incident patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min) related to type 2 diabetes in a tertiary hospital from Gran Canaria (Spain) during a period of 2 years. Subjects were classified as normoalbuminuric (urinary albumin-to-creatine ratio [UACR] <30 mg/g), microalbuminuric (UACR ≥30 and <300 mg/g), or proteinuric (UACR ≥300 mg/g). Of 78 eligible patients, 21.8% had normoalbuminuria, 20.5% had microalbuminuria, and 57.7% had proteinuria. Individuals with normoalbuminuria were mostly women and had a lower prevalence of smoking and polyneuropathy than subjects with microalbuminuria or proteinuria. They also presented greater measures of body mass index and waist circumference, higher values of total and LDL cholesterol, and lower values of HbA1c and serum creatinine than subjects with microalbuminuria or proteinuria. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that female sex (positively) and HbA1c and polyneuropathy (negatively) were independently associated with absence of albuminuria. In conclusion, around 20% of subjects with diabetes-related advanced chronic kidney disease, characteristically women, have normal urinary albumin excretion. HbA1c and polyneuropathy are inversely related to this non-albuminuric form of nephropathy.

  2. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  3. Renal cell cancer: a shift in approaches for treatment of advanced disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Banegas, Matthew P; Harlan, Linda C; Mann, Bhupinder; Yabroff, K Robin

    2014-09-01

    Several new agents have become available to treat renal cell cancer (RCC) in recent years, although evidence on their dissemination is limited. This study examined recent trends in RCC treatment in US community practices. Data from the population-based National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies were used to evaluate treatment of patients with RCC newly diagnosed in 2004 and 2009 (N=2357). Descriptive statistics and logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to assess treatment patterns and the associations among demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics, with receipt of systemic therapy and time-to-systemic treatment. Between 2004 and 2009, systemic therapy use increased among patients with stage III and IV RCC, from 3.8% to 15.7% and 35.2% to 57.4%, respectively. Among patients with stage IV disease, the most commonly used therapies changed from interleukin-2 (16.3%) and interferon-alfa (16.6%) in 2004 to sunitinib (39.2%) and temsirolimus (15.2%) in 2009. Further, notable decreases were seen in the use of surgery and time-to-systemic treatment for patients with stage IV disease. Patients who were older, living in areas with lower educational attainment, and diagnosed in 2004 were significantly less likely to receive systemic therapy and had longer time-to-systemic treatment (P<.05). The findings indicate that over the past decade, treatment for RCC in the United States has evolved toward increased use of systemic therapy. As the diffusion of new therapies continues, it will be imperative to understand how variation in care for RCC will impact health outcomes and costs of care. PMID:25190695

  4. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of renal cortex in a salt-load rat model of advanced kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shaoling; He, Hanchang; Tan, Lishan; Wang, Liangliang; Su, Zhengxiu; Liu, Yufeng; Zhu, Hongguo; Zhang, Menghuan; Hou, Fan Fan; Li, Aiqing

    2016-01-01

    Salt plays an essential role in the progression of chronic kidney disease and hypertension. However, the mechanisms underlying pathogenesis of salt-induced kidney damage remain largely unknown. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats, that underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx, a model of advanced kidney damage) or sham operation, were treated for 2 weeks with a normal or high-salt diet. We employed aTiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiling of the renal cortex. We found 318 proteins differentially expressed in 5/6Nx group relative to sham group, and 310 proteins significantly changed in response to salt load in 5/6Nx animals. Totally, 1810 unique phosphopeptides corresponding to 550 phosphoproteins were identified. We identified 113 upregulated and 84 downregulated phosphopeptides in 5/6Nx animals relative to sham animals. Salt load induced 78 upregulated and 91 downregulated phosphopeptides in 5/6Nx rats. The differentially expressed phospholproteins are important transporters, structural molecules, and receptors. Protein-protein interaction analysis revealed that the differentially phosphorylated proteins in 5/6Nx group, Polr2a, Srrm1, Gsta2 and Pxn were the most linked. Salt-induced differential phosphoproteins, Myh6, Lmna and Des were the most linked. Altered phosphorylation levels of lamin A and phospholamban were validated. This study will provide new insight into pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic kidney disease and salt sensitivity. PMID:27775022

  5. Renal and iliac artery stenting by interventional cardiologists and vascular surgeons: the Foundation to Advance Medical Education (FAME) initiative.

    PubMed

    Holmes, David R; Fox, Robert D; Tommaso, Carl; Hodgson, Patricia K; Green, Richard; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Rosenfield, Kenneth

    2005-05-01

    The American College of Cardiology, in concert with the Society for Coronary Angiography and Interventions and the Society for Vascular Surgery, planned and implemented an initiative to teach stenting of renal and iliac arteries to their peers in practice. Supported by the Foundation to advance medical Education (FAME), the initiative involved 25 preceptees and 6 preceptors and included a didactic portion (a remote learning exercise), an animal practicum, a procedural simulation, and a preceptor/preceptee training segment, all of which was followed by evaluations by the participants. Assessments of the success of the initiative differed between preceptees, who were positive about the experience, and preceptors, who were more critical of the endeavor (with surgeons more critical than cardiologists). Technical problems, such as obtaining temporary licensure to practice medicine in another state, interfered with the hands-on experiences of several preceptees. Programs such as the FAME initiative will grow in importance as new technologies continue to be introduced into medical practice and the need to train physicians in practice in their use expands.

  6. Subcutaneous administration of interleukin 2 and interferon-alpha-2b in advanced renal cell carcinoma: a confirmatory study.

    PubMed Central

    Facendola, G.; Locatelli, M. C.; Pizzocaro, G.; Piva, L.; Pegoraro, C.; Pallavicini, E. B.; Signaroldi, A.; Meregalli, M.; Lombardi, F.; Beretta, G. D.

    1995-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have suggested that the combination of subcutaneous recombinant human interleukin 2 (rIL-2) and interferon alpha (rIFN-alpha) is especially promising in advanced renal cell carcinoma. We assessed the safety, activity and toxicity of home therapy with these two agents in 50 patients. Each treatment cycle consisted of a 2 day pulse phase, with 9 x 10(6) IU m-2 of rIL-2 being given subcutaneously every 12 h, followed by a 6 week maintenance phase during which rIL-2 1.8 x 10(6) IU m-2 was administered subcutaneously every 12 h on days 1-5 and rIFN-alpha 2b 5 x 10(6) IU m-2 once a day on days 1, 3 and 5. Objective responses (CR+PR) occurred in 9/50 (18%) patients, six of whom (12%) achieved a complete response. Disease stabilisation was observed in 17 cases (34%) and 18 patients progressed during therapy. In the other six cases, treatment was interrupted early for toxicity or patient refusal. One patient died of myocardial infarction during the second cycle. The overall median survival was 12 months. Home therapy with subcutaneous rIL-2 + rIFN-alpha 2b proved to be active, feasible and moderately toxic, but serious adverse events can sometimes occur. PMID:8519672

  7. Advanced glycation end products, carotid atherosclerosis, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroki; Koyama, Hidenori; Fukumoto, Shinya; Tanaka, Shinji; Shoji, Takuhito; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Tahara, Hideki; Inaba, Masaaki; Kakiya, Ryusuke; Tabata, Tsutomu; Miyata, Toshio; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2011-04-01

    Numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to be decreased in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the mechanism of which remained poorly understood. In this study, mutual association among circulating EPC levels, carotid atherosclerosis, serum pentosidine, and skin autofluorescence, a recently established noninvasive measure of advanced glycation end products accumulation, was examined in 212 ESRD subjects undergoing hemodialysis. Numbers of circulating EPCs were measured as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) VEGFR2+ cells and progenitor cells as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) fraction by flow cytometry. Skin autofluorescence was assessed by the autofluorescence reader; and serum pentosidine, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid atherosclerosis was determined as intimal-medial thickness (IMT) measured by ultrasound. Circulating EPCs were significantly and inversely correlated with skin autofluorescence in ESRD subjects (R = -0.216, P = .002), but not with serum pentosidine (R = -0.079, P = .25). Circulating EPCs tended to be inversely associated with IMT (R = -0.125, P = .069). Intimal-medial thickness was also tended to be correlated positively with skin autofluorescence (R = 0.133, P = .054) and significantly with serum pentosidine (R = 0.159, P = .019). Stepwise multiple regression analyses reveal that skin autofluorescence, but not serum pentosidine and IMT, was independently associated with low circulating EPCs. Of note, skin autofluorescence was also inversely and independently associated with circulating progenitor cells. Thus, tissue accumulated, but not circulating, advanced glycation end products may be a determinant of a decrease in circulating EPCs in ESRD subjects.

  8. Advanced glycation end products, carotid atherosclerosis, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroki; Koyama, Hidenori; Fukumoto, Shinya; Tanaka, Shinji; Shoji, Takuhito; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Tahara, Hideki; Inaba, Masaaki; Kakiya, Ryusuke; Tabata, Tsutomu; Miyata, Toshio; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2011-04-01

    Numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to be decreased in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the mechanism of which remained poorly understood. In this study, mutual association among circulating EPC levels, carotid atherosclerosis, serum pentosidine, and skin autofluorescence, a recently established noninvasive measure of advanced glycation end products accumulation, was examined in 212 ESRD subjects undergoing hemodialysis. Numbers of circulating EPCs were measured as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) VEGFR2+ cells and progenitor cells as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) fraction by flow cytometry. Skin autofluorescence was assessed by the autofluorescence reader; and serum pentosidine, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid atherosclerosis was determined as intimal-medial thickness (IMT) measured by ultrasound. Circulating EPCs were significantly and inversely correlated with skin autofluorescence in ESRD subjects (R = -0.216, P = .002), but not with serum pentosidine (R = -0.079, P = .25). Circulating EPCs tended to be inversely associated with IMT (R = -0.125, P = .069). Intimal-medial thickness was also tended to be correlated positively with skin autofluorescence (R = 0.133, P = .054) and significantly with serum pentosidine (R = 0.159, P = .019). Stepwise multiple regression analyses reveal that skin autofluorescence, but not serum pentosidine and IMT, was independently associated with low circulating EPCs. Of note, skin autofluorescence was also inversely and independently associated with circulating progenitor cells. Thus, tissue accumulated, but not circulating, advanced glycation end products may be a determinant of a decrease in circulating EPCs in ESRD subjects. PMID:20494372

  9. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein With Standard Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

  10. Cabozantinib-s-malate and Nivolumab With or Without Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic Genitourinary Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Malignant Reproductive System Neoplasm; Malignant Urinary System Neoplasm; Metastatic Urethral Neoplasm; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Progressive Neoplastic Disease; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Urethra Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Urethral Urothelial Carcinoma

  11. Hypertensive Retinopathy as the First Manifestation of Advanced Renal Disease in a Young Patient: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Arriozola-Rodríguez, Karen Janeth; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Hernández, Virginia Alejandra; Rodríguez-Loaiza, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a 23-year-old patient suffering from bilateral acute visual loss who received the diagnosis of hypertensive retinopathy. After systemic evaluation, he was diagnosed with bilateral renal disease and chronic renal failure, requiring a kidney transplantation to manage the systemic illness, followed by gradual improvement of his visual acuity. PMID:26955342

  12. New developments in metastatic prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Manickavasagar, Thubeena; Gilson, Clare; Chowdhury, Simon; Kirby, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is still commonly a lethal condition. The concept that 'men with prostate cancer die with rather than of their cancer' has been shown to be false. It is estimated that 10-20% of men in the UK present with locally advanced disease. Median overall survival remains only 3.5 years for men presenting with metastatic disease. The use of LHRH analogues to achieve medical castration has become the gold standard for both locally advanced prostate cancer, combined with radiotherapy, and metastatic disease. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard first-line treatment for advanced disease resulting in improvements in symptoms, radiological findings and PSA levels. Ultimately the majority of men with advanced prostate cancer will develop resistance to ADT Docetaxel is the standard first-line therapy recommended by international guidelines for patients with symptomatic metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer who are suitable candidates for chemotherapy. More than 90% of patients with castrate refractory prostate cancer have bone metastases. Radium-223 dichloride is a novel alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical agent, which mimics calcium and therefore targets bone metastases. It is indicated in patients with metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer who have symptomatic bone metastases without visceral metastases.

  13. The European medicines agency review of eribulin for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer: summary of the scientific assessment of the committee for medicinal products for human use.

    PubMed

    Pean, Elias; Klaar, Sigrid; Berglund, Eva Gil; Salmonson, Tomas; Borregaard, Jeanett; Hofland, Kenneth F; Ersbøll, Jens; Abadie, Eric; Giuliani, Rosa; Pignatti, Francesco

    2012-09-01

    The European Commission issued on March 17, 2011, a marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union (EU) for eribulin (Halaven; Eisai Limited). The decision was based on the favorable opinion of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use recommending a marketing authorization for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who have progressed after at least 2 chemotherapeutic regimens for advanced disease. Eribulin mesylate is a structurally simplified synthetic analogue of halichondrin B, which is a natural product isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai (ATC code L01XX41). Eribulin is a nontaxane, microtubule dynamics inhibitor belonging to the halichondrin class of antineoplastic agents. Eribulin inhibits the growth phase of microtubules without affecting the shortening phase and sequesters tubulin into nonproductive aggregates leading to G(2)-M cell-cycle block, disruption of mitotic spindles, and, ultimately, apoptotic cell death after prolonged mitotic blockage. The recommended dose of eribulin is 1.23 mg/m(2) (equivalent to 1.4 mg/m(2) eribulin mesylate) to be administered intravenously over 2 to 5 min on days 1 and 8 of a 3-week cycle. In the pivotal trial, eribulin was associated with increased overall survival in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who received at least 2 prior chemotherapy lines for advanced disease (median overall survival was 13.2 months in the eribulin arm vs. 10.6 months in the control arm; HR = 0.805; 95% confidence interval, 0.677-0.958; P = 0.014). The most common side effects are asthenia or fatigue and neutropenia. The objective of this article is to summarize the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary report and product information, including product characteristics, are available on the European Medicines Agency website.

  14. Budget impact analysis of first-line treatment with pazopanib for advanced renal cell carcinoma in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to economic constraints, cancer therapies are under close scrutiny by clinicians, pharmacists and payers alike. There is no published pharmacoeconomic evidence guiding the choice of first-line therapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the Spanish setting. We aimed to develop a model describing the natural history of RCC that can be used in healthcare decision-making. We particularly analyzed the budget impact associated with the introduction of pazopanib compared to sunitinib under the Spanish National Healthcare System (NHS) perspective. Methods We developed a Markov model to estimate the future number of cases of advanced RCC (patients with favorable or intermediate risk) resulting either from initial diagnosis or disease progression after surgery. The model parameters were obtained from the literature. We assumed that patients would receive either pazopanib or sunitinib as first-line therapy until disease progression. Pharmacological costs and costs associated with the management of adverse events (AE) were considered. A univariate sensitivity analysis was undertaken in order to test the robustness of the results. Results The model predicted an adult RCC prevalence of 7.5/100,000 (1-year), 20.7/100,000 (3-year) and 32.5/100,000 (5-year). These figures are very close to GLOBOCAN reported RCC prevalence estimates of 7.6/100,000, 20.2/100,000 and 31.1/100,000, respectively. The model predicts 1,591 advanced RCC patients with favorable or intermediate risk in Spain in 2013. Annual per patient pharmacological costs were €32,365 and €39,232 with pazopanib and sunitinib, respectively. Annual costs associated with the management of AE were €662 and €974, respectively. Overall annual per patient costs were €7,179 (18%) lower with pazopanib compared to sunitinib. For every point increase in the percentage of patients treated with pazopanib, the NHS would save €67,236. If all the 1,591 patients predicted were treated with pazopanib, the

  15. Advanced oxidation protein products induce endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human renal glomerular endothelial cells through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiujie; Duan, Na; Wang, Yue; Shu, Shuangshuang; Xiang, Xiaohong; Guo, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shaojie; Tang, Xun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in renal glomerular endothelial cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Furthermore, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been shown to contribute to the progression of DN. However, whether AOPPs induce EndMT in renal glomerular endothelial cells remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the effect of AOPPs on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) and the mechanisms underlying the effects. Our results showed that AOPP treatment lowered the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin, CD31, and claudin 5 and induced the overexpression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast-specific protein 1, which indicated that AOPPs induced EndMT in HRGECs. Furthermore, AOPP stimulation increased the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein, which suggested that AOPPs triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in HRGECs. Notably, the aforementioned AOPP effects were reversed following the treatment of cells with salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress, whereas the effects were reproduced after exposure to thapsigargin, an inducer of ER stress. Collectively, our results indicate that AOPPs trigger EndMT in HRGECs through the induction of ER stress. These findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for inhibiting renal fibrosis by targeting ER stress.

  16. Advanced oxidation protein products induce endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human renal glomerular endothelial cells through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiujie; Duan, Na; Wang, Yue; Shu, Shuangshuang; Xiang, Xiaohong; Guo, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shaojie; Tang, Xun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in renal glomerular endothelial cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Furthermore, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been shown to contribute to the progression of DN. However, whether AOPPs induce EndMT in renal glomerular endothelial cells remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the effect of AOPPs on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) and the mechanisms underlying the effects. Our results showed that AOPP treatment lowered the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin, CD31, and claudin 5 and induced the overexpression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast-specific protein 1, which indicated that AOPPs induced EndMT in HRGECs. Furthermore, AOPP stimulation increased the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein, which suggested that AOPPs triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in HRGECs. Notably, the aforementioned AOPP effects were reversed following the treatment of cells with salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress, whereas the effects were reproduced after exposure to thapsigargin, an inducer of ER stress. Collectively, our results indicate that AOPPs trigger EndMT in HRGECs through the induction of ER stress. These findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for inhibiting renal fibrosis by targeting ER stress. PMID:26861949

  17. Talazoparib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Mesothelioma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma Responsive to Pembrolizumab.

    PubMed

    Truong, Phu; Rahal, Ahmad; Kallail, K James

    2016-06-04

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive liver tumor that occurs with chronic liver disease. Surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for localized disease whereas therapeutic options for advanced disease are limited. The innovative blockade of immune checkpoints with targeted immunotherapies, such as monoclonal antibodies against programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1), have shown promise in the treatment of solid malignancies. The PD-1 inhibiting antibodies, nivolumab and pembrolizumab prolonged overall survival in randomized trials in metastatic melanoma and advanced non-small cell lung cancer. This is a report of a 75-year-old male patient with metastatic HCC who was initially treated with the standard of therapy sorafenib. After failure of sorafenib therapy, pembrolizumab was started. There was a dramatic response to pembrolizumab with decrease in tumor size and drop in alfa fetoprotein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of metastatic HCC responsive to pembrolizumab after failure of sorafenib.

  19. Efficient and reproducible generation of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, V; Griffiths, R; Hawkins, R E; Gilham, D E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy is showing great promise in the treatment of patients with advanced malignant melanoma. However, the translation of TIL therapy to non-melanoma tumours such as renal cell carcinoma has been less successful with a major constraint being the inability to reproducibly generate TILs from primary and metastatic tumour tissue. Methods: Primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma biopsies were subjected to differential tumour disaggregation methods and procedures that stimulate the specific expansion of TILs tested to determine which reliably generated TIL maintained antitumour specificity. Results: Enzymatic or combined enzymatic/mechanical disaggregation resulted in equivalent numbers of TILs being liberated from renal cell carcinoma biopsies. Following mitogenic activation of the isolated TILs with anti-CD3/anti-CD28-coated paramagnetic beads, successful TIL expansion was achieved in 90% of initiated cultures. The frequency of T-cell recognition of autologous tumours was enhanced when tumours were disaggregated using the GentleMACS enzymatic/mechanical system. Conclusion: TILs can be consistently produced from renal cell carcinoma biopsies maintaining autologous tumour recognition after expansion in vitro. While the method of disaggregation has little impact on the success of TIL growth, methods that preserve the cell surface architecture facilitate TIL recognition of an autologous tumour, which is important in terms of characterising the functionality of the expanded TIL population. PMID:25867267

  20. Metastatic pleural tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... persons. Alternative Names Tumor - metastatic pleural Images Pleural space References Arenberg D, Pickens A. Metastatic malignant tumors. In: Mason RJ, Murray JF, Broaddus VC, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap ...

  1. Metastatic calcification of the stomach imaged on a bone scan

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.; Ryo, U.Y.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    A whole body bone scan obtained on a 21-year-old woman with sickle cell disease and chronic renal failure showed localization of the radionuclide diffusely in the stomach. The localization of the radionuclide represented metastatic calcification of the stomach caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  2. An Open-Label, Single-Arm, Phase 2 Trial of the Polo-Like Kinase Inhibitor Volasertib (BI 6727) in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Walter M.; Vaughn, David J.; Sonpavde, Guru; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Petrylak, Daniel P.; Rosen, Peter; Lin, Chia-Chi; Mahoney, John; Modi, Sanjiv; Lee, Peter; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Su, Wu-Chou; Spira, Alexander; Pilz, Korinna; Vinisko, Richard; Schloss, Charles; Fritsch, Holger; Zhao, Charles; Carducci, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Polo-like kinases (Plks) control multiple steps during the cell cycle, and Plk1 is overexpressed in urothelial cancer (UC). Volasertib (BI 6727), a Plk inhibitor, has demonstrated antitumor activity in several malignancies, including UC. In this phase 2 trial, the authors investigated volasertib as a second-line treatment in advanced/metastatic UC. METHODS Patients who progressed within 2 years of 1 prior chemotherapy regimen received 300 mg volasertib on day 1 every 3 weeks. The dose was escalated to 350 mg in cycle 2 if volasertib was tolerated in cycle 1. The primary endpoint was tumor response, which was assessed every 6 weeks; secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, overall survival, duration of response, safety, and pharmacokinetics. RESULTS Fifty patients were enrolled, and the median patient age was 68.5 years (range, 52-83 years). All patients had received prior platinum, 94% of patients had relapsed ≤2 years after prior therapy, 36% had liver metastases, and 54% had lung metastases. The median number of treatment cycles was 2 (range, 1-27 treatment cycles), and 23 patients were dose escalated at cycle 2. Seven patients (14%) had a partial response, 13 (26%) had stable disease, and 30 (60%) progressed within 6 weeks. The median response duration was 41 weeks (range, 29.1-77.3 weeks). The median progression-free survival was 1.4 months, and the median overall survival was 8.5 months. The most frequent grade 3 and 4 adverse events were neutropenia (28%), thrombocytopenia (20%), and anemia (16%). No cumulative toxicity was observed. CONCLUSIONS Volasertib as second-line treatment for advanced/metastatic UC had an acceptable safety profile but demonstrated insufficient antitumor activity for further evaluation as a monotherapy. PMID:24339028

  3. Increased skeletal:renal uptake ratio. [Bone-seekers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, T.H.; Holman, B.L.

    1980-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with increased skeletal:renal uptake ratios of /sup 99m/Tc-methylene diphosphonate were studied. Increased uptake was central in metastatic prostate carcinoma, peripheral in hematologic disorders, and heterogeneous in Paget disease and fibrous dysplasia. There was no discernible redistribution of skeletal uptake in patients with renal failure. Absence of both renal and bladder activity was not observed in patients with normal renal function. An increased ratio was always abnormal and frequently indicated diffuse bone disease.

  4. CEA and CA19.9 as early predictors of progression in advanced/metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy and bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Petrioli, Roberto; Licchetta, Antonella; Roviello, Giandomenico; Pascucci, Alessandra; Francini, Edoardo; Bargagli, Gianluca; Conca, Raffaele; Miano, Salvatora Tindara; Marzocca, Giuseppe; Francini, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the changes of the tumor markers CEA and CA19.9 as early predictors of progression in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients participating in a clinical study and receiving chemotherapy and bevacizumab (Bev). Seventy-two patients had high baseline CEA or CA19.9 serum levels. By ROC analyses, the areas under the curves were 0.83 for variable CEA cutoff values for distinguishing progressive disease (PD) versus stable disease (SD)/partial remission (PR)/complete remission (CR), and 0.80 for variable CA19.9 cutoff values for distinguishing PD versus SD/PR/CR. Rises in CEA and CA19.9 may early signal the occurrence of progression in mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy and Bev. PMID:22236191

  5. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  6. Comparing nodal versus bony metastatic spread using tumour phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Mangiola, Stefano; Hong, Matthew K. H.; Cmero, Marek; Kurganovs, Natalie; Ryan, Andrew; Costello, Anthony J.; Corcoran, Niall M.; Macintyre, Geoff; Hovens, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The role of lymph node metastases in distant prostate cancer dissemination and lethality is ill defined. Patients with metastases restricted to lymph nodes have a better prognosis than those with distant metastatic spread, suggesting the possibility of distinct aetiologies. To explore this, we traced patterns of cancer dissemination using tumour phylogenies inferred from genome-wide copy-number profiling of 48 samples across 3 patients with lymph node metastatic disease and 3 patients with osseous metastatic disease. Our results show that metastatic cells in regional lymph nodes originate from evolutionary advanced extraprostatic tumour cells rather than less advanced central tumour cell populations. In contrast, osseous metastases do not exhibit such a constrained developmental lineage, arising from either intra or extraprostatic tumour cell populations, at early and late stages in the evolution of the primary. Collectively, this comparison suggests that lymph node metastases may not be an intermediate developmental step for distant osseous metastases, but rather represent a distinct metastatic lineage. PMID:27653089

  7. Surgical Outcomes of Hemorrhagic Metastatic Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Heon; Jung, Eugene; Gwak, Ho Shin; Shin, Sang Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors are not rare, but little is known about the surgical outcome following treatment. We conducted this study to determine the result of the surgical outcome of hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors. Materials and Methods From July 2001 to December 2008, 21 patients underwent surgery for hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors at our institution. 15 patients had lung cancer, 3 had hepatocellular carcinoma, and the rest had rectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma. 20 patients had macroscopic hemorrhage in the tumors, and one patient had intracerebral hemorrhage surrounding the tumor. A retrospective clinical review was conducted focusing on the patterns of presenting symptoms and signs, as well as local recurrence following surgery. Results Among 21 hemorrhagic brain metastases, local recurrence developed in two patients. The 12 month progression free survival rate was 86.1%. Mean time to progression was 20.8 months and median survival time after surgery was 11.7 months. Conclusion The results of our study showed that hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors rarely recurred after surgery. Surgery should be considered as a good treatment option for hemorrhagic brain metastasis, especially in cases with increased intracranial pressure or severe neurologic deficits. PMID:21811426

  8. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. PMID:26759458

  9. Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Great Imitator

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Indraneel; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Suresh; Talreja, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TCRC) is a rare renal tumor. Patients are usually asymptomatic; it is usually detected incidentally, during imaging studies for Bosniak type III and type IV renal cysts. These tumors rarely metastasize. The role of targeted therapy in such rare tumors is still controversial. We report a case of TCRC initially presented as a Bosniak type II renal cyst and was discovered ultimately to be a metastatic disease. This type of presentation might broaden our understanding of this rare disease. PMID:27601972

  10. The adverse effects of sorafenib in patients with advanced cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Gao, Zu-Hua; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Sorafenib is the first multi-kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular cancer (HCC) and metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) and is increasingly being used to treat patients with well-differentiated radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancer (DTC). Sorafenib demonstrates targeted activity on several families of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases that are involved in angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastatic progression of cancer. Sorafenib treatment results in long-term efficacy and low incidence of life-threatening toxicities. Although sorafenib has demonstrated many benefits in patients, the adverse effects cannot be ignored. The most common treatment-related toxicities include diarrhoea, fatigue, hand-foot skin reaction and hypertension. Most of these toxicities are considered mild to moderate and manageable to varying degrees; however, cardiovascular events might lead to death. In this MiniReview, we summarize the adverse effects of sorafenib that commonly occur in patients with advanced cancers. PMID:25495944

  11. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone Disease cont. Page ( 4 ) MBD vs. Primary Bone Cancer The diagnosis of metastatic bone disease should not ... from an unknown primary carcinoma or a primary bone cancer (sarcoma). For example, if an area of bone ...

  12. Metastatic Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sangüeza, O P; Davis, L S; Gourdin, F W

    1997-09-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is the term used for granulomatous lesions of Crohn's disease involving sites other than the gastrointestinal tract. Metastatic Crohn's disease has been considered uncommon, when in actuality it may simply be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed since the clinical findings can be different. We report on three patients with this condition: one with generalized plaques, another with perineal and perianal ulcerations, and a third with a painless forearm nodule. PMID:9305298

  13. The European Medicines Agency review of ipilimumab (Yervoy) for the treatment of advanced (unresectable or metastatic) melanoma in adults who have received prior therapy: summary of the scientific assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use.

    PubMed

    Hanaizi, Zahra; van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Calvo, Gonzalo; Lopez, Arantxa Sancho; van Dartel, Maaike; Camarero, Jorge; Abadie, Eric; Pignatti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    On 13 July 2011 the European Commission issued a marketing authorisation valid throughout the European Union (EU) for ipilimumab for the treatment of advanced (unresectable or metastatic) melanoma in adults who have received prior therapy. Ipilimumab is a monoclonal antibody that specifically blocks the inhibitory signal of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), resulting in T cell activation, proliferation and lymphocyte infiltration into tumours, leading to tumour cell death. The recommended induction regimen of ipilimumab is 3mg/kg administered intravenously over a 90 min period every 3 weeks for a total of four doses. In a phase 3 trial in patients with advanced melanoma, median overall survival for ipilimumab was 10 months versus 6 months for gp100, an experimental melanoma vaccine (Hazard ratio (HR) 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.51, 0.87; p = 0.0026). Ipilimumab was most commonly associated with adverse reactions resulting from increased or excessive immune activity. Most of these, including severe reactions, resolved following initiation of appropriate medical therapy or withdrawal of ipilimumab. The most common side-effects (affecting more than 10% of patients) were diarrhoea, rash, pruritus, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, decreased appetite and abdominal pain. The objective of this paper is to summarise the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary of product characteristics (SmPC), are available on the European Medicines Agency (EMA) website (www.ema.europa.eu).

  14. Phase I dose-escalation study of cabazitaxel administered in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic or unresectable advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Puzanov, Igor; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Cohen, Roger B.; Morris, John C.; Olowokure, Olugbenga O.; Yin, Jian Y.; Doroumian, Séverine; Shen, Liji; Olszanski, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Taxane–gemcitabine combinations have demonstrated antitumor activity. This phase I study (NCT01001221) aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine and to assess the preliminary efficacy of this combination. The patients included had metastatic or unresectable solid tumors and had exhausted standard treatment. Cohorts of three to six patients received cabazitaxel (15–20 mg/m2) before (part 1a) or after (part 1b) gemcitabine (700–1000 mg/m2) on Day 1 and gemcitabine alone on Day 8. Prophylactic growth factors were not allowed in cycle 1. In part 1a (n=12), five patients received 20 mg/m2 cabazitaxel plus 1000 mg/m2 gemcitabine (20/1000), five received 15/900, two received 15/700. In part 1b, all six patients received the lowest dose (700/15). At all doses, two or more patients experienced a DLT, regardless of administration sequence, including febrile neutropenia (n=4), grade 4 neutropenia (n=2), grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n=2), and grade 3 aspartate transaminase increase (n=1). The MTD was not established as all cohorts exceeded the MTD by definition. All patients experienced an adverse event; the most frequent all-grade nonhematologic events were fatigue (66.7%), decreased appetite (50.0%), and diarrhea (44.4%). The most frequent grade 3–4 hematologic abnormalities were neutropenia (83.3%), leukopenia (77.8%), and lymphopenia (72.2%). Toxicity was sequence-independent but appeared worse with gemcitabine followed by cabazitaxel. Durable partial responses were observed in three patients (prostate cancer, appendiceal cancer, and melanoma). The unacceptable DLTs with cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine, at doses reduced more than 25% from single-agent doses, preclude further investigation. PMID:26020806

  15. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  16. Phase II Trial of Dolastatin-10, a Novel Anti-Tubulin Agent, in Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Balcerzak, S. P.; Kraft, A. S.; Edmonson, J. H.; Okuno, S. H.; Davey, M.; Mclaughlin, S.; Beard, M. T.; Rogatko, A.

    2004-01-01

    Patients:Soft tissue sarcomas are uncommon malignancies with few therapeutic options for recurrent or metastatic disease. Dolastatin-10 (Dol-10) is a pentapeptide anti-microtubule agent that binds to tubulin sites distinct from vinca alkaloids. Based on the novel mechanism of action, limited activity of other anti-microtubular agents, and anti-neoplastic activity in pre-clinical screening of Dol-10, this multi-institutional phase II study was conducted to determine the objective response rate of Dol-10 in recurrent or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas that had not been treated with chemotherapy outside of the adjuvant setting. Methods: Dol-10 was given intravenously at a dose of 400 μg/m2 and repeated every 21 days. Toxicities were assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0). Radiographic studies and tumor measurements were repeated every two cycles to assess response [Miller AB, et al. Cancer 1981; 47(1): 207]. Results: Dol-10 was associated with hematological toxicity and with some vascular toxicities. There was no significant gastrointestinal, hepatic or renal toxicity. There was one death on study due to respiratory failure. There were no objective responses in 12 patients treated with Dol-10. Discussion: Based on this phase II trial, further study of Dol-10 on this schedule is not recommended in advanced or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:18521404

  17. Screw Placement and Osteoplasty Under Computed Tomographic-Fluoroscopic Guidance in a Case of Advanced Metastatic Destruction of the Iliosacral Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Trumm, Christoph Gregor; Rubenbauer, Bianca; Piltz, Stefan; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    2011-02-15

    We present a case of combined surgical screw placement and osteoplasty guided by computed tomography-fluoroscopy (CTF) in a 68-year-old man with unilateral osteolytic destruction and a pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint due to a metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. The patient experienced intractable lower back pain that was refractory to analgesia. After transarterial particle and coil embolization of the tumor-feeding vessels in the angiography unit, the procedure was performed under general anesthesia by an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologists and trauma surgeons. Under intermittent single-shot CTF, two K wires were inserted into the left iliosacral joint from a lateral transiliac approach at the S1 level followed by two self-tapping surgical screws. Continuous CTF was used for monitoring of the subsequent polymethylmethacrylate injection through two vertebroplasty cannulas for further stabilization of the screw threads within the osteolytic sacral ala. Both the screw placement and cement injection were successful, with no complications occurring during or after the procedure. With additional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and opioid medication, the patient reported a marked decrease in his lower back pain and was able to move independently again at the 3-month follow-up assessment. In our patient with intolerable back pain due to tumor destruction and consequent pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint, CTF-guided iliosacral screw placement combined with osteoplasty was successful with respect to joint stabilization and a reduction in the need for analgesic therapy.

  18. Systemic chemotherapy in inoperable or metastatic bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Bamias, A; Tiliakos, I; Karali, M-D; Dimopoulos, M A

    2006-04-01

    Urothelial cancer is a common malignancy. The management of patients with recurrent disease after cystectomy or initially metastatic or unresectable disease represents a therapeutic challenge. Systemic chemotherapy prolongs survival but long-term survival remains infrequent. During recent years there has been improvement due to the use of novel chemotherapeutic agents, mainly gemcitabine and the taxanes. The long-considered-standard MVAC has been challenged by combinations showing more favourable toxicity profiles and equal (gemcitabine-cisplatin) or even improved (dose-dense, G-CSF-supported MVAC) efficacy. Specific interest has also been generated in specific groups of patients (elderly patients, patients with renal function impairment or comorbidities), who are not fit for the standard cisplatin-based chemotherapy but can derive significant benefit from carboplatin- or taxane-based treatment. Retrospective analyses have enabled the identification of groups of patients with different prognoses, who possibly require different therapeutic approaches. Modern chemotherapy offers a chance of long-term survival in patients without visceral metastases, possibly in combination with definitive local treatment. Finally, the progress of targeted therapies in other neoplasms seems to be reflected in advanced bladder cancer by recent studies indicating that biological agents can be combined with modern chemotherapy. The true role of such therapies is currently being evaluated. PMID:16303860

  19. Localised pulmonary metastatic calcification associated with pulmonary artery obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Bloodworth, J; Tomashefski, J F

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metastatic pulmonary calcification, a complication of uraemia and disordered calcium metabolism, may be diffuse or localised. The factors that determine calcium precipitation are complex, but tissue alkalosis is thought to be important. As obstruction of the pulmonary artery theoretically causes local alkalosis a retrospective necropsy study was carried out to examine the relation between metastatic pulmonary calcification and vascular obstruction. METHODS: Five patients with focal and two with diffuse metastatic calcification in the lungs were identified over eight years. Lungs were studied macroscopically and by light microscopy, haematoxylin and eosin and histochemical stains being used for calcium. RESULTS: Underlying risk factors for calcification in these patients included renal failure in six and disseminated malignancy in five. In the five patients with localised calcification obstruction of the pulmonary artery by thrombus or tumour was found proximal or adjacent to areas of calcium deposition. In two patients metastatic calcification was confined to a lung with unilateral pulmonary artery thromboembolic occlusion. Calcification was not specifically associated with infarction, pneumonia, or diffuse alveolar damage. Lesions of the pulmonary artery were not seen in the two patients with diffuse bilateral metastatic calcification. CONCLUSION: In this small series there was a spatial association between pulmonary artery obstruction and localised metastatic calcification. It is proposed that pulmonary artery obstruction alters the microchemical environment of the lung, favouring tissue alkalosis and thereby enhancing parenchymal calcification in patients predisposed to this condition. Images PMID:1519194

  20. Treatment for metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bensouda, Y; Kaikani, W; Ahbeddou, N; Rahhali, R; Jabri, M; Mrabti, H; Boussen, H; Errihani, H

    2011-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a specific entity different from head and neck carcinoma. Incidence is higher in South-East Asia and North Africa. Prognosis, especially for locally advanced stages (IIB - IVB) and metastasis, remains poor: more than third of cases will present local and/or metastatic recurrence. Overall 5-year survival for all NPC stages ranges from 50% to 70%. The role of chemotherapy in metastasis is well established, and remains an important palliative treatment, although no randomized trial has been reported comparing the different chemotherapy regimens. As 1(st)-line treatment, platin-based regimens seems optimal; in 2(nd) line and after progression under platins, there is no consensus: monotherapy with drugs such as gemcitabine, capecitabine or taxanes has been the most widely tested, with acceptable results. Future trials should integrate targeted therapy, in the light of overexpression of EGFR1 and C-kit in NPC. The present study presents a review of the literature concerning the various studies of metastatic NPC. PMID:21177151

  1. Chemotherapy in metastatic retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kingston, J E; Hungerford, J L; Plowman, P N

    1987-03-01

    Eleven children with metastatic retinoblastoma diagnosed during the period 1970-1984 were treated with chemotherapy. Short-term complete responses were observed in three children treated with a four-drug combination which included cisplatinum, and in one child treated with vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The median duration of survival of the 11 children receiving chemotherapy was nine months, whilst the median survival of 13 children with metastatic retinoblastoma who were not given chemotherapy was only 2.3 months (p = 0.06). This suggests that retinoblastoma is a chemosensitive tumour and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy may have a role in children with retinoblastoma who at diagnosis are thought to be at high risk of developing metastatic disease. PMID:3587892

  2. Phase II trial of doxorubicin/docetaxel/cyclophosphamide for locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer: results from NSABP trial BP-58.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roy E; Anderson, Stewart J; Brown, Ann; Scholnik, Aaron P; Desai, Ajit M; Kardinal, Carl G; Lembersky, Barry C; Mamounas, Eleftherios P

    2002-12-01

    Based on the recommended phase II doses for doxorubicin (60 mg/m2) and docetaxel (60 mg/m2) and the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project's (NSABP) experience with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2), we conducted a phase II trial at 18 institutions using doxorubicin/docetaxel/cyclophosphamide (ATC) given every 21 days, in preparation for a major adjuvant breast cancer study (NSABP B-30), in which ATC would be used. Eligibility requirements included measurable stage IIIB/IV breast cancer, performance status 0-2, normal left ventricular ejection fraction, and no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease (nontaxane adjuvant chemotherapy was allowed if completed > 12 months before entry and if the cumulative dose of doxorubicin was =240 mg/m2). Eighty-nine patients were entered who ranged in age from 30-78 years (38.2% < 50 years; 61.8% =50 years). A total of 33.7% of patients had stage IIIB disease, and 66.3% had stage IV disease. Among the stage IV patients, 20.3% had received prior adjuvant chemotherapy. Dexamethasone premedication (8 mg p.o. b.i.d. for 3 days) and prophylactic ciprofloxacin (500 mg p.o. b.i.d. days 5-15) were used. Colony-stimulating growth factors were reserved for secondary prophylaxis after prolonged or febrile neutropenia (FN) or documented severe infection in a prior cycle. After a cumulative dose of doxorubicin 480 mg/m2, patients could continue with docetaxel/cyclophosphamide alone. Eighty-nine patients and 577 courses were evaluable for toxicity. Median time on study as of May 2002 was 36.5 months (range, 28-47 months). Febrile neutropenia occurred in 34 patients (38%); 8 developed FN in the absence of prior prophylactic growth factor support; 26 developed FN despite prior growth factor support (for one patient this information was unavailable). There were no septic deaths. One patient died from pulmonary embolism. Other grade 3/4 adverse events included: nausea (9%), vomiting (7%), stomatitis (6

  3. SEOM clinical guidelines in metastatic breast cancer 2015.

    PubMed

    Gavilá, J; Lopez-Tarruella, S; Saura, C; Muñoz, M; Oliveira, M; De la Cruz-Merino, L; Morales, S; Alvarez, I; Virizuela, J A; Martin, M

    2015-12-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is essentially an incurable disease. However, recent advances have resulted in a significant improvement of overall survival. The SEOM guidelines are intended to make evidence-based recommendations on how to manage patients with metastatic breast cancer to achieve the best patient outcomes based on a rational use of the currently available therapies. To assign a level of certainty and a grade of recommendation the United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines methodology was selected as reference.

  4. Outcomes in a Multi-institutional Cohort of Patients Treated With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Advanced or Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paly, Jonathan J.; Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Biggs, Peter J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Roeder, Falk; Martínez-Monge, Rafael; Whitson, Jared; Calvo, Felipe A.; Fastner, Gerd; Sedlmayer, Felix; Wong, William W.; Ellis, Rodney J.; Haddock, Michael G.; Choo, Richard; Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study aimed to analyze outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2010, 98 patients received IORT for advanced or locally recurrent RCC at 9 institutions. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 3.5 years. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Chained imputation accounted for missing data, and multivariate Cox hazards regression tested significance. Results: IORT was delivered during nephrectomy for advanced disease (28%) or during resection of locally recurrent RCC in the renal fossa (72%). Sixty-nine percent of the patients were male, and the median age was 58 years. At the time of primary resection, the T stages were as follows: 17% T1, 12% T2, 55% T3, and 16% T4. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a visibly complete resection of tumor. Preoperative or postoperative external beam radiation therapy was administered to 27% and 35% of patients, respectively. The 5-year OS was 37% for advanced disease and 55% for locally recurrent disease. The respective 5-year DSS was 41% and 60%. The respective 5-year DFS was 39% and 52%. Initial nodal involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 2.9-3.6, P<.01), presence of sarcomatoid features (HR 3.7-6.9, P<.05), and higher IORT dose (HR 1.3, P<.001) were statistically significantly associated with decreased survival. Adjuvant systemic therapy was associated with decreased DSS (HR 2.4, P=.03). For locally recurrent tumors, positive margin status (HR 2.6, P=.01) was associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: We report the largest known cohort of patients with RCC managed by IORT and have identified several factors associated with survival. The outcomes for patients receiving IORT in the setting of local recurrence compare favorably to

  5. Sciatica leading to the discovery of a renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Amine Lakmichi, Mohamed; Jarir, Redouane; Kabour, Jamal; Dahami, Zakaria; Said Moudouni, Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell cancer is not exceptional in kidney cancer (30% of patients with kidneyl cancer). Its prognosis is particularly severe. However, sciatic neuralgia (sciatica) remains an exceptional revealing clinical sign of this disease. The authors report the case of a patient admitted with right sciatica as chief complain, leading to the discovery of a renal cell carcinoma. Although uncommon, renal cell carcinoma spine metastasis should be included in the differential diagnosis of back pain and sciatica. PMID:22355428

  6. Sciatica leading to the discovery of a renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lakmichi, Mohamed Amine; Jarir, Redouane; Kabour, Jamal; Dahami, Zakaria; Said Moudouni, Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell cancer is not exceptional in kidney cancer (30% of patients with kidneyl cancer). Its prognosis is particularly severe. However, sciatic neuralgia (sciatica) remains an exceptional revealing clinical sign of this disease. The authors report the case of a patient admitted with right sciatica as chief complain, leading to the discovery of a renal cell carcinoma. Although uncommon, renal cell carcinoma spine metastasis should be included in the differential diagnosis of back pain and sciatica.

  7. Metastatic Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Lanka, Padmavathy; Lanka, Lakshmana Rao; Sylvester, N; Lakshmi, M Dhana; Ethirajan, N

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease, first described in 1922, is characterized by segmental granulomatous inflammation of the intestinal tract and frequently involves the cutaneous tissues as well. Cutaneous Crohn's disease (CCD) is synonymous with metastatic Crohn's disease (MSD). A case of CCD, without any gastrointestinal involvement is reported for its rarity.

  8. Health-related quality of life in locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer: methodological and clinical issues in randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ghislain, Irina; Zikos, Efstathios; Coens, Corneel; Quinten, Chantal; Balta, Vasiliki; Tryfonidis, Konstantinos; Piccart, Martine; Zardavas, Dimitrios; Nagele, Eva; Bjelic-Radisic, Vesna; Cardoso, Fatima; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Velikova, Galina; Bottomley, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide, and increasingly, randomised controlled trials of this disease are measuring the health-related quality of life of these patients. In this systematic Review, we assess the adequacy of methods used to report health-related quality of life (HRQOL) from 49 eligible randomised controlled trials of advanced breast cancer. We compare our findings with those from the literature to investigate whether the standard of HRQOL reporting in this field has changed. We conclude that the overall reporting of HRQOL has improved, but some crucial aspects remain problematic, such as the absence of HRQOL research hypotheses and the overemphasis on statistical rather than clinical significance. Additionally, new challenges are arising with the emergence of novel treatments and the advent of personalised medicine, and improved HRQOL tools are required to cover the range of side-effects of newer therapies. PMID:27396647

  9. Dose-finding study of hepatic arterial infusion of irinotecan-based treatment in patients with advanced cancers metastatic to the liver

    PubMed Central

    Said, Rabih; Kurzrock, Razelle; Naing, Aung; Hong, David S.; Fu, Siqing; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Wheler, Jennifer J; Janku, Filip; Kee, Bryan K; Bidyasar, Savita; Lim, Joann; Wallace, Michael; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Liver metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. We investigated the use of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of irinotecan combination therapy in patients with liver metastases. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients with histologically confirmed advanced cancer with liver metastases that was refractory to standard therapy were eligible. A standard “3+3” phase I study design was used to determine the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Three cohorts were evaluated: HAI of irinotecan with systemic intravenous (IV) (a) bevacizumab, (b) oxaliplatin and bevacizumab, or (c) bevacizumab and cetuximab. RESULTS From October 2009 through December 2013, 98 patients with various tumor types were enrolled (median age, 62 years, range, 34–85; and median number of prior therapies, 4, range, 1–11). In cohorts A and C, dose escalation continued until the highest dose level—considered the MTD—was reached. In cohort B, dose escalation continued until dose level 3, and dose level 2 was considered the MTD. Rates of grade 3/4 adverse events were as follows: diarrhea, 8%; fatigue, 4%; neutropenia, 4%; thrombocytopenia, 2%; and skin rash, 2%. Seventy-seven patients were evaluable for response. Partial response was noted in 5 (6.5%) patients (neuroendocrine cancer, n=2; CRC, n=2; NSCLC, n=1); and stable disease ≥ 6 months in 17 (22.1%) patients (CRC, n=13; breast, n=1; neuroendocrine, n=1; NSCLC, n=1; pancreatic, n=1). CONCLUSIONS HAI irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab; oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab; or cetuximab plus bevacizumab was safe and may be a treatment option for selected patients with advanced cancer and liver involvement. PMID:25990659

  10. Rationale and protocol of SOAP: a phase II study to evaluate the efficacy of sorafenib as second-line treatment after pazopanib in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Roberto; Verzoni, Elena; Grassi, Paolo; Farcomeni, Alessio; de Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of agents targeting vascular endothelial grow factors has radically changed the approach to metastatic renal cell carcinoma; however, cure is not within definitive reach. In many cases, the tumor will progress several months after the start of first-line therapy and new lines of therapy are required. Pazopanib and sorafenib are two frequently used targeted agents, and no sound data are currently available for patients who relapsed after pazopanib. In this paper we illustrate the SOAP study, which was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of sorafenib in terms of progression free-survival in 44 patients treated in 10 Italian centers who had relapsed after first-line pazopanib. Standard treatment with sorafenib will be administered until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Secondary endpoints include the evaluation of overall survival, safety and quality of life. A subanalysis to evaluate toxicities as predictive factors has also been planned.

  11. RECIST 1.1 Compared With RECIST 1.0 in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Receiving Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Katherine M.; Nishino, Mizuki; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) is the most widely accepted method to objectively assess response to therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)–targeted therapy. Both RECIST 1.0 and 1.1 have been used to assess response to VEGF-targeted therapies; however, systematic comparisons are lacking. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty-two patients with metastatic RCC treated with VEGF-targeted therapies were retrospectively studied. Tumor measurements and response assessment according to RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 were compared, including the number of target lesions, baseline measurements, response at each follow-up, best overall response, and time to progression (TTP). Morphologic changes and new enhancement were also assessed over the course of treatment, and TTP was evaluated using morphologic change criteria in combination with RECIST 1.1. RESULTS The number of target lesions according to RECIST 1.1 was significantly fewer than by RECIST 1.0 (median, 2 vs 4; p < 0.0001). At first imaging follow-up, the percentage change of the sums of the diameter measurements by RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 were highly concordant (R = 0.857; mean shrinkage, 12.1% by RECIST 1.1 vs 10.8% by RECIST 1.0). Best response assessment was highly concordant between the two criteria (weighted κ = 0.819). There was no evidence of a difference in TTP by the two criteria, with a median TTP of 8.9 months (95% CI for the median, 5.5–13.9) by RECIST 1.1 and 8.9 months (95% CI for the median, 5.8–13.6) by RECIST 1.0. The median TTP by RECIST 1.1 alone was 8.9 months compared with 5.6 months for RECIST 1.1 and morphologic changes combined. CONCLUSION RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 response assessments were overall highly concordant in patients with RCC treated with VEGF-targeted therapy, with fewer target lesions according to RECIST 1.1 but no difference in TTP. PMID:25714313

  12. Renal autotransplantation: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B H; Banowsky, L H; Hewitt, C B; Straffon, R A

    1976-01-01

    Autotransplantation, with or without an extracorporeal renal operation, has been done 39 times in 37 patients. Indications for the procedure included severe ureteral injury in 4 patients, failed supravesical diversion in 2, renal carcinoma in a solitary kidney in 1, renovascular hypertension in 1 and donor arterial reconstruction before renal transplantation in 29. Success was obtained in all but 2 procedures, both of which involved previously operated kidneys with severe inflammation and adhesions involving the renal pelvis and pedicle. Based on our experience and a review of currently available literature we believe that renal autotransplantation and extracorporeal reconstruction can provide the best solution for patients with severe renovascular and ureteral disease not correctable by conventional operative techniques. The technique can be of particular value in removing centrally located tumors in solitary kidneys and in preparing donor kidneys with abnormal arteries for renal transplantation. The role of autotransplantation in the management of advanced renal trauma and calculus disease is less clear. A long-term comparison of patients treated by extracorporeal nephrolithotomy versus conventional lithotomy techniques will be necessary before a conclusion is reached in these disease categories.

  13. Renal autotransplantation: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B H; Banowsky, L H; Hewitt, C B; Straffon, R A

    1977-09-01

    Autotransplantation, with or without an extracorporeal renal operation, has been done 39 times in 37 patients. Indications for the procedure included several ureteral injury in 4 patients, failed supravesical diversion in 2, renal carcinoma in a solitary kidney in 1, renovascular hypertension in 1 and donor arterial reconstruction before renal transplantation in 29. Success was obtained in all but 2 procedures, both of which involved previously operated kidneys with severe inflammation and adhesions involving the renal pelvis and pedicle. Based on our experience and a review of currently available literature we believe that renal autotransplantation and extracorporeal reconstruction can provide the best solution for patients with severe renovascular and ureteral disease not correctable by conventional operative techniques. The technique can be of particular value in removing centrally located tumors in solitary kidneys and in preparing donor kidneys with abnormal arteries for renal transplantation. The role of autotransplantation in the management of advanced renal trauma and calculus disease is less clear. A long-term comparison of patients treated by extracorporeal nephrolithotomy versus conventional lithotomy techniques will be necessary before a conclusion is reached in these disease categories.

  14. Phase I Study of BIIB028, a selective heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, in patients with refractory metastatic or locally advanced solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hong, David; Said, Rabih; Falchook, Gerald; Naing, Aung; Moulder, Stacy; Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria; Galluppi, Gerald; Dakappagari, Naveen; Storgard, Chris; Kurzrock, Razelle; Rosen, Lee S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a ubiquitous molecular chaperone involved in protein folding, activation, and assembly, including key mediators of signal transduction, cell cycle control, and transcriptional regulation. We conducted a phase I dose-finding and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study of BIIB028, a prodrug designed to inhibit Hsp90 activity. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced solid tumors were enrolled and received escalating doses of BIIB028 intravenously twice a week in 21-day cycles (3+3 design). Response was evaluated after 2 cycles. Results Forty-one patients received doses of 6 to 192 mg/m2. The maximum tolerated dose was 144 mg/m2. Dose-limiting toxicities were syncope (n=1) and fatigue (n=1). Common toxicities at least possibly related to drug were grade 1–2, including fatigue (46%), diarrhea (44%), nausea (44%), vomiting (29%), hot flushes (29%) and abnormal dreams (17%). The concentration-time curves for Day 1 and Day 18 for both prodrug and active metabolite (CF2772) showed a negligible difference. There was a dose-dependent increase in plasma exposure for BIIB028 (CF3647) and CF2772 with plasma half-life of 0.5 and 2.1 hours, respectively. Pharmacodynamic analyses demonstrated significant increases in Hsp70 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and significantly decreased circulating human epidermal growth factor receptor 2- extracellular domain in all patients who received BIIB028 at dose levels ≥48mg/m2. Stable disease for at least 8 cycles (24 weeks) was achieved in 5 (12%) patients (6, 6, 8, 12.5 and 19 months). Conclusion BIIB028 is a well-tolerated molecule that demonstrated target impact and was associated with prolonged stable disease in 2 patients. PMID:23873691

  15. Renal calculus complicated with squamous cell carcinoma of renal pelvis: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiantao; Lei, Jun; He, Leye; Yin, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding renal calculus is a risk factor of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the renal pelvis. It is highly aggressive and usually diagnosed at advanced stages with a poor prognosis. We present two cases of kidney stone complications with renal pelvic SCC. These two patients had a radical nephrectomy and the dissected tissues were renal pelvic SCC. Our cases further emphasize that renal pelvic SCC should be considered in patients with longstanding renal calculus. These cases contribute greatly to an early diagnosis and early treatment, both of which will significantly minimize the damage of, and markedly improve the prognosis of, renal pelvic SCC.

  16. Small renal tumor with lymph nodal enlargement: A histopathological surprise

    PubMed Central

    Thottathil, Mujeeburahiman; Verma, Ashish; D’souza, Nischith; Khan, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Renal cancer with lymph nodal mass on the investigation is clinically suggestive of an advanced tumor. Small renal cancers are not commonly associated with lymph nodal metastasis. Association of renal cell carcinoma with renal tuberculosis (TB) in the same kidney is also rare. We report here a case of small renal cancer with multiple hilar and paraaortic lymph nodes who underwent radical nephrectomy, and histopathology report showed renal and lymph nodal TB too. PMID:27453671

  17. Phase I trial of twice-weekly intravenous interleukin 12 in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer or malignant melanoma: ability to maintain IFN-gamma induction is associated with clinical response.

    PubMed

    Gollob, J A; Mier, J W; Veenstra, K; McDermott, D F; Clancy, D; Clancy, M; Atkins, M B

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the tolerability, antitumor activity, and biological effects of a new schedule of i.v. recombinant human interleukin 12 (rhIL-12). Twenty-eight patients were enrolled in a Phase I trial in which rhIL-12 was administered twice weekly as an i.v. bolus for 6 weeks. Stable or responding patients were eligible to receive additional 6-week cycles until there was no evidence of disease or until tumor progression. Patient cohorts were treated with escalating doses of rhIL-12 (30-700 ng/kg). The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was 500 ng/kg, with dose-limiting toxicities consisting of elevated hepatic transaminases and cytopenias. At the MTD (n = 14), there was one partial response occurring after 6 cycles of rhIL-12 in a patient with renal cell cancer. Two additional renal cell cancer patients treated at the MTD had prolonged disease stabilization, with one of these exhibiting tumor regression after 8 cycles of rhIL-12. IFN-gamma, IL-15, and IL-18 were induced in patients treated with rhIL-12. Whereas IFN-gamma and IL-15 induction were attenuated midway through the first cycle in patients with disease progression, those patients with tumor regression or prolonged disease stabilization were able to maintain IFN-gamma, IL-15, and IL-18 induction. The down-modulation of IFN-gamma induction during rhIL-12 treatment did not relate to IL-10 production or alterations in rhIL-12 bioavailability but was associated with an acquired defect in lymphocyte IFN-gamma production in response to IL-12, IL-2, or IL-15. This defect could be partially overcome in vitro through combined stimulation with IL-12 plus IL-2. These findings show that the chronic administration of twice-weekly i.v. rhIL-12 is well-tolerated, stimulates the production of IL-12 costimulatory cytokines and IFN-gamma, and can induce delayed tumor regression. Strategies aimed at maintaining IFN-gamma induction, such as the addition of IL-2, may further augment the response rate to this

  18. Effect of Advancing Age and Multiple Chronic Conditions on Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease after Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswami, Ashok; Kiley, Mary-Lou; Anthony, Faith F; Chen, Yuexin; Chen, Jason; Rajagopal, Sumanth; Liu, Taylor I; Young, Charlie; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is insufficient information on the effect that advancing age and multiple chronic conditions (MCC) have on mortality after placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vs non-ESRD. Objective: To assess whether a differential effect of age and MCC exists between ESRD and non-ESRD. Design: Population-based, retrospective cohort study using data from the national Kaiser Permanente Cardiac Device Registry of patients who underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013. Main Outcome Measures: All-cause mortality. Results: Of 7825 patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement, ESRD-affected patients constituted 4.0% of the cohort (n = 311), were similar in age (p = 0.91), and presented with a larger comorbidity burden (3.3 ± 1.3 vs 2.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.001). The effect of advancing age (every 5 years) on mortality in the ESRD cohort (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03–1.20) was less than in the non-ESRD cohort (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.25–1.32). Similarly, the effect of each additional comorbidity in the ESRD cohort was less (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.91–1.19) than in the non-ESRD group (HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.16–1.25). Lastly, ESRD was independently associated with a 3-fold greater hazard of mortality. Conclusions: Advancing age and increasing number of MCC have a differential effect on mortality risk in patients with ESRD compared with their non-ESRD counterparts. Future studies should focus on assessment of nonlinear relationships of age, MCC, and naturally occurring clusters of MCC on mortality. PMID:26562307

  19. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastasized to Pagetic Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Ashley; Liu, Bo; Rop, Baiywo; Edison, Michelle; Valente, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Paget’s disease of the bone, historically known as osteitis deformans, is an uncommon disease typically affecting individuals of European descent. Patients with Paget’s disease of the bone are at increased risk for primary bone neoplasms, particularly osteosarcoma. Many cases of metastatic disease to pagetic bone have been reported. However, renal cell carcinoma metastasized to pagetic bone is extremely rare. A 94-year-old male presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen demonstrated a large mass in the right kidney compatible with renal cell carcinoma. The patient was also noted to have Paget’s disease of the pelvic bones and sacrum. Within the pagetic bone of the sacrum, there was an enhancing mass compatible with renal cell carcinoma. A subsequent biopsy of the renal lesion confirmed renal cell carcinoma. Paget’s disease of the bone places the patient at an increased risk for bone neoplasms. The most commonly reported sites for malignant transformation are the femur, pelvis, and humerus. In cases of malignant transformation, osteosarcoma is the most common diagnosis. Breast, lung, and prostate carcinomas are the most common to metastasize to pagetic bone. Renal cell carcinoma associated with Paget’s disease of the bone is very rare, with only one prior reported case. Malignancy in Paget's disease of the bone is uncommon with metastatic disease to pagetic bone being extremely rare. We report a patient diagnosed with concomitant renal cell carcinoma and metastatic disease within Paget’s disease of the sacrum. Further research is needed to assess the true incidence of renal cell carcinoma associated with pagetic bone.

  20. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastasized to Pagetic Bone.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Ashley; Liu, Bo; Rop, Baiywo; Edison, Michelle; Valente, Michael; Burt, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease of the bone, historically known as osteitis deformans, is an uncommon disease typically affecting individuals of European descent. Patients with Paget's disease of the bone are at increased risk for primary bone neoplasms, particularly osteosarcoma. Many cases of metastatic disease to pagetic bone have been reported. However, renal cell carcinoma metastasized to pagetic bone is extremely rare. A 94-year-old male presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen demonstrated a large mass in the right kidney compatible with renal cell carcinoma. The patient was also noted to have Paget's disease of the pelvic bones and sacrum. Within the pagetic bone of the sacrum, there was an enhancing mass compatible with renal cell carcinoma. A subsequent biopsy of the renal lesion confirmed renal cell carcinoma. Paget's disease of the bone places the patient at an increased risk for bone neoplasms. The most commonly reported sites for malignant transformation are the femur, pelvis, and humerus. In cases of malignant transformation, osteosarcoma is the most common diagnosis. Breast, lung, and prostate carcinomas are the most common to metastasize to pagetic bone. Renal cell carcinoma associated with Paget's disease of the bone is very rare, with only one prior reported case. Malignancy in Paget's disease of the bone is uncommon with metastatic disease to pagetic bone being extremely rare. We report a patient diagnosed with concomitant renal cell carcinoma and metastatic disease within Paget's disease of the sacrum. Further research is needed to assess the true incidence of renal cell carcinoma associated with pagetic bone.

  1. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastasized to Pagetic Bone.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Ashley; Liu, Bo; Rop, Baiywo; Edison, Michelle; Valente, Michael; Burt, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease of the bone, historically known as osteitis deformans, is an uncommon disease typically affecting individuals of European descent. Patients with Paget's disease of the bone are at increased risk for primary bone neoplasms, particularly osteosarcoma. Many cases of metastatic disease to pagetic bone have been reported. However, renal cell carcinoma metastasized to pagetic bone is extremely rare. A 94-year-old male presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen demonstrated a large mass in the right kidney compatible with renal cell carcinoma. The patient was also noted to have Paget's disease of the pelvic bones and sacrum. Within the pagetic bone of the sacrum, there was an enhancing mass compatible with renal cell carcinoma. A subsequent biopsy of the renal lesion confirmed renal cell carcinoma. Paget's disease of the bone places the patient at an increased risk for bone neoplasms. The most commonly reported sites for malignant transformation are the femur, pelvis, and humerus. In cases of malignant transformation, osteosarcoma is the most common diagnosis. Breast, lung, and prostate carcinomas are the most common to metastasize to pagetic bone. Renal cell carcinoma associated with Paget's disease of the bone is very rare, with only one prior reported case. Malignancy in Paget's disease of the bone is uncommon with metastatic disease to pagetic bone being extremely rare. We report a patient diagnosed with concomitant renal cell carcinoma and metastatic disease within Paget's disease of the sacrum. Further research is needed to assess the true incidence of renal cell carcinoma associated with pagetic bone. PMID:27660736

  2. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastasized to Pagetic Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Ashley; Liu, Bo; Rop, Baiywo; Edison, Michelle; Valente, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Paget’s disease of the bone, historically known as osteitis deformans, is an uncommon disease typically affecting individuals of European descent. Patients with Paget’s disease of the bone are at increased risk for primary bone neoplasms, particularly osteosarcoma. Many cases of metastatic disease to pagetic bone have been reported. However, renal cell carcinoma metastasized to pagetic bone is extremely rare. A 94-year-old male presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen demonstrated a large mass in the right kidney compatible with renal cell carcinoma. The patient was also noted to have Paget’s disease of the pelvic bones and sacrum. Within the pagetic bone of the sacrum, there was an enhancing mass compatible with renal cell carcinoma. A subsequent biopsy of the renal lesion confirmed renal cell carcinoma. Paget’s disease of the bone places the patient at an increased risk for bone neoplasms. The most commonly reported sites for malignant transformation are the femur, pelvis, and humerus. In cases of malignant transformation, osteosarcoma is the most common diagnosis. Breast, lung, and prostate carcinomas are the most common to metastasize to pagetic bone. Renal cell carcinoma associated with Paget’s disease of the bone is very rare, with only one prior reported case. Malignancy in Paget's disease of the bone is uncommon with metastatic disease to pagetic bone being extremely rare. We report a patient diagnosed with concomitant renal cell carcinoma and metastatic disease within Paget’s disease of the sacrum. Further research is needed to assess the true incidence of renal cell carcinoma associated with pagetic bone. PMID:27660736

  3. [Metastatic Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Romero Gutiérrez, Marta; Alcántara Torres, Mariano; Muñoz Rosas, Concepción; Gómez Moreno, Ana Zaida; Guardiola Arévalo, Antonio; Rodríguez Merlo, Rufo; Carrobles Jiménez, José María

    2010-01-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is a granulomatous cutaneous lesion that appears in patients with Crohn's disease and is located in any skin area, separated from the lesions in the gastrointestinal tract. This entity is characterized by its heterogeneous behavior, both in its localization and clinical expression and in its effect on patients' quality of life. Histology is essential for diagnosis and shows non-caseating granulomas. There are no treatment guidelines and various therapeutic strategies have been employed, with variable response. In most patients, treatment with biological agents is highly effective. We describe three cases of metastatic Crohn's disease with the aim of analyzing the characteristics of this entity, which should always be included in the differential diagnosis of skin lesions in patients with Crohn's disease. A literature review is also provided.

  4. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  5. Renal perfusion scintiscan

    MedlinePlus

    Renal perfusion scintigraphy; Radionuclide renal perfusion scan; Perfusion scintiscan - renal; Scintiscan - renal perfusion ... supply the kidneys. This is a condition called renal artery stenosis. Significant renal artery stenosis may be ...

  6. A study to describe the health trajectory of patients with advanced renal disease who choose not to receive dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kilshaw, Lindsey; Sammut, Hannah; Asher, Rebecca; Williams, Peter; Saxena, Rema; Howse, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background Some patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF) are unlikely to benefit from dialysis and conservative management (CM) is offered as a positive alternative. Understanding the trajectory of illness by health care professionals may improve end-of-life care. Methods We aimed to describe the trajectory of functional status within our CM population through a prospective, observational study using the objective Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and subjective Barthel Index (BI) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) [EuroQol 5D-5L (EQ-5D-5L)] measurements and correlating them with demographic and laboratory data and with sentinel events. Results There was a significant increase in TUG scores over the 6 months prior to death {2.24 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–4.32], P = 0.017} and a significant decrease in EQ-5D-5L [−0.19 (95% CI −0.33 to −0.06), P = 0.006]. The only significant associations with mortality were serum albumin [hazard ratio (HR) 0.81 (95% CI 0.67–0.97), P = 0.024] and male gender [HR 5.94 (95% CI 1.50–23.5), P = 0.011]. Conclusions We have shown there is a significant decline in functional status in the last 6 months before death in the CM population. Of interest, there was a significant relationship of lower serum albumin with functional decline and risk of death. We hope that with improved insight into disease trajectories we can improve our ability to identify and respond to the changes in needs of these patients, facilitate complex and sensitive end-of-life discussions and improve end-of-life care. PMID:27274835

  7. Primary renal carcinoid tumour with lung metastasis misdiagnosed as renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Daboul, Nour; Monga, Dulabh; Bunker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with a history of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosed 10 years prior, status post right nephrectomy, presented for evaluation of pulmonary nodules. A year after the nephrectomy, he had undergone cutaneous metastasectomy in the right flank area, and a further 2 years later he had had his second cutaneous metastasectomy in the right chest wall. Both cutaneous pathologies had, at the time, shown metastatic neoplasm with histological features compatible with those of the previous renal tumour. He was treated with sorafenib. 3 years later he developed asymptomatic pulmonary nodules, which gradually doubled in size over the next 2.5 years. He underwent bronchoscopy and left lower lobe biopsy. Pathology revealed a metastatic renal carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumour. Second review of the previous renal neoplasm and the cutaneous metastatic pathology showed trabecular architecture, consistent with carcinoid, but mimicking the long parallel arrays that have been described in some cases of papillary RCC. PMID:26951438

  8. Pathophysiology and management of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Crowell, W A; Brown, C A; Barsanti, J A; Finco, D R

    1997-09-01

    Recently, the hypothesis that all renal diseases are inherently progressive and self-perpetuating has focused attention on adaptive changes in renal structure and function that occur whenever renal function is reduced. These glomerular adaptations to renal disease include increases in filtration rate, capillary pressure and size, and are referred to as glomerular hyperfiltration, glomerular hypertension and glomerular hypertrophy, respectively. Extrarenal changes, such as dietary phosphate excess, systemic hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, acidosis and hyperparathyroidism occur in animals with renal disease and may be contributors to progression of renal disease. Emphasis in the management of companion animals with renal disease has shifted to identifying, understanding and controlling those processes that play a role in the progression from early to end-stage renal failure. Advances made by veterinary nephrologists in the past 15 years permit resolution of old controversies, formulation of new hypotheses and discussion of unresolved issues about the nature of progressive renal disease in dogs and cats. PMID:9308397

  9. [Renal cell carcinoma in the coming era of robotic technology].

    PubMed

    Kolombo, Ivan; Ponesický, Jirí; Toberný, Michal; Kríz, Radko; Zemanová, Iva; Weichet, Jirí; Vymazal, Josef; Cernohorský, Stanislav; Bartůnek, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the most malignant urological tumour and the incidence in the Czech Republic is currently highest in the world. Kidney cancer is associated with seven different genes and is characterized nowadays as metabolic disease. Authors present some current facts about advances in diagnosis and new treatment methods. Different findings required individual approach. Diagnosis improved with more sophisticated ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography etc. Apart from standard surgery new alternative methods of minimally invasive procedures also assert (laparoscopy, robotic surgery, radiofrequency ablation, kryoablation) and are incorporated in current complex treatment strategies. Systemic therapy with new targeted antiangiogenics drugs is a new standard of treatment for metastatic kidney cancer Complex care with integration of local treatment (surgery, radiotherapy, selective embolization, radiosurgery, cementoplasty, vetrebroplasty etc.) and systemic medication with best supportive care is optimal for a metastatic kidney cancer. More accurate diagnostic methods and complex interdisciplinary approach with integration of systemic therapy with new targeted drugs and new minimally invasive procedures represent new possibilities for patients with kidney cancer. PMID:21634198

  10. Obesity and Outcomes in Patients with Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Leiter, Amanda; Doucette, John; Krege, Susan; Lin, Chia-Chia; Hahn, Noah; Ecke, Thorsten; Sonpavde, Guru; Bamias, Aristotle; Oh, William K.; Galsky, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity has been associated with worse outcomes in patients with clinically localized urothelial cancer. However, this impact has not been evaluated in metastatic disease. Objective: To assess the impact of obesity on outcomes of patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. Methods: Data from 537 patients were aggregated from eight phase II and phase III clinical trials investigating first-line cisplatin-based combination therapy in metastatic urothelial cancer. Chemotherapy regimen, adverse events, treatment response, and survival outcomes were compared across body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA) categories. Results: BMI was classified according to WHO criteria (<18.5 underweight, 18.5–24.99 normal weight, 25–29.99 overweight, >30 obese). BSA was classified as either below or greater than or equal to (average for this cohort (1.87 m2 for males and 1.66 m2 for females). There was no significant difference in number of chemotherapy cycles, adverse events, and response rate or survival outcomes (overall and progression-free) across BMI and BSA categories. There was no significant difference in adverse events across BMI categories, but the incidences of embolic events and renal failure were higher in patients with an average or higher BSA than those with a lower than average BSA (6.6% vs. 3.1% for renal failure p = 0.06; 5.9% vs. 2.7% for renal failure, p = 0.07). There was no significant difference in response rate or survival outcomes (overall and progression-free) amongst BMI and BSA categories. Conclusions: Obese patients with metastatic urothelial cancer on cisplatin-based therapies have similar response rates, survival outcomes, and tolerability of cisplatin-based therapy to non-obese patients. PMID:27500201

  11. Clinical Impact of Education Provision on Determining Advance Care Planning Decisions among End Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Regular Hemodialysis in University Malaya Medical Centre

    PubMed Central

    Hing (Wong), Albert; Chin, Loh Ee; Ping, Tan Li; Peng, Ng Kok; Kun, Lim Soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Advance care planning (ACP) is a process of shared decision-making about future health-care plans between patients, health care providers, and family members, should patients becomes incapable of participating in medical treatment decisions. ACP discussions enhance patient's autonomy, focus on patient's values and treatment preferences, and promote patient-centered care. ACP is integrated as part of clinical practice in Singapore and the United States. Aim: To assess the clinical impact of education provision on determining ACP decisions among end-stage renal disease patients on regular hemodialysis at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). To study the knowledge and attitude of patients toward ACP and end-of-life issues. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six patients were recruited from UMMC. About 43 questions pretest survey adapted from Lyon's ACP survey and Moss's cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attitude survey was given to patients to answer. An educational brochure is then introduced to these patients, and a posttest survey carried out after that. The results were analyzed using SPSS version 22.0. Results: Opinion on ACP, including CPR decisions, showed an upward trend on the importance percentage after the educational brochure exposure, but this was statistically not significant. Seventy-five percent of participants had never heard of ACP before, and only 3.6% had actually prepared a written advanced directive. Conclusion: The ACP educational brochure clinically impacts patients’ preferences and decisions toward end-of-life care; however, this is statistically not significant. Majority of patients have poor knowledge on ACP. This study lays the foundation for execution of future larger scale clinical trials, and ultimately, the incorporation of ACP into clinical practice in Malaysia. PMID:27803566

  12. Lysozyme enhances renal excretion of advanced glycation endproducts in vivo and suppresses adverse age-mediated cellular effects in vitro: a potential AGE sequestration therapy for diabetic nephropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, F.; Cai, W.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Vlassara, H.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lysozyme (LZ), a host-defense protein, contains an 18 amino-acid domain with high affinity binding for sugar-derived proteins or lipids, called advanced glycation endproducts (AGE), that are implicated in diabetes- and age-dependent complications (DC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A) The effects of LZ on AGE- removal were tested in vivo. LZ was injected (200 ug/day, i.p., X2 weeks) in non-obese diabetic (NOD), db/db (+/+) mice, and non-diabetic, AGE-infused Sprague-Dawley rats. B) LZ: AGE interactions with macrophage-like T1B-183 cells (Mf) and mesangial cells (MC) were tested in vitro. RESULTS: A) In NOD mice, LZ reduced the elevated basal serum AGE (sAGE) (p < 0.05), enhanced urinary AGE (uAGE) excretion by approximately 2-fold (p < 0.01), while it reduced albuminuria (UA), p < 0.005. In db/db mice, LZ infusion also reduced the elevated sAGE (p < 0.05), doubled uAGE excretion (p < 0.05), and decreased UA (p < 0.01). In addition, LZ maintained normal sAGE in normal rats infused with AGE-BSA, as it doubled the urinary AGE (uAGE) clearance (p < 0.01). B) LZ stimulated the uptake and degradation of (125) I-labeled AGE-BSA and (25) I-human serum AGE by Mf, while suppressing AGE-induced TNFalpha and IGF-I production. In MC, LZ suppressed the AGE-promoted PDGF-B, alpha1 type IV collagen, and tenascin mRNA levels, and restored the AGE-suppressed expression and activity of MMP-9, but not MMP-2. CONCLUSION: LZ may act to: a) accelerate renal in-vivo AGE clearance, b) suppress macrophage and mesangial cell- specific gene activation in vitro, and c) improve albuminuria due to diabetes. These data suggest that LZ by sequestering AGEs may protect against diabetic renal damage. PMID:11788787

  13. Role of the neural niche in brain metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Termini, John; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul

    2014-08-01

    Metastasis is the relentless pursuit of cancer to escape its primary site and colonize distant organs. This malignant evolutionary process is biologically heterogeneous, yet one unifying element is the critical role of the microenvironment for arriving metastatic cells. Historically, brain metastases were rarely investigated because patients with advanced cancer were considered terminal. Fortunately, advances in molecular therapies have led to patients living longer with metastatic cancer. However, one site remains recalcitrant to our treatment efforts, the brain. The central nervous system is the most complex biologic system, which poses unique obstacles but also harbors opportunities for discovery. Much of what we know about the brain microenvironment comes from neuroscience. We suggest that the interrelated cellular responses in traumatic brain injury may guide us toward new perspectives in understanding brain metastases. In this view, brain metastases may be conceptualized as progressive oncologic injury to the nervous system. This review discusses our evolving understanding of bidirectional interactions between the brain milieu and metastatic cancer.

  14. Health-related quality of life in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer treated with eribulin mesylate or capecitabine in an open-label randomized phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Javier; Hudgens, Stacie; Twelves, Chris; Perez, Edith A; Awada, Ahmad; Yelle, Louise; McCutcheon, Susan; Kaufman, Peter A; Forsythe, Anna; Velikova, Galina

    2015-12-01

    The clinical benefit of eribulin versus capecitabine was evaluated using health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data from a phase 3 randomized trial in patients with pretreated advanced/metastatic breast cancer (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00337103). The study population has been described previously (Kaufman et al. in J Clin Oncol 33:594-601, 2015). Eligible patients received eribulin (1.4 mg/m(2) intravenously on days 1 and 8) or capecitabine (1.25 g/m(2) orally twice daily on days 1-14) per 21-day cycles. HRQoL was assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality-of-life Questionnaire-Core 30 questions (QLQ-C30) and breast module-23 questions (QLQ-BR23), administered at baseline through 24 months, until disease progression or other antitumor treatment initiation. Minimally important difference (MID) and time to symptom worsening (TSW) were investigated. 1062 (96.4 %) Patients completed the EORTC questionnaire at baseline; overall, compliance was ≥80 %. Patients receiving capecitabine versus eribulin had significantly worse symptoms (higher scores) for nausea/vomiting (MID 8; P < 0.05) and diarrhea (MID 7; P < 0.05). Treatment with eribulin versus capecitabine, led to worse systemic therapy side-effects (dry mouth, different tastes, irritated eyes, feeling ill, hot flushes, headaches, and hair loss; MID 10; P < 0.01). Clinically meaningful worsening was observed for future perspective (MID 10; P < 0.05) with capecitabine and for systemic therapy side-effects scale (MID 10; P < 0.01) with eribulin. Patients receiving capecitabine experienced more-rapid deterioration in body image (by 2.9 months) and future perspective (by 1.4 months; P < 0.05) compared with those on eribulin; the opposite was observed for systemic side-effects where patients receiving eribulin experienced more-rapid deterioration than those receiving capecitabine (by 2 months; P < 0.05). Eribulin and capecitabine were found to have similar

  15. Current evidence and the evolving role of sunitinib in the management of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Noronha, V; Joshi, A; Bakshi, G; Tongaonkar, H; Prabhash, K

    2016-01-01

    The development of targeted agents has expanded the anticancer arsenal available to oncologists and revolutionized the field of cancer treatment. In patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), small molecule targeted therapies have improved clinical outcomes compared with cytokine-based treatments. Sunitinib malate is one such drug that has demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This oral, multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor is approved for use in multiple countries for the treatment of advanced RCC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients who have progressed on imatinib therapy. In patients with advanced RCC, sunitinib significantly improves clinical outcomes with a favorable safety profile compared with conventional treatment with interferon-a. The clinically proven treatment and safety outcomes have led investigators to evaluate the merits of sunitinib therapy in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting in patients with mRCC. In the neoadjuvant setting, preliminary data suggest that sunitinib can effectively reduce the primary tumor and facilitate surgical resection in patients with locally advanced and mRCC. Post-operative complications were observed in some patients, but the overall safety profile and efficacy suggests that mRCC patients with surgically inoperable tumors may benefit from neoadjuvant sunitinib therapy. Ongoing clinical trials should provide insight into the value of sunitinib as adjuvant therapy. PMID:27146754

  16. Phase Ib, Dose Escalation Study of Oral LDE225 in Combination With BKM120 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Dose Escalation; Safety; Preliminary Efficacy; Advanced Solid Tumors; Metastatic Breast Cancer; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Colorectal Cancer; Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme; Gastric Cancer; Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer; Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Hormone Receptor Positive (ER+/PR+, and Her2-) Metastatic Breast Cancer

  17. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Devon A; Bhakta, Nirav R; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are initiated

  18. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Devon A.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D.; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality1. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours2–5. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown2. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are

  19. A single-dose mass balance and metabolite-profiling study of vemurafenib in patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Simone M; Rinderknecht, Jeannine; Dummer, Reinhard; Kuhn, Felix Pierre; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Lee, Lucy; Ayala, Ruben C; Racha, Jagdish; Geng, Wanping; Moore, David; Liu, Mei; Joe, Andrew K; Bazan, Selby Patricia Gil; Grippo, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    Vemurafenib, a selective inhibitor of oncogenic BRAF kinase carrying the V600 mutation, is approved for treatment of advanced BRAF mutation–positive melanoma. This study characterized mass balance, metabolism, rates/routes of elimination, and disposition of 14C-labeled vemurafenib in patients with metastatic melanoma. Seven patients with metastatic BRAF-mutated melanoma received unlabeled vemurafenib 960 mg twice daily for 14 days. On the morning of day 15, patients received 14C-labeled vemurafenib 960 mg (maximum 2.56 MBq [69.2 μCi]). Thereafter, patients resumed unlabeled vemurafenib (960 mg twice daily). Blood, urine, and feces were collected for metabolism, pharmacokinetic, and dose recovery analysis. Within 18 days after dose, ∼95% of 14C-vemurafenib–related material was recovered from feces (94.1%) and urine (<1%). The parent compound was the predominant component (95%) in plasma. The mean plasma elimination half-life of 14C-vemurafenib–related material was 71.1 h. Each metabolite accounted for <0.5% and ≤6% of the total administered dose in urine and feces, respectively (0–96 h postdose). No new metabolites were detected. Vemurafenib was well-tolerated. Excretion of vemurafenib via bile into feces is considered the predominant elimination route from plasma with minor renal elimination (<1%). PMID:25729580

  20. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  1. Mipsagargin, a novel thapsigargin-based PSMA-activated prodrug: results of a first-in-man phase I clinical trial in patients with refractory, advanced or metastatic solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, D; Wilding, G; Denmeade, S; Sarantopoulas, J; Cosgrove, D; Cetnar, J; Azad, N; Bruce, J; Kurman, M; Allgood, V E; Carducci, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mipsagargin (G-202; (8-O-(12-aminododecanoyl)-8-O-debutanoyl thapsigargin)-Asp-γ-Glu-γ-Glu-γ-GluGluOH)) is a novel thapsigargin-based targeted prodrug that is activated by PSMA-mediated cleavage of an inert masking peptide. The active moiety is an inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump protein that is necessary for cellular viability. We evaluated the safety of mipsagargin in patients with advanced solid tumours and established a recommended phase II dosing (RP2D) regimen. Methods: Patients with advanced solid tumours received mipsagargin by intravenous infusion on days 1, 2 and 3 of 28-day cycles and were allowed to continue participation in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The dosing began at 1.2 mg m−2 and was escalated using a modified Fibonacci schema to determine maximally tolerated dose (MTD) with an expansion cohort at the RP2D. Plasma was analysed for mipsagargin pharmacokinetics and response was assessed using RECIST criteria. Results: A total of 44 patients were treated at doses ranging from 1.2 to 88 mg m−2, including 28 patients in the dose escalation phase and 16 patients in an expansion cohort. One dose-limiting toxicity (DLT; Grade 3 rash) was observed in the dose escalation portion of the study. At 88 mg m−2, observations of Grade 2 infusion-related reaction (IRR, 2 patients) and Grade 2 creatinine elevation (1 patient) led to declaration of 66.8 mg m−2 as the recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Across the study, the most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were fatigue, rash, nausea, pyrexia and IRR. Two patients developed treatment-related Grade 3 acute renal failure that was reversible during the treatment-free portion of the cycle. To help ameliorate the IRR and creatinine elevations, a RP2D of 40 mg m−2 on day 1 and 66.8 mg m−2 on days 2 and 3 with prophylactic premedications and hydration on each

  2. Computational Modelling of Metastasis Development in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baratchart, Etienne; Benzekry, Sébastien; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Colin, Thierry; Cooley, Lindsay S.; Pineau, Raphäel; Ribot, Emeline J; Saut, Olivier; Souleyreau, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    The biology of the metastatic colonization process remains a poorly understood phenomenon. To improve our knowledge of its dynamics, we conducted a modelling study based on multi-modal data from an orthotopic murine experimental system of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The standard theory of metastatic colonization usually assumes that secondary tumours, once established at a distant site, grow independently from each other and from the primary tumour. Using a mathematical model that translates this assumption into equations, we challenged this theory against our data that included: 1) dynamics of primary tumour cells in the kidney and metastatic cells in the lungs, retrieved by green fluorescent protein tracking, and 2) magnetic resonance images (MRI) informing on the number and size of macroscopic lesions. Critically, when calibrated on the growth of the primary tumour and total metastatic burden, the predicted theoretical size distributions were not in agreement with the MRI observations. Moreover, tumour expansion only based on proliferation was not able to explain the volume increase of the metastatic lesions. These findings strongly suggested rejection of the standard theory, demonstrating that the time development of the size distribution of metastases could not be explained by independent growth of metastatic foci. This led us to investigate the effect of spatial interactions between merging metastatic tumours on the dynamics of the global metastatic burden. We derived a mathematical model of spatial tumour growth, confronted it with experimental data of single metastatic tumour growth, and used it to provide insights on the dynamics of multiple tumours growing in close vicinity. Together, our results have implications for theories of the metastatic process and suggest that global dynamics of metastasis development is dependent on spatial interactions between metastatic lesions. PMID:26599078

  3. Metastatic malignant chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, W B; Mankin, H J

    1996-12-01

    A case of malignant chondroblastoma with metastases is reported. The patient initially presented with a lytic lesion in his left pubic ramus. He was treated with curettage, but the lesion recurred 3 years later. After repeated curettage, radiation therapy, and the late development of multiple bone and soft-tissue metastases, he succumbed to his disease 13 years after diagnosis. The surgical pathology from each of his several procedures was reviewed. Although no definite malignant transformation was apparent, a metastatic deposit curetted 3 months prior to death showed some increase in mitotic activity. Flow cytometry of specimens from the patient's first local recurrence and a late distant metastasis was performed and revealed the interval development of a minor aneuploid peak between the two samples. This fatal chondroblastoma is the only one in our series of 80 patients treated over the past 25 years. PMID:9001683

  4. Renal tumors: diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Puay Hoon; Cheng, Liang; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Merino, Maria J; Netto, George; Reuter, Victor E; Shen, Steven S; Grignon, David J; Montironi, Rodolfo; Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Moch, Holger

    2013-10-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology convened a consensus conference on renal cancer, preceded by an online survey, to address issues relating to the diagnosis and reporting of renal neoplasia. In this report, the role of biomarkers in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of renal tumors is addressed. In particular we focused upon the use of immunohistochemical markers and the approach to specific differential diagnostic scenarios. We enquired whether cytogenetic and molecular tools were applied in practice and asked for views on the perceived prognostic role of biomarkers. Both the survey and conference voting results demonstrated a high degree of consensus in participants' responses regarding prognostic/predictive markers and molecular techniques, whereas it was apparent that biomarkers for these purposes remained outside the diagnostic realm pending clinical validation. Although no individual antibody or panel of antibodies reached consensus for classifying renal tumors, or for confirming renal metastatic disease, it was noted from the online survey that 87% of respondents used immunohistochemistry to subtype renal tumors sometimes or occasionally, and a majority (87%) used immunohistochemical markers (Pax 2 or Pax 8, renal cell carcinoma [RCC] marker, panel of pan-CK, CK7, vimentin, and CD10) in confirming the diagnosis of metastatic RCC. There was consensus that immunohistochemistry should be used for histologic subtyping and applied before reaching a diagnosis of unclassified RCC. At the conference, there was consensus that TFE3 and TFEB analysis ought to be requested when RCC was diagnosed in a young patient or when histologic appearances were suggestive of the translocation subtype; whereas Pax 2 and/or Pax 8 were considered to be the most useful markers in the diagnosis of a renal primary. PMID:24025522

  5. Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kah Poh; Mohile, Supriya G; Kessler, Elizabeth; Fung, Chunkit

    2016-10-01

    The aging of the population, along with rising life expectancy, means that increasing numbers of older men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and a large proportion of these men will present with metastatic disease. In this paper, we discuss recent advances in prostate cancer treatment. In particular, we review management approaches for older patients with metastatic prostate cancer based on the decision tree developed by the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, which categorized older men as "fit," "vulnerable," and "frail" according to comprehensive geriatric assessment. PMID:27586377

  6. Donor transmission of melanoma following renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kathryn T; Olszanski, Anthony; Farma, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Donor transmission of melanoma is one of the more common and lethal of recipient malignancies, often presenting with systemic disease. Although some patients may receive durable remission of melanoma following explantation of the allograft and withdrawal of immunosuppression, donor transmission of melanoma is fatal in most patients. Here we present a case of a 44-year-old male who developed metastatic melanoma following renal transplant.

  7. CTGF is a therapeutic target for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Finger, E C; Cheng, C-F; Williams, T R; Rankin, E B; Bedogni, B; Tachiki, L; Spong, S; Giaccia, A J; Powell, M B

    2014-02-27

    Metastatic melanoma remains a devastating disease with a 5-year survival rate of less than five percent. Despite recent advances in targeted therapies for melanoma, only a small percentage of melanoma patients experience durable remissions. Therefore, it is critical to identify new therapies for the treatment of advanced melanoma. Here, we define connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) as a therapeutic target for metastatic melanoma. Clinically, CTGF expression correlates with tumor progression and is strongly induced by hypoxia through HIF-1 and HIF-2-dependent mechanisms. Genetic inhibition of CTGF in human melanoma cells is sufficient to significantly reduce orthotopic tumor growth, as well as metastatic tumor growth in the lung of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Mechanistically, inhibition of CTGF decreased invasion and migration associated with reduced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. Most importantly, the anti-CTGF antibody, FG-3019, had a profound inhibitory effect on the progression of established metastatic melanoma. These results offer the first preclinical validation of anti-CTGF therapy for the treatment of advanced melanoma and underscore the importance of tumor hypoxia in melanoma progression.

  8. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sustarsic, Elahu G.; Junnila, Riia K.; Kopchick, John J.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  9. Necrotizing myopathy as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Naert, E; De Bleecker, J L; Lumen, N; Rottey, S

    2015-02-01

    We report a 49-year-old patient with necrotizing myopathy and a right renal mass. After laparoscopic radical nephrectomy, a remission of myopathy was seen. Pathologic evaluation of the nephrectomy specimen revealed a clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Relapse of myopathy 6 months postoperatively coincided with the diagnosis of the appearance of liver metastatic disease. After initiation of treatment with an mTOR-inhibitor, myopathy became less active requiring smaller amounts of corticosteroids with a complete remission of myopathy after 3 months of systemic treatment for metastatic renal cell cancer.

  10. Immunotherapy advances in uro-genital malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ratta, Raffaele; Zappasodi, Roberta; Raggi, Daniele; Grassi, Paolo; Verzoni, Elena; Necchi, Andrea; Di Nicola, Massimo; Salvioni, Roberto; de Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer has made significant progresses over the last 20 years. Multiple efforts have been attempted to restore immune-mediated tumor elimination, leading to the development of several targeted immunotherapies. Data from recent clinical trials suggest that these agents might improve the prognosis of patients with advanced genito-urinary (GU) malignancies. Nivolumab has been the first immune checkpoint-inhibitor approved for pre-treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Pembrolizumab and atezolizumab have shown promising results in both phase I and II trials in urothelial carcinoma. Brentuximab vedotin has demonstrated early signals of clinical activity and immunomodulatory effects in highly pre-treated patients with testicular germ cell tumors. In this review, we have summarized the major clinical achievements of immunotherapy in GU cancers, focusing on immune checkpoint blockade as well as the new immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under clinical evaluation for these malignancies.

  11. Renal Medullary Carcinoma: Case Report of an Aggressive Malignancy with Near-Complete Response to Dose-Dense Methotrexate, Vinblastine, Doxorubicin, and Cisplatin Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Amjad, Ali Imran; Ali, Hira; Appleman, Leonard J.; Parwani, Anil; Dhir, Rajiv; Roy, Somak; Parikh, Rahul A.

    2014-01-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is a rare but aggressive malignancy affecting young individuals with sickle cell trait. Renal medullary carcinoma commonly presents with advanced or metastatic disease and is associated with a rapidly progressive clinical course and an extremely short overall survival measured in weeks to few months. Due to the rarity of RMC, there is no proven effective therapy and patients are often treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. We report near-complete radiological and pathological response in a patient treated with dose-dense MVAC (methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin) chemotherapy. The patient underwent consolidation nephrectomy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and had a 16-month progression-free survival, one of the longest reported in patients with RMC. PMID:25215253

  12. Parvalbumin is constantly expressed in chromophobe renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Martignoni, G; Pea, M; Chilosi, M; Brunelli, M; Scarpa, A; Colato, C; Tardanico, R; Zamboni, G; Bonetti, F

    2001-08-01

    Chromophobe renal carcinoma is composed of neoplastic cell showing several features similar to those found in the intercalated cells of the collecting ducts. Because the distal nephron expresses calcium-binding proteins playing a role in calcium homeostasis, we reasoned that these proteins could be expressed by chromophobe carcinoma and therefore represent a diagnostic marker. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of different calcium-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin-D28K, and calretinin) in 140 renal tumors, including 75 conventional (clear cell) carcinomas, 32 chromophobe carcinomas, 17 papillary renal cell carcinomas, and 16 oncocytomas. Parvalbumin was strongly positive in all primary chromophobe carcinomas and in one pancreatic metastasis; it was positive in 11 of 16 oncocytomas and absent in conventional (clear cell) and papillary renal cell carcinomas, either primary or metastatic. Calbindin-D28K and calretinin were negative in all tumors, with the exception of two chromophobe carcinomas, four oncocytomas, and two papillary renal cell carcinomas showing inconspicuous calretinin expression. Our data demonstrate that parvalbumin may be a suitable marker for distinguishing primary and metastatic chromophobe carcinoma from conventional (clear cell) and papillary renal cell carcinoma. Moreover, they suggest a relationship between chromophobe renal carcinoma and renal oncocytoma and indicate that chromophobe carcinoma exhibits differentiation toward the collecting-duct phenotype.

  13. A Case of Metastatic Melanoma in the Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Hossack, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of melanoma are resulting in patients living for extended periods after being diagnosed with metastatic disease. Metastases to the ureter are rare, but they have been described in the literature on a number of occasions. In this case report, we describe a patient with established metastatic melanoma who, whilst taking and responding to immunomodulatory therapy, was found to have an obstructive mass in the middle of his left ureter. Rather than performing either a nephroureterectomy or partial resection of the ureter, we opted to perform an endoscopic resection of the melanoma. Follow-up imaging at 12 months shows no evidence of local disease recurrence. We submit that primary endoscopic management of metastatic melanoma in the ureter is a viable alternative to a radical approach.

  14. [Effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonist (losartan) on renal function, serum potassium and blood pressure in patients with advanced renal failure: differences between patients with a serum creatinine (SCr) level higher than 3 mg/dl and those with a lower SCr level].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masaaki; Tanno, Yudo; Otsuka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Hajime; Ikeda, Masato; Katoh, Naohiko; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Tokutome, Goro; Hosoya, Tatsuo

    2002-10-01

    The administration of angiotensin II receptor antagonist(AIIA) to patients with advanced chronic renal failure(CRF) is not actively recommended. This study was performed to verify the appropriateness of this situation and to determine if there are any substantial differences between patients with a serum creatinine(SCr) level higher than 3 mg/dl and those with a lower SCr level in terms of the clinical effects such as renal function, serum potassium level and systemic blood pressure(BP) after the administration of AIIA. Sixteen patients with advanced CRF who were admitted to the out-patient clinic in Jikei University Hospital(1998/1-1999/12) were enrolled(average age: 65 years, underlying renal disease: diabetic nephropathy 6, CGN 5, and other 1). They had never been administered AIIA before. The patients were classified into two groups in accordance with their level of SCr: group A(SCr lower than 3.0 mg/dl; n = 11), and Group B(SCr higher than 3.0 mg/dl; n = 5). Losartan(50 mg/day) administration was started in order to examine parameters such as the SCr, potassium, BP at the out-patient clinic, and urinary protein excretion at the 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 month time points. Although the 1/SCr values provided negative slopes with time in both groups, no significant difference was found between the two slopes. There were no changes in the serum potassium levels or urinary protein excretion during the study period in either group, and no statistical difference was found between the two groups. Although the serum potassium level exceeded 5.5 mEq/l in two patients each in both groups, the level was controlled by diet therapy with restricted potassium. BP was reduced significantly in both groups during the study period, and no statistical difference in BP reduction was observed between the two groups. In conclusion, the results indicate there were no differences in the effect on renal function, serum potassium levels or systemic BP between the patients with a SCr level

  15. Everolimus and Vatalanib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Cabozantinib (advanced renal cell carcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda. ... drink grapefruit juice or eat grapefruit or any foods or supplements that contain grapefruit or grapefruit juice ...

  17. [Pazopanib (Votrient) in the management of renal cell cancer and soft tissue sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Gennigens, C; Jerusalem, G

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma accounts for 3% of all malignant tumors. Until a few years ago, immunotherapy (Interferon and/or Interleukin-2) was the only approved systemic treatment in the metastatic setting. Better knowledge of renal cell cancer biology drew attention on the fundamental role of angiogenesis. Several strategies targeting angiogenesis have been developed including VEGF and VEGFR inhibitors. They are now the standard treatment in first and second line. Pazopanib, a VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is one of the treatment options recommended for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, in first line and after cytokines failure. Since more recently, pazopanib is also approved in the treatment of metastatic soft tissue sarcoma, after failure of at least one line of chemoterapy. In this paper, we will review the mechanism of action and the clinical results of pazopanib in renal cell carcinoma and sarcoma. PMID:22984765

  18. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePlus

    Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - renal; Atherosclerotic disease - renal ... disorder of the arteries. It occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls ...

  19. Summary of the first annual Genitourinary Medical Oncology Conference Renal Cell Carcinoma Forum

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lori A; Escudier, Bernard; Reaume, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The first annual Canadian Genitourinary Medical Oncology Conference was held in June 2006 before the Canadian Urology Association Annual Meeting. This article summarizes 3 presentations that took place as part of the Renal Cell Carcinoma Forum: “Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: 2006 and Beyond” was presented by Dr. Bernard Escudier; “Practical Experience with Targeted Therapy,” by Dr. Lori Wood; and “Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma,” by Dr. Neil Reaume. PMID:18542786

  20. Small Renal Masses: Surgery or Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eu Chang; Yu, Ho Song

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of kidney cancer has been rising over the past two decades, especially in cases in which the disease is localized and small in size (<4 cm). This rise is mainly due to the widespread use of routine abdominal imaging such as ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Early detection was initially heralded as an opportunity to cure an otherwise lethal disease. However, despite increasing rates of renal surgery in parallel to this trend, mortality rates from renal cell carcinoma have remained relatively unchanged. Moreover, data suggest that a substantial proportion of small renal masses are benign. As a result, the management of small renal masses has continued to evolve along two basic themes: it has become less radical and less invasive. These shifts are in part a reflection of an improved understanding that the biology of incidentally discovered renal cell carcinoma may be more indolent than previously thought. However, not all small renal masses are indolent, and de novo metastatic disease can develop at the initial presentation. Therefore, it is with this background of clinical uncertainty and biological heterogeneity that clinicians must interpret the benefits and disadvantages of various clinical approaches to small renal masses. PMID:23700492

  1. Icotinib plus gemcitabine for metastatic pancreatic cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Shen, Hong; Hu, Han-Guang; Huang, Jian-Jin

    2015-01-01

    A large majority of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have advanced metastatic disease with unresectable malignancies. Despite treatment advances, the survival benefit from chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted drugs is limited. Moreover, their application is limited in China because of high toxicity and cost. Recently, inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor activity have shown promise for the treatment of solid cancers when used in combination with standard therapy. However, these drugs have not been evaluated extensively for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we report the treatment of a 64-year-old male with metastatic pancreatic cancer using a novel regimen of icotinib with gemcitabine. Marked shrinkage of the mass was observed after two treatment cycles, and partial remission was achieved. The abdominal pain was relieved. The adverse effects were tolerable and treatment cost was acceptable. This is the first reported case for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer with icotinib plus gemcitabine and demonstrates a promising therapeutic alternative. PMID:25805958

  2. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Persistent, Recurrent, or Progressive Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB): A metastatic mediator and emerging therapeutic target in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Gordana; Rose, April AN; Annis, Matthew G; Siegel, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapies are rapidly growing with respect to their clinical development and impact on cancer treatment due to their highly selective anti-tumor action. However, many aggressive cancers such as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) currently lack well-defined therapeutic targets against which such agents can be developed. The identification of tumor-associated antigens and the generation of antibody drug-conjugates represent an emerging area of intense interest and growth in the field of cancer therapeutics. Glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB) has recently been identified as a gene that is over-expressed in numerous cancers, including TNBC, and often correlates with the metastatic phenotype. In breast cancer, GPNMB expression in the tumor epithelium is associated with a reduction in disease-free and overall survival. Based on these findings, glembatumumab vedotin (CDX-011), an antibody-drug conjugate that selectively targets GPNMB, is currently being investigated in clinical trials for patients with metastatic breast cancer and unresectable melanoma. This review discusses the physiological and potential pathological roles of GPNMB in normal and cancer tissues, respectively, and details the clinical advances and challenges in targeting GPNMB-expressing malignancies. PMID:23874106

  4. Is the Blood-Brain Barrier Relevant in Metastatic Germ Cell Tumor?

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, Jose M. Schneider, Bryan P.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Germ cell tumors are uniquely chemosensitive and curable, even with advanced metastatic disease. Central nervous system recurrence can terminate a complete remission in other chemosensitive tumors, such as small cell lung cancer, because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We propose to document that the BBB is also relevant in germ cell tumors despite their dramatic chemosensitivity. Methods and Materials: We present five cases illustrating the concept of the BBB in patients with metastatic testicular cancer treated with chemotherapy. Results: In our large series of patients with metastatic testicular cancer treated with chemotherapy, we identified 5 unique patients. These patients were rendered free of disease only to experience relapse in the brain alone. This included 1 patient who initially had good-risk metastatic disease by means of the International Germ Cell Collaborative Group staging system at the onset of chemotherapy. Conclusions: The BBB is relevant in patients with metastatic testicular cancer.

  5. Haematogenous dissemination of cells from human renal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Glaves, D.; Huben, R. P.; Weiss, L.

    1988-01-01

    Estimates were made of the rates at which cancer cells were released directly into the renal vein in patients undergoing radical nephrectomy for primary renal cancer. Cancer cells were counted in blood samples taken from the renal vein using a density gradient centrifugation procedure, and identified using immunocytochemical techniques, on the basis of their cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins. Cancer cells were released as single cells and multicell emboli in 8/10 patients, in numbers varying widely between 14-7509 emboli ml-1 of blood. Despite a calculated median input into the metastatic process of 3.7 x 10(7) cancer cells per day for at least 180 days, only 3/10 patients had extraperitoneal metastases prior to surgery and only 1 of the remaining disease-free patients subsequently developed distant metastases over a maximum 35 month period. These results are discussed in terms of primary tumour kinetics and metastatic inefficiency. Images Figure 1 PMID:3279993

  6. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  7. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is.

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Marie; Joore, Manuela; Whiting, Penny; van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Armstrong, Nigel; Misso, Kate; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer. Some epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutations make tumours responsive to treatment with EGFR-TK inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) but less responsive to treatment with standard chemotherapy. Patients with NSCLC are therefore tested for EGFR-TK tumour gene mutations to inform treatment decisions. There are a variety of tests available to detect these mutations. The different tests vary in the specific mutations that they attempt to detect, the amount of tumour cells needed for the test to work, the time that it takes to give a result, the error rate of the test, and the cost of the test. OBJECTIVE To compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of EGFR-TK mutation tests used to identify previously untreated adults with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC, who may benefit from first-line treatment with TKIs. DATA SOURCES Twelve databases to August 2012 [including MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations and Daily Update (OvidSP), EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology Assessment database (HTA), Science Citation Index (SCI), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), BIOSIS Previews, NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme, PROSPERO (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews)], research registers and conference proceedings. A web-based survey gathered data on technical performance of EGFR-TK mutation tests. METHODS Randomised controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Diagnostic accuracy studies were assessed using QUADAS-2. There were insufficient data for meta-analysis. For accuracy studies, we calculated sensitivity and specificity together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Survival data were summarised

  9. A Decade of Experience in Developing Preclinical Models of Advanced- or Early-Stage Spontaneous Metastasis to Study Antiangiogenic Drugs, Metronomic Chemotherapy, and the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kerbel, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The clinical circumstance of treating spontaneous metastatic disease, after resection of primary tumors, whether advanced/overt or microscopic in nature, is seldom modeled in mice and may be a major factor in explaining the frequent discordance between preclinical and clinical therapeutic outcomes where the trend is "overprediction" of positive results in preclinical mouse model studies. To evaluate this hypothesis, a research program was initiated a decade ago to develop multiple models of metastasis in mice, using variants of human tumor cell lines selected in vivo for enhanced spontaneous metastatic aggressiveness after surgical resection of established orthotopic primary tumors. These models have included breast, renal, and colorectal carcinomas; ovarian cancer (but without prior surgery); and malignant melanoma. They have been used primarily for experimental therapeutic investigations involving various antiangiogenic drugs alone or with chemotherapy, especially "metronomic" low-dose chemotherapy. The various translational studies undertaken have revealed a number of clinically relevant findings. These include the following: (i) the potential of metronomic chemotherapy, especially when combined with a vascular endothelial growth factor pathway targeting drug to successfully treat advanced metastatic disease; (ii) the development of relapsed spontaneous brain metastases in mice with melanoma or breast cancer whose systemic metastatic disease is successfully controlled for a period with a given therapy; (iii) foreshadowing the failure of adjuvant antiangiogenic drug-based phase III trials; (iv) recapitulating the failure of oral antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors plus standard chemotherapy in contrast to the modest successes of antiangiogenic antibodies plus chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer; and (v) revealing "vessel co-option" and absence of angiogenesis as a determinant of intrinsic resistance or minimal responsiveness to antiangiogenic therapy

  10. Pulmonary manifestations of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Sahni, Sonu; Iftikhar, Asma; Talwar, Arunabh

    2015-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for majority of all primary renal neoplasms. Classic manifestations of RCC include the triad of flank pain, hematuria and a palpable renal mass. Patients with RCC can develop various extra renal manifestations including involvements of the lungs, inferior vena cava, liver and the bones. The pulmonary manifestations of renal cell carcinoma include metastatic disease including endobronchial, pleural, parenchymal or lymph node metastasis, pleural effusion or hemothorax. Pulmonary embolism and tumor embolism is another common manifestation of renal cell carcinoma. RCC is a highly vascular tumor and can cause pulmonary arterio-venous fistulas leading to high output failure. Rarely, RCC can also present with paraneoplastic presentations including cough or bilateral diaphragm paralysis. Drugs used to treat RCC have been associated with drug related pneumonitis and form an important differential diagnosis in patients with RCC on therapy presenting with shortness of breath. In this review we discuss the various pulmonary manifestations of RCC. A high index of suspicion with these presentations can lead to an early diagnosis and assist in instituting an appropriate intervention. PMID:26525375

  11. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC): renal cancer risk, surveillance and treatment.

    PubMed

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R; Schmidt, Laura S; Middelton, Lindsay A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Tomlinson, Ian; Richard, Stéphane; Linehan, W Marston

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant condition in which susceptible individuals are at risk for the development of cutaneous leiomyomas, early onset multiple uterine leiomyomas and an aggressive form of type 2 papillary renal cell cancer. HLRCC is caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene which inactivate the enzyme and alters the function of the tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle. Issues surrounding surveillance and treatment for HLRCC-associated renal cell cancer were considered as part of a recent international symposium on HLRCC. The management protocol proposed in this article is based on a literature review and a consensus meeting. The lifetime renal cancer risk for FH mutation carriers is estimated to be 15 %. In view of the potential for early onset of RCC in HLRCC, periodic renal imaging and, when available, predictive testing for a FH mutation is recommended from 8 to 10 years of age. However, the small risk of renal cell cancer in the 10-20 years age range and the potential drawbacks of screening should be carefully discussed on an individual basis. Surveillance preferably consists of annual abdominal MRI. Treatment of renal tumours should be prompt and generally consist of wide-margin surgical excision and consideration of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. The choice for systemic treatment in metastatic disease should, if possible, be part of a clinical trial. Screening procedures in HLRCC families should preferably be evaluated in large cohorts of families.

  12. Clinical and molecular insights into tuberous sclerosis complex renal disease.

    PubMed

    Siroky, Brian J; Yin, Hong; Bissler, John J

    2011-06-01

    Patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are at great risk of developing renal lesions as part of their disease. These lesions include renal cysts and tumors. Significant advances in understanding the cell biology of these renal lesions has already led to clinical trials demonstrating that pharmacological interventions are likely possible. This review focuses on the pathology of these renal lesions, their underlying cell biology, and the possible therapeutic strategies that may prove to significantly improve care for these patients.

  13. 10% Tumor Diameter Shrinkage on the First Follow-Up Computed Tomography Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated With Angiogenesis Inhibitors: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Franchetti, Yoko; Nishino, Mizuki; Fay, André P.; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted agents are standard therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), associated with variable tumor shrinkage. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) is of limited utility in this setting, and other imaging changes are sought to reliably predict outcome early. We aim to validate 10% tumor shrinkage as the best early indicator of outcome. Methods. In this institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study, 66 mRCC patients with 165 lesions on clinical trials of VEGF-targeted agents underwent thoracic and abdominal computed tomography at baseline and at first follow-up after therapy. Measurements were performed according to RECIST and tumor shrinkage of ≥10% decrease in sum of the longest diameter (−10%SLD). Correlation with time-to-treatment failure (TTF) and overall survival (OS) were compared and stratified by response to the radiologic criteria. Receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis yielded the optimal threshold change in SLD, defining patients with prolonged survival. Results. More than −10%SLD significantly differentiated responders from nonresponders (median TTF 8.4 vs. 4.1 months, p = .001), whereas partial response by RECIST did not (median TTF 6.9 vs. 5.5 months in responders vs. nonresponders, p = .34). −10%SLD was also significantly predictive of OS (median OS 35.1 vs. 15.0 months in responders vs. nonresponders, p = .003). ROC curve analysis yielded −9.3% in SLD as the optimal threshold for response/no response. Conclusion. Ten percent tumor shrinkage is validated as a reliable early predictor of outcome in mRCC patients receiving VEGF-targeted therapies and may provide a practical measure to guide therapeutic decisions. PMID:24755461

  14. Tissue-specific and convergent metabolic transformation of cancer correlates with metastatic potential and patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Gaude, Edoardo; Frezza, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells undergo a multifaceted rewiring of cellular metabolism to support their biosynthetic needs. Although the major determinants of this metabolic transformation have been elucidated, their broad biological implications and clinical relevance are unclear. Here we systematically analyse the expression of metabolic genes across 20 different cancer types and investigate their impact on clinical outcome. We find that cancers undergo a tissue-specific metabolic rewiring, which converges towards a common metabolic landscape. Of note, downregulation of mitochondrial genes is associated with the worst clinical outcome across all cancer types and correlates with the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition gene signature, a feature of invasive and metastatic cancers. Consistently, suppression of mitochondrial genes is identified as a key metabolic signature of metastatic melanoma and renal cancer, and metastatic cell lines. This comprehensive analysis reveals unexpected facets of cancer metabolism, with important implications for cancer patients' stratification, prognosis and therapy. PMID:27721378

  15. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  16. Oligonol, a low-molecular-weight polyphenol derived from lychee fruit, attenuates diabetes-induced renal damage through the advanced glycation end product-related pathway in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Hum; Yokozawa, Takako; Noh, Jeong Sook

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to examine whether oligonol, a low-molecular-weight polyphenol derived from lychee fruit, has an ameliorative effect on diabetes-induced alterations, such as advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation or apoptosis in the kidneys of db/db mice with type 2 diabetes. Oligonol [10 or 20 mg/(kg body weight · d), orally] was administered every day for 8 wk to prediabetic db/db mice, and its effect was compared with vehicle-treated db/db and normal control mice (m/m). The administration of oligonol decreased the elevated renal glucose concentrations and reactive oxygen species in db/db mice (P < 0.05). The increased serum urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations, which reflect renal dysfunction in db/db mice, were substantially lowered by oligonol. Oligonol reduced renal protein expression of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits (p22 phagocytic oxidase and NAD(P)H oxidase-4), AGEs (except for pentosidine), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase B-targeting proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (P < 0.05). Oligonol improved the expressions of antiapoptotic [B-cell lymphoma protein 2 (Bcl-2) and survivin] and proapoptotic [Bcl-2-associated X protein, cytochrome c, and caspase-3] proteins in the kidneys of db/db mice (P < 0.05). In conclusion, these results provide important evidence that oligonol exhibits a pleiotropic effect on AGE formation and apoptosis-related variables, representing renoprotective effects against the development of diabetic complications in db/db mice with type 2 diabetes.

  17. Evaluation of the antioxidant and anti-glication effects of the hexane extract from Piper auritum leaves in vitro and beneficial activity on oxidative stress and advanced glycation end-product-mediated renal injury in streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Perez Gutierrez, Rosa Martha; Flores Cotera, Luis B; Gonzalez, Adriana Maria Neira

    2012-10-09

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant activity of hexane extracts from leaves of Piper auritum (HS). Eight complementary in vitro test methods were used, including inhibition of DPPH· radicals, nitric oxide, superoxide anion, ion-chelating, ABTS, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, β-carotene bleaching and peroxy radical scavenging. The results indicated that HS possesses high antioxidant activity. To add to these finding we tested the effect against oxidative stress in liver, pancreas and kidney in diabetic rats. Low levels of SOD, CAT, GPx and GSH in diabetic rats were reverted to near normal values after treatment with HS. These results suggest that P. auritum prevents oxidative stress, acting as a suppressor of liver cell damage. Given the link between glycation and oxidation, we proposed that HS might possess significant in vitro antiglycation activity. Our data confirmed the inhibitory effect of HS on bovine serum albumin, serum glycosylated protein, glycation of LDL, and glycation hemoglobin. The effect of HS on diabetic renal damage was investigated using streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The oral administration of HS at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days significantly reduced advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) formation, elevated renal glucose and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels in the kidneys of diabetic rats. This implies that HS would alleviate the oxidative stress under diabetes through the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. These findings indicate that oxidative stress is increased in the diabetic rat kidney and that HS can prevent renal damage associated with diabetes by attenuating the oxidative stress.

  18. Renal calculus disease.

    PubMed

    Schulsinger, D A; Sosa, R E

    1998-03-01

    We have seen an explosion in technical innovations for the management of urolithiasis. Today, the endourologist possesses an assortment of minimally invasive tools to treat renal stones. Most patients receive fast, safe and effective treatment in the outpatient setting. Despite the many technical advances, however, anatomical malformations and complex stones still provide significant challenges in diagnosis, access to a targeted stone, fragmentation, and clearance of the resulting fragments. This review examines a variety of urinary stone presentations and treatment strategies for cost-effective management.

  19. Renal infarction secondary to invasive aspergillosis in a 5-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hyun; Im, Soo Ah; Cho, Bin

    2014-07-01

    Aspergillus species have angioinvasive properties and can involve extrapulmonary organs by hematogenous spread from the lungs. However, renal involvement by Aspergillus is uncommon and is usually associated with the formation of abscesses. We report an unusual case of invasive renal aspergillosis presenting with extensive renal infarction in a 5-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This case emphasizes the fact that renal aspergillosis initially presents with only renal infarction, and metastatic-embolism by invasive aspergillosis should be considered in differential diagnosis for any focal lesion of kidney in a patient with leukemia.

  20. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma: a potential mimic of conventional clear cell renal carcinoma on core biopsy.

    PubMed

    Liddell, Heath; Mare, Anton; Heywood, Sean; Bennett, Genevieve; Chan, Hin Fan

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCP-RCC) is a recently described, relatively uncommon variant of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with a reported incidence of 4.1%. Thought to only arise in those with end stage renal disease, CCP-RCC is increasingly identified in those without renal impairment. CCP-RCCs have unique morphologic, genetic, and immunohistochemical features distinguishing them from both conventional clear cell renal cell carcinomas and papillary renal cell carcinomas. Immunohistochemically, these tumors are positive for CK7 and negative for CD10 and racemase. This is in contrast to conventional cell renal cell carcinomas (CK7 negative, CD10 positive) and papillary cell carcinomas (CK7, CD10, and racemase positive). These tumours appear to be indolent in nature, with no current documented cases of metastatic spread. We present the case of a 42-year-old female who presented with an incidental finding of a renal mass that on a core biopsy was reported as clear cell carcinoma, Fuhrman grade 1. She subsequently underwent a radical nephrectomy and further histological examination revealed the tumor to be a clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma, Fuhrman grade 1. PMID:25709850

  1. Effect of 2-dodecyl-6-methoxycyclohexa-2,5-diene-1,4-dione, isolated from Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) roots, on advanced glycation end-product-mediated renal injury in type 2 diabetic KKAy mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ni; Lin, Xing; Wen, Qingwei; Kintoko; Zhang, Shijun; Huang, Jianchun; Xu, Xiaohui; Huang, Renbin

    2013-05-10

    The roots of Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) have a long history of medical use in traditional Chinese medicine for treating diabetes and diabetic nephropathy. 2-Dodecyl-6-methoxycyclohexa-2,5-diene-1,4-dione (DMDD) was isolated from the tuberous roots of A. carambola L. The purpose of this study was to investigate the beneficial effect of DMDD on the advanced glycation end-product-mediated renal injury in type 2 diabetic KKAy mice with regard to prove its efficacy by local traditional practitioners in the treatment of kidney frailties in diabetics. KKAy mice were orally administrated DMDD (12.5, 25, 50mg/kg body weight/d) or aminoguanidine (200mg/kg body weight/d) for 8 weeks. Hyperglycemia, renal AGE formation, and the expression of related proteins, such as the AGE receptor, nuclear factor-κB, transforming growth factor-β1, and N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine, were markedly decreased by DMDD. Diabetes-dependent alterations in proteinuria, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, and serum urea-N and glomerular mesangial matrix expansion were attenuated after treatment with DMDD for 8 weeks. The activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, which are reduced in the kidneys of KKAy mice, were enhanced by DMDD. These findings suggest that DMDD may inhibit the progression of diabetic nephropathy and may be a therapeutic agent for regulating several pharmacological targets to treat or prevent of diabetic nephropathy.

  2. The Place of FDG PET/CT in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Value and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike for most other malignancies, application of FDG PET/CT is limited for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mainly due to physiological excretion of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG) from the kidneys, which decreases contrast between renal lesions and normal tissue, and may obscure or mask the lesions of the kidneys. Published clinical observations were discordant regarding the role of FDG PET/CT in diagnosing and staging RCC, and FDG PET/CT is not recommended for this purpose based on current national and international guidelines. However, quantitative FDG PET/CT imaging may facilitate the prediction of the degree of tumor differentiation and allows for prognosis of the disease. FDG PET/CT has potency as an imaging biomarker to provide useful information about patient’s survival. FDG PET/CT can be effectively used for postoperative surveillance and restaging with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, as early diagnosis of recurrent/metastatic disease can drastically affect therapeutic decision and alter outcome of patients. FDG uptake is helpful for differentiating benign or bland emboli from tumor thrombosis in RCC patients. FDG PET/CT also has higher sensitivity and accuracy when compared with bone scan to detect RCC metastasis to the bone. FDG PET/CT can play a strong clinical role in the management of recurrent and metastatic RCC. In monitoring the efficacy of new target therapy such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treatment for advanced RCC, FDG PET/CT has been increasingly used to assess the therapeutic efficacy, and change in FDG uptake is a strong indicator of biological response to TKI. PMID:27656421

  3. The Place of FDG PET/CT in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Value and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike for most other malignancies, application of FDG PET/CT is limited for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mainly due to physiological excretion of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG) from the kidneys, which decreases contrast between renal lesions and normal tissue, and may obscure or mask the lesions of the kidneys. Published clinical observations were discordant regarding the role of FDG PET/CT in diagnosing and staging RCC, and FDG PET/CT is not recommended for this purpose based on current national and international guidelines. However, quantitative FDG PET/CT imaging may facilitate the prediction of the degree of tumor differentiation and allows for prognosis of the disease. FDG PET/CT has potency as an imaging biomarker to provide useful information about patient’s survival. FDG PET/CT can be effectively used for postoperative surveillance and restaging with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, as early diagnosis of recurrent/metastatic disease can drastically affect therapeutic decision and alter outcome of patients. FDG uptake is helpful for differentiating benign or bland emboli from tumor thrombosis in RCC patients. FDG PET/CT also has higher sensitivity and accuracy when compared with bone scan to detect RCC metastasis to the bone. FDG PET/CT can play a strong clinical role in the management of recurrent and metastatic RCC. In monitoring the efficacy of new target therapy such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treatment for advanced RCC, FDG PET/CT has been increasingly used to assess the therapeutic efficacy, and change in FDG uptake is a strong indicator of biological response to TKI.

  4. The Place of FDG PET/CT in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Value and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike for most other malignancies, application of FDG PET/CT is limited for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), mainly due to physiological excretion of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG) from the kidneys, which decreases contrast between renal lesions and normal tissue, and may obscure or mask the lesions of the kidneys. Published clinical observations were discordant regarding the role of FDG PET/CT in diagnosing and staging RCC, and FDG PET/CT is not recommended for this purpose based on current national and international guidelines. However, quantitative FDG PET/CT imaging may facilitate the prediction of the degree of tumor differentiation and allows for prognosis of the disease. FDG PET/CT has potency as an imaging biomarker to provide useful information about patient's survival. FDG PET/CT can be effectively used for postoperative surveillance and restaging with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, as early diagnosis of recurrent/metastatic disease can drastically affect therapeutic decision and alter outcome of patients. FDG uptake is helpful for differentiating benign or bland emboli from tumor thrombosis in RCC patients. FDG PET/CT also has higher sensitivity and accuracy when compared with bone scan to detect RCC metastasis to the bone. FDG PET/CT can play a strong clinical role in the management of recurrent and metastatic RCC. In monitoring the efficacy of new target therapy such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) treatment for advanced RCC, FDG PET/CT has been increasingly used to assess the therapeutic efficacy, and change in FDG uptake is a strong indicator of biological response to TKI. PMID:27656421

  5. A disproportionate elevation in right ventricular filling pressure, in relation to left ventricular filling pressure, is associated with renal impairment and increased mortality in advanced decompensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Grodin, Justin L.; Drazner, Mark H.; Dupont, Matthias; Mullens, Wilfried; Taylor, David O.; Starling, Randall C.; Tang, W. H. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Background Discordance between left- and right-sided filling pressures occurs in a subset of patients presenting with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). We hypothesized that a disproportionately increased right atrial pressure (RAP) relative to the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) would be associated with both renal dysfunction and mortality in ADHF. Methods A total of 367 patients admitted with ADHF with elevated intracardiac filling pressures were treated with intensive medical therapy guided by invasive hemodynamic monitoring. Baseline characteristics, hemodynamics, and renal function at admission were stratified by RAP/PCWP quartiles. The association of RAP/PCWP quartile with all-cause mortality after a median follow-up of 2.4 years was assessed in univariable and multivariable models, which included adjustment for the RAP. Results The median RAP/PCWP was 0.58 (interquartile range 0.43-0.75). Increasing RAP/PCWP was inversely associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline and with treatment (P < .0001) independently of RAP. High RAP/PCWP was associated with increased mortality (quartile 4 vs 1: hazard ratio [95% CI] 2.1 [1.3-3.5], P = .002). The association of RAP/PCWP with mortality persisted after adjustment for age, gender, mean arterial pressure, RAP, cardiac index, pulmonary vascular resistance, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (hazard ratio 2.4 [1.4-3.9], P = .007). Conclusion A disproportionate increase in right to left ventricular filling pressures is associated with renal dysfunction and mortality, independently of the right atrial pressure. PMID:26027618

  6. Evolving Pharmacotherapies for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Salama, April K.S.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma remains a difficult disease to treat, and long term survivors are rare. Over the past few years, however, breakthroughs in both immunotherapy as well as targeted agents have had a tremendous impact on patients diagnosed with this disease. This review summarizes recent advances in systemic therapies for melanoma, including immune modulators directed against cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1), as well as a number of targeted agents. These approaches hold great promise as the landscape of therapeutic options for advanced melanoma continues to evolve. PMID:23843723

  7. The European Medicines Agency review of pazopanib for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: summary of the scientific assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Maria; Borregaard, Jeanett; Ersbøll, Jens; ten Bosch, George J A; van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Abadie, Eric; Schellens, Jan H M; Pignatti, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    On June 14, 2010, the European Commission issued a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union for pazopanib for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Pazopanib is an antineoplastic agent that inhibits multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. The recommended oral dose is 800 mg once daily. The benefit of pazopanib is an increased progression-free survival. In the pivotal trial VEG105192, the median progression-free survival was 9.2 months (95% confidence interval, 7.4-12.9) in the pazopanib arm compared with 4.2 months (95% confidence interval, 2.8-4.2) in the placebo arm. The most common side effects include diarrhea, hair color change, hypertension, nausea, fatigue, anorexia, vomiting, dysgeusia, elevated alanine aminotransferase, elevated aspartate aminotransferase, and abdominal pain. The objective of this article is to summarize the scientific review of the application that led to approval in the European Union.

  8. The European Medicines Agency review of pazopanib for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: summary of the scientific assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Maria; Borregaard, Jeanett; Ersbøll, Jens; ten Bosch, George J A; van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Abadie, Eric; Schellens, Jan H M; Pignatti, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    On June 14, 2010, the European Commission issued a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union for pazopanib for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Pazopanib is an antineoplastic agent that inhibits multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. The recommended oral dose is 800 mg once daily. The benefit of pazopanib is an increased progression-free survival. In the pivotal trial VEG105192, the median progression-free survival was 9.2 months (95% confidence interval, 7.4-12.9) in the pazopanib arm compared with 4.2 months (95% confidence interval, 2.8-4.2) in the placebo arm. The most common side effects include diarrhea, hair color change, hypertension, nausea, fatigue, anorexia, vomiting, dysgeusia, elevated alanine aminotransferase, elevated aspartate aminotransferase, and abdominal pain. The objective of this article is to summarize the scientific review of the application that led to approval in the European Union. PMID:21976546

  9. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment.

    PubMed

    Sustarsic, Elahu G; Junnila, Riia K; Kopchick, John J

    2013-11-01

    Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute's NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on this data, GH could be a new therapeutic target in melanoma. PMID:24134847

  10. [Renal oncocytoma. Report of 13 cases].

    PubMed

    Li, G R; Soulie, M; Escourrou, G; Versini, P; Pontonnier, F; Plante, P; Tostain, J

    1997-01-01

    We report 13 cases of renal oncocytoma. Urinary symptoms occurred in only 3 cases. The patient's age ranged from 41 to 74 years with an average of 62.3 years. The mean tumor diameter was 5.6 cm (range: 1.5-14). Diagnostic features of ultrasonography, CT scan and, in some instances, angiography were suggestive of renal oncocytoma in 2 patients, but never affirmative, 4 patients were treated by partial nephrectomy. No local or metastatic recurrence was observed with a mean follow-up of 30.8 months, ranging from 6 to 96 months. We assume that the term renal oncocytoma should be restricted to tumors exclusively composed of regular oncocytic cells with an eosinophilic granular mitochondria-rich cytoplasm and an absence of malignant potential. Diagnostic imaging characteristics may sometimes suggest the diagnosis of renal oncocytoma, but cannot eliminate the main differential diagnosis, i.e. granular renal cell adenocarcinoma. When the tumor is small and unifocal, nephron sparing surgery may be considered. Whether or not the diagnosis has been confirmed by fine needle aspiration, conservative surgery must be controlled by intraoperative frozen sections of the tumor and surgical margins.

  11. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Kleinman, George; Tandon, Adesh

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland. PMID:26933415

  12. Renal cell carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Renal cancer; Kidney cancer; Hypernephroma; Adenocarcinoma of renal cells; Cancer - kidney ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 57. National Cancer Institute: PDQ renal cell cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. ...

  13. Actomyosin tension as a determinant of metastatic cancer mechanical tropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrail, Daniel J.; Kieu, Quang Minh N.; Iandoli, Jason A.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite major advances in the characterization of molecular regulators of cancer growth and metastasis, patient survival rates have largely stagnated. Recent studies have shown that mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix can drive the transition to a malignant phenotype. Moreover, it is also known that the metastatic process, which results in over 90% of cancer-related deaths, is governed by intracellular mechanical forces. To better understand these processes, we identified metastatic tumor cells originating from different locations which undergo inverse responses to altered matrix elasticity: MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that prefer rigid matrices and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells that prefer compliant matrices as characterized by parameters such as tumor cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and migration. Transcriptomic analysis revealed higher expression of genes associated with cytoskeletal tension and contractility in cells that prefer stiff environments, both when comparing MDA-MB-231 to SKOV-3 cells as well as when comparing bone-metastatic to lung-metastatic MDA-MB-231 subclones. Using small molecule inhibitors, we found that blocking the activity of these pathways mitigated rigidity-dependent behavior in both cell lines. Probing the physical forces exerted by cells on the underlying substrates revealed that though force magnitude may not directly correlate with functional outcomes, other parameters such as force polarization do correlate directly with cell motility. Finally, this biophysical analysis demonstrates that intrinsic levels of cell contractility determine the matrix rigidity for maximal cell function, possibly influencing tissue sites for metastatic cancer cell engraftment during dissemination. By increasing our understanding of the physical interactions of cancer cells with their microenvironment, these studies may help develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma. PMID:27136637

  15. Aflibercept in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Fei; Lockhart, Albert Craig

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the US. In recent decades, an improved understanding of the role of the angiogenesis pathway in colorectal cancer has led to advancements in treatment. Bevacizumab has been shown to improve the progression-free survival and overall survival when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and at present is the only antiangiogenesis agent approved for the treatment of this cancer. Aflibercept is a novel angiogenesis-targeting agent, and has demonstrated efficacy in treating metastatic colorectal cancer in a recent randomized Phase III trial. Here we review the role of angiogenesis in the tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer, strategies for targeting angiogenesis, and the clinical development of aflibercept. PMID:22253552

  16. Antihypertensive agents and renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vergoulas, G

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the field of kidney transplantation have led to a significant increase in the life of renal allograft with 1 - year graft survival rates of 93% to 99%.This increase in early graft survival has made it possible to observe the long-term morbidities that accompany renal transplantation. Studies correlating the reduction of arterial blood pressure with patient and graft survival as well as the risk of cardiovascular disease do not exist. The recommendations come from the general population and from comparative studies of hypertensive and normotensive kidney graft recipients. It is known that in the general population hypertension is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease but at the same time a risk factor for death, ischaemic heart disease, chronic heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy. We must always have in mind that there are many similarities between a kidney graft recipient and a patient with chronic kidney disease. Renal transplant recipients represent a patient population with a very high risk for development of cardiovascular disease which has been identified as the leading cause of death in these patients1. Of 18,482 deaths among renal allograft recipients, 38% had functioning renal allografts 2, 3. Successful renal transplantation (Rt) can result in partial regression of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) if it is associated with hypertension (HTN) remission or if HTN is controlled by medications. Frequently post transplant HTN is associated with failure of LVH to regress. Transplant clinicians must choose antihypertensive agents that will provide their patients with maximum benefit from renal allograft and cardiovascular perspective. The target must always be long term patient and graft survival and acceptable quality of life. The antihypertensive drugs usually used after kidney transplantation are diuretics, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers and β – blockers. Most

  17. Metastatic Crohn's disease in a Chinese girl.

    PubMed

    Yu, J T H T; Chong, L Y; Lee, K C

    2006-12-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease, in which non-caseating granulomatous infiltration of the skin occurs at sites separated from the gastro-intestinal tract by normal tissue, is the least common dermatologic manifestation of Crohn's disease. We report a 15-year-old girl with metastatic Crohn's disease presenting as granulomatous vulvar papules and nodules with typical histopathologic features. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of metastatic Crohn's disease in Chinese children reported in the English medical literature.

  18. Therapeutic challenges in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Penticuff, Justin C; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignancy that in advanced disease, is highly resistant to systemic therapies. Elucidation of the angiogenesis pathways and their intrinsic signaling interactions with the genetic and metabolic disturbances within renal cell carcinoma variants has ushered in the era of “targeted therapies”. Advanced surgical interventions and novel drugs targeting VEGF and mTOR, have improved patient survival and prolonged clinically stable-disease states. This review discusses the current understanding of diagnostic challenges and the mechanism-based clinical evidence on therapeutic management of advanced RCC. PMID:26309897

  19. [Update in continuous renal replacement techniques].

    PubMed

    Romero-García, M; de la Cueva-Ariza, L; Delgado-Hito, P

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure affects 25% of patients hospitalized in intensive care units. Despite technological advances, the mortality of these patients is still high due to its associated complications. Continuous renal replacement techniques are one of the treatments for acute renal failure because they make it possible to treat the complications and decrease mortality. The nurse's knowledge and skills regarding these techniques will be decisive for the success of the therapy. Consequently, the nurse's experience and training are key components. The objective of this article is to update the knowledge on continuous renal replacement techniques. Keeping this in mind, a review has been made of the physical and chemical principles such as diffusion and convection, among others. A description of the different continuous renal replacement techniques, a presentation of the main vascular access, and a description of the nursing cares and complications related to techniques used have also been provided.

  20. Radiotherapy of metastatic seminoma in the dog. Case reports

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.K.; Walker, M.; Legendre, A.M.; vanEe, R.T.; Gompf, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    Four dogs with metastatic seminoma were treated with cesium 137 teleradiotherapy. Minimum total tumor dose ranged from 17 to 40 gray (Gy) and was usually given through bilateral opposing sublumbar ports in eight to ten fractions, with three fractions given weekly. The tumor regressed in all four dogs. The first dog (case 1) was free of tumor and died of non-tumor related causes at 57 months. The second dog (case 2) was free of tumor but was euthanatized at 37 months for a limb fracture. The third dog (case 3) was euthanatized for undertermined pulmonary disease 43 months after radiotherapy. The fourth dog (case 4) was euthanatized 6 months following radiotherapy because of transitional cell carcinoma and renal failure. No evidence of seminoma was found at necropsy. Radiotherapy was shown to be effective treatment for seminoma with regional metastasis.

  1. Delayed recurrence of renal cell carcinoma presenting as a haemorrhoid

    PubMed Central

    Davies, James R.L.; Smith, Gavin; Cornaby, Andrew J.; Thomas, Teresa; Lamparelli, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic non-colorectal cancer of the anal canal is a rare entity. To date, only four cases have been described in the literature. We present a 76-year-old man who was referred with an unusual perianal lesion. He had a history of renal cell carcinoma 7 years previously. Histologically, the lesion revealed clear cell carcinoma in keeping with metastasis. To our knowledge, this is only the second time a renal carcinoma metastasis to the anal canal has been identified. PMID:25818654

  2. Renal actinomycosis with concomitant renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dong-Suk; Jang, Won Ik; Jung, Ji Yoon; Chung, Sarah; Choi, Dae Eun; Na, Ki-Ryang; Lee, Kang Wook; Shin, Yong-Tai

    2012-02-01

    Renal actinomycosis is a rare infection caused by fungi of the genus Actinomyces. A 74-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of gross hematuria with urinary symptoms and intermittent chills. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed thrombosis in the left renal vein and diffuse, heterogeneous enlargement of the left kidney. After nephrectomy, sulfur granules with chronic suppurative inflammation were seen microscopically, and the histopathological diagnosis was renal actinomycosis. Our case is the first report of renal actinomycosis with renal vein thrombosis.

  3. Urothelial and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Renal Pelvis – A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hippargi, Surekha B.; Kumar, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the renal pelvis are relatively rare. Urothelial carcinoma of renal pelvis accounts for 7% of all renal neoplasms, with Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) forming a very small percentage of these cases. Urothelial and SCC of renal pelvis is still a rarer entity. This malignancy of the renal pelvis lacks the characteristic presentation of common renal cell carcinoma and usually presents at an advanced disease stage. We report a case of urothelial and SCC of renal pelvis in a 61-year-old male who presented with non-specific clinical complaints like dysuria and right flank pain. PMID:27790450

  4. Severe antenatally diagnosed renal disorders: background, prognosis and practical approach.

    PubMed

    Aulbert, Wiebke; Kemper, Markus J

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays most renal disorders, especially urinary tract malformations and renal cystic disease, are diagnosed antenatally. In cases of severe bilateral disease, intrauterine renal dysfunction may lead to renal oligohydramnios (ROH), resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia which affects perinatal mortality and morbidity as well as the long-term outcome. However, some infants may only have mild pulmonary and renal disease, and advances in postnatal and dialysis treatment have resulted in improved short- and long-term outcome even in those infants with severe ROH. Here, we review the current state of knowledge and clinical experience of patients presenting antenatally with severe bilateral renal disorders and ROH. By addressing underlying mechanisms, intrauterine tools of diagnosis and treatment as well as published outcome data, we hope to improve antenatal counselling and postnatal care. KEY SUMMARY POINTS: 1. Nowadays most renal disorders are diagnosed antenatally, especially urinary tract malformations and renal cystic disease. 2. Severe kidney dysfunction may lead to renal oligohydramnios, which can cause pulmonary hypoplasia and is a risk factor of perinatal mortality and postnatal renal outcome. However, as considerable clinical heterogeneity is present, outcome predictions need to be treated with caution. 3. Advances in postnatal and dialysis treatment have resulted in improved short- and long-term outcomes even in infants with severe renal oligohydramnios. 4. A multidisciplinary approach with specialist input is required when counselling a family with an ROH-affected fetus as the decision-making process is very challenging. PMID:26081158

  5. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  6. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Carcinoma of the Collecting Ducts of Bellini; Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma; Kidney Medullary Carcinoma; Kidney Oncocytoma; Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  7. Robotic renal and adrenal surgery.

    PubMed

    Sung, Gyung Tak; Gill, Inderbir S

    2003-12-01

    Technology today is evolving at a dramatic rate. Quantum development has occurred in the area of robotic enhancement technology (RET) in the last decade. Incorporation of RET with advanced telecommunication technologies is a recent integration in medicine, with growth potential and application in the delivery of modern health care. There remain, however, many areas which need to be further improved and evaluated before clinical applications of the robot become accepted in adrenal and renal minimally invasive surgery. PMID:14712880

  8. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  9. Metastatic thyroid carcinoma of the mandibule.

    PubMed

    Erdag, T; Bilgen, C; Ceryan, K

    1999-01-01

    A case of metastatic papillary carcinoma to the mandible is presented. Though relatively rare, metastatic tumours of the mandible should be included in the differential diagnosis of the tumours in the parotid region. For the primary site; being in the cervicofacial region, the thyroid gland must be considered by the head and neck surgeon.

  10. The motility-proliferation-metabolism interplay during metastatic invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Inbal; Natan, Sari; Zaritsky, Assaf; Levine, Herbert; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause for cancer patients’ death, and despite all the recent advances in cancer research it is still mostly incurable. Understanding the mechanisms that are involved in the migration of the cells in a complex environment is a key step towards successful anti-metastatic treatment. Using experimental data-based modeling, we focus on the fundamentals of metastatic invasion: motility, invasion, proliferation and metabolism, and study how they may be combined to maximize the cancer’s ability to metastasize. The modeled cells’ performance is measured by the number of cells that succeed in migration in a maze, which mimics the extracellular environment. We show that co-existence of different cell clones in the tumor, as often found in experiments, optimizes the invasive ability in a frequently-changing environment. We study the role of metabolism and stimulation by growth factors, and show that metabolism plays a crucial role in the metastatic process and should therefore be targeted for successful treatment. PMID:26337223

  11. The motility-proliferation-metabolism interplay during metastatic invasion.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Inbal; Natan, Sari; Zaritsky, Assaf; Levine, Herbert; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause for cancer patients' death, and despite all the recent advances in cancer research it is still mostly incurable. Understanding the mechanisms that are involved in the migration of the cells in a complex environment is a key step towards successful anti-metastatic treatment. Using experimental data-based modeling, we focus on the fundamentals of metastatic invasion: motility, invasion, proliferation and metabolism, and study how they may be combined to maximize the cancer's ability to metastasize. The modeled cells' performance is measured by the number of cells that succeed in migration in a maze, which mimics the extracellular environment. We show that co-existence of different cell clones in the tumor, as often found in experiments, optimizes the invasive ability in a frequently-changing environment. We study the role of metabolism and stimulation by growth factors, and show that metabolism plays a crucial role in the metastatic process and should therefore be targeted for successful treatment. PMID:26337223

  12. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review of the clinical and radiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshinori; Shinozaki, Hiroharu; Kimura, Yuki; Masugi, Yohei; Ito, Homare; Terauchi, Toshiaki; Kimata, Masaru; Furukawa, Junji; Kobayashi, Kenji; Ogata, Yoshiro

    2013-11-09

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer is rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, and most cases arise from renal cell carcinoma. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, who presented with a pancreatic tumor detected during her annual health examination. She had undergone left nephrectomy 13 years previously for renal cell carcinoma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed two tumors in the head and body of the pancreas, a hypervascular tumor and a hypovascular tumor with an enhanced rim, respectively. She underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, and metastatic pancreatic tumors arising from the kidney with clustered clear cell carcinoma immunohistochemically positive for CD10 were diagnosed. This report presents the different enhancement features of different lesions on CT scans. Because the enhancement features of lesions have been reported to vary according to the size of the metastatic tumor, a knowledge of the history of renal cell carcinoma is crucial for diagnosis.

  13. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review of the clinical and radiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Yoshinori; Shinozaki, Hiroharu; Kimura, Yuki; Masugi, Yohei; Ito, Homare; Terauchi, Toshiaki; Kimata, Masaru; Furukawa, Junji; Kobayashi, Kenji; Ogata, Yoshiro

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer is rare, accounting for approximately 2% of all pancreatic malignancies, and most cases arise from renal cell carcinoma. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, who presented with a pancreatic tumor detected during her annual health examination. She had undergone left nephrectomy 13 years previously for renal cell carcinoma. Computed tomography (CT) revealed two tumors in the head and body of the pancreas, a hypervascular tumor and a hypovascular tumor with an enhanced rim, respectively. She underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, and metastatic pancreatic tumors arising from the kidney with clustered clear cell carcinoma immunohistochemically positive for CD10 were diagnosed. This report presents the different enhancement features of different lesions on CT scans. Because the enhancement features of lesions have been reported to vary according to the size of the metastatic tumor, a knowledge of the history of renal cell carcinoma is crucial for diagnosis. PMID:24209713

  14. PROGRESSIVE RENAL VASCULAR PROLIFERATION AND INJURY IN OBESE ZUCKER RATS

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, Radu; Chade, Alejandro R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Obesity, an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease, may induce renal injury by promoting inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines can induce neovascularization in different organs, including the kidneys. However, whether obesity triggers renal neovascularization and, if so, its effect on renal function has never been investigated. Methods Blood pressure, proteinuria and glomerular-filtration-rate (GFR) were measured in-vivo. Renal microvascular (MV) architecture was studied by 3D micro-CT in lean and obese Zucker rats (LZR and OZR, n=7/group) at 12, 22, and 32 weeks of age. Renal inflammation was assessed by quantifying interleukin (IL)-6, tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-alpha, and ED-1 expression, as renal fibrosis in trichrome-stained cross-sections. Results Mild inflammation and lower GFR was only observed in younger OZR, without renal fibrosis or changes in MV density. Interestingly, renal MV density increased in OZR at 32 weeks of age, accompanied by pronounced increase in renal IL-6 and TNF-alpha, ED-1+ cells, proteinuria, decreased GFR, and fibrosis. Conclusion This study shows increased renal cortical vascularization in experimental obesity, suggesting neovascularization as an evolving process as obesity progresses. Increased renal vascularization, possibly triggered by inflammation, may reflect an initially compensatory mechanism in obesity. However, increased inflammation and inflammatory-induced neovascularization may further promote renal injury as obesity advances. PMID:20536738

  15. Metastatic breast cancer and its complications.

    PubMed

    Rubens, R D

    1992-12-01

    Tamoxifen is now established for use in premenopausal as well as postmenopausal patients. Recent reports have not shown its activity to be enhanced by the addition of either prednisolone, progestogens, or interferon. Reversible ocular toxicity from tamoxifen appears to be more common than had been previously realized. Different schedules giving the same dose intensity of doxorubicin give markedly different pharmacokinetic profiles. Although this does not lead to differences in responses or physical toxicity, it seems to have important implications for quality of life. Taxol is showing impressive activity in advanced breast cancer, and significant response rates have also been reported for carboplatin and podophyllotoxin derivatives. To achieve maximum effectiveness from the cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil combination, attention to schedule and dose intensity has been shown to be important. No new effective cytotoxic combinations have been described. High-dose chemotherapy requiring bone marrow support remains experimental. Further progress has been made in monitoring the response of metastatic bone disease to treatment. The precise significance for patients of the results in many of the papers reviewed is often uncertain because they lack quality-of-life measures; the importance of this approach is emphasized. PMID:1457519

  16. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Ganitumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-02

    Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone Marrow; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Lung; Metastatic Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of Bone; Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of Soft Tissues

  17. Factors that can minimize bleeding complications after renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M S; Chen, J Z; Xu, A P

    2014-10-01

    Renal biopsy is a very important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of renal diseases. However, bleeding remains to be one of the most serious complications in this procedure. Many new techniques have been improved to make it safer. The risk factors and predictors of bleeding after percutaneous renal biopsy have been extensively reported in many literatures, and generally speaking, the common risk factors for renal biopsy complications focus on hypertension, high serum creatinine, bleeding diatheses, amyloidosis, advanced age, gender and so on. Our primary purpose of this review is to summarize current measures in recent years literature aiming at minimizing the bleeding complication after the renal biopsy, including the drug application before and after renal biopsy, operation details in percutaneous renal biopsies, nursing and close monitoring after the biopsy and other kinds of biopsy methods.

  18. Pregnancy in women with renal disease. Yes or no?

    PubMed Central

    Edipidis, K

    2011-01-01

    Women with renal disease who conceive and continue pregnancy, are at significant risk for adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Although advances in antenatal and neonatal care continue to improve these outcomes, the risks remain proportionate to the degree of underlying renal dysfunction. The aim of this article, is to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome, in women with chronic renal disease and to provide if possible, useful conclusions whether and when, a woman with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), should decide to get pregnant. This article, reviews briefly the normal physiological changes of renal function during pregnancy, and make an attempt to clarify the nature and severity of the risks, in the settings of chronic renal insufficiency and end stage renal disease, including dialysis patients and transplant recipients. PMID:21897751

  19. Robot-Assisted Retroperitoneoscopic Surgery for Synchronous Contralateral Ureteral Metastasis of Renal-Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wei-Hong; Chiu, Allen Wen-Shien; Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) with synchronous metastasis to contralateral ureter is extremely rare with only four cases reported in the literature. We report a case of synchronous metastatic RCC to the contralateral ureter with effective robot-assisted retroperitoneoscopic nephron-sparing surgery that leads to favorable oncologic and functional outcome. PMID:27579394

  20. Orthotopic non-metastatic and metastatic oral cancer mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bais, Manish V; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Trackman, Philip C

    2015-05-01

    Oral cancer is characterized by high morbidity and mortality with a predisposition to metastasize to different tissues, including lung, liver, and bone. Despite progress in the understanding of mutational profiles and deregulated pathways in oral cancer, patient survival has not significantly improved over the past decades. Therefore, there is a need to establish in vivo models that recapitulate human oral cancer metastasis to evaluate therapeutic potential of novel drugs. Here we report orthotopic tongue cancer nude mouse models to study oral cancer growth and metastasis using human metastatic (UMSCC2) and non-metastatic (CAL27) cell lines, respectively. Transduction of these cell lines with lentivirus expressing red fluorescent protein (DsRed) followed by injection into tongues of immunodeficient mice generated orthotopic tongue tumors that could be monitored for growth and metastasis by fluorescence measurement with an in vivo Imaging System (IVIS 200). The growth rates of CAL27-DsRed induced tumors were higher than UMSCC2-DsRed tumors after day 15, while UMSCC2-DsRed tumors revealed metastasis beginning on day 21. Importantly, UMSCC2 tumors metastasized to a number of tissues including the submandibular gland, lung, kidney, liver, and bone. Further, immunohistochemical analyses of tongue tumors induced by CAL27 and UMSCC2 cells revealed elevated expression of components of protumorigenic pathways deregulated in human cancers, including Cyclin D1, PCNA, Ki-67, LSD1, LOXL2, MT-MMP1, DPAGT1, E-cadherin, OCT4A, and H3K4me1/2. These orthotopic mouse models are likely to be useful tools for gaining insights into the activity and mechanisms of novel oral cancer drug candidates.

  1. A Study of Varlilumab and Atezolizumab in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Carcinoma, Renal Cell; Kidney Diseases; Kidney Neoplasms; Urogenital Neoplasms; Urologic Diseases; Urologic Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Clear-cell Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma; Melanoma; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  2. Renal Medullary Carcinoma Response to Chemotherapy: a Referral Center Experience in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Maroja Silvino, Marina Cavalcanti; Venchiarutti Moniz, Camila Motta; Munhoz Piotto, Gustavo Henrique; Siqueira, Sheila; Galapo Kann, Ariel; Dzik, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is rare, accounting for less than 1% of all renal neoplasms. Case reports suggest RMC is highly aggressive, poorly responsive to chemotherapy, often metastatic at diagnosis, affects young men with sickle cell trait, and median overall survival (mOS) is less than 12 months. We report the epidemiological characteristics, treatments performed, response rate to each treatment and mOS of five patients with RMC. All patients had sickle cell trait, four were male, three had metastatic disease at diagnosis and mean age at diagnosis was 25 years. Non-metastatic patients were submitted to nephrectomy. Two patients had partial response to first line chemotherapy including cisplatin and gemcitabine. There was no response to sunitinib or second line chemo - therapy; mOS was 6 months. Due to its rarity, case series are the only evidence available to discuss the treatment for RMC. In our experience, only cisplatin and gemcitabine based regimen offered response. PMID:24179656

  3. Treatment options in patients with metastatic gastric cancer: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bilici, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of gastric cancer, it remains the world’s second highest cause of cancer death. As gastric cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, systemic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for these patients. However, no standard palliative chemotherapy regimen has been accepted for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. Palliative chemotherapy including fluoropyrimidine, platin compounds, docetaxel and epirubicin prolongs survival, and improves a high quality of life to a greater extent than best supportive care. The number of clinical investigations associated with targeted agents has recently increased. Agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor 1 and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have been widely tested. Trastuzumab was the first target drug developed, and pivotal phase III trials showed improved survival when trastuzumab was integrated into cisplatin/fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic gastric cancer. Trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy was thus approved to be a new standard of care for patients with HER2-positive advanced esophagogastric adenocarcinoma. Thus, the evaluation of HER2 status in all patients with metastatic gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma should be considered. Other agents targeting vascular endothelial growth factor, mammalian target of rapamycin, and other biological pathways have also been investigated in clinical trials, but showed little impact on the survival of patients. In this review, systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer in the first- and second-line setting are summarized in the light of recent advances. PMID:24744580

  4. Discovery of a Metastatic Immune Escape Mechanism Initiated by the Loss of Expression of the Tumour Biomarker Interleukin-33.

    PubMed

    Saranchova, Iryna; Han, Jeffrey; Huang, Hui; Fenninger, Franz; Choi, Kyung Bok; Munro, Lonna; Pfeifer, Cheryl; Welch, Ian; Wyatt, Alexander W; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin E; Jefferies, Wilfred A

    2016-01-01

    A new paradigm for understanding immune-surveillance and immune escape in cancer is described here. Metastatic carcinomas express reduced levels of IL-33 and diminished levels of antigen processing machinery (APM), compared to syngeneic primary tumours. Complementation of IL-33 expression in metastatic tumours upregulates APM expression and functionality of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules, resulting in reduced tumour growth rates and a lower frequency of circulating tumour cells. Parallel studies in humans demonstrate that low tumour expression of IL-33 is an immune biomarker associated with recurrent prostate and kidney renal clear cell carcinomas. Thus, IL-33 has a significant role in cancer immune-surveillance against primary tumours, which is lost during the metastatic transition that actuates immune escape in cancer. PMID:27619158

  5. Discovery of a Metastatic Immune Escape Mechanism Initiated by the Loss of Expression of the Tumour Biomarker Interleukin-33

    PubMed Central

    Saranchova, Iryna; Han, Jeffrey; Huang, Hui; Fenninger, Franz; Choi, Kyung Bok; Munro, Lonna; Pfeifer, Cheryl; Welch, Ian; Wyatt, Alexander W.; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin E.; Jefferies, Wilfred A.

    2016-01-01

    A new paradigm for understanding immune-surveillance and immune escape in cancer is described here. Metastatic carcinomas express reduced levels of IL-33 and diminished levels of antigen processing machinery (APM), compared to syngeneic primary tumours. Complementation of IL-33 expression in metastatic tumours upregulates APM expression and functionality of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules, resulting in reduced tumour growth rates and a lower frequency of circulating tumour cells. Parallel studies in humans demonstrate that low tumour expression of IL-33 is an immune biomarker associated with recurrent prostate and kidney renal clear cell carcinomas. Thus, IL-33 has a significant role in cancer immune-surveillance against primary tumours, which is lost during the metastatic transition that actuates immune escape in cancer. PMID:27619158

  6. Renal infarction after aerobics.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, J H; Moinuddin, M; Buchignani, J S; Rockett, J F; Callison, M K

    1984-11-01

    Renal infarction is most frequently due to emboli from the heart or aorta. Other causes include atheromatous disease, renal artery aneurysm, vasculitis, hypotension, hypercoagulable states, aortic dissection, and major trauma. Most renal infarctions are segmental. The extent of disease is dependent upon the size and number of renal vessels involved, coexistent renal disease, and collateral circulation. Flank pain, fever, leukocytosis, hematuria, renal failure, or hypertension may suggest the diagnosis, but these findings are nonspecific and diagnosis will depend not only on history and physical examination, but also on the appropriate imaging tests. The type of treatment is dictated by the etiology of the infarction.

  7. iTRAQ Quantitative Proteomic Comparison of Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Uveal Melanoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, John W.; Hu, Bo; Crabb, John S.; Triozzi, Pierre; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Singh, Arun D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Uveal melanoma is the most common malignancy of the adult eye. The overall mortality rate is high because this aggressive cancer often metastasizes before ophthalmic diagnosis. Quantitative proteomic analysis of primary metastasizing and non-metastasizing tumors was pursued for insights into mechanisms and biomarkers of uveal melanoma metastasis. Methods Eight metastatic and 7 non-metastatic human primary uveal melanoma tumors were analyzed by LC MS/MS iTRAQ technology with Bruch’s membrane/choroid complex from normal postmortem eyes as control tissue. Tryptic peptides from tumor and control proteins were labeled with iTRAQ tags, fractionated by cation exchange chromatography, and analyzed by LC MS/MS. Protein identification utilized the Mascot search engine and the human Uni-Prot/Swiss-Protein database with false discovery ≤ 1%; protein quantitation utilized the Mascot weighted average method. Proteins designated differentially expressed exhibited quantitative differences (p ≤ 0.05, t-test) in a training set of five metastatic and five non-metastatic tumors. Logistic regression models developed from the training set were used to classify the metastatic status of five independent tumors. Results Of 1644 proteins identified and quantified in 5 metastatic and 5 non-metastatic tumors, 12 proteins were found uniquely in ≥ 3 metastatic tumors, 28 were found significantly elevated and 30 significantly decreased only in metastatic tumors, and 31 were designated differentially expressed between metastatic and non-metastatic tumors. Logistic regression modeling of differentially expressed collagen alpha-3(VI) and heat shock protein beta-1 allowed correct prediction of metastasis status for each of five independent tumor specimens. Conclusions The present data provide new clues to molecular differences in metastatic and non-metastatic uveal melanoma tumors. While sample size is limited and validation required, the results support collagen alpha-3(VI) and

  8. Treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gradishar, William J

    2014-05-01

    Many newer agents in combination are being studied in the front-line treatment of women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC), but the story in the endocrine arena is more about the wise use of new strategies to overcome endocrine resistance, because no new antihormonal agents have been approved in the past decade. During his presentation at the NCCN 19th Annual Conference, Dr. William Gradishar explored what's new in the treatment of MBC, focusing primarily on enhancing the effect of endocrine therapy to overcome resistance with newer targeted agents such as everolimus, reevaluating the role of rebiopsy on disease progression and measuring circulating tumor cells as a surrogate of response to treatment, and reviewing the effective treatment regimens for HER2-positive disease.

  9. [Management of metastatic bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Hélène; Serrate, Camille; Pouessel, Damien; Le Maignan, Christine; Teixeira, Luis; Culine, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    The management of patients with metastatic bladder cancer is mainly based on cytotoxic chemotherapy. The reference molecule is cisplatin. In 2014, first-line regimens include gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC protocol) or methotrexate, vinblastine, and cisplatin doxorubicin (MVAC protocol). When cisplatin is contra-indicated, another platinum Salt, carboplatin, is used in combination with gemcitabine. Vinflunine is the only molecule to have obtained a marketing approval for patients who failed first-line chemotherapy including a platinum salt. The overall prognosis of patients remains dismal, since the median overall survival is 12 to 14 months for patients being treated with cisplatin, whereas it is less than 1 year for patients receiving carboplatin. The identification of new effective drugs is a major challenge for the coming years. PMID:25668832

  10. Temsirolimus and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Paraganglioma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Regional Pheochromocytoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  11. The metastatic patterns of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffree, G. M.; Price, C. H.; Sissons, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed comparison of the anatomical distribution and frequency of clinically evident metastases in 152 cases of osteosarcoma, and autopsy findings in 43 cases. The behaviour of long bone tumours is contrasted with those arising elsewhere, which tend to metastasize less widely because of early death from effects of the primary tumour. In both clinical and autopsy series long bone tumours produced lung metastases (LM) in over 90% of patients dying with metastases, but the terminal frequency of extra-pulmonary metastases (EPM) rises from a clinical level of 33% to 83% at autopsy. There was little difference between tumours of the major long bones in the frequency of either LM or EPM, but EPM from the humerus tended to be fewer and sited above the diaphragm and from the femur below it. EPM most often involved other bones, notably vertebrae and pelvis. Not more than 10% of tumours invaded regional lymph nodes but terminally a quarter of the long bone tumours had metastasized to heart and abdomen. The infrequency of metastases in muscle was confirmed. The median time for LM was 5-6 months after starting treatment, for EPM 9-10. months. First metastases after 24 months were infrequent, especially in children. With delay in the appearance of metastases, whether LM or EPM, post-metastatic survival lengthened. Neither age, sex nor mode of treatment of the primary notably affected metastatic frequency, although recurrences were much more numerous when radiotherapy, even with high dosage, was the definitive treatment. Local recurrence usually appeared within 6-8 months and was shown to lead to increased frequency of osseous metastases. It is suggested that terminal dissemination may often be tertiary but not always from a pulmonary secondary. PMID:1058038

  12. Detection of lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in urine is indicative of disseminated TB with renal involvement in patients living with HIV and advanced immunodeficiency: evidence and implications

    PubMed Central

    Lawn, Stephen D.; Gupta-Wright, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    TB is the leading cause of HIV/AIDS-related deaths globally. New diagnostic tools are urgently needed to avert deaths from undiagnosed HIV-associated TB. Although simple assays that detect lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in urine have been commercially available for years, their specific role and utility were initially misunderstood, such that they have been slower to emerge from the diagnostics pipeline than otherwise might have been expected. In this article, we review and explain how urine-LAM assays should be understood as diagnostics for disseminated TB in HIV-positive patients with advanced immunodeficiency, in whom haematogenous TB dissemination to the kidneys serves as the primary mechanism by which LAM enters the urine. These insights are critical for the appropriate design of studies to evaluate these assays and to understand how they might be most usefully implemented. This understanding also supports the 2015 WHO recommendations on the restricted use of these assays in sick HIV-positive patients with advanced immunodeficiency. PMID:26884498

  13. Management of advanced bladder cancer in the era of targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Soave, A; Engel, O; Von Amsberg, G; Becker, A; Dahlem, R; Shariat, S F; Fisch, M; Rink, M

    2015-06-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is the standard treatment of advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). Unfortunately, systemic chemotherapy is ineffective in a significant number of patients, while side effects occur frequently. Detailed molecular-genetic investigations revealed a broad heterogeneity of underlying genomic mutations in UCB and led to the detection of cancer-specific therapeutic targets. These findings may allow a more tailored and individualized patient-based therapy, focusing on specific genomic variations, which may cause chemo-resistance in patients progressing or relapsing after standard chemotherapy. Targeted therapies hold the potential to be more effective in inhibiting cancer cell growth and progression, as well as to cause fewer side effects. While targeted therapies have been successfully established in the treatment of various malignancies including renal cell carcinoma, the clinical impact of these modern treatment strategies still remains unsettled for UCB. In this review, we comprehensively summarize the most current and relevant findings on targeted therapy in advanced and metastatic UCB, elucidating chances and limitations and discussing future perspectives.

  14. Tumor Therapeutic Response and Vessel Tortuosity: Preliminary Report in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bullitt, Elizabeth; Lin, Nancy U.; Ewend, Matthew G.; Zeng, Donglin; Winer, Eric P.; Carey, Lisa A.; Smith, J. Keith

    2008-01-01

    No current non-invasive method is capable of assessing the efficacy of brain tumor therapy early during treatment. We outline an approach that evaluates tumor activity via statistical analysis of vessel shape using vessels segmented from MRA. This report is the first to describe the changes in vessel shape that occur during treatment of metastatic brain tumors as assessed by sequential MRA. In this preliminary study of 16 patients undergoing treatment for metastatic breast cancer we conclude that vessel shape may predict tumor response several months in advance of traditional methods. PMID:17354817

  15. Targeted therapy in her2-positive metastatic breast cancer: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X.; Verma, S.

    2015-01-01

    Breast tumours positive for her2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) represent approximately 20% of all breast cancer cases and are associated with an aggressive natural history. The advent of targeted anti-her2 therapies has dramatically improved disease control and survival in patients with metastatic her2-positive breast cancer. Targeted agents are now considered the standard of care in the first-line setting and beyond. The present review summarizes the currently available data on targeted anti-her2 therapies from completed randomized phase iii clinical trials and briefly discusses emerging advances that will address unmet needs in metastatic her2-positive breast cancer. PMID:25848336

  16. Therapeutic Considerations in Treating HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Ciara C.; Smith, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in detection and treatment, metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remains the second highest cause of cancer-related death for women in the United States. Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) is amplified in 25–30% of breast cancers and is associated with aggressive disease and, historically, with poorer outcomes. The advent of trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody to HER2, revolutionized the management of HER2-positive breast cancer (BC) in the metastatic and adjuvant settings. However, relapse despite adjuvant trastuzumab and resistance to trastuzumab in the metastatic setting remain substantial clinical problems for many patients with HER2-positive BC. As such, analyzing the mechanisms of trastuzumab resistance and developing new therapy to overcome trastuzumab resistance are research priorities. There has been progress, with the approval of three additional HER2-targeted agents in the last six years: lapatinib, pertuzumab, and ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1). Other HER2-targeted therapies, including neratinib and afatinib, are in clinical development, and trials of novel agents such as heat shock protein-90 (HSP90) inhibitors, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, and HER2-targeted vaccines are ongoing. In addition to developing new therapy, research is addressing several unique challenges in the management of HER2-positive MBC. In this article, we discuss advances in the treatment of HER2-positive MBC, with a focus on novel HER2-targeted therapy and HER2-targeted agents recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Additionally, we also address the management of brain metastases (BM) and hormone receptor (HR) - positive, HER2-positive MBC. PMID:25285186

  17. Renal vein thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys. Possible Complications Complications may include: Acute renal failure (especially if thrombosis occurs in a dehydrated child) ... Saunders; 2012:chap 34. Read More Acute kidney failure Arteriogram Blood ... embolus Renal Tumor Update Date 5/19/2015 Updated by: ...

  18. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your provider. Alternative Names Necrosis - renal papillae; Renal medullary necrosis Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Ruggenenti P, Cravedi P, Remuzzi G. Microvascular and macrovascular diseases of the kidney. In: Taal MW, Chertow GM, ...

  19. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  20. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  1. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Krogstrup, Nicoline V; Oltean, Mihai; Jespersen, Bente; Dor, Frank J M F

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in a variety of clinical settings such as renal transplantation and hypovolemic and/or septic shock. Strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury are obviously clinically relevant. Ischemic conditioning is an inherent part of the renal defense mechanism against ischemia and can be triggered by short periods of intermittent ischemia and reperfusion. Understanding the signaling transduction pathways of renal ischemic conditioning can promote further clinical translation and pharmacological advancements in this era. This review summarizes research on the molecular mechanisms underlying both local and remote ischemic pre-, per- and postconditioning of the kidney. The different types of conditioning strategies in the kidney recruit similar powerful pro-survival mechanisms. Likewise, renal ischemic conditioning mobilizes many of the same protective signaling pathways as in other organs, but differences are recognized. PMID:26330099

  2. Macrophage diversity in renal injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Ricardo, Sharon D.; van Goor, Harry; Eddy, Allison A.

    2008-01-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages can determine the outcome of the immune response and whether this response contributes to tissue repair or mediates tissue destruction. In addition to their important role in immune-mediated renal disease and host defense, macrophages play a fundamental role in tissue remodeling during embryonic development, acquired kidney disease, and renal allograft responses. This review summarizes macrophage phenotype and function in the orchestration of kidney repair and replacement of specialized renal cells following injury. Recent advances in our understanding of macrophage heterogeneity in response to their microenvironment raise new and exciting therapeutic possibilities to attenuate or conceivably reverse progressive renal disease in the context of fibrosis. Furthermore, parallels with pathological processes in many other organs also exist. PMID:18982158

  3. Renal Function Assessment During Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Belkis; Tuncel, Murat

    2016-09-01

    Theranostics labeled with Y-90 or Lu-177 are highly efficient therapeutic approaches for the systemic treatment of various cancers including neuroendocrine tumors and prostate cancer. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been used for many years for metastatic or inoperable neuroendocrine tumors. However, renal and hematopoietic toxicities are the major limitations for this therapeutic approach. Kidneys have been considered as the "critical organ" because of the predominant glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption by the proximal tubules, and interstitial retention of the tracers. Severe nephrotoxity, which has been classified as grade 4-5 based on the "Common Terminology Criteria on Adverse Events," was reported in the range from 0%-14%. There are several risk factors for renal toxicity; patient-related risk factors include older age, preexisting renal disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, previous nephrotoxic chemotherapy, metastatic lesions close to renal parenchyma, and single kidney. There are also treatment-related issues, such as choice of radionuclide, cumulative radiation dose to kidneys, renal radiation dose per cycle, activity administered, number of cycles, and time interval between cycles. In the literature, nephrotoxicity caused by PRRT was documented using different criteria and renal function tests, from serum creatinine level to more accurate and sophisticated methods. Generally, serum creatinine level was used as a measure of kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimation based on serum creatinine was preferred by several authors. Most commonly used formulas for estimation of GFR are "Modifications of Diet in Renal Disease" (MDRD) equation and "Cockcroft-Gault" formulas. However, more precise methods than creatinine or creatinine clearance are recommended to assess renal function, such as GFR measurements using Tc-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), Cr-51-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or

  4. Utility of renal biopsy in the clinical management of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Dhaun, Neeraj; Bellamy, Christopher O; Cattran, Daniel C; Kluth, David C

    2014-05-01

    Characterizing chronic kidney disease (CKD) at all stages is an essential part of rational management and the renal biopsy plays a key role in defining the processes involved. There remain no global guidelines available to the renal community on indications for this important diagnostic, prognostic, and relatively safe test. Although most nephrologists recognize several clear indications for a renal biopsy, it is still underutilized. It not only helps the clinician to manage the patient with CKD, but it can also help clarify the epidemiology of CKD, and aid research into the pathobiology of disease with the aim of discovering new therapies. It may be useful for instance in elderly patients with CKD, those with diabetes and presumed 'hypertensive nephropathy', and in some patients with advanced CKD as part of the pretransplant work-up. In some populations (for example, immunoglobulin A nephropathy and ANCA vasculitis), renal biopsy allows disease classification that may predict CKD progression and response to therapy. For the individual, interval renal biopsy may be of use in providing ongoing therapeutic and prognostic information. Molecular advances will change the landscape of renal pathology and add a new dimension to the diagnostic precision of kidney biopsy. Organizing the multiplicity of information available in a renal biopsy to maximize benefits to the patient, as well as to the epidemiologist and researcher, is one of the challenges that face the nephrology community.

  5. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Urinary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-03

    Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Distal Urethral Carcinoma; Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma Associated With Urethral Carcinoma; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urethra Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Carcinoma

  6. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-he; Teng, Gao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a group of metabolic diseases of multiple etiologies. Although great progress has been made, researchers are still working on the pathogenesis of T2DM and how to best use the treatments available. Aside from several novel pharmacological approaches, catheter-based sympathetic renal denervation (RDN) has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. In this article, we will summarize herein the role sympathetic activation plays in the progression of T2DM and review the recent clinical RDN experience in glucose metabolism. We performed systematic review in online databases, including PubMed, EmBase, and Web of Science, from inception until 2015. Studies were included if a statistical relationship was investigated between RDN and T2DM. The quality of each included study was assessed by Newcastle–Ottawa scale score. To synthesize these studies, a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was applied as appropriate. Then, we calculated heterogeneity, performed sensitivity analysis, tested publication bias, and did meta-regression analysis. Finally, we identified 4 eligible articles. In most studies, RDN achieved via novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency energy has gained a significant role in resistant hypertension, as well as improvements in glycemic control in T2DM. But the DREAMS-Study showed that RDN did not change median insulin sensitivity nor systemic sympathetic activity. Firstly, the current published studies lacked a proper control group, along with the sample capacity was small. Also, data obtained in the subgroups of diabetic patients were not separately analyzed and the follow-up period was very short. In addition, a reduction in blood pressure accounts for the improvements in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance cannot be excluded. If the favorable result of better glucose metabolism is confirmed in large-scale, randomized studies

  7. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome. PMID:27635229

  8. Cardio-renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  9. [Idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Bennani, S; Ait Bolbarod, A; el Mrini, M; Kadiri, R; Benjelloun, S

    1996-06-01

    The authors report a case of idiopathic renal arteriovenous fistula. The diagnosis was established angiographically in a 24 year old man presenting gross hematuria. Embolization of the fistula was performed. Efficiency of this treatment was appreciated clinically and by duplex renal ultrasonography. The characteristics of renal arteriovenous fistulas are reviewed. PMID:8763700

  10. Bone metastatic disease: taking aim at new therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, F; Di Bussolo, E; Mandatori, I; Mattia, C

    2011-01-01

    Conventional treatment for metastatic bone pain requires a multidisciplinary approach (medical therapy, surgery, and radiation), but is primarily palliative. Biphosphonates introduced the concept of disease-modifying therapy, by effectively reducing bone pain and skeletal related events in patients suffering from bone metastatic cancer. In the past decade, the growing knowledge of bone biology and our understanding of the molecular mechanisms at the basis of the interaction between cancer cells and bone matrix led to the identification of new therapeutic targets for innovative "smart drugs". The most investigated is the RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway, and denosumab, among novel targeted therapies, is the molecule that is in the most advanced development phase. Additional targets have been identified and potential novel therapeutic interventions, classified as inhibitors of bone resorption or stimulators of bone formation, are under preclinical and clinical evaluation. These promising targets include cathepsin K, the Src tyrosine kinases, integrins, chloride channels, the parathyroid hormone-related peptide, endotelin-1, sclerostin, and TGF-beta. Other pathways or molecules expressed by bone cells and cancer cells, such as CXCR4, GPNMB, EGF-family ligands, Wnt/DKK1, and MIP-1 alpha have recently emerged as potential targets. The aim of this review is to discuss the molecular mechanisms behind these emerging therapeutic targets in bone metastases and to give an overview of results from those in advanced clinical phases.

  11. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  12. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  13. Adenocarcinoma metastatic to the mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Webster, K

    1988-07-01

    Two cases of metastatic lesions presenting in the mandibular condyle as Temporo-Mandibular Joint Pain Dysfunction Syndrome are presented with a discussion on the mechanisms of tumour metastases to bone.

  14. [Renal calcium excretion and urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Aruga, Seiji; Honma, Yukio

    2011-10-01

    Patients with urolithiasis have been increasing in the world, especially morbidity of calcium nephrolithiasis has been increasing in the advanced countries. The changes in the environmental factors including alternation of diet are said to be associated with the increment of morbidity of kidney stone. Idiopathic hypercalciuria is one of the most important risk factor of calcium nephrolithiasis and is classified into absorptive, resorptive, and renal leak. Though the origins of these three types of hypercalciuria are different, increased bone resorption and increased calcium absorption from gut tend to be observed simultaneously. Not only genetic abnormalities in the proteins which are involved in calcium metabolisms but environmental factors such as high sodium intake and chronic acid load caused by increased ingestion of animal protein have been considered to be associated with increased urinary calcium excretion. Renal metabolisms of oxalate and phosphate which are important compositions of calcium containing stone, uric acid as a promoter and citrate as a inhibitor of nephrolithiasis are also described.

  15. Burnout in renal care professionals.

    PubMed

    Kotzabassaki, S; Parissopoulos, S

    2003-01-01

    Burnout is defined as "a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and reduced personal accomplishment that can occur among individuals who work with people in some capacity", and it can be considered as a result of long-term exposure to occupational stress. Frequently reported occupational stressors among caring professionals are those intrinsic to the job, related to patient demands, related to roles within the organisation, and those related to relationships at work and career development. In renal care however, there are some unique characteristics such as technologically advanced equipment, the intensive caring environment and the long-term relationships being established between the carer and chronic renal patients, that one should take into consideration. It seems that job resources may act as moderators to burnout. Furthermore, specific personality characteristics and socio-demographic variables seem to affect the burnout experience. Individual and social organisational means for burnout prevention and coping are discussed and suggested. PMID:14748431

  16. Current status of ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mues, Adam C.; Landman, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The increase in detection of small (≤ 4 cm) renal cortical neoplasms has made nephron-sparing surgery the new standard of care for T1a renal lesions. Advances in minimally invasive surgery have improved the surgical approach to these lesions to include laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and renal ablative therapies. In this review, we discuss the indications, outcomes, and potential complications of the commonly used ablative modalities in urologic practice. We will expand on renal cryoablation and review the mechanism of action, surgical approaches, and evidence based medicine using this modality. PMID:19955677

  17. Case for diagnosis. Metastatic Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Gontijo, João Renato Vianna; Leidenz, Franciele Antonieta Bianchi; Sousa, Maria Silvia Laborne Alves de

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is a rare skin manifestation, defined by granulomatous skin lesions that are discontinuous to the affected gastrointestinal tract and histopathologically resembling inflammatory bowel lesions. Up to 44% of patients with Crohn's disease have cutaneous manifestations, of which metastatic lesions are the least common. We present a case of an adolescent with refractory Crohn's disease and persistent papules and plaques on the skin. PMID:27579756

  18. Case for diagnosis. Metastatic Crohn's disease*

    PubMed Central

    Gontijo, João Renato Vianna; Leidenz, Franciele Antonieta Bianchi; de Sousa, Maria Silvia Laborne Alves

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease is a rare skin manifestation, defined by granulomatous skin lesions that are discontinuous to the affected gastrointestinal tract and histopathologically resembling inflammatory bowel lesions. Up to 44% of patients with Crohn's disease have cutaneous manifestations, of which metastatic lesions are the least common. We present a case of an adolescent with refractory Crohn's disease and persistent papules and plaques on the skin. PMID:27579756

  19. Targeting bone metastatic cancer: Role of the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Bertoldo, Francesco; Silvestris, Franco; Ibrahim, Toni; Cognetti, Francesco; Generali, Daniele; Ripamonti, Carla Ida; Amadori, Dino; Colleoni, Marco Angelo; Conte, Pierfranco; Del Mastro, Lucia; De Placido, Sabino; Ortega, Cinzia; Santini, Daniele

    2014-04-01

    One of the great challenges of cancer medicine is to develop effective treatments for bone metastatic cancer. Most patients with advanced solid tumors will develop bone metastasis and will suffer from skeletal related events associated with this disease. Although some therapies are available to manage symptoms derived from bone metastases, an effective treatment has not been developed yet. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates cell growth and survival. Alterations in mTOR signaling have been associated with pathological malignancies, including bone metastatic cancer. Inhibition of mTOR signaling might therefore be a promising alternative for bone metastatic cancer management. This review summarizes the current knowledge on mTOR pathway signaling in bone tissue and provides an overview on the known effects of mTOR inhibition in bone cancer, both in in vitro and in vivo models.

  20. In Vitro Co-Culture Models of Breast Cancer Metastatic Progression towards Bone.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Advanced breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone through a multistep process involving the detachment of cells from the primary tumor, their intravasation into the bloodstream, adhesion to the endothelium and extravasation into the bone, culminating with the establishment of a vicious cycle causing extensive bone lysis. In recent years, the crosstalk between tumor cells and secondary organs microenvironment is gaining much attention, being indicated as a crucial aspect in all metastatic steps. To investigate the complex interrelation between the tumor and the microenvironment, both in vitro and in vivo models have been exploited. In vitro models have some advantages over in vivo, mainly the possibility to thoroughly dissect in controlled conditions and with only human cells the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic progression. In this article we will review the main results deriving from in vitro co-culture models, describing mechanisms activated in the crosstalk between breast cancer and bone cells which drive the different metastatic steps. PMID:27571063

  1. In Vitro Co-Culture Models of Breast Cancer Metastatic Progression towards Bone

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Advanced breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone through a multistep process involving the detachment of cells from the primary tumor, their intravasation into the bloodstream, adhesion to the endothelium and extravasation into the bone, culminating with the establishment of a vicious cycle causing extensive bone lysis. In recent years, the crosstalk between tumor cells and secondary organs microenvironment is gaining much attention, being indicated as a crucial aspect in all metastatic steps. To investigate the complex interrelation between the tumor and the microenvironment, both in vitro and in vivo models have been exploited. In vitro models have some advantages over in vivo, mainly the possibility to thoroughly dissect in controlled conditions and with only human cells the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic progression. In this article we will review the main results deriving from in vitro co-culture models, describing mechanisms activated in the crosstalk between breast cancer and bone cells which drive the different metastatic steps. PMID:27571063

  2. Oncology nursing support for safe and effective use of eribulin in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Diana; Urquhart, Laura; Hopkins, Una; Knight, Sandra; Moore, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Nurse practitioners play important roles in breast cancer prevention, early detection, therapeutic efficacy, and surveillance. Assessment of a patient's health status is part of the nine nurse practitioner core competencies updated in 2012 by the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. Although adverse events are common in treatment for metastatic breast cancer (MBC), proactive management strategies can limit the number and/or severity of adverse events. Additionally, knowledge of common metastatic sites and clinical signs/symptoms of recurrence provides one of the first-line strategies for successful treatment. We review five case studies of women with MBC who were managed successfully with eribulin mesylate in late lines of therapy after at least two chemotherapeutic regimens for advanced breast cancer that included both an anthracycline and a taxane in either the adjuvant or metastatic setting. PMID:24855406

  3. Tumor attributes predicting cutaneous metastatic destiny: a report of two interesting cases.

    PubMed

    Gurumurthi, Ravichandran; Thirumalai, Raja; Easow, Jose M; Mohan, Subhashini

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous metastases are the result of complex interaction between the tumor cells ("seed") and the host environment ("soil"). Metastases to the skin can be an early sign of internal malignancy or represent recurrence of the primary tumor and portends a poorer prognosis. Invasion and metastasis are the hallmarks of on cogenesis. Skin is the largest organ in the body, but the incidence of metastases is low. With advances in molecular biology, factors responsible for the initiation and perpetuation of metastatic tumor cells at distant sites are being elucidated. The concept of "pre-metastatic niche" and interaction between various chemokines has given a new outlook in understanding the organ specificity of metastatic tumor cells. We present two cases of cutaneous metastases with interesting clinical findings correlating with its biologic subtypes.

  4. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: an updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tournigand, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Richa, Hubert; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2015-01-01

    Systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with unresectable advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), but salvage surgery of metastatic disease should be considered in the case of adequate tumor shrinkage. Several drugs and combinations are now available for use in treating patients with advanced CRC, but the optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Moreover, the administration of antitumor therapy can be modulated by periods of maintenance or treatment breaks rather than delivered as full therapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, followed by reintroduction of prior full therapy when required, before switching to other drugs. Consequently, randomized strategy trials are needed to define the optimal treatment sequences. Molecular testing for Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) is mandatory but not sufficient to select appropriate patients for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. PMID:26673925

  5. State of the art management of metastatic gastroesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Adrian G.; Lynch, David

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical locations of upper gastrointestinal (GI) tumors have changed remarkably in the western world and reflect the increasing impact of obesity and gastroesophageal (GE) reflux rather than infectious etiologies. Incidence rates of GE tumors are rising rapidly and survival rates for patients with metastatic disease remain poor. Traditionally, cytotoxic chemotherapy has had some survival advantages but increasingly complex combination regimens are limited by toxicities. The advent of molecularly targeted therapy has provided additional options for patients with advanced disease including trastuzumab and ramucirumab. There has also been detailed molecular characterization of upper GI tumors which hopefully will result in improved tailoring of clinical trial design accounting for the heterogeneity inherent in GE tumors. While numerous targeted therapies are currently being studied in clinical trials, there is much excitement regarding the role of immunotherapy in GE cancers. Although further investigation is warranted, it represents a promising avenue for patients with advanced GE tumors. PMID:26539453

  6. Role of surgical consolidation in metastatic urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takashige; Matsumoto, Ryuji; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Since the development of systemic combination chemotherapy, postchemotherapy extirpation has been performed in selected patients mainly with locally advanced and/or initially unresectable bladder cancer, and, in very selected patients, surgical consolidation for visceral metastases has also been performed. The purpose of this article was to review and summarize the current evidence for the role of surgical consolidation in metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Recent findings The role of metastasectomy has not yet been examined in a randomized setting. In terms of locally advanced and/or node-positive bladder cancer, studies further support the benefit of surgical consolidation, especially after a favorable response to systemic chemotherapy. Regarding metastasectomy for visceral metastasis, recent evidence suggested that lung metastases (ideally small solitary lesions) are a good indication. Summary Patients with a good response to chemotherapy, limited nodal/pulmonary disease, and a favorable performance status are good candidates for surgical consolidation. Careful patient selection is mandatory. PMID:27471992

  7. Therapeutic strategy in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Tournigand, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Richa, Hubert; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2015-05-01

    Systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with unresectable advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), but salvage surgery of metastatic disease should be considered in the case of adequate tumor shrinkage. Several drugs and combinations are now available for use in treating patients with advanced CRC, but the optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Moreover, the administration of antitumor therapy can be modulated by periods of maintenance or treatment breaks rather than delivered as full therapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, followed by reintroduction of prior full therapy when required, before switching to other drugs. Consequently, randomized strategy trials are needed to define the optimal treatment sequences. Molecular testing for Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) is mandatory but not sufficient to select appropriate patients for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) therapy. PMID:26673925

  8. Tumor homogeneity between primary and metastatic sites for BRAF status in metastatic melanoma determined by immunohistochemical and molecular testing.

    PubMed

    Boursault, Lucile; Haddad, Véronique; Vergier, Béatrice; Cappellen, David; Verdon, Severine; Bellocq, Jean-Pierre; Jouary, Thomas; Merlio, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors have demonstrated improvement of overall survival in patients with metastatic melanoma and BRAF(V600) mutations. In order to evaluate BRAF tumor heterogeneity between primary and metastatic site, we have evaluated the performance of immunohistochemistry (IHC) with an anti-BRAF(V600E) antibody in both localization by comparison with high resolution melting analysis followed by Sanger sequencing in a parallel blinded study. A total of 230 samples distributed as primary melanoma (n = 88) and different types of metastatic samples (n = 142) were studied in 99 patients with advanced or metastatic melanoma (stage III or IV). The prevalence of each BRAF mutation was c.1799T>A, BRAF(V600E) (45.2%), c.1799_1800TG>AA, BRAF(V600E2) (3.0%), c.1798_1799GT>AA, BRAF(V600K) (3.0%), c.1801 A>G, BRAF(K601E) (1.3%), c.1789_1790CT>TC, BRAF(L597S) (0.4%), c.1780G>A, BRAF(D594N) (0.9%) respectively. IHC was positive in 109/112 samples harboring BRAF(V600E/E2) mutations and negative in other cases. The cytoplasmic staining was either strongly positive in tumor cells of BRAF(V600E) mutated cases. It appeared strong brown, different from the vesicular grey cytoplasmic pigmentation of melanophages. Concordance between the two techniques was 96.4%. Sensitivity of IHC for detecting the BRAF(V600E/E2) mutations was 97.3%, while specificity was 100%. Both our IHC and molecular study demonstrated homogeneity between primary and metastatic sites for BRAF status in melanoma. This study also provides evidence that IHC may be a cost-effective first-line method for BRAF(V600E) detection. Thereafter, molecular techniques should be used in negative, ambiguous or non-contributive cases.

  9. Renal infarction resulting from traumatic renal artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Kim, Won; Jin, Gong Yong; Na, Ki Ryang; Yun, Il Yong; Park, Sung Kwang

    2008-06-01

    Renal artery dissection may be caused by iatrogenic injury, trauma, underlying arterial diseases such as fibromuscular disease, atherosclerotic disease, or connective tissue disease. Radiological imaging may be helpful in detecting renal artery pathology, such as renal artery dissection. For patients with acute, isolated renal artery dissection, surgical treatment, endovascular management, or medical treatment have been considered effective measures to preserve renal function. We report a case of renal infarction that came about as a consequence of renal artery dissection.

  10. Metastatic sebaceous cell carcinoma, review of the literature and use of electrochemotherapy as possible new treatment modality

    PubMed Central

    Baduel, Eugenio Sportoletti; Brizio, Matteo; Picciotto, Franco; Dika, Emi; Fierro, Maria Teresa; Macripò, Giuseppe; Quaglino, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Metastatic extraorbital sebaceous carcinoma is a rare event that could involve the head and neck. The treatment of choice for the initial stage of the disease is surgery and/or radiotherapy. The treatment of recurrent or advanced disease is still controversial. Material and methods Extensive literature search was done, and the treatment options are discussed. Results Results. The literature search found several treatment modalities in use for the treatment of metastatic extraorbital sebaceous carcinoma. Electrochemotherapy was not included in the reported treatments. We used this technique for a man of 85 years old with a recurrent and locally metastatic extraorbital sebaceous carcinoma of the scalp. During the period of 8 months, two sessions of electrochemotherapy were employed, which resulted in an objective response of the tumour and good quality of life. Conclusions Electrochemotherapy has shown to be a interesting tools for treatment of metastatic extraorbital sebaceous carcinoma when other radical options are not available or convenient. PMID:27679547

  11. Metastatic sebaceous cell carcinoma, review of the literature and use of electrochemotherapy as possible new treatment modality

    PubMed Central

    Baduel, Eugenio Sportoletti; Brizio, Matteo; Picciotto, Franco; Dika, Emi; Fierro, Maria Teresa; Macripò, Giuseppe; Quaglino, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Metastatic extraorbital sebaceous carcinoma is a rare event that could involve the head and neck. The treatment of choice for the initial stage of the disease is surgery and/or radiotherapy. The treatment of recurrent or advanced disease is still controversial. Material and methods Extensive literature search was done, and the treatment options are discussed. Results Results. The literature search found several treatment modalities in use for the treatment of metastatic extraorbital sebaceous carcinoma. Electrochemotherapy was not included in the reported treatments. We used this technique for a man of 85 years old with a recurrent and locally metastatic extraorbital sebaceous carcinoma of the scalp. During the period of 8 months, two sessions of electrochemotherapy were employed, which resulted in an objective response of the tumour and good quality of life. Conclusions Electrochemotherapy has shown to be a interesting tools for treatment of metastatic extraorbital sebaceous carcinoma when other radical options are not available or convenient.

  12. Postpartum renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Rubens, D; Sterns, R H; Segal, A J

    1985-01-01

    Renal vein thrombosis in adults is usually a complication of the nephrotic syndrome. Rarely, it has been reported in nonnephrotic women postpartum. The thrombosis may be a complication of the hypercoagulable state associated with both the nephrotic syndrome and pregnancy. Two postpartum patients with renal vein thrombosis and no prior history of renal disease are reported here. Neither patient had heavy proteinuria. In both cases, pyelonephritis was suspected clinically and the diagnosis of renal vein thrombosis was first suggested and confirmed by radiologic examination. Renal vein thrombosis should be considered in women presenting postpartum with flank pain.

  13. Donor-derived metastatic melanoma in a liver transplant recipient established by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Muhammad; Eason, James D; Das, Kanak; Sylvestre, Pamela B; Dean, Amanda G; Vanatta, Jason M

    2013-10-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a donor-derived malignancy that has rarely been reported in liver allograft recipients. We present a case of a transmitted donor-derived melanoma to a liver allograft recipient in whom the diagnosis was established by polymerase chain reaction-based DNA fingerprinting. A 52-year-old African-American man underwent a successful orthotropic liver transplant for alcohol-induced cirrhosis. One year after the orthotropic liver transplant, he presented at our institution with diffuse abdominal pain, and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen and chest showed innumerable masses diffusely involving the liver and multiple subcutaneous nodules in the abdominal and chest wall. A liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic melanoma. The origin of melanoma was traced to the donor by DNA fingerprinting of the native liver, the donor liver, and the donor gallbladder. Chemotherapy was initiated with temozolomide (75 mg/m² daily) and thalidomide (50 mg daily), to which he responded within 8 weeks with radiologic improvement in metastatic lesions. Tacrolimus was switched to sirolimus because of renal insufficiency as well as reported effectiveness against melanoma. Our patient survived for 9 months after the diagnosis of metastatic melanoma. He ultimately died of brain metastases. Donor-derived metastatic melanoma is a rare cancer with the highest transmission and mortality rates, which requires better recognition. Prompt diagnosis of donor-derived melanoma is critical and can be achieved reliably with polymerase chain reaction-based DNA analysis. Management options after diagnosis include de-escalation of immunosuppression, with or without urgent organ removal or retransplant. The roles of chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy require further study.

  14. Panitumumab: the evidence of its therapeutic potential in metastatic colorectal cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Erika; Morgillo, Floriana; Troiani, Teresa; Tortora, Giampaolo; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common malignant disease. Of newly diagnosed patients, 40% have metastatic disease at diagnosis, and approximately 25% of patients with localized disease at diagnosis will ultimately develop metastatic disease. The benefits of systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer over best supportive care have been established. Panitumumab (ABX-EGF) is the first fully human monoclonal antibody developed for use in colorectal cancer that targets the extracellular domains of epidermal growth factor receptor. Aims: The goal of this article is to review the published evidence for the use of panitumumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer to define its therapeutic potential. Evidence review: The major evidence of panitumumab activity in colorectal cancer has appeared in meeting report abstracts. One phase II study in monotherapy, one in combination with chemotherapy, and one phase III study have included only patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Clinical potential: To date, in phase II clinical studies panitumumab has demonstrated antitumor activity in advanced, refractory colorectal cancer. As monotherapy it resulted in a 10% response rate with 38% of patients having stable disease, and a 36% response rate with 46% stable disease when combined with chemotherapy. A phase III study indicates a clinically significant advantage of panitumumab as third-line monotherapy over best supportive care. Panitumumab appears to have a good tolerability profile, with no maximum tolerated dose yet defined. PMID:21221177

  15. Metastatic Crohn's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Palamaras, I; El-Jabbour, J; Pietropaolo, N; Thomson, P; Mann, S; Robles, W; Stevens, H P

    2008-09-01

    Metastatic Crohn's disease (MCD) indicates the presence of non-caseating granuloma of the skin at sites separated from the gastrointestinal tract by normal tissue and is the least common dermatologic manifestation of CD. In adults, MCD usually appears after the initial diagnosis of CD in 70% of cases, whereas in children, it appears at the same time as CD in almost half of the cases. The most frequent skin lesions in adults are nodules, plaques with or without ulceration on the extremities and ulcers on the genitals. In children, genital swelling with or without erythema is the most frequent presentation of MCD. Simultaneous presence of perianal CD affects more females (60%) and particularly children. Associated gastrointestinal symptoms are present in one third of the cases in adults and in half of the cases in children. Treatment is often unsatisfactory. Randomised controlled trials are lacking. Various chemotherapeutic agents have been used such as oral metronidazole, topical and/or oral steroids, azathioprine, cyclosporine, sulfasalazine, tetracyclines, topical or systemic tacrolimus, infliximab alone or with methotrexate, and surgical treatment with oral zinc sulphate. MCD represents another 'great imitator'. This reviews the most relevant characteristics of this disease, in order to increase awareness and to avoid delay in diagnosis and improve management of the whole CD complex.

  16. Anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Phillippa; Sarfraz, Farook; Ravanan, Rommel

    2011-11-15

    A 23-year-old female who presented with advanced renal failure was subsequently diagnosed with renal vein thrombosis and antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease. A previous case of renal vein thrombosis has been reported in association with anti-GBM disease, but to our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which the presentation of anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis was concurrent. Further study is essential to understand if the association of anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis as seen in our case was pure coincidence or is in fact occurs more frequently. It may be that the dual diagnosis is not made as establishing one sufficient diagnosis for renal failure may halt further investigations for additional diagnoses.

  17. Metastatic Bladder Cancer Presenting with Persistent Hematuria in Young Man with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Premal; Rabin, Harvey R.; Vickers, Michael M.; Parkins, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of metastatic bladder cancer developing in a young man with cystic fibrosis (CF) that was initially diagnosed as ureterolithiasis and managed as renal colic. With the improved survival of patients with CF, an increasing burden of extrapulmonary disease manifestations is apparent. Renal colic is observed at an increased frequency in patients with CF relative to the general population and is a commonly recognized cause of hematuria. However, CF patients harboring a malignancy are recognized to be at increased risk of delayed identification owing to atypical symptoms and lack of demographic risk factors. This case illustrates how investigations to rule out malignancy are warranted in those CF patients not responding to therapies directed towards presumptive diagnoses. PMID:23762727

  18. PD-L1 Expression in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: An Analysis of Nephrectomy and Sites of Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jilaveanu, L.B.; Shuch, B.; Zito, C. R.; Parisi, F.; Barr, M.; Kluger, Y.; Chen, L.; Kluger, H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expression of programmed death ligand (PD-L1/B7-H1/CD274) represents a mechanism of immune escape for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. Drugs blocking PD-L1 or its receptor are in clinical development and early data suggests that tumor PD-L1 expression may predict response. Patients and Methods: A tissue microarray (TMA) consisting of four biopsy cores from 34 matched pairs of nephrectomy and metastatic sites of clear cell RCC was used to assess PD-L1 expression by quantitative immunofluorescence. Assessment of intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity and primary and metastatic tumor expression was performed using a method of Automated Quantitative Analysis (AQUA). Results: The median AQUA scores were higher in metastatic than primary specimens (P < 0.0001). The correlation between PD-L1 expression in matched primary and metastatic specimens was weak (R= 0.24). Within a given tumor, variable PD-L1 staining heterogeneity was seen, however the degree of heterogeneity was similar in primary and metastatic sites (P = 0.482). Conclusions: The weak correlation between PD-L1 expression in primary and metastatic sites for a given patient suggests that expression in nephrectomy specimens cannot be used to select metastatic RCC patients for PD-L1 and PD-1 inhibitors. The intra-tumor heterogeneity seen in both primary and metastatic specimens indicates that a single core biopsy might not be sufficient to determine PD-L1 expression. PMID:24563671

  19. Jade-1, a candidate renal tumor suppressor that promotes apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mina I; Foy, Rebecca L; Chitalia, Vipul C; Zhao, Jin; Panchenko, Maria V; Wang, Hongmei; Cohen, Herbert T

    2005-08-01

    Medical therapies are lacking for advanced renal cancer, so there is a great need to understand its pathogenesis. Most renal cancers have defects in the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor pVHL. The mechanism by which pVHL protein functions in renal tumor suppression remains unclear. Jade-1 is a short-lived, kidney-enriched transcription factor that is stabilized by direct interaction with pVHL. Loss of Jade-1 stabilization by pVHL correlates with renal cancer risk, making the relationship between Jade-1 and renal cancer compelling. We report that Jade-1 expression was barely detectable in all tested renal cancer cell lines, regardless of VHL status. Strikingly, proteasome inhibitor treatment increased endogenous Jade-1 expression up to 10-fold. Jade-1 inhibited renal cancer cell growth, colony formation, and tumor formation in nude mice. Intriguingly, Jade-1 also affected the pattern of cell growth in monolayer culture and 3D culture. Jade-1 increased apoptosis by 40-50% and decreased levels of antiapoptotic Bcl-2. Antisense Jade-1-expressing cells confirmed these results. Therefore, Jade-1 may suppress renal cancer cell growth in part by increasing apoptosis. Jade-1 may represent a proapoptotic barrier to proliferation that must be overcome generally in renal cancer, perhaps initially by pVHL inactivation and subsequently by increased proteasomal activity. Therefore, Jade-1 may be a renal tumor suppressor.

  20. The rebirth of interest in renal tubular function.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Jerome; Grantham, Jared J

    2016-06-01

    The measurement of glomerular filtration rate by the clearance of inulin or creatinine has evolved over the past 50 years into an estimated value based solely on plasma creatinine concentration. We have examined some of the misconceptions and misunderstandings of the classification of renal disease and its course, which have followed this evolution. Furthermore, renal plasma flow and tubular function, which in the past were estimated by the clearance of the exogenous aryl amine, para-aminohippurate, are no longer measured. Over the past decade, studies in experimental animals with reduced nephron mass and in patients with reduced renal function have identified small gut-derived, protein-bound uremic retention solutes ("uremic toxins") that are poorly filtered but are secreted into the lumen by organic anion transporters (OATs) in the proximal renal tubule. These are not effectively removed by conventional hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. Residual renal function, urine produced in patients with advanced renal failure or undergoing dialysis treatment, may represent, at least in part, secretion of fluid and uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate, mediated by proximal tubule OATs and might serve as a useful survival function. In light of this new evidence of the physiological role of proximal tubule OATs, we suggest that measurement of renal tubular function and renal plasma flow may be of considerable value in understanding and managing chronic kidney disease. Data obtained in normal subjects indicate that renal plasma flow and renal tubular function might be measured by the clearance of the endogenous aryl amine, hippurate.