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Sample records for advanced metastatic renal

  1. Sequence of treatment in locally advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Stefanie; Gillessen, Silke

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of drugs that have shown activity in advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has led to a debate on the optimal sequence of treatments. There is agreement on recommending targeted agents as the standard of care in this disease. Uncertainty, however, remains on the best first-line drug choice. Physicians and patients may select sunitinib, bevacizumab in combination with interferon-alpha (IFN-α), pazopanib, or—in poor risk patients—temsirolimus. There are also a variety of therapies with proven efficacy on hand in the second-line setting: sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib, and everolimus. While most randomized RCC trials assessed progression free survival (PFS) as primary endpoint, some agents were shown to improve median overall survival (OS), and given in sequence they have extended the life expectancy of RCC patients from 13 months in the cytokine era to over 30 months. Despite the progress made, there are sobering aspects to the oncologic success story in RCC, as the new treatments do not obtain an objective response or disease stabilization (SD) in all patients. There are also as yet no predictors to select patients who might benefit and those who are primary resistant to specific drugs, and ultimately almost all patients will experience disease progression. Bearing inevitable treatment failure in mind, availability of further drugs and switching therapy while the patient is in a condition to continue pharmacotherapy is essential. Of note, depending on the setting, only 33-59% of patients receive second-line treatment. In this review we present data on first-, second-, and third-line treatment in RCC, and discuss the difficulties in their interpretation in the context of treatment sequence. We summarize biological aspects and discuss mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy and their implications for treatment selection. PMID:26816832

  2. Phase II Trial Of Neoadjuvant Axitinib In Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Jose A.; Devine, Catherine E.; Urbauer, Diana L.; Lozano, Marisa; Maity, Tapati; Ahrar, Kamran; Tamboli, Pheroze; Tannir, Nizar M.; Wood, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown modest impact of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on primary renal tumors. These studies were mostly retrospective and heterogeneous in their eligibility criteria with regards to histology, disease stage, duration of therapy, and time off therapy prior to surgery. Objective To prospectively investigate the safety and efficacy of axitinib in downsizing tumors in patients with non-metastatic biopsy-proven clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Design, Setting, and Participants This is a single-institutional, single-arm phase 2 clinical trial. Patients with locally-advanced non-metastatic biopsy-proven ccRCC were eligible. This trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov(NCT01263769). Intervention Patients received axitinib 5mg for up to 12 weeks. Axitinib was continued until 36 hours prior to surgery. Patient underwent partial or radical nephrectomy after axitinib therapy. Outcome Measurements and Statistical Analysis The primary outcome was objective response rate prior to surgery. Secondary outcomes included safety, tolerability, and quality of life. A dedicated radiologist independently reviewed all CT scans to evaluate for response using RECIST. Results and Limitations Twenty-four patients were treated. 22 patients continued axitinib for 12 weeks, while 1 patient continued axitinib for 11 weeks, and underwent surgery as planned. One patient stopped treatment at 7 weeks due to adverse events. Median reduction of primary renal tumor diameter was 28.3%. Eleven patients experienced a partial response by RECIST; 13 had stable disease. There was no progression of disease while on axitinib. The most common AEs were hypertension, fatigue, oral mucositis, hypothyroidism, and hand-foot syndrome. Postoperatively, 2 grade 3 and 13 grade 2 complications were noted. No grade 4 or 5 complications occurred. FKSI (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Kidney Specific Index-15) changed over time, with quality of life worsening while on therapy

  3. Phase II Study of Erlotinib in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Papillary Histology Renal Cell Cancer: SWOG S0317

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael S.; Hussey, Michael; Nagle, Raymond B.; Lara, Primo N.; Mack, Philip C.; Dutcher, Janice; Samlowski, Wolfram; Clark, Joseph I.; Quinn, David I.; Pan, Chong-Xian; Crawford, David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Patients with advanced papillary renal cell cancer (pRCC) have poor survival after systemic therapy; the reported median survival time is 7 to 17 months. In this trial, we evaluated the efficacy of erlotinib, an oral epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor in patients with advanced pRCC, a tumor type associated with wild-type von Hippel Lindau gene. Patients and Methods Patients with histologically confirmed, advanced, or metastatic pRCC were treated with erlotinib 150 mg orally once daily. A RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) response rate (RR) of ≥ 20% was considered a promising outcome. Secondary end points included overall survival and 6-month probability of treatment failure. Results Of 52 patients registered, 45 were evaluable. The overall RR was 11% (five of 45 patients; 95% CI, 3% to 24%), and the disease control rate was 64% (ie five partial response and 24 stable disease). The median overall survival time was 27 months (95% CI, 13 to 36 months). Probability of freedom from treatment failure at 6 months was 29% (95% CI, 17% to 42%). There was one grade 5 adverse event (AE) of pneumonitis, one grade 4 thrombosis, and nine other grade 3 AEs. Conclusion Although the RECIST RR of 11% did not exceed prespecified estimates for additional study, single-agent erlotinib yielded disease control and survival outcomes of interest with an expected toxicity profile. The design of future trials of the EGFR axis in pRCC should be based on preclinical or molecular data that define appropriate patient subgroups, new drug combinations, or potentially more active alternative schedules. PMID:19884559

  4. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  5. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Atar, Yavuz; Topaloglu, Ilhan; Ozcan, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx, nasal cavity, and paranasal sinuses can be misdiagnosed as primary malignant or benign diseases. A 33-year-old male attended our outpatient clinic complaining of difficulty breathing through the nose, bloody nasal discharge, postnasal drop, snoring, and discharge of phlegm. Endoscopic nasopharyngeal examination showed a vascularized nasopharyngeal mass. Under general anesthesia, multiple punch biopsies were taken from the nasopharynx. Pathologically, the tumor cells had clear cytoplasm and were arranged in a trabecular pattern lined by a layer of endothelial cells. After the initial pathological examination, the pathologist requested more information about the patient's clinical status. A careful history revealed that the patient had undergone left a nephrectomy for a kidney mass diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma 3 years earlier. Subsequently, nasopharyngeal metastatic renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining with CD10 and vimentin. Radiotherapy was recommended for treatment. PMID:23924557

  6. Surgical considerations for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Adibi, Mehrad; Thomas, Arun Z; Borregales, Leonardo D; Matin, Surena F; Wood, Christopher G; Karam, Jose A

    2015-12-01

    Among patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 25-30% present with metastatic disease at the time of initial diagnosis. Despite the ever-increasing array of treatment options available for these patients, surgery remains one of the cornerstones of therapy. Proper patient selection for cytoreductive surgery is paramount to its effective use in the management of patients with metastatic RCC despite the decrease in reported morbidity rates. We explore the evolving role cytoreductive surgery in metastatic RCC spanning the immunotherapy era to the targeted therapy era. Despite significant advances in the management of patients with metastatic RCC, further evidence on the definitive role of cytoreductive surgery in the targeted therapy era is awaited through large randomized trials. PMID:26546481

  7. Ocular Metastatic Renal Carcinoma Presenting With Proptosis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ruju; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Fay, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic renal carcinoma is the third most common source of ocular and second most common source of orbital metastases. This is the first published case of von Hippel-Lindau (vHL) disease that developed renal cell carcinoma metastatic to an eye with a retinal hemangioblastoma. A 73-year-old woman had a history of vHL disease that included prior retinal hemangioblastomas, 2 cerebellar hemangioblastomas, and bilateral renal cell carcinomas with sacral metastasis. After presenting with progressive, painful proptosis secondary to a large mass observable by ocular CT, an enucleation-orbitotomy was performed, and the surgical specimen was sent for histopathological analysis. The ophthalmic renal metastatic tumor, like the primary tumor, was a clear cell variant that involved both the eyeball and orbit in continuity. The intraocular component was larger than the extraocular portion, which was interpreted as an outward extension of an initial retinal metastasis that probably first settled within a hemangioblastoma. Clusters of ectatic ghost vessels with thickened walls produced by periodic acid Schiff-positive, redundant basement membrane material were partially infiltrated by tumor cells at their periphery, thereby lending some support for this hypothesis. Immunohistochemical positivity for the biomarkers cytokeratin 18, vimentin, carbonic anhydrase IX, PAX2, and PAX 8 confirmed the diagnosis. The patient has refused further treatment. Her anophthalmic socket has comfortably retained a porous polyethylene implant without clinical evidence of local recurrence during 5 months of follow up. PMID:24828963

  8. Everolimus for the second-line treatment of advanced and/or metastatic renal cell cancer: a critique of the submission from Novartis.

    PubMed

    Pitt, M; Crathorne, L; Moxham, T; Bond, M; Hyde, C

    2010-10-01

    This paper represents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of everolimus plus best supportive care (BSC) for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) which has progressed following or on vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy (sunitinib, sorafenib, bevacizumab), compared to BSC alone. The submitting manufacturer's case for clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness was mainly based on a well-conducted randomised controlled trial (RCT), Renal Cell Cancer Treatment with Oral RAD001 Given Daily-1 (RECORD-1), comparing BSC plus everolimus with BSC plus placebo and a de novo economic model. The RCT indicated a marked statistically significant effect on progression-free survival. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) estimate was 52,000 pounds per quality-adjusted life-year (this included a reduction in drug cost associated with an approved patient access scheme). The ERG undertook a critical appraisal of the submission. The ERG was generally in agreement with the submitting manufacturer concerning its estimates of effectiveness; however, there was greater concern surrounding the estimates of cost-effectiveness. The ERG judged that if potential errors in the model were corrected, the ICERs offered by the submitting manufacturer would overstate the cost-effectiveness of everolimus for the second-line treatment of metastatic RCC (that this ICER would be a higher value). Concerning the estimates of cost-effectiveness in RCC, the observations in the ERG report provide strong further support for research collecting rigorous estimates of utilities associated with the main health states likely to be experienced by patients with renal cell cancer. At the time of writing, NICE was yet to issue the Appraisal Consultation Document for this appraisal. PMID:21047490

  9. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y C

    2016-04-15

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  10. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  11. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas. PMID:27232353

  12. Pazopanib for the first-line treatment of patients with advanced and/or metastatic renal cell carcinoma : a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Kilonzo, Mary; Hislop, Jenni; Elders, Andrew; Fraser, Cynthia; Bissett, Donald; McClinton, Samuel; Mowatt, Graham; Vale, Luke

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of pazopanib hydrochloride (GlaxoSmithKline) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of the drug for the first-line treatment of advanced and/or metastatic renal cell carcinoma, as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. The Aberdeen Health Technology Assessment Group were commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article provides a description of the company submission, the ERG review and NICE's subsequent decisions. The objective of this paper is to summarize the independent review and critique of the evidence submitted for the consideration of the NICE Appraisal Committee and NICE's subsequently issued guidance. The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology based upon the manufacturer's submission to NICE. The ERG also independently searched for relevant evidence and modified the manufacturer's decision analytic model to examine the impact of altering some of the key assumptions. For progression-free survival (PFS), there was a statistically significant longer survival for pazopanib compared with placebo (as assessed by the ERG, based upon the original manufacturer submission with a clinical cut-off date of 23 May 2008) [median 11.1 vs. 2.8 months; hazard ratio (HR) 0.40; 95 % CI 0.27, 0.60]. Data from the indirect comparison suggested that pazopanib had a greater survival than interferon alpha (IFN-α) [HR 0.512; 95 % CI 0.326, 0.802] but provided no evidence of any difference compared with sunitinib (HR 0.949; 95 % CI 0.575, 1.568). With regard to overall survival, 64 % (n = 99) of patients in the pazopanib arm and 63 % (n = 49) of patients in the placebo arm had died and a total of 51 % (n = 40) of placebo patients had crossed over to receive pazopanib. Although data were provided on an intention-to-treat basis, crossover between therapies

  13. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC): a rapid autopsy report of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Udager, Aaron M; Alva, Ajjai; Chen, Ying-Bei; Siddiqui, Javed; Lagstein, Amir; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E; Chinnaiyian, Arul M; Mehra, Rohit

    2014-04-01

    Rapid ("warm") autopsies of patients with advanced metastatic cancer provide invaluable insight into the natural history, pathobiology, and morphology of advanced and treatment-resistant tumors. Here, we report a rapid autopsy case of a hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) patient with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-the first such case described for either a primary renal tumor or HLRCC-related cancer. Mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene underlie HLRCC, a rare syndrome involving cutaneous and uterine leiomyomata and aggressive kidney tumors. Loss of heterozygosity at the wild-type FH gene locus results in profound cellular metabolic derangement, "pseudohypoxic" upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)-dependent transcription, and aberrant protein succination; these molecular changes drive oncogenesis of kidney tumors in HLRCC patients. The current index patient had a high-grade RCC with classic morphologic features of HLRCC, including large nuclei with prominent eosinophilic nucleoli and perinucleolar clearing. In addition, this patient's RCC demonstrated extensive sarcomatoid and rhabdoid features-morphologies not previously well described in HLRCC-associated kidney tumors. Here, we report the extent of metastatic dissemination and supplement this unique tumor morphology with mitochondrial enzyme histochemistry and extended immunohistochemical analysis. Tumor cells strongly expressed PAX8, vimentin, CD10, and the HIF target GLUT1 and showed increased nuclear p53 accumulation; the expression of other RCC markers was negative. We also detail microscopic tubular epithelial changes in the grossly uninvolved ipsilateral renal parenchyma and demonstrate sporadic, aberrant upregulation of the HIF targets GLUT1 and CAIX in dysplastic peritumoral tubules. PMID:24625422

  14. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC): a rapid autopsy report of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Udager, Aaron M.; Alva, Ajjai; Chen, Ying-Bei; Siddiqui, Javed; Lagstein, Amir; Tickoo, Satish K.; Reuter, Victor E.; Chinnaiyian, Arul M.; Mehra, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Rapid (“warm”) autopsies of patients with advanced metastatic cancer provide invaluable insight into the natural history, pathobiology, and morphology of advanced and treatment-resistant tumors. Here, we report a rapid autopsy case of a hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) patient with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC)—the first such case described for either a primary renal tumor or HLRCC-related cancer. Mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene underlie HLRCC, a rare syndrome involving cutaneous and uterine leiomyomata and aggressive kidney tumors. Loss of heterozygosity at the wild-type FH gene locus results in profound cellular metabolic derangement, “pseudohypoxic” upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1[alpha] (HIF-1[alpha])-dependent transcription, and aberrant protein succination; these molecular changes drive oncogenesis of kidney tumors in HLRCC patients. The current index patient had a high-grade RCC with classic morphologic features of HLRCC, including large nuclei with prominent eosinophilic nucleoli and perinucleolar clearing. In addition, this patient’s RCC demonstrated extensive sarcomatoid and rhabdoid features—morphologies not previously well described in HLRCC-associated kidney tumors. Here, we report the extent of metastatic dissemination and supplement this unique tumor morphology with mitochondrial enzyme histochemistry and extended immunohistochemical analysis. Tumor cells strongly expressed PAX8, vimentin, CD10, and the HIF target GLUT1 and showed increased nuclear p53 accumulation; the expression of other RCC markers was negative. We also detail microscopic tubular epithelial changes in the grossly uninvolved ipsilateral renal parenchyma and demonstrate sporadic, aberrant upregulation of the HIF targets GLUT1 and CAIX in dysplastic peritumoral tubules. PMID:24625422

  15. First-line therapy for treatment-naive patients with advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a systematic review of published randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Takyar, Shweta; Diaz, Jose; Sehgal, Manu; Sapunar, Francisco; Pandha, Hardev

    2016-06-01

    In the recent years, a number of targeted therapies have been approved for first-line treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. A systematic review was conducted to assess the clinical efficacy, safety and effect of all first-line treatments evaluated to date on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A systematic search of Embase, Cochrane and MEDLINE databases was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (1980-2015) evaluating any targeted therapy/immunotherapy against placebo or any other targeted intervention/immunotherapy in treatment-naive patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Conference proceedings from major cancer congresses (2007-2015) were handsearched. Sixteen randomized controlled trials were identified, mostly phase III. Overall, targeted therapies were associated with either improved [sunitinib, bevacizumab+interferon α (IFNα) and temsirolimus] or comparable (sorafenib) progression-free survival (PFS) versus IFNα monotherapy. Sunitinib demonstrated comparable PFS and overall survival to pazopanib, comparable PFS to sorafenib and shorter PFS compared with bevacizumab+IFNα (although no conclusions were made with regard to superiority/inferiority). Compared with sorafenib, tivozanib demonstrated a significantly longer PFS, and both tivozanib and axitinib demonstrated higher response rates. Nintedanib demonstrated comparable PFS and overall survival to sunitinib in a phase II trial. Temsirolimus, sunitinib and sorafenib treatment led to better HRQoL versus IFNα; pazopanib was associated with better HRQoL versus sunitinib. No direct meta-analyses or indirect treatment comparison analysis were undertaken because of noncomparability of the trials. In general, targeted therapies demonstrated favourable clinical efficacy and improved HRQoL compared with IFNα monotherapy. The newer therapies, tivozanib and axitinib (but not nintedanib), appeared to exhibit greater clinical benefit (response rate) than older tyrosine

  16. Comprehensive overview of the efficacy and safety of sorafenib in advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma after a first tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Afonso, F J; Anido, U; Fernández-Calvo, O; Vázquez-Estévez, S; León, L; Lázaro, M; Ramos, M; Antón-Aparicio, L

    2013-06-01

    We performed a literature search that shed light on the signaling pathways involved in the sorafenib activity as first- or subsequent-line treatment, taking into account its toxicity profile. Sorafenib appears to have better tolerability when compared with other agents in the same indication. Cross-resistance between tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) may be limited, even after failure with a previous VEGFR inhibitor, but the optimal sequence with TKIs remains to be determined. Randomized trials of second-line treatment options have showed either modest or no differences in terms of progression-free and overall survival (OS). Direct comparison between sorafenib and axitinib demonstrated differences in terms of PFS in favor of axitinib, but not in terms of OS as second-line treatment. In contrast, a phase III study showed a benefit in OS, favoring sorafenib when compared with temsirolimus. In conclusion, after using other VEGF inhibitor such as sunitinib, sorafenib is active and safe for the treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic RCC. PMID:23401018

  17. Trial Watch: Therapeutic vaccines in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Combe, Pierre; de Guillebon, Eleonore; Thibault, Constance; Granier, Clémence; Tartour, Eric; Oudard, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Despite the renaissance of cancer immunotherapy, no novel immunotherapy has been approved for the treatment of renal cell cancer (RCC) since the availability of recombinant cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-α). All vaccine trials have failed to meet their endpoints although they have highlighted potential predictive biomarkers (e.g., pre-existing immune response, hematological parameters, tumor burden). Recent advances in immunomodulatory therapies have prompted the study of combination treatments targeting the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment consisting of regulatory T-cells (Treg), myeloid suppressor cells, and cytokines. Approaches under investigation are use of inhibitors to curb the overexpression of immune checkpoint ligands by tumor cells (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1/PD-L1) and exploiting the immunomodulatory effects of anti-angiogenic agents that are the current standard of metastatic RCC care. Phase III trials are focusing on the possible synergy between therapeutic vaccines (e.g., IMA-901 and AGS-003) and anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:26155388

  18. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma: update on epidemiology, genetics, and therapeutic modalities

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Angela; Hessamodini, Hannah; Wong, Germaine; Lim, Wai H

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains a major therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Despite advances in the understanding of the immunobiology of RCC and the availability of several novel targeted agents, there has been little improvement in the survival of patients with metastatic RCC. This review will focus on the recent understanding of risk factors and treatment options and outcomes of metastatic RCC, in particular, targeted therapeutic agents that inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Prospective studies are required to determine whether sequential targeted therapy will further improve progression-free survival in RCC. Ongoing research to develop novel agents with better tolerability and enhanced efficacy in the treatment of metastatic RCC is required.

  19. PARTIAL NEPHRECTOMY IN THE SETTING OF METASTATIC RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    Babaian, Kara N.; Merrill, Megan M.; Matin, Surena; Tamboli, Pheroze; Tannir, Nizar M.; Jonasch, Eric; Wood, Christopher G.; Karam, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) remains the standard of care for appropriately selected patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Although the role of partial nephrectomy (PN) is well accepted in patients with localized disease, limited data are available regarding PN in the metastatic setting. We sought to identify the indications and outcomes for PN in the setting of mRCC with particular attention to different PN subgroups. Materials and Methods We analyzed data from a consecutive cohort of 33 patients with mRCC who underwent PN at a single institution between 1996 and 2011. Non-parametric statistics were used to compare PN subgroups. Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier method, and survival functions were compared using the log-rank test. Results Eight patients presented with bilateral synchronous renal masses; 20 with a metachronous contralateral renal mass; and 5 with a unilateral renal mass. Overall, 22 patients (67%) died of disease at a median of 27 months after PN. Patients who underwent PN for a metachronous contralateral renal mass and for a renal mass ≤4cm had the best OS (61 months and 42 months, respectively). Median OS for patients with and without metastatic disease at original diagnosis was 27 and 63 months, respectively (p=0.003). Conclusions Our findings suggest that the presence of metastasis at original diagnosis and the timing of presentation of the PN index lesion play an important role in survival. These factors should be taken into consideration when determining which patients would benefit from partial nephrectomy in the setting of mRCC. PMID:24518767

  20. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Douglas Magno; Pontes, Flavia Sirotheau Correa; Miyahara, Ligia Akiko Ninokata; Guerreiro, Marcella Yasmin Reis; de Almeida, Maria Clara Lopes; Pontes, Helder Antonio Rebelo; Pinto, Decio Dos Santos

    2016-09-01

    Metastases to the oral cavity are extremely rare events, representing less than 1% of all malignant oral tumors. Renal cell carcinoma constitutes about 3% of solid tumors in adults, and it is the most frequent kidney neoplasm, representing about 90% of kidney malignancies. Due to the silent growth of this neoplasm, most patients have no symptoms and the diagnosis is belated, usually after metastases. The present study reports an additional patient of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the oral cavity regarding the clinical and pathologic features. PMID:27607131

  1. [Systemic therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Maute, Luise; Bergmann, Lothar

    2016-04-01

    In metastatic ccRCC , the treatment options in 1st line treatment are still the tyrosinkinase inhibitors (TKI) pazopanib and sunitinib, for patients with low or intermediate risk additionally IFNα/bevacizumab and for high risk patients the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. In 2nd line following cytokine therapy, axitinib or pazopanib and following TKI /VEGF directed therapy axitinib or everolimus may be administered. New upcoming agents in RCC are the PD1 antibody nivolumab and the multikinase inhibitor Cabozantinib, which both showed an OS advantage compared to everolimus. After marketing authorization in Europe, these agents should therefore be preferred in 2nd and 3rd line therapy. Further agents are under investigation. PMID:27031198

  2. Immunotherapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rachna; Vaena, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often curable by surgery alone. However, metastatic RCC is generally incurable. In the 1990s, immunotherapy in the form of cytokines was the mainstay of treatment for metastatic RCC. However, responses were seen in only a minority of highly selected patients with substantial treatment-related toxicities. The advent of targeted agents such as vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitors VEGF-TKIs and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors led to a change in this paradigm due to improved response rates and progression-free survival, a better safety profile, and the convenience of oral administration. However, most patients ultimately progress with about 12% being alive at 5 years. In contrast, durable responses lasting 10 years or more are noted in a minority of those treated with cytokines. More recently, an improved overall survival with newer forms of immunotherapy in other malignancies (such as melanoma and prostate cancer) has led to a resurgence of interest in immune therapies in metastatic RCC. In this review we discuss the rationale for immunotherapy and recent developments in immunotherapeutic strategies for treating metastatic RCC. PMID:26161397

  3. Prognostic factors of adult metastatic renal carcinoma: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    de Forges, A; Rey, A; Klink, M; Ghosn, M; Kramar, A; Droz, J P

    1988-01-01

    In order to define the prognostic factors for metastatic renal carcinoma, we reviewed 134 patients who were treated from 1971 through 1986. Survival rates were 72, 45, and 25% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Seventeen variables were tested using the logrank test. Improved survival was correlated with normal performance status, and an absence of fever, weight loss, hepatic metastasis, and lung metastasis (or, if lung metastasis was present, less than 2 cm in diameter and limited to one site), a disease-free interval, sedimentation rate less than 100, and renal surgery. Four variables retained significant value in the multivariate analysis: hepatic metastasis, lung metastasis, disease-free interval, and a variable combining the sedimentation rate and the weight loss (SWRL). Predictive survival rates based on these variables were calculated from the Cox model. Six subgroups of patients were identified. The estimation of survival is clinically of value for future phase II trials of chemotherapy in patients with adult metastatic renal carcinoma. PMID:3187293

  4. A Case of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Granuloma Pyogenicum

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Won Woo; Chung, Ji Min; Jung, Kyoung Eun; Park, Jong Wook

    2008-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is well known for its frequent metastasis and particularly to the lungs, liver, bones and brain, but metastasis to the skin is rare. We report here on a case of metastatic RCC in a 73-year-old man who presented with a 1.5 cm sized, moist, beefy-red and exophytic nodule on the scalp. The lesion had grown rapidly for 2 months and it clinically mimicked granuloma pyogenicum. A skin biopsy revealed a solid mass composed of clear cells with clear cytoplasm and oval hyperchromatic nuclei, and they were arranged in an alveolar pattern. As skin metastasis from renal cell carcinoma signals widespread systemic metastasis and a poor prognosis, clinicians should conduct a careful inspection of the skin of a patient with RCC and they should also have a high index of suspicion for finding a primary internal organ malignancy in the RCC patients who present with a skin lesion. PMID:27303209

  5. A Study of Varlilumab (Anti-CD27) and Sunitinib in Patients With Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Carcinoma, Renal Cell; Kidney Diseases; Kidney Neoplasms; Urogenital Neoplasms; Urologic Diseases; Urologic Neoplasms; Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Clear-cell Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

  6. Genetic mutations associated with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qingjian; Li, Fengjie; Zhao, Jiang; Wu, Kaijin; Qu, Cunye; Chen, Yibu; Li, Meng; Chen, Xuelian; Stucky, Andres; Zhong, Jiangjian; Li, Longkun; Zhong, Jiang F.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of death among cancer patients, yet early detection and intervention of metastasis could significantly improve their clinical outcomes. We have sequenced and analyzed RNA (Expression) and DNA (Mutations) from the primary tumor (PT), tumor extension (TE) and lymphatic metastatic (LM) sites of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) before treatment. Here, we report a three-nucleotide deletion near the C-region of Plk5 that is specifically associated with the lymphatic metastasis. This mutation is un-detectable in the PT, becomes detectable in the TE and dominates the LM tissue. So while only a few primary cancer cells carry this mutation, the majority of metastatic cells have this mutation. The increasing frequency of this mutation in metastatic tissue suggests that this Plk5 deletion could be used as an early indicator of CCRCC metastasis, and be identified by low cost PCR assay. A large scale clinical trial could reveal whether a simple PCR assay for this mutation at the time of nephrectomy could identify and stratify high-risk CCRCC patients for treatments. PMID:26908440

  7. Optimal management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: current status.

    PubMed

    Escudier, Bernard; Albiges, Laurence; Sonpavde, Guru

    2013-04-01

    The armamentarium for the systemic therapy of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone dramatic changes over the past 6 years. While high-dose interleukin (IL)-2 remains an option for highly selected good and intermediate risk patients with clear-cell histology because of durable complete responses in a small fraction of patients, cytokine-based therapy including interferon (IFN) has been supplanted by vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Treatment decision is initially based on prognostication of the disease. As metastatic RCC (mRCC) is commonly an indolent disease, a period of observation should always been considered. For good and intermediate risk disease, pazopanib, sunitinib or the combination of bevacizumab plus IFN are considered. Notably, recent data suggest non-inferiority for the efficacy of pazopanib compared to sunitinib coupled with a better toxicity profile. A novel VEGF receptor inhibitor, tivozanib, is expected to be approved based on improvement in PFS when compared to sorafenib in the first-line setting. The use of temsirolimus for poor risk disease is supported by a phase III trial dedicated to this group of patients. The role of cytoreductive nephrectomy in the context of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors is being studied in randomized trials. Selected patients with solitary or oligometastatic disease may be eligible for metastatectomy. Following first-line VEGF inhibitors, second-line therapy with everolimus and axitinib have demonstrated benefits in progression-free survival (PFS). One phase III trial comparing sorafenib and temsirolimus in the post-sunitinib setting showed no difference in PFS, the primary endpoint, but did show a superior overall survival for sorafenib. Sorafenib, pazopanib and axitinib have all demonstrated clinical benefit following cytokines. Therapy following first-line mTOR inhibitors remains undefined, although VEGF inhibitors have demonstrated activity in

  8. Metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma - an unusual response to Temsirolimus in second line therapy.

    PubMed

    Stanculeanu, D L; Lazescu, A; Zob, D D; Bunghez, R; Anghel, R; Poteca, T D

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents 3% of all cancers, with the highest incidence occurring in the most developed countries and representing the seventh most common cancer in men and the ninth most common cancer in women. The understanding of the tumor molecular biology and the discovery of new drugs that target molecular pathways have increased the arsenal against advanced renal cell carcinoma and improved the outcomes in the patients suffering from these affections. Studying the molecular signaling that controls the tumor growth and the progression has led to the development of molecular therapies targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, resulting in a significant improvement in the overall survival and quality of life. Sunitinib represents an inhibitor of VEGFR 1-3, c-kit, FLT-3 and PDGFR. We present the case of a patient with metastatic clear cell RCC with a treatment effect following sequential VEGF and mTOR inhibitor treatment. Under sunitinib treatment, the patient had a progression free survival (PFS) of approximately 9 months, similar to the PFS observed in clinical trials. Sunitinib was well tolerated by this patient. Temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, is currently only approved for the first-line treatment of mRCC patients with poor prognosis. This study analyzes a treatment effect of second line temsirolimus in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). PMID:27453754

  9. Metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma – an unusual response to Temsirolimus in second line therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stanculeanu, DL; Lazescu, A; Zob, DD; Bunghez, R; Anghel, R; Poteca, TD

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents 3% of all cancers, with the highest incidence occurring in the most developed countries and representing the seventh most common cancer in men and the ninth most common cancer in women. The understanding of the tumor molecular biology and the discovery of new drugs that target molecular pathways have increased the arsenal against advanced renal cell carcinoma and improved the outcomes in the patients suffering from these affections. Studying the molecular signaling that controls the tumor growth and the progression has led to the development of molecular therapies targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, resulting in a significant improvement in the overall survival and quality of life. Sunitinib represents an inhibitor of VEGFR 1-3, c-kit, FLT-3 and PDGFR. We present the case of a patient with metastatic clear cell RCC with a treatment effect following sequential VEGF and mTOR inhibitor treatment. Under sunitinib treatment, the patient had a progression free survival (PFS) of approximately 9 months, similar to the PFS observed in clinical trials. Sunitinib was well tolerated by this patient. Temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, is currently only approved for the first-line treatment of mRCC patients with poor prognosis. This study analyzes a treatment effect of second line temsirolimus in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).

  10. Treatment of elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Elisa; Grassi, Paolo; Cavo, Alessia; Verzoni, Elena; Maggi, Claudia; De Braud, Filippo; Boccardo, Francesco; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The risk of developing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) increases with age, and given the constant gain in life expectancy of the general population, both localized RCC and metastatic RCC (mRCC) are more frequently observed in the elderly population. The elderly are a heterogeneous group of patients often characterized by the presence of comorbidities, different compliance to treatment and polypharmacy. Here we review the available data with the aim to analyze the safety and efficacy of new targeted therapies (TTs) in elderly mRCC patients. TTs seem to be effective in both older and younger patients, but elderly patients appear to show reduced tolerance to treatments compared to younger patients. Prospective trials are needed to better understand how to manage mRCC in elderly patients. PMID:26654225

  11. Atypical presentations and rare metastatic sites of renal cell carcinoma: a review of case reports

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is a potentially lethal cancer with aggressive behavior and a propensity for metastatic spread. Due to the fact that the patterns of metastases from renal cell carcinomas are not clearly defined, there have been several reports of cases of renal cell carcinoma associated with rare metastatic sites and atypical presenting symptoms. The present review focuses on these atypical rare clinical presentations of renal cell carcinomas both at the time of diagnosis of the primary tumor but also in the years after radical nephrectomy. PMID:21888643

  12. A Comprehensive Overview of Targeted Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mihály, Z; Sztupinszki, Z; Surowiak, P; Győrffy, B

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy and immunotherapy failed to deliver decisive results in the systemic treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Agents representing the current standards operate on members of the RAS signal transduction pathway. Sunitinib (targeting vascular endothelial growth factor), temsirolimus (an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin - mTOR) and pazopanib (a multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor) are used in the first line of recurrent disease. A combination of bevacizumab (inhibition of angiogenesis) plus interferon α is also first-line therapy. Second line options include everolimus (another mTOR inhibitor) as well as tyrosine kinase inhibitors for patients who previously received cytokine. We review the results of clinical investigations focusing on survival benefit for these agents. Additionally, trials focusing on new agents, including the kinase inhibitors axitinib, tivozanib, dovitinib and cediranib and monoclonal antibodies including velociximab are also discussed. In addition to published outcomes we also include follow-up and interim results of ongoing clinical trials. In summary, we give a comprehensive overview of current advances in the systemic treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:22515521

  13. [Three Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction Associated with Targeted Therapy of Sorafenib for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma : Case Report].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kimiaki; Takai, Manabu; Kawata, Kei; Horie, Kengo; Kikuchi, Mina; Kato, Taku; Mizutani, Kosuke; Seike, Kensaku; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Deguchi, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) used for advanced renal cell carcinoma. Treatment with sorafenib prolongs progression-free survival in patients with advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. However, in spite of its therapeutic efficacy, sorafenib causes a wide range of adverse events. Cardiovascular adverse events have been observed when sorafenib was used with targeted agents. Although these adverse events like hypertension, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac ischemia or infarction were manageable with standard medical therapies in most cases, some had a poor clinical outcome. We report three cases of acute myocardial infarction associated with sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26497860

  14. Metastatic Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast Masquerading as a Primary Renal Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jarrah, Adil; Taranikanti, Varna; Sawhney, Sukhpal; Furrukh, Muhammad; Al-Hosni, Mohammad; Saparamadu, P. A. M.; De Silva, M. V. C.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is known to metastasise to different organs in the body, but an initial presentation of breast cancer with loin pain secondary to a metastatic renal mass is extremely rare. We report a 58-year-old woman who presented with recurrent left loin pain due to a metastatic deposit of invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast. The detection of a renal mass on computed tomography led to the assumption of a renal pelvic malignancy. The diagnostic dilemma posed by the detection of a breast mass during staging and the usefulness of immunohistochemistry in the confirmation of diagnosis are discussed. PMID:23984034

  15. Biochemical and pathological response of prostate cancer in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma on sunitinib treatment.

    PubMed

    Song, Ik Chan; Lim, Jae Sung; Yun, Hwan Jung; Kim, Samyong; Kang, Dae Young; Lee, Hyo Jin

    2009-12-01

    Sunitinib is a small molecular inhibitor of tyrosine kinases and is used to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour after disease progression or intolerance to imatinib therapy. Here, we describe biochemical and pathological response of prostate cancer in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma during sunitinib treatment. A 62-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a mass in the scalp. He was diagnosed with left renal cell carcinoma with right renal and scalp metastases. In addition, synchronous prostate cancer involving less than one-half of the right lobe was found with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value of 23.4 ng/ml. Treatment was begun with sunitinib (50 mg daily, 4 weeks on and 2 weeks off). Regarding the prostate cancer, active monitoring was planned considering the far advanced renal cell carcinoma. Surprisingly, the PSA level was 3.4 ng/ml at week 6 and 0.2 ng/ml at week 12, and it subsequently remained normal. At the time of writing (cycle 6 of sunitinib therapy), the prostate nodule significantly decreased in size. Furthermore, a 12-core re-biopsy revealed pathological evidence of regression with sunitinib treatment, with control of his renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19773269

  16. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as Nasal Mass: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ritesh; Mayappa, Nagaraj; Prashanth, V

    2016-09-01

    Sinonasal neoplasms are rare and exceptional site for metastatic tumours and comprising <3 % of all malignant aerodigestive tumours and <1 % of all malignancies. Renal cell carcinoma is known to metastasise to the most unusual sites, the sinonasal region being one of them. We here by present a case of 60 year old male patient who presented with epistaxis and nasal obstruction. Clinical examination and CT scan revealed a tumour in the right nasal cavity and maxillary sinus. The presence of primary renal cell carcinoma was recognized only after surgical removal of metastatic tumour. Very few reports have been presented in literature of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the sinonasal region. We present this case to document its occurrence; highlight the rarity, presentation and difficulties in diagnosis and treatment along with review of literature. PMID:27508143

  17. Differential Expression of Prognostic Proteomic Markers in Primary Tumour, Venous Tumour Thrombus and Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Tissue and Correlation with Patient Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Laird, Alexander; O’Mahony, Fiach C.; Nanda, Jyoti; Riddick, Antony C. P.; O’Donnell, Marie; Harrison, David J.; Stewart, Grant D.

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most deadly of urological malignancies. Metastatic disease affects one third of patients at diagnosis with a further third developing metastatic disease after extirpative surgery. Heterogeneity in the clinical course ensures predicting metastasis is notoriously difficult, despite the routine use of prognostic clinico-pathological parameters in risk stratification. With greater understanding of pathways involved in disease pathogenesis, a number of biomarkers have been shown to have prognostic significance, including Ki67, p53, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and ligand D (VEGFD), SNAIL and SLUG. Previous pathway analysis has been from study of the primary tumour, with little attention to the metastatic tumours which are the focus of targeted molecular therapies. As such, in this study a tissue microarray from 177 patients with primary renal tumour, renal vein tumour thrombus and/or RCC metastasis has been created and used with Automated Quantitative Analysis (AQUA) of immunofluorescence to study the prognostic significance of these markers in locally advanced and metastatic disease. Furthermore, this has allowed assessment of differential protein expression between the primary tumours, renal vein tumour thrombi and metastases. The results demonstrate that clinico-pathological parameters remain the most significant predictors of cancer specific survival; however, high VEGFR1 or VEGFD can predict poor cancer specific survival on univariate analysis for locally advanced and metastatic disease. There was significantly greater expression of Ki67, p53, VEGFR1, SLUG and SNAIL in the metastases compared with the primary tumours and renal vein tumour thrombi. With the exception of p53, these differences in protein expression have not been shown previously in RCC. This confirms the importance of proliferation, angiogenesis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition in the pathogenesis and metastasis of RCC. Importantly

  18. Recent advances in the management of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ana M.; Nanus, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have significantly improved over the past few years with the recent approval of two new agents resulting in prolonged progression-free and overall survival. PMID:27019698

  19. Metastatic chromophobe renal cell carcinoma to the brain.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Metastases represent the most common tumors of the central nervous system, with clear cell renal cell carcinomas showing a particular predilection to involve the brain. This report documents an unusual case of a patient with a chromophobe renal cell carcinoma presenting with a brain metastasis. A 58-year-old man presented with stroke-like symptomatology, including expressive aphasia, right side facial weakness, headaches and vomiting. CT imaging demonstrated a 4.7 cm left frontal lobe hemorrhagic mass. He underwent surgery with excision of the mass, which was marked by sheets of large cells with lightly eosinophilic to clear cytoplasm. PAX8 staining was positive and a diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma of probably renal origin was rendered. Subsequently, CT imaging of the abdomen revealed a 12.9 cm left renal mass. The patient underwent a left nephrectomy and a diagnosis of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma was made. The tumor was noted to extend into the perirenal fat and to have involved a paraaortic lymph node. Re-review of the frontal lobe lesion confirmed the tumor was the same. Chromophobe renal cell carcinomas are far less common than clear cell tumors, are less likely to metastasize, and generally have a more favorable overall prognosis. When they metastasize, they most commonly involve the liver, lung and lymph nodes, in contrast to the more common clear cell carcinomas that typically spread to the lungs, bone and brain. PMID:26589090

  20. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  1. Aldesleukin in advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schmidinger, Manuela; Hejna, Michael; Zielinski, Christoph C

    2004-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma accounts for 2-3% of all malignancies. The most common subtype [85%] is the clear cell variant. A total of 30% of patients present with metastatic disease at diagnosis and another 30-40% will develop metastases during the course of the disease. Conventional cancer treatment is not effective, but cytokines including recombinant interleukin-2 (aldesleukin) have demonstrated clinical activity of various degrees. This drug profile provides a review of the literature on studies using aldesleukin in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Aldesleukin has been used in different dose schedules applying various administration routes, as either monotherapy or in combination with other cytokines, chemotherapy, endocrine treatment and adoptive cellular immunotherapy. Although a large number of randomized trials have been performed with different treatment strategies, it still remains uncertain whether the dose or combination of aldesleukin with other agents substantially influence treatment outcome. It appears that factors other than those that are treatment related are responsible for the course of the disease. PMID:15606326

  2. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as Painful Chewing Successfully Treated with Combined Nivolumab and Sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Fade; Abdallah, Al-Ola; Arnaoutakis, Konstantinos; Makhoul, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the head and neck is rare. It is the third-most common cause of distant metastasis to the head and neck, after breast cancer and lung cancer. Several drugs are available to treat metastatic RCC including high-dose interleukin and targeted therapy. Immunotherapy with nivolumab was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a second-line treatment for patients with metastatic RCC. Case Presentation: We present a case of metastatic RCC in a 71-year-old man with a single complaint of a 1-year history of pain while chewing food. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography showed diffuse metastatic disease. Nivolumab, off-label use before its recent FDA approval, was combined with sunitinib and resulted in an excellent and ongoing response. Discussion: RCC is the third-most common cause of distant metastasis to the head and neck. The patient described in this case did not have any symptoms commonly seen in RCC, such as painless hematuria, weight loss, anorexia, fatigue, or anemia, despite the bulk of his disease. The other important aspect of this case is the almost complete response of his metastatic disease to the combination of nivolumab and sunitinib that was used off label before the FDA issued the approval. Future clinical trials should look at combining immunotherapy with targeted therapy in metastatic RCC. PMID:27352410

  3. Indications for surgery in advanced/metastatic GIST.

    PubMed

    Ford, Samuel J; Gronchi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are a relatively rare entity and often present as a locally advanced tumour or with metastatic disease. Complete surgical resection is the only means of cure in localised disease; however, imatinib therapy has greatly advanced the management of GIST and is established as both an adjunct to surgery in high-risk cases and as principle therapy in metastatic disease. Surgery in advanced GIST has undergone a renaissance in recent years with the potential for a combined treatment approach with either neoadjuvant imatinib in locally advanced primary disease or as an adjunct to imatinib in those with metastases or recurrent disease. Neoadjuvant imatinib can render a locally advanced primary GIST resectable, allow less invasive procedures or promote preservation of function, especially if the tumour is located in an anatomically difficult position. The role of surgery in metastatic or recurrent disease is more controversial and case selection is critical. The potential benefit is difficult to quantify, although surgery may have a limited favourable impact on progression-free survival and overall survival for those patients whose disease is responding to imatinib or those with limited focal progression. Patients with imatinib resistant disease should not be offered surgery unless as an emergency where palliative intervention may be justified. PMID:27318456

  4. Radiation therapy in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Onufrey, V.; Mohiuddin, M.

    1985-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the kidney is an unusual tumor, both in its biological behavior and in its response to radiation treatment. Historically, these tumors have been considered to be radioresistant, and the role of radiation therapy remains questionable in the primary management of this disease. However, radiation treatment is routinely used in the palliation of metastatic lesions for relief of symptoms. Therefore, we have undertaken a review of our experience in the treatment of this disease to determine the effectiveness of radiation in its palliation. From 1956 to 1981, 125 patients with metastatic lesions from hypernephroma have been treated in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Most patients were referred for relief of bone pain (86), brain metastasis (12), spinal cord compression (9), and soft tissue masses (18). Total doses varied from 2000 rad to a maximum of 6000 rad. Response to treatment was evaluated on the basis of relief of symptoms, either complete, partial or no change. Our results indicate a significantly higher response rate of 65% for total doses equal to or greater than a TDF of 70, as compared to 25% for doses lower than a TDF of 70. No difference in response was observed either for bone or soft tissue metastasis or visceral disease. This leads us to believe that metastatic lesions from adenocarcinomas of the kidney should be treated to higher doses to obtain maximum response rates. Analysis of these results are presented in detail.

  5. Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to the ovary or fallopian tube: a clinicopathological study of 9 cases.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li; Huang, He; Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Jinsong

    2016-05-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the most common type of kidney cancer in adult, rarely metastasizes to the ovary or fallopian tube, and most cases published in the literature were case reports. Herein, we describe the clinicopathological features of 9 cases of RCC metastatic to the ovary (n = 8) or the fallopian tube (n = 1). The patients' age at the onset of primary renal tumor was available in 8 patients, ranging from 37 to 73 years (mean, 51 years; median, 50 years). Ovarian metastasis was detected prior to or concurrently with the primary renal tumors in 3 patients, and after the diagnosis of renal tumors in 6 patients. The histotypes of the RCCs were clear cell (n = 7), chromophobe (n = 1), and unclassified (n = 1). Immunohistochemical stainings were performed on the sections containing metastatic tumors in 4 cases. Interestingly, pagetoid intraepithelial spread in the tubal mucosa was observed in the case of RCC metastatic to the fallopian tube. Among the 8 patients with follow-up data, 5 died of disease and 3 were alive with disease, with a follow-up period ranging from 3.7 months to 17 years (mean, 77 months; median, 53 months) after the diagnosis of primary kidney tumors. Diagnostically, metastatic RCC may mimic primary ovarian tumors clinically, morphologically, or immunophenotypically. Pathologists should also keep in mind that both ovarian and kidney tumors express PAX8 and PAX2, the markers commonly used to diagnose metastatic RCC. In addition, chromophobe RCC only rarely metastasizes, but it can be a diagnostic challenge when it metastasizes to the ovary. PMID:27067787

  6. Role of partial nephrectomy as cytoreduction in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karam, J A; Babaian, K N; Tannir, N M; Matin, S F; Wood, C G

    2015-06-01

    In this review, we describe the role, feasibility and safety of partial nephrectomy in the setting of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Partial nephrectomy is currently the preferred therapeutic modality in patients with localized renal tumors, while radical cytoreductive nephrectomy is the standard of care for appropriately selected patients with metastatic disease. Several studies have shown the prognostic value of percentage tumor removed when cytoreductive nephrectomy is done. This concept of percentage tumor removal and the associated benefit should also be applied when considering patients for cytoreductive partial nephrectomy; however, the potential adverse events after partial nephrectomy should be kept in mind, as these, when they occur, could delay time to starting systemic therapy. Several small retrospective studies have shown the feasibility of this approach in carefully selected patient groups. In well-selected patients with metastatic disease and primary tumors that are amenable to nephron sparing approaches, partial nephrectomy could offer an alternative to radical nephrectomy, with manageable adverse events, and good renal functional outcomes. Preserving renal function in this population could allow these patients to participate in clinical trial that they otherwise might not qualify for. PMID:25645343

  7. Multiple Metastatic Deposits in the Head and Neck Region from a Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ishak, Azlan Iskandar; Md Pauzi, Suria Hayati; Masir, Noraidah; Goh, Bee See

    2010-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presenting with multiple deposits in the head and neck region is unusual. It is not uncommon for a RCC to metastasise to a distant site after years of a tumour-free period, but most of it would be expected to have a single site of deposit. We report a rare case of a patient who had a nephrectomy 10 years earlier for RCC and presented with tumours in the frontal sinus and posterior pharyngeal wall. Radiological imaging and histology confirmed metastatic RCC at both sites. PMID:22135565

  8. Multiple metastatic deposits in the head and neck region from a renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Azlan Iskandar; Md Pauzi, Suria Hayati; Masir, Noraidah; Goh, Bee See

    2010-10-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presenting with multiple deposits in the head and neck region is unusual. It is not uncommon for a RCC to metastasise to a distant site after years of a tumour-free period, but most of it would be expected to have a single site of deposit. We report a rare case of a patient who had a nephrectomy 10 years earlier for RCC and presented with tumours in the frontal sinus and posterior pharyngeal wall. Radiological imaging and histology confirmed metastatic RCC at both sites. PMID:22135565

  9. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome during sunitinib therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hadj, Jamal Oulad; Braven, Rogier DEN; Tillier, Corrine; Schrijver, Hans M; Verheul, Henk M W; VAN DER Vliet, Hans J

    2012-06-01

    Sunitinib is an oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent antiangiogenic and antitumor activity that is approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Well-known side effects of sunitinib include hypertension, fatigue, thyroid dysfunction, cardiotoxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity and skin toxicity. In this study, we report the case of a 61-year-old male with papillary metastatic RCC who responded to sunitinib but developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures during the third cycle. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compatible with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS). After the administration of anti-epileptic drugs and the withdrawal of sunitinib there was rapid clinical improvement. Notably, radiological characteristics of RPLS persisted during second-line therapy with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus and only resolved when everolimus was terminated due to disease progression. Although sunitinib-induced RPLS has been reported previously, our case is the first to additionally suggest that everolimus may sustain and therefore potentially contribute to the occurrence of RPLS. PMID:22783436

  10. Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting with a Gingival Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Kamal E.H.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic deposits to the oral cavity are exceptionally rare. The commonest tumor types metastasizing to the oral cavity include lung and breast carcinoma. Renal cell carcinoma is believed to be the third most common infra clavicular tumor to metastasize to the head and neck. We report a case where an oral cavity deposit was the initial presentation for an occult clear cell renal carcinoma. Additional therapeutic options, including immunotherapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and participation in a clinical trial, should be discussed with the patient despite the poor overall prognosis. PMID:27478584

  11. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer presenting as metastatic kidney cancer at 18 years of age: implications for surveillance.

    PubMed

    van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Badeloe, Sadhanna; Oosting, Sjoukje F; Hovenga, Sjoerd; Semmelink, Harry J F; van Moorselaar, R Jeroen A; van Waesberghe, Jan Hein; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Menko, Fred H

    2012-03-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skin piloleiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cancer caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Previously, we proposed renal imaging for FH mutation carriers starting at the age of 20 years. However, recently an 18-year-old woman from a Dutch family with HLRCC presented with metastatic renal cancer. We describe the patient and family data, evaluate current evidence on renal cancer risk and surveillance in HLRCC and consider the advantages and disadvantages of starting surveillance for renal cancer in childhood. We also discuss the targeted therapies administered to our patient. PMID:22086304

  12. Metastatic clear cell variant of renal cell carcinoma of the mandible: Review and case report

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ajaz; Jahan, Shahi; Najar, Latief; Hassan, Shahid; Mohammad, Manzoor

    2016-01-01

    A case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the mandible is reported. A 22-year-old man consulted us for hypoesthesia of the right lower lip. Panorama X-ray film showed a radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular body. A diagnosis of a metastatic tumor to the mandible from the right kidney was made after evaluation by computed tomography and bone scan with Tc99 methyl diphosphonate which also revealed multiple bone metastases. Histologically diagnosis was clear cell variant of RCC. Patient has been put on radiotherapy for symptomatic treatment and a molecularly targeted drug. The therapy effectively stopped the progressive growth of oral and other metastatic lesions. The quality of life is relatively well maintained with tolerable adverse effects. The patient is still on our follow-up with an improved quality of life.

  13. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Trigeminal Schwannoma in a Patient Presenting with Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Arthur; Kleinman, George; Murali, Raj; Wainwright, John; Tandon, Adesh

    2015-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) mimicking trigeminal schwannoma. The patient, with no prior history of RCC, presented with clinical symptoms and imaging consistent with trigeminal neuralgia secondary to trigeminal schwannoma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large bilobed cystic/solid mass primarily in the cerebellopontine angle cistern, with extension into the left middle cranial fossa, Meckel cave, and left cavernous sinus. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be an RCC infiltrating into the trigeminal nerve fascicles. Further imaging and investigation revealed widespread metastasis to the vertebral bodies and long bones. Metastatic RCC to the trigeminal nerve is rare. Despite the development of more effective treatment modalities, the prognosis of metastatic RCC remains poor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of RCC metastasizing to the trigeminal nerve fascicles. PMID:26623243

  14. Metastatic clear cell variant of renal cell carcinoma of the mandible: Review and case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajaz; Jahan, Shahi; Najar, Latief; Hassan, Shahid; Mohammad, Manzoor

    2016-01-01

    A case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the mandible is reported. A 22-year-old man consulted us for hypoesthesia of the right lower lip. Panorama X-ray film showed a radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular body. A diagnosis of a metastatic tumor to the mandible from the right kidney was made after evaluation by computed tomography and bone scan with Tc99 methyl diphosphonate which also revealed multiple bone metastases. Histologically diagnosis was clear cell variant of RCC. Patient has been put on radiotherapy for symptomatic treatment and a molecularly targeted drug. The therapy effectively stopped the progressive growth of oral and other metastatic lesions. The quality of life is relatively well maintained with tolerable adverse effects. The patient is still on our follow-up with an improved quality of life. PMID:27563625

  15. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Trigeminal Schwannoma in a Patient Presenting with Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Arthur; Kleinman, George; Murali, Raj; Wainwright, John; Tandon, Adesh

    2015-11-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) mimicking trigeminal schwannoma. The patient, with no prior history of RCC, presented with clinical symptoms and imaging consistent with trigeminal neuralgia secondary to trigeminal schwannoma. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large bilobed cystic/solid mass primarily in the cerebellopontine angle cistern, with extension into the left middle cranial fossa, Meckel cave, and left cavernous sinus. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be an RCC infiltrating into the trigeminal nerve fascicles. Further imaging and investigation revealed widespread metastasis to the vertebral bodies and long bones. Metastatic RCC to the trigeminal nerve is rare. Despite the development of more effective treatment modalities, the prognosis of metastatic RCC remains poor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of RCC metastasizing to the trigeminal nerve fascicles. PMID:26623243

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae Renal Abscess Syndrome: A Rare Case with Metastatic Involvement of Lungs, Eye, and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Fayez S.; Pandey, Ambarish

    2013-01-01

    We describe a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae renal abscess with metastatic spread leading to endopthalmitis, pulmonary cavitary lesions, and cerebral emboli in a 41-year-old Hispanic female with diabetes mellitus who presented with a four-to-five-day history of fevers, headache, eye pain, and vomiting. She was treated with IV antibiotics and made a gradual but full recovery. PMID:23984128

  17. The role of radiation therapy in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Halperin, E C; Harisiadis, L

    1983-02-15

    From 1965 to 1980, 35 patients were treated by radiation for palliation of symptoms related to metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The male:female ratio was 1.9:1. Eighty-six percent (30/35) of the patients were over 40 years of age at initial presentation. Sixty-three percent (22/35) of the patients showed symptoms of metastatic disease within three years of diagnosis of the primary malignancy. Sixty sites were irradiated in the 35 patients: 36 sites of metastatic bone pain, 14 obstructing and/or palpable masses, and ten sites treated for symptoms due to central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Efficacy of treatment was assessed at serial follow-up visits beginning one month after completion of radiotherapy. Bone pain responded at 77% of the treated sites. Mass effect responded in 64%. Disappointing results were obtained with CNS metastases. There was only a 30% response of brain and spinal cord lesions within the dose range that these patients were treated. No correlation between TDF equivalent dose of radiation administered and frequency of palliative response was found. In those sites where a response of bone pain to radiation was observed, 86% of the responses lasted the remainder of the patient's life. No correlation was found between TDF equivalent dose of radiation administered and duration of response. Radiation may be a useful palliative tool for bone pain and mass effect from metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Inordinately high doses need not be used to achieve the desired effect. PMID:6185207

  18. Penoscrotal lymphedema associated with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Crawley, David; Haddock, Peter; Jackson, Max; Kamradt, Jeffrey; Kesler, Stuart

    2015-08-01

    A 64-year-old male presented with lower back pain, radiating in a sciatic-type distribution, swelling in his lower abdomen and right leg, and edema of the scrotum and penile shaft. A sonogram and CT imaging indicated an enhancing mass in the right kidney and a spinal metastasis. The right lower extremity and penoscrotal lymphedema was caused by lymphatic obstruction due to a sacral metastasis of renal cell carcinoma. He was treated with cytoreductive nephrectomy, radiation and a systemic tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Pelvic imaging is suggested to determine whether malignant lymphatic obstruction is present when presented with idiopathic penoscrotal edema. PMID:26267035

  19. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma imaging evaluation in the era of anti-angiogenic therapies.

    PubMed

    Sirous, Reza; Henegan, John C; Zhang, Xu; Howard, Candace M; Souza, Frederico; Smith, Andrew D

    2016-06-01

    During the last decade, the arsenal of anti-angiogenic (AAG) agents used to treat metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has grown and revolutionized the treatment of metastatic RCC, leading to improved overall survival compared to conventional chemotherapy and traditional immunotherapy agents. AAG agents include inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling pathways and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Both of these classes of targeted agents are considered cytostatic rather than cytotoxic, inducing tumor stabilization rather than marked tumor shrinkage. As a result, decreases in tumor size alone are often minimal and/or occur late in the course of successful AAG therapy, while tumor devascularization is a distinct feature of AAG therapy. In successful AAG therapy, tumor devascularization manifests on computed tomography images as a composite of a decrease in tumor size, a decrease in tumor attenuation, and the development of tumor necrosis. In this article, we review Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST)-the current standard of care for tumor treatment response assessment which is based merely on changes in tumor length-and its assessment of metastatic RCC tumor response in the era of AAG therapies. We then review the features of an ideal tumor imaging biomarker for predicting metastatic RCC response to a particular AAG agent and serving as a longitudinal tumor response assessment tool. Finally, a discussion of the more recently proposed imaging response criteria and new imaging trends in metastatic RCC response assessment will be reviewed. PMID:27193601

  20. Modeling Spontaneous Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (mRCC) in Mice Following Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tracz, Amanda; Mastri, Michalis; Lee, Christina R.; Pili, Roberto; Ebos, John M. L.

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges to improved testing of new experimental therapeutics in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the development of models that faithfully recapitulate early- and late-stage metastatic disease progression. Typical tumor implantation models utilize ectopic or orthotopic primary tumor implantation, but few include systemic spontaneous metastatic disease that mimics the clinical setting. This protocol describes the key steps to develop RCC disease progression stages similar to patients. First, it uses a highly metastatic mouse tumor cell line in a syngeneic model to show orthotopic tumor cell implantation. Methods include superficial and internal implantation into the sub-capsular space with cells combined with matrigel to prevent leakage and early spread. Next it describes the procedures for excision of tumor-bearing kidney (nephrectomy), with critical pre- and post- surgical mouse care. Finally, it outlines the steps necessary to monitor and assess micro-and macro-metastatic disease progression, including bioluminescent imaging as well provides a detailed visual necropsy guide to score systemic disease distribution. The goal of this protocol description is to facilitate the widespread use of clinically relevant metastatic RCC models to improve the predictive value of future therapeutic testing.  PMID:24836396

  1. Efficacy and safety of axitinib in elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hideaki; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Ozono, Seiichiro; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of age on clinical outcomes of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients receiving axitinib. This study included 144 consecutive mRCC patients who received axitinib for at least 12 weeks as second-line therapy in a routine clinical setting. The efficacy, safety and quality of life (QOL) were compared between patients aged <75 (n = 116) and ≥75 (n = 28) years. No significant differences in the clinicopathological characteristics were noted between younger and older patients. There was no significant difference in the response rate, clinical benefit rate or proportion of patients going on to receive third-line therapy between these two groups. In addition, the progression-free and overall survivals in older patients were similar to those in younger patients. There were no significant differences in the incidences of adverse events between these two groups, except for that of fatigue, which was significantly more frequent in older than younger patients. There was no significant difference in the incidence of the discontinuation of axitinib due to adverse events between the two groups. QOL assessment at 12 weeks after the introduction of axitinib using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form showed no significant differences in any of the eight scale scores between the two groups. Taken together, it might be possible to achieve clinical outcomes in older patients receiving axitinib comparable to those in younger patients, suggesting that advanced age should not be a contraindication to treatment with axitinib as a second-line setting in mRCC patients. PMID:27444960

  2. Efficacy and safety of sunitinib in elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, T E; Bukowski, R M; Rini, B I; Gore, M E; Larkin, J M; Figlin, R A; Barrios, C H; Escudier, B; Lin, X; Fly, K; Martell, B; Matczak, E; Motzer, R J

    2014-01-01

    Background: We retrospectively analyzed sunitinib outcome as a function of age in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. Methods: Data were pooled from 1059 patients in six trials. Kaplan–Meier estimates of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared by log-rank test between patients aged <70 (n=857; 81%) and ⩾70 (n=202; 19%) years. Results: In first-line patients, median PFS was comparable in younger and older patients, 9.9 vs 11.0 months, respectively (HR, 0.89; 95% CI: 0.73–1.09; P=0.2629), as was median OS, 23.6 vs 25.6 months (HR, 0.93; 95% CI: 0.74–1.18; P=0.5442). Similarly, in cytokine-refractory patients, median PFS was 8.1 vs 8.4 months (HR, 0.79; 95% CI: 0.49–1.28; P=0.3350), while median OS was 20.2 vs 15.8 months (HR, 1.14; 95% CI: 0.73–1.79; P=0.5657). Some treatment-emergent adverse events were significantly less common in younger vs older patients, including fatigue (60% vs 69%), cough (20% vs 29%), peripheral edema (17% vs 27%), anemia (18% vs 25%), decreased appetite (13% vs 29%), and thrombocytopenia (16% vs 25% all P<0.05). Hand–foot syndrome was more common in younger patients (32% vs 24%). Conclusions: Advanced age should not be a deterrent to sunitinib therapy and elderly patients may achieve additional clinical benefit. PMID:24434434

  3. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  4. Undifferentiated metastatic renal cell carcinoma presenting as a cutaneous nodular lesion.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Giovanni; Lido, Paolo; Bei, Roberto; Polisca, Patrizio

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous metastases may be the first sign of clinically silent visceral cancer. Approximately 30% of patients with primary renal cell carcinoma present with metastatic disease, and only 8% of them have skin metastases. We present the case of a 59-year-old male patient with a subcutaneous nodular on the upper chest extending to the jugular region. The lesion appeared skin colored and was not painful and 5 cm × 3.5 cm in diameter. The histological examination of the cutaneous biopsy showed an infiltration of undifferentiated epithelial cells positive to cytokeratins AE1/AE3, whereas they were negative to CK-20, CK5/6, cluster of differentiation 10, vimentin, thyroid transcription factor-1, S-100, human melanoma black-45, hepatocyte-specific antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen, and chromogranin A. A total-body computed tomography (CT) showed the presence of a tumoral lesion in the left kidney with multiple metastases in the lung, brain, and bones. According to the cutaneous biopsy and total-body CT, a final diagnosis of an undifferentiated renal carcinoma presenting as a subcutaneous metastasis was made. A chemotherapeutic treatment with gemcitabine and cisplatin resulted in the stabilization of the renal and metastatic lesions with an improvement in the quality of life of the patient. Considering that the prognosis of patients with cutaneous metastases is very poor, it is necessary to obtain an appropriate diagnosis in order to identify patients with treatable disease with the purpose of starting a therapeutic protocol. PMID:26623153

  5. Subcutaneous nephrovesical bypass: Treatment for ureteral obstruction in advanced metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUNYAN; WANG, GONGCHENG; HOU, PEIJIN; ZHUANG, HAIJUN; YANG, XIAOSONG; GU, SHUO; WANG, HENGBING; JI, LU; XU, ZONGYUAN; MENG, JUNSONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the value of subcutaneous nephrovesical bypass (SNVB) for the treatment of ureteral obstruction due to pelvic metastatic disease. SNVB stents (n=30) were implanted in 24 patients with advanced metastatic disease between January 2008 and December 2012. Urinalysis, serum creatinine (SCr), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), quality of life (QoL) scores, and renal ultrasonography were evaluated at follow-up. The SNVB procedures were successful in all 24 patients. Patient follow-ups occurred at an average of 10.6 months. Preoperative hydronephrosis was eliminated in 16 cases (53.3%) and reduced in the remaining patients. Following surgery, SCr levels reduced significantly from 256±46 to 124±23 μmol/l (P<0.001). GFRs increased from 25±4.8 to 45±5.3 ml/min (P<0.01). The mean QoL scores were 3.4±1.4 preoperatively and 7.6±1.0 postoperatively (P<0.001). The results showed that SNVB is a minimally invasive, effective and safe procedure for patients with ureteral obstruction resulting from advanced malignant disease. As an alternative procedure to percutaneous nephrostomy, SNVB offers patients a better QoL. PMID:25435997

  6. Synergistic antitumor responses by combined GITR activation and sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nengwang; Fu, Shuai; Xu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yi; Hao, Junwen; Zhang, Aimin; Wang, Baocheng

    2016-01-15

    Sunitinib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the frontline therapy for renal and gastrointestinal cancers. In view of its well-documented proapoptotic and immunoadjuvant properties, we speculate that combination of Sunitinib and immunotherapy would provide a synergistic antitumor effect. Here, we report that a remarkably synergistic antitumor responses elicited by the combined treatment of Sunitinib and an agonistic antibody against glucocorticoid-induced TNFR related protein (GITR) in a model of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Sunitinib significantly increased the infiltration, activation, and proliferation and/or cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells and NK cells in liver metastatic foci when combined with the anti (α)-GITR agonist, which was associated with treatment-induced prominent upregulation of Th1-biased immune genes in the livers from mice receiving combined therapy versus single treatment. Sunitinib/α-GITR treatment also markedly promoted the maturation, activation and cytokine production of liver-resident macrophages and DCs compared with that achieved by α-GITR or Sunitinib treatment alone in mice. Cell depletion experiments demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells, NK cells and macrophage infiltrating liver metastatic foci all contribute to the antitumor effect induced by combined treatment. Furthermore, mechanistic investigation revealed that Sunitinib treatment reprograms tumor-associated macrophages toward classically activated or "M1" polarization upon GITR stimulation and consequently mounts an antitumor CD8(+) T and NK cell response via inhibiting STAT3 activity. Thus, our findings provide a proof of concept that Sunitinib can synergize with α-GITR treatment to remodel the tumor immune microenvironment to trigger regressions of an established metastatic cancer. PMID:26239999

  7. Novel therapeutic options for second-line therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    VON KLOT, CHRISTOPH-A. J.; MERSEBURGER, AXEL S.; KUCZYK, MARKUS A.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has gained a variety of therapeutic options since the introduction of targeted therapy, starting in 2007. The basic molecular mechanisms included predominantly the targeting of vascular endothelial growth factor or the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin. Recently, results from two randomized controlled trials, the CheckMate-25 and the METEOR trial, regarding therapy for RCC in the second-line setting have been published. In the present review, the current status of second-line therapy in mRCC is discussed, together with results from the two newly introduced substances, nivolumab and cabozantinib. PMID:27313856

  8. Recent advances in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: towards multidisciplinary personalized care.

    PubMed

    Bex, Axel; Gore, Martin; Mulders, Peter; Sternberg, Cora N

    2012-11-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? With recent improvements in the prognosis for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), focus is now shifting towards maximising clinical benefit from targeted therapies. Factors other than efficacy data are increasingly being considered when selecting a treatment strategy, with a view towards optimising clinical outcomes. This review examines the development and efficacy of targeted agents for the management of mRCC and discusses the potential factors, including resistance mechanisms, sequential therapy, prognostic and predictive markers of response, and adverse event management, that may contribute to successful individually tallored treatment of patients with this disease. • Targeted agents have substantially improved outcomes for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). • Treatment focus is now shifting towards achieving a continuum of care such that long-term benefit and extended survival may be achieved through the optimal use of targeted agents. • To achieve this goal, a number of factors which impact on treatment selection and outcomes need to be considered when treating patients with mRCC, such as the optimal sequence of targeted therapies (and the related issue of resistance mechanisms). • Recent advances are also likely to impact on the future treatment of mRCC. Examples include the identification of predictive biomarkers as well as a consideration of patient risk profiles or the safety profile of the selected targeted agent. In addition, attention is focusing on re-defining the role of surgery for the treatment of RCC in the context of targeted therapies. • This review examines the recent and future advances that offer the potential for personalizing treatment by selecting the most appropriate treatment for each patient with a view towards optimizing clinical outcomes. PMID:22624610

  9. Phase II studies of recombinant human interferon gamma in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Quesada, J R; Kurzrock, R; Sherwin, S A; Gutterman, J U

    1987-02-01

    Thirty-three patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma were treated with recombinant human interferon gamma (rIFN gamma) in two sequential, nonrandomized phase II studies. Fifteen patients received rIFN gamma by daily i.m. injection in doses ranging from 0.25 to 1.0 mg/m2, and 18 patients received it by daily continuous i.v. infusion in doses ranging from 0.01 to 0.05 mg/m2. Partial remissions were achieved by one of 14 (7%) evaluable patients in the i.m. study and in one of 16 in the i.v. study (6%). The incidence of clinical toxicity was similar for both studies. Toxicity was severe in patients receiving rIFN gamma by the i.m. route at 1.0 mg/m2 and by the i.v. route at 0.05 mg/m2. Toxicity includes constitutional symptoms (fatigue, anorexia, weight loss), leukopenia, abnormalities in liver function tests, and hypertriglyceridemia. At the doses and schedules used, rIFN gamma had minimal therapeutic activity as a single agent in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:3104544

  10. Management of inferior vena cava tumor thrombus in locally advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Psutka, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma is accompanied by intravascular tumor thrombus in up to 10% of cases, of which nearly one-third of patients also have concurrent metastatic disease. Surgical resection in the form of radical nephrectomy and caval thrombectomy represents the only option to obtain local control of the disease and is associated with durable oncologic control in approximately half of these patients. The objective of this clinical review is to outline the preoperative evaluation for, and operative management of patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma with venous tumor thrombi involving the inferior vena cava. Cornerstones of the management of these complex patients include obtaining high-quality imaging to characterize the renal mass and tumor thrombus preoperatively, with further intraoperative real-time evaluation using transesophageal echocardiography, careful surgical planning, and a multidisciplinary approach. Operative management of patients with high-level caval thrombi should be undertaken in high-volume centers by surgical teams with capacity for bypass and invasive intraoperative monitoring. In patients with metastatic disease at presentation, cytoreductive nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy may be safely performed with simultaneous metastasectomy if possible. In the absence of level one evidence, neoadjuvant targeted therapy should continue to be viewed as experimental and should be employed under the auspices of a clinical trial. However, in patients with significant risk factors for postoperative complications and mortality, and especially in those with metastatic disease, consultation with medical oncology and frontline targeted therapy may be considered. PMID:26445601

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization as an adjunct tool in the diagnosis of primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma in fine needle aspiration specimens.

    PubMed

    Kos, Zuzana; Williams, Phillip A; Belanger, Eric C; Mai, Kien T

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the role of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the diagnosis of primary renal neoplasms and lesions suspicious for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Consecutive fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) of 39 renal masses and 41 metastatic tumours suspicious for renal cell origin were assessed with an immunohistochemical panel for CK7, RCC antigen, CD10, AMACR, PAX8, vimentin, and CD117. In addition, FISH was performed using probes for chromosomes 1p, 3p, 7, 17, X, and Y. A total of 31 of 39 primary renal masses and 33 of 41 metastatic tumors suspicious for renal origin demonstrated typical cytological and immunohistochemical (IHC) features of subtypes of renal neoplasms (40 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 20 papillary RCC, and 4 renal oncocytomas). FISH analysis of 15 randomly selected cases each of primary and metastatic lesions revealed chromosomal abnormalities consistent with the diagnosis in 73% of these cases. Of 8 primary renal masses demonstrating atypical microscopic features and noncontributory IHC profiles, FISH was helpful in subtyping 5 (62%) of these lesions (2 clear cell RCC, 1 solid variant of oncocytic papillary RCC, 1 mixed clear cell and papillary RCC, and 1 chromophobe RCC with papillary architecture). Of 8 metastatic tumors clinically suspicious for renal cell origin and supportive, but nondiagnostic IHC, FISH revealed supportive chromosomal changes in 6 (75%) cases. In conclusion FISH analysis on FNAB material, even with limited tissue, may be contributory to the diagnosis and subtyping of RCC in diagnostically challenging biopsies. PMID:24692327

  12. Progress of Molecular Targeted Therapies for Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Matteo; Amantini, Consuelo; Burattini, Luciano; Berardi, Rossana; Santoni, Giorgio; Cascinu, Stefano; Muzzonigro, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a crucial role in tumor angiogenesis. VEGF expression in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is mostly regulated by hypoxia, predominantly via the hypoxia-induced factor (HIF)/Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway. Advances in our knowledge of VEGF role in tumor angiogenesis, growth, and progression have permitted development of new approaches for the treatment of mRCC, including several agents targeting VEGF and VEGF receptors: tyrosine kinase pathway, serine/threonine kinases, α5β1-integrin, deacetylase, CD70, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), AKT, and phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K). Starting from sorafenib and sunitinib, several targeted therapies have been approved for mRCC treatment, with a long list of agents in course of evaluation, such as tivozanib, cediranib, and VEGF-Trap. Here we illustrate the main steps of tumor angiogenesis process, defining the pertinent therapeutic targets and the efficacy and toxicity profiles of these new promising agents. PMID:24093097

  13. High-resolution profiling of histone h3 lysine 36 trimethylation in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ho, T H; Park, I Y; Zhao, H; Tong, P; Champion, M D; Yan, H; Monzon, F A; Hoang, A; Tamboli, P; Parker, A S; Joseph, R W; Qiao, W; Dykema, K; Tannir, N M; Castle, E P; Nunez-Nateras, R; Teh, B T; Wang, J; Walker, C L; Hung, M-C; Jonasch, E

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in SETD2, a histone H3 lysine trimethyltransferase, have been identified in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC); however it is unclear if loss of SETD2 function alters the genomic distribution of histone 3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) in ccRCC. Furthermore, published epigenomic profiles are not specific to H3K36me3 or metastatic tumors. To determine if progressive SETD2 and H3K36me3 dysregulation occurs in metastatic tumors, H3K36me3, SETD2 copy number (CN) or SETD2 mRNA abundance was assessed in two independent cohorts: metastatic ccRCC (n=71) and the Cancer Genome Atlas Kidney Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma data set (n=413). Although SETD2 CN loss occurs with high frequency (>90%), H3K36me3 is not significantly impacted by monoallelic loss of SETD2. H3K36me3-positive nuclei were reduced an average of ~20% in primary ccRCC (90% positive nuclei in uninvolved vs 70% positive nuclei in ccRCC) and reduced by ~60% in metastases (90% positive in uninvolved kidney vs 30% positive in metastases) (P<0.001). To define a kidney-specific H3K36me3 profile, we generated genome-wide H3K36me3 profiles from four cytoreductive nephrectomies and SETD2 isogenic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing and RNA sequencing. SETD2 loss of methyltransferase activity leads to regional alterations of H3K36me3 associated with aberrant RNA splicing in a SETD2 mutant RCC and SETD2 knockout cell line. These data suggest that during progression of ccRCC, a decline in H3K36me3 is observed in distant metastases, and regional H3K36me3 alterations influence alternative splicing in ccRCC. PMID:26073078

  14. Neoadjuvant treatment in advanced renal cell carcinoma: current situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Albiges, Laurence; Méjean, Arnaud; Escudier, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Neoadjuvant approaches in renal cell carcinoma are currently under investigation, following the demonstration of targeted therapy efficacy in the metastatic setting. It raises the issues of downsizing locally advanced or nonresectable tumor and offering organ-sparing surgery, safety and its potential role in early micrometastatic disease. Relevant studies of the neoadjuvant setting in renal cell carcinoma with targeted therapies were identified from the literature, clinical trial databases and conference abstracts. To date, a neoadjuvant approach appears feasible in terms of safety. Currently available drugs do not achieve major tumor downsizing with primary tumor diameters response rate of 10%. Neoadjuvants should only be considered in clinical trials or as a litmus test in locally advanced patients. PMID:23253222

  15. Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma

  16. The Wide Experience of the Sequential Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lambea, Julio; Anido, Urbano; Etxániz, Olatz; Flores, Luis; Montesa, Álvaro; Sepúlveda, Juan Manuel; Esteban, Emilio

    2016-11-01

    Sequential targeted therapies are the standard of care for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Several drugs are available for patients whose disease progresses while they receive initial tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy; these include nivolumab (an inhibitor of PD-1 receptor), everolimus (an inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin) or additional TKIs. Until now, there has been no clinical evidence to support the use of one strategy versus another, so investigators and physicians rely on experience, judgement and findings from molecular analyses to select the appropriate treatment. However, with the arrival of nivolumab and cabozantinib that provide an overall survival higher than other alternative treatments, therapeutic strategies may have changed. Here, we discuss findings from preclinical and clinical studies that might help clinicians to choose the optimal treatment approach for patients with mRCC who progress to initial therapy. PMID:27613167

  17. Tracking sub-clonal TP53 mutated tumor cells in human metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Guilhem; Bouchtaoui, Morad El; Leboeuf, Christophe; Battistella, Maxime; Varna, Mariana; Ferreira, Irmine; Plassa, Louis-François; Hamdan, Diaddin; Bertheau, Philippe; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Damotte, Diane; Janin, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinomas (RCCs) are heterogeneous tumors with late acquisition of TP53 abnormalities during their evolution. They harbor TP53 abnormalities in their metastases. We aimed to study TP53 gene alterations in tissue samples from primary and metastatic RCCs in 36 patients followed up over a median of 4.2 years, and in xenografted issued from primary RCCs. In 36 primary RCCs systematically xenografted in mice, and in biopsies of metastases performed whenever possible during patient follow-up, we studied p53-expressing tumor cells and TP53 gene abnormalities. We identified TP53 gene alterations in primary tumors, metastases and xenografts. Quantification of tumors cells with TP53 gene alterations showed a significant increase in the metastases compared to the primary RCCs, and, strikingly, the xenografts were similar to the metastases and not to the primary RCCs from which they were derived. Using laser-microdissection of p53-expressing tumor cells, we identified TP53-mutated tumor cells in the xenografts derived from the primary RCC, and in a lung metastasis later developed in one patient. The mutation enabled us to track back their origin to a minority sub-clone in the primary heterogeneous RCC. Combining in situ and molecular analyses, we demonstrated a clonal expansion in a living patient with metastatic RCC. PMID:26002555

  18. [Molecular biological foundation of targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Lai, Chong; Teng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing. Radical cure by surgery can only be achieved in patients with early stage tumors. How to precisely use antineoplastic agents after surgery is an important problem to be solved. Most metastatic RCCs are pathologically identified as clear cell RCC (ccRCC), thus to develop agents targeting ccRCC is critical. Most clinically available targeted therapies are based on targeting some spots in specific pathways; or based on targeting new anti-tumor mechanisms, such as programmed death-1(PD-1), antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) and stem cells. There is still no targeted therapy having definite effect to most RCC patients. Only von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway so far has been confirmed to be related to ccRCC development and progression; the inactivation of VHL gene causes many significant downstream gene changes. The key proteins involved in VHL pathway may be potential therapeutic targets for ccRCC. In this article, we review the current progress of targeted therapy for RCC, focus on the molecular characteristics of ccRCC, its relation to VHL pathway, the potential therapeutic targets and future clinical application for metastatic ccRCC. PMID:27045248

  19. Precision Oncology: Identifying Predictive Biomarkers for the Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Parth K.; Farber, Nicholas J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of multiple new pharmaceutical agents for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has left physicians with several options for first- and second- line therapy. With limited head-to-head comparisons, however, there is a paucity of evidence to recommend the use of one agent over another. To address this knowledge gap, Voss et al. identified serum biomarkers from specimens collected during the RECORD-3 trial, a comparative study of first-line sunitinib versus first-line everolimus. Of the biomarkers identified, the 5 most strongly associated with first-line everolimus progression-free survival (PFS1L) were combined to form a composite biomarker score (CBS). The CBS was significantly associated with everolimus PFS1L in multivariate regression analysis. This study is an example of the additional value offered by a randomized trial with prospective biospecimen collection and a significant step towards identifying predictive biomarkers for the treatment of metastatic RCC. As further comparative trials are performed, it will be essential that biomarkers are appropriately identified and validated in order to further the goal of precision oncology.

  20. Prolonged Survival following Repetitive Stereotactic Radiosurgery in a Patient with Intracranial Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferrel, Ethan A.; Roehrig, Andrew T.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Mackay, Alexander R.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Call, Jason A.; Carlson, Jonathan D.; Ling, Benjamin C.; Demakas, John J.; Cooke, Barton S.; Wagner, Aaron; Lee, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the brain have a very poor prognosis of three months if left untreated. SRS is an effective treatment modality in numerous patients. This case exemplifies the utility of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in prolonging survival and maintaining quality of life in a patient with RCC. This 64-year-old female patient initially presented to her primary care physician 22 months after a left nephrectomy for RCC with complaints of mild, intermittent headaches and difficulty with balance. An MRI revealed five cerebellar lesions suspicious for intracranial metastasis. The patient's first GKRS treatment targeted four lesions with 22 Gy at the 50% isodose line. She underwent a total of seven GKRS treatments over the next 60 months for recurrent metastases to the brain. 72 months and 12 months have now passed since her brain metastases were first discovered and since her last GKRS treatment, respectively, and this woman is alive with considerable quality of life and no evidence of metastatic reoccurrence. This case shows that repeated GKRS treatments, with minimal surgical intervention, can effectively treat multiple intracranial lesions in select patients, prolonging survival and avoiding iatrogenic neurocognitive decline while maintaining a high quality of life. PMID:26600958

  1. An update on current management of advanced renal cell cancer, biomarkers, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Wanqing Iris; Kim, Jenny J.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) treatment underwent significant advancement that resulted in an unprecedented improvement in the prognosis of this disease. This review will provide an updated review of currently approved treatment options, namely antiangiogenic and immunotherapy, as well as treatment guideline recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). We will summarize studies ongoing in determining prognostic and predictive biomarkers in maximizing therapeutic benefit in the treatment of this disease. Lastly, we will discuss promising agents in clinical testing. PMID:25722991

  2. Titanocenes: Cytotoxic and Anti-angiogenic Chemotherapy Against Advanced Renal-Cell Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Megan; Tacke, Matthias

    6-Substituted fulvenes are interesting and easily accessible starting materials for the synthesis of novel-substituted titanocenes via reductive dimerisation, carbolithiation or hydridolithiation reactions, which are followed by a transmetallation reaction with titanium tetrachloride in the latter two cases. Depending on the substitution pattern, these titanocenes prove to be bioorganometallic anticancer drugs, which have significant potential against advanced or metastatic renal-cell cancer. Patients bearing these stages of kidney cancer have a poor prognosis so far and therefore real progress in the area of metal-based anticancer drugs may come from this simple and effective synthetic approach.

  3. Recent advances of immunohistochemistry for diagnosis of renal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Tanaka, Azusa; Ohe, Chisato; Nagashima, Yoji

    2013-08-01

    The recent classification of renal tumors has been proposed according to genetic characteristics as well as morphological difference. In this review, we summarize the immunohistochemical characteristics of each entity of renal tumors. Regarding translocation renal cell carcinoma (RCC), TFE3, TFEB and ALK protein expression is crucial in establishing the diagnosis of Xp11.2 RCC, renal carcinoma with t(6;11)(p21;q12), and renal carcinoma with ALK rearrangement, respectively. In dialysis-related RCC, neoplastic cells of acquired cystic disease-associated RCC are positive for alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), but negative for cytokeratin (CK) 7, whereas clear cell papillary RCC shows the inverse pattern. The diffuse positivity for carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) is diagnostic for clear cell RCC. Co-expression of CK7 and CA9 is characteristic of multilocular cystic RCC. CK7 and AMACR are excellent markers for papillary RCC and mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma. CD82 and epithelial-related antigen (MOC31) may be helpful in the distinction between chromophobe RCC and renal oncocytoma. WT1 and CD57 highlights the diagnosis of metanephric adenoma. The combined panel of PAX2 and PAX8 may be useful in the diagnosis of metastatic RCC. PMID:23957913

  4. MET Expression in Primary and Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Implications of Correlative Biomarker Assessment to MET Pathway Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shuch, Brian; Falbo, Ryan; Parisi, Fabio; Adeniran, Adebowale; Kluger, Yuval; Kluger, Harriet M.; Jilaveanu, Lucia B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Inhibitors of the MET pathway hold promise in the treatment for metastatic kidney cancer. Assessment of predictive biomarkers may be necessary for appropriate patient selection. Understanding MET expression in metastases and the correlation to the primary site is important, as distant tissue is not always available. Methods and Results. MET immunofluorescence was performed using automated quantitative analysis and a tissue microarray containing matched nephrectomy and distant metastatic sites from 34 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Correlations between MET expressions in matched primary and metastatic sites and the extent of heterogeneity were calculated. The mean expression of MET was not significantly different between primary tumors when compared to metastases (P = 0.1). MET expression weakly correlated between primary and matched metastatic sites (R = 0.5) and a number of cases exhibited very high levels of discordance between these tumors. Heterogeneity within nephrectomy specimens compared to the paired metastatic tissues was not significantly different (P = 0.39). Conclusions. We found that MET expression is not significantly different in primary tumors than metastatic sites and only weakly correlates between matched sites. Moderate concordance of MET expression and significant expression heterogeneity may be a barrier to the development of predictive biomarkers using MET targeting agents. PMID:26448928

  5. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Thyroid Gland and Pancreas Showing Uptake on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT Scan.

    PubMed

    Kanthan, Gowri L; Schembri, Geoffrey Paul; Samra, Jaswinder; Roach, Paul; Hsiao, Edward

    2016-07-01

    Ga DOTATATE PET/CT is an imaging technique used in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors. We report a case of 66-year-old woman with a history of surgically removed renal cell carcinoma who presented for a DOTATATE PET/CT scan to characterize a newly diagnosed pancreatic lesion. DOTATATE-avid lesions were identified in the thyroid gland and pancreas. Subsequent biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma at both sites. It is important to be aware that tumors other than neuroendocrine tumors may also show uptake on DOTATATE PET/CT scan. A biopsy may be required if lesions are identified at atypical sites. PMID:27055137

  6. Outcome of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with targeted therapy without cytoreductive nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Richey, S. L.; Culp, S. H.; Jonasch, E.; Corn, P. G.; Pagliaro, L. C.; Tamboli, P.; Patel, K. K.; Matin, S. F.; Wood, C. G.; Tannir, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) became a standard procedure in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in the immunotherapy era. Historically, median overall survival (OS) of patients treated with interferon alpha (IFN-α) without CN was 7.8 months. Median OS in patients treated with targeted therapy (TT) without CN is unknown. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed records of patients with mRCC who received TT without CN. Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox regression analysis were used to estimate median OS and identify poor prognostic factors. Results: One hundred and eighty-eight patients were identified. Most patients had intermediate-risk (54.8%) or poor-risk (44.1%) disease. Median OS for all patients was 10.4 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.1–12.5]. By multivariable analysis, elevated baseline lactate dehydrogenase and corrected calcium, performance status of two or more, retroperitoneal nodal metastasis, thrombocytosis, current smoking, two or more metastatic sites, and lymphopenia were independent risk factors for inferior OS. Patients with four or more factors had increased risk of death (hazard ratio 8.83, 95% CI 5.02–15.5, P < 0.001) and 5.5-month median OS. Nineteen patients (10.0%) survived for 2+ years. Conclusions: These data highlight the improved OS of patients with mRCC treated with TT without CN, compared with historical IFN-α treatment, and may guide the design of trials investigating the role of CN in the TT era. PMID:21115604

  7. FDG-PET as a predictive biomarker for therapy with everolimus in metastatic renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, James L; Appelbaum, Daniel E; Kocherginsky, Masha; Cowey, Charles L; Kimryn Rathmell, Wendy; McDermott, David F; Stadler, Walter M

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor, everolimus, affects tumor growth by targeting cellular metabolic proliferation pathways and delays renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression. Preclinical evidence suggests that baseline elevated tumor glucose metabolism as quantified by FDG-PET ([18F] fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography) may predict antitumor activity. Metastatic RCC (mRCC) patients refractory to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway inhibition were treated with standard dose everolimus. FDG-PET scans were obtained at baseline and 2 weeks; serial computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained at baseline and every 8 weeks. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the most FDG avid lesion, average SUVmax of all measured lesions and their corresponding 2-week relative changes were examined for association with 8-week change in tumor size. A total of 63 patients were enrolled; 50 were evaluable for the primary endpoint of which 48 had both PET scans. Patient characteristics included the following: 36 (72%) clear cell histology and median age 59 (range: 37–80). Median pre- and 2-week treatment average SUVmax were 6.6 (1–17.9) and 4.2 (1–13.9), respectively. Response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST)-based measurements demonstrated an average change in tumor burden of 0.2% (−32.7% to 35.9%) at 8 weeks. Relative change in average SUVmax was the best predictor of change in tumor burden (all evaluable P = 0.01; clear cell subtype P = 0.02), with modest correlation. Baseline average SUVmax was correlated with overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.023; 0.020), but not with change in tumor burden. Everolimus therapy decreased SUVs on follow-up PET scans in mRCC patients, but changes were only modestly correlated with changes in tumor size. Thus, clinical use of FDG-PET-based biomarkers is challenged by high variability. In this phase II trial, FDG-PET was explored as a

  8. MLN0264 in Previously Treated Asian Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma or Metastatic or Recurrent Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma Expressing Guanylyl Cyclase C

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Advanced Gastrointestinal Carcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoma

  9. A simple prognostic model for overall survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Hazem I.; Patenaude, Francois; Toumishey, Ethan; Ross, Laura; Abdelsalam, Mahmoud; Reiman, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The primary purpose of this study was to develop a simpler prognostic model to predict overall survival for patients treated for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) by examining variables shown in the literature to be associated with survival. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients treated for mRCC at two Canadian centres. All patients who started first-line treatment were included in the analysis. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model was constructed using a stepwise procedure. Patients were assigned to risk groups depending on how many of the three risk factors from the final multivariate model they had. Results: There were three risk factors in the final multivariate model: hemoglobin, prior nephrectomy, and time from diagnosis to treatment. Patients in the high-risk group (two or three risk factors) had a median survival of 5.9 months, while those in the intermediate-risk group (one risk factor) had a median survival of 16.2 months, and those in the low-risk group (no risk factors) had a median survival of 50.6 months. Conclusions: In multivariate analysis, shorter survival times were associated with hemoglobin below the lower limit of normal, absence of prior nephrectomy, and initiation of treatment within one year of diagnosis. PMID:27217858

  10. Targeting PD-1/PD-L1 in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, Matthew; McDermott, David

    2015-01-01

    Immunostimulatory therapies have been a cornerstone of treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) since the 1990s. However, the use of traditional immunotherapeutic approaches for RCC, such as high-dose interleukin-2 and interferon-α, has been limited by significant systemic toxicities and the need to deliver these therapies at centers of expertise. Furthermore, in spite of the success of these immunostimulatory therapies for some patients with RCC, it is clear that most patients fail to respond to cytokine therapy. More effective immune therapy for RCC has therefore been necessary. The interaction between programmed death-1 (PD-1, present on T cells), and one of its ligands (PD-L1, present on antigen-presenting cells and tumor cells) constitutes an immune checkpoint through which tumors can induce T-cell tolerance and avoid immune destruction. Monoclonal antibodies that disrupt the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction serve as inhibitors of this immune checkpoint, and have demonstrated favorable activity in RCC as monotherapy and in combination with other active agents. This review summarizes the current landscape of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy for RCC, and highlights challenges for the future development of this promising approach. PMID:26622321

  11. [Sunitinib in clinical practice: the expanded access program for metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Marschner, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The preferential application of Sunitinib in the first-line therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is based on data of a phase III study documenting a doubling of progression-free survival (PFS) with the multi-kinase inhibitor compared to Interferon- alpha. Data from clinical studies were then supplemented and supported by comprehensive experiences in everyday practice. Sunitinib was offered to a large group of patients in an expanded access program with more than 4,500 participants. Patients with no access to Sunitinib treatment due to their country-specific approval situation or patients unable to participate in the approval study on the basis of exclusion criteria could thus be included. The cohorte also encompassed patients with an unfavorable prognosis due to metastases of the brain, non-clear cell RCC, or an ECOG performance status > or =2. Priority was given to questions regarding the safety and long-term tolerability of Sunitinib in clinical practice. Regarding tolerability, these subgroups in the expanded access program did not differ from the total population. New or cumulative toxicities did not occur. In addition, even subgroups with an unfavorable prognosis were able to profit from treatment with Sunitinib. A synopsis of phase III data and the results of the expanded access program confirm the evidence for Sunitinib in all patient populations. PMID:20164671

  12. Thyroid dysfunction in 281 patients with metastatic melanoma or renal carcinoma treated with interleukin-2 alone.

    PubMed

    Krouse, R S; Royal, R E; Heywood, G; Weintraub, B D; White, D E; Steinberg, S M; Rosenberg, S A; Schwartzentruber, D J

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the incidence of thyroid dysfunction in cancer patients receiving immunotherapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2) alone, and to assess the relationship of hypothyroidism to clinical response. A cohort of 281 consecutive patients with metastatic melanoma or renal carcinoma were treated with IL-2 alone from July 1, 1989 until June 30, 1993. The majority (n = 216) received high-dose IL-2 and the remainder (n = 65) received low-dose therapy. Thyroid function was measured before, during, and after immunotherapy. Forty-one percent of initially euthyroid patients developed thyroid dysfunction after starting high-dose IL-2-alone therapy. The most common abnormality was hypothyroidism, occurring in 35% of patients, although moderate or severe hypothyroidism requiring thyroid hormone replacement occurred in 9% of patients. Hypothyroidism was related to duration of IL-2 therapy and was not associated with clinical response. Hyperthyroidism developed in 7% of previously euthyroid patients receiving high-dose IL-2. Overall, the incidence of thyroid dysfunction was similar in the high- and low-dose IL-2 regimens. In conclusion, thyroid dysfunction is a common sequela of IL-2 therapy. Thyroid function should be measured routinely in cancer patients receiving IL-2-based treatment. It is recommended that thyroid hormone replacement be given to patients with moderate or severe hypothyroidism. PMID:8680655

  13. CRISPR-Mediated VHL Knockout Generates an Improved Model for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Hu, Junhui; Moughon, Diana L; Liu, Peijun; Lin, Lucia C; Hermann, Kip; Mangul, Serghei; Guan, Wei; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xu, Hua; Wu, Lily

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is nearly incurable and accounts for most of the mortality associated with RCC. Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) is a tumour suppressor that is lost in the majority of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) cases. Its role in regulating hypoxia-inducible factors-1α (HIF-1α) and -2α (HIF-2α) is well-studied. Recent work has demonstrated that VHL knock down induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In this study we showed that a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock out of VHL in the RENCA model leads to morphologic and molecular changes indicative of EMT, which in turn drives increased metastasis to the lungs. RENCA cells deficient in HIF-1α failed to undergo EMT changes upon VHL knockout. RNA-seq revealed several HIF-1α-regulated genes that are upregulated in our VHL knockout cells and whose overexpression signifies an aggressive form of ccRCC in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) database. Independent validation in a new clinical dataset confirms the upregulation of these genes in ccRCC samples compared to adjacent normal tissue. Our findings indicate that loss of VHL could be driving tumour cell dissemination through stabilization of HIF-1α in RCC. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon can guide the search for more effective treatments to combat mRCC. PMID:27358011

  14. CRISPR-Mediated VHL Knockout Generates an Improved Model for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Hu, Junhui; Moughon, Diana L.; Liu, Peijun; Lin, Lucia C.; Hermann, Kip; Mangul, Serghei; Guan, Wei; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xu, Hua; Wu, Lily

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is nearly incurable and accounts for most of the mortality associated with RCC. Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) is a tumour suppressor that is lost in the majority of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) cases. Its role in regulating hypoxia-inducible factors-1α (HIF-1α) and -2α (HIF-2α) is well-studied. Recent work has demonstrated that VHL knock down induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In this study we showed that a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock out of VHL in the RENCA model leads to morphologic and molecular changes indicative of EMT, which in turn drives increased metastasis to the lungs. RENCA cells deficient in HIF-1α failed to undergo EMT changes upon VHL knockout. RNA-seq revealed several HIF-1α-regulated genes that are upregulated in our VHL knockout cells and whose overexpression signifies an aggressive form of ccRCC in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) database. Independent validation in a new clinical dataset confirms the upregulation of these genes in ccRCC samples compared to adjacent normal tissue. Our findings indicate that loss of VHL could be driving tumour cell dissemination through stabilization of HIF-1α in RCC. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon can guide the search for more effective treatments to combat mRCC. PMID:27358011

  15. Interleukin-2 and interferon-alpha-2a outpatient therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lipton, A; Harvey, H; Givant, E; Hopper, K; Lawler, J; Matthews, Y; Hirsh, M; Zeffren, J

    1993-02-01

    The combination of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-alpha-2a (IFN-alpha-2a) has synergistic bioactivity in numerous preclinical model systems. Thirty-nine patients with metastatic renal cell cancer were treated with continuous intravenous infusion IL-2 for 4-5 days plus intramuscular IFN-alpha-2a 2-3 days a week for 4 consecutive weeks. A 2- to 4-week rest period was permitted after each 4 weeks of treatment. Thirty-one of the 39 patients were assessable for response determination. Response rate (six complete+seven partial remissions) was 33.3% for all patients, or 41.9% when the analysis was restricted to the 31 evaluable patients. Three patients were unable to tolerate treatment due to anorexia, weight loss, and severe fatigue. This therapy was relatively well tolerated in the outpatient setting in the other patients despite fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, and weight loss. There was no correlation of response with site of metastases or bulk of disease. PMID:8318497

  16. Cytodiagnosis of a Cutaneous Clear Cell Malignancy: Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma on Chin

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Gyanendra; Chaturvedi, Sunanda; Khan, Shakir Ali

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell type of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is most common urological malignancy. Several diagnostic challenges arise when it presents as a cutaneous nodule, being an uncommon presentation. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of a cutaneous nodule is crucial for distinguishing primary tumours from metastatic tumours because cutaneous metastases represent a terminal stage of illness. Due to considerable overlap of cytomorphological features determination of primary warrants need of detailed clinical history and close inspection of every cytological detail. We report here a case of cutaneous metastasis of RCC on chin in a patient 11 years after nephrectomy. Though there are reports of RCC metastases diagnosed on histology, there are fewer cytology case reports. Cytological differential diagnosis has been discussed for arriving at the final diagnosis in case of clear cell tumours. Early and accurate diagnosis is mandatory for optimal treatment. Cytodiagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of RCC is uncommon due to its low suspicion index in cutaneous nodules. More so, it presents late and an unusual sites due to its resemblance to common dermatological diseases. PMID:26894079

  17. Stereotactic body radiotherapy using CyberKnife for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ting-Shi; Liang, Ping; Lu, Huan-Zhen; Liang, Jian-Ning; Liu, Jian-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Ying-Chuan; Tang, Min-Yang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy using CyberKnife for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer. METHODS: From June 2010 to May 2014, 25 patients with locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy. Nine patients presented with unresectable locally advanced disease and 16 had metastatic disease. Primary end-points of this study were overall survival, relief of abdominal pain, and toxicity. RESULTS: Fourteen patients were treated with a total dose of 30-36 Gy in three fractions and the remainder with 40-48 Gy in four fractions. Median follow-up was 11 mo (range: 2-25 mo). The median survival duration calculated from the time of stereotactic body radiotherapy for the entire group, the locally advanced group, and the metastatic group was 9.0 mo, 13.5 mo, and 8.5 mo, respectively. Overall survival was 37% and 18% at one and two years, respectively. Abdominal pain relief was achieved within 2 wk of completing radiotherapy in the patients who received successful palliation (13 of 20 patients had significant pain). Five patients (20%) had grade 1 nausea, and one (4%) had grade 2 nausea. No acute grade 3+ toxicity was seen. CONCLUSION: Stereotactic body radiotherapy using the CyberKnife system is a promising, noninvasive, palliative treatment with acceptable toxicity for locally advanced unresectable and metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:26185389

  18. Eribulin Mesylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium and Kidney Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Distal Urethral Carcinoma; Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma Associated With Urethral Carcinoma; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Urethra Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Carcinoma

  19. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  20. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  1. Macrocytosis during sunitinib treatment predicts progression-free survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kucharz, Jakub; Giza, Agnieszka; Dumnicka, Paulina; Kuzniewski, Marek; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata; Bryniarski, Pawel; Herman, Roma; Zygulska, Aneta Lidia; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    Sunitinib, a multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is a first-line treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) in patients in 'low' and 'intermediate' Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Heng risk groups. Disruptions of hematopoiesis, such as anemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia, are typically observed during sunitinib treatment. When it comes to RBC parameters, an increase in mean cell volume (MCV) tends to occur, meeting the criteria for macrocytosis in some patients (MCV > 100 fL). We examined changes in RBC parameters of 27 mRCC patients treated with sunitinib (initial dose of 50 mg/day, 6-week treatment: 4 weeks on, 2 weeks off) and correlated them with progression-free survival time (PFS). Patients who had macrocytosis after 3 treatment cycles had significantly longer PFS than those whose MCV stayed less than 100 fL (not reached vs. 11.2 months, p < 0.001). We also found a correlation between MCV values after the first and third treatment cycles and the risk of progression: HR of 0.9 (0.81-0.99) and 0.76 (0.65-0.90) per 1 fL increase in MCV, respectively. The mechanism of MCV elevation during sunitinib treatment has not yet been fully explained. One of the probable causes is sunitinib's inhibitory influence on c-Kit kinase, as is the case with imatinib. For mRCC patients, this phenomenon could help predict PFS, but since our sample was small, further studies are essential. PMID:27573381

  2. Survival Outcomes and Tumor IMP3 Expression in Patients with Sarcomatoid Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tantravahi, Srinivas K.; Albertson, Daniel; Agarwal, Archana M.; Poole, Austin; Patel, Shiven B.; Hawatmeh, Jamil S.; Straubhar, Alli M.; Liu, Ting; Stenehjem, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid histology (SmRCC) is associated with poor survival. No data is available from randomized trials on the efficacy of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors in SmRCC. We identified SmRCC patients from a single institutional database. To identify predictive and prognostic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis was performed on the tumor samples for downstream targets of VEGF and mTOR pathways. Survival outcomes were stratified by IHC analysis, extent of sarcomatoid component, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), and Heng risk criteria. Twenty-seven patients with SmRCC were included. First line therapy included targeted therapy (n = 19), immunotherapy (n = 4), cytotoxic chemotherapy (n = 1), and no treatment (n = 3). Median OS was 8.2 months (95% CI 3.8–14.2 months). Median survival in months, based on MSKCC and Heng risk groups, was favorable 89.3 versus 84.5, intermediate 9.5 versus 12.7, and poor 3.9 versus 5.1. None of the IHC markers predicted outcomes of treatment with VEGF or mTOR inhibitors. Only tumor IMP3 expression was associated with inferior OS, although not statistically significant (IMP3 negative 14.2 versus IMP3 positive 4.9 months; HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.16–1.21; P = 0.12). The study was limited by small sample size. PMID:25688268

  3. Cost-effectiveness of pazopanib compared with sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Amdahl, J.; Diaz, J.; Park, J.; Nakhaipour, H.R.; Delea, T.E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Canada and elsewhere, pazopanib and sunitinib—tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors—are recommended as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mrcc). A large randomized noninferiority trial of pazopanib versus sunitinib (comparz) demonstrated that the two drugs have similar efficacy; however, patients randomized to pazopanib experienced better health-related quality of life (hrqol) and nominally lower rates of non-study medical resource utilization. Methods The cost-effectiveness of pazopanib compared with sunitinib for first-line treatment of mrcc from a Canadian health care system perspective was evaluated using a partitioned-survival model that incorporated data from comparz and other secondary sources. The time horizon of 5 years was based on the maximum duration of follow-up in the final analysis of overall survival from the comparz trial. Analyses were conducted first using list prices for pazopanib and sunitinib and then by assuming that the prices of sunitinib and pazopanib would be equivalent. Results Based on list prices, expected costs were CA$10,293 less with pazopanib than with sunitinib. Pazopanib was estimated to yield 0.059 more quality-adjusted life-years (qalys). Pazopanib was therefore dominant (more qalys and lower costs) compared with sunitinib in the base case. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, pazopanib was dominant in 79% of simulations and was cost-effective in 90%–100% of simulations at a threshold cost-effectiveness ratio of CA$100,000. Assuming equivalent pricing, pazopanib yielded CA$917 in savings in the base case, was dominant in 36% of probabilistic sensitivity analysis simulations, and was cost-effective in 89% of simulations at a threshold cost-effectiveness ratio of CA$100,000. Conclusions Compared with sunitinib, pazopanib is likely to be a cost-effective option for first-line treatment of mrcc from a Canadian health care

  4. Outcome and Safety of Sorafenib in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Dialysis Patients: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, Alessandro; Bersanelli, Melissa; Castagneto, Bruno; Masini, Cristina; Di Meglio, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Benedetta; Buti, Sebastiano

    2016-08-01

    Few data are available about sorafenib use in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) undergoing hemodialysis. No systematic review has been previously performed about this issue. The objective of the present review is to investigate pharmacokinetics and clinical outcomes of sorafenib in mRCC patients undergoing hemodialysis. According to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, all the literature about mRCC dialysis patients receiving sorafenib, published from January 1946 to August 2015, was evaluated. Applying inclusion/exclusion criteria, 11 articles were selected for the analysis; 1 patient from our department was also included. The investigated outcomes were pharmacokinetics, toxicity, response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival where available. A total of 36 patients were included. Median treatment duration was 6.0 months on overall population; median progression-free survival was 6.3 months (calculated on 19 patients); response rate was 22% (on 29 patients); median overall survival was 14.9 months (on 28 patients). Of note, 24 patients started sorafenib at reduced dose; 6 of 36 patients (17%) required dose reduction due to adverse events (AEs). Sorafenib treatment was discontinued in 7 patients (19%) because of AEs. Most of AEs were Grade 1-2; severe toxicities (Grade 4-5) included G4 anemia (1 case), G4 hypertension (1 case), G4 cerebellar hemorrhage (1 patient), and a case of G5 subarachnoid hemorrhage. This review confirmed the efficacy of sorafenib treatment in mRCC patients receiving hemodialysis. Nevertheless, drug toxicity seems to be increased in these patients, despite the initiation of therapy at reduced doses; therefore, sorafenib should be used with caution in dialysis patients. PMID:26899142

  5. Nivolumab for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results of a Randomized Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Motzer, Robert J.; Rini, Brian I.; McDermott, David F.; Redman, Bruce G.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Harrison, Michael R.; Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Drabkin, Harry A.; George, Saby; Logan, Theodore F.; Margolin, Kim A.; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Lambert, Alexandre M.; Waxman, Ian M.; Hammers, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nivolumab is a fully human immunoglobulin G4 programmed death–1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody that restores T-cell immune activity. This phase II trial assessed the antitumor activity, dose-response relationship, and safety of nivolumab in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Patients and Methods Patients with clear-cell mRCC previously treated with agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway were randomly assigned (blinded ratio of 1:1:1) to nivolumab 0.3, 2, or 10 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks. The primary objective was to evaluate the dose-response relationship as measured by progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and safety. Results A total of 168 patients were randomly assigned to the nivolumab 0.3- (n = 60), 2- (n = 54), and 10-mg/kg (n = 54) cohorts. One hundred eighteen patients (70%) had received more than one prior systemic regimen. Median PFS was 2.7, 4.0, and 4.2 months, respectively (P = .9). Respective ORRs were 20%, 22%, and 20%. Median OS was 18.2 months (80% CI, 16.2 to 24.0 months), 25.5 months (80% CI, 19.8 to 28.8 months), and 24.7 months (80% CI, 15.3 to 26.0 months), respectively. The most common treatment-related adverse event (AE) was fatigue (24%, 22%, and 35%, respectively). Nineteen patients (11%) experienced grade 3 to 4 treatment-related AEs. Conclusion Nivolumab demonstrated antitumor activity with a manageable safety profile across the three doses studied in mRCC. No dose-response relationship was detected as measured by PFS. These efficacy and safety results in mRCC support study in the phase III setting. PMID:25452452

  6. Renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid and sarcomatoid features presented as a metastatic thigh mass with an unusual immunohistochemical profile.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Kandil, Mona; Elshakhs, Soliman; El-Dien, Marwa Serag; Abdallah, Rania

    2014-01-23

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) may metastasize anywhere in the body and sometimes the primary tumor is missing and necessitates extensive investigations to detect. In this report, we describe a case of RCC metastasizing to the thigh in a 70 year old male with a highly pleomorphic morphology suggesting a high grade sarcoma that showed unequivocal positivity for desmin directing the diagnosis for pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma. After completion of 33 cycles of radiotherapy, the patient developed large intraabdominal mass that showed conventional areas of RCC with immunoreactivity for CD10, CK, EMA, carbonic anhydrase IX and vimentin. The tumor cells in other areas resembled that of thigh mass which raised suspicions whether the two masses represented the same tumor or not. Surprisingly, the tumor cells of thigh mass showed diffuse positivity for CD10 and focal expression for CK, EMA and carbonic anhydrase IX. Extensive investigations failed to detect any primary renal lesions. The present case demonstrated that RCC can metastasize to virtually any body site and can have significant morphologic overlap with other non-renal neoplasms. Absence of primary origin of RCC according to radiological and operative data should not hinder the diagnosis of metastatic RCC. RCC with sarcomatoid and rhabdoid features carries aggressive behavior manifested by great metastatic potential and short survival time. PMID:24711903

  7. [Recent Advances in Systemic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Oki, Eiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of chemotherapeutic agents and biomarkers have remarkably improved treatment outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, decision making regarding the choice of therapy for mCRC has been complicated by the availability of many different treatment options. In this review, we will discuss the clinical evidence for current systemic treatment, including the key roles of 3 cytotoxic drugs and oral fluoropyrimidines, the appropriate use of anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR therapy, the significance of RAS mutation status as a predictive marker for anti-EGFR therapy, and new agents for salvage therapy (regorafenib and TAS-102 [TFTD]). PMID:26809522

  8. Latest Advances in Chemotherapeutic, Targeted and Immune Approaches in the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Darshil J.; Dronca, Roxana S.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer due to its metastatic potential and is an important public health concern. Melanoma incidence has been increasing worldwide. While potentially curable when diagnosed early, metastatic melanoma carries a poor prognosis. Until recently, systemic therapy for metastatic melanoma was ineffective, but the recent successes in the development of new therapies for metastatic melanoma, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibitors, anti-Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1)/ Programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway blocking antibodies, as well as combinatorial strategies of cytotoxic chemotherapy and inhibitors of angiogenesis, have all yielded promising results, changing the continually evolving landscape of therapeutic options for patients with this disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the evolution of and recent advances in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. The present review is based on a comprehensive PubMed search between the dates of January 1, 1960, to November 15, 2013, using the search term melanoma or metastatic melanoma combined with terms, such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, CTLA-4, PD-1, PDL-1, adoptive T cell, targeted therapy, MAPK, molecular biology and survival. PMID:24684873

  9. [Bevacizumab as first-line therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma : Progression-free survival for 3 years].

    PubMed

    Pichler, R; Horninger, W; Aigner, F; Heidegger, I

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who was diagnosed in 2006 with renal cell cancer (RCC) and had undergone consecutive tumor nephrectomy (clear-cell RCC, Fuhrmann grade II, stage pT3a, R0). Over the years, the patient underwent several surgical and radiological interventions due to various metastatic lesions. This case report describes the 3-year progression-free survival in a patient who underwent first-line therapy with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab. Except for hypertension, the patient does not suffer currently from any other side effects of bevacizumab therapy. PMID:26471795

  10. High-dose methotrexate with leucovorin rescue, vinblastine, and bleomycin with or without tamoxifen in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bell, D R; Aroney, R S; Fisher, R J; Levi, J A

    1984-04-01

    A regimen of high-dose methotrexate with leucovorin rescue, vinblastine, and bleomycin with or without tamoxifen was administered to 34 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. No complete remissions were observed, but ten patients (30%) achieved partial remission and an additional 13 patients (39%) had stabilization of disease. The median survival of responding patients (110 weeks) was significantly longer than that of nonresponding patients. The addition of tamoxifen did not influence response or survival. This regimen was tolerated without significant toxicity. A prospective randomized study of the vinblastine and high-dose methotrexate regimen compared to the respective single agents seem to be indicated. PMID:6201268

  11. The role of neoadjuvant therapy in the management of locally advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Borregales, Leonardo D.; Adibi, Mehrad; Thomas, Arun Z.; Wood, Christopher G.; Karam, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the armamentarium of targeted therapy agents for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has significantly increased. Improvements in response rates and survival, with more manageable side effects compared with interleukin 2/interferon immunotherapy, have been reported with the use of targeted therapy agents, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors (everolimus and temsirolimus) and VEGF receptor antibodies (bevacizumab). Current guidelines reflect these new therapeutic approaches with treatments based on risk category, histology and line of therapy in the metastatic setting. However, while radical nephrectomy remains the standard of care for locally advanced RCC, the migration and use of these agents from salvage to the neoadjuvant setting for large unresectable masses, high-level venous tumor thrombus involvement, and patients with imperative indications for nephron sparing has been increasingly described in the literature. Several trials have recently been published and some are still recruiting patients in the neoadjuvant setting. While the results of these trials will inform and guide the use of these agents in the neoadjuvant setting, there still remains a considerable lack of consensus in the literature regarding the effectiveness, safety and clinical utility of neoadjuvant therapy. The goal of this review is to shed light on the current body of evidence with regards to the use of neoadjuvant treatments in the setting of locally advanced RCC. PMID:27034725

  12. The role of neoadjuvant therapy in the management of locally advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Borregales, Leonardo D; Adibi, Mehrad; Thomas, Arun Z; Wood, Christopher G; Karam, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, the armamentarium of targeted therapy agents for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has significantly increased. Improvements in response rates and survival, with more manageable side effects compared with interleukin 2/interferon immunotherapy, have been reported with the use of targeted therapy agents, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors (everolimus and temsirolimus) and VEGF receptor antibodies (bevacizumab). Current guidelines reflect these new therapeutic approaches with treatments based on risk category, histology and line of therapy in the metastatic setting. However, while radical nephrectomy remains the standard of care for locally advanced RCC, the migration and use of these agents from salvage to the neoadjuvant setting for large unresectable masses, high-level venous tumor thrombus involvement, and patients with imperative indications for nephron sparing has been increasingly described in the literature. Several trials have recently been published and some are still recruiting patients in the neoadjuvant setting. While the results of these trials will inform and guide the use of these agents in the neoadjuvant setting, there still remains a considerable lack of consensus in the literature regarding the effectiveness, safety and clinical utility of neoadjuvant therapy. The goal of this review is to shed light on the current body of evidence with regards to the use of neoadjuvant treatments in the setting of locally advanced RCC. PMID:27034725

  13. MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy increases the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Shang, Yiman; Gao, Quanli

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising cancer treatment, but its efficacy is restricted by various factors, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In this study, we determine whether chemotherapeutic drugs that reduce MDSC levels enhance the efficacy of CIK cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Fifty-three patients were included in this study; 17 were diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC), 10 with advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), and 26 with metastatic melanoma (MM). These patients were divided into two groups: CIK cell therapy alone and CIK cell therapy combined with chemotherapy. Combining CIK cell therapy and chemotherapy increased 1-year survival rates and median survival times in MRCC and PC patients, but not in MM patients. The disease control rate did not differ between treatment groups for MRCC or MM patients, but was higher in PC patients receiving combined treatment than CIK cell treatment alone. These data suggest that addition of MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy to CIK cell therapy improves survival in MRCC and PC patients. PMID:26716894

  14. Whole-Exome Sequencing in Two Extreme Phenotypes of Response to VEGF-Targeted Therapies in Patients With Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fay, Andre P; de Velasco, Guillermo; Ho, Thai H; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Murray, Bradley; Albiges, Laurence; Signoretti, Sabina; Hakimi, A Ari; Stanton, Melissa L; Bellmunt, Joaquim; McDermott, David F; Atkins, Michael B; Garraway, Levi A; Kwiatkowski, David J; Choueiri, Toni K

    2016-07-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing have provided a unique opportunity to understand the biology of disease and mechanisms of sensitivity or resistance to specific agents. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous disease and highly variable clinical responses have been observed with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted therapy (VEGF-TT). We hypothesized that whole-exome sequencing analysis might identify genotypes associated with extreme response or resistance to VEGF-TT in metastatic (mRCC). Patients with mRCC who had received first-line sunitinib or pazopanib and were in 2 extreme phenotypes of response were identified. Extreme responders (ERs) were defined as those with partial response or complete response for 3 or more years (n=13) and primary refractory patients (PRPs) were defined as those with progressive disease within the first 3 months of therapy (n=14). International Metastatic RCC Database Consortium prognostic scores were not significantly different between the groups (P=.67). Considering the genes known to be mutated in RCC at significant frequency, PBRM1 mutations were identified in 7 ERs (54%) versus 1 PRP (7%) (P=.01). In addition, mutations in TP53 (n=4) were found only in PRPs (P=.09). Our data suggest that mutations in some genes in RCC may impact response to VEGF-TT. PMID:27407122

  15. Everolimus in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Buti, Sebastiano; Leonetti, Alessandro; Dallatomasina, Alice; Bersanelli, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, and its pathogenesis is strictly related to altered cellular response to hypoxia, in which mTOR signaling pathway is implicated. Everolimus, an mTOR serine/threonine kinase inhibitor, represents a therapeutic option for the treatment of advanced RCC. Aim The objective of this article is to review the evidence for the treatment of metastatic RCC with everolimus. Evidence review Everolimus was approved for second- and third-line therapy in patients with advanced RCC according to the results of a Phase III pivotal trial that demonstrated a benefit in median progression-free survival of ~2 months compared to placebo after failure of previous lines of therapy, of which at least one was an anti-VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). The role of this drug in first-line setting has been investigated in Phase II trials, with no significant clinical benefit, even in combination with bevacizumab. Everolimus activity in non-clear cell RCC is supported by two randomized Phase II trials that confirmed the benefit in second-line setting but not in first line. Recently, two randomized Phase III trials (METEOR and CheckMate 025) demonstrated the inferiority of everolimus in second-line setting compared to the TKI cabozantinib and to the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab, respectively. Moreover, a recent Phase II study demonstrated a significant benefit for the second-line combination treatment with everolimus plus lenvatinib (a novel TKI) in terms of progression-free survival and overall survival compared to the single-agent everolimus. Basing on preclinical data, the main downstream effectors of mTOR cascade, S6RP and its phosphorylated form, could be good predictive biomarkers of response to everolimus. The safety profile of the drug is favorable, with a good cost-effectiveness compared to second-line sorafenib or axitinib, and no significant impact on the quality of life of treated

  16. Systemic Treatments for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: 10-Year Experience of Immunotherapy and Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Han; Park, Weon Seo; Kim, Sun Ho; Joung, Jae Young; Seo, Ho Kyung; Lee, Kang Hyun; Chung, Jinsoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of first-line systemic targeted therapy (TT) and immunotherapy (IT) in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Materials and Methods This study was a retrospective review of the data of 262 patients treated with systemic IT or TT with tyrosine kinase inhibitors between 2003 and 2013. The objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor ver. 1.0 criteria and the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test. Results During the median 4.3-month treatment and the 24-month follow-up period, the ORR/PFS/OS of the overall first-line and second-line therapy were 41.9%/8.1 months/16.8 months and 27.5%/6.5 months/15.3 months, respectively. The first-line TT/IT/sequential IT had a PFS of 9.3/6.4/5.7 months and an OS of 15.8/16.5/40.6 months (all p < 0.05). The second-line of TT/IT had a PFS of 7.1/2.1 months (both p < 0.05) and an OS of 16.6/8.6 months (p=0.636), respectively. Pazopanib provided the best median PFS of 11.0 months (p < 0.001) and a quadruple IT regimen had a superior PFS (p=0.522). For OS, sequential treatment with IT and TT was superior compared to treatment with either IT or TT alone (40.6/16.5/15.8 months, p=0.014). The prognosis according to the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center model showed that favorable/intermediate/poor risk groups had a PFS of 8.5/10.4/2.3 months, and an OS of 43.1/20.4/5.6 months, respectively. The prognosis calculated using the Heng model showed that the favorable/intermediate/poor risk groups had a PFS of 9.2/3.9/2.7 months, and an OS of 32.4/16.5/6.1months, respectively (all p < 0.001). Conclusion In patients with mRCC, TT provided a better PFS and OS compared with IT. PMID:26875203

  17. Nivolumab versus Cabozantinib: Comparing Overall Survival in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wiecek, Witold; Karcher, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) affects over 330,000 new patients every year, of whom 1/3 present with metastatic RCC (mRCC) at diagnosis. Most mRCC patients treated with a first-line agent relapse within 1 year and need second-line therapy. The present study aims to compare overall survival (OS) between nivolumab and cabozantinib from two recent pivotal studies comparing, respectively, each one of the two emerging treatments against everolimus in patients who relapse following first-line treatment. Comparison is traditionally carried out using the Bucher method, which assumes proportional hazard. Since OS curves intersected in one of the pivotal studies, models not assuming proportional hazards were also considered to refine the comparison. Four Bayesian parametric survival network meta-analysis models were implemented on overall survival (OS) data digitized from the Kaplan-Meier curves reported in the studies. Three models allowing hazard ratios (HR) to vary over time were assessed against a fixed-HR model. The Bucher method favored cabozantinib, with a fixed HR for OS vs. nivolumab of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: [0.77, 1.54]). However, all models with time-varying HR showed better fits than the fixed-HR model. The log-logistic model fitted the data best, exhibiting a HR for OS initially favoring cabozantinib, the trend inverting to favor nivolumab after month 5 (95% credible interval <1 from 10 months). The initial probability of cabozantinib conferring superior OS was 54%, falling to 41.5% by month 24. Numerical differences in study-adjusted OS estimates between the two treatments remained small. This study evidences that HR for OS of nivolumab vs. cabozantinib varies over time, favoring cabozantinib in the first months of treatment but nivolumab afterwards, a possible indication that patients with poor prognosis benefit more from cabozantinib in terms of survival, nivolumab benefiting patients with better prognosis. More evidence, including real

  18. Repurposing the anti-malarial drug artesunate as a novel therapeutic agent for metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to its attenuation of tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sharon; Lee, Se Jeong; Lim, Joung Eun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still incurable. Artesunate (ART), a well-known anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, exhibits highly selective anti-tumor actions against various tumors through generation of cytotoxic carbon-centered free radical in the presence of free iron. However, the therapeutic efficacy of ART against metastatic RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. In the analysis on a dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 469) and a tissue microarray set from Samsung Medical Center (n = 119) from a cohort of patients with clear cell RCC (ccRCC), up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), which is a well-known predictive marker for ART, was correlated with the presence of distant metastasis and an unfavorable prognosis. Moreover, ART exerted potent selective cytotoxicity against human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, and SN12C-GFP-SRLu2) and sensitized these cells to sorafenib in vitro, and the extent of ART cytotoxicity correlated with TfR1 expression. ART-mediated growth inhibition of human RCC cell lines was shown to result from the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and oncosis-like cell death. Furthermore, ART inhibited cell clonogenicity and invasion of human RCC cells and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these in vitro data, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of ART were also validated in human 786-O xenografts. Taken together, ART is a promising novel candidate for treating human RCC, either alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:26426994

  19. Targeted therapies and complete responses in first line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. A meta-analysis of published trials.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Roberto; Alesini, Daniele; Palazzo, Antonella; Trenta, Patrizia; Santoni, Matteo; De Marchis, Laura; Cascinu, Stefano; Naso, Giuseppe; Cortesi, Enrico

    2014-03-01

    Antiangiogenic agents (AAs) have reported grater efficacy compared to interferon. Despite these advances, radiological complete response to therapy is rare. We meta-analyzed the incidence of complete response in patients treated with AAs and in controls in main randomized clinical trials for first-line therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PubMed was reviewed for phase II-III randomized clinical trials with AAs vs. non-AAs in patients with good or intermediate prognosis. We calculated the relative risk of events in patients assigned to AAs compared to control. Five RCTs were found; four were phase III and one was phase II. A total of 2747 patients was valuable for final analysis and randomized to receive AAs or control. Patients in the control-group had interferon (85%) or placebo (15%); patients in the AAs-group received bevacizumab (48%), sunitinib (26%), pazopanib (20%) or sorafenib (6%). The incidence of complete response in patients treated with AAs was 2.0% (95% CI, 1.2-2.8) compared to 1.4% (95% CI, 0.7-2.1) in the control arm. Comparing the different type of AAs, the incidence of complete response was 2.5% (95% CI, 1.2-3.8) in the bevacizumab group and 1.6% (95% CI, 0.1-2.5) in the TKIs group. The relative risk to have a complete response was 1.52 (95% CI, 0.85-2.73; p=0.16) in patients treated with AAs compared to controls; this was found higher in patients treated with TKIs compared to bevacizumab. The complete response is a rare event in metastatic kidney tumor, even if AAs reported greater efficacy in terms of progression-free survival and of overall response rate, they did not increase the curative rate of metastatic disease. Probably, some biologic factors other than angiogenesis may influence the complete response in this disease. PMID:24070900

  20. miR-221/222 Are Involved in Response to Sunitinib Treatment in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khella, Heba W Z; Butz, Henriett; Ding, Qiang; Rotondo, Fabio; Evans, Kenneth R; Kupchak, Peter; Dharsee, Moyez; Latif, Ashraf; Pasic, Maria D; Lianidou, Evi; Bjarnason, Georg A; Yousef, George M

    2015-11-01

    Sunitinib is a multitargeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor used for metastatic renal cancer. There are no biomarkers that can predict sunitinib response. Such markers are needed to avoid administration of costly medication with side effects to patients who would not benefit from it. We compared global miRNA expression between patients with a short (≤12 months) versus prolonged (>12 months) progression-free survival (PFS) under sunitinib as first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. We identified a number of differentially expressed miRNAs and developed miRNA statistical models that can accurately distinguish between the two groups. We validated our models in the discovery set and an independent set of 57 patients. Target prediction and pathway analysis showed that these miRNAs are involved in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), TGFβ, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling and cell-cell communication. We tested the effect of these miRNAs on cellular proliferation and angiogenesis. We validated the negative correlation between miR-221 and its target, VEGFR2.miR-221 overexpression was associated with a poor PFS while its target, VEGFR2 was associated with longer survival. Gain of function experiments showed that miR-221 and miR-222 decreased angiogenesis and cellular proliferation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) while increasing cellular proliferation in ACHN cells. miRNAs represent potential predictive markers for sunitinib response. PMID:26201448

  1. Comparative efficacy and safety of axitinib versus sorafenib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Man, Libo; Li, Guizhong; Huang, Guanglin; Wang, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to evaluate the comparative efficacy and safety of axitinib and sorafenib in the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Materials and methods Eligible studies were searched from PubMed, Embase, and Future Medicine databases. The pooled hazard ratios and relative risk ratios (RRs) were calculated by using Stata 12.0 software. Results A total of 1,011 patients qualified to participate in this Phase III study that included randomized controlled trials. Meta-analysis results showed that axitinib was more highly and significantly associated with a survival benefit in the independently assessed progression-free survival in comparison to sorafenib. The values of RR of the objective response rate and disease control rate were also significantly different. Results of the analysis of adverse events concerning hypertension and hypothyroidism demonstrated that the values of RR were significantly higher in the axitinib group and lower risks were established in the patients treated with axitinib. Conclusion Therefore, axitinib was a better treatment option for metastatic renal cell carcinoma treatment than sorafenib, especially after failure of prior systemic therapies. This analysis revealed that axitinib had higher risks of hypertension and hypothyroidism and lower risks of rash and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. PMID:27354814

  2. Treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma with a combination of human lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha and cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Kotake, T; Kinouchi, T; Saiki, S; Kuroda, M; Miki, T; Kiyohara, H; Usami, M

    1991-02-01

    Human lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha was administered intramuscularly at a dose of 5 x 10(6) units/day to 20 metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients. For potentiating the antitumor effect of interferon, cimetidine was also given to them orally at a dose of 800 mg/day. The combination therapy obtained a complete response in three patients (15%) and a partial response in three (15%). Nine patients (45%) had stable disease and five (25%), progressive disease. All six patients who responded to the combination therapy had been nephrectomized and had pulmonary metastases. Two of them also had metastases to other sites (mediastinal lymph nodes and bone). The pulmonary metastases were significantly more receptive to interferon therapy than those at the other sites. The average times before a response was obtained were 2.2 months for a minor response, 2.7 months for a partial response and 3.0 months for a complete response, and the average duration of response was 26 months. The six patients who responded survived for a significantly longer period than the 14 non-responding patients treated with interferon in combination with cimetidine. The major toxicities encountered were fever, fatigue and anorexia due to interferon, and the combination therapy was well tolerated except in three patients. The results suggest that interferon-alpha and cimetidine combination therapy may be of use in the management of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:2067120

  3. Therapeutic Strategies for Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Whom First-Line Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-Directed Therapies Fail.

    PubMed

    Malouf, Gabriel G; Flippot, Ronan; Khayat, David

    2016-05-01

    Metastases are present in one third of renal cell carcinomas at diagnosis. The overall survival duration in metastatic renal cell carcinoma is approximately 22 months, which underlines the need for more effective systemic treatments. Therapies on the basis of antiangiogenic agents and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin have been approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, but only benefits for progression-free survival were demonstrated in the second-line setting. Fortunately, promising treatments are emerging, from new antiangiogenic agents to immune checkpoint inhibitors. For the first time, both an immune checkpoint inhibitor (nivolumab) and a dual inhibitor of the tyrosine kinases c-Met and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (cabozantinib) have demonstrated improvements in overall survival in the second-line setting. Finding the best sequence for these novel agents will be crucial to improving outcomes in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. This article comprises both a systematic review of the literature and recommendations for second-line therapeutic strategies for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma in whom inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor have failed. PMID:27170687

  4. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition. Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC. PMID:26872372

  5. Pathophysiology and recent advances in the management of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Elder, Grahame

    2002-12-01

    Bone disease is observed in 75-100% of patients with chronic renal failure as the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 60 ml/minute. Hyperparathyroid (high turnover) bone disease is found most frequently followed by mixed osteodystrophy, low-turnover bone disease, and osteomalacia. With advancing renal impairment, "skeletal resistance" to parathyroid hormone (PTH) occurs. To maintain bone turnover, intact PTH (iPTH) targets from two to four times the upper normal range have been suggested, but whole PTH(1-84) assays indicate that amino-terminally truncated fragments, which accumulate in end-stage renal disease (ESRD), account for up to one-half of the measured iPTH. PTH levels and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) provide some information on bone involvement but bone biopsy and histomorphometry remains the gold standard. Calcitriol and calcium salts can be used to suppress PTH and improve osteomalacia but there is growing concern that these agents predispose to the development of vascular calcification, cardiovascular morbidity, low-turnover bone disease and fracture. Newer therapeutic options include less calcemic vitamin D analogues, calcimimetics and bisphosphonates for hyperparathyroidism, and sevelamer for phosphate control. Calcitriol and hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) have been shown to maintain bone mineral density (BMD) in certain patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). After renal transplantation, renal osteodystrophy generally improves but BMD often worsens. Bisphosphonate therapy may be appropriate for some patients at risk of fracture. When renal bone disease is assessed using a combination of biochemical markers, histology and bone densitometry, early intervention and the careful use of an increasing number of effective therapies can reduce the morbidity associated with this common problem. PMID:12469904

  6. Safety assessment of molecular targeted therapies in association with radiotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a real-life report.

    PubMed

    Langrand-Escure, Julien; Vallard, Alexis; Rivoirard, Romain; Méry, Benoîte; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Espenel, Sophie; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Ben Mrad, Majed; Diao, Peng; Rancoule, Chloé; Suchaud, Jean-Philippe; Fournel, Pierre; Guillot, Aline; Chargari, Cyrus; Escudier, Bernard; Négrier, Sylvie; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Molecular targeted therapies (TT) are the cornerstone of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treatment. There is a paucity of data on the safety of the radiotherapy (RT)-TT association in a sequential or a concomitant setting. The aim of the present study is to retrospectively assess the safety of the RT-TT association. From 2006 to 2014, data from 84 consecutive patients treated with RT and TT for metastatic RCC were retrospectively collected. RT-TT sequential and concomitant associations were, respectively, defined by a time interval of more than five TT half-lives and less than or equal to five TT half-lives between the last TT administration and RT initiation. Toxicities in the fields of RT were assessed systematically. As many patients received several TT and RT courses, 136 RT-TT associations were analyzed, with 66 sequential and 70 concomitant schemes. RT was mainly delivered on bone (75%) and brain metastases (14.7%). TT were tyrosine kinase inhibitors (73.5%), mTOR inhibitors (19.8%), and monoclonal antibodies (6.7%). With a median follow-up of 9.5 months, whatever the sequence, no grade≥4 toxicity was reported. Two grade 3 toxicities were reported with sequential (3%) and concomitant (2.9%) RT-TT, respectively. Sequential or concomitant RT-TT associations in metastatic RCC do not seem to cause major toxicity. PMID:27045782

  7. Gene set enrichment analysis and ingenuity pathway analysis of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed I; Dębski, Konrad J; Dabrowski, Michał; Czarnecka, Anna M; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, genome-wide RNA expression analysis has become a routine tool that offers a great opportunity to study and understand the key role of genes that contribute to carcinogenesis. Various microarray platforms and statistical approaches can be used to identify genes that might serve as prognostic biomarkers and be developed as antitumor therapies in the future. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is a serious, life-threatening disease, and there are few treatment options for patients. In this study, we performed one-color microarray gene expression (4×44K) analysis of the mRCC cell line Caki-1 and the healthy kidney cell line ASE-5063. A total of 1,921 genes were differentially expressed in the Caki-1 cell line (1,023 upregulated and 898 downregulated). Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) approaches were used to analyze the differential-expression data. The objective of this research was to identify complex biological changes that occur during metastatic development using Caki-1 as a model mRCC cell line. Our data suggest that there are multiple deregulated pathways associated with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mccRCC), including integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, IGF-I signaling, CXCR4 signaling, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. The IPA upstream analysis predicted top transcriptional regulators that are either activated or inhibited, such as estrogen receptors, TP53, KDM5B, SPDEF, and CDKN1A. The GSEA approach was used to further confirm enriched pathway data following IPA. PMID:27279483

  8. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Yang, Eddy S; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Ramaker, Ryne C; Cooper, Sara J; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  9. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Ryne C.; Cooper, Sara J.; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S.; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L.; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  10. Current management and future directions in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma-a latin american perspective: 10 years in review.

    PubMed

    Smaletz, Oren

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of kidney cancer is estimated at 337,860 new cases per year in the International Agency for Research on Cancer's GLOBOCAN 2012 update, with an estimated 143,369 deaths annually. Over the past 10 years, there have been significant advances in the treatment of advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma, including the development of targeted therapies. Currently recommended first-line treatments include sunitinib, temsirolimus, bevacizumab plus interferon, and pazopanib, or high-dose interleukin-2 or sorafenib for selected patients. Recommended second-line treatments include all of the above agents, as well as everolimus and axitinib. Unfortunately, combination therapies have generally resulted in increased toxicity and little improvement in efficacy. Recent studies focused on identification of predictive biomarkers for responses to specific targeted therapies and have not been successful to date. Despite recent advances in targeted treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, important questions regarding biomarkers of efficacy, and optimal combination and sequencing of agents remain to be answered. This paper reviews literature concerned with first-and second-line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma and will discuss key issues in Latin America. PMID:26689508

  11. Current management and future directions in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma–a latin american perspective: 10 years in review

    PubMed Central

    Smaletz, Oren

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The worldwide incidence of kidney cancer is estimated at 337,860 new cases per year in the International Agency for Research on Cancer's GLOBOCAN 2012 update, with an estimated 143,369 deaths annually. Over the past 10 years, there have been significant advances in the treatment of advanced/metastatic renal cell carcinoma, including the development of targeted therapies. Currently recommended first-line treatments include sunitinib, temsirolimus, bevacizumab plus interferon, and pazopanib, or high-dose interleukin-2 or sorafenib for selected patients. Recommended second-line treatments include all of the above agents, as well as everolimus and axitinib. Unfortunately, combination therapies have generally resulted in increased toxicity and little improvement in efficacy. Recent studies focused on identification of predictive biomarkers for responses to specific targeted therapies and have not been successful to date. Despite recent advances in targeted treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, important questions regarding biomarkers of efficacy, and optimal combination and sequencing of agents remain to be answered. This paper reviews literature concerned with first-and second-line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma and will discuss key issues in Latin America. PMID:26689508

  12. Sapanisertib or Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    High Grade Sarcoma; Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma; Metastatic Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Recurrent Leiomyosarcoma; Recurrent Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Recurrent Synovial Sarcoma; Recurrent Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Uterine Corpus Leiomyosarcoma

  13. Review of systemic therapies for locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Arsen; Tan, Carlyn; Tuli, Richard; Hendifar, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer, along with colon cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. Up to a quarter of patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis and 40% will develop metastatic disease. The past 10 years have been extremely exciting in the treatment of both locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer (mRC). With the advent of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, increased numbers of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are surviving longer and some are seeing their tumors shrink to sizes that allow for resection. The advent of biologics and monoclonal antibodies has propelled the treatment of mRC further than many could have hoped. Combined with regimens such as FOLFOX or FOLFIRI, median survival rates have been increased to an average of 23 months. However, the combinations of chemotherapy regimens seem endless for rectal cancer. We will review the major chemotherapies available for locally advanced and mRC as well as regimens currently under investigation such as FOLFOXIRI. We will also review vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors as single agents and in combination with traditional chemotherapy regimens. PMID:25830038

  14. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient’s functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer. PMID:24616568

  15. The Toxicity and Benefit of Various Dosing Strategies for Interleukin-2 in Metastatic Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pachella, Laura A; Madsen, Lydia T; Dains, Joyce E

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy has been used with success in curing meta-static renal cell carcinoma and melanoma in a small minority of patients. However, the benefits can be accompanied by severe toxicity. This review of the literature discusses varying doses of IL-2 and their associated re-sponse rates and the toxicities associated with treatment. The review also explores the maximally beneficial dose with the most tolerable side effects. Although the higher-dose regimens with a more frequent dosing schedule produce higher-grade toxicity, they were found to deliver the most durable and complete responses. It is recommended to use a higher-dose regimen (720,000 IU/kg every 8 hours for a maximum of 15 doses) and provide sup-portive care for toxicity, so patients can have maximal benefit from therapy. PMID:26557408

  16. Complete remission with sunitinib in a poor-risk patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: the fine balance between toxicity and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Modena, Alessandra; Simbolo, Michele; Brunelli, Matteo; Artibani, Walter; Martignoni, Guido; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-04-01

    Sunitinib represents a reasonable therapeutic option for first-line treatment of poor-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma and the treatment should aim at the delicate balance between managing side effects to improve the toxicity profile and patient compliance to treatment while maintaining anticancer efficacy. Achievement of a complete response, although rare, is possible, even in poor-risk patients. Treatment discontinuation represents a viable alternative for both tumour biology and patients' quality of life. To date, no molecular markers have been identified with prognostic and/or predictive value for guiding therapeutic decisions. Further research should aim at gaining in-depth knowledge of renal cell carcinoma biology for a tailored personalized therapy. We report a case of poor-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma, with Von Hippel-Lindau loss of function, which achieved and maintained a complete remission after first-line therapy with sunitinib by using a reduced dosage and a modified schedule of treatment. PMID:25569703

  17. Changes in metabolic profile, iron and ferritin levels during the treatment of metastatic renal cancer - A new potential biomarker?

    PubMed

    Golčić, Marin; Petković, Marija

    2016-09-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) develops in approximately 33% of all renal cancer patients. First line treatment of mRCC includes drugs such as sunitinib, temsirolimus and pazopanib, with overall survival now reaching up to 43,6months in patients with favorable-risk metastatic disease. Several side-effects in mRCC treatment, such as hypothyroidism, can be used as positive prognostic factors and indicate good response to therapy. Hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia independent of hypothyroidism are reported as side-effects in temsirolimus treatment and recently in sunitinib treatment, but the exact mechanism and significance of the changes remains elusive. Most likely, metabolic changes are caused by inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a positive target of tumor growth suppression, but also a regulator of iron homeostasis. There are no clinical studies reporting changes in iron and ferritin levels during mRCC biotherapy, but we hypothesize that inhibition of mTOR will also affect iron and ferritin levels. If both lipid and iron changes correlate, there is a high possibility that both changes are primarily caused by mTOR inhibition and the level of change should correlate with the inhibition of mTOR pathway and hence the efficacy of targeted treatment. We lastly hypothesize that mRCC biotherapy causes hypercholesterolemia with a possibly improved cholesterol profile due to increase HDL/LDL ratio, so statins might not have a role as supplementary treatment, whereas a sharp rise in triglyceride levels seems to be the primary target for additional therapy. PMID:27515221

  18. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Does Not Control Proliferation in Primary Cultures of Human Metastatic Renal Cellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Ilaria; Potenza, Duilio Michele; Bottino, Cinzia; Glasnov, Toma N.; Ferulli, Federica; Mosca, Alessandra; Guerra, Germano; Rosti, Vittorio; Luinetti, Ombretta; Porta, Camillo; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is activated following depletion of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive Ca2+ pool to regulate proliferation in immortalized cell lines established from either primary or metastatic lesions. The molecular nature of SOCE may involve both Stim1, which senses Ca2+ levels within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ reservoir, and a number of a Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membrane, including Orai1, Orai3, and members of the canonical transient receptor (TRPC1–7) family of ion channels. The present study was undertaken to assess whether SOCE is expressed and controls proliferation in primary cultures isolated from secondary lesions of heavily pretreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. SOCE was induced following pharmacological depletion of the ER Ca2+ store, but not by InsP3-dependent Ca2+ release. Metastatic RCC cells express Stim1-2, Orai1–3, and TRPC1–7 transcripts and proteins. In these cells, SOCE was insensitive to BTP-2, 10 µM Gd3+ and Pyr6, while it was inhibited by 100 µM Gd3+, 2-APB, and carboxyamidotriazole (CAI). Neither Gd3+ nor 2-APB or CAI impaired mRCC cell proliferation. Consistently, no detectable Ca2+ signal was elicited by growth factor stimulation. Therefore, a functional SOCE is expressed but does not control proliferation of mRCC cells isolated from patients resistant to multikinase inhibitors. PMID:25126575

  19. Prognostic significance of modified Glasgow Prognostic Score in patients with non-metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dae Sung; Kim, Sun Il; Choo, Seol Ho; Jang, Seok Heun; Ahn, Hyun Soo; Kim, Se Joong

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) as a prognostic factor in patients with non-metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and methods Between June 1994 and July 2012, 469 patients with RCC underwent radical or partial nephrectomy at two hospitals. Among these patients, 65 with non-clear cell type histology and 16 with lymph-node or distant metastasis were excluded. The medical records of the remaining 388 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The mGPS was calculated using a selective combination of C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin as previously described. The prognostic significance of various clinicopathological variables including mGPS was analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Of the total 388 patients, 40 patients (10.3%) developed local recurrence or distant metastasis and 18 patients (4.6%) died of disease during the follow-up period. The univariate analysis identified CRP, mGPS, thrombocytosis, T stage, Fuhrman's nuclear grade and lymphovascular invasion as significant prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival (RFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). The multivariate analysis indicated that mGPS (p < 0.001), T stage (p = 0.024) and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.046) were independent prognostic factors for RFS, whereas mGPS (p = 0.001) was the only independent prognostic factor for CSS. Conclusions The mGPS is an independent prognostic factor for RFS and CSS in patients with non-metastatic clear cell RCC treated with radical or partial nephrectomy. These findings suggest that mGPS should be used for predicting recurrence or survival in patients undergoing nephrectomy for non-metastatic clear cell RCC. PMID:26878156

  20. Current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer: improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Pedro Nazareth; Muniz, Thiago Pimentel; Miranda, Raelson Rodrigues; Tadokoro, Hakaru; Forones, Nora Manoukian; Monteiro, Ines-de-Paula; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Janjigian, Yelena Y; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we review the literature on the current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer aimed at improving patient care. We conclude that the key to guiding targeted therapy is individual biomarkers, which are not completely elucidated. HER2 overexpression is the only predictive biomarker currently in use. Furthermore, it is necessary to understand that gastric tumors are heterogeneous; therefore, is impossible to evaluate a novel biological compound without evaluating personal biomarkers. The selection of patients who are able to receive each treatment is paramount for improving advanced gastric cancer survival and reducing unnecessary costs. PMID:26838766

  1. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs): recent insights and advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. PMID:22886480

  2. Tumor Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase Signaling and Development of Metastatic Disease in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Anne Hansen; Kristensen, Annette Torgunrud; Saelen, Marie Grøn; de Wijn, Rik; Edvardsen, Hege; Jovanovic, Jovana; Abrahamsen, Torveig Weum; Dueland, Svein; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2012-01-01

    Background Recognizing EGFR as key orchestrator of the metastatic process in colorectal cancer, but also the substantial heterogeneity of responses to anti-EGFR therapy, we examined the pattern of composite tumor kinase activities governed by EGFR-mediated signaling that might be implicated in development of metastatic disease. Patients and Methods Point mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA and ERBB2 amplification were determined in primary tumors from 63 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer scheduled for radical treatment. Using peptide arrays with tyrosine kinase substrates, ex vivo phosphopeptide profiles were generated from the same baseline tumor samples and correlated to metastasis-free survival. Results Unsupervised clustering analysis of the resulting phosphorylation of 102 array substrates defined two tumor classes, both consisting of cases with and without KRAS/BRAF mutations. The smaller cluster group of patients, with tumors generating high ex vivo phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-related substrates, had a particularly aggressive disease course, with almost a half of patients developing metastatic disease within one year of follow-up. Conclusion High phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-mediated signaling activity of the primary tumor, rather than KRAS/BRAF mutation status, was identified as a hallmark of poor metastasis-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing radical treatment of the pelvic cavity. PMID:23226389

  3. Lymphangitic retroperitoneal carcinomatosis occurring from metastatic sarcomatoid chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alimchandani, Meghna; Lara, Karlena; Tsokos, Maria; Linehan, W M; Merino, Maria J

    2014-03-01

    Forty -five year-old man with left renal mass underwent nephrectomy to reveal 20cm tumor diagnosed as sarcomatoid chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (CRCC). Lymph node metastasis of chromophobe and sarcomatoid components, disseminated tumor in retroperitoneal fat, lymphatic vessels, peri-renal adipose tissue in lymphangitic carcinomatosis pattern were identified. Chromophobe epithelial cells EMA, c-Kit, cytokeratin 7 positive; sarcomatoid cells were CD10, SMA positive with high proliferation index . Chromophobe epithelial cells had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in chromosomes 1p, 1q while sarcomatoid cells had LOH in 3p,1p, 1q. In conclusion, sarcomatoid CRCC has aggressive biologic behavior and potential to metastasize in unusual patterns. PMID:24696789

  4. Chemotherapy and irradiation for locally advanced and metastatic pulmonary carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Curtis R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Nishino, Mizuki; Chen, Aileen B.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Kulke, Matthew H.; McNamee, Ciaran J.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The optimal management of locally advanced and metastatic pulmonary carcinoid tumors remains to be determined. Materials and methods A retrospective review was conducted on patients with typical and atypical pulmonary carcinoid tumors treated at our institutions between 1990 and 2012. Results 300 patients were identified with pulmonary carcinoid, (80 patients with atypical carcinoid), of whom 29 presented with metastatic disease (16 atypical). Of evaluable patients, 26 (41%) with stages I–III atypical carcinoid tumors recurred at a median time of 3.7 years (range, 0.4–32), compared to 3 (1%) patients with typical carcinoid (range, 8–12.3). 39 patients were treated with chemotherapy, including 30 patients with metastatic disease (27 atypical), and 7 patients were treated with adjuvant platinum–etoposide chemoradiation (6 atypical, 1 typical, 6 stage IIIA, 1 stage IIB). At a median follow-up of 2 years there were 2 recurrences in the 7 patients receiving adjuvant treatment. Median survival after diagnosis of metastatic disease for patients with atypical pulmonary carcinoid was 3.3 years with a 5-year survival of 24%. Treatment regimens showing efficacy in pulmonary carcinoid include 15 patients treated with octreotide-based therapies (10% response rate (RR), 70% disease control rate (DCR), 15 month median progression-free survival (PFS)), 13 patients treated with etoposide + platinum (23% RR, 69% DCR, 7 month median PFS), and 14 patients treated with temozolomide-based therapies (14% RR, 57% DCR, 10 month median PFS). 8 of 10 patients with octreotide-avid disease treated with an octreotide-based regimen experienced disease control (1 partial response, 7 stable disease) for a median of 18 months (range 6–72 months). Conclusions These results support our previous finding that a subset of pulmonary carcinoid tumors are responsive to chemotherapy. PMID:25218177

  5. Differential expression of PD-L1 between primary and metastatic sites in clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Callea, Marcella; Albiges, Laurence; Gupta, Mamta; Cheng, Su-Chun; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Fay, André P.; Song, Jiaxi; Carvo, Ingrid; Bhatt, Rupal S.; Atkins, Michael B.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Choueiri, Toni K.; McDermott, David F.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Signoretti, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    PD-L1 expression in primary clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) increases the likelihood of response to anti-PD-1 inhibition, but fails to identify all responders. We hypothesized that PD-L1 levels assessed in randomly selected areas of the primary tumors may not accurately reflect expression levels in metastatic lesions, which are the target of systemic therapy. Therefore, we compared PD-L1 expression in a series of primary ccRCC and their metastases. Tissue blocks from 53 primary ccRCCs and 76 corresponding metastases were retrieved. Areas with predominant and highest nuclear grade were selected. Slides were immunostained with a validated anti-PD-L1 antibody (405.9A11). Membranous expression in tumor cells was quantified using H-score. Expression in tumor-infiltrating mononuclear cells (TIMC) was quantified using a combined score. Discordant tumor cell PD-L1 staining between primary tumors and metastases was observed in 11/53 cases (20.8%). Overall, tumor cell PD-L1 levels were not different in primary tumors and metastases (p=0.51). Tumor cell PD-L1 positivity was associated with higher T stage (p=0.03) and higher Fuhrman Nuclear Grade (FNG) (p<0.01). Within individual lesions, PD-L1 positivity was heterogeneous and almost exclusively detected in high nuclear grade areas (p<0.001). No difference was found in PD-L1 levels in TIMCs between primary tumors and metastases (p=0.82). Heterogeneity of PD-L1 expression in ccRCC suggests that its assessment as predictive biomarker for PD-1 blockade may require analysis of metastatic lesions. Notably, since PD-L1 expression was mostly detected in high nuclear grade areas, to avoid false negative results, these areas should be specifically selected for assessment. PMID:26014095

  6. Cabozantinib versus everolimus in advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choueiri, Toni K.; Escudier, Bernard; Powles, Thomas; Mainwaring, Paul; Rini, Brian I.; Donskov, Frede; Hammers, Hans; Hutson, Thomas E.; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Peltola, Katriina; Roth, Bruce J.; Bjarnason, Georg A.; Géczi, Lajos; Keam, Bhumsuk; Moroto, Pablo; Heng, Daniel Y. C.; Schmidinger, Manuela; Kantoff, Philip W.; Borgman, Anne; Hessel, Colin; Scheffold, Christian; Schwab, Gisela M.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Motzer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cabozantinib is an oral small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) as well as MET and AXL; each has been implicated in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathobiology or development of resistance to antiangiogenic drugs. This randomized open-label phase 3 trial evaluated the efficacy of cabozantinib compared to everolimus in RCC patients who progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. Methods The trial randomized 658 patients to receive cabozantinib at a dose of 60 mg daily, or everolimus at a dose of 10 mg daily. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Secondary efficacy endpoints were overall survival and objective response rate. Results Median progression-free survival was 7.4 months with cabozantinib and 3.8 months with everolimus. The risk of progression or death was 42% lower with cabozantinib compared to everolimus (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45 to 0.75; P < 0.001). Objective response rates were 21% with cabozantinib and 5% with everolimus (P < 0.001). A planned interim analysis showed that overall survival was improved with cabozantinib (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.89; P = 0.005) but did not cross the significance boundary. Adverse events (grade 3 or 4, regardless of causality) were reported in 74% of cabozantinib patients and 65% of everolimus patients. Discontinuation of study treatment for adverse events occurred in 9.1% of cabozantinib patients and 10% of everolimus patients. Conclusions Cabozantinib improved progression-free survival compared to everolimus in RCC patients who progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. PMID:26406150

  7. Outcomes of Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and End-Stage Renal Disease Receiving Dialysis and Targeted Therapies: A Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Aditya V.; Matrana, Marc R.; Atkinson, Bradley J.; Flaherty, Amber L.; Jonasch, Eric; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2014-01-01

    Data are limited regarding outcomes in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) receiving targeted therapy. We retrospectively identified patients with mRCC and ESRD treated at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 2002 to 2012. Fourteen patients were identified with a median number of targeted therapies (TTs) per patient of 3 (range, 1–4). Outcomes in patients with mRCC and ESRD were similar to those reported in patients with normal kidney function. Introduction Limited data are available regarding patients with renal cell carcinoma and ESRD treated with TTs. The objective of this study was to explore the tolerability and safety of TT in patients with mRCC and ESRD. Patients and Methods We retrospectively identified patients with mRCC and ESRD treated at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 2002 to 2012. Patient characteristics including demographic, histology, treatment, and adverse events are reported. Duration of treatment (TOT) was determined from date of drug initiation to discontinuation. Overall survival (OS) was determined from initiation of TT to death. Statistics are descriptive. Results Fourteen patients were identified. Ten patients had clear-cell histology and 4 had papillary histology. The median number of TTs per patient was 3 (range, 1–4) with median TOT of 28 months for all TTs. Eighty-eight percent of all toxicities were Grade 1 to 2; no Grade 4 toxicities were noted. Treatment discontinuations included 3 patients treated with sorafenib due to hand-foot syndrome, intolerable fatigue, and squamous cell skin cancer development; 2 patients treated with pazopanib due to intolerable fatigue and increased transaminase levels; and 1 patient treated with everolimus due to pneumonitis. Eight patients died from progressive disease. Median OS from initiation of TT was 28.5 months and 35 months from time of diagnosis. Conclusion Toxicities were mild to moderate and

  8. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  9. Molecular targeted therapies in advanced or metastatic chordoma patients: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Lebellec, Loïc; Aubert, Sébastien; Zaïri, Fahed; Ryckewaert, Thomas; Chauffert, Bruno; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Chordomas, derived from undifferentiated notochordal remnants, represent less than 4% of bone primary tumors. Despite surgery followed by radiotherapy, local and metastatic relapses are frequent. In case of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas, medical treatment is frequently discussed. While chemotherapy is ineffective, it would appear that some molecular targeted therapies, in particular imatinib, could slow down the tumor growth in case-reports, retrospective series, and phase I or II trials. Nineteen publications, between January 1990 and September 2014, have been found describing the activity of these targeted therapies. A systematic analysis of these publications shows that the best objective response with targeted therapies was stabilization in 52 to 69% of chordomas. Given the indolent course of advanced chordoma and because of the absence of randomized trial, the level of evidence to treat chordomas with molecular therapy is low (level III), whatever the drug. Furthermore, we could not draw firm conclusion on the activity of imatinib. Other putative targets have also been described. Therefore, further clinical trials are expected, especially with these targets. Nevertheless, it seems essential, in those future studies, to consider the naturally slow course of the disease. PMID:25682222

  10. Exceptional Response to Systemic Therapy in Advanced Metastatic Gastric Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion; Manning, Maria A; Carroll, John E; Xiu, Joanne; Smaglo, Brandon G; Mikhail, Sameh; Salem, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas represent one of the top five most common types of cancer worldwide. Despite significant advancement, it is still not known which first-line chemotherapy option is best matched to an individual patient. The vast advances in molecular biology have led to the discovery of many potential predictive biomarkers, such as HER-2 neu, thymidylate synthase (TS), excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and topoisomerase-1 (TOPO1). These markers could allow us to select treatment based on an individual’s tumor profile, resulting in an improvement of outcome. Our report highlights two patients with metastatic gastric cancer that achieved an exceptional response with traditional therapy and provides insights into the future perspectives of molecular profile-directed chemotherapy. PMID:26918225

  11. [Treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma with interferon alpha and OK-432 (streptococcal preparation)].

    PubMed

    Shinoda, M; Naide, Y

    1992-11-01

    A total of 12 patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma received interferon alpha (3 million units intramuscularly 6 times weekly) and OK-432 (5 KE (Klinische Einheit) intramuscularly twice weekly). Metastatic lesions appeared before operation in six patients and after operation in six patients. Among them 5 patients had received interferon therapy and this combination therapy was started after the judgment of progressive disease for interferon therapy. Eleven pulmonary and 5 bone metastases were evaluable. The median duration of the combination therapy was 89.3 weeks. There were 4 partial responses and no complete responses among the 12 patients, giving a response rate of 33.3%. The median duration of response was 25 months, with a range of 6 to 54 months. Responses were seen predominantly in patients in whom metastases appeared after operation (3 of 4 responders). However, regarding the individual organs, two complete and 2 partial responses were observed among 11 pulmonary metastases and 2 partial responses among 5 bone metastases. The survival period after discovery of the metastasis was 10 to 67 months and the 5-year survival rate was 70.5%. Almost all patients had fever and induration at the injection site. Other side effects included leukopenia, anorexia, and depression. This combination therapy is thought to be effective against bone or other organs metastasis resistant to interferon alone. PMID:1485585

  12. Glycosaminoglycan Profiling in Patients' Plasma and Urine Predicts the Occurrence of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Francesco; Volpi, Nicola; Nilsson, Helén; Nookaew, Intawat; Maruzzo, Marco; Roma, Anna; Johansson, Martin E; Stierner, Ulrika; Lundstam, Sven; Basso, Umberto; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-05-24

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) progression. Here, we used genome-scale metabolic modeling to elucidate metabolic reprogramming in 481 ccRCC samples and discovered strongly coordinated regulation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis at the transcript and protein levels. Extracellular GAGs are implicated in metastasis, so we speculated that such regulation might translate into a non-invasive biomarker for metastatic ccRCC (mccRCC). We measured 18 GAG properties in 34 mccRCC samples versus 16 healthy plasma and/or urine samples. The GAG profiles were distinctively altered in mccRCC. We derived three GAG scores that distinguished mccRCC patients with 93.1%-100% accuracy. We validated the score accuracies in an independent cohort (up to 18 mccRCC versus nine healthy) and verified that the scores normalized in eight patients with no evidence of disease. In conclusion, coordinated regulation of GAG biosynthesis occurs in ccRCC, and non-invasive GAG profiling is suitable for mccRCC diagnosis. PMID:27184840

  13. Predictive Immunohistochemical Markers Related to Drug Selection for Patients Treated with Sunitinib or Sorafenib for Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Wang, Lei; Li, Hongzhao; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yu; Guo, Gang; Liu, Kan; Meng, Qingyu; Zhao, Chaofei; Wang, Dianjun; Song, Zhigang; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug decisions in metastatic renal cell carcinoma are exclusively made on the basis of clinical criteria. We investigated whether these biomarkers (HIF-1α, HIF-2α, CAIX, VEGF, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, PDGFB, PDGFRA, PDGFRB, CD31, CD44, bcl-xL, KIT, p21, CXCR4, PTEN, (CSF)-1R, RET, and FLT-3) can predictive the different effects between sunitinib and sorafenib treatments and are available to guide targeted drug selection. We enrolled all patients who underwent nephrectomy with postoperative sunitinib- or sorafenib-treatment at our institution from 2007 to 2012. Immunohistochemical approach was applied to assess the potential differential effects of immunostainings between sunitinib- and sorafenib-treated groups. We found that patients with high HIF-2α, CD31 expression showed greater relative PFS and OS benefit and patients with high CAIX expression presented greater relative OS benefit from sunitinib than from sorafenib, patients with high VEGFR1 or PDGFRB expression levels exhibited worse relative PFS benefit from sunitinib than from sorafenib. Namely high HIF-2α, CD31, and CAIX expression levels along with low VEGFR1 and PDGFRB expression levels improved the benefit of sunitinib treatment compared with sorafenib treatment. These results can identify whether patients can benefit more from sunitinib or sorafenib for drug selection guidance, eventually with precision medicine. PMID:27488093

  14. Predictive Immunohistochemical Markers Related to Drug Selection for Patients Treated with Sunitinib or Sorafenib for Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Wang, Lei; Li, Hongzhao; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yu; Guo, Gang; Liu, Kan; Meng, Qingyu; Zhao, Chaofei; Wang, Dianjun; Song, Zhigang; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug decisions in metastatic renal cell carcinoma are exclusively made on the basis of clinical criteria. We investigated whether these biomarkers (HIF-1α, HIF-2α, CAIX, VEGF, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, PDGFB, PDGFRA, PDGFRB, CD31, CD44, bcl-xL, KIT, p21, CXCR4, PTEN, (CSF)-1R, RET, and FLT-3) can predictive the different effects between sunitinib and sorafenib treatments and are available to guide targeted drug selection. We enrolled all patients who underwent nephrectomy with postoperative sunitinib- or sorafenib-treatment at our institution from 2007 to 2012. Immunohistochemical approach was applied to assess the potential differential effects of immunostainings between sunitinib- and sorafenib-treated groups. We found that patients with high HIF-2α, CD31 expression showed greater relative PFS and OS benefit and patients with high CAIX expression presented greater relative OS benefit from sunitinib than from sorafenib, patients with high VEGFR1 or PDGFRB expression levels exhibited worse relative PFS benefit from sunitinib than from sorafenib. Namely high HIF-2α, CD31, and CAIX expression levels along with low VEGFR1 and PDGFRB expression levels improved the benefit of sunitinib treatment compared with sorafenib treatment. These results can identify whether patients can benefit more from sunitinib or sorafenib for drug selection guidance, eventually with precision medicine. PMID:27488093

  15. A Molecular Model for Predicting Overall Survival in Patients with Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma: Results from CALGB 90206 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung L.; Halabi, Susan; Li, Ping; Mayhew, Greg; Simko, Jeff; Nixon, Andrew B.; Small, Eric J.; Rini, Brian; Morris, Michael J.; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; George, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Prognosis associated with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) can vary widely. Methods This study used pretreatment nephrectomy specimens from a randomized phase III trial. Expression levels of candidate genes were determined from archival tumors using the OpenArray® platform for TaqMan® RT-qPCR. The dataset was randomly divided at 2:1 ratio into training (n = 221) and testing (n = 103) sets to develop a multigene prognostic signature. Findings Gene expressions were measured in 324 patients. In the training set, multiple models testing 424 candidate genes identified a prognostic signature containing 8 genes plus MSKCC clinical risk factors. In the testing set, the time dependent (td) AUC for a prognostic model containing the 8 genes with and without MSKCC risk factors were 0.72 and 0.69, respectively. The tdAUC for the clinical risk factors alone was 0.61. Additional primary mRCCs from patients with mRCC (n = 12) were sampled in multiple sites and standard deviations of gene expressions within a tumor were used as a measure of heterogeneity. All 8 genes in the final prognostic model met our criteria for minimal heterogeneity. Conclusions A molecular prognostic signature based on 8 genes was developed and is ready for external validation in this patient population and other related settings such as nonmetastatic RCC. PMID:26870806

  16. Recent advances in renal hypoxia: insights from bench experiments and computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Layton, Anita T

    2016-07-01

    The availability of oxygen in renal tissue is determined by the complex interactions among a host of processes, including renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting, medullary architecture, Na(+) transport, and oxygen consumption. When this delicate balance is disrupted, the kidney may become susceptible to hypoxic injury. Indeed, renal hypoxia has been implicated as one of the major causes of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of renal hypoxia; some of these studies were published in response to a recent Call for Papers of this journal: Renal Hypoxia. PMID:27147670

  17. Exploiting natural anti-tumor immunity for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Katherine A; James, Britnie R; Guan, Yue; Torry, Donald S; Wilber, Andrew; Griffith, Thomas S

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations of spontaneous disease regression in some renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients implicate a role for tumor immunity in controlling this disease. Puzzling, however, are findings that high levels of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are common to RCC. Despite expression of activation markers by TILs, functional impairment of innate and adaptive immune cells has been consistently demonstrated contributing to the failure of the immune system to control RCC. Immunotherapy can overcome the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor and provide an opportunity for long-term disease free survival. Unfortunately, complete response rates remain sub-optimal indicating the effectiveness of immunotherapy remains limited by tumor-specific factors and/or cell types that inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here we discuss immunotherapies and the function of multiple immune system components to achieve an effective response. Understanding these complex interactions is essential to rationally develop novel therapies capable of renewing the immune system's ability to respond to these tumors. PMID:25996049

  18. Favorable prognostic influence of T-box transcription factor Eomesodermin in metastatic renal cell cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dielmann, Anastasia; Letsch, Anne; Nonnenmacher, Anika; Miller, Kurt; Keilholz, Ulrich; Busse, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    T-box transcription factors, T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) encoded by Tbx21 and Eomesodermin (Eomes), drive the differentiation of effector/memory T cell lineages and NK cells. The aim of the study was to determine the prognostic influence of the expression of these transcription factors in peripheral blood (pB) in a cohort of 41 metastatic (m) RCC patients before receiving sorafenib treatment and to analyze their association with the immunophenotype in pB. In contrast to Tbx21, in the multivariate analysis including clinical features, Eomes mRNA expression was identified as an independent good prognostic factor for progression-free survival (PFS, p = 0.042) and overall survival (OS, p = 0.001) in addition to a favorable ECOG performance status (p = 0.01 and p = 0.008, respectively). Eomes expression correlated positively not only with expression of Tbx21 and TGFβ1 mRNA, but also with mRNA expression of the activation marker ICOS, and with in vivo activated HLA-DR(+) T cells. Eomes expression was negatively associated with TNFα-producing T cells. On protein level, Eomes was mainly expressed by CD56(+)CD3(-) NK cells in pB. In conclusion, we identified a higher Eomes mRNA expression as an independent good prognostic factor for OS and PFS in mRCC patients treated with sorafenib. PMID:26753694

  19. Sunitinib re-challenge in advanced renal-cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Porta, C; Paglino, C; Grünwald, V

    2014-01-01

    Despite offering significant clinical benefits in advanced renal-cell carcinoma (RCC), the effectiveness of targeted therapies eventually declines with the development of resistance. Defining optimal sequences of therapy is therefore the focus of much current research. There is also evidence that treatment ‘re-challenge' may be an effective strategy in some patients. We review evidence to evaluate whether sunitinib may have value as re-challenge therapy in patients who have progressed on prior targeted therapy with sunitinib and/or an alternative tyrosine kinase inhibitor or mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor. Re-challenge with sunitinib appears to be of clinical benefit, thus representing a feasible therapeutic option for patients with advanced RCC who are refractory to other treatments and are able to receive further therapy. These observations support hypotheses that resistance to targeted agents is transient and can be at least partially reversed by re-introduction of the same agent after a treatment break. Median progression-free survival durations appear to be shorter and response rates lower on re-challenge than following initial treatment, although a wider interval between treatments appears to increase response to sunitinib re-challenge. PMID:24800947

  20. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Role of Chemotherapy in Advanced and Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (NET)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew H.; Lee, Adrian; Li, Bob T.; Lumba, Sumit; Clarke, Stephen J.; Samra, Jaswinder; Pavlakis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives In the era of somatostatin analogues and targeted therapies, the role of chemotherapy in NET remains largely undefined. This systematic review aimed to assess the effect of chemotherapy on response rates (RR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity compared to other chemotherapies/systemic therapies or best supportive care in patients with advanced or metastatic NET. Methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1946 to 2015 were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE, other databases and conference proceedings. Review of abstracts, quality assessment and data abstraction were performed independently by two investigators. Meta-analyses were conducted using Mantel-Haenszel analysis with random-effects modelling. Results Six RCTs comparing standard streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouacil (STZ/5FU) chemotherapy to other chemotherapy regimens, and 2 comparing this to interferon (IFN) were included. Only 1 study was considered at low risk of bias. STZ/5-FU was no different to other chemotherapies in response rate [RR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72–1.27], PFS (RR 0.95; CI 0.81–1.13), or OS (RR 1.03; CI 0.77–1.39). IFN may produce higher response than STZ/5FU (RR 0.20; CI 0.04–1.13), but event rates were small and survival was no different. Interferon was associated with higher overall haematological (RR 0.47; CI 0.27–0.82) and lower overall renal toxicity (RR 3.61; CI 1.24–10.51). Conclusion Strong evidence is lacking in the area of chemotherapy in neuroendocrine tumors. There is currently no evidence that one chemotherapeutic regimen is significantly better than the other, nor is interferon better than chemotherapy. There is an urgent need to design RCTs comparing modern chemotherapy to other agents in NET. PMID:27362760

  1. A phase II trial of the nucleolin-targeted DNA aptamer AS1411 in metastatic refractory renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Bambury, Richard; Drabkin, Harry A.; Lara, Primo N.; Harzstark, Andrea L.; Figlin, Robert A.; Smith, Gregory W.; Choueiri, Toni; Erlandsson, Fredrik; Laber, Damian A.

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA aptamers represent a novel strategy in anti-cancer medicine. These compounds are short sequences of DNA that have protein binding effects via shape specific recognition of a target protein in an interaction which is analogous to antibody-antigen binding. AS1411, a DNA aptamer that targets nucleolin (a protein which is overexpressed in many tumor types), was evaluated in patients with metastatic, predominantly clear-cell, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who had failed treatment with ≥1 previous tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We present the first manuscript reporting the use of this novel anti-cancer agent in humans. Methods In this phase II, single-arm study, AS1411 was administered at 40 mg/kg/day by continuous intravenous infusion on days 1–4 of a 28-day cycle, for two cycles. Primary endpoint was overall response rate; progression-free survival (PFS) and safety were secondary endpoints. Results 35 patients were enrolled and treated; 33 completed two treatment cycles. Median number of prior therapies was 2 (range 1–7). One patient (2.9%) had a response to treatment. The response was dramatic (84% reduction in the sum of longest diameters of selected target tumor lesions) and durable (the patient remains free of progression 2 years after completing therapy). No responses were seen in the other patients. Median PFS was 4 months. Only 34% of patients had an AS1411-related adverse event, all of which were mild or moderate. Conclusions AS1411 appears to have limited activity in unselected patients with metastatic RCC. However, rare, dramatic and durable responses can be observed and toxicity is low. Further studies with nucleolin targeted compounds may benefit from efforts to discover predictive biomarkers of response. Currently, promising pre-clinical studies are ongoing using AS1411 conjugated to traditional cytotoxic agents to selectively deliver these treatments to tumor cells. DNA aptamers represent a novel way to target cancer cells at a molecular

  2. Incidental detection of pancreatic hemangioma mimicking a metastatic tumor of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Ji-Ye; Choi, Jin Young; Choi, Young Deuk

    2016-01-01

    Adult pancreatic hemangioma is a rare disease. We presented a case of a woman with pancreatic tail mass mimicking a distant metastasis from the kidney. A 68-year-old woman was found with a left kidney mass on medical checkup. Computed tomography scan showed a 4.3 cm-sized mass in the left kidney, suggesting renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and a strongly enhancing tiny nodule in the pancreatic tail. We could not rule the possibility of RCC metastasis, hence, surgical resection of the pancreatic mass simultaneously with radical nephrectomy for RCC was conducted. Gross pathologic examination revealed hemangioma. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for CD34, CD31 and factor VIII-related antigen. There were no significant postoperative events, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7 without any complications. Treatment strategies for pancreatic hemangioma have not been established. To our knowledge, this was the first case report of asymptomatic pancreatic hemangioma. In previous literature, treatment differed on a case-by-case basis, ranging from observation to surgical resection. The most important factor in deciding whether to perform surgery is possibly risk-benefit effectiveness; however, tumor location, patient symptoms, and other factors are also important.

  3. Incidental detection of pancreatic hemangioma mimicking a metastatic tumor of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Ji-Ye; Choi, Jin Young; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2016-05-01

    Adult pancreatic hemangioma is a rare disease. We presented a case of a woman with pancreatic tail mass mimicking a distant metastasis from the kidney. A 68-year-old woman was found with a left kidney mass on medical checkup. Computed tomography scan showed a 4.3 cm-sized mass in the left kidney, suggesting renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and a strongly enhancing tiny nodule in the pancreatic tail. We could not rule the possibility of RCC metastasis, hence, surgical resection of the pancreatic mass simultaneously with radical nephrectomy for RCC was conducted. Gross pathologic examination revealed hemangioma. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for CD34, CD31 and factor VIII-related antigen. There were no significant postoperative events, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7 without any complications. Treatment strategies for pancreatic hemangioma have not been established. To our knowledge, this was the first case report of asymptomatic pancreatic hemangioma. In previous literature, treatment differed on a case-by-case basis, ranging from observation to surgical resection. The most important factor in deciding whether to perform surgery is possibly risk-benefit effectiveness; however, tumor location, patient symptoms, and other factors are also important. PMID:27212999

  4. Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy Is Associated with an Immunosuppressive Tumor Microenvironment in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-De; Hoang, Anh; Zhou, Lijun; Kalra, Sarathi; Yetil, Alper; Sun, Mianen; Ding, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xuesong; Bai, Shanshan; German, Peter; Tamboli, Pheroze; Rao, Priya; Karam, Jose A; Wood, Christopher; Matin, Surena; Zurita, Amado; Bex, Axel; Griffioen, Arjan W; Gao, Jianjun; Sharma, Padmanee; Tannir, Nizar; Sircar, Kanishka; Jonasch, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an immunogenic and proangiogenic cancer, and antiangiogenic therapy is the current mainstay of treatment. Patients with RCC develop innate or adaptive resistance to antiangiogenic therapy. There is a need to identify biomarkers that predict therapeutic resistance and guide combination therapy. We assessed the interaction between antiangiogenic therapy and the tumor immune microenvironment and determined their impact on clinical outcome. We found that antiangiogenic therapy-treated RCC primary tumors showed increased infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, which was inversely related to patient overall survival and progression-free survival. Furthermore, specimens from patients treated with antiangiogenic therapy showed higher infiltration of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells and enhanced expression of checkpoint ligand programed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). Both immunosuppressive features were correlated with T-lymphocyte infiltration and were negatively related to patient survival. Treatment of RCC cell lines and RCC xenografts in immunodeficient mice with sunitinib also increased tumor PD-L1 expression. Results from this study indicate that antiangiogenic treatment may both positively and negatively regulate the tumor immune microenvironment. These findings generate hypotheses on resistance mechanisms to antiangiogenic therapy and will guide the development of combination therapy with PD-1/PD-L1-blocking agents. PMID:26014097

  5. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  6. Comparative efficacy and safety of first-line treatments in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer: a network meta-analysis based on phase 3 RCTs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Tieshi; Yang, Rong; Ji, Changwei; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Xu, Linfeng; Liu, Guangxiang; Guo, Hongqian

    2016-03-29

    It is impossible to conduct head-to-head trials of all the therapies to determine optimal treatment in the rapidly advancing era of therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). In this network meta-analysis,we aimed to compare efficacy and safety of first-line treatments for mRCC. We searched PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and unpublished studies were also sought through "clinicaltrials.gov" from their inception through January 31, 2016. A database search identified 1253 articles, with 11 studies meeting the eligibility criteria. A total of 7597 patients in twelve different treatment arms were assessed. Network meta-analysis showed sunitinib had a significantly longer PFS than IFN-α (SMD=-5.68; 95%CI: -10.76,-0.86; P<0.001) and placebo (SMD=-6.71; 95%CI: -12.65,-0.79; P<0.001), meanwhile, pazopanib had a significantly longer PFS compared with placebo (SMD=5.13; 95%CI: 0.43, 10.09; P<0.001). The cumulative ranking probability curve indicated that sunitinib had the highest probability of being the best treatment modality in terms of PFS and it also had the highest probability of being the safest drugs as the first-line treatment when it came to SAE. Thus, sunitinib might be the best choice of first-line treatment for patients with mRCC because it has the most favorable balance between efficacy and safety. PMID:26908455

  7. Interpreting overall survival results when progression-free survival benefits exist in today’s oncology landscape: a metastatic renal cell carcinoma case study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yiyun; Bycott, Paul; Åkerborg, Örjan; Jönsson, Linus; Negrier, Sylvie; Chen, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Background The debate surrounding the acceptance of progression-free survival (PFS) as an intermediate endpoint to overall survival (OS) has grown in recent years, due to the challenges in demonstrating an OS benefit within clinical trials today. PFS is generally a good predictor of OS for cases where survival post-progression (SPP) is short, and less so when SPP is long. SPP depends on multiple factors, including residual effect from experimental treatment and effect from crossover or other subsequent therapies, posing unique challenges into the translation of PFS benefit into OS. Methods The objective of this analysis was to conduct simulations investigating how increasing SPP impacts PFS translation to OS, utilizing data from the AXIS (axitinib versus sorafenib in advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma) trial. The underlying assumption was a treatment benefit in PFS (the PFS distribution parameters were chosen to be equal to median PFS in the AXIS trial) but no treatment effect on SPP, implying that PFS improvement is directly reflected in OS improvement. Results The probability of a statistically significant difference between arms for OS decreased from 54.7% to 6.1% when median SPP was increased from one to 20 months. The probability of the hazard ratio of OS being ≥0.9 was similarly increased from 24.3% to 72.6%, even though the hazard ratio for PFS was 0.69. Conclusion The present study shows that when simulated SPP is added to trial PFS data, the existing PFS benefit is diluted. Knowing that the AXIS treatment arms are well balanced with respect to post-trial treatments, we conclude that the PFS to OS benefit translation is primarily obscured by random variability largely unrelated to the true outcomes. The implications for drug development are not insignificant, as there would be a need to include more patients in studies or utilize a longer follow-up time to overcome the SPP variability issue. PMID:25278784

  8. Comparative efficacy and safety of first-line treatments in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer: a network meta-analysis based on phase 3 RCTs

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Tieshi; Yang, Rong; Ji, Changwei; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Xu, Linfeng; Liu, Guangxiang; Guo, Hongqian

    2016-01-01

    It is impossible to conduct head-to-head trials of all the therapies to determine optimal treatment in the rapidly advancing era of therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). In this network meta-analysis,we aimed to compare efficacy and safety of first-line treatments for mRCC. We searched PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and unpublished studies were also sought through “clinicaltrials.gov” from their inception through January 31, 2016. A database search identified 1253 articles, with 11 studies meeting the eligibility criteria. A total of 7597 patients in twelve different treatment arms were assessed. Network meta-analysis showed sunitinib had a significantly longer PFS than IFN-α (SMD=−5.68; 95%CI: −10.76,−0.86; P<0.001) and placebo (SMD=−6.71; 95%CI: −12.65,−0.79; P<0.001), meanwhile, pazopanib had a significantly longer PFS compared with placebo (SMD=5.13; 95%CI: 0.43, 10.09; P<0.001). The cumulative ranking probability curve indicated that sunitinib had the highest probability of being the best treatment modality in terms of PFS and it also had the highest probability of being the safest drugs as the first-line treatment when it came to SAE. Thus, sunitinib might be the best choice of first-line treatment for patients with mRCC because it has the most favorable balance between efficacy and safety. PMID:26908455

  9. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  10. Pazopanib in Metastatic Renal Cancer: A “Real-World” Experience at National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Sabrina C.; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; Della Pepa, Chiara; Di Napoli, Marilena; Crispo, Anna; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Domenico; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maiolino, Piera; Muto, Paolo; Perdonà, Sisto; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Facchini, Gaetano; D'Aniello, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Pazopanib is an oral angiogenesis inhibitor, currently approved for treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) and soft tissue sarcoma. The present study analyzed the outcomes of pazopanib in first-line treatment of mRCC, in a single Italian cancer center. In the light of the retrospective, observational nature and the unselected population, our experience can be defined a “real-world” study. The medical records of 38 mRCC patients treated with front-line pazopanib were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. The progression free survival (PFS) and the overall survival (OS) were the primary endpoints, while secondary objectives included objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and treatment tolerability. Pazopanib achieved a median PFS (mPFS) of 12.7 months (95% CI, 6.9–18.5 months). The median OS (mOS) was 26.2 months (95% CI, 12.6–39.9 months); the observed ORR and DCR were 30.3 and 72.7%, respectively, with a median duration of response of 11 weeks. mPFS appeared not to be influenced by number of co-morbidities (< 3 vs. ≥3), gender, Fuhrman grade and age. Conversely, the ORR and the DCR positively affect the mPFS (HR = 0.05 [95% CI, 0.05–0.55], p = 0.01; HR = 0.10 [95% CI, 0.02–0.43], p = 0.002, respectively). A worse outcome was associated with a lower mPFS in patients with liver metastases (p = 0.2) and with a high tumor burden (number of metastatic sites < 6 vs. ≥6) (p = 0.08). Worst OS was observed in patients aged ≥70 years old (HR = 6.91 [95% CI, 1.49–31.91], p = 0.01). The treatment was well-tolerated: no grade 4 adverse events, nor discontinuation due to toxicities was reported. Grade 3 hypertension affected positively the OS reaching the statistical significance (HR = 0.22 [95% CI, 0.05–0.8], p = 0.03). Thyroid dysfunction (hypo and hyperthyroidism) seems to correlate with better outcome in terms of a longer mPFS (HR = 0.12 [95% CI, 0.02–0.78], p = 0.02). Our results are consistent with those reported in

  11. A phase I/II trial of BNC105P with everolimus in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC)

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta; Azad, Arun; Bhatia, Shailender; Drabkin, Harry; Costello, Brian; Sarantopoulos, John; Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Lauer, Richard; Starodub, Alexander; Hauke, Ralph; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Hahn, Noah M.; Sonpavde, Guru; Richey, Stephen; Breen, Timothy; Kremmidiotis, Gabriel; Leske, Annabell; Doolin, Elizabeth; Bibby, David C.; Simpson, Jeremy; Iglesias, Jose; Hutson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose BNC105P inhibits tubulin polymerization, and preclinical studies suggest possible synergy with everolimus. In this phase I/II study, efficacy and safety of the combination were explored in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Experimental Design A phase I study in patients with clear cell mRCC and any prior number of therapies was conducted using a classical 3+3 design to evaluate standard doses of everolimus with increasing doses of BNC105P. At the recommended phase II dose (RP2D), patients with clear cell mRCC and 1-2 prior therapies (including ≥1 VEGF-TKI) were randomized to BNC105P with everolimus (Arm A) or everolimus alone (Arm B). The primary endpoint of the study was 6-month progression-free survival (6MPFS). Secondary endpoints included response rate, PFS, overall survival (OS) and exploratory biomarker analyses. Results In the phase I study (n=15), a dose of BNC105P at 16 mg/m2 with everolimus at 10 mg daily was identified as the RP2D. In the phase II study, 139 patients were randomized, with 69 and 67 evaluable patients in Arms A and B, respectively. 6MPFS was similar in the treatment arms (Arm A: 33.82% v Arm B: 30.30%, P=0.66) and no difference in median PFS was observed (Arm A: 4.7 mos v Arm B: 4.1 mos; P=0.49). Changes in matrix metalloproteinase-9, stem cell factor, sex hormone binding globulin and serum amyloid A protein were associated with clinical outcome with BNC105P. Conclusions Although the primary endpoint was not met in an unselected population, correlative studies suggest several biomarkers that warrant further prospective evaluation. PMID:25788492

  12. Association of Angiopoietin-2 and Ki-67 Expression with Vascular Density and Sunitinib Response in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirtti, Tuomas; Ristimäki, Ari; Joensuu, Heikki; Bono, Petri; Saharinen, Pipsa

    2016-01-01

    The Angiopoietin-2 (Ang2, Angpt2) growth factor is a context-dependent antagonist/agonist ligand of the endothelial Tie2 receptor tyrosine kinase and known to promote tumour angiogenesis and metastasis. Angiopoietin antagonists have been tested in clinical cancer trials in combination with VEGF-based anti-angiogenic therapy, including sunitinib, which is widely used as a first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, little is known about Ang2 protein expression in human tumours and the correlation of tumour Ang2 expression with tumour vascularization, tumour cell proliferation and response to anti-angiogenic therapies. Here, we evaluated, using immunohistochemistry, the expression of Ang2, CD31 and the cell proliferation marker Ki-67 in the primary kidney cancer from 136 mRCC patients, who received first-line sunitinib after nephrectomy. Ang2 protein expression was restrained to RCC tumour vessels, and correlated with tumour vascularization and response to sunitinib. High pre-therapeutic Ang2 expression, and more strongly, combined high expression of both Ang2 and CD31, were associated with a high clinical benefit rate (CBR). Low cancer Ki-67 expression, but not Ang2 or CD31 expression, was associated with favourable progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) as compared to patients with high Ki-67 expression (PFS 6.5 vs. 10.6 months, P = 0.009; OS, 15.7 vs. 28.5 months, P = 0.015). In summary, in this study to investigate endothelial Ang2 in mRCC patients treated with first-line sunitinib, high cancer Ang2 expression was associated with the CBR, but not PFS or OS, whereas low Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with long PFS and OS. PMID:27100185

  13. Clinically Non-Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma With Sarcomatoid Dedifferentiation: Natural History and Outcomes after Surgical Resection with Curative Intent

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Megan M.; Wood, Christopher G.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Slack, Rebecca S.; Babaian, Kara N.; Jonasch, Eric; Pagliaro, Lance C.; Compton, Zachary; Tamboli, Pheroze; Sircar, Kanishka; Pisters, Louis L.; Matin, Surena F.; Karam, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid dedifferentiation (sRCC) is an aggressive malignancy associated with a poor prognosis. While existing literature focuses on patients presenting with metastatic disease, characteristics and outcomes for patients with localized disease are not well described. We aimed to evaluate post-nephrectomy characteristics, outcomes, and predictors of survival in patients with sRCC who presented with clinically localized disease. Patients and Methods An IRB-approved review from 1986–2011 identified 77 patients who presented with clinically localized disease, underwent nephrectomy and had sRCC in their primary kidney tumor. Clinical and pathologic variables were captured for each patient. Overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were calculated for all patients and those who had no evidence of disease (NED) following nephrectomy, respectively. Comparisons were made with categorical groupings in proportional hazards regression models for univariable and multivariable analyses. Results OS for the entire cohort (N=77) at 2 years was 50%. A total of 56 (77%) patients of the 73 who were NED following nephrectomy experienced a recurrence, with a median time to recurrence of 26.2 months. On multivariable analysis, tumor stage, pathologically positive lymph nodes, and year of nephrectomy were significant predictors of both OS and RFS. Limitations include the retrospective nature of this study and relatively small sample size. Conclusions Long-term survival for patients with sRCC, even in clinically localized disease is poor. Aggressive surveillance of those who are NED following nephrectomy is essential and further prospective studies evaluating the benefit of adjuvant systemic therapies in this cohort are warranted. PMID:25700975

  14. Percutaneous Cryoablation of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma for Local Tumor Control: Feasibility, Outcomes, and Estimated Cost-effectiveness for Palliation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun J.; Littrup, Peter J.; Goodrich, Dylan J.; Currier, Brandt P.; Aoun, Hussein D.; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Adam, Barbara; Goodman, Allen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess complications, local tumor recurrences, overall survival (OS), and estimates of cost-effectiveness for multisite cryoablation (MCA) of oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods A total of 60 computed tomography- and/or ultrasound-guided percutaneous MCA procedures were performed on 72 tumors in 27 patients (three women and 24 men). Average patient age was 63 years. Tumor location was grouped according to common metastatic sites. Established surgical selection criteria graded patient status. Median OS was determined by Kaplan–Meier method and defined life-years gained (LYGs). Estimates of MCA costs per LYG were compared with established values for systemic therapies. Results Total number of tumors and cryoablation procedures for each anatomic site are as follows: nephrectomy bed, 11 and 11; adrenal gland, nine and eight; paraaortic, seven and six; lung, 14 and 13; bone, 13 and 13; superficial, 12 and nine; intraperitoneal, five and three; and liver, one and one. A mean of 2.2 procedures per patient were performed, with a median clinical follow-up of 16 months. Major complication and local recurrence rates were 2% (one of 60) and 3% (two of 72), respectively. No patients were graded as having good surgical risk, but median OS was 2.69 years, with an estimated 5-year survival rate of 27%. Cryoablation remained cost-effective with or without the presence of systemic therapies according to historical cost comparisons, with an adjunctive cost-effectiveness ratio of $28,312–$59,554 per LYG. Conclusions MCA was associated with very low morbidity and local tumor recurrence rates for all anatomic sites, with apparent increased OS. Even as an adjunct to systemic therapies, MCA appeared cost-effective for palliation of oligometastatic RCC. PMID:22538119

  15. CPI-613 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-28

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  16. Acute renal allograft rejection after immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Spain, L; Higgins, R; Gopalakrishnan, K; Turajlic, S; Gore, M; Larkin, J

    2016-06-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors such as ipilimumab and nivolumab improve survival in patients with advanced melanoma and are increasingly available to clinicians for use in the clinic. Their safety in organ transplant recipients is not well defined but published case reports describing treatment with ipilimumab have not been complicated by graft rejection. No cases of anti-programmed cell death protein 1 administration are reported in this group. We describe a case of acute graft rejection in a kidney transplant recipient after treatment with nivolumab, after progression on ipilimumab. Potential factors increasing the risk of graft rejection in this case are discussed, in particular the contribution of nivolumab. PMID:26951628

  17. Advances in Personalized Targeted Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma and Non-Invasive Tumor Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Klinac, Dragana; Gray, Elin S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive scientific progress in the melanoma field, treatment of advanced stage melanoma with chemotherapeutics and biotherapeutics has rarely provided response rates higher than 20%. In the past decade, targeted inhibitors have been developed for metastatic melanoma, leading to the advent of more personalized therapies of genetically characterized tumors. Here we review current melanoma treatments and emerging targeted molecular therapies. In particular we discuss the mutant BRAF inhibitors Vemurafenib and Dabrafenib, which markedly inhibit tumor growth and advance patients’ overall survival. However this response is almost inevitably followed by complete tumor relapse due to drug resistance hampering the encouraging initial responses. Several mechanisms of resistance within and outside the MAPK pathway have now been uncovered and have paved the way for clinical trials of combination therapies to try and overcome tumor relapse. It is apparent that personalized treatment management will be required in this new era of targeted treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an easily accessible means of monitoring patient relapse and several new approaches are available for the molecular characterization of CTCs. Thus CTCs provide a monitoring tool to evaluate treatment efficacy and early detection of drug resistance in real time. We detail here how advances in the molecular analysis of CTCs may provide insight into new avenues of approaching therapeutic options that would benefit personalized melanoma management. PMID:23515890

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Axitinib Versus Sorafenib in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Subgroup Analysis of Japanese Patients from the Global Randomized Phase 3 AXIS Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Takeshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Tarazi, Jamal; Chen, Connie; Kim, Sinil; Ozono, Seiichiro; Naito, Seiji; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Objective Axitinib is a potent and selective second-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2 and 3. The efficacy and safety of axitinib in Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma were evaluated. Methods A subgroup analysis was conducted in Japanese patients enrolled in the randomized Phase III trial of axitinib versus sorafenib after failure of one prior systemic therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Results Twenty-five (of 361) and 29 (of 362) patients randomized to the axitinib and sorafenib arms, respectively, were Japanese and included in this analysis. Median progression-free survival in Japanese patients was 12.1 months (95% confidence interval 8.6 to not estimable) for axitinib and 4.9 months (95% confidence interval 2.8–6.6) for sorafenib (hazard ratio 0.390; 95% confidence interval 0.130–1.173; stratified one-sided P = 0.0401). The objective response rate was 52.0% for axitinib and 3.4% for sorafenib (P = 0.0001). The common all-causality adverse events (all grades) in Japanese patients were dysphonia (68%), hypertension (64%), hand–foot syndrome (64%) and diarrhea (56%) for axitinib, and hand–foot syndrome (86%), hypertension (62%) and diarrhea (52%) for sorafenib. The safety profiles of axitinib and sorafenib in Japanese patients were generally similar to those observed in the overall population, with the exceptions of higher incidences of hypertension, dysphonia, hand–foot syndrome, hypothyroidism and stomatitis. Conclusions Axitinib is efficacious and well tolerated in Japanese patients with previously treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma, consistent with the results in the overall population, providing a new targeted therapy for these Japanese patients. PMID:23630366

  19. Overall survival and final efficacy and safety results from a Japanese phase II study of axitinib in cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eto, Masatoshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Kamei, Yoichi; Fujii, Yosuke; Umeyama, Yoshiko; Ozono, Seiichiro; Naito, Seiji; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    In an open-label, multicenter phase II study of Japanese patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib showed substantial antitumor activity with an acceptable safety profile. Here, we report overall survival and updated efficacy and safety results. Sixty-four Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma following prior therapy with cytokines were treated with axitinib at a starting dose of 5 mg b.i.d. Following median treatment duration of 14.2 months, median overall survival was 37.3 months (95% CI, 28.6–49.9). The objective response rate, the primary endpoint of the study, was 51.6% (95% CI, 38.7–64.2); the median duration of response, 11.1 months (95% CI, 8.2–13.7); and the median progression-free survival was 11.0 months (95% CI, 9.2–12.0), assessed by the independent review committee. Common treatment-related all-grade adverse events were hypertension (88%), hand-foot syndrome (75%), diarrhea (66%), proteinuria (63%), fatigue (55%) and dysphonia (53%). In an exploratory analysis, median overall survival was found to be significantly longer in patients who had greater decreases in plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during the first cycle of treatment. In conclusion, the present study showed axitinib to be effective, and toxicities with long-term treatment were generally controllable with axitinib dose modification and/or standard medications in these Japanese patients. Some frequently reported adverse events warrant close monitoring and management. Changes in the plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 may be used as a prognostic factor for overall survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma following axitinib treatment. This study is registered at http://ClinicalTrial.gov (identifier NCT00569946). PMID:25283266

  20. Overall survival and final efficacy and safety results from a Japanese phase II study of axitinib in cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Eto, Masatoshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Kamei, Yoichi; Fujii, Yosuke; Umeyama, Yoshiko; Ozono, Seiichiro; Naito, Seiji; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-12-01

    In an open-label, multicenter phase II study of Japanese patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib showed substantial antitumor activity with an acceptable safety profile. Here, we report overall survival and updated efficacy and safety results. Sixty-four Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma following prior therapy with cytokines were treated with axitinib at a starting dose of 5 mg b.i.d. Following median treatment duration of 14.2 months, median overall survival was 37.3 months (95% CI, 28.6-49.9). The objective response rate, the primary endpoint of the study, was 51.6% (95% CI, 38.7-64.2); the median duration of response, 11.1 months (95% CI, 8.2-13.7); and the median progression-free survival was 11.0 months (95% CI, 9.2-12.0), assessed by the independent review committee. Common treatment-related all-grade adverse events were hypertension (88%), hand-foot syndrome (75%), diarrhea (66%), proteinuria (63%), fatigue (55%) and dysphonia (53%). In an exploratory analysis, median overall survival was found to be significantly longer in patients who had greater decreases in plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during the first cycle of treatment. In conclusion, the present study showed axitinib to be effective, and toxicities with long-term treatment were generally controllable with axitinib dose modification and/or standard medications in these Japanese patients. Some frequently reported adverse events warrant close monitoring and management. Changes in the plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 may be used as a prognostic factor for overall survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma following axitinib treatment. This study is registered at ClinicalTrial.gov (identifier NCT00569946). PMID:25283266

  1. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wehler, Thomas C.; Graf, Claudine; Biesterfeld, Stefan; Brenner, Walburgis; Schadt, Jörg; Gockel, Ines; Berger, Martin R.; Thüroff, Joachim W.; Galle, Peter R.; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P = .039), tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005), and low hemoglobin (P = .039). In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19266088

  2. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Somatostatinoma

  3. On the development of models in mice of advanced visceral metastatic disease for anti-cancer drug testing.

    PubMed

    Man, Shan; Munoz, Raquel; Kerbel, Robert S

    2007-12-01

    It is well known clinically that advanced, bulky visceral metastatic disease is generally much less responsive to most anti-cancer therapies, compared to microscopic metastatic disease. This problem is exacerbated when treating cancers that have been previously exposed to multiple lines of therapy, and which have acquired a 'refractory' phenotype. However, mimicking such clinical treatment situations in preclinical mouse models involving the testing of new or existing cancer therapies is extremely rare. Treatment of 'metastasis', in retrospect, usually involves minimal residual disease and therapy naïve tumors. This could account in many instances for the failure to reproduce highly encouraging preclinical results in subsequent phase I or phase II clinical trials. To that end, we have embarked on an experimental program designed to develop models of advanced, visceral metastatic disease, in some cases involving tumors previously exposed to various therapies. The strategy first involves the orthotopic transplantation of a human cancer cell line, such as breast cancer cell line, into the mammary fat pads of immune deficient mice, followed by surgical resection of the resultant primary tumors that develops. Recovery of distant macroscopic metastases, usually in the lungs, is then undertaken, which can take up to 4 months to visibly form. Cell lines are established from such metastases and the process of orthotopic transplantation, surgical resection, and recovery of distant metastases is undertaken, at least one more time. Using such an approach highly metastatically aggressive variant sublines can be obtained, provided they are once again injected into an orthotopic site and the primary tumors removed by surgery. By waiting sufficient time after removal of the primary tumors, about only 1 month, mice with extensive metastatic disease in sites such as the lungs, liver, and lymph nodes can be obtained. An example of therapy being initiated in an advanced stage of such

  4. A large-scale prospective registration study of the safety and efficacy of sorafenib tosylate in unresectable or metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Japan: results of over 3200 consecutive cases in post-marketing all-patient surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Oya, Mototsugu; Iijima, Masafumi; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Gemma, Akihiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Adachi, Masatoshi; Okayama, Yutaka; Sunaya, Toshiyuki; Inuyama, Lyo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Real-life safety and efficacy of sorafenib in advanced renal cell carcinoma in a nationwide patient population were evaluated by post-marketing all-patient surveillance. Methods All patients with unresectable or metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Japan who started sorafenib therapy from February 2008 to September 2009 were registered and followed for up to 12 months. Baseline characteristics, treatment status, tumor response, survival and safety data were recorded by the prescribing physicians. Results Safety and efficacy were evaluated in 3255 and 3171 patients, respectively. The initial daily dose was 800 mg in 78.2% of patients. Median duration of treatment was 6.7 months and the mean relative dose intensity was 68.4%. Overall, 2227 patients (68.4%) discontinued the treatment by 12 months, half of which (52.0% of discontinued patients) were due to adverse events. The most common adverse drug reactions were hand–foot skin reaction (59%), hypertension (36%), rash (25%) and increase in lipase/amylase (23%). The median progression-free survival was 7.3 months (95% confidence intervals: 6.7–8.1), and the overall survival rate at 1 year was 75.4% (73.5–77.1). Prognostic factors for overall survival were mostly consistent with those in previous clinical trials in the univariate analysis and largely similar to those for progression-free survival and duration of treatment in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Sorafenib for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma under the labeled dose was feasible in daily medical practice, for its acceptable toxicity profile and favorable clinical benefit that were consistent with those in clinical trials. PMID:26206897

  5. Prognostic tissue biomarker exploration for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma receiving vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Park, Inkeun; Cho, Yong Mee; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Lee, Dae-Ho

    2016-04-01

    In metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), the prognostic role of several tumor tissue biomarkers has been evaluated, but the results were controversial. This study aims to verify the prognostic importance of selected tumor tissue biomarkers in patients with mRCC. The clinicopathological features, immunohistochemical staining and scoring for select tissue biomarkers, treatment, and outcome of patients with mRCC treated with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) between July 2006 and March 2011 at Asan Medical Center in Seoul, South Korea, were reviewed. In total, 123 patients met the inclusion criteria. Most patients had clear-cell carcinoma (107 patients, 87.0 %). First-line VEGFR TKIs were sunitinib (97 patients, 78.9 %), sorafenib (23 patients, 18.7 %), and pazopanib (3 patients, 2.4 %). With a median follow-up period of 60.0 months (95 % confidence interval (CI), 56.3-63.6), median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 25.6 months (95 % CI, 19.2-32.0) and 12.2 months (95 % CI, 8.1-16.3), respectively. In the multivariable analysis for OS, carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX; 47.5 % or less vs. more than 47.5 %, p = 0.014), sarcomatoid change (40 % or less vs. more than 40 %, p < 0.001), tumor necrosis (20 % or less vs. more than 20 %, p = 0.006), and Heng's risk group (good vs. intermediate vs. poor, p = 0.011) were identified as independent prognostic factors. In the multivariable analysis for PFS, CAIX (p < 0.001), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN; 45 % or less vs. more than 45 %, p = 0.004), sarcomatoid change (p = 0.002), and tumor necrosis (p = 0.001) were identified as independent factors affecting PFS. CAIX and PTEN had prognostic importance for mRCC patients receiving first-line VEGFR TKI. Future validation and mechanistic studies are required. PMID:26526582

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Sorafenib Therapy on Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Korean Patients: Results from a Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Han; Kim, Sohee; Nam, Byung-Ho; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Choung Soo; Seo, Ill Young; Kim, Tae Nam; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Seo, Seong Il; Joo, Kwan Joong; Song, Kanghyon; Kwak, Cheol; Chung, Jinsoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sorafenib for Korean patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods A total of 177 mRCC patients using sorafenib as first- (N = 116), second- (N = 43), and third-line (N = 18) therapies were enrolled from 11 Korean centers between 2006 and 2012. The patient characteristics, therapy duration, tumor response, disease control rate, and tolerability were assessed at baseline and at routine follow-ups, and the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) times and rates were analyzed. Results Among all patients, 18 (10.2%) stopped sorafenib treatment for a median of 1.7 weeks, including 15 (8.5%) who discontinued the drug, while 40 (22.6%) and 12 (6.8%) patients required dose reductions and drug interruptions, respectively. Severe adverse events (AEs) or poor compliance was observed in 64 (36.2%) patients, with 118 (7.4%) ≥grade 3 AEs. During the treatment, one myocardial infarction was observed. The number of ≥grade 3 AEs in the first-line sorafenib group was 71 (6.8% of the total 1048 AEs). During a median follow-up of 17.2 months, the radiologically confirmed best objective response rate, disease control rate, median PFS, and median OS were 22.0%, 53.0%, 6.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2–8.9), and 32.6 months (95% CI, 27.3–63.8) for the total 177 sorafenib-treated patients, respectively, and 23.2%, 56.0%, 7.4 months (95% CI, 5.5–10.5), and not reached yet (95% CI, 1.0–31.1) for the first-line sorafenib group, respectively. Conclusions Sorafenib produced tolerable safety, with a ≥grade 3 AE rate of 7.4% and an acceptable disease control rate (53.0%) in Korean mRCC patients. PMID:26308612

  7. The Relationship Between the Adverse Events and Efficacy of Sorafenib in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Fuli; Wu, Guojun; Zhang, Longlong; Wang, Yangmin; Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qing; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Li, Peijun; Wang, Jian; Lu, Xitao; Yuan, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between the adverse events and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), with a purpose to guide the judgment of efficacy in sorafenib treatment. Eighty-three mRCC patients who received sorafenib therapy at northwest China were studied retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to correlate tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) with adverse event types and grades. Among 83 patients who underwent sorafenib therapy, 2 cases (2.4%) had completed response (CR), 14 cases (16.9%) had partial response (PR), 57 cases (68.7%) had stable disease (SD), and 10 cases (12.0%) developed progressive disease (PD). The median PFS and OS were 15.0 and 29.0 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 1 or 2 adverse events included hand-foot syndrome (68.7%), diarrhea (54.2%), and alopecia (51.8%). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were hand-foot syndrome (6.0%), hypertension (4.8%), and diarrhea (3.6%). The frequency and severity of adverse events correlated with tumor response rate (both with P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed the independent predictors of better PFS included rash (OR 0.307, 95%CI 0.148–0.636, P = 0.001) and diarrhea (OR 0.391, 95%CI 0.169–0.783, P = 0.008). Elevated transaminase was the independent predictor of poor PFS (OR 2.606, 95%CI 1.299–5.532, P = 0.012). For OS, rash (OR 0.473, 95%CI 0.253–0.886, P = 0.019) and diarrhea (OR 0.321, 95%CI 0.171–0.605, P = 0.000) correlated with better OS. Sorafenib-related adverse events are associated with efficacy in patients with mRCC from northwest China. Rash and diarrhea are independent protective factors of both PFS and OS, and elevated transaminase is an independent risk factor of PFS. A large prospective study is warranted. PMID:26656362

  8. Recent Advances in Bone-Targeted Therapies of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiyun; He, Guangchun; Liu, Junwen; Luo, Feijun; Peng, Xiaoning; Tang, Shigang; Gao, Zhiyong; Lin, Qinlu; Keller, Jill M.; Yang, Tao; Keller, Evan T.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting men worldwide, with bone being the most common site of metastasis in patients that progress beyond organ confinement. Bone metastases are virtually incurable and result in significant disease morbidity and mortality. Bone provides a unique microenvironment whose local interactions with tumor cells offer novel targets for therapeutic interventions. Several attractive molecules or pathways have been identified as new potential therapeutic targets for bone metastases caused by metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. In this review, we present the recent advances in molecular targeted therapies for prostate cancer bone metastasis focusing on therapies that target the bone cells and the bone microenvironment. The therapies covered in this review include agents that inhibit bone resorption, agents that stimulate bone formation, and agents that target the bone matrix. Suggestions to devise more effective molecular targeted therapies are proposed. Hopefully, with better understanding of the biology of the disease and the development of more robust targeted therapies, the survival and quality of life of the affected individuals could be significantly improved. PMID:24767837

  9. New strategies in metastatic melanoma: oncogene-defined taxonomy leads to therapeutic advances.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Keith T; Fisher, David E

    2011-08-01

    The discovery of BRAF and KIT mutations provided the first basis for a molecular classification of cutaneous melanoma on therapeutic grounds. As BRAF-targeted therapy quickly moves toward regulatory approval and incorporation as standard therapy for patients with metastatic disease, proof of concept has also been established for targeting mutated KIT in melanoma. NRAS mutations have long been known to be present in a subset of melanomas and represent an elusive subgroup for targeted therapies. Matching patient subgroups defined by genetic aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and p16/cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) pathways with appropriate targeted therapies has not yet been realized. And, an increasing understanding of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators, most notably MITF, and how they may play a role in melanoma pathophysiology, has provided another axis to approach with therapies. The foundation has been established for individual oncogene targeting, and current investigations seek to understand the intersection of these susceptibilities and other described potential targets and pathways. The melanoma field stands poised to take the lead among cancer subtypes in advancing combination therapy strategies that simultaneously target multiple biologic underpinnings of the disease. PMID:21670085

  10. Recent advances in renal interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation has been an important means for the treatment of patients with end stage of renal disease, the long-term survival rate of the renal allograft remains a challenge. The cause of late renal allograft loss, once known as chronic allograft nephropathy, has been renamed “interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy” (IF/TA) to reflect the histologic pattern seen on biopsy. The mechanisms leading to IF/TA in the transplanted kidney include inflammation, activation of renal fibroblasts, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Identifying the mediators and factors that trigger IF/TA may be useful in early diagnosis and development of novel therapeutic strategies for improving long-term renal allograft survival and patient outcomes. In this review, we highlight the recent advances in our understanding of IF/TA from three aspects: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:25285155

  11. Carbonic Anhydrase 9 Expression Increases with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Targeted Therapy and Is Predictive of Outcome in Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Grant D.; O’Mahony, Fiach C.; Laird, Alexander; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.; Eory, Lel; Lubbock, Alexander L.R.; Nanda, Jyoti; O’Donnell, Marie; Mackay, Alan; Mullen, Peter; McNeill, S. Alan; Riddick, Antony C.P.; Aitchison, Michael; Berney, Daniel; Bex, Axel; Overton, Ian M.; Harrison, David J.; Powles, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a lack of biomarkers to predict outcome with targeted therapy in metastatic clear cell renal cancer (mccRCC). This may be because dynamic molecular changes occur with therapy. Objective To explore if dynamic, targeted-therapy-driven molecular changes correlate with mccRCC outcome. Design, setting, and participants Multiple frozen samples from primary tumours were taken from sunitinib-naïve (n = 22) and sunitinib-treated mccRCC patients (n = 23) for protein analysis. A cohort (n = 86) of paired, untreated and sunitinib/pazopanib-treated mccRCC samples was used for validation. Array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) analysis and RNA interference (RNAi) was used to support the findings. Intervention Three cycles of sunitinib 50 mg (4 wk on, 2 wk off). Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Reverse phase protein arrays (training set) and immunofluorescence automated quantitative analysis (validation set) assessed protein expression. Results and limitations Differential expression between sunitinib-naïve and treated samples was seen in 30 of 55 proteins (p < 0.05 for each). The proteins B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2), mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) (serine/threonine kinase) had both increased intratumoural variance and significant differential expression with therapy. The validation cohort confirmed increased CA9 expression with therapy. Multivariate analysis showed high CA9 expression after treatment was associated with longer survival (hazard ratio: 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.26–0.87; p = 0.02). Array CGH profiles revealed sunitinib was associated with significant CA9 region loss. RNAi CA9 silencing in two cell lines inhibited the antiproliferative effects of sunitinib. Shortcomings of the study include selection of a specific protein for analysis, and the specific time points at which the treated tissue was analysed. Conclusions CA9 levels increase with

  12. Advanced Renal Failure in Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia: Clinical Course and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Iluminado A.; Hosten, Adrian O.; Dillard, Martin G.; Castro, Oswaldo L.

    1982-01-01

    Advanced renal failure occurred in nine adult sickle cell disease patients. There were six men and three women with a mean age of 38.6 years. Eight patients had homozygous SS disease, one had sickle cell thalassemia. Three patients had acute renal failure from which they partially recovered. Six developed endstage kidney disease requiring dialysis. Two of these received a kidney transplant, and there was one death in the immediate postoperative period. Angina pectoris, hyperkalemia, and severe anemia complicated chronic dialysis, suggesting that early transplantation should be considered for sickle cell anemia patients with renal failure. PMID:6757451

  13. Pemetrexed for the maintenance treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, J; McLeod, C; Bagust, A; Boland, A; Fleeman, N; Dundar, Y; Oyee, J; Dickson, R; Davis, H; Green, J; McKenna, E; Pearson, M

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of pemetrexed for the maintenance treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in accordance with the licensed indication, based upon the evidence submission from the manufacturer (Eli Lilly) to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal (STA) process. The primary clinical outcome measure was progression free survival (PFS). Secondary outcomes included overall survival (OS), time to worsening of symptoms, objective tumour response rate, adverse events and changes in lung cancer symptom scale. Data for two populations were presented: patients with non-squamous NSCLC histology and patients with adenocarcinoma histology. The clinical evidence was derived from a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised controlled trial (RCT), the JMEN trial. The trial compared the use of pemetrexed + best supportive care (BSC ) as maintenance therapy, with placebo + BSC in patients with NSCLC (n = 663) who had received four cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy (CTX) and whose disease had not progressed. In the licensed population (patients with non-squamous histology), the trial demonstrated greater median PFS for patients treated with pemetrexed than for patients in the placebo arm [4.5 vs 2.6 months; hazard ratio (HR) 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36 to 0.55, p < 0.00001]. Median OS was also greater for the pemetrexed- treated patients (15.5 vs 10.3 months; HR 0.70; 95% CI 0.56 to 0.88, p = 0.002). In addition, tumour response and disease control rates were statistically significantly greater for patients who received pemetrexed. Patient survival rates at 1 year and 2 years were higher in the pemetrexed arm. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) estimated by the manufacturer's model were 33,732 pounds per quality adjusted life-year (QALY

  14. Advances of Targeted Therapy in Treatment of Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide, prognosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) was poor. Development and introduction of biologic agents in treatment of patients with metastatic CRC have brought improved outcomes. Monoclonal antibodies directing epidermal growth factor receptors and vascular endothelial growth factor are main biologic agents currently used in treatment of metastatic CRC. Encouraged by results from many clinical trials demonstrating efficacy of those monoclonal antibodies, the combination therapy with those targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents has been established as the standard therapy for patients with metastatic CRC. However, emergency of resistance to those target agents has limited the efficacy of treatment, and strategies to overcome the resistance are now being investigated by newly developed biological techniques clarifying how to acquire resistance. Here, we introduce mechanisms of action of the biologic agents currently used for treatment of metastatic CRC and several landmark historical clinical studies which have changed the main stream of treatment. The mechanism of resistance to those agents, one of serious problems in treatment metastatic CRC, and ongoing clinical trials to overcome the limitations and improve treatment outcomes will also be presented in this review. PMID:27127793

  15. Survival of patients with advanced metastatic melanoma: The impact of novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Ugurel, Selma; Röhmel, Joachim; Ascierto, Paolo A; Flaherty, Keith T; Grob, Jean Jacques; Hauschild, Axel; Larkin, James; Long, Georgina V; Lorigan, Paul; McArthur, Grant A; Ribas, Antoni; Robert, Caroline; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garbe, Claus

    2016-01-01

    The survival of advanced metastatic melanoma has been greatly improved within the past few years. New therapeutic strategies like kinase inhibitors for BRAF-mutant melanoma and immune checkpoint blockers proved to prolong survival times within clinical trials, and many of them have already entered routine clinical use. However, these different treatment modalities have not yet been tested against each other, which complicate therapy decisions. We performed an explorative analysis of survival data from recent clinical trials. Thirty-five Kaplan-Meier survival curves from 17 trials were digitised, re-grouped by matching inclusion criteria and treatment line, and averaged by therapy strategy. Notably, the survival curves grouped by therapy strategy revealed a very high concordance, even if different agents were used. The greatest survival improvement was observed with the combination of BRAF plus MEK inhibitors as well as with Programmed-death-1 (PD1) blockers with or without cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) blockers, respectively, with these two treatment strategies showing similar survival outcomes. For first-line therapy, averaged survival proportions of patients alive at 12 months were 74.5% with BRAF plus MEK inhibitor treatment versus 71.9% with PD-1 blockade. This explorative comparison shows the kinase inhibitors as similarly effective as immune checkpoint blockers with regard to survival. However, to confirm these first trends for implementation into an individualised treatment of melanoma patients, data from prospective clinical trials comparing the different treatment strategies head-to-head have to be awaited. PMID:26707829

  16. Analysis of adverse events of sunitinib in patients treated for advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cedrych, Ida; Jasiówka, Marek; Niemiec, Maciej; Skotnicki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of the metastatic stage of renal cell carcinoma is specific because classical chemotherapy is not applicable here. The treatment is mainly based on molecularly targeted drugs, including inhibitors of tyrosine kinases. In many cases the therapy takes many months, and patients often report to general practitioners due to adverse events. In this article, the effectiveness and side effects of one of these drugs are presented. The aim of the study was to analyse of the toxicity and safety of treatment with sunitinib malate in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma in the metastatic stage. Material and methods Adverse events were analyzed using retrospective analysis of data collected in a group of 39 patients treated in the Department of Systemic and Generalized Malignancies in the Cancer Center in Krakow, Poland. Results Toxicity of treatment affected 50% of patients. The most common side effects observed were hypertension, thrombocytopenia, stomatitis, diarrhea and weakness. Grade 3 serious adverse events according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4 affected up to 10% of patients. The most common serious adverse events were hypertension and fatigue. Conclusions Sunitinib malate is characterized by a particular type of toxicity. Knowledge of the types and range of adverse events of this drug is an important part of oncological and internal medicine care. PMID:27186181

  17. Advances in the Urinary Exosomes in Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Pei; Qin, Yan; Li, Xue-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Cells secrete around 30-100 nm membrane-enclosed vesicles that are released into the extracellular spaceis termed exosomes(EXs). EXs widely present in body fluids and incorporated proteins,nucleic acids that reflect the physiological state of their cells of origin and they may play an important role in cell-to-cell communication in various physiological and disease processes. In this article we review the recent basic and clinical studies in urinary EXs in renal diseases,focusing on their biological characteristics and potential roles as new biological markers,intervention treatment goals,and targeted therapy vectors in renal diseases.However,some issues still exist;in particular,the clinical application of EXs as a liquid biopsy technique warrants further investigations. PMID:27594162

  18. Effect of Target Therapy on the Content of Transcription and Growth Factors, Protein Kinase TOR, and Activity of Intracellular Proteases in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Spirina, L V; Usynin, E A; Kondakova, I V; Yurmazov, Z A; Slonimskaya, E M

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed the dynamics of the expression of transcription factors, VEGF and its receptor VEGFR2, serine-threonine protein kinase mTOR and activity of proteasome and calpain in patients with metastatic renal cancer during therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitor Votrient and mTOR blocker Afinitor. The expression of hypoxic nuclear factor HIF-1α in the tumor tissue decreased during therapy with the target preparations. The decrease of VEGF and its receptor VEGFR2 was observed only in patients treated with mTOR inhibitor. The increase in calpain activity in the tumor tissue was observed in both groups. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanism of action of target anticancer preparations as allow considering the studied markers as predictors in choosing optimal therapy. PMID:27165064

  19. The high-dose aldesleukin (IL-2) "select" trial: a trial designed to prospectively validate predictive models of response to high-dose IL-2 treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Clement, Jessica M; McDermott, David F

    2009-08-01

    For patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the prognosis is poor. Despite the recent approval of drugs such as sorafenib, sunitinib, and temsirolimus, durable remissions of metastatic disease are rare. This is largely due to the fact that these drugs, while effective, do not result in the eradication of disease. In 1992, the FDA approved the use of high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) for the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC because of a small number of patients that achieved durable responses. However, IL-2 has not become a mainstay of treatment because of the expense and toxicity associated with this therapy. This review article discusses a phase II trial that investigates predictive biomarkers that might help clinicians identify the patient population with metastatic RCC that would benefit from IL-2 therapy and therefore limit patients who receive this toxic therapy to those most likely to benefit. PMID:19692326

  20. Imaging characteristic analysis of metastatic spine lesions from breast, prostate, lung, and renal cell carcinomas for surgical planning: Osteolytic versus osteoblastic

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Justin A.; Mendez, Gustavo A.; Ching, Alex; Kubicky, Charlotte Dai; Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgeons treating metastatic spine disease can use computed tomography (CT) imaging to determine whether lesions are osteolytic, osteoblastic, or mixed. This enables treatment that considers the structural integrity of the vertebral body (VB), which is impaired with lytic lesions but not blastic lesions. The authors analyzed CT imaging characteristics of spine metastasis from breast, lung, prostate, and renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) to determine the metastasis patterns of each of these common tumors. Methods: The authors identified patients with metastatic spine disease treated during a 3-year period. Variables studied included age, sex, and cancer type. Lesions from breast, lung, prostate, and RCC primary lesions were selected for imaging analysis. Results: Sixty-six patients were identified: 17 had breast metastasis, 14 prostate, 18 lung, and 17 RCC. Breast cancer metastasis involved 33% of VBs with 56%, 20%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Prostate cancer metastasis involved 35% of VBs with 14%, 62%, and 24% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. Lung cancer metastasis involved 13% of VBs with 64%, 33%, and 3% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed, respectively. RCC metastasis involved 11% of VBs with 91%, 7%, and 2% osteolytic, osteoblastic, and mixed lesions, respectively. Conclusions: To improve surgical planning, we advocate the use of CT prior to surgery to evaluate whether spine metastases are osteolytic or osteoblastic. In cases of osteolytic lesions, the concern is of segmental instability requiring reconstruction and the risk for screw pull out should instrumentation be considered. In cases of osteoblastic lesions, surgeons should consider debulking dense bone. PMID:27274410

  1. [Prognostic predictive factors of the clinical response to immunotherapy with subcutaneous interleukin-2, in patients with metastatic renal carcinoma: analysis of 60 cases].

    PubMed

    Lissoni, P; Scardino, E; Favini, P; Barni, S; Tancini, G; Baccalin, A; Verweij, F; Strada, G; Musci, R; Rocco, F

    1995-04-01

    The intravenous immunotherapy with high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) would constitute one of the most effective treatments of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). More recently, IL-2 subcutaneous therapy has also appeared active, either alone or in association with interferon, with results comparable to those found with the intravenous route of injection, but with a lower toxicity. On this basis, we have designed a protocol of treatment with low-dose IL-2 alone given subcutaneously as a first or a second line therapy in metastatic RCC. The study included 60 consecutive patients (pts) (M/F: 39/21, median age 56 years, range 26/74). IL-2 was given at a dose of 3 millions IU twice/day for 5 days/week, for 6 weeks, corresponding to one cycle. In non progressed pts a second cycle was repeated after a 28-day rest period. Dominant metastasis sites were, as follows: soft tissues: 8; bone: 11; lung: 29; liver: 3; liver plus lung: 7; adrenal: 2. The minimum follow-up was 18 months and the median follow-up was 34 months (range 18-48). A complete response (CR) was achieved in 2/60 (3%) pts. A partial response (PR) was obtained in 15/60 (25%). Therefore, tumor objective rate (CR + PR) was 17/60 (28%). The median duration of response was 13 months (4-33).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7787857

  2. Elevated expression of IFN-inducible CXCR3 ligands predicts poor prognosis in patients with non-metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weisi; Liu, Yidong; Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Lin; Chang, Yuan; Xu, Le; Zhang, Weijuan; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-01-01

    IFN-inducible CXCR3 ligands (ICL), namely CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11, exhibit pleiotropic roles in orchestrating immunity and angiogenesis. However, the prognosis value of them in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was still obscure. Thus, we retrospectively used immunohistochemistry approach to evaluate the impact of these ligands on recurrence and survival of non-metastatic clear cell RCC (ccRCC) patients after nephrectomy. We systemically built a prespecified ICL score based on these ligands, and found specimens with high ICL score were prone to possess high Fuhrman grade, necrosis, and high-risk level of SSIGN. Moreover, ICL score stratified patients into different risk subgroups, and remained an independent adverse prognosticator for overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Meanwhile, in TCGA database, the increasing ICL mRNA predicted poor survival and early recurrence. Furthermore, after adding ICL score into SSIGN, the C-index for OS and RFS increased from 0.705 to 0.746 and 0.712 to 0.765, respectively. In conclusion, the ICL score based on expression of CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 stratified non-metastatic ccRCC patients into different risk subgroups of recurrence and death, which might benefit preoperative risk stratification and guide immune therapy in the future. PMID:26910919

  3. Elevated expression of IFN-inducible CXCR3 ligands predicts poor prognosis in patients with non-metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weisi; Liu, Yidong; Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Lin; Chang, Yuan; Xu, Le; Zhang, Weijuan; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-03-22

    IFN-inducible CXCR3 ligands (ICL), namely CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11, exhibit pleiotropic roles in orchestrating immunity and angiogenesis. However, the prognosis value of them in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) was still obscure. Thus, we retrospectively used immunohistochemistry approach to evaluate the impact of these ligands on recurrence and survival of non-metastatic clear cell RCC (ccRCC) patients after nephrectomy. We systemically built a prespecified ICL score based on these ligands, and found specimens with high ICL score were prone to possess high Fuhrman grade, necrosis, and high-risk level of SSIGN. Moreover, ICL score stratified patients into different risk subgroups, and remained an independent adverse prognosticator for overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Meanwhile, in TCGA database, the increasing ICL mRNA predicted poor survival and early recurrence. Furthermore, after adding ICL score into SSIGN, the C-index for OS and RFS increased from 0.705 to 0.746 and 0.712 to 0.765, respectively. In conclusion, the ICL score based on expression of CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11 stratified non-metastatic ccRCC patients into different risk subgroups of recurrence and death, which might benefit preoperative risk stratification and guide immune therapy in the future. PMID:26910919

  4. A structured review of health utility measures and elicitation in advanced/metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yanni; Wolfram, Verena; Cook, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Health utilities are increasingly incorporated in health economic evaluations. Different elicitation methods, direct and indirect, have been established in the past. This study examined the evidence on health utility elicitation previously reported in advanced/metastatic breast cancer and aimed to link these results to requirements of reimbursement bodies. Methods Searches were conducted using a detailed search strategy across several electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and EconLit databases), online sources (Cost-effectiveness Analysis Registry and the Health Economics Research Center), and web sites of health technology assessment (HTA) bodies. Publications were selected based on the search strategy and the overall study objectives. Results A total of 768 publications were identified in the searches, and 26 publications, comprising 18 journal articles and eight submissions to HTA bodies, were included in the evidence review. Most journal articles derived utilities from the European Quality of Life Five-Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D). Other utility measures, such as the direct methods standard gamble (SG), time trade-off (TTO), and visual analog scale (VAS), were less frequently used. Several studies described mapping algorithms to generate utilities from disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments such as European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire – Breast Cancer 23 (EORTC QLQ-BR23), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – General questionnaire (FACT-G), and Utility-Based Questionnaire-Cancer (UBQ-C); most used EQ-5D as the reference. Sociodemographic factors that affect health utilities, such as age, sex, income, and education, as well as disease progression, choice of utility elicitation method, and country settings, were identified

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF ADVANCED AGE ON THE HEPATIC AND RENAL TOXICITY OF CHLOROFORM

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF ADVANCED AGE ON THE HEPATIC AND RENAL TOXICITY OF CHLOROFORM (CHC13). A McDonald, Y M Sey and J E Simmons. NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC.
    Disinfection, by chlorination or by ozonation followed by treatment with either chlorine or chloramine, of water containi...

  6. Two cases of gastrointestinal perforation after radiotherapy in patients receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitor for advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of gastrointestinal perforation (GIP) after radiotherapy in patients receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Case 1 was a 61-year-old woman with lung metastases after a radical nephrectomy for a right RCC (cT3aN0M0) treated with interferon-alpha (OIF, 5 MIU, three times per week). She developed lytic metastases of the left femur and the left acetabulum. She was treated with palliative radiotherapy to the metastatic portion (3 Gy × 10 fractions), and 400 mg sorafenib twice per day plus continuing interferon alpha. She experienced sudden left lower abdominal pain after four weeks of treatment, and was diagnosed with a perforation of the sigmoid colon with fecal peritonitis. Case 2 was a 48-year-old man with lung, lymph node, and bone metastases after a radical nephrectomy for a right RCC (cT2N0M0), and was treated with 400 mg sorafenib twice per day. He developed lytic bone metastases of the lumbar vertebrae, which was treated with palliative radiotherapy to L2-4 (3 Gy × 10 fractions). He experienced sudden abdominal pain after two months of radiation treatment, and was diagnosed with a perforation of the sigmoid colon with fecal peritonitis. These cases underwent radiotherapy, and therefore this may be related to the radiosensitivity of TKI. PMID:22906119

  7. Vaccination of patients with metastatic renal cancer with modified vaccinia Ankara encoding the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax) given alongside interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Robert E; Macdermott, Catriona; Shablak, Alaaeldin; Hamer, Caroline; Thistlethwaite, Fiona; Drury, Noel L; Chikoti, Priscilla; Shingler, William; Naylor, Stuart; Harrop, Richard

    2009-05-01

    Approximately 90% of renal cell tumors overexpress the tumor antigen 5T4. The attenuated strain of vaccinia virus, modified vaccinia Ankara, has been engineered to express 5T4 (TroVax). We conducted an open-label phase 1/2 trial in which TroVax was administered alongside interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) to 11 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Antigen-specific cellular and humoral responses were monitored throughout the study, and clinical responses were assessed by measuring the changes in tumor burden by computed tomography scan (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors). The primary objective was to assess the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of TroVax when given alongside IFNalpha. Treatment with TroVax plus IFNalpha was well tolerated with no serious adverse events attributed to TroVax. All 11 patients mounted 5T4-specific antibody responses and 5 (45%) mounted cellular responses. No objective tumor responses were seen, but the overall median time to progression (TTP) of 9 months (range: 2.1 to 26+ mo) was longer than expected for IFNalpha alone. For the 10 clear cell patients the TTP ranged from 3.9 to 26+ months, with a median TTP of 10.4 months. The high frequency of 5T4-specific immune responses and prolonged median TTP for clear cell patients compared with that expected for IFNalpha alone is encouraging and warrants further investigation. PMID:19342962

  8. Baseline chronic kidney disease is associated with toxicity and survival in patients treated with targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nouhaud, François-Xavier; Pfister, Christian; Defortescu, Guillaume; Giwerc, Anthony; Charbit, David; Gouerant, Sophie; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Di Fiore, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    To assess the impact of baseline chronic kidney disease on targeted therapy (TT)-induced toxicities and survival in patients treated for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Data from patients receiving first-line TT from January 2006 to June 2012 were collected retrospectively. TT side effects, time to treatment failure (TTF), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed according to the baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) calculated using the modification diet in renal disease formula. Hundred and two patients treated with sunitinib (N=67), sorafenib (N=24), or temsirolimus (N=11) were included. Forty-two patients (41%) had baseline chronic kidney disease with GFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m. Patients with GFR less than 60 were more likely to encounter severe (grade 3-4) TT-induced toxicities (79 vs. 32%, P<0.0001). Moreover, renal function impairment was significantly associated with higher median TTF and OS (respectively, 12 vs. 6 months for TTF, P=0.003; and 33 vs. 13 months for OS, P=0.001). On multivariate analysis, GFR less than 60 was identified as the only factor associated with a higher rate of severe toxicity: odds ratio=4.74 (1.67-13.41), P=0.003. Severe toxicity (P=0.05) was identified as an independent prognostic factor for OS and TTF. Baseline chronic kidney disease was associated with higher TT-induced toxicities, which were identified as a prognostic factor of higher survival in mRCC treatment. These results suggest that GFR measurement could be used to optimize the efficacy of TT in patients treated for an mRCC. PMID:26020808

  9. Metastatic Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Fliedner, Stephanie M. J.; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pacak, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare chromaffin cell tumors that can often be cured by resection. Although described for the first time in 1886 1, the diagnosis of PGL remains a challenge, because patients do not present with characteristic signs and symptoms. If untreated, PGL can have a devastating outcome due to myocardial infarction, severe hypertension, stroke and/or arrhytmia caused by catecholamine excess. Even after proper diagnosis, the risk of metastatic disease remains. In recent years the opinion that metastatic disease is rare in PGL had to be revised, particularly in patients presenting with extra-adrenal PGL, with a PGL exceeding a size of 5 cm and/or carrying an SDHB germline mutation (especially for children and adolescents). In up to 10 % of patients, metastases are already present at diagnosis of PGL. Measurement of plasma and urinary metanephrine levels has long been used effectively in the diagnosis of PGL. Recently, a dopaminergic phenotype (excess dopamine, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and or methoxytyramine) was recognized as a good indicator for metastatic disease. Vast progress in targeted PET imaging (e.g. 18F-FDA, 18F-FDOPA, 18F-FDG) now allows for reliable early detection of metastatic disease. However, once metastatses are present, treatment options are limited. Survival of patients with metastatic PGL is variable. Depending on the study population the overall 5 year survival is 35–60 %, 2. Here we review recent advances involving findings about the genetic background, the molecular pathogenesis, new diagnostic indicators, pathologic markers and emerging treatment options for metastatic PGL. PMID:21167381

  10. 89Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Donoghue, Joseph A.; Beylergil, Volkan; Lyashchenko, Serge; Ruan, Shutian; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Gonen, Mithat; Lewis, Jason S.; Holland, Jason P.; Cheal, Sarah M.; Reuter, Victor E.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Loda, Massimo F.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Bander, Neil H.; Scher, Howard I.; Morris, Michael J.; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Given the bone tropism of prostate cancer, conventional imaging modalities poorly identify or quantify metastatic disease. 89Zr-huJ591 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed in patients with metastatic prostate cancer to analyze and validate this as an imaging biomarker for metastatic disease. The purpose of this initial study was to assess safety, biodistribution, normal organ dosimetry, and optimal imaging time post-injection for lesion detection. Methods Ten patients with metastatic prostate cancer received 5 mCi of 89Zr-huJ591. Four whole-body scans with multiple whole-body count rate measurements and serum activity concentration measurements were obtained in all patients. Biodistribution, clearance, and lesion uptake by 89Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging was analyzed and dosimetry was estimated using MIRD techniques. Initial assessment of lesion targeting of 89Zr-huJ591 was done. Optimal time for imaging post-injection was determined. Results The dose was well tolerated with mild chills and rigors seen in two patients. The clearance of 89Zr-huJ591 from serum was bi-exponential with biological half-lives of 7 ± 4.5 h (range 1.1–14 h) and 62 ± 13 h (range 51–89 h) for initial rapid and later slow phase. Whole-body biological clearance was 219 ± 48 h (range 153–317 h). The mean whole-body and liver residence time was 78.7 and 25.6 h, respectively. Dosimetric estimates to critical organs included liver 7.7 ± 1.5 cGy/mCi, renal cortex 3.5 ± 0.4 cGy/mCi, and bone marrow 1.2 ± 0.2 cGy/mCi. Optimal time for patient imaging after injection was 7 ± 1 days. Lesion targeting of bone or soft tissue was seen in all patients. Biopsies were performed in 8 patients for a total 12 lesions, all of which were histologically confirmed as metastatic prostate cancer. One biopsy-proven lesion was not positive on 89Zr-huJ591, while the remaining 11 lesions were 89Zr-huJ591 positive. Two biopsy-positive nodal lesions were noted only on 89Zr-huJ591

  11. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  12. Eribulin for the treatment of advanced or metastatic breast cancer: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Janette; Bagust, Adrian; Boland, Angela; Oyee, James; Trevor, Nicola; Beale, Sophie; Dundar, Yenal; Hockenhull, Juliet; Proudlove, Chris; O'Reilly, Susan

    2015-02-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of eribulin (Eisai Ltd) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of eribulin as treatment for patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (LABC/MBC) pre-treated with at least two chemotherapy regimens. This article summarizes the review of evidence by the Evidence Review Group (ERG) and provides a summary of the NICE Appraisal Committee's (AC's) decision. The clinical evidence was derived from a multi-centred, open-label, randomized, phase III study comparing eribulin with treatment of physician's choice (TPC) in 762 patients with LABC/MBC. Clinical effectiveness results were submitted for two populations: the overall intention-to-treat (ITT) population and a subset (n = 488) that included only patients from North America, Western Europe and Australia (Region 1). For the primary endpoint of overall survival (OS), a primary analysis (after 55 % of patients had died) and an updated analysis (after 77 % of patients had died) were conducted. In the ITT population, treatment with eribulin was associated with a significant improvement in median OS compared with TPC in both primary [difference in median OS 2.5 months; hazard ratio (HR) 0.81, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.66-0.99] and updated analyses (2.7 months; HR 0.81, 95 % CI 0.67-0.96). A statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) was reported for eribulin compared with TPC when assessed by the investigator (difference in median PFS 1.48 months; HR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.64-0.90), but not when assessed by the ERG (1.44 months; HR 0.87, 95 % CI 0.71-1.05). Gains in OS were greater for Region 1 patients than for the ITT population (3.1 vs. 2.7 months). Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data suggested a benefit for eribulin responders, but was based on phase II studies. In the eribulin arm, serious adverse events included febrile neutropenia (4.2 %) and neutropenia (1

  13. Advances in understanding the renal transport and toxicity of mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K. ); Lash, L.H. )

    1994-01-01

    As a result of industrialization and changes in the environment during the twentieth century, humans and animals are exposed to numerous chemical forms of mercury, including elemental mercury vapor (Hg[sup 0]), inorganic mercurous (Hg[sup +]) and mercuric (Hg[sup 2+]) compounds, and organic mercuric (R-Hg[sup +] or R-Hg-R; where R represents any organic ligand) compounds. The risk of exposure and subsequent intoxication is of increasing concern because of the steadily increasing deposition of mercury in the environment (Fitzgerald Clarkson, 1991). All forms of mercury have nephrotoxic effects, although disposition and toxicity of mercury in tissues can vary depending on the chemical form of mercury. For example, the initial toxic effects of both elemental mercury and organic forms of mercury are observed in the nervous system. This is due to their lipophilicity, which allows them to cross the blood-brain barrier. At later times, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity can develop. With inorganic mercurous or mercuric salts, the most prominent effect is nephrotoxicity. Until recently, little was known about the mechanisms involved in the nephropathy induced by mercury. The purpose of this article is to review recent data on the intrarenal accumulation and disposition, nephrotoxicity, and target site specificity of mercury, and factors that modify or alter renal injury induced by mercury. 170 refs., 7 figs.

  14. A Phase I Study of High-Dose Interleukin-2 With Sorafenib in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Elaine; Mortazavi, Amir; Kendra, Kari; Lesinski, Gregory B.; Mace, Thomas A.; Geyer, Susan; Carson, William E.; Tahiri, Sanaa; Bhinder, Arvinder; Clinton, Steven K.; Olencki, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of high-dose interleukin-2 (HD IL-2) followed by sorafenib in patients with metastatic melanoma (MM) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Biomarkers relevant to the antitumor effects of IL-2 that may be altered by sorafenib including the percentages of natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and STAT5 phosphorylation (pSTAT5) in T cells were evaluated. We hypothesized that the proposed treatment schedule is feasible and safe and may lead to enhanced tumor response. A phase I dose escalation trial was conducted in patients with either metastatic RCC or MM. HD IL-2 (600,000 IU/kg IV q8h×8–12 doses) was administered on days 1–5 and 15–19, followed by sorafenib on days 29–82. The sorafenib dose was escalated. The percentage of Tregs, MDSC, and pSTAT5 in T cells were evaluated in peripheral blood by flow cytometry. Twelve of the 18 patients were evaluable for dose-limiting toxicity. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. The treatment-related toxicity was predictable and did not seem to be additive with this schedule of administration. Partial responses were seen in 3 patients. No significant changes in the percentage of circulating Treg and MDSC were observed, whereas sorafenib did not adversely affect the ability of IL-2 to induce pSTAT5 in T cells. HD IL-2 followed by sorafenib was safe and feasible in patients with MM and RCC and did not adversely affect T-cell signaling through STAT5 in response to IL-2. PMID:24598448

  15. Pioglitazone, etoricoxib, interferon-α, and metronomic capecitabine for metastatic renal cell carcinoma: final results of a prospective phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Walter, B; Schrettenbrunner, I; Vogelhuber, M; Grassinger, J; Bross, K; Wilke, J; Suedhoff, T; Berand, A; Wieland, W F; Rogenhofer, S; Andreesen, R; Reichle, A

    2012-06-01

    We enrolled 45 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) at a progressive disease between March 2003 and April 2008 to assess the impact of an anti-inflammatory treatment regime in combination with metronomic low-dose chemotherapy. 42% of the patients had been systemically pre-treated. Therapy consisted of etoricoxib 60 mg daily plus pioglitazone 60 mg daily, day 1+, low-dose interferon-α 4.5 MU sc three times a week, week 1+ and low-dose capecitabine 1 g/m(2) twice daily orally for 14 days, every 3 weeks, day 1+, until disease progression. Objective response was observed in 35% of the patients (PR 27, CR 9%), which was paralleled by strong CRP decline for all patients with initially elevated CRP levels (n = 32). CRP values decreased from mean 42.3 mg/L (range 9.1-236), to 11.1 mg/L, (range 1.1-35.6), P = 0.006. Median overall survival and progression-free survival for the total cohort were 26.9 and 7.2 months for patients with elevated CRP 24.4 and 11.3 months (95% CI, 22.8-31.0/5.7-16.9) and 13.8-2.6 months (95% CI, 6.5-21.1/0.4-4.8) for the non-elevated CRP group, respectively (P = 0.082/0.017). Median observation time: 26.1 months; Overall survival at 5 years: 18%. Toxicity>WHO grade 3 was reported: Hand-foot syndrome in 16 patients (36%), diarrhea in 4, and pneumonia in 2 patients. Our data allow us to conclude that the control of tumor-associated inflammation is an important therapeutic principle in patients with metastatic RCC. PMID:21607771

  16. Assessment of survival of patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma after radical cytoreductive nephrectomy versus no surgery: a SEER analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wen-Jun; Zhu, Yao; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purposes To examine the factors related to the choice of cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mCCRCC), and compare the population-based survival rates of patients treated with or without surgery in the modern targeted therapy era. Materials and Methods From 2006 to 2009, patients with mCCRCC were identified from SEER database. The factors that affected patients to be submitted to CN were examined and propensity scores for each patient were calculated. Then patients were matched based upon propensity scores. Univariable and multivariable cox regression models were used to compare survival rates of patients treated with or without surgery. Finally, sensitivity analysis for the cox model on a hazard ratio scale was performed. Results Age, race, tumor size, T stage and N stage were associated with nephrectomy univariablely. After the match based upon propensity scores, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year cancer-specific survival rate estimates were 45.1%, 27.9%, and 21.7% for the no-surgery group vs 70.6%, 52.2%, and 41.7% for the surgery group, respectively (hazard ratio 0.42, 95%CI: 0.35-0.52, log-rank P<0.001). In multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression model, race, T stage, N stage and median household income were significantly associated with survival. Sensitivity analysis on a hazard ratio scale indicated that the hazard ratio might be above 1.00 only when the unknown factor had an opposite effect on survival which was 3-fold than CN. Conclusion The results of our study showed that CN significantly improves the survival of patients with metastatic CCRCC even in the targeted therapy era. PMID:26005970

  17. Phase III Trial of Bevacizumab Plus Interferon Alfa Versus Interferon Alfa Monotherapy in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Final Results of CALGB 90206

    PubMed Central

    Rini, Brian I.; Halabi, Susan; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Vaena, Daniel A.; Archer, Laura; Atkins, James N.; Picus, Joel; Czaykowski, Piotr; Dutcher, Janice; Small, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Bevacizumab is an antibody that binds vascular endothelial growth factor and has activity in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Interferon alfa (IFN-α) is the historic standard initial treatment for RCC. A prospective, randomized, phase III trial of bevacizumab plus IFN-α versus IFN-α monotherapy was conducted. Patients and Methods Patients with previously untreated, metastatic clear cell RCC were randomly assigned to receive either bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks) plus IFN-α (9 million units subcutaneously three times weekly) or the same dose and schedule of IFN-α monotherapy in a multicenter phase III trial. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points were progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate, and safety. Results Seven hundred thirty-two patients were enrolled. The median OS time was 18.3 months (95% CI, 16.5 to 22.5 months) for bevacizumab plus IFN-α and 17.4 months (95% CI, 14.4 to 20.0 months) for IFN-α monotherapy (unstratified log-rank P = .097). Adjusting on stratification factors, the hazard ratio was 0.86 (95% CI, 0.73 to 1.01; stratified log-rank P = .069) favoring bevacizumab plus IFN-α. There was significantly more grade 3 to 4 hypertension (HTN), anorexia, fatigue, and proteinuria for bevacizumab plus IFN-α. Patients who developed HTN on bevacizumab plus IFN-α had a significantly improved PFS and OS versus patients without HTN. Conclusion OS favored the bevacizumab plus IFN-α arm but did not meet the predefined criteria for significance. HTN may be a biomarker of outcome with bevacizumab plus IFN-α. PMID:20368558

  18. First-line cetuximab-based chemotherapies for patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Sakata, Kazuya; Okuyama, Masaki; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujii, Hitoshi; Fukuzaki, Takayuki; Morita, Tetsushi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Maski

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. A burgeoning number of studies have demonstrated that the addition of cetuximab to another standard first-line regimen markedly improves the outcome of CRC treatment. However, at present, the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy has not been well described in Japan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of first-line chemotherapies that included cetuximab for patients with advanced or metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) wild-type CRC in Japan. This prospective multicenter observational study was conducted at 13 affiliated medical institutions. A total of 64 patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2013. The patients met the following criteria for eligibility: i) histologically confirmed, advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC; and ii) cetuximab-based chemotherapies administered as a first-line treatment. First-line cetuximab-based treatments were administered as follows: 29 patients (45.3%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin; 14 patients (21.9%) received a combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin; and 10 patients (15.6%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan. The overall response rate (including complete plus partial responses) was 50% (32/64 patients). Initially, 48 lesions were diagnosed as unresectable. Among those, 13 lesions (27.1%) were converted to a resectable status following cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy treatments. The median overall survival time and the progression-free survival time were 1,189 and 359 days, respectively. The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event was neutropenia, which occurred in 20.3% of the patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 skin toxicity was 17.2% (11/64 patients). Cetuximab-based therapies may represent a promising first-line regimen for patients with advanced or

  19. Targeted Therapy in Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (LA-R/M HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Echarri, María José; Lopez-Martin, Ana; Hitt, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other than best supportive care are currently available. Most SCCHN tumours overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This receptor is a tyrosine-kinase membrane receptor that has been implicated in angiogenesis, tumour progression and resistance to different cancer treatments. In this review, we analysed the different drugs and pathways under development to treat SCCHN, especially recurrent/metastatic disease. Until now, the EGFR signalling pathway has been considered the most important target with respect to new drugs; however, new drugs, such as immunotherapies, are currently under study. As new treatments for SCCHN are developed, the influence of therapies with respect to overall survival, progression free survival and quality of life in patients with this disease is changing. PMID:26927178

  20. Next-Generation Sequencing and In Silico Analysis Facilitate Prolonged Response to Pazopanib in a Patient With Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andrew W; Giri, Smith; Patel, Dilan; Sluder, Heather; Vanderwalde, Ari; Martin, Mike G

    2015-10-01

    With the advent of widespread tumor genetic profiling, an increased number of mutations with unknown significance are being identified. Often, a glut of uninterpretable findings may confuse the clinician and provide little or inappropriate guidance in therapeutic decision-making. This report describes a method of protein modeling by in silico analysis (ie, using computer simulation) that is easily accessible to the practicing clinician without need for further laboratory analysis, which can potentially serve as a guide in therapeutic decisions based on poorly characterized tumor mutations. An example of this model is given wherein poorly characterized KIT, PDGFRB, and ERBB2 mutations were discovered in a patient with treatment-refractory metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis. The KIT and PDGFRB mutations were predicted to be pathogenic using in silico analysis, whereas the ERBB2 mutation was predicted to be benign. Based on these findings, the patient was treated with pazopanib and achieved a partial response that lasted for 7.5 months. We propose that in silico analysis be explored as a potential means to further characterize genetic abnormalities found by tumor profiling assays, such as next-generation sequencing. PMID:26483058

  1. Circulating biomarkers and outcome from a randomised phase II trial of sunitinib vs everolimus for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Martin H; Chen, David; Marker, Mahtab; Hakimi, A Ari; Lee, Chung-Han; Hsieh, James J; Knox, Jennifer J; Voi, Maurizio; Motzer, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Background: RECORD-3 assessed non-inferiority of progression-free survival (PFS) with everolimus vs sunitinib in previously untreated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Baseline plasma sample collection and randomised design enabled correlation of circulating biomarkers with efficacy. Methods: Samples were analysed for 121 cancer-related biomarkers. Analyses of biomarkers categorised patients as high or low (vs median) to assess association with first-line PFS (PFS1L) for each treatment arm. A composite biomarker score (CBS) incorporated biomarkers potentially predictive of PFS1L with everolimus. Results: Plasma samples from 442 of the 471 randomised patients were analysed. Biomarkers were associated with PFS1L for everolimus alone (29), sunitinib alone (9) or both (12). Everolimus-specific biomarkers (CSF1, ICAM1, IL-18BP, KIM1, TNFRII) with hazard ratio ⩾1.8 were integrated into a CBS (range 0–5). For CBS low (0–3, n=291) vs high (4–5, n=151), PFS1L differed significantly for everolimus but not for sunitinib. There was no significant difference in PFS1L between everolimus and sunitinib in the high CBS patient cohort. Conclusions: Baseline levels of multiple soluble biomarkers correlated with benefit from everolimus and/or sunitinib, independent of clinical risk factors. A similar PFS1L was observed for both treatments among patients with high CBS score. PMID:26908330

  2. Pre-treatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio may be associated with the outcome in patients treated with everolimus for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, M; De Giorgi, U; Iacovelli, R; Conti, A; Burattini, L; Rossi, L; Luca Burgio, S; Berardi, R; Muzzonigro, G; Cortesi, E; Amadori, D; Cascinu, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). We aimed to assess the association between pre-treatment neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and the outcome of patients treated with everolimus for mRCC. Methods: Ninety-seven patients with mRCC were treated with everolimus till April 2013 in our institutions. Patients were stratified in two groups with NLR >3 (Group A) vs <3 (Group B). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using Kaplan–Meier method. Gender, age, Motzer prognostic group, PFS on first-line therapy, neutrophilia and NLR were included in the Cox analysis to investigate their prognostic relevance. Results: Median OS and PFS were 10.6 and 5.3 months, respectively. Median OS was 12.2 months in Group A and 24.4 months in Group B (P=0.001). Median PFS was 3.4 months in Group A and 9.9 months in Group B (P<0.001). At multivariate analysis, only Motzer prognostic group and NLR were independent prognostic factors for OS and PFS. Conclusion: Pre-treatment NLR is an independent prognostic factor for patients with mRCC treated with second- or third-line everolimus. This should be investigated and validated in prospective studies. PMID:24008663

  3. Mutation status concordance between primary lesions and metastatic sites of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and the impact of mutation testing methodologies: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, James; Dearden, Simon; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Walker, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Increased understanding of the genetic aetiology of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (aNSCLC) has facilitated personalised therapies that target specific molecular aberrations associated with the disease. Biopsy samples for mutation testing may be taken from primary or metastatic sites, depending on which sample is most accessible, and upon differing diagnostic practices between territories. However, the mutation status concordance between primary tumours and corresponding metastases is the subject of debate. This review aims to ascertain whether molecular diagnostic testing of either the primary or metastatic tumours is equally suitable to determine patient eligibility for targeted therapies. A literature search was performed to identify articles reporting studies of mutations in matched primary and metastatic aNSCLC tumour samples. Clinical results of mutation status concordance between matched primary and metastatic tumour samples from patients with aNSCLC were collated. Articles included in this review (N =26) all reported mutation status data from matched primary and metastatic tumour samples obtained from adult patients with aNSCLC. Generally, substantial concordance was observed between primary and metastatic tumours in terms of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, p16 and p53 mutations. However, some level of discordance was seen in most studies; mutation testing methodologies appeared to play a key role in this, along with underlying tumour heterogeneity. Substantial concordance in mutation status observed between primary and metastatic tumour sites suggests that diagnostic testing of either tumour type may be suitable to determine a patient's eligibility for personalised therapies. As with all diagnostic testing, highly sensitive and appropriately validated mutation analysis methodologies are desirable to ensure accuracy. Additional work is also required to define how much discordance is clinically significant given natural tumour heterogeneity. The ability of both

  4. The Toxicity and Benefit of Various Dosing Strategies for Interleukin-2 in Metastatic Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pachella, Laura A.; Madsen, Lydia T.; Dains, Joyce E.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy has been used with success in curing meta­static renal cell carcinoma and melanoma in a small minority of patients. However, the benefits can be accompanied by severe toxicity. This review of the literature discusses varying doses of IL-2 and their associated re­sponse rates and the toxicities associated with treatment. The review also explores the maximally beneficial dose with the most tolerable side effects. Although the higher-dose regimens with a more frequent dosing schedule produce higher-grade toxicity, they were found to deliver the most durable and complete responses. It is recommended to use a higher-dose regimen (720,000 IU/kg every 8 hours for a maximum of 15 doses) and provide sup­portive care for toxicity, so patients can have maximal benefit from therapy. PMID:26557408

  5. A Rare Case of the Simultaneous, Multifocal, Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Ipsilateral Left Testes, Bladder, and Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kongnyuy, Michael; Lawindy, Samuel; Martinez, Daniel; Parker, Justin; Hall, Mary

    2016-01-01

    We describe the rare case of a 68-year-old gentleman with the history of a hand-assisted laparoscopic left radical nephrectomy for a T2bN0M1 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Seven years after surgery and with clean surveillance imaging for metastasis/recurrence the patient presented with three separate tumors suspicious for malignancy. A bladder lesion was found during workup for hematuria, a stomach lesion during diagnostic endoscopy, and a testicular lesion during self-exam. He underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor, left inguinal orchiectomy, and upper endoscopic ensnarement. All specimens surprisingly showed RCC by histology and immunostaining. These three sites are rare for RCC metastasis and simultaneous presentation is even rarer, further emphasizing the importance of continuous and careful follow-up in this patient population, despite what could appear as complete remission. PMID:26904352

  6. Seeking new prognostic and predictive factors in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma – apoptosis-regulating factors

    PubMed Central

    Szczylik, Cezary; Rzepecki, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Kidney cancer, despite the constant upward trend in the incidence of this type of cancer (about 1.5-5.9% per year), is rather rare, representing approximately 2-3% of all adult cancers. Since recently, drugs based on so-called targeted therapy play a decisive role in the treatment of patients with metastatic kidney cancer. Prognostic and predictive factors can significantly contribute to prognosis assessment and the correct classification of patients to specific forms of causal treatment of kidney cancer. In addition to the most commonly used and widely known prognostic factors, grouped in the so-called Motzer model, new prognostic markers of this tumour are being sought. Preliminary reports indicate that there may be a promising role of factors that regulate the cell cycle and apoptosis, and agents from the group of hypoxia-induced proteins. The proliferation markers or proteins related to cellular adhesion can also be relevant. This article presents examples of markers from the first of the above groups of proteins, which on the basis of the performed analyses showed independent prognostic or predictive value in kidney cancer. PMID:23788861

  7. Cixutumumab and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Undifferentiated High Grade Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Childhood Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma With Mixed Embryonal and Alveolar Features; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Malignant Adult Hemangiopericytoma; Malignant Childhood Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

  8. Advanced glycation end products overload might explain intracellular cobalamin deficiency in renal dysfunction, diabetes and aging.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rima; Shannan, Batool; Herrmann, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to aging. Cobalamin (Cbl) is required for cell growth and functions, and its deficiency causes serious complications. Diabetics and renal patients show high concentrations of Cbl, but metabolic evidence of Cbl deficiency that is reversible after Cbl treatment. Cbl might be sequestered in blood and cannot be delivered to the cell. Megalin mediates the uptake of transcobalamin-Cbl complex into the proximal tubule cells. Megalin is involved in the uptake and degradation of AGEs. In aging, diabetes or renal dysfunction, AGEs might overload megalin thus lowering Cbl uptake. Transcobalamin-Cbl might retain in blood. Shedding of megalin and transcobalamin receptor under glycation conditions is also a possible mechanism of this phenomenon. PMID:21880434

  9. Cutaneous PEComas Express CD10: Implications for the Classification of PEComas and the Differential Diagnosis With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel; Nguyen, Catherine M; Cassarino, David S

    2016-09-01

    Cutaneous perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are peculiar, rare mesenchymal tumors of uncertain lineage. They show a characteristic epithelioid morphology, and they are usually composed of monomorphous clear-to-granular appearing perivascular cells. One of the main differential diagnoses with PEComas is a cutaneous metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). CD10 has been emphasized to be a crucial marker in the diagnosis of metastasis from RCC. Although visceral PEComas have been studied for CD10 expression, primary cutaneous PEComas have not. Although it could be assumed a priori that cutaneous PEComas would stain as their visceral counterpart, there is increasing evidence that cutaneous PEComas could actually be unrelated to PEComas from other organs. In this report, the author's studied three primary cutaneous PEComas, and included CD10 in our immunohistochemical studies. All three PEComas expressed the marker. They conclude that a CD10 clear-cell dermal tumor is not necessarily equivalent to a metastasis from RCC and that additional stains should be added to rule out PEComa, even if the biopsy or the panel of antibodies is limited. PMID:26909587

  10. Advances and new perspectives in the treatment of metastatic colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Recondo, Gonzalo Jr; Díaz-Cantón, Enrique; de la Vega, Máximo; Greco, Martin; Recondo, Gonzalo Sr; Valsecchi, Matias E

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade we have witnessed an unprecedented outburst of new treatment approaches for the management of metastatic colon cancer. Anti-angiogenic drugs, epidermal growth factor receptor blockers and multi-kinase inhibitors have all resulted in small but consistent improvement in clinical outcomes. However, this progress has paradoxically leaded us into new challenges. In many cases the clinical development was done in parallel and the lack of head-to-head comparison evolved into circumstances where several valid new “standards of care” are available. Even though desirable in essence, the availability of many options as well as different possible combinations frequently leaves the busy clinician in the difficult situation of having to choose between one or the other, sometimes without solid evidence to support each decision. In addition, progress never stops and new agents are continuously tested. For these reason this review will try to summarize all the clinical trials that constitute the theoretical framework that support our daily practice but will also procure the reader with rational answers to common clinical dilemmas by critically appraising the current literature. Lastly, we will provide with a compilation of promising new agents that may soon become our next line of defense against this deadly disease. PMID:25024813

  11. Phase II Trial of Goserelin and Exemestane Combination Therapy in Premenopausal Women With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayu; Xu, Binghe; Yuan, Peng; Ma, Fei; Li, Qing; Zhang, Pin; Cai, Ruigang; Fan, Ying; Luo, Yang; Li, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A promising option as the treatment of choice for premenopausal patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) could be the combination of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog and an aromatase inhibitor. However, no prospective studies on the efficacy of goserelin with exemestane in locally advanced or MBC premenopausal breast cancer patients have been reported. We present the phase II trial of goserelin plus exemestane in a total of 44 premenopausal women with locally advanced or MBC. All patients received a subcutaneous injection of 3.6 mg goserelin every 4 weeks along with 25 mg exemestane daily. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). The second end point included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), duration of response (DOR), and clinical benefit rate (CBR) based on complete response (CR), partial response (PR), or stable disease (SD) for ≥6 months. The median PFS was 13 months (range: 2–42 months). The median DOR was 8 months (range: 2–40 months). Two patients achieved CR (4.5%), and 15 patients experienced PR (34.1%). Fifteen patients (34.1%) had SD ≥6 months. The ORR was 38.6%, and the CBR was 65.9%. Primary progressive disease occurred in 15 patients (34.1%). Five patients (11.4%) died during the study period. Because a few patients have died, the median OS has not been reached. Drug therapy was well tolerated. The most frequent grade-3 adverse events were arthralgia (18.2%), skin rash (6.8%), and myalgia (4.5%). No participants withdrew from the study due to drug toxicity. This study suggested that goserelin and exemestane might be highly effective and well-tolerated regimens in premenopausal women with hormone-responsive, locally advanced or MBC. PMID:26131799

  12. Tolerability of Therapies Recommended for the Treatment of Hormone Receptor-Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    For women with hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer, endocrine therapies, including the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen, the aromatase inhibitors anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane, and the selective estrogen receptor degrader fulvestrant, are recommended in clinical guidelines. The addition of targeted agents such as everolimus or palbociclib to aromatase inhibitors are also recommended as treatment options. Chemotherapy remains an option, although clinical guidelines have recommended these agents be reserved for patients with immediately life-threatening disease or if resistance to endocrine therapy is known or suspected. The present review has consolidated the tolerability profiles of the agents approved for use in the treatment of hormone receptor-positive advanced or metastatic breast cancer based on phase III registration trial data. Endocrine therapies are generally well tolerated, although the addition of targeted therapies to aromatase inhibitors or fulvestrant appears to increase the proportion of patients experiencing adverse events, and palbociclib and chemotherapy appear to be more closely associated with serious adverse events, including neutropenia. PMID:27151773

  13. Prognosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma with first-line interferon-α therapy in the era of molecular-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Wataru; Eto, Masatoshi; Kamba, Tomomi; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato; Kamai, Takao; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Azuma, Haruhito; Matsubara, Akio; Nishimura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Ogawa, Osamu; Naito, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    The RCC-SELECT study showed the correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in STAT3 gene and survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients with first-line interferon-α (IFN-α). In that study, even patients with STAT3 SNP linked to shorter overall survival (OS) exhibited remarkably improved prognosis. All 180 patients evaluated in the above study were further analyzed for correlation between OS and demographics/clinicopathological parameters. OS was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Associations between OS and potential prognostic factors were assessed using the log-rank test and the Cox proportional hazards model. The median OS was 42.8 months. Univariate analysis showed that worse Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-performance status (ECOG-PS), high T stage, regional lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, higher grade, infiltrative growth pattern, the presence of microscopic vascular invasion (MVI), hypercalcemia, anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated C-reactive protein were significantly associated with OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG-PS (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.665, P = 0.0004), hypercalcemia (HR = 6.428, P = 0.0005) and the presence of MVI (HR = 2.668, P = 0.0109) were jointly significant poor prognostic factors. This is the first study analysing prognostic factors of mRCC patients with first-line IFN-α using large cohort of the prospective study. The present study suggests that first-line IFN-α is still a useful therapy for mRCC even in the era of molecular targeted therapy. PMID:27089226

  14. Angiotensin system inhibitors and survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with VEGF-targeted therapy: A pooled secondary analysis of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sorich, Michael J; Kichenadasse, Ganessan; Rowland, Andrew; Woodman, Richard J; Mangoni, Arduino A

    2016-05-01

    Use of angiotensin system inhibitors (ASIs; angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) has been reported to be associated with improved survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), particularly when used with vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapies. This study was a secondary pooled analysis of two Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of patients with mRCC: NCT00334282 comparing pazopanib to placebo and NCT00720941 comparing pazopanib to sunitinib. ASI users were defined as patients using an ASI at baseline. Association with overall survival (OS; primary outcome) and progression-free survival (PFS) was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. The association was adjusted in multivariable analysis for baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP), use of other antihypertensive drugs and prognostic factors comprising the Heng risk criteria for mRCC. Of 1,545 patients pooled from the two RCTs, 649 (42%) were using one or more antihypertensive drugs at baseline, 385 (59%) of which were using an ASI. In the multivariable analysis of patients using pazopanib or sunitinib, no significant association was observed between baseline ASI use and OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.97 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-1.18], p = 0.80) or PFS (HR 0.88 [95% CI 0.73-1.06], p = 0.17). Exploratory subgroup analysis of NCT00720941 highlighted that the effect of baseline ASI use on OS may differ between patients treated with sunitinib and pazopanib. In conclusion, use of ASIs at baseline was not a significant independent prognostic factor for improved survival in a pooled analysis of mRCC patients treated with pazopanib or sunitinib. PMID:26685869

  15. Treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) with CAIX CAR-engineered T-cells-a completed study overview.

    PubMed

    Lamers, Cor H J; Klaver, Yarne; Gratama, Jan W; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno

    2016-06-15

    We studied safety and proof of concept of a phase I/II trial with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The CAR was based on the G250 mAb that recognized an epitope of carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX). Twelve patients with CAIX+ mRCC were treated in three cohorts with a maximum of 10 daily infusions of 2×10(7) to 2×10(9) CAR T-cells. Circulating CAR T-cells were transiently detectable in all patients and maintained antigen-specific immune functions following their isolation post-treatment. Blood cytokine profiles mirrored CAR T-cell presence and in vivo activity. Unfortunately, patients developed anti-CAR T-cell antibodies and cellular immune responses. Moreover, CAR T-cell infusions induced liver enzyme disturbances reaching CTC grades 2-4, which necessitated cessation of treatment in four out of eight patients (cohort 1+2). Examination of liver biopsies revealed T-cell infiltration around bile ducts and CAIX expression on bile duct epithelium, adding to the notion of on-target toxicity. No such toxicities were observed in four patients that were pretreated with G250 mAb (cohort 3). The study was stopped due to the advent of competing treatments before reaching therapeutic or maximum tolerated dose in cohort 3. No clinical responses have been recorded. Despite that, from this trial numerous recommendations for future trials and their immune monitoring could be formulated, such as choice of the target antigen, format and immunogenicity of receptor and how the latter relates to peripheral T-cell persistence. PMID:27284065

  16. Comparative effectiveness of everolimus and axitinib as second targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the US: a retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Pal, Sumanta K; Signorovitch, James E; Reichmann, William M; Li, Nanxin; Yang, Chelsey; Liu, Zhimei; Perez, Jose Ricardo; Jonasch, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Second targeted therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) include mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORis) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This observational study compares overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients treated with everolimus (an mTORi) and axitinib (a TKI) following first TKI, and assesses the impact of type and duration of first TKI on the relative effectiveness of these second targeted therapies. Methods Retrospective reviews of medical records were conducted by medical oncologists or hematologists/oncologists recruited from a nationwide panel. Included patients with mRCC were required to have discontinued a first TKI (sunitinib, sorafenib, or pazopanib) for medical reasons, and to have initiated everolimus or axitinib as second targeted therapy between February 2012 and January 2013. OS and PFS were compared between patients treated with everolimus vs. axitinib using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. Comparative results were also stratified by type and duration of first TKI. Results Included patients (n = 325 for everolimus and n = 127 for axitinib) had a mean age of 61 years and 31% were female. Sunitinib was the most commonly used first TKI (73%). After adjusting for patient characteristics, no statistically significant differences were observed in OS or PFS between everolimus and axitinib. When stratifying by type and duration of first TKI, there was no statistically significant difference in OS between everolimus and axitinib in all subgroups except for patients with <6 months on sunitinib or sorafenib as first TKI. No significant difference in PFS was observed in any subgroup. Limitations Important limitations include potential missing or inaccurate data in medical charts, and confounding due to unobserved factors. Conclusions In this retrospective chart review, no significant differences were detected in OS or PFS between axitinib and

  17. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Treated With Bisphosphonates and Targeted Agents: Results of an Italian Multicenter Study and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Vittorio; Porta, Camillo; Saia, Giorgia; Paglino, Chiara; Bettini, Giordana; Scoletta, Matteo; Bonacina, Riccardo; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Lo Re, Giovanni; Guglielmini, Pamela; Di Fede, Olga; Campisi, Giuseppina; Bedogni, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) associated with the use of bisphosphonates has been rarely reported in metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) patients. Since the introduction of combined therapies consisting of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBPs) and targeted agents, an increasing number of RCC patients were reported to develop ONJ, suggesting that therapeutic angiogenesis suppression might increase the risk of ONJ in NBPs users. We performed a multicenter retrospective study and reviewed literature data to assess the occurrence and to investigate the nature of ONJ in RCC patients taking NBPs and targeted agents. Nine Italian Centers contributed to the data collection. Patients with exposed and nonexposed ONJ were eligible for the study if they had been taking NBPs and were receiving targeted agents at the time of ONJ diagnosis. Forty-four RCC patients were studied. Patients were mostly male (82%), with a median age of 63 years (range, 45-85 years). Zoledronic acid (93%) and sunitinib (80%) were the most frequently used NBP and antiangiogenic agent, respectively. Other agents included Pamidronate, ibandronate, sorafenib, bevacizumab, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Forty-nine sites of ONJ were encountered, with the mandible being the preferred site of ONJ (52%); both jaws were affected in 5 cases (12%). The most common precipitating event was dental/periodontal infection (34%), followed by tooth extraction (30%). Oral triggers of ONJ were missing in 10 cases (23%). This unexpectedly high number of ONJ cases, in comparison with literature data, suggests that frequency of ONJ in RCC patients might be largely underestimated and suggests a potential role for targeted agents in the incremental risk of ONJ. PMID:25586958

  18. STAT3 polymorphism rs4796793 may be a predictive factor of tumor response to multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitors in metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ioroi, Takeshi; Kanaya, Kazuya; Shinomiya, Kazuaki; Komoto, Shiho; Hirata, Sachi; Harada, Kenichi; Watanabe, Aimi; Suno, Manabu; Nishioka, Tatsuya; Kume, Manabu; Makimoto, Hiroo; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Hirano, Takeshi; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato; Hirai, Midori

    2016-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 is a key factor in multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitor (mTKI)-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. This study aimed to identify associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the STAT3 gene and tumor response to mTKIs in patients with metastatic RCC (mRCC). Seventy-one patients with clear cell RCC treated with any mTKI were retrospectively genotyped to elucidate a potential association between STAT3 SNPs and overall best response to drugs. Of 50 patients included for analysis, a partial or complete response was observed in 17. A significant association was found between rs4796793 alleles and tumor response [G vs. C, odds ratio (OR) 3.25, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.30-8.07]. There were a higher percentage of responders with the C/C genotype at rs4796793 than with the G/C + G/G genotypes (OR 4.46, 95 % CI 1.31-15.28). Time-to-event analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference between patients with the CC genotype and those with G/C + G/G genotypes in time-to-treatment response, but not in progression-free survival or time-to-treatment failure. The rs4796793 genotype is a novel predictive factor of the response to mTKIs in patients with mRCC. However, prospective translational trials with larger patient cohorts are required to confirm these results. PMID:26833481

  19. GLI2 expression levels in radical nephrectomy specimens as a predictor of disease progression in patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma following treatment with sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Junya; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in the progression of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (m-ccRCC) as well as the molecular targets of sunitinib, an inhibitor of multiple tyrosine kinases. A total of 39 patients subjected to radical nephrectomy who were diagnosed with m-ccRCC and were subsequently treated with sunitinib were enrolled in the present study. The expression levels of the Hedgehog signaling proteins (GLI1, GLI2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and transforming growth factor-β) and major molecular targets of sunitinib [vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1 and −2, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α and -β] in primary RCC specimens were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. The expression levels of GLI2, VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and pre-treatment C-reactive protein as well as the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center risk were identified as significant predictors of progression-free survival (PFS). Of these, only GLI2 expression was independently correlated to PFS according to multivariate analysis. Furthermore, treatment with sunitinib resulted in a marked inhibition of GLI2 expression in the parental human RCC ACHN cell line, but not in ACHN cells with acquired resistance to sunitinib. These findings suggested that GLI2 may be involved in the acquisition of resistance to sunitinib in RCC; thus, it may be useful to consider the expression levels of GLI2 in addition to conventional prognostic parameters when selecting m-ccRCC patients likely to benefit from treatment with sunitinib. PMID:27602218

  20. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in human peripheral blood: Optimized quantification in healthy donors and patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Flörcken, Anne; Takvorian, Anna; Singh, Anju; Gerhardt, Anne; Ostendorf, Benjamin Nils; Dörken, Bernd; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells is an important mechanism leading to tolerance against tumors. Phenotypic characterization of MDSC has been established and heterogeneous populations with monocytic or granulocytic features have been characterized. Increased levels of MDSC have been described in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and seem to correlate with an adverse outcome. As MDSC constitute only small populations in peripheral blood of cancer patients, it is highly important to achieve technically optimized conditions for quantification. Different cell preparation techniques--besides freezing and thawing--are potential sources of substantial variation. Our study was focused on an optimized quantification of MDSC in pB of healthy donors and patients with mRCC, in whom major technical sources of variation were analyzed. Whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used for the flow cytometric quantification of MDSC in the pB of mRCC patients and healthy donors. We compared (1) analysis in whole blood vs. PBMC after Ficoll gradient centrifugation and (2) immediate analysis after blood drawing vs. analysis one day later. Finally, in order to evaluate our optimized technical approach, pB of 15 patients with histologically confirmed mRCC under treatment with either sunitinib or sorafenib was analyzed. No difference in the number of MDSC was observed after analysis in whole blood vs. PBMC. In contrast, the time point of analysis was a source of substantial variation (one day later vs. immediate analysis after blood drawing). In conclusion, for optimal analysis of MDSC, immediate analysis of whole blood after blood drawing rather than one day later seems to be most appropriate under the aspect of practical feasibility and reliability. Using this method, we were able to confirm both (a) increased numbers of MDSC in patients with mRCC and (b) a decrease of MDSC under sunitinib therapy. PMID:26462434

  1. Association between treatment effects on disease progression end points and overall survival in clinical studies of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Delea, T E; Khuu, A; Heng, D YC; Haas, T; Soulières, D

    2012-01-01

    Background: The relationship between progression-free survival and time to progression (PFS/TTP) and overall survival (OS) has been demonstrated in a variety of solid tumours but not in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted to identify controlled trials of cytokine or targeted therapies for mRCC reporting information on treatment effects on PFS/TTP and OS for one or more comparison. The associations between treatment effects on PFS/TTP and OS were analysed using linear regression. Results: Thirty-one studies representing 10 943 patients, 75 treatment groups, and 41 comparisons were identified. The correlation coefficient between the negative log of the hazard ratio (HR) for PFS/TTP (−ln HRPFS/TTP) vs the negative log of the HR for OS (−ln HROS) was 0.80 (P<0.0001). In linear regression, the coefficient on −ln HRPFS/TTP vs −ln HROS was 0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.47 0.81; R2=0.63), suggesting each 10% relative risk reduction (RRR) for PFS/TTP was associated with a 6% RRR for OS. A 1-month gain in median PFS/TTP was associated with a 1.17-month gain in median OS (95% CI: 0.59,1.76; R2=0.28). Conclusion: In trials of treatments for mRCC, treatment effects on PFS/TTP are strongly associated with treatment effects on OS. PMID:22935581

  2. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  3. Clinical experience and critical evaluation of the role of everolimus in advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Maxine; Abdollah, Firas; Schmitges, Jan; Jeldres, Claudio; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Perrotte, Paul; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of sequential everolimus, an orally administered inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), was proven in a placebo-controlled phase III study, where median progression-free survival was 4.9 vs 1.9 months for placebo (hazard ratio: 0.33, P < 0.001). Placebo crossovers (80%) contaminated overall survival data. Adverse event discontinuation rate was of only 10% and health-adjusted quality-of-life was sustained. These data represent the first placebo-controlled evidence of efficacy for a sequentially used targeted agent. Everolimus resulted in the strongest hazard ratio ever recorded for progression-free survival, despite it being tested in a population with the most aggressive natural history ever recorded in all available phase III metastatic renal cell carcinoma trials. Everolimus use after exclusively one prior antivascular endothelial growth factor failure resulted in an even longer progression-free survival time (5.4 months) than in the entire population (4.9 months). These benefits should also be considered in the light of sustained and unimpaired health-related quality of life. Use in first line other than second or subsequent lines remains to be validated. PMID:24198635

  4. Sunitinib treatment in patients with advanced renal cell cancer: the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA) experience

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Rafael Corrêa; Reinert, Tomás; Campos, Franz; Peixoto, Fábio Affonso; de Andrade, Carlos Augusto; Castro, Thalita; Herchenhorn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of sunitinib treatment in a non-screened group of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) treated by the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) at a single reference institution. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study, which evaluated patients with mRCC who received sunitinib between May 2010 and December 2013. Results: Fifty-eight patients were eligible. Most patients were male 41 (71%), with a median age of 58 years. Nephrectomy was performed in 41 (71%) patients with a median interval of 16 months between the surgery and initiation of sunitinib. The most prevalent histological subtype was clear cell carcinoma, present in 52 (91.2%) patients. In 50 patients (86%), sunitinib was the first line of systemic treatment. The main adverse effects were fatigue (57%), hypothyroidism (43%), mucositis (33%) and diarrhea (29%). Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects were infrequent: fatigue (12%), hypertension (12%), thrombocytopenia (7%), neutropenia (5%) and hand-foot syndrome (5%). Forty percent of patients achieved a partial response and 35% stable disease, with a disease control rate of 75%. Median progression free survival was 7.6 months and median overall survival was 14.1 months. Conclusion: Sunitinib treatment was active in the majority of patients, especially those with low and intermediate risk by MSKCC score, with manageable toxicity. Survival rates were inferior in this non-screened population with mRCC treated in the SUS. PMID:27564279

  5. Recent advances in renal transplantation: antibody-mediated rejection takes center stage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien Chia; Sicard, Antoine; Rabeyrin, Maud; Morelon, Emmanuel; Dubois, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Overlooked for decades, antibodies have taken center stage in renal transplantation and are now widely recognized as the first cause of allograft failure. Diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection has considerably improved with identification of antibody-mediated lesions in graft biopsies and advances made in the detection of circulating donor-specific antibodies. Unfortunately, this progress has not yet translated into better outcomes for patients. Indeed, in the absence of a drug able to suppress antibody generation by plasma cells, available therapies can only slow down graft destruction. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of antibody-mediated rejection and discusses future interesting research directions. PMID:26097724

  6. Sunitinib as Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in the Management of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking a Glomus Vagale Tumor in the Head and Neck: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Serkan; Somner, Jessica; Rajan, Gunesh P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) of the head and neck with intracranial extension is rare and may pose difficulties to the diagnosis and management. Method We describe a unique case of a 76-year-old man with a metastatic RCC to the neck and lateral skull base with intracranial extension presenting with Collet-Sicard syndrome 8 years after initial diagnosis. The radiologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of a glomus vagale tumor on the basis of clinical and radiologic features. Results Despite radiotherapy, the intracranial extension progressed in size, resulting in early hydrocephalus. Sunitinib, a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was instituted to treat the glomus vagale tumor with a marked reduction in tumor volume and resolution of the early hydrocephalus. The surgical resection of the tumor with its intracranial extension was achieved without additional postoperative morbidity. The histopathologic diagnosis surprisingly demonstrated metastatic RCC. Conclusion We present a case of metastatic RCC to the head and neck region mimicking a glomus vagale tumor and describe the first use of sunitinib as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy to achieve a single-stage radical en bloc resection of the tumor mass. PMID:27247912

  7. Update on Mechanisms of Renal Tubule Injury Caused by Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Yuan, Yang; Sun, Zilin

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) caused by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may be associated with lipid accumulation in the kidneys. This study was designed to investigate whether Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML, a member of the AGEs family) increases lipid accumulation in a human renal tubular epithelial cell line (HK-2) via increasing cholesterol synthesis and uptake and reducing cholesterol efflux through endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). Our results showed that CML disrupts cholesterol metabolism in HK-2 cells by activating sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) and liver X receptor (LXR), followed by an increase in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) mediated cholesterol synthesis and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) mediated cholesterol uptake and a reduction in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediated cholesterol efflux, ultimately causing lipid accumulation in HK-2 cells. All of these responses could be suppressed by an ERS inhibitor, which suggests that CML causes lipid accumulation in renal tubule cells through ERS and that the inhibition of ERS is a potential novel approach to treating CML-induced renal tubular foam cell formation. PMID:27034941

  8. Effect of taurine on advanced glycation end products-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.-S. Chuang, L.-Y.; Guh, J.-Y.; Yang, Y.-L.; Hsu, M.-S.

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that advanced glycation end products (AGE) play a major role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Taurine is a well documented antioxidant agent. To explore whether taurine was linked to altered AGE-mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DN, we examined the molecular mechanisms of taurine responsible for inhibition of AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells. We found that AGE (but not non-glycated BSA) caused inhibition of cellular mitogenesis rather than cell death by either necrosis or apoptosis. There were no changes in caspase 3 activity, bcl-2 protein expression, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in BSA, AGE, or the antioxidant taurine treatments in these cells. AGE-induced the Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was markedly blocked by taurine. Furthermore, taurine, the Raf-1 kinase inhibitor GW5074, and the ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 may have the ability to induce cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression from AGE-treated cells. The ability of taurine, GW5074, or PD98059 to inhibit AGE-induced hypertrophy was verified by the observation that it significantly decreased cell size, cellular hypertrophy index, and protein levels of RAGE, p27{sup Kip1}, collagen IV, and fibronectin. The results obtained in this study suggest that taurine may serve as the potential anti-fibrotic activity in DN through mechanism dependent of its Raf-1/ERK inactivation in AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells.

  9. Intermittent versus continuous androgen deprivation for locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in older men in the United States (USA) and Western Europe. Androgen deprivation (AD) constitutes, in most cases, the first-line of treatment for these cases. The negative impact of CAD in quality of life, secondary to the adverse events of sustained hormone deprivation, plus the costs of this therapy, motivated the intermittent treatment approach. The objective of this study is to to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials that compared the efficacy and adverse events profile of intermittent versus continuous androgen deprivation for locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Methods Several databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and CENTRAL. The endpoints were overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), time to progression (TTP) and adverse events. We performed a meta-analysis (MA) of the published data. The results were expressed as Hazard Ratio (HR) or Risk Ratio (RR), with their corresponding 95% Confidence Intervals (CI 95%). Results The final analysis included 13 trials comprising 6,419 patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. TTP was similar in patients who received intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) or continuous androgen deprivation (CAD) (fixed effect: HR = 1.04; CI 95% = 0.96 to 1.14; p = 0.3). OS and CSS were also similar in patients treated with IAD or CAD (OS: fixed effect: HR = 1.02; CI 95% = 0.95 to 1.09; p = 0.56 and CSS: fixed effect: HR = 1.06; CI 95% = 0.96 to 1.18; p = 0.26). Conclusion Overall survival was similar between IAD and CAD in patients with locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. Data on CSS are weak and the benefits of IAD on this outcome remain uncertain. Impact in QoL was similar for both groups, however, sexual activity scores were higher and the incidence of hot flushes was lower in

  10. Survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the pretargeted versus targeted therapy eras.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengxiang; Wong, Yu-Ning; Armstrong, Katrina; Haas, Naomi; Subedi, Prasun; Davis-Cerone, Margaret; Doshi, Jalpa A

    2016-02-01

    Between December 2005 and October 2009, FDA approved six targeted therapies shown to significantly extend survival for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in clinical trials. This study aimed to examine changes in survival between the pretargeted and targeted therapy periods in advanced RCC patients in a real-world setting. Utilizing the 2000-2010 SEER Research files, a pre-post study design with a contemporaneous comparison group was employed to examine differences in survival outcomes for patients diagnosed with advanced RCC (study group) or advanced prostate cancer (comparison group, for whom no significant treatment innovations happened during this period) across the pretargeted therapy era (2000-2005) and the targeted therapy era (2006-2010). RCC patients diagnosed in the targeted therapy era (N = 6439) showed improved survival compared to those diagnosed in the pretargeted therapy era (N = 7231, hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death: 0.86, P < 0.01), while the change between the pre-post periods was not significant for advanced prostate cancer patients (HR: 0.97, P = 0.08). Advanced RCC patients had significantly larger improvements in overall survival compared to advanced prostate cancer patients (z = 4.31; P < 0.01). More detailed year-to-year analysis revealed greater survival improvements for RCC in the later years of the posttargeted period. Similar results were seen for cause-specific survival. Subgroup analyses by nephrectomy status, age, and gender showed consistent findings. Patients diagnosed with advanced RCC during the targeted therapy era had better survival outcomes than those diagnosed during the pretargeted therapy era. Future studies should examine the real-world survival improvements directly associated with targeted therapies. PMID:26645975

  11. Advances in Radiation Therapy for Primary and Metastatic Adult Soft Tissue Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Philip; Sen, Neilayan; Abrams, Ross; Wang, Dian

    2016-06-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) consist of a heterogeneous group of rare malignancies arising from mesenchymal origin. While surgical resection is the primary treatment for STS, the use of radiotherapy (RT) as an adjunctive modality has been shown to improve oncologic outcomes. Technologic improvements, such as image guidance and intensity-modulated radiotherapy that significantly improve both the precision and delivery of RT, have led to the reduction of long-term RT toxicities without compromising outcomes. This review addresses these technologic advancements as well as discussing the most current updates regarding the use of brachytherapy, charged particles, and novel agents with RT. PMID:27113370

  12. Subgroup Analyses from a Phase 3, Open-Label, Randomized Study of Eribulin Mesylate Versus Capecitabine in Pretreated Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Twelves, Chris; Awada, Ahmad; Cortes, Javier; Yelle, Louise; Velikova, Galina; Olivo, Martin S.; Song, James; Dutcus, Corina E.; Kaufman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE AND METHODS Our secondary analyses compared survival with eribulin versus capecitabine in various patient subgroups from a phase 3, open-label, randomized study. Eligible women aged ≥18 years with advanced/metastatic breast cancer and ≤3 prior chemotherapies (≤2 for advanced/metastatic disease), including an anthracycline and taxane, were randomized 1:1 to intravenous eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 or twice-daily oral capecitabine 1250 mg/m2 on days 1–14 (21-day cycles). RESULTS In the intent-to-treat population (eribulin 554 and capecitabine 548), overall survival appeared longer with eribulin than capecitabine in various subgroups, including patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (15.9 versus 13.5 months, respectively), estrogen receptor-negative (14.4 versus 10.5 months, respectively), and triple-negative (14.4 versus 9.4 months, respectively) disease. Progression-free survival was similar between the treatment arms. CONCLUSIONS Patients with advanced/metastatic breast cancer and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-, estrogen receptor-, or triple-negative disease may gain particular benefit from eribulin as first-, second-, and third-line chemotherapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION (PRIMARY STUDY) This study reports the subgroup analyses of eribulin versus capecitabine from a phase 3, open-label, randomized study (www.clinicaltrials.gov; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00337103). PMID:27398025

  13. Molecularly targeted therapies for advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Soley; Rocha-Lima, Caio M

    2013-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States. Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy has been a standard for patients with advanced stage disease. Improvements in overall survival and quality of life have been modest. Improved knowledge of the aberrant molecular signaling pathways found in NSCLC has led to the development of biomarkers with associated targeted therapeutics, thus changing the treatment paradigm for many NSCLC patients. In this review, we present a summary of many of the currently investigated biologic targets in NSCLC, discuss their current clinical trial status, and also discuss the potential for development of other targeted agents. PMID:23696960

  14. FDA Approval Summary: Temsirolimus as Treatment for Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Prowell, Tatiana M.; Ibrahim, Amna; Farrell, Ann T.; Justice, Robert; Mitchell, Shan Sun; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Pazdur, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s approval of temsirolimus (Torisel®), on May 30, 2007, for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Information provided includes regulatory history, study design, study results, and literature review. A multicenter, three-arm, randomized, open-label study was conducted in previously untreated patients with poor-prognosis, advanced RCC. The study objectives were to compare overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate, and safety in patients receiving interferon (IFN)-α versus those receiving temsirolimus alone or in combination with IFN-α. In the second planned interim analysis of the intent-to-treat population (n = 626), there was a statistically significant longer OS time in the temsirolimus (25 mg) arm than in the IFN-α arm (median, 10.9 months versus 7.3 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.73; p = .0078). The combination of temsirolimus (15 mg) and IFN-α did not lead to a significant difference in OS compared with IFN-α alone. There was also a statistically significant longer PFS time for the temsirolimus (25 mg) arm than for the IFN-α arm (median, 5.5 months versus 3.1 months; HR, 0.66, p = .0001). Common adverse reactions reported in patients receiving temsirolimus were rash, asthenia, and mucositis. Common laboratory abnormalities were anemia, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Serious but rare cases of interstitial lung disease, bowel perforation, and acute renal failure were observed. Temsirolimus has demonstrated superiority in terms of OS and PFS over IFN-α and provides an additional treatment option for patients with advanced RCC. PMID:20332142

  15. Review of US Comparative Economic Evidence for Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma after Failure of First-Line VEGF Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael K.; Wang, Xufang; Chulikavit, Maruit J.; Liu, Zhimei

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2006, the economic burden of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) was estimated to be up to $1.6 billion worldwide and has since grown annually. With the continuing increase of the economic burden of this disease in the United States, there is a growing need for economic analyses to guide treatment and policy decisions for this patient population. Objective To evaluate available comparative economic data on targeted therapies for patients with mRCC who have failed first-line targeted therapies. Method A broad and comprehensive literature review was conducted of US-based studies between January 1, 2005, and February 11, 2013, evaluating comparative economic evidence for targeted agents that are used as second-line therapy or beyond. Based on the specific search parameters that focused on cost-effectiveness and economic comparisons between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor (VEGFr) inhibitors and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, only 7 relevant, US-based economic evaluations were found appropriate for inclusion in the analysis. All authors, who are experts in the health economics and outcomes research field, reviewed the search results. Studies of interest were those with a targeted agent, VEGF/VEGFr or mTOR inhibitor, in at least 1 study arm. Discussion As a group, targeted therapies were found to be cost-effective options in treating patients with refractory mRCC in the United States. Oral therapies showed an economic advantage over intravenous agents, presumably because oral therapies have a lower impact on outpatient resources. Based on 3 studies, everolimus has been shown to have an economic advantage over temsirolimus and to be cost-effective compared with sorafenib. No economic comparison between everolimus and axitinib, the only 2 drugs with a National Comprehensive Cancer Network category 1 recommendation for use after the failure of VEGFr tyrosine kinase inhibitors, is available. Conclusion The limited

  16. Local control rates of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the bone using stereotactic body radiation therapy: Is RCC truly radioresistant?′

    PubMed Central

    Bourlon, Maria T.; Bedrick, Edward; Bhatia, Shilpa; Kessler, Elizabeth R.; Flaig, Thomas W.; Fisher, Christine M.; Kavanagh, Brian D; Lam, Elaine T.; Karam, Sana D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We report the radiographic and clinical response rate of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) compared with conventional fractionated external beam radiation therapy (CF-EBRT) for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) bone lesions treated at our institution. Methods and materials Forty-six consecutive patients were included in the study, with 95 total lesions treated (50 SBRT, 45 CF-EBRT). We included patients who had histologic confirmation of primary RCC and radiographic evidence of metastatic bone lesions. The most common SBRT regimen used was 27 Gy in 3 fractions. Results Median follow-up was 10 months (range, 1-64 months). Median time to symptom control between SBRT and CF-EBRT were 2 (range, 0-6 weeks) and 4 weeks (range, 0-7 weeks), respectively. Symptom control rates with SBRT and CF-EBRT were significantly different (P = .020) with control rates at 10, 12, and 24 months of 74.9% versus 44.1%, 74.9% versus 39.9%, and 74.9% versus 35.7%, respectively. The median time to radiographic failure and unadjusted pain progression was 7 months in both groups. When controlling for gross tumor volume, dose per fraction, smoking, and the use of systemic therapy, biologically effective dose ≥80 Gy was significant for clinical response (hazard ratio [HR], 0.204; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.043-0.963; P = .046) and radiographic (HR, 0.075; 95% CI, 0.013-0.430; P = .004). When controlling for gross tumor volume and total dose, biologically effective dose ≥80 Gy was again predictive of clinical local control (HR, 0.140; 95% CI, 0.025-0.787; P = .026). Toxicity rates were low and equivalent in both groups, with no grade 4 or 5 toxicity reported. Conclusions SBRT is both safe and effective for treating RCC bone metastases, with rapid improvement in symptoms after treatment and more durable clinical and radiographic response rate. Future prospective trials are needed to further define efficacy and toxicity of treatment, especially in the setting of targeted agents

  17. Retrospective Analysis of the Efficacy and Safety of Sorafenib in Chinese Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and Prognostic Factors Related to Overall Survival

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoteng; Guo, Gang; Li, Xuesong; Zhang, Cuijian; Huang, Lihua; Fang, Dong; Song, Yi; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sorafenib has been recommended as first- or second-line treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) by several guidelines. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of sorafenib monotherapy in Chinese patients with mRCC and determine the prognostic clinicopathologic factors associated with survival in these patients. This is a single-arm retrospective study conducted in 2 tertiary medical centers; 140 mRCC patients were enrolled between January 2007 and June 2014. Sorafenib was administered at a dose of 400 mg twice daily, and continued until disease progression, at which point the dose was increased to 600 or 800 mg twice daily, or the onset of an intolerable adverse drug event (ADE) that required dose reduction or temporary suspension of treatment. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS), and the secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and safety. The median follow-up time was 32 months. The median OS and PFS were 24 months (range, 3–88 months) and 16 months (range, 0–88 months), respectively. Patients with clear cell carcinoma had a greater OS (P = 0.001) whereas sarcomatoid differentiation (P = 0.045) and disease progression (P = 0.010) negatively impacted OS; time from kidney surgery or biopsy to initiation of sorafenib treatment was associated with PFS (P = 0.027). Efficacy analysis revealed that 3 (2.1%) patients achieved complete responses, 28 (20.0%) patients experienced partial responses, 88 (62.9%) patients had stable disease, and 21 (15.0%) patients developed progressive disease. Moreover, the ORR was 22.1%, and the DCR was 85.0%. Most ADEs were classified as grades 1 or 2 with only 14 (10.0%) patients experiencing a severe ADE (grade 3). Sorafenib monotherapy can achieve promising OS and PFS for Chinese patients with mRCC, especially in those with clear cell carcinoma, with manageable adverse events. PMID

  18. Axitinib versus sorafenib as a second-line therapy in Asian patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: results from a randomized registrational study

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shukui; Bi, Feng; Jin, Jie; Cheng, Ying; Guo, Jun; Ren, Xiubao; Huang, Yiran; Tarazi, Jamal; Tang, Jie; Chen, Connie; Kim, Sinil; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-01-01

    Background This registrational trial evaluated the efficacy, safety, and patient-reported outcomes of axitinib versus sorafenib as a second-line treatment in Asian patients with clear-cell metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Methods In this open-label, multicenter study, previously treated Asian patients with clear-cell mRCC were stratified by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status and prior therapy and randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive axitinib (5 mg twice daily) or sorafenib (400 mg twice daily). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) assessed by a masked independent review committee. Results A total of 204 Asian patients received axitinib (n=135) or sorafenib (n=69). Median PFS (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 6.5 (4.7–9.1) months with axitinib versus 4.8 (3.0–6.5) months with sorafenib (hazard ratio, 0.731; 95% CI, 0.506–1.058; one-sided P=0.0531). The objective response rate (95% CI) was 23.7% (16.8%–31.8%) with axitinib versus 10.1% (4.2%–19.8%) with sorafenib. Common, grade ≥3, all-causality adverse events were hypertension (19.3%), weight decrease (5.2%), and proteinuria (5.2%) with axitinib and hypertension (8.7%) and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (7.2%) with sorafenib. In a time-to-deterioration composite end point of death, progression, and worsening of Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Kidney Symptom Index score, patients treated with axitinib demonstrated a 17%–24% risk reduction compared with sorafenib-treated patients. Conclusion Axitinib is clinically active and well tolerated in previously treated Asian patients with mRCC, consistent with the results from the global Phase III trial. These results establish axitinib as a second-line treatment option for Asian patients with mRCC. PMID:26089686

  19. Evaluation of response from axitinib per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors versus Choi criteria in previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Nott, Louise; Joshi, Abhishek; Kannourakis, George; Tarazi, Jamal; Alam, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Background Axitinib, a selective and potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, was available to patients from Canada and Australia, prior to regulatory approval of axitinib in these countries, for treatment of clear-cell metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) after failure of one prior systemic regimen. Methods This single-arm, open-label study of axitinib evaluated the efficacy, safety, and quality of life (QoL) in patients with mRCC whose disease progressed after one prior systemic first-line regimen. Primary objective was objective response rate evaluated per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and Choi criteria. Progression-free survival, overall survival, safety, and QoL were secondary end points. Due to the small study size, analyses comprised of descriptive statistics. Results Fifteen patients were recruited, five from Canada and ten from Australia, over a limited recruitment period. Thirteen patients received sunitinib as prior therapy. All patients had clear-cell carcinoma, eleven had prior nephrectomy. Liver, lung, and lymph nodes were the most frequent sites of metastases; one patient had brain metastasis. Median time on axitinib was 118.0 days (range: 3.5–645.0 days); estimated survival probability at 12 months was 57.8%. Two (13.3%) patients had objective responses per RECIST versus nine (60.0%) per Choi criteria. Six patients had progressive disease based on RECIST versus three per Choi criteria. Nine (60.0%) events of progression or death occurred by the end of study, and three patients continued to receive the study drug. Fatigue (33%) and diarrhea (20%) were the most common grade ≥3 all-causality, treatment-emergent adverse events. The mean change in European Quality of Life – 5 Dimensions score from baseline to end of treatment was −0.0837. Conclusion The small number of patients and lack of a comparator arm limit the ability to draw definitive conclusions; however, safety and

  20. The Relationship Between the Adverse Events and Efficacy of Sorafenib in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Study from Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Fuli; Wu, Guojun; Zhang, Longlong; Wang, Yangmin; Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qing; Lu, Jingyi; Wang, Yujie; Li, Peijun; Wang, Jian; Lu, Xitao; Yuan, Jianlin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between the adverse events and efficacy of sorafenib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), with a purpose to guide the judgment of efficacy in sorafenib treatment.Eighty-three mRCC patients who received sorafenib therapy at northwest China were studied retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to correlate tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) with adverse event types and grades.Among 83 patients who underwent sorafenib therapy, 2 cases (2.4%) had completed response (CR), 14 cases (16.9%) had partial response (PR), 57 cases (68.7%) had stable disease (SD), and 10 cases (12.0%) developed progressive disease (PD). The median PFS and OS were 15.0 and 29.0 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 1 or 2 adverse events included hand-foot syndrome (68.7%), diarrhea (54.2%), and alopecia (51.8%). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were hand-foot syndrome (6.0%), hypertension (4.8%), and diarrhea (3.6%). The frequency and severity of adverse events correlated with tumor response rate (both with P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed the independent predictors of better PFS included rash (OR 0.307, 95%CI 0.148-0.636, P = 0.001) and diarrhea (OR 0.391, 95%CI 0.169-0.783, P = 0.008). Elevated transaminase was the independent predictor of poor PFS (OR 2.606, 95%CI 1.299-5.532, P = 0.012). For OS, rash (OR 0.473, 95%CI 0.253-0.886, P = 0.019) and diarrhea (OR 0.321, 95%CI 0.171-0.605, P = 0.000) correlated with better OS.Sorafenib-related adverse events are associated with efficacy in patients with mRCC from northwest China. Rash and diarrhea are independent protective factors of both PFS and OS, and elevated transaminase is an independent risk factor of PFS. A large prospective study is warranted. PMID:26656362

  1. Levels of circulating CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cells correlate with outcome in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Farace, F; Gross-Goupil, M; Tournay, E; Taylor, M; Vimond, N; Jacques, N; Billiot, F; Mauguen, A; Hill, C; Escudier, B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Predicting the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy would be of clinical value in patients (pts) with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). We tested the hypothesis that circulating endothelial cell (CEC), bone marrow-derived CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cell or plasma angiogenic factor levels are associated with clinical outcome in mRCC pts undergoing treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Methods: Fifty-five mRCC pts were prospectively monitored at baseline (day 1) and day 14 during treatment (46 pts received sunitinib and 9 pts received sorafenib). Circulating endothelial cells (CD45−CD31+CD146+7-amino-actinomycin (7AAD)− cells) were measured in 1 ml whole blood using four-color flow cytometry (FCM). Circulating CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor cells were measured in progenitor-enriched fractions by four-color FCM. Plasma VEGF, sVEGFR2, SDF-1α and sVCAM-1 levels were determined by ELISA. Correlations between baseline CEC, CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor cells, plasma factors, as well as day 1–day 14 changes in CEC, CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor, plasma factor levels, and response to TKI, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: No significant correlation between markers and response to TKI was observed. No association between baseline CEC, plasma VEGF, sVEGFR-2, SDF-1α, sVCAM-1 levels with PFS and OS was observed. However, baseline CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+7AAD− progenitor cell levels were associated with PFS (P=0.01) and OS (P=0.006). Changes in this population and in SDF-1α levels between day 1 and day 14 were associated with PFS (P=0.03, P=0.002). Changes in VEGF and SDF-1α levels were associated with OS (P=0.02, P=0.007). Conclusion: Monitoring CD45dimCD34+VEGFR2+ progenitor cells, plasma VEGF and SDF-1α levels could be of clinical interest in TKI-treated mRCC pts to predict outcome. PMID:21386843

  2. Metastasectomy Following Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Jose A.; Rini, Brian I.; Varella, Leticia; Garcia, Jorge A.; Dreicer, Robert; Choueiri, Toni K.; Jonasch, Eric; Matin, Surena F.; Campbell, Steven C.; Wood, Christopher G.; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Metastasectomy is often incorporated in the overall management of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). While this approach has been studied in the immunotherapy era, only a few cases have been described in the targeted therapy era. Therefore, we evaluated the role of metastasectomy in patients with mRCC who received prior targeted therapy. Patients and Methods Patients who underwent consolidative metastasectomy following targeted therapy at three institutions from 2004 to 2009 were evaluated in this retrospective study. All patients received at least one cycle of targeted therapy prior to surgical resection of all visible disease. Results Twenty-two patients were identified. Sites of metastasectomy included the retroperitoneum in 12 patients, lung in 6 patients, adrenal gland in 2 patients, bowel in 2 patients, and mediastinum, bone, brain, and IVC thrombus in 1 patient each. A total of 6 postoperative complications were observed in 4 patients within 12 weeks from surgery, all of which resolved with appropriate management. Postoperatively, nine patients received at least one targeted therapy. Eleven patients recurred at a median of 42 weeks from metastasectomy and another eleven patients have not experienced a recurrence at a median of 43 weeks from metastasectomy. Twenty-one patients were alive at a median follow-up of 109 weeks and one patient died of RCC 105 weeks after metastasectomy. Conclusions In a cohort of selected patients with limited tumor burden after treatment with targeted agents, consolidative metastasectomy is feasible with acceptable morbidity. Significant time off targeted therapy and long-term tumor-free status are possible with this approach. PMID:21167518

  3. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  4. Application of Molecular Profiling in Clinical Trials for Advanced Metastatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Mickey; Lih, Chih-Jian; Polley, Eric C.; Chen, Alice P.; Rubinstein, Larry V.; Zhao, Yingdong; Simon, Richard M.; Conley, Barbara A.; Doroshow, James H.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the application of molecular profiling, including sequencing, genotyping, and/or mRNA expression profiling, to the analysis of patient tumors with the objective of applying these data to inform therapeutic choices for patients with advanced cancers. Multiple clinical trials that are attempting to validate this personalized or precision medicine approach are in various stages of development and execution. Although preliminary data from some of these efforts have fueled excitement about the value and utility of these studies, their execution has also provoked many questions about the best way to approach complicating factors such as tumor heterogeneity and the choice of which genetic mutations to target. This commentary highlights some of the challenges confronting the clinical application of molecular tumor profiling and the various trial designs being utilized to address these challenges. Randomized trials that rigorously test patient response to molecularly targeted agents assigned based on the presence of a defined set of mutations in putative cancer-driving pathways are required to address some of the current challenges and to identify patients likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:25663694

  5. Acute effect of high dose (48 mg) of piretanide in advanced renal insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Hadj Aissa, A; Pozet, N; Labeeuw, M; Pellet, M; Traeger, J

    1981-01-01

    1 The acute effects of a high dose of piretanide, a new potent diuretic were studied in eight patients with severely impaired renal function (GFR between 0.09 and 0.17 ml s-1 1.73 m-2). 2 After hydration and following two control periods, a single dose of 48 mg piretanide was ingested. Thereafter, urine was collected every 30 min for 2 h and every hour for the next 4 h. Urinary fluid losses were replaced orally (100 ml of water ever hour) and intravenously (isotonic saline + glucose infusion). 3 The following measurements were made: urine flow rate, clearances of inulin, PAH, urea, creatinine, uric acid, osmolar and free water clearances, excretion rates of sodium, chloride, potassium, calcium, phosphate, bicarbonate, ammonium, titratable acidity and urine pH. 4 Piretanide (48 mg) appeared to be effective in advanced renal insufficiency, producing a significant increase in urine flow rate, in sodium, chloride, potassium and calcium excretion and in Cosm. 5 There was no significant change in GFR, as measured by inulin clearance, or in the other measured parameters. PMID:7213511

  6. Thiazolidinediones and Edema: Recent Advances in the Pathogenesis of Thiazolidinediones-Induced Renal Sodium Retention.

    PubMed

    Horita, Shoko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Masashi; Seki, George

    2015-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are one of the major classes of antidiabetic drugs that are used widely. TZDs improve insulin resistance by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and ameliorate diabetic and other nephropathies, at least, in experimental animals. However, TZDs have side effects, such as edema, congestive heart failure, and bone fracture, and may increase bladder cancer risk. Edema and heart failure, which both probably originate from renal sodium retention, are of great importance because these side effects make it difficult to continue the use of TZDs. However, the pathogenesis of edema remains a matter of controversy. Initially, upregulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in the collecting ducts by TZDs was thought to be the primary cause of edema. However, the results of other studies do not support this view. Recent data suggest the involvement of transporters in the proximal tubule, such as sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter and sodium-proton exchanger. Other studies have suggested that sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 in the thick ascending limb of Henle and aquaporins are also possible targets for TZDs. This paper will discuss the recent advances in the pathogenesis of TZD-induced sodium reabsorption in the renal tubules and edema. PMID:26074951

  7. Cetuximab for the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent/metastatic oral cancer: An investigation of distant metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Naruse, Tomofumi; Yanamoto, Souichi; Matsushita, Yuki; Sakamoto, Yuki; Morishita, Kota; Ohba, Seigo; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Yamada, Shin-Ichi; Asahina, Izumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the efficacy and safety of cetuximab therapy for patients with locally advanced (LA) and recurrent/metastatic (R/M) oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), with a specific focus on distant metastases (DMs). Data from 21 patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC treated with cetuximab therapy in our department between December, 2012 and July, 2015 were reviewed. The endpoint was the time-to-progression and the assessments made were tumor response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety. The overall response rate was 57.1%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 33.3%. The overall median PFS and OS were 5.5 and 8.0 months, respectively. For patients with DMs, the overall response rate was 60.0%, with a CR rate of 40.0%. The median PFS and OS were 3.8 and 5.8 months, respectively. In addition, improved 1-year OS was observed following approval of cetuximab, although the differences between the group of patients treated after that time and historical controls were not statistically significantly (P=0.246). Grade 3–4 adverse events included infusion reaction (4 cases), neutropenia, hypophosphatemia, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, liver toxicity and mucositis (1 case each). There was one cetuximab-related death due to interstitial pneumonia. An acne-like rash was observed in all cases, but no grade 3 or 4 rash was reported. Hypomagnesemia was observed in 10 cases. Our results suggest that cetuximab may display significant therapeutic efficacy in patients with unresectable LA and R/M OSCC, including those with DMs. PMID:27446558

  8. Pharmacogenetics-Guided Phase I Study of Capecitabine on an Intermittent Schedule in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumours.

    PubMed

    Soo, Ross Andrew; Syn, Nicholas; Lee, Soo-Chin; Wang, Lingzhi; Lim, Xn-Yii; Loh, Marie; Tan, Sing-Huang; Zee, Ying-Kiat; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Chuah, Benjamin; Chan, Daniel; Lim, Siew-Eng; Goh, Boon-Cher; Soong, Richie; Yong, Wei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The FDA-approved starting dosage of capecitabine is 1,250 mg/m(2), and market research indicates that U.S. physicians routinely prescribe 1,000 mg/m(2). Retrospective analyses however report reduced toxicity and efficacy in a subset of patients with the 3R/3R genotype of the thymidylate synthase gene enhancer region (TSER). This study sought to develop TSER genotype-specific guidelines for capecitabine dosing. Capecitabine was dose-escalated in advanced and/or metastatic cancer patients with TSER 3R/3R (Group A; N = 18) or 2R/2R + 2R/3R (Group B; N = 5) from 1,250 to 1,625 mg/m(2) b.i.d., every 2 weeks on/1 week off for up to 8 cycles. Parent and metabolites pharmacokinetics, adverse events, and tumour response were assessed. The maximum tolerated and recommended doses in 3R/3R patients are 1,625 mg/m(2) and 1,500 mg/m(2). At 1,500 mg/m(2), one in nine 3R/3R patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity. Dosing guidelines for 2R/2R + 2R/3R remain undetermined due to poor accrual. The results indicate that 3R/3R patients may be amenable to 1,500 mg/m(2) b.i.d. on an intermittent schedule, and is the first to prospectively validate the utility of TSER pharmacogenetic-testing before capecitabine treatment. PMID:27296624

  9. Pharmacogenetics-Guided Phase I Study of Capecitabine on an Intermittent Schedule in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Ross Andrew; Syn, Nicholas; Lee, Soo-Chin; Wang, Lingzhi; Lim, Xn-Yii; Loh, Marie; Tan, Sing-Huang; Zee, Ying-Kiat; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Chuah, Benjamin; Chan, Daniel; Lim, Siew-Eng; Goh, Boon-Cher; Soong, Richie; Yong, Wei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The FDA-approved starting dosage of capecitabine is 1,250 mg/m2, and market research indicates that U.S. physicians routinely prescribe 1,000 mg/m2. Retrospective analyses however report reduced toxicity and efficacy in a subset of patients with the 3R/3R genotype of the thymidylate synthase gene enhancer region (TSER). This study sought to develop TSER genotype-specific guidelines for capecitabine dosing. Capecitabine was dose-escalated in advanced and/or metastatic cancer patients with TSER 3R/3R (Group A; N = 18) or 2R/2R + 2R/3R (Group B; N = 5) from 1,250 to 1,625 mg/m2 b.i.d., every 2 weeks on/1 week off for up to 8 cycles. Parent and metabolites pharmacokinetics, adverse events, and tumour response were assessed. The maximum tolerated and recommended doses in 3R/3R patients are 1,625 mg/m2 and 1,500 mg/m2. At 1,500 mg/m2, one in nine 3R/3R patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity. Dosing guidelines for 2R/2R + 2R/3R remain undetermined due to poor accrual. The results indicate that 3R/3R patients may be amenable to 1,500 mg/m2 b.i.d. on an intermittent schedule, and is the first to prospectively validate the utility of TSER pharmacogenetic-testing before capecitabine treatment. PMID:27296624

  10. Approval summary: pemetrexed maintenance therapy of advanced/metastatic nonsquamous, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Cohen, Martin H; Cortazar, Patricia; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2010-01-01

    On July 2, 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved pemetrexed injection (Alimta® Injection; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) for maintenance treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer whose disease has not progressed after four cycles of platinum-based doublet induction chemotherapy. A double-blind study of pemetrexed plus best supportive care versus placebo plus best supportive care was conducted. Pemetrexed, 500 mg/m(2) i.v., was administered every 21 days until disease progression. Folic acid, vitamin B(12), and a corticosteroid were given to all study patients. There were 663 randomized patients (pemetrexed, 441; placebo, 222). Treatments were well balanced with respect to baseline disease characteristics and stratification factors. The median overall survival (OS) time for intent-to-treat (ITT) patients was 13.4 months for patients receiving pemetrexed and 10.6 months for those receiving placebo (hazard ratio [HR] 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65-0.95; p = .012). Median OS times were 15.5 months versus 10.3 months for patients with nonsquamous histologies receiving pemetrexed and placebo, respectively (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.56-0.88). The median OS time in patients with squamous histology receiving pemetrexed was 9.9 months, versus 10.8 months for those receiving placebo (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.77-1.50). A significantly longer progression-free survival interval for both the ITT and nonsquamous patient populations receiving pemetrexed maintenance therapy was also observed. The most common (>5%) adverse reactions in patients receiving pemetrexed were hematologic toxicity, an increase in hepatic enzymes, fatigue, gastrointestinal toxicity, sensory neuropathy, and skin rash. PMID:21148615

  11. Advanced glycation end-products and skin autofluorescence in end-stage renal disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Stefan; Graaff, Reindert; van Oeveren, Wim; Stegmayr, Bernd; Sikole, Aleksandar; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Smit, Andries J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially in its end stage, is marked by extremely high cardiovascular rates of morbidity and mortality; hemodialysis patients have a five-fold shorter life expectancy than healthy subjects of the same age. In CKD the metabolic products that accumulate in the body are so-called uremic toxins. These include advanced glycation end-products (AGE). AGE levels are markedly increased in CKD patients not only because of impaired excretion but also because of increased production. AGE formation has initially been described as a non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and glucose in the so-called Maillard reaction, but they are also more rapidly formed during oxidative stress and subsequent formation of reactive carbonyl compounds like (methyl)glyoxal. AGE accumulate in tissue where they cross-link with proteins, e.g., collagen, inducing tissue stiffening of blood vessels and skin. They may also interact with receptor of AGE (RAGE) and other receptors, which lead to activation of intracellular transduction mechanisms resulting in cytokine release and further tissue damage in CKD. The accumulation of AGE in the skin can be measured non-invasively using autofluorescence. The skin autofluorescence is a strong marker of cardiovascular mortality in CKD. The focus of this review is on the role of tissue and plasma AGE, and of skin autofluorescence as a proxy of tissue AGE accumulation, in the increase in cardiovascular disease in end stage renal disease (ESRD). This review will also present the possibility of reducing the AGE accumulation in ESRD patients using the following five methods: 1) use of low AGE peritoneal dialysis solutions; 2) use of advanced hemodialysis techniques; 3) use of AGE reducing drugs; 4) optimizing the nutrition of hemodialysis patients; and 5) renal transplantation. PMID:23612551

  12. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  13. Combined treatment with low-dose interferon plus vinblastine is associated with less toxicity than conventional interferon monotherapy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsavaris, N; Skarlos, D; Bacoyiannis, C; Aravantinos, G; Kosmas, C; Retalis, G; Panopoulos, C; Vadiaka, M; Dimitrakopoulos, A; Kostantinidis, K; Mitropoulos, D; Bougas, D; Pantazopoulos, D; Kosmidis, P

    2000-08-01

    The outcome of treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma is disappointing. In interferon (IFN)-treated patients, the high incidence of adverse effects causes many patients to withdraw from treatment. This 12-week randomized study compared the incidence of toxicity associated with high-dose IFN monotherapy (15 x 10(6) U thrice weekly) and treatment with the combination of low-dose IFN (5 x 10(6) U thrice weekly) and 6 mg/m2 vinblastine (VBL) every 14 days in 100 consecutive patients. There was no significant difference in response rate between treatment arms (42% IFN vs. 34% IFN + VBL) or between subgroups (by tumor location). Combined treatment was associated with a significantly lower incidence of fever, fatigue, and weight loss but with a higher incidence of leukopenia. There was no significant difference in the incidence of other events. More patients treated with IFN monotherapy required bed rest, and overall treatment costs were 60% higher than for combined treatment. It is concluded that combined treatment with low-dose IFN and VBL, without loss of short-term efficacy, is better tolerated and less expensive than high-dose IFN monotherapy. PMID:10954911

  14. Use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors after failure of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma undergoing hemodialysis: A single-center experience with four cases.

    PubMed

    Omae, Kenji; Kondo, Tsunenori; Takagi, Toshio; Iizuka, Junpei; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-07-01

    We retrospectively identified patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis treated with the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors as a second- and/or third-line targeted therapy after treatment failure with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Patient medical records were reviewed to evaluate the response to therapies and treatment-related toxicities. Four patients were identified. All patients had undergone nephrectomy, and one had received immunotherapy before targeted therapy. Two patients had clear cell histology, and the other two had papillary histology. All patients were classified into the intermediate risk group according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center risk model. All patients were treated with everolimus as a second- or third-line therapy, and two patients were treated with temsirolimus as a second- or third-line therapy after treatment failure with sorafenib or sunitinib. The median duration of everolimus therapy was 6.7 months, whereas that of temsirolimus was 9.5 months. All patients had stable disease as the best response during each period of therapy. There were no severe adverse events. The use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in patients who previously failed to respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors appears to be feasible in patients with end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis. PMID:26833674

  15. Cabozantinib in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: design, development, and potential place in the therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Paolo; Verzoni, Elena; Ratta, Raffaele; Mennitto, Alessia; de Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has markedly improved over the last few years with the introduction of several targeted agents in clinical practice. Nevertheless, either primary or secondary resistance to inhibition of VEGF and mTOR pathways has limited the clinical benefit of these systemic treatments. Recently, a better understanding of the involvement of MET and its ligand HGF in many biological processes made this signaling pathway an attractive therapeutic target in oncology, particularly in mRCC. Herein, we review the development of cabozantinib, a recently approved inhibitor of multiple tyrosine kinase receptors, including MET, VEGFRs, and AXL, which has proven to increase progression-free survival and overall survival when compared to everolimus in mRCC patients who had progressed after VEGFR-targeted therapy. Finally, we discuss the potential role of cabozantinib within the current treatment landscape for mRCC. PMID:27462141

  16. Inhibition of NA(+)/H(+) Exchanger 1 Attenuates Renal Dysfunction Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products in Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Chen, Geng-Rong; Wang, Fu; Xu, Ping; Liu, Li-Ying; Yin, Ya-Ling; Wang, Shuang-Xi

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that sodium hydrogen exchanger 1 (NHE1) is involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. The role of NHE1 in kidney dysfunction induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) remains unknown. Renal damage was induced by AGEs via tail vein injections in rats. Function and morphology of kidney were determined. Compared to vehicle- or BSA-treated rats, AGEs caused abnormalities of kidney structures and functions in rats, accompanied with higher MDA level and lower GSH content. Gene expressions of NHE1 gene and TGF-β1 in the renal cortex and urine were also increased in AGEs-injected rats. Importantly, all these detrimental effects induced by AGEs were reversed by inhibition of NHE1 or suppression of oxidative stress. These pieces of data demonstrated that AGEs may activate NHE1 to induce renal damage, which is related to TGF-β1. PMID:26697498

  17. Lenalidomide in Combination with Dexamethasone in Elderly Patients with Advanced, Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma and Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Patrizia; Gamberi, Barbara; Castagnari, Barbara; Molinari, Anna Lia; Savini, Paolo; Ceccolini, Michela; Tani, Monica; Merli, Anna; Imola, Manuela; Mianulli, Anna Maria; Cellini, Claudia; Tomassetti, Simona; Merli, Francesco; Fattori, Pierpaolo; Zaccaria, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Salvage therapy of elderly patients with advanced, relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM) is often limited by poor marrow reserve and multi-organ impairment. In particular, renal failure occurs in up to 50% of such patients, and this can potentially limit the therapeutic options. Both thalidomide and bortezomib have proven effective in these patients, with an acceptable toxicity, while, in clinical practice, lenalidomide is generally not considered a first-choice drug for MM patients with renal failure as early reports showed an increased hematological toxicity unless appropriate dose reduction is applied. Aim of this study was a retrospective evaluation of the efficacy of the combination Lenalidomide + Dexamethasone in a population of elderly MM patients treated in 5 Italian Centers. The study included 20 consecutive MM patients (9 M, 11 F, median age 76.5 years) with relapsed (N= 6) or refractory (N=13) MM and moderate to severe renal failure, defined as creatinine clearance (Cr Cl) < 50ml/min. Four patients were undergoing hemodyalisis at study entry. 85 % of the patients had been previously treated with bortezomib-containing regimens. Lenalidomide dose was adjusted according to renal function and patients clinical conditions Median treatment duration was 16 months (1–22), therapy was interrupted after 1 21-day cycle in 2 patients. Grade III–IV neutropenia was observed in 7 patients (35%); grade III–IV non hematological toxicity was recorded in 3 cases (28%). A > partial response was observed in 8 patients (40%), 1 of whom obtained a VGPR; 4 additional patients achieved a minor response. Median response duration was 16 months (range 2–19+ months). A complete and partial renal response was obtained in 4 and 3 patients, respectively, all of them were responsive to Lenalidomide-dexamethasone According to our data, LEN+DEX has shown efficacy and acceptable toxicity in this population of elderly patients with advanced MM and renal failure PMID:23795275

  18. Efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus erlotinib for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Hu, Guo-fang; Zhang, Qian-qian; Tang, Ning; Guo, Jun; Liu, Li-yan; Han, Xiao; Wang, Xia; Wang, Zhe-hai

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is considered as a chemoresistant neoplasm with extremely dismal prognosis. Gemcitabine is recommended as the standard agent for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. A series of trials have been conducted to improve the outcome of advanced pancreatic cancer with other anticancer drugs in combination with gemcitabine. Unfortunately, the designers of the clinical trials failed to improve the poor prognosis of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Erlotinib was the first additional drug that improved the overall survival of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer with gemcitabine. We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the efficacy and safety of the combination of gemcitabine with erlotinib (GemErlo) for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer using the currently available evidence. Methods PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and relevant abstracts of major conferences were comprehensively searched. Data results on objective response rate, disease control rate, and 1-year survival were pooled by using MetaAnalyst with a random-effects model. Results on progression-free survival and overall survival were only summarized descriptively. Results A total of 24 studies with 1,742 patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer treated with GemErlo were included. Combined objective response rate was 14.4% (95% CI: 11.6%–17.7%), disease control rate was 55.0% (95% CI: 51.5%–58.5%), and 1-year survival rate was 28.5% (95% CI: 24.0%–33.4%). Progression-free survival ranged from 2.63 to 9.6 months, and overall survival varied from 6 to 10 months. As for the toxicity profile, the most common adverse events (AEs) were hematologic reactions, skin rash, and gastrointestinal reactions. Other severe AEs, which had low incidence, included treatment-induced death and interstitial lung disease. Conclusion Our study showed that GemErlo is associated with reasonable activity in treating

  19. New advances in genitourinary cancer: evidence gathered in 2014.

    PubMed

    Suárez, C; Puente, J; Gallardo, E; Méndez-Vidal, M J; Climent, M A; León, L; Olmos, D; García del Muro, X; González-Billalabeitia, E; Grande, E; Bellmunt, J; Mellado, B; Maroto, P; González del Alba, A

    2015-09-01

    This review provides updated information published in 2014 regarding advances and major achievements in genitourinary cancer. Sections include the best in prostate cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, and germ cell tumors. In the field of prostate cancer, data related to treatment approach of hormone-sensitive disease, castrate-resistant prostate cancer, mechanisms of resistance, new drugs, and molecular research are presented. In relation to renal cancer, relevant aspects in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma, immunotherapy, and molecular research, including angiogenesis and von Hippel-Lindau gene, molecular biology of non-clear cell histologies, and epigenetics of clear renal cell cancer are described. New strategies in the management of muscle-invasive localized bladder cancer and metastatic disease are reported as well as salient findings of biomolecular research in urothelial cancer. Some approaches intended to improve outcomes in poor prognosis patients with metastatic germ cell cancer are also reported. Results of clinical trials in these areas are discussed. PMID:26227584

  20. Clinical efficacy of computed tomography-guided iodine-125 seed implantation therapy in patients with advanced spinal metastatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liyun; Lu, Jian; Wang, Zhongmin; Cheng, Yingsheng; Teng, Gaojun; Chen, Kemin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and clinical efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided radioactive iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation treatment in patients with spinal metastatic tumors. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 20 cases of spinal metastatic tumors, including nine men and eleven women aged 50–79 years (mean age: 61.1 years). We used treatment planning system (TPS) to construct three-dimensional images of the spinal metastatic tumors and to determine what number and dose rate distribution to use for the 125I seeds. The matched peripheral dose of the 125I seed implantation was 90–130 Gy. Twenty-four spinal metastatic tumors were treated by CT-guided radioactive 125I seed implantation. A median of 19 (range: 4–43) 125I seeds were implanted. Results Twenty cases were followed for a median of 15.3 months (range: 7–32 months). The rate of pain relief was 95%. The median control time for all of the patients was 12.5 months. The 3-, 6-, and 12-month cumulative local control rates were 100%, 95%, and 60%, respectively. The median survival time for all of the patients was 16 months. The cumulative 6- and 12-month survival rates were 100% and 78.81%, respectively. No major complications were observed. No 125I seeds were lost or migrated to other tissues or organs. Conclusion CT-guided radioactive 125I seed implantation is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive method for the treatment of patients with spinal metastatic tumors. It is a possible alternative therapy for the treatment of spinal metastases. PMID:26719712

  1. Gemcitabine and AMG 479 in Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Cancer of Pancreas; Cancer of the Pancreas; Metastases; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Bone Metastases; Endocrine Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Solid Tumors; Advanced Malignancy

  2. Oral essential amino acid supplements in children with advanced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Jones, R W; Dalton, N; Start, K; El-Bishti, M M; Chantler, C

    1980-07-01

    The effects on growth, nitrogen balance, and body composition of a protein-restricted diet supplemented with oral essential amino acids (EAA) were studied in seven children with advanced chronic renal failure. The diet was designed to provide minimum protein requirements for height-age, half in unselected form and half as an EAA supplement. Energy from carbohydrate and fat were increased to give a protein/energy ratio of 1.25 G:100 kcal. Nitrogen balance, studied in five children before and after 6 to 8 months of EAA treatment, was improved in each case. intracellular water (total body water minus bromide space) increased in four children but fell in three children during treatment. No significant improvement in growth, expressed as height or height velocity standard deviation scores in relation to bone age, was observed. Serum urea and urea/creatinine ratio fell after institution of EAA treatment, but the fall was not sustained. Although the EAA preparation proved acceptable to the children, dietary assessments indicated that the desired dietary aims were rarely achieved. It is concluded that, in this pediatric age group, the long-term application of a protein restricted diet with EAA supplements is of limited value. PMID:7395791

  3. Left-sided renal colic as a symptom of advanced stomach cancer – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kuciel-Lisieska, Grażyna; Licznerska, Grażyna; Tenderenda, Michał

    2012-01-01

    The typical symptoms of advanced cancer of the stomach are well known in clinical practice. The presented case concerns a patient with symptoms of left-sided renal colic, caused by a malignant tumour involving the ureter, which was diagnosed with a CT scan. The multifocal process, involving the stomach, two parts of the colon, the left ovary and the side of the pelvis, was confirmed only during surgery. The resection or partial resection of the above-mentioned organs involved by the malignant process and reconstruction of the alimentary tract as well as the ureter were performed at time of this operation. The patient's recovery was without any complications. The histopathological findings support the diagnosis of this malignant process as disseminated stomach cancer. In the available literature only two cases of stomach cancer metastasis to the ureter have been described. In both cited examples resection of the ureter with nephrectomy was performed. The review of the literature supports the value of stomach palliative resection in prolonging life and improving quality of life. PMID:23788876

  4. Importance of advanced glycation end products in diabetes-associated cardiovascular and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Mark E

    2004-12-01

    Although the features of diabetic cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis, and nephropathy have been clinically characterized, the pathogenesis and the mechanisms underlying the abnormalities in the diabetic heart and kidney are not fully understood. During the past several years, in an attempt to discover interventions for diabetes-related complications, researchers have refocused their attention from the hemodynamic aspects of the disease to the biochemical interactions of glucose and proteins. Diabetes is a disorder of chronic hyperglycemia, and glucose participates in diabetic complications such as atherosclerosis, cardiac dysfunction, and nephropathy. Chronic hyperglycemia accelerates the reaction between glucose and proteins and leads to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), which form irreversible cross-links with many macromolecules such as collagen. In diabetes, these AGE accumulate in tissues at an accelerated rate. The development of the novel compound dimethyl-3-phenacylthiazolium chloride (alagebrium chloride), which chemically breaks AGE cross-links, led to several preclinical animal studies that showed an attenuation or reversal of disease processes of the heart and kidney. In diabetes, AGE not only structurally stiffen structural collagen backbones but also act as agonists to AGE receptors (RAGE) on various cell types, which stimulate the release of profibrotic growth factors, promote collagen deposition, increase inflammation, and ultimately lead to tissue fibrosis. In the heart, large vessels, and kidney, these reactions produce diastolic dysfunction, atherosclerosis, and renal fibrosis. Administration of the cross-link breaker alagebrium chloride in these diabetic animals attenuates these pathologic phenomena, restoring functionality to the heart, vasculature, and kidney. PMID:15607433

  5. Advancing Cardiovascular, Neurovascular, and Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Small Rodents Using Cryogenic Radiofrequency Coil Technology

    PubMed Central

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Pohlmann, Andreas; Reimann, Henning M.; Waiczies, Helmar; Peper, Eva; Huelnhagen, Till; Seeliger, Erdmann; Schreiber, Adrian; Kettritz, Ralph; Strobel, Klaus; Ku, Min-Chi; Waiczies, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Research in pathologies of the brain, heart and kidney have gained immensely from the plethora of studies that have helped shape new methods in magnetic resonance (MR) for characterizing preclinical disease models. Methodical probing into preclinical animal models by MR is invaluable since it allows a careful interpretation and extrapolation of data derived from these models to human disease. In this review we will focus on the applications of cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) coils in small animal MR as a means of boosting image quality (e.g., by supporting MR microscopy) and making data acquisition more efficient (e.g., by reducing measuring time); both being important constituents for thorough investigational studies on animal models of disease. This review attempts to make the (bio)medical imaging, molecular medicine, and pharmaceutical communities aware of this productive ferment and its outstanding significance for anatomical and functional MR in small rodents. The goal is to inspire a more intense interdisciplinary collaboration across the fields to further advance and progress non-invasive MR methods that ultimately support thorough (patho)physiological characterization of animal disease models. In this review, current and potential future applications for the RF coil technology in cardiovascular, neurovascular, and renal disease will be discussed. PMID:26617515

  6. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  7. Sorafenib in patients with locally advanced and metastatic chordomas: a phase II trial of the French Sarcoma Group (GSF/GETO)†

    PubMed Central

    Bompas, E.; Le Cesne, A.; Tresch-Bruneel, E.; Lebellec, L.; Laurence, V.; Collard, O.; Saada-Bouzid, E.; Isambert, N.; Blay, J. Y.; Amela, E. Y.; Salas, S.; Chevreau, C.; Bertucci, F.; Italiano, A.; Clisant, S.; Penel, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no consensual treatment of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas. Patients and methods We conducted a multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled phase II trial of sorafenib (800 mg/day). The primary end point was the 9-month progression-free rate according to RECIST 1.1. All patients had documented progressive disease at the time of study entry. Results Twenty-seven patients were enrolled between May 2011 and January 2014. The median age was 64 (range, 30–86) years. There were 17 men and 10 women. Twelve patients had been previously treated with chemotherapy and molecularly targeted agents. The maximum toxicity grade per patient was grade 3 in 21 cases (77.8%) and grade 4 in 4 cases (14.8%). Sorafenib provided an intent-to-treat best objective response of 1/27 [3.7%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1% to 19.0%], a 9-month progression-free rate of 73.0% (95% CI 46.1–88.0) and a 12-month overall survival rate of 86.5% (95% CI 55.8–96.5). Survival curves were similar in pretreated and not pretreated patients. Discussion Additional clinical trials further exploring sorafenib as a treatment of locally advanced or metastatic chordomas are warranted. PMID:26202596

  8. Vismodegib and Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Chondrosarcoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Conjunctival Kaposi Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Kaposi Sarcoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone

  9. End-Stage Renal Disease From Cast Nephropathy in a Teenager With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Butani, Lavjay; Ducore, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Cast nephropathy is the most common manifestation of renal injury in patients with multiple myeloma but is rarely reported in other conditions. We are reporting our experience in caring for a teenager with a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma who developed rapidly progressive kidney injury that advanced to end-stage renal disease. On renal biopsy extensive tubular necrosis and intratubular eosinophilic casts were noted. This previously unreported finding should prompt oncologists to closely monitor for such a complication in patients with secretory tumors. Whether early plasmapheresis could be of benefit, as has been tried in multiple myeloma, remains to be determined. PMID:26989910

  10. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Omar M. Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy{sub 10}). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy{sub 10}. Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  11. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers, including cancers of the blood and the lymphatic system ( leukemia , multiple myeloma , and lymphoma ), can form metastatic tumors. Although rare, the metastasis of blood and lymphatic system cancers to the lung, heart, central nervous system , ...

  12. [Treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma with a combination of interferon alpha and gamma].

    PubMed

    Naito, S; Yasumasu, T; Kumazawa, J; Hiratsuka, Y; Sakamoto, K; Iguchi, A; Masaki, Z; Hasui, Y; Osada, Y; Kurozumi, T

    1995-08-01

    A total of 29 patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma entered a pilot study of combination therapy with interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). IFN-alpha (HLBI: 3 x 10(6) IU, BALL 1:5 x 10(6) IU, IFN-alpha-2a: 9 x 10(6) IU or IFN-alpha-2b: 6 x 10(6) IU) was given intramuscularly every day and IFN-gamma (IFN-gamma-1a: 3 x 10(6) JRU) was given intravenously by drip infusion 3 times a week (every 2-3 days). The treatment was continued for 3 months as the induction therapy, and then the tumor response was evaluated. Of the 22 evaluable patients, 4 achieved a partial response (PR), 10 showed no change (NC), and in 8 the disease had progressed (PD) during the therapy. Thus, the overall response rate was 18.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1-34.3%]. A favorable response tended to be obtained in patients with good performance status or small pulmonary metastases, or in those who had no prior therapy with IFN-alpha, who received this treatment immediately subsequent to radical nephrectomy, or who received IFN-gamma as much as possible according to this regimen. Toxicity was evaluated in 28 patients: fever, general fatigue, anorexia, leukocytopenia and impaired liver function were frequently noted, and 3 patients were withdrawn from the study because of such adverse effects. In patients who had a PR or NC, the same dosage of IFN-alpha was continued to be given intramuscularly 2-3 times a week (every 2-4 days) as the maintenance therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7474618

  13. Asymptomatic renal cell carcinoma with metastasis to the skin and duodenum: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Adhip; Littler, Yvonne; Libertiny, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is known to have blood-borne metastasis. This is usually to the bone, lungs and brain. Other unusual metastatic presentations such as skin and bowel metastasis have also been described. In most cases, the metastasis occurs as a late manifestation in a patient with known primary renal cell carcinoma. A rare synchronous presentation of skin and duodenal metastasis in an otherwise asymptomatic patient is reported here. This patient presented with a skin lesion that, on excision, brought up the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. While the patient was waiting for surgery, she also developed melena that, on gastroscopy, confirmed a duodenal metastasis. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of otherwise unrelated lesions as presentations for an advanced renal malignancy. PMID:22684828

  14. A randomized phase II trial of interleukin 2 and interleukin 2-interferon alpha in advanced renal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Jayson, G. C.; Middleton, M.; Lee, S. M.; Ashcroft, L.; Thatcher, N.

    1998-01-01

    A randomized phase II trial was performed to compare the efficacy and toxicity of interleukin 2 (IL-2) with an IL-2 and interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) regimen for the treatment of metastatic renal carcinoma. Sixty patients with recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who had previously undergone a nephrectomy were randomized to receive three cycles of IL-2 or IL-2 with IFN-alpha2b. Eighteen MU of IL-2 were administered subcutaneously on Mondays-Fridays for 3 weeks out of 4. Those patients randomized to receive the combination received the same regimen of IL-2 with 9 MU of IFN-alpha2b subcutaneously on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays for 3 weeks out of 4. Thirty patients were randomized to receive each arm. Twenty-nine were evaluable in each arm. Twenty-two patients received three cycles of IL-2 but only 14 patients received three cycles of IL-2/IFN-alpha because of the greater toxicity of the combination. The principal toxicities included nausea, fatigue and fever. There were no complete responses in either arm and only two patients who were treated with IL-2 attained a partial response. Twelve patients in each arm had stable disease and 15 patients in the IL-2 arm and 16 patients in the IL-2/IFN-alpha arm progressed through treatment. There were no significant differences in survival. Ten patients who received IL-2 are alive with a median follow-up of 266 days, whereas six patients who received IL-2/IFN-alpha are alive after a median of 278 days. The median survival from the time of identification of metastatic disease is 444 days in the IL-2 arm and 381 days in the IL-2/IFN-alpha arm. The IL-2/IFN-alpha combination is more toxic than IL-2 alone and this resulted in a reduced number of cycles of treatment. However, the median survival of the two groups was the same, suggesting that further evaluation of the IL-2/IFN-alpha combination should be confined to large prospective randomized clinical trials. PMID:9703284

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Kwon, Young Suk; Labib, Mina; Foran, David J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26609190

  16. [Metastatic prostate cancer complicated with chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy causing acute renal failure, mimicking thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome: pathomechanism, differential diagnosis and therapy related to a case].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Ragán, Márton; Kalmár, Katalin; Kovács, Lajos; Varga, Erzsébet; Varga, Tünde; Rakonczai, Ervin

    2010-12-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is characterized as activation of the clotting system resulting in fibrin thrombi, gradually diminishing levels of clotting factors with increased risk of bleeding. Basically two types of DIC are distinguished: (1) chronic (compensated) - with alteration of laboratory values and (2) acute (non-compensated) - with severe clinical manifestations: bleeding, shock, acute renal failure (ARF), transient focal neurologic deficit, delirium or coma. Chronic DIC related to metastatic neoplasia is caused by pancreatic, gastric or prostatic carcinoma in most of the cases. Incidence rate of DIC is 13-30% in prostate cancer, among those only 0.4-1.65% of patients had clinical signs and symptoms of DIC. In other words, chronic DIC is developed in one of eight patients with prostate cancer. DIC is considered as a poor prognostic factor in prostatic carcinoma. The similar clinical and laboratory findings of TTP-HUS (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - hemolytic uremic syndrome) and DIC makes it difficult to differentiate between them. A 71 years old male patient with known chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, benign prostatic hyperplasia, significant carotid artery stenosis, gastric ulcer and alcoholic liver disease was admitted to another hospital with melena. Gastroscopy revealed intact gastric mucosa and actually non-bleeding duodenal ulcer covered by clots. Laboratory results showed hyperkalemia, elevated kidney function tests, indirect hyperbilirubinemia, increased liver function tests, leukocytosis, anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated international normalized ratio (INR). He was treated with saline infusions, four units of red blood cells and one unit of fresh frozen plasma transfusions. Four days later he was transported to our Institution with ARF. Physical examination revealed dyspnoe, petechiae, hemoptoe, oliguria, chest-wall pain and aggressive behavior. Thrombocytopenia, signs of MAHA (fragmentocytes and helmet cells

  17. The clinical implications of the genetics of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Inger; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Pinto, Peter A; Linehan, W Marston

    2009-01-01

    Over the last several decades, the advances in molecular genetics have elucidated kidney cancer gene pathways. Kidney cancer is a heterogeneous disorder. Each specific type of kidney cancer has its own histologic features, gene, and clinical course. Insight into the genetic basis of kidney cancer has been learned largely from the study of the familial or hereditary forms of kidney cancer. Extirpative surgery is currently the treatment of choice for kidney cancer that is confined to the kidney. Treatment for advanced or metastatic kidney cancer is a formidable challenge with the traditional therapies currently available. However, investigation of the Mendelian single-gene syndromes, like von Hippel Lindau (VHL: VHL gene), hereditary papillary renal carcinoma (HPRC: c-Met gene), Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD: BHD gene), and hereditary leiomyomatosis renal cell cancer (HLRCC: fumarate hydratase gene) provides an opportunity to develop pathway specific therapies. Advances in molecular therapeutics offer novel treatment options for patients with advanced disease. PMID:19285230

  18. Recurrence pattern in patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma: The implications of clinicopathological variables

    PubMed Central

    Sameh, Wael M.; Hashad, Mohammed M.; Eid, Ahmed A.; Abou Yousif, Tamer A.; Atta, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recurrence rates for patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (LARCC) remain high. To date the predictors of recurrence in those patients remain controversial. The aim of the present study was to assess the relapse pattern in those patients and identify predictors for recurrence. Patients and methods We evaluated retrospectively 112 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for LARCC (T3–T4N0M0) between January 2000 and December 2010. Clinical and pathological data were collected from hospital medical records and compiled into a computerized database. Studied variables were age, mode of presentation, Tumour-Node-Metastasis (TNM) stage, Fuhrman nuclear grade, histological subtype, tumour size, venous thrombus level, collecting-system invasion and sarcomatoid differentiation. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Results Patients were followed for a mean and median follow-up of 33 and 24 months, respectively, after surgery. During the follow-up, recurrences (distant and/or local) were recorded in 58 patients, representing 52% of the cohort. The mean and median times to recurrence were 25 and 13 months, respectively. Sites of recurrence were multiple in 36 patients (62%), lung only in 14 (24%), and local in eight (14%). RFS rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were 50%, 43% and 34%, respectively, while the median RFS was 23.7 months. Using univariate analysis, RFS after nephrectomy was significantly shorter in patients aged <70 years, symptomatic at presentation, with larger tumours, higher nuclear grade, collecting-system invasion, and/or sarcomatoid differentiation. After multivariate analysis, T-stage, nuclear grade and sarcomatoid differentiation retained their power as independent predictors of RFS (P = 0.032, <0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Conclusions For patients with LARCC, T-stage, grade and sarcomatoid differentiation independently dictate the

  19. Trastuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Urinary Tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  20. Determination of Angptl4 mRNA as a Diagnostic Marker of Primary and Metastatic Clear Cell Renal-Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Verine, Jérôme; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Soliman, Hany; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Belhadj, Stéphanie; Philippe, Josette; Lesage, Matthieu; Wittmer, Evelyne; Chanel, Stéphane; Couvelard, Anne; Ferlicot, Sophie; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Janin, Anne; Germain, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that angiopoietin-like 4 (angptl4) mRNA, a hypoxia-inducible gene, is highly expressed in clear cell renal-cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common subtype of RCC for which no specific marker is available. We here investigated whether angptl4 mRNA 1) could be a useful diagnostic and/or prognostic marker of ccRCC in a large and comprehensive retrospective series, 2) induction is dependent on the VHL status of tumors. Methodology/Principal Findings Using in situ hybridization, we report that angptl4 mRNA is expressed in 100% of both sporadic (n = 102) and inherited (n = 6) primary ccRCCs, without any statistical association with nuclear grade (p = 0.39), tumor size (p = 0.09), stage grouping (p = 0.17), progression-free survival (p = 0.94), and overall survival (p = 0.80). Angptl4 mRNA was also expressed in 26 (87%) of 30 secondary ccRCCs but neither in any other secondary RCCs (n = 7). In contrast, angptl4 mRNA was neither expressed in 94% non-ccRCC renal tumors (papillary RCCs (n = 46), chromophobe RCCs (n = 28), and oncocytomas (n = 9)), nor in non-renal clear cell carcinomas (n = 39). Angptl4 expression was also examined in tumors associated (n = 23) or not associated (n = 66) with VHL disease. 40 (98%) hemangioblastomas expressed angptl4 whereas all pheochromocytomas (n = 23) and pancreatic tumors (n = 25) were angptl4-negative, whatever their VHL status. Conclusions/Significance Angptl4 mRNA expression was highly associated with ccRCC (p = 1.5 10−49, Chi square test) allowing to define its expression as a diagnosis marker for primary ccRCC. Moreover, angptl4 mRNA allows to discriminate the renal origin of metastases of clear-cell carcinomas arising from various organs. Finally, inactivation of VHL gene is neither necessary nor sufficient for angptl4 mRNA induction. PMID:20454689

  1. Advances in Ethical, Social, and Economic Aspects of Chronic Renal Disease in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Arze, S; Paz Zambrana, S

    2016-03-01

    Since 2005, great progress has been made in health care provision to patients with terminal renal failure in Bolivia. Access to dialysis and transplantation is regulated by the Ministry of Health, based on clinical criteria, applied equitably, without favoritism or discrimination based on race, sex, economic means, or political power. Until December 2013, there were no restrictions in dialysis and transplantation in Health Insurance institutions, but they covered only 30% of the population. Now the remaining 70% has access to free dialysis funded by the communities where patients live, with funds coming from the government and taxes on oil products. More than 2,231 people are getting dialysis, reaching a population growth of >60% annually. The number of hemodialysis units has increased by >200% (60 units), making access easier for end-stage renal failure patients. Treatment protocols have been drawn up to guarantee the best quality of life for the patients. The Law on Donation and Transplantation was enacted in 1996, and Supplementary Regulations were enacted in 1997 with various amendments over the past 5 years. A National Transplant Coordination Board, working under the National Renal Health Program, supervises and regulates transplants and promotes deceased-donor transplantation in an attempt to cover the demand for donors. Rules have been drawn up for accreditation of transplant centers and teams to guarantee the best possible conditions and maximum guaranties. Since January 2014, the National Renal Health Program has been providing free kidney transplants from living donors. PMID:27110002

  2. Advances of multidetector computed tomography in the characterization and staging of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsili, Athina C; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 90%-95% of kidney tumors. With the widespread use of cross-sectional imaging modalities, more than half of RCCs are detected incidentally, often diagnosed at an early stage. This may allow the planning of more conservative treatment strategies. Computed tomography (CT) is considered the examination of choice for the detection and staging of RCC. Multidetector CT (MDCT) with the improvement of spatial resolution and the ability to obtain multiphase imaging, multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstructions in any desired plane brought about further improvement in the evaluation of RCC. Differentiation of RCC from benign renal tumors based on MDCT features is improved. Tumor enhancement characteristics on MDCT have been found closely to correlate with the histologic subtype of RCC, the nuclear grade and the cytogenetic characteristics of clear cell RCC. Important information, including tumor size, localization, and organ involvement, presence and extent of venous thrombus, possible invasion of adjacent organs or lymph nodes, and presence of distant metastases are provided by MDCT examination. The preoperative evaluation of patients with RCC was improved by depicting the presence or absence of renal pseudocapsule and by assessing the possible neoplastic infiltration of the perirenal fat tissue and/or renal sinus fat compartment. PMID:26120380

  3. Clinical research of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with cytokine-induced killer cell treatment in advanced renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignant disease that demonstrates resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Yet Active immunization using genetically modified dendritic cells holds promise for the adjuvant treatment of malignancies to eradicate or control residual disease. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of effector CD8+ T cells with diverse TCR specificities, possessing non-MHC-restricted cytolytic activities against tumor cells. Clinical studies have confirmed benefit and safety of CIK cell-based therapy for patients with malignancies. This clinical trial was conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cell (gmDCs-CIK) treatment of patients with RCC. Methods 28 patients with advanced renal cancer were admitted to Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences from December 2010 to March 2012 and treated by gmDCs-CIK. Clinical efficacy and safety between pre- and post-treatment were compared. Results This analysis showed an objective response rate (ORR) of 39% and a disease control rate (DCR) of as 75%. There is no significant relationship between clinical efficacy and whether metastasis occurred or not (P > 0.05). There is no significant relationship between ORR and cycles of treatment (P > 0.05), but DCR was significantly related with cycles of treatment (P < 0.05). No clinically significant side effects were observed. There were no significant changes of T cell subsets including CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells except Th1 in peripheral blood between day 30 after immunotherapy and 1 day before immunotherapy in 11 patients. Conclusion DC-CIK is feasible and effective in treating advanced renal cancer and thus provides a new approach. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01924156. Registration date: August 14, 2013. PMID:24720900

  4. Advances in renal neoplasia: recommendations from the 2012 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Montironi, Rodolfo; Egevad, Lars

    2014-05-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2012 Consensus Conference made recommendations regarding the classification, prognostic factors, staging, and immunohistochemical and molecular assessment of adult renal tumors. There was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as novel tumors: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell papillary RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor-family translocation RCC [in particular t(6; 11) RCC], and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, 3 rare epithelial carcinomas were considered emerging or provisional entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC, succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocation RCC. There were also a number of suggested modifications to existing World Health Organization 2004 categories, with the new classification to be known as the ISUP Vancouver Classification. Tumor morphotype, sarcomatoid/rhabdoid differentiation, and tumor necrosis were identified as significant prognostic parameters for RCC. The ISUP Grading System was accepted with grades 1-3 of clear cell and papillary RCC being based on nucleolar prominence, whereas extreme nuclear pleomorphism or sarcomatoid and/or rhabdoid differentiation defined grade 4 tumors. It was agreed that chromophobe RCC should not be graded. Consensus guidelines were formulated for specimen handling, and it was agreed that renal sinus invasion is present when tumor is in direct contact with fat or loose connective tissue of the sinus or if there is involvement of endothelial-lined spaces within the renal sinus, regardless of the size. The role of biomarkers in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of renal tumors was considered, and panels of immunohistochemical markers were identified for use in specific differential diagnostic scenarios. PMID:24661331

  5. Combined levamisole with recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Creagan, E T; Hestorff, R D; Suman, V J; Mailliard, J A; Nair, S; Krook, J E; Kugler, J W; Marschke, R F; Michalak, J C; Tschetter, L K

    1998-04-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy (AI) with interleukin-2 (IL-2) and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells is an antineoplastic modality in which immune-activated cells are administered to a host having cancer in an attempt to mediate tumor regression. Levamisole (LEV), an immune stimulant, has been suggested as having therapeutic effectiveness in a variety of cancers. After a phase I trial of recombinant IL-2 plus LEV, a phase II trial of this combination was conducted in patients who had advanced renal cell carcinoma. The regimen was IL-2 at 3 x 10(6) U/m2 daily x 5 plus LEV at 50 mg/m2 perorally three times a day x 5. Only one of the 22 eligible patients had a regression. It was a partial regression, 85 days in duration. The median time to treatment failure (refusal, progression, or off study because of toxicity) was 36 days. The only grade 4 toxicity reported was lethargy. This regimen is not recommended for further testing in patients who have advanced renal cell carcinoma. PMID:9537198

  6. Sorafenib Tosylate With or Without Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage D Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma

  7. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  8. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-28

    Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

  9. SU2C Phase Ib Study of Paclitaxel and MK-2206 in Advanced Solid Tumors and Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Krop, Ian; Akcakanat, Argun; Chen, Huiqin; Liu, Shuying; Li, Yisheng; Culotta, Kirk S.; Tarco, Emily; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Moulder-Thompson, Stacy; Velez-Bravo, Vivianne; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Doyle, Laurence A.; Do, Kim-Anh; Winer, Eric P.; Mills, Gordon B.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is preclinical synergism between taxanes and MK-2206. We aim to determine the maximum tolerated dose, safety, and activity of combining MK-2206 and paclitaxel in metastatic cancer. Methods: Patients received weekly doses of paclitaxel at 80mg/m2 on day 1, followed by MK-2206 orally on day 2 escalated at 90mg, 135mg, and 200mg. Treatment continued until progression, excessive toxicity, or patient request. Blood and tissue were collected for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics markers. A cycle consisted of three weeks of therapy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as unacceptable toxicity during the first cycle. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Twenty-two patients were treated, nine in dose escalation and 13 in dose expansion. Median age was 55 years. Median number of cycles was four. Dose escalation was completed with no DLT. CTCAE Grade 3 or higher adverse events were fatigue (n = 2), rash (n = 2), hyperglycemia (n = 1), and neutropenia (n = 7). Four patients in the expansion phase required MK-2206 dose reduction. Phase II recommended dose was established as paclitaxel 80mg/m2 weekly on day 1, and MK-2206 135mg weekly on day 2. Paclitaxel systemic exposure was similar in the presence or absence of MK-2206. Plasma MK-2206 concentrations were similar to data from previous phase I monotherapy. There was a statistically significant decrease in expression of pAKT S473 (P = .01) and pAKT T308 (P = .002) after therapy. PI3K/AKT/mTOR downregulation in tumor tissues and circulating markers did not correlate with tumor response or clinical benefit. There were five objective responses, and nine patients had stable disease. Conclusion: MK-2206 was well tolerated with paclitaxel. Preliminary antitumor activity was documented. PMID:25688104

  10. Potential Approaches and Recent Advances in Biomarker Discovery in Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Majer, Weronika; Kluzek, Katarzyna; Bluyssen, Hans; Wesoły, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The early diagnosis and monitoring of clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC), which is the most common renal malignancy, remains challenging. The late diagnosis and lack of tools that can be used to assess the progression of the disease and metastasis significantly influence the chance of survival of ccRCC patients. Molecular biomarkers have been shown to aid the diagnosis and disease monitoring for other cancers, but such markers are not currently available for ccRCC. Recently, plasma and serum circulating nucleic acids, nucleic acids present in urine, and plasma and urine proteins gained interest in the field of cancer biomarker discovery. Here, we describe the applicability of plasma and urine nucleic acids as cancer biomarkers with a particular focus on DNA, small RNA, and protein markers for ccRCC. PMID:26516358

  11. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; PALB2 Gene Mutation; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  12. Sorafenib in locally advanced or metastatic, radioactive iodine-refractory, differentiated thyroid cancer: a randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Brose, Marcia S; Nutting, Christopher M; Jarzab, Barbara; Elisei, Rossella; Siena, Salvatore; Bastholt, Lars; de la Fouchardiere, Christelle; Pacini, Furio; Paschke, Ralf; KeeShong, Young; Sherman, Steven I; Smit, Johannes WA; Chung, John; Kappeler, Christian; Pena, Carol; Molnár, István; Schlumberger, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with radioactive iodine (131I, RAI)-refractory locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) have a poor prognosis due to the lack of effective treatment options. Methods This multicentre, randomized (1:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 study (DECISION; NCT00984282) investigated sorafenib (400 mg orally twice-daily) in patients with RAI-refractory locally advanced or metastatic DTC progressing within the past 14 months. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) by central independent review. Patients receiving placebo could crossover to open-label sorafenib upon progression. Archival tumour tissue was examined for BRAF and RAS mutations. Serum thyroglobulin was measured at baseline and each visit. Findings A total of 417 patients were randomized to sorafenib (n=207) or placebo (n=210). Sorafenib treatment significantly improved PFS compared with placebo (hazard ratio, 0·59; 95% confidence interval, 0·45–0·76; P<0·0001; median 10·8 vs. 5·8 months, respectively). PFS improvement was seen in all pre-specified clinical and genetic biomarker subgroups irrespective of mutation status. There was no statistically significant difference in overall survival (hazard ratio, 0·80; 95% confidence interval, 0·54–1·19; P=0·14); median overall survival had not been reached and 150 (71%) patients receiving placebo crossed over to sorafenib upon progression. Response rates (all partial responses) were 12·2% (24/196; sorafenib) and 0·5% (1/201; placebo; p<0·0001). Median thyroglobulin levels increased in the placebo group, and decreased, then paralleled treatment responses in the sorafenib group. Most adverse events were grade 1 or 2. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events in the sorafenib arm were hand–foot skin reaction (76·3%), diarrhoea (68·6%), alopecia (67·1%), and rash/desquamation (50·2%). Interpretation Sorafenib significantly improved PFS compared with placebo in patients

  13. The Changes of Lipid Metabolism in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Everolimus: A New Pharmacodynamic Marker?

    PubMed Central

    Pantano, Francesco; Santoni, Matteo; Procopio, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Mimma; Iacovelli, Roberto; Porta, Camillo; Conti, Alessandro; Lugini, Antonio; Milella, Michele; Galli, Luca; Ortega, Cinzia; Guida, Francesco Maria; Silletta, Marianna; Schinzari, Giovanni; Verzoni, Elena; Modica, Daniela; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Rauco, Annamaria; Felici, Alessandra; Ballatore, Valentina; Cascinu, Stefano; Tonini, Giuseppe; Carteni, Giacomo; Russo, Antonio; Santini, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Background Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). We aimed to assess the association between the baseline values and treatmentrelated modifications of total serum cholesterol (C), triglycerides (T), body mass index (BMI), fasting blood glucose level (FBG) and blood pressure (BP) levels and the outcome of patients treated with everolimus for mRCC. Methods 177 patients were included in this retrospective analysis. Time to progression (TTP), clinical benefit (CB) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results Basal BMI was significantly higher in patients who experienced a CB (p=0,0145). C,T and C+T raises were significantly associated with baseline BMI (p=0.0412, 0.0283 and 0.0001). Median TTP was significantly longer in patients with T raise compared to patients without T (10 vs 6, p=0.030), C (8 vs 5, p=0.042) and C+T raise (10.9 vs 5.0, p=0.003). At the multivariate analysis, only C+T increase was associated with improved TTP (p=0.005). T raise (21.0 vs 14.0, p=0.002) and C+T increase (21.0 vs 14.0, p=0.006) were correlated with improved OS but were not significant at multivariate analysis. Conclusion C+T raise is an early predictor for everolimus efficacy for patients with mRCC. PMID:25885920

  14. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Methods According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Conclusions Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies. PMID:26157320

  15. Medical treatment of renal cancer: new horizons

    PubMed Central

    Greef, Basma; Eisen, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) makes up 2–3% of adult cancers. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in the mid-2000s radically changed the management of RCC. These targeted treatments superseded immunotherapy with interleukin-2 and interferon. The pendulum now appears to be shifting back towards immunotherapy, with the evidence of prolonged overall survival of patients with metastatic RCC on treatment with the anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand monoclonal antibody, nivolumab. Clinical prognostic criteria aid prediction of relapse risk for resected localised disease. Unfortunately, for patients at high risk of relapse, no adjuvant treatment has yet shown benefit, although further trials are yet to report. Clinical prognostic models also have a role in the management of advanced disease; now there is a pressing need for predictive biomarkers to direct therapy. Treatment selection for metastatic disease is currently based on histology, prognostic group and patient preference based on side effect profile. In this article, we review the current medical and surgical management of localised, oligometastatic and advanced RCC, including side effect management and the evidence base for management of poor-risk and non-clear cell disease. We discuss recent results from clinical trials and how these are likely to shape future practice and a renaissance of immunotherapy for renal cell cancer. PMID:27490806

  16. Medical treatment of renal cancer: new horizons.

    PubMed

    Greef, Basma; Eisen, Tim

    2016-08-23

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) makes up 2-3% of adult cancers. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in the mid-2000s radically changed the management of RCC. These targeted treatments superseded immunotherapy with interleukin-2 and interferon. The pendulum now appears to be shifting back towards immunotherapy, with the evidence of prolonged overall survival of patients with metastatic RCC on treatment with the anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand monoclonal antibody, nivolumab. Clinical prognostic criteria aid prediction of relapse risk for resected localised disease. Unfortunately, for patients at high risk of relapse, no adjuvant treatment has yet shown benefit, although further trials are yet to report. Clinical prognostic models also have a role in the management of advanced disease; now there is a pressing need for predictive biomarkers to direct therapy. Treatment selection for metastatic disease is currently based on histology, prognostic group and patient preference based on side effect profile. In this article, we review the current medical and surgical management of localised, oligometastatic and advanced RCC, including side effect management and the evidence base for management of poor-risk and non-clear cell disease. We discuss recent results from clinical trials and how these are likely to shape future practice and a renaissance of immunotherapy for renal cell cancer. PMID:27490806

  17. Advanced glycosylation endproducts block the antiproliferative effect of nitric oxide. Role in the vascular and renal complications of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hogan, M; Cerami, A; Bucala, R

    1992-09-01

    Advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs) accumulate on long-lived tissue proteins such as basement membrane collagen and have been implicated in many of the long-term complications of diabetes mellitus. These products originate from glucose-derived Schiff base and Amadori products but undergo a series of complex rearrangement reactions to form ultimately protein-bound, fluorescent heterocycles. AGEs can react with and chemically inactivate nitric oxide (NO), a potent endothelial cell-derived vasodilator and antiproliferative factor. Since mesenchymal cell proliferation is an early and characteristic lesion of diabetic vasculopathy and glomerulopathy, we investigated the possibility that collagen-bound AGEs functionally inactivate the antiproliferative effect of NO. In model cell culture systems, AGEs were found to block the cytostatic effect of NO on aortic smooth muscle and renal mesangial cells. The inactivation of endothelial cell-derived NO by basement membrane AGEs may represent a common pathway in the development of the accelerated vascular and renal disease that accompany long-term diabetes mellitus. PMID:1522220

  18. Adult Height in Patients with Advanced CKD Requiring Renal Replacement Therapy during Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Harambat, Jérôme; Bonthuis, Marjolein; van Stralen, Karlijn J.; Ariceta, Gema; Battelino, Nina; Bjerre, Anna; Jahnukainen, Timo; Leroy, Valérie; Reusz, György; Sandes, Ana R.; Sinha, Manish D.; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Combe, Christian; Jager, Kitty J.; Verrina, Enrico; Schaefer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Growth and final height are of major concern in children with ESRD. This study sought to describe the distribution of adult height of patients who started renal replacement therapy (RRT) during childhood and to identify determinants of final height in a large cohort of RRT children. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A total of 1612 patients from 20 European countries who started RRT before 19 years of age and reached final height between 1990 and 2011 were included. Linear regression analyses were performed to calculate adjusted mean final height SD score (SDS) and to investigate its potential determinants. Results The median final height SDS was −1.65 (median of 168 cm in boys and 155 cm in girls). Fifty-five percent of patients attained an adult height within the normal range. Adjusted for age at start of RRT and primary renal diseases, final height increased significantly over time from −2.06 SDS in children who reached adulthood in 1990–1995 to −1.33 SDS among those reaching adulthood in 2006–2011. Older age at start of RRT, more recent period of start of RRT, cumulative percentage time on a functioning graft, and greater height SDS at initiation of RRT were independently associated with a higher final height SDS. Patients with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract and metabolic disorders had a lower final height than those with other primary renal diseases. Conclusions Although final height remains suboptimal in children with ESRD, it has consistently improved over time. PMID:24178977

  19. Inherited renal cystic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyun; King, Bernard F; Vrtiska, Terri J; Irazabal, Maria V; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    A number of inherited renal diseases present with renal cysts and often lead to end-stage renal disease. With recent advances in genetics, increasing number of genes and mutations have been associated with cystic renal diseases. Although genetic testing can provide a definite diagnosis, it is often reserved for equivocal cases or for ongoing investigational research. Therefore, imaging findings are essential in the routine diagnosis, follow-up, and detection of complications in patients with inherited cystic renal diseases. In this article, the most recent classification, genetic analysis, clinical presentations, and imaging findings of inherited cystic renal diseases will be discussed. PMID:27167233

  20. Retrospective Study of Metastatic Melanoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Brain with Multivariate Analysis of Prognostic Pre-Treatment Clinical Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ferrel, Ethan A.; Roehrig, Andrew T.; Kaya, Erin A.; Carlson, Jonathan D.; Ling, Benjamin C.; Wagner, Aaron; MacKay, Alexander R.; Call, Jason A.; Demakas, John J.; Lamoreaux, Wayne T.; Fairbanks, Robert K.; Cooke, Barton S.; Peressini, Ben; Lee, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) or melanoma have historically had very poor prognoses of less than one year. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) can be an effective treatment for patients with these tumors. This study analyzes the effect of pretreatment prognostic factors on overall survival (OS) for RCC and melanoma patients with metastasis to the brain treated with SRS. A total of 122 patients with brain metastases from either RCC or melanoma were grouped by age at brain metastasis diagnosis, whether they received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in addition to SRS, or they underwent surgical resection, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), number of brain metastases, and primary tumor. Median survival times for melanoma patients and RCC patients were 8.20 ± 3.06 and 12.70 ± 2.63 months, respectively. Patients with >5 metastases had a significantly shorter median survival time (6.60 ± 2.45 months) than the reference group (1 metastasis, 10.70 ± 13.40 months, p = 0.024). Patients with KPS ≤ 60 experienced significantly shorter survival than the reference group (KPS = 90–100), with median survival times of 5.80 ± 2.46 months (p < 0.001) and 45.20 ± 43.52 months, respectively. We found a median overall survival time of 12.7 and 8.2 months for RCC and melanoma, respectively. Our study determined that a higher number of brain metastases (>5) and lower KPS were statistically significant predictors of a lower OS prognosis. PMID:26999120

  1. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumor - metastatic (secondary); Cancer - brain tumor (metastatic) ... For many people with metastatic brain tumors, the cancer is not curable. It will eventually spread to other areas of the body. Prognosis depends on the type of tumor ...

  2. A single arm phase 1b study of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC)

    PubMed Central

    Kanesvaran, R.; Watt, K.; Turnbull, J. D.; Armstrong, A. J.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, M.; George, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Everolimus ,an oral inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and sunitinib, an oral inhibitor of VEGF/PDGF receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, have both been shown to provide clinical benefit in patients with advanced RCC. We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of combination therapy with these agents in patients with advanced RCC. Methods We conducted a phase Ib dose escalation trial of sunitinib and everolimus in patients with advanced metastatic RCC. Prior nephrectomy was required, and prior radiation or chemotherapy other than VEGF/mTOR-based therapies was permitted. The primary endpoint was to determine the MTD/recommended phase 2 dose. Results A total of 4 out of a planned 30 subjects were enrolled in this study (M:F= 2:2; mean age 52 years, 50% with KPS <80). The first three patients were enrolled on a 4+2 dosing schedule of daily sunitinib 50 mg and weekly everolimus 30 mg. Mean time on drug was 99 days. One partial response was seen. Toxicities included mucositis, thrombocytopenia, anemia, fatigue, dehydration and hypoglycemia. Due to multiple grade 3–4 toxicities, the protocol was amended to 2+1 dosing of sunitinib 37.5 mg and daily everolimus 5mg. The first patient on this schedule died from multi-organ failure with septic shock after 1 cycle of treatment. Subsequently, the study was closed. Pharmacokinetics results inconclusively suggest that toxicities could be attributed to the drug exposure. Conclusions Combined use of everolimus and sunitinib in the treatment of mRCC was not well tolerated in this small cohort. PMID:26174223

  3. Pembrolizumab and Ziv-aflibercept in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Metastatic Melanoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  4. Phase II study of necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 as first-line treatment in patients with locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elez, E; Hendlisz, A; Delaunoit, T; Sastre, J; Cervantes, A; Varea, R; Chao, G; Wallin, J; Tabernero, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: This single-arm phase II study investigated the EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) in first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: Patients received 800-mg intravenous necitumumab (day 1; 2-week cycles), followed by oxaliplatin 85 mg m−2, folinic acid 400 mg m−2, and 5-fluorouracil (400 mg m−2 bolus then 2400 mg m−2 over 46 h). Radiographic evaluation was performed every 8 weeks until progression. Primary endpoint was objective response rate. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled and treated. Objective response rate was 63.6% (95% confidence interval 47.8–77.6); complete response was observed in four patients; median duration of response was 10.0 months (7.0–16.0). Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 22.5 (11.0–30.0) and 10.0 months (7.0–12.0), respectively. Clinical outcome was better in patients with KRAS exon 2 wild type (median OS 30.0 months (23.0–NA); median PFS 12.0 (8.0–20.0)), compared with KRAS exon 2 mutant tumours (median OS 7.0 months (5.0–37.0); median PFS 7.0 (4.0–18.0)). The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events were neutropenia (29.5%), asthenia (27.3%), and rash (20.5%). Conclusion: First-line necitumumab+mFOLFOX6 was active with manageable toxicity in locally advanced or mCRC; additional evaluation of the impact of tumour RAS mutation status is warranted. PMID:26766738

  5. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1 losses

  6. Recent advances in the treatment of renal diseases with nebivolol: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Shamekhi Amiri, Fateme

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in both acute and chronic kidney diseases. Chronic kidney disease is associated with various consequences to the cardiovascular system and metabolic profiles. Nebivolol, a highly cardioselective third-generation β-blocker, has nitric oxide (NO) induced vasodilation and antioxidant properties. Nebivolol affects the endothelial NO pathway in two complementary ways: it increases endothelial mediated NO expression and has antioxidant action, which leads to a decrease in degradation. Central blood pressure can be effectively lowered by nebivolol in the prehypertension phase. Clinically nebivolol's ability to modulate endothelial dysfunction may offer additional vascular protection in treating hypertension. As well, pre-treatment with 5mg nebivolol every 24 hours for 4 days is protective against nephrotoxic effects of contrast media. The aim of this study is to review the current literature on the efficacy and safety of nebivolol in the treatment of various states of renal diseases. PMID:27117765

  7. Sunitinib benefits patients with renal cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Findings from clinical trial patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, a common kidney cancer, show they did not have accelerated tumor growth after treatment with sunitinib, in contrast to some study results in animals.

  8. Prognostic Value of Quantitative Metabolic Metrics on Baseline Pre-Sunitinib FDG PET/CT in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Barkhodari, Amir; Harshman, Lauren; Srinivas, Sandy; Quon, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate various quantitative metrics on FDG PET/CT for monitoring sunitinib therapy and predicting prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC). Methods Seventeen patients (mean age: 59.0 ± 11.6) prospectively underwent a baseline FDG PET/CT and interim PET/CT after 2 cycles (12 weeks) of sunitinib therapy. We measured the highest maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of all identified lesions (highest SUVmax), sum of SUVmax with maximum six lesions (sum of SUVmax), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) from baseline PET/CT and interim PET/CT, and the % decrease in highest SUVmax of lesion (%Δ highest SUVmax), the % decrease in sum of SUVmax, the % decrease in TLG (%ΔTLG) and the % decrease in MTV (%ΔMTV) between baseline and interim PET/CT, and the imaging results were validated by clinical follow-up at 12 months after completion of therapy for progression free survival (PFS). Results At 12 month follow-up, 6/17 (35.3%) patients achieved PFS, while 11/17 (64.7%) patients were deemed to have progression of disease or recurrence within the previous 12 months. At baseline, PET/CT demonstrated metabolically active cancer in all cases. Using baseline PET/CT alone, all of the quantitative imaging metrics were predictive of PFS. Using interim PET/CT, the %Δ highest SUVmax, %Δ sum of SUVmax, and %ΔTLG were also predictive of PFS. Otherwise, interim PET/CT showed no significant difference between the two survival groups regardless of the quantitative metric utilized including MTV and TLG. Conclusions Quantitative metabolic measurements on baseline PET/CT appears to be predictive of PFS at 12 months post-therapy in patients scheduled to undergo sunitinib therapy for mRCC. Change between baseline and interim PET/CT also appeared to have prognostic value but otherwise interim PET/CT after 12 weeks of sunitinib did not appear to be predictive of PFS. PMID:27123976

  9. Renal organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the absence of new treatment modalities has become a strong driver for innovation in nephrology. An increasing understanding of stem cell biology has kindled the prospects of regenerative options for kidney disease. However, the kidney itself is not a regenerative organ, as all the nephrons are formed during embryonic development. Here, we will investigate advances in the molecular genetics of renal organogenesis, including what this can tell us about lineage relationships, and discuss how this may serve to inform us about both the normal processes of renal repair and options for regenerative therapies. PMID:22198432

  10. Retrospective Analysis of the Safety and Efficacy of High-dose Interleukin-2 After Prior Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael K. K.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Redman, Bruce G.; Logan, Theodore; Gao, Dexiang; Flaig, Thomas W.; Lewis, Karl; Poust, Jamie; Monk, Paul; Jarkowski, Anthony; Sendilnathan, Arun; Bolden, Marcus; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Olencki, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are the most common first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, high-dose interleukin-2 (HD-IL2) remains the only agent that provides durable complete responses. The optimal sequence of these agents remains uncertain. This retrospective multi-institutional study examined the safety and efficacy of HD-IL2 following TKI therapy. After IRB approval at 7 HD-IL2 centers, data relating to patient, disease, and treatment characteristics among 40 consecutive patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who were treated with HD-IL2 after at least 1 prior TKI therapy were retrospectively collected. The most common cardiac adverse events were grade 3 hypotension and vascular leak syndrome. Six patients (15%) experienced other grade ≥3 cardiac adverse events. There were 2 treatment-related deaths due to congestive heart failure, occurring in 1 patient with short TKI to HD-IL2 interval and another patient with an abnormal baseline cardiac stress test. Best responses included 2 CRs (5%, duration 40+ and 62+ mo), 3 PRs (8%, duration 6, 11, and 24 mo), 13 SD (32%, median duration 12 mo), 20 PD (50%), and 2 not evaluable patients. Median overall survival was 22 months. Administration of HD-IL2 could be safe and effective after TKI therapy; however, careful selection of patients is critical. We recommend baseline cardiac risk factor assessment, screening with both cardiac stress test and echocardiogram, and allowing a TKI to HD-IL2 interval of at least 2 months. PMID:25075565

  11. Retrospective analysis of the safety and efficacy of high-dose interleukin-2 after prior tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lam, Elaine T; Wong, Michael K K; Agarwal, Neeraj; Redman, Bruce G; Logan, Theodore; Gao, Dexiang; Flaig, Thomas W; Lewis, Karl; Poust, Jamie; Monk, Paul; Jarkowski, Anthony; Sendilnathan, Arun; Bolden, Marcus; Kuzel, Timothy M; Olencki, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are the most common first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, high-dose interleukin-2 (HD-IL2) remains the only agent that provides durable complete responses. The optimal sequence of these agents remains uncertain. This retrospective multi-institutional study examined the safety and efficacy of HD-IL2 following TKI therapy. After IRB approval at 7 HD-IL2 centers, data relating to patient, disease, and treatment characteristics among 40 consecutive patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma who were treated with HD-IL2 after at least 1 prior TKI therapy were retrospectively collected. The most common cardiac adverse events were grade 3 hypotension and vascular leak syndrome. Six patients (15%) experienced other grade ≥3 cardiac adverse events. There were 2 treatment-related deaths due to congestive heart failure, occurring in 1 patient with short TKI to HD-IL2 interval and another patient with an abnormal baseline cardiac stress test. Best responses included 2 CRs (5%, duration 40+ and 62+ mo), 3 PRs (8%, duration 6, 11, and 24 mo), 13 SD (32%, median duration 12 mo), 20 PD (50%), and 2 not evaluable patients. Median overall survival was 22 months. Administration of HD-IL2 could be safe and effective after TKI therapy; however, careful selection of patients is critical. We recommend baseline cardiac risk factor assessment, screening with both cardiac stress test and echocardiogram, and allowing a TKI to HD-IL2 interval of at least 2 months. PMID:25075565

  12. Identifying Advanced Glycation End Products as a Major Source of Oxidants in Aging: Implications for the Management and/or Prevention of Reduced Renal Function in Elderly Persons

    PubMed Central

    Vlassara, Helen; Uribarri, Jaime; Ferrucci, Luigi; Cai, Weijing; Torreggiani, Massimo; Post, James B.; Zheng, Feng; Striker, Gary E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aging is characterized by increasing inflammation and oxidant stress (OS). Reduced renal function was present in more than 20% of normal-aged individuals sampled in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cross-sectional study of the US population. Longitudinal studies in the United States and Italy showed that renal function does not decline in some individuals, suggesting that a search for causes of the loss of renal function in some persons might be indicated and interventions to reduce this outcome should be sought. Because advanced glycation end products (AGEs) induce both inflammation and OS, accumulate with age, and primarily are excreted by the kidney, one outcome of reduced renal function in aging could be decreased AGE disposal. The build-up of AGEs with reduced renal function could contribute to inflammation, increased oxidant stress, and accumulation of AGEs in aging. In fact, results from a longitudinal study of normal aging adults in Italy showed that the most significant correlation with mortality was the level of renal function. A clear link between inflammation, OS, AGEs, and chronic disease was shown in studies of mice that showed that reduction of AGE levels by drugs or decreased intake of AGEs reduces chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease of aging. The data support a role for AGEs in the development of renal lesions in aging mice and reveal that AGEs in the diet are very important contributors to renal and cardiovascular lesions. AGEs signal through two receptors, one of which is anti-inflammatory (AGER1) and the other is proinflammatory (RAGE). Overexpression of AGER1 protects against OS and acute vascular injury. The reduction of AGEs in the diet is as efficient in preventing aging-related cardiovascular and renal lesions in mice as that seen with calorie restriction. Studies in normal adults of all ages and those with CKD suggest that the findings in mice may be directly applicable to both aging

  13. Improved overall survival following tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer—the Holy Grail in cancer treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Sellmann, Ludger; Fenchel, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is characterized by a poor prognosis and few second- or third-line treatments. First-generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition has paved the way for targeted therapies in lung cancer. Although these drugs result in excellent responses [and significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS)] in patients with activating EGFR mutations, none of these randomized studies has yet demonstrated a statistically significant improvement of overall survival (OS). PFS is often used as a predictor for improved OS since it is independent of subsequent treatment, but OS is acknowledged as the key clinical outcome in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. When effective treatment is given as post therapy, it will be difficult to distinguish the treatment effect of original and subsequent treatments because differences in OS are potentially confounded by crossover, and a relevant number of patients assigned to chemotherapy arms received tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) as second- or third-line treatment after disease progression. The high proportion of crossover may extend the benefit associated with the administration of TKIs to patients assigned to the control arm, and its “salvage”-effect may compensate for the relevant differences in PFS of first-line treatment consistently demonstrated in all TKI trials. Results for the INFORM trial (maintenance therapy with gefitinib following platinum-based chemotherapy) provided evidence that maintenance therapy with gefitinib significantly improved PFS, with greatest benefit in patients harboring EGFR mutation. Despite a high crossover rate (53%) final OS results of this study have now demonstrated a significant survival benefit for the gefitinib-treated EGFR mutation-positive patients (46.9 vs. 21.0 months, P=0.036). This is the first randomized clinical trial that showed a significant and clinical meaningful OS benefit in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC

  14. Improved overall survival following tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer-the Holy Grail in cancer treatment?

    PubMed

    Sellmann, Ludger; Fenchel, Klaus; Dempke, Wolfram C M

    2015-06-01

    Advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is characterized by a poor prognosis and few second- or third-line treatments. First-generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition has paved the way for targeted therapies in lung cancer. Although these drugs result in excellent responses [and significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS)] in patients with activating EGFR mutations, none of these randomized studies has yet demonstrated a statistically significant improvement of overall survival (OS). PFS is often used as a predictor for improved OS since it is independent of subsequent treatment, but OS is acknowledged as the key clinical outcome in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. When effective treatment is given as post therapy, it will be difficult to distinguish the treatment effect of original and subsequent treatments because differences in OS are potentially confounded by crossover, and a relevant number of patients assigned to chemotherapy arms received tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) as second- or third-line treatment after disease progression. The high proportion of crossover may extend the benefit associated with the administration of TKIs to patients assigned to the control arm, and its "salvage"-effect may compensate for the relevant differences in PFS of first-line treatment consistently demonstrated in all TKI trials. Results for the INFORM trial (maintenance therapy with gefitinib following platinum-based chemotherapy) provided evidence that maintenance therapy with gefitinib significantly improved PFS, with greatest benefit in patients harboring EGFR mutation. Despite a high crossover rate (53%) final OS results of this study have now demonstrated a significant survival benefit for the gefitinib-treated EGFR mutation-positive patients (46.9 vs. 21.0 months, P=0.036). This is the first randomized clinical trial that showed a significant and clinical meaningful OS benefit in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC

  15. Further advances of chronic renal replacement therapy in eastern Germany, 1994 versus 1989.

    PubMed

    Thieler, H; Kohler, I; Achenbach, H; Goetz, K H; Kraatz, G; Osten, B; Smit, H

    1995-08-01

    Unlike the other former Soviet-block countries, Eastern Germany/the "GDR", had the opportunity to the re-unification with a highly developed western country, the Federal Republic of (West) Germany in 1990. In order to record the following rapid improvements in renal replacement therapy, we performed our own survey in Eastern Germany--excluding Eastern Berlin--by questionnaire, comparing the years 1989/December, and 1994/December. 112 of the 113 dialysis facilities for adult regular dialysis patients replied to our questionnaire (99%). From 1989 to 1994, the number of dialysis centers increased from 53 to 113 (-->213%), reaching 7.9 centres p.m.p. Of these facilities, 29% were hospital centers, 48% were private dialysis units, and 23% were run by nonprofit dialysis organizations. The number of dialysis stations increased from 602 to 1,719 (-->286%), i.e. 120 stations p.m.p. The number of patients in regular dialysis treatment rose from 2,127 to 5,335 (-->251%), that means a prevalence of 373 patients p.m.p. In 1989, 67 new patients (p.m.p.) had been accepted for maintenance treatment (incidence), in contrast to 130 new patients p.m.p. in 1994 (-->194%), now under the conditions of unlimited accessibility to dialysis treatment. Questions referring to this point--the incidence of new patients--were only asked in Thüringen (2.5 mio. inhabitants). Alternative treatment modalities became feasible under the new conditions in Eastern Germany. In contrast to 99% hemodialysis patients in December 1989, at the end of 1994 92.8% of the patients were treated by hemodialysis, 2.0% by hemofiltration, and 5.2% by peritoneal dialysis, predominantly CAPD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8529297

  16. Renal cell cancer: a shift in approaches for treatment of advanced disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Banegas, Matthew P; Harlan, Linda C; Mann, Bhupinder; Yabroff, K Robin

    2014-09-01

    Several new agents have become available to treat renal cell cancer (RCC) in recent years, although evidence on their dissemination is limited. This study examined recent trends in RCC treatment in US community practices. Data from the population-based National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies were used to evaluate treatment of patients with RCC newly diagnosed in 2004 and 2009 (N=2357). Descriptive statistics and logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to assess treatment patterns and the associations among demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics, with receipt of systemic therapy and time-to-systemic treatment. Between 2004 and 2009, systemic therapy use increased among patients with stage III and IV RCC, from 3.8% to 15.7% and 35.2% to 57.4%, respectively. Among patients with stage IV disease, the most commonly used therapies changed from interleukin-2 (16.3%) and interferon-alfa (16.6%) in 2004 to sunitinib (39.2%) and temsirolimus (15.2%) in 2009. Further, notable decreases were seen in the use of surgery and time-to-systemic treatment for patients with stage IV disease. Patients who were older, living in areas with lower educational attainment, and diagnosed in 2004 were significantly less likely to receive systemic therapy and had longer time-to-systemic treatment (P<.05). The findings indicate that over the past decade, treatment for RCC in the United States has evolved toward increased use of systemic therapy. As the diffusion of new therapies continues, it will be imperative to understand how variation in care for RCC will impact health outcomes and costs of care. PMID:25190695

  17. Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin in Metastatic or Unresectable Bladder Cancer With Decreased Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  18. Colon carcinoma metastatic to the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, J.W. Jr.; Carter, M.P.; Berens, S.V.; Long, R.F.; Caplan, G.E.

    1986-09-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the thyroid gland rarely is encountered in clinical practice; however, autopsy series have shown that it is not a rare occurrence. A case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with metastases to the thyroid is reported. A review of the literature reveals that melanoma, breast, renal, and lung carcinomas are the most frequent tumors to metastasize to the thyroid. Metastatic disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cold nodules on radionuclide thyroid scans, particularly in patients with a known primary.

  19. Subcutaneous administration of interleukin 2 and interferon-alpha-2b in advanced renal cell carcinoma: a confirmatory study.

    PubMed Central

    Facendola, G.; Locatelli, M. C.; Pizzocaro, G.; Piva, L.; Pegoraro, C.; Pallavicini, E. B.; Signaroldi, A.; Meregalli, M.; Lombardi, F.; Beretta, G. D.

    1995-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have suggested that the combination of subcutaneous recombinant human interleukin 2 (rIL-2) and interferon alpha (rIFN-alpha) is especially promising in advanced renal cell carcinoma. We assessed the safety, activity and toxicity of home therapy with these two agents in 50 patients. Each treatment cycle consisted of a 2 day pulse phase, with 9 x 10(6) IU m-2 of rIL-2 being given subcutaneously every 12 h, followed by a 6 week maintenance phase during which rIL-2 1.8 x 10(6) IU m-2 was administered subcutaneously every 12 h on days 1-5 and rIFN-alpha 2b 5 x 10(6) IU m-2 once a day on days 1, 3 and 5. Objective responses (CR+PR) occurred in 9/50 (18%) patients, six of whom (12%) achieved a complete response. Disease stabilisation was observed in 17 cases (34%) and 18 patients progressed during therapy. In the other six cases, treatment was interrupted early for toxicity or patient refusal. One patient died of myocardial infarction during the second cycle. The overall median survival was 12 months. Home therapy with subcutaneous rIL-2 + rIFN-alpha 2b proved to be active, feasible and moderately toxic, but serious adverse events can sometimes occur. PMID:8519672

  20. Prognostic Value of Components of Body Composition in Patients Treated with Targeted Therapy for Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weijie; Zhu, Yao; Wang, Hongkai; Zhang, Hailiang; Shi, Guohai; Liu, Xiaohang; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the association between various components of body composition and overall survival of patients treated with targeted therapies for advanced renal cell carcinoma. Methods This retrospective study included 124 Chinese patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma who had been treated with targeted therapy from 2008 to 2012 at Fudan University Cancer Center. The L3 plane from a computed tomography scan was analyzed. Area and density were recorded as quantitative and quality measures. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportion hazard regression models were constructed to calculate the crude and adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of various components of body composition for overall survival. X-tile software was used to search for optimal cutoffs for male and female patients and the concordance index evaluated incremental changes in prognostication. Results After adjusting for age, sex and Heng risk stratification, only visceral adipose tissue index (HR 0.981, p = 0.002) and subcutaneous adipose tissue index (HR 0.987, p = 0.048) were independently associated with overall survival. Visceral adipose tissue remained a significant prognostic factor (HR 0.997, p = 0.005) when the influence of body mass index was included. Using defined cutoffs, patients with low VAT had double the death rate (p = 0.007). Visceral adipose tissue also added significant benefit to Heng risk stratification. Further exploratory analysis revealed that visceral adipose tissue may be an indicator of nutritional status in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. Conclusion Radiologic measurement of VAT is an independent prognostic factor for Asian patients treated with targeted therapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma. PMID:25668688

  1. Prospective randomized trial comparing once-a-week vs daily radiation therapy for locally-advanced, non-metastatic, lung cancer: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, O.M.; Slawson, R.G.; Poussin-Rosillo, H.; Amin, P.P.; Sewchand, W.; Strohl, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    This is the first report of an on-going Phase III protocol for patients with locally-advanced, non-metastatic, measurable lung cancer. The study randomizes two arms: 6000 rad using 500 rad fractions once a week (1 X W) for 12 weeks with spinal cord (SC) protection at 3000 rad; and 6000 rad using 200 rad fractions daily (5 X W) for 6 weeks with SC protection at 4500 rad. Both arms use an initially large loco-regional field that is further reduced when tumor doses reach 3000 rad in (1 X W) arm and 5000 rad in (5 X W) arm. The protocol was activated April 1982; as of August 1984, it had accrued 100 patients of whom 68 were evaluable (29 (1 X W) and 39 (5 X W)). There have been no major differences in tumor responses or failure patterns between the (1 X W) and (5 X W) arms; response rates have been 69 and 64%; CR 31 and 20%; total incidence of local failures 20 and 23%; and overall incidence of distant failures 34 and 43%, respectively. The (1 X W) arm has been far better tolerated with 76% of its patients free of any esophagitis and 97% without weight loss, as compared to only 33 and 67% in the (5 X W), respectively. The (1 X W) arm has not conveyed loss in tumor control effectiveness, in-treatment progression, or higher incidence of distant spread. Subacute and chronic complications have been minimal with either treatment. No fatal or life-threatening toxicities have occurred; the incidence of severe complications has been 7% in the (1 X W) arm and 8% in the (5 X W) arm. Nevertheless, the number of patients alive and at risk greater than or equal to 12 months is still relatively small; definitive statements regarding very late toxic reactions cannot yet be made. Results in the present protocol arms have not been different from what was expected. Once a week RT yields results that appear no different from those achieved with conventional RT in lung cancer.

  2. A phase 2 trial of sunitinib in patients with advanced non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tannir, Nizar M.; Plimack, Elizabeth; Ng, Chaan; Tamboli, Pheroze; Bekele, Neby; Xiao, Lianchun; Smith, Lisa; Lim, Zita; Pagliaro, Lance; Araujo, John; Aparicio, Ana; Matin, Surena; Wood, Christopher G; Jonasch, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background Sunitinib is a standard of care treatment in advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Retrospective and expanded access data suggest sunitinib has activity in advanced non-clear cell RCC (nccRCC). Objective To prospectively determine the clinical efficacy and safety of sunitinib in patients with advanced nccRCC. Design, Setting, and Participants This is a single-arm phase 2 trial with a two-stage design. Eligibility criteria included pathologically confirmed nccRCC or ccRCC with ≥ 20 percent sarcomatoid histology, performance status 0–2, measurable disease, maximum 2 prior systemic therapies, and no prior treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors directed against the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Intervention Patients received sunitinib 50 mg daily on a 4-week on, 2-week off schedule. Outcome Measurements and Statistical Analysis Primary endpoints were objective response rate (ORR) and progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were safety and overall survival (OS). Results and Limitations Fifty-seven patients were eligible [papillary (27), chromophobe (5), unclassified (8), collecting duct or medullary carcinoma (6), sarcomatoid (7), others (4)]. Median PFS for 55 evaluable patients was 2.7 months [95% CI: 1.4, 5.4]. Two patients with chromophobe and one patient with unclassified histology had a confirmed partial response (5% ORR). Median PFS for patients with papillary histology was 1.6 months (95% CI: 1.4, 5.4). Median PFS for patients with chromophobe histology was 12.7 months (95% CI: 8.5, NA). Median OS for all patients was 16.8 months (95% CI: 10.7, 26.3). Treatment emergent adverse events were consistent with sunitinib’s mechanism of action. The non-randomized design and small number of patients are limitations of this study. Conclusions The differential response of chromophobe histology to sunitinib suggests a therapeutically relevant biological heterogeneity exists within nccRCC. The low ORR and short

  3. Budget impact analysis of first-line treatment with pazopanib for advanced renal cell carcinoma in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to economic constraints, cancer therapies are under close scrutiny by clinicians, pharmacists and payers alike. There is no published pharmacoeconomic evidence guiding the choice of first-line therapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the Spanish setting. We aimed to develop a model describing the natural history of RCC that can be used in healthcare decision-making. We particularly analyzed the budget impact associated with the introduction of pazopanib compared to sunitinib under the Spanish National Healthcare System (NHS) perspective. Methods We developed a Markov model to estimate the future number of cases of advanced RCC (patients with favorable or intermediate risk) resulting either from initial diagnosis or disease progression after surgery. The model parameters were obtained from the literature. We assumed that patients would receive either pazopanib or sunitinib as first-line therapy until disease progression. Pharmacological costs and costs associated with the management of adverse events (AE) were considered. A univariate sensitivity analysis was undertaken in order to test the robustness of the results. Results The model predicted an adult RCC prevalence of 7.5/100,000 (1-year), 20.7/100,000 (3-year) and 32.5/100,000 (5-year). These figures are very close to GLOBOCAN reported RCC prevalence estimates of 7.6/100,000, 20.2/100,000 and 31.1/100,000, respectively. The model predicts 1,591 advanced RCC patients with favorable or intermediate risk in Spain in 2013. Annual per patient pharmacological costs were €32,365 and €39,232 with pazopanib and sunitinib, respectively. Annual costs associated with the management of AE were €662 and €974, respectively. Overall annual per patient costs were €7,179 (18%) lower with pazopanib compared to sunitinib. For every point increase in the percentage of patients treated with pazopanib, the NHS would save €67,236. If all the 1,591 patients predicted were treated with pazopanib, the

  4. Advanced Glycation End-Products Induce Connective Tissue Growth Factor-Mediated Renal Fibrosis Predominantly through Transforming Growth Factor β-Independent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guihua; Li, Cai; Cai, Lu

    2004-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) play a critical role in diabetic nephropathy by stimulating extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a potent inducer of ECM synthesis and increases in the diabetic kidneys. To determine the critical role of CTGF in AGE-induced ECM accumulation leading to diabetic nephropathy, rats were given AGEs by intravenous injection for 6 weeks. AGE treatment induced a significant renal ECM accumulation, as shown by increases in periodic acid-Schiff-positive materials, fibronectin, and type IV collagen (Col IV) accumulation in glomeruli, and a mild renal dysfunction, as shown by increases in urinary volume and protein content. AGE treatment also caused significant increases in renal CTGF and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 mRNA and protein expression. Direct exposure of rat mesangial cells to AGEs in vitro significantly induced increases in fibronectin and Col IV production, which could be completely prevented by pretreatment with anti-CTGF antibody. AGE treatment also significantly increased both TGF-β1 and CTGF mRNA expression; however, inhibition of TGF-β1 mRNA expression by shRNA or neutralization of TGF-β1 protein by anti-TGF-β1 antibody did not significantly prevent AGE-increased expression of CTGF mRNA and protein. These results suggest that AGE-induced CTGF expression, predominantly through a TGF-β1-independent pathway, plays a critical role in renal ECM accumulation leading to diabetic nephropathy. PMID:15579446

  5. Advanced oxidation protein products induce endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human renal glomerular endothelial cells through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiujie; Duan, Na; Wang, Yue; Shu, Shuangshuang; Xiang, Xiaohong; Guo, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shaojie; Tang, Xun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in renal glomerular endothelial cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Furthermore, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been shown to contribute to the progression of DN. However, whether AOPPs induce EndMT in renal glomerular endothelial cells remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the effect of AOPPs on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) and the mechanisms underlying the effects. Our results showed that AOPP treatment lowered the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin, CD31, and claudin 5 and induced the overexpression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast-specific protein 1, which indicated that AOPPs induced EndMT in HRGECs. Furthermore, AOPP stimulation increased the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein, which suggested that AOPPs triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in HRGECs. Notably, the aforementioned AOPP effects were reversed following the treatment of cells with salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress, whereas the effects were reproduced after exposure to thapsigargin, an inducer of ER stress. Collectively, our results indicate that AOPPs trigger EndMT in HRGECs through the induction of ER stress. These findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for inhibiting renal fibrosis by targeting ER stress. PMID:26861949

  6. Metastatic seminoma presenting as flank pain

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Lisa G.; Davis, Niall F.; Forde, James C.; O’Kelly, Olive; Gupta, Rrajnish K.; Flood, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Seminoma is the most common single histological sub-type of testicular carcinoma. Patients usually present with a painless lump and stage I disease. We describe a case of an incidental meta-static seminoma in a 28-year-old man post-renal trauma with a dramatically elevated β-human chorionic gonadotropin (βHCG). His βHCG level has returned to normal post-orchidectomy and chemotherapy. PMID:24475006

  7. Cabozantinib-s-malate and Nivolumab With or Without Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic Genitourinary Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Malignant Reproductive System Neoplasm; Malignant Urinary System Neoplasm; Metastatic Urethral Neoplasm; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Progressive Neoplastic Disease; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Urethra Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Urethral Urothelial Carcinoma

  8. Cetuximab-based therapy is effective in chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced and metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ezzeldin M; Abouelkhair, Khaled M; Al-Masri, Osama A; Chaudry, Najeeb C; Kazkaz, Ghieth A

    2011-06-01

    Randomized controlled trails (RCTs) where cetuximab added to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy for patients with advanced/metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis intended to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based therapy (CBT) in that setting. We analyzed four eligible RCTs that included 1,003 and 1,015 patients randomized to CBT and control intervention, respectively. As compared with the noncetuximab group, CBT demonstrated an 9% reduction in the risk of disease progression [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.91; (CI = 0.83-1.00); p = 0.06], a 13% reduction in the risk of death [HR = 0.87; (CI = 0.78-0.96); p = 0.005], and an approximately 50% increase in objective response rate [odds ratio (OR) = 1.48; (CI = 1.22-1.80); p < 0.0001]. CBT-related adverse events were similar across comparisons except for toxicities known to be associated with anti-EGFR therapy. CBT produced significant clinical benefit with acceptable toxicity as a first-line strategy in patients with advanced/metastatic NSCLC. Further research is needed to identify markers predictive of cetuximab benefit in that disease. PMID:21424607

  9. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein With Standard Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Non-Resectable Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Gallbladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Carcinoma; Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

  10. The European medicines agency review of eribulin for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer: summary of the scientific assessment of the committee for medicinal products for human use.

    PubMed

    Pean, Elias; Klaar, Sigrid; Berglund, Eva Gil; Salmonson, Tomas; Borregaard, Jeanett; Hofland, Kenneth F; Ersbøll, Jens; Abadie, Eric; Giuliani, Rosa; Pignatti, Francesco

    2012-09-01

    The European Commission issued on March 17, 2011, a marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union (EU) for eribulin (Halaven; Eisai Limited). The decision was based on the favorable opinion of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use recommending a marketing authorization for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who have progressed after at least 2 chemotherapeutic regimens for advanced disease. Eribulin mesylate is a structurally simplified synthetic analogue of halichondrin B, which is a natural product isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai (ATC code L01XX41). Eribulin is a nontaxane, microtubule dynamics inhibitor belonging to the halichondrin class of antineoplastic agents. Eribulin inhibits the growth phase of microtubules without affecting the shortening phase and sequesters tubulin into nonproductive aggregates leading to G(2)-M cell-cycle block, disruption of mitotic spindles, and, ultimately, apoptotic cell death after prolonged mitotic blockage. The recommended dose of eribulin is 1.23 mg/m(2) (equivalent to 1.4 mg/m(2) eribulin mesylate) to be administered intravenously over 2 to 5 min on days 1 and 8 of a 3-week cycle. In the pivotal trial, eribulin was associated with increased overall survival in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who received at least 2 prior chemotherapy lines for advanced disease (median overall survival was 13.2 months in the eribulin arm vs. 10.6 months in the control arm; HR = 0.805; 95% confidence interval, 0.677-0.958; P = 0.014). The most common side effects are asthenia or fatigue and neutropenia. The objective of this article is to summarize the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the EU. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary report and product information, including product characteristics, are available on the European Medicines Agency website. PMID

  11. Metastatic pulmonary calcification misdiagnosed as a fungal infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, ZHIXIN; QIU, TIAN; ZHAO, ZHIGANG; CHEN, LIANG'AN; SHE, DANYANG

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification is a rare lesion, characterized by calcium salt depositing in normal lung tissue. The clinical profile of a case of metastatic pulmonary calcification following renal transplantation was described. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed ground-glass opacities in bilateral lungs and a node exhibiting a halo in the right upper lobe, which were suspected aspergillus infection. Following examination and therapy, the results of lung biopsy revealed metastatic pulmonary calcification. Although metastatic pulmonary calcification was reported in renal failure patients previously, metastatic pulmonary calcification with cavity lesions has never, to the best of our knowledge, been previously reported. The aim of the present report was to improve the understanding of metastatic pulmonary calcification. PMID:26998293

  12. The role of metastasectomy in renal cell carcinoma in the era of targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Börje

    2013-02-01

    Despite contemporary innovations in systemic therapy and surgical treatment, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remains the most lethal urologic malignancy. Still, around 20 % of patients with RCC present with metastases at diagnosis, and 40-50 % of those with localized advanced disease will ultimately progress to metastatic disease. Although the new, targeted therapy paradigms have changed the treatment of patients with advanced RCC and offer prolonged survival, cure is extremely uncommon in the absence of surgical resections. In this paper, the current role of metastasectomy is reviewed. Searches were carried out in the PubMed database and the Cochrane Library of Controlled Clinical Trials. While there is no randomized study available, recent large observational studies have better defined the prognosis of patients with metastatic RCC with or without metastasectomy. In multivariate analysis, independent predictive factors included male gender, disease-free interval > 1 year, single metastatic site and complete metastasectomy. Other reports from selected patient materials show 29-31 % 5-year overall survival rates. In patients with recurrent disease after resection of a lung metastasis, 60 % were able to undergo a subsequent resection, compared with 25 % with recurrent bone metastasis. Also, metastasectomy after initial systemic therapy gave partial or complete response in a majority of patients. In these patients, the median survival was 4.7 years and 21 % remained free of disease at last follow-up. Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma should be considered for multimodal therapy, including surgery of metastatic lesions. A proportion of patients will achieve long-term survival with aggressive surgical resection. PMID:23212738

  13. Laevofolinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide and escalating doses of epirubicin with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support in locally advanced and/or metastatic breast carcinoma: a phase I-II study of the Southern Italy Oncology Group (GOIM).

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, G.; Romito, S.; Gebbia, V.; Pacilio, G.; Giotta, F.; Testa, A.; Pezzella, G.; Durini, E.; Agostara, B.; Cariello, S.

    1995-01-01

    Sixty-four consecutive patients with locally advanced (n = 7) or metastatic breast cancer (n = 57), were treated with a combination of laevofolinic acid 100 mg m-2 plus 5-fluorouracil 340 mg m-2 i.v. on days 1-3, cyclophosphamide 600 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1 and epirubicin 90 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1. Epirubicin dose was progressively escalated by 10 mg m-2 per cycle up to 120 mg m-2 in the absence of dose-limiting toxicities. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was given subcutaneously in order to prevent neutropenia. Epirubicin dosage could be increased to 100 mg m-2 in 53 patients (87%), to 110 mg m-2 in 31 patients (51%) and to 120 mg m-2 in 18 cases (30%). In most patients the dose-limiting toxicity was represented by myelosuppression. A statistically significant correlation was found between median white blood count (WBC) or absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir and epirubicin dose level (P = 0.009; P = 0.008). Moreover, a statistically significant correlation was observed between the number of chemotherapeutic cycles, nadir ANC and WBC and the occurrence of anaemia and thrombocytopenia of increasing severity. These data suggest the occurrence of progressive cumulative bone marrow toxicity. Although patients who reached different epirubicin levels showed differences in mean dose intensity, such differences were not statistically significant. No correlation was found between the increase in dose intensity and type, rate or duration of objective responses. In patients with metastatic breast cancer the overall response rate was 72% (95% CL 66-78%) with a 25% complete response rate. Median duration of response was 10 and 13 months respectively for complete and partial responses. All patients with locally advanced breast cancer had an objective response and underwent radical mastectomy. Projected median survival of the whole series of patients with metastatic breast cancer was 20 + months. These data demonstrate that the combination of 5-fluorouracil with

  14. Renal cell carcinoma: presentation, staging, and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Russo, P

    2000-04-01

    The widespread availability of abdominal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography (CT) scanning has increased the diagnosis of incidental renal tumors, which now comprise the vast majority of the new cases diagnosed each year. With the detection of renal tumors at an earlier stage, partial nephrectomy and nephron-sparing surgery have evolved as effective alternatives to radical nephrectomy. The poor prognostic findings of involved regional lymph nodes or ipsilateral adrenal metastases has led to more selective operations on those sites in the face of incidental tumor detection. Technological advances have allowed for the development by committed surgical investigators of techniques of laparoscopic and laparoscopically assisted nephrectomy. Although not widely employed, further improvements in technology may widen the appeal of these approaches to selected renal tumors. Advances in cardiovascular surgical techniques have made resection of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with tumor thrombi involving the inferior vena cava (IVC) possible, although this approach is still associated with significant perioperative mortality depending on the degree of caval involvement. In highly selected cases, resection of limited metastatic disease is recommended, particularly if the disease-free interval is greater than 12 months and there is a only a single site of metastatic disease. Whether metastectomy is therapeutic or fits within the realm of the often long and unpredictable natural history of RCC is not known. Strategies for follow-up are based primarily on the pathologic stage of the operated tumor. Small incidental tumors have an excellent prognosis and require little in the way of postoperative imaging. As the pathologic stage increases, the likelihood of developing metastatic disease increases, necessitating biannual chest x-ray in addition to history and physical examination. Symptom-directed bone scans and CT scans are effective in identifying most

  15. Efficient and reproducible generation of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, V; Griffiths, R; Hawkins, R E; Gilham, D E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy is showing great promise in the treatment of patients with advanced malignant melanoma. However, the translation of TIL therapy to non-melanoma tumours such as renal cell carcinoma has been less successful with a major constraint being the inability to reproducibly generate TILs from primary and metastatic tumour tissue. Methods: Primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma biopsies were subjected to differential tumour disaggregation methods and procedures that stimulate the specific expansion of TILs tested to determine which reliably generated TIL maintained antitumour specificity. Results: Enzymatic or combined enzymatic/mechanical disaggregation resulted in equivalent numbers of TILs being liberated from renal cell carcinoma biopsies. Following mitogenic activation of the isolated TILs with anti-CD3/anti-CD28-coated paramagnetic beads, successful TIL expansion was achieved in 90% of initiated cultures. The frequency of T-cell recognition of autologous tumours was enhanced when tumours were disaggregated using the GentleMACS enzymatic/mechanical system. Conclusion: TILs can be consistently produced from renal cell carcinoma biopsies maintaining autologous tumour recognition after expansion in vitro. While the method of disaggregation has little impact on the success of TIL growth, methods that preserve the cell surface architecture facilitate TIL recognition of an autologous tumour, which is important in terms of characterising the functionality of the expanded TIL population. PMID:25867267

  16. Pulmonary Metastasectomy 31 Years After Surgery for Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yui; Harada, Aya; Aoki, Masaya; Kamimura, Go; Wakida, Kazuhiro; Nagata, Toshiyuki; Yokomakura, Naoya; Kariatsumari, Kota; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Sato, Masami

    2015-06-01

    An 82-year-old man underwent a left upper lobectomy for a solitary tumor on suspicion of lung cancer. Histopathologic findings of the resected specimen showed clear cell renal cell carcinoma, which was diagnosed as a metastasis from kidney cancer concealed for 31 years after nephrectomy. The Ki-67 labeling index of the metastatic tumor was high (36.1%). A few cases of recurrent renal cell carcinoma after a long interval from initial diagnosis have been seen. However, pulmonary metastasectomy more than 30 years after radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma has not been reported. This remarkable case provides new and valuable clinical insights into metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26046874

  17. Talazoparib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Mesothelioma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. Role of targeted therapy in combination with surgery in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bex, Axel; Powles, Thomas; Karam, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    Surgical complete resection is the only curative treatment of renal cell carcinoma including patients with locally advanced disease and those with limited metastatic disease. Patients at high risk of recurrence after complete resection might theoretically benefit from adjuvant and neoadjuvant systemic treatment strategies to prolong disease-free survival and ultimately overall survival. Another rationale for using targeted therapy includes downsizing/downstaging of surgically complex locally advanced renal cell carcinoma to facilitate complete resection or primary tumors to allow for nephron-sparing strategies. Unfortunately, a considerable percentage of patients are diagnosed with metastatic disease at first presentation. Although large population-based studies consistently show a survival benefit after cytoreductive nephrectomy in the targeted therapy era, confounding factors preclude definite conclusions for this heterogeneous patient group until ongoing phase III trials are published. Presurgical targeted therapy has been proposed to identify patients with clinical benefit and potentially long-term survival after cytoreductive nephrectomy. Recently, the use of targeted therapy before or after local treatment of metastases has been reported in small retrospective series. The present review revisits the current evidence base of targeted therapy in combination with surgery for the various disease stages in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26238981

  19. Metastatic calcification of the stomach imaged on a bone scan

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.; Ryo, U.Y.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    A whole body bone scan obtained on a 21-year-old woman with sickle cell disease and chronic renal failure showed localization of the radionuclide diffusely in the stomach. The localization of the radionuclide represented metastatic calcification of the stomach caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  20. Tubulocystic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Great Imitator

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Indraneel; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Suresh; Talreja, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TCRC) is a rare renal tumor. Patients are usually asymptomatic; it is usually detected incidentally, during imaging studies for Bosniak type III and type IV renal cysts. These tumors rarely metastasize. The role of targeted therapy in such rare tumors is still controversial. We report a case of TCRC initially presented as a Bosniak type II renal cyst and was discovered ultimately to be a metastatic disease. This type of presentation might broaden our understanding of this rare disease. PMID:27601972

  1. Laparoscopic lymphadenectomy around the left renal vein (16a2lat) by tunneling under the pancreas for advanced Siewert type II adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Takiguchi, Shuji; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Murakami, Kohei; Makino, Tomoki; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Makoto; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Miyata, Hiroshi; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2016-09-01

    The para-aortic lymph nodes around the left renal vein (16a2lat) are now considered important to target in the treatment of advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. We describe a laparoscopic approach for resecting these nodes. This new tunneling approach starts from the ligament of Treitz and then enters the retroperitoneal space. The left renal vein and left adrenal vein are dissected to identify the anatomy of the 16a2lat area. After this dissection, the 16a2lat nodes are retrieved through the suprapancreatic area. Six patients with advanced type II junctional cancer underwent laparoscopic 16a2lat lymph node dissection. The median operative time and estimated blood loss were 479 (390-750) min and 250 (130-500) ml, respectively. The median hospital stay was 22 (17-54) days and there were no deaths or serious complications. Although this series was relatively small, our technique proved effective and feasible. PMID:26482844

  2. Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma Responsive to Pembrolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Phu; Kallail, K. James

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive liver tumor that occurs with chronic liver disease. Surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for localized disease whereas therapeutic options for advanced disease are limited. The innovative blockade of immune checkpoints with targeted immunotherapies, such as monoclonal antibodies against programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1), have shown promise in the treatment of solid malignancies. The PD-1 inhibiting antibodies, nivolumab and pembrolizumab prolonged overall survival in randomized trials in metastatic melanoma and advanced non-small cell lung cancer. This is a report of a 75-year-old male patient with metastatic HCC who was initially treated with the standard of therapy sorafenib. After failure of sorafenib therapy, pembrolizumab was started. There was a dramatic response to pembrolizumab with decrease in tumor size and drop in alfa fetoprotein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of metastatic HCC responsive to pembrolizumab after failure of sorafenib. PMID:27433410

  3. A Comparative Analysis on the Efficacy and Safety of Intaxel® and Taxol® in Advanced Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Istvan; Rubovszky, Gabor; Horvath, Zsolt; Ganofszky, Erna; Szabo, Eszter; Dank, Magdolna; Boer, Katalin; Hitre, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Background: Among the presently available cytotoxic drugs, paclitaxel, in combination with doxorubicin and carboplatin, come under the highly active therapy for metastatic breast cancer. Between the two brands of paclitaxel (Intaxel, which is marketed by Fresenius Kabi and Taxol, the original paclitaxel which is manufactured by BMS) the similarity has not been evaluated in clinical trial settings till date. This prospective, controlled, randomized, multicentre, open-label phase IV study was planned to compare the safety and efficacy of Intaxel with Taxol, when they were used in combination with carboplatin or doxorubicin, as a second line treatment for metastatic breast cancer. Methods: Fourty nine eligible patients were randomized to receive Intaxel or Taxol with either doxorubicin or carboplatin. The patients who had received a prior anthracycline based chemotherapy were randomized to the paclitaxel/carboplatin arm. The patients were evaluated in three phases i.e. at baseline, during the treatment and at follow up for the tumour response, the time period till the disease progression and the toxicity. The time till the disease progression was assessed by the Kaplan–Meier method. The continuous and categorical variables were assessed by using the ANOVA test and Fisher’s exact test, respectively. Results: After 3 cycles, an objective response rate of 55.56% (CR = 3, PR = 7) was noted in the Intaxel group and that of 59.09% (CR = 1, PR = 12) was noted in the Taxol group. After 6 cycles, an objective response rate of 50% was noted in both the groups. No significant difference was observed in the response rate of the two groups after 3 cycles (p > 0.05) and at the end of the treatment (p > 0.05). The patients who received Intaxel had a lower incidence of thrombocytopaenia (p = 0.0146) and neurosensory loss (p = 0.008) as compared to those who received Taxol. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that the safety and efficacy of Intaxel and Taxol are

  4. [Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015 in St. Gallen : Critical review of the recommendations on diagnosis and therapy of metastatic prostate cancer by a German expert panel].

    PubMed

    Thomas, C; Bögemann, M; König, F; Machtens, S; Schostak, M; Steuber, T; Heidenreich, A

    2016-06-01

    In March 2015, the first Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCC) took place in St. Gallen. 41 experts from 17 countries reviewed important areas of controversy in advanced hormone-naive and castration-resistant prostate cancer and gave therapy recommendations. These results have been recently published in "Annals of Oncology". While most of the recommendations from St. Gallen are comprehensible, some of them need to be further discussed. Therefore, we as a German expert panel will critically debate the St. Gallen recommendations. For metastatic hormone-naive prostate cancer, continuous androgen deprivation remains the standard. There is no evidence for superiority of primary maximal androgen deprivation. Patients suitable for chemotherapy, especially in the presence of high tumour burden, should receive androgen deprivation plus taxanes upfront. In metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer, novel hormonal agents like abiraterone or enzalutamid should be the treatment of choice in the majority of patients. Taxanes should be used first-line in patients with unfavourable prognostic markers. Radium-223 is an option in symptomatic patients with bone metastases. There is first evidence that second-line hormonal treatment after first-line failure of a novel endocrine agent has a high failure rate. Cabazitaxel should be part of the treatment sequence in patients with a good performance status. Baseline staging for castration-resistant prostate cancer should include CT-abdomen/-chest and bone scan. Radiographic monitoring should be performed 2 to 3 times a year. Determination of PSA and ALP is to take place every 2 to 4 months. PMID:26820660

  5. Randomized Phase III Study Comparing Paclitaxel/Cisplatin/ Gemcitabine and Gemcitabine/Cisplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer Without Prior Systemic Therapy: EORTC Intergroup Study 30987

    PubMed Central

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M.; Skoneczna, Iwona; De Santis, Maria; Daugaard, Gedske; Boehle, Andreas; Chevreau, Christine; Paz-Ares, Luis; Laufman, Leslie R.; Winquist, Eric; Raghavan, Derek; Marreaud, Sandrine; Collette, Sandra; Sylvester, Richard; de Wit, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival. Patients and Methods We conducted a randomized phase III study to compare paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine (PCG) with GC in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate, and toxicity. Results From 2001 to 2004, 626 patients were randomly assigned; 312 patients were assigned to PCG, and 314 patients were assigned to GC. After a median follow-up of 4.6 years, the median OS was 15.8 months on PCG versus 12.7 months on GC (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; P = .075). OS in the subgroup of all eligible patients was significantly longer on PCG (3.2 months; HR, 0.82; P = .03), as was the case in patients with bladder primary tumors. PFS was not significantly longer on PCG (HR, 0.87; P = .11). Overall response rate was 55.5% on PCG and 43.6% on GC (P = .0031). Both treatments were well tolerated, with more thrombocytopenia and bleeding on GC than PCG (11.4% v 6.8%, respectively; P = .05) and more febrile neutropenia on PCG than GC (13.2% v 4.3%, respectively; P < .001). Conclusion The addition of paclitaxel to GC provides a higher response rate and a 3.1-month survival benefit that did not reach statistical significance. Novel approaches will be required to obtain major improvements in survival of incurable urothelial cancer. PMID:22370319

  6. Metastatic pleural tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... persons. Alternative Names Tumor - metastatic pleural Images Pleural space References Arenberg D, Pickens A. Metastatic malignant tumors. In: Mason RJ, Murray JF, Broaddus VC, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap ...

  7. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  8. Advances in the management of metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours during the cisplatin era: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed Central

    Gerl, A.; Clemm, C.; Schmeller, N.; Hartenstein, R.; Lamerz, R.; Wilmanns, W.

    1996-01-01

    Long-term outcome was reviewed in 266 consecutive patients with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours treated at a single institution. The overall 3 year survival was 77%, and 3 year progression-free survival was 71%. Multivariate analysis identified the following clinical features as independent prognostic factors: the presence of liver, bone or brain metastasis, serum human chorionic gonadotropin > or = 10000 U l-1 and/or alpha-fetoprotein > or = 1000 ng ml-1, a mediastinal mass > 5 cm and the presence of 20 or more lung metastases. Age was not of prognostic significance. Patients without any of the above poor-risk factors had a 3 year survival of 91% regardless of etoposide- or vinblastine-containing chemotherapy compared with 61% for the remaining patients. However, etoposide-containing protocols led to significantly improved survival in patients with at least one poor risk factor. After 612 patient-years of observation no case of secondary leukaemia was observed among 119 surviving patients who had received etoposide as part of their treatment. With a median follow-up of 93 months, five patients developed a second germ cell tumour, two patients nongerm cell malignancies. Fourteen patients relapsed after a disease-free interval of more than 2 years, and nine patients died more than 5 years after commencement of treatment underscoring the need to report long-term results. There is some evidence that cumulative experience translates into improved survival and cure rates for patients with poor-risk metastatic disease. PMID:8883418

  9. A phase 3 tRial comparing capecitabinE in combination with SorafenIb or pLacebo for treatment of locally advanced or metastatIc HER2-Negative breast CancEr (the RESILIENCE study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic/antiproliferative activity. A randomized phase 2b screening trial in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced breast cancer demonstrated a significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) when sorafenib was added to capecitabine versus placebo (median 6.4 versus 4.1 months; hazard ratio = 0.58; P = 0.001). Most drug-related adverse events were Grade 1/2 in severity with the exception of Grade 3 hand-foot skin reaction/syndrome (44% versus 14%, respectively). These results suggest a role for the combination of sorafenib and capecitabine in breast cancer and supported a phase 3 confirmatory trial. Here we describe RESILIENCE - a multinational, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial - assessing the addition of sorafenib to first- or second-line capecitabine in advanced HER2-negative breast cancer. Methods/design Eligibility criteria include ≥18 years of age, ≤1 prior chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease, and resistant to/failed taxane and anthracycline or no indication for further anthracycline. Prior treatment with a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor is not allowed. Patients with significant cardiovascular disease or active brain metastases are not eligible. Patients are stratified by hormone-receptor status, geographic region, and prior metastatic chemotherapy status and randomized (1:1) to capecitabine (1000 mg/m2 orally twice daily (BID), days 1 to 14 of 21) in combination with sorafenib (orally BID, days 1 to 21, total dose 600 mg/day) or matching placebo. Capecitabine and sorafenib/placebo doses can be escalated to 1250 mg/m2 BID and 400 mg BID, respectively, as tolerated, or reduced to manage toxicity. Dose re-escalation after a reduction is allowed for sorafenib/placebo but not for capecitabine. This dosing algorithm was designed to mitigate dermatologic and other toxicity, in addition to detailed guidelines

  10. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Lessons Learned, Future Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Venook, Alan P

    2016-05-01

    Survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer has dramatically improved over the past 20 years, primarily because physicians have become adept at using the many regimens approved for this patient population. Future advances may come from understanding molecular subtypes, finding and treating new actionable mutations, and harnessing the immune system. PMID:27226509

  11. The adverse effects of sorafenib in patients with advanced cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Gao, Zu-Hua; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Sorafenib is the first multi-kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular cancer (HCC) and metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) and is increasingly being used to treat patients with well-differentiated radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancer (DTC). Sorafenib demonstrates targeted activity on several families of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases that are involved in angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastatic progression of cancer. Sorafenib treatment results in long-term efficacy and low incidence of life-threatening toxicities. Although sorafenib has demonstrated many benefits in patients, the adverse effects cannot be ignored. The most common treatment-related toxicities include diarrhoea, fatigue, hand-foot skin reaction and hypertension. Most of these toxicities are considered mild to moderate and manageable to varying degrees; however, cardiovascular events might lead to death. In this MiniReview, we summarize the adverse effects of sorafenib that commonly occur in patients with advanced cancers. PMID:25495944

  12. Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Villa, Gianluca; Ricci, Zaccaria; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    Renal replacement therapy (RRT) is a cornerstone in the clinical management of patients with acute kidney injury. Results from different studies agree that early renal support therapy (aimed to support the residual kidney function during early phases of organ dysfunction) may reduce mortality with respect to late RRT (aimed to substitute the complete loss of function during the advanced kidney insufficiency). Although it seems plausible that a timely initiation of RRT may be associated with improved renal and nonrenal outcomes in these patients, there is scarce evidence in literature to exactly identify the most adequate onset timing for RRT. PMID:26410148

  13. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. PMID:26759458

  14. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  15. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain from an unknown location. This is called cancer of unknown primary (CUP) origin. Growing brain tumors can place pressure ... not know the original location. This is called cancer of unknown primary (CUP) origin. Metastatic brain tumors occur in about ...

  16. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone Disease cont. Page ( 4 ) MBD vs. Primary Bone Cancer The diagnosis of metastatic bone disease should not ... from an unknown primary carcinoma or a primary bone cancer (sarcoma). For example, if an area of bone ...

  17. Phase I dose-escalation study of cabazitaxel administered in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic or unresectable advanced solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rixe, Olivier; Puzanov, Igor; LoRusso, Patricia M; Cohen, Roger B; Morris, John C; Olowokure, Olugbenga O; Yin, Jian Y; Doroumian, Séverine; Shen, Liji; Olszanski, Anthony J

    2015-08-01

    Taxane-gemcitabine combinations have demonstrated antitumor activity. This phase I study (NCT01001221) aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine and to assess the preliminary efficacy of this combination. The patients included had metastatic or unresectable solid tumors and had exhausted standard treatment. Cohorts of three to six patients received cabazitaxel (15-20 mg/m) before (part 1a) or after (part 1b) gemcitabine (700-1000 mg/m) on Day 1 and gemcitabine alone on Day 8. Prophylactic growth factors were not allowed in cycle 1. In part 1a (n=12), five patients received 20 mg/m cabazitaxel plus 1000 mg/m gemcitabine (20/1000), five received 15/900, two received 15/700. In part 1b, all six patients received the lowest dose (700/15). At all doses, two or more patients experienced a DLT, regardless of administration sequence, including febrile neutropenia (n=4), grade 4 neutropenia (n=2), grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n=2), and grade 3 aspartate transaminase increase (n=1). The MTD was not established as all cohorts exceeded the MTD by definition. All patients experienced an adverse event; the most frequent all-grade nonhematologic events were fatigue (66.7%), decreased appetite (50.0%), and diarrhea (44.4%). The most frequent grade 3-4 hematologic abnormalities were neutropenia (83.3%), leukopenia (77.8%), and lymphopenia (72.2%). Toxicity was sequence-independent but appeared worse with gemcitabine followed by cabazitaxel. Durable partial responses were observed in three patients (prostate cancer, appendiceal cancer, and melanoma). The unacceptable DLTs with cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine, at doses reduced more than 25% from single-agent doses, preclude further investigation. PMID:26020806

  18. A phase II, multicenter, single-arm trial of eribulin as first-line chemotherapy for HER2-negative locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Shinya; Tei, Seika; Nishimura, Shigehiko; Kawajiri, Hidemi; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Yamagata, Shigehito; Noda, Satoru; Nishimori, Takeo; Mizuyama, Yoko; Sunami, Takeshi; Tezuka, Kenji; Ikeda, Katsumi; Ogawa, Yoshinari; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuro; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Takada, Minoru; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    The treatment goals for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) are prolonging survival and improving the quality of life. Eribulin, a non-taxane tubulin inhibitor, demonstrated improved survival in previous studies and also showed mild toxicity when used in late-line therapy for MBC. We conducted a phase II study to investigate the efficacy of eribulin mesylate as the first-line chemotherapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative MBC. This was a phase II, open-label, single-arm, multicenter trial conducted in Japan. Patients with HER2-negative MBC received intravenous eribulin (1.4 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day cycle). The primary efficacy outcome was overall response rate (ORR). Secondary outcomes included time to treatment failure, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and safety. A total of 35 patients were enrolled and received a median of 8 (range 1-21) cycles of eribulin therapy. ORR and clinical benefit rate were 54.3 and 62.9 %, respectively. Median PFS was 5.8 months and median OS was 35.9 months. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was observed in 63 % of patients. The majority of non-hematological adverse events were mild in severity. The present trial demonstrated that eribulin has antitumor activity comparable with other key established cytotoxic agents with acceptable safety and tolerability. Thus, eribulin as first-line chemotherapy might be beneficial for patients with HER2-negative MBC. PMID:27026861

  19. Outcomes in a Multi-institutional Cohort of Patients Treated With Intraoperative Radiation Therapy for Advanced or Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paly, Jonathan J.; Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Biggs, Peter J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Roeder, Falk; Martínez-Monge, Rafael; Whitson, Jared; Calvo, Felipe A.; Fastner, Gerd; Sedlmayer, Felix; Wong, William W.; Ellis, Rodney J.; Haddock, Michael G.; Choo, Richard; Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study aimed to analyze outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with advanced or recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2010, 98 patients received IORT for advanced or locally recurrent RCC at 9 institutions. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 3.5 years. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Chained imputation accounted for missing data, and multivariate Cox hazards regression tested significance. Results: IORT was delivered during nephrectomy for advanced disease (28%) or during resection of locally recurrent RCC in the renal fossa (72%). Sixty-nine percent of the patients were male, and the median age was 58 years. At the time of primary resection, the T stages were as follows: 17% T1, 12% T2, 55% T3, and 16% T4. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a visibly complete resection of tumor. Preoperative or postoperative external beam radiation therapy was administered to 27% and 35% of patients, respectively. The 5-year OS was 37% for advanced disease and 55% for locally recurrent disease. The respective 5-year DSS was 41% and 60%. The respective 5-year DFS was 39% and 52%. Initial nodal involvement (hazard ratio [HR] 2.9-3.6, P<.01), presence of sarcomatoid features (HR 3.7-6.9, P<.05), and higher IORT dose (HR 1.3, P<.001) were statistically significantly associated with decreased survival. Adjuvant systemic therapy was associated with decreased DSS (HR 2.4, P=.03). For locally recurrent tumors, positive margin status (HR 2.6, P=.01) was associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: We report the largest known cohort of patients with RCC managed by IORT and have identified several factors associated with survival. The outcomes for patients receiving IORT in the setting of local recurrence compare favorably to

  20. Epidemiology and therapies for metastatic sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Conley, Anthony P; Reed, Damon R

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are cancers arising from the mesenchymal layer that affect children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. Although most sarcomas are localized, many display a remarkable predilection for metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones, subcutaneous tissue, and lymph nodes. Additionally, many sarcoma patients presenting initially with localized disease may relapse at metastatic sites. While localized sarcomas can often be cured through surgery and often radiation, controversies exist over optimal management of patients with metastatic sarcoma. Combinations of chemotherapy are the most effective in many settings, and many promising new agents are under active investigation or are being explored in preclinical models. Metastatic sarcomas are excellent candidates for novel approaches with additional agents as they have demonstrated chemosensitivity and affect a portion of the population that is motivated toward curative therapy. In this paper, we provide an overview on the common sarcomas of childhood (rhabdomyosarcoma), adolescence, and young adults (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor) and older adults (leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and undifferentiated high grade sarcoma) in terms of the epidemiology, current therapy, promising therapeutic directions and outcome with a focus on metastatic disease. Potential advances in terms of promising therapy and biologic insights may lead to more effective and safer therapies; however, more clinical trials and research are needed for patients with metastatic sarcoma. PMID:23700373

  1. Sciatica leading to the discovery of a renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Amine Lakmichi, Mohamed; Jarir, Redouane; Kabour, Jamal; Dahami, Zakaria; Said Moudouni, Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell cancer is not exceptional in kidney cancer (30% of patients with kidneyl cancer). Its prognosis is particularly severe. However, sciatic neuralgia (sciatica) remains an exceptional revealing clinical sign of this disease. The authors report the case of a patient admitted with right sciatica as chief complain, leading to the discovery of a renal cell carcinoma. Although uncommon, renal cell carcinoma spine metastasis should be included in the differential diagnosis of back pain and sciatica. PMID:22355428

  2. Sciatica leading to the discovery of a renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lakmichi, Mohamed Amine; Jarir, Redouane; Kabour, Jamal; Dahami, Zakaria; Said Moudouni, Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell cancer is not exceptional in kidney cancer (30% of patients with kidneyl cancer). Its prognosis is particularly severe. However, sciatic neuralgia (sciatica) remains an exceptional revealing clinical sign of this disease. The authors report the case of a patient admitted with right sciatica as chief complain, leading to the discovery of a renal cell carcinoma. Although uncommon, renal cell carcinoma spine metastasis should be included in the differential diagnosis of back pain and sciatica. PMID:22355428

  3. Phase II Trial of Dolastatin-10, a Novel Anti-Tubulin Agent, in Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Balcerzak, S. P.; Kraft, A. S.; Edmonson, J. H.; Okuno, S. H.; Davey, M.; Mclaughlin, S.; Beard, M. T.; Rogatko, A.

    2004-01-01

    Patients:Soft tissue sarcomas are uncommon malignancies with few therapeutic options for recurrent or metastatic disease. Dolastatin-10 (Dol-10) is a pentapeptide anti-microtubule agent that binds to tubulin sites distinct from vinca alkaloids. Based on the novel mechanism of action, limited activity of other anti-microtubular agents, and anti-neoplastic activity in pre-clinical screening of Dol-10, this multi-institutional phase II study was conducted to determine the objective response rate of Dol-10 in recurrent or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas that had not been treated with chemotherapy outside of the adjuvant setting. Methods: Dol-10 was given intravenously at a dose of 400 μg/m2 and repeated every 21 days. Toxicities were assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2.0). Radiographic studies and tumor measurements were repeated every two cycles to assess response [Miller AB, et al. Cancer 1981; 47(1): 207]. Results: Dol-10 was associated with hematological toxicity and with some vascular toxicities. There was no significant gastrointestinal, hepatic or renal toxicity. There was one death on study due to respiratory failure. There were no objective responses in 12 patients treated with Dol-10. Discussion: Based on this phase II trial, further study of Dol-10 on this schedule is not recommended in advanced or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:18521404

  4. Screw Placement and Osteoplasty Under Computed Tomographic-Fluoroscopic Guidance in a Case of Advanced Metastatic Destruction of the Iliosacral Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Trumm, Christoph Gregor; Rubenbauer, Bianca; Piltz, Stefan; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    2011-02-15

    We present a case of combined surgical screw placement and osteoplasty guided by computed tomography-fluoroscopy (CTF) in a 68-year-old man with unilateral osteolytic destruction and a pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint due to a metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. The patient experienced intractable lower back pain that was refractory to analgesia. After transarterial particle and coil embolization of the tumor-feeding vessels in the angiography unit, the procedure was performed under general anesthesia by an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologists and trauma surgeons. Under intermittent single-shot CTF, two K wires were inserted into the left iliosacral joint from a lateral transiliac approach at the S1 level followed by two self-tapping surgical screws. Continuous CTF was used for monitoring of the subsequent polymethylmethacrylate injection through two vertebroplasty cannulas for further stabilization of the screw threads within the osteolytic sacral ala. Both the screw placement and cement injection were successful, with no complications occurring during or after the procedure. With additional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and opioid medication, the patient reported a marked decrease in his lower back pain and was able to move independently again at the 3-month follow-up assessment. In our patient with intolerable back pain due to tumor destruction and consequent pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint, CTF-guided iliosacral screw placement combined with osteoplasty was successful with respect to joint stabilization and a reduction in the need for analgesic therapy.

  5. Targeted Therapy for Metastatic Urothelial Cancer: A Work in Progress.

    PubMed

    Plimack, Elizabeth R; Geynisman, Daniel M

    2016-06-20

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 64-year-old man presented to the clinic to discuss treatment options for progressive metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC). At age 57 years, he underwent cystoprostatectomy for bacillus Calmette-Guérin-refractory, high-grade noninvasive UC. He was well until age 61 years, when he developed a left upper-tract UC. He underwent left nephroureterectomy, revealing locally advanced high-grade UC invading the renal parenchyma (pT3). Postoperatively, his renal function precluded adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy. He enrolled onto a clinical trial of autologous cellular immunotherapy targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, for which he was eligible on the basis of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positivity (≥ 1+ by immunohistochemistry) in his nephrectomy tumor specimen. He was randomly assigned to observation. Two years later, he developed a left pelvic mass. Biopsy confirmed metastatic high-grade UC. He was briefly treated with gemcitabine and carboplatin, but this was discontinued as a result of rapid symptomatic and radiographic progression at 8 weeks. He underwent palliative radiation to the left pelvic mass to relieve symptoms of pain and leg edema and subsequently elected to enroll onto a clinical trial of a programmed death 1 inhibitor. Concurrently, his previously obtained pelvic mass biopsy sample was sent for panel-based genomic profiling. He now returns for his first restaging evaluation. Imaging shows marked progression on

  6. Functional and symptom impact of trametinib versus chemotherapy in BRAF V600E advanced or metastatic melanoma: quality-of-life analyses of the METRIC study

    PubMed Central

    Schadendorf, D.; Amonkar, M. M.; Milhem, M.; Grotzinger, K.; Demidov, L. V.; Rutkowski, P.; Garbe, C.; Dummer, R.; Hassel, J. C.; Wolter, P.; Mohr, P.; Trefzer, U.; Lefeuvre-Plesse, C.; Rutten, A.; Steven, N.; Ullenhag, G.; Sherman, L.; Wu, F. S.; Patel, K.; Casey, M.; Robert, C.

    2014-01-01

    inhibitor in metastatic melanoma demonstrated that trametinib was associated with less functional impairment, smaller declines in health status, and less exacerbation of symptoms versus chemotherapy. PMID:24504441

  7. A Rare Intrascrotal Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Adawi, Essa

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma is potentially a lethal disease with in some cases aggressive behavior. The given fact that the patterns of metastases from RCC are not clearly identified, which may involve some rare metastatic locations. We present a case of 58 years old male presented with painless left scrotal mass, which was discovered to be an intrascrotal metastases appeared 3 years after nephrectomy for ipsilateral renal cell carcinoma. We believe that the rarity of the metastatic site and the intriguing possible mechanism of spread make an interesting case for clinicians and could add more follow-up measures for patients treated from renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26793583

  8. Renal calculus complicated with squamous cell carcinoma of renal pelvis: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiantao; Lei, Jun; He, Leye; Yin, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding renal calculus is a risk factor of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the renal pelvis. It is highly aggressive and usually diagnosed at advanced stages with a poor prognosis. We present two cases of kidney stone complications with renal pelvic SCC. These two patients had a radical nephrectomy and the dissected tissues were renal pelvic SCC. Our cases further emphasize that renal pelvic SCC should be considered in patients with longstanding renal calculus. These cases contribute greatly to an early diagnosis and early treatment, both of which will significantly minimize the damage of, and markedly improve the prognosis of, renal pelvic SCC. PMID:26029303

  9. Renal calculus complicated with squamous cell carcinoma of renal pelvis: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jiantao; Lei, Jun; He, Leye; Yin, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding renal calculus is a risk factor of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the renal pelvis. It is highly aggressive and usually diagnosed at advanced stages with a poor prognosis. We present two cases of kidney stone complications with renal pelvic SCC. These two patients had a radical nephrectomy and the dissected tissues were renal pelvic SCC. Our cases further emphasize that renal pelvic SCC should be considered in patients with longstanding renal calculus. These cases contribute greatly to an early diagnosis and early treatment, both of which will significantly minimize the damage of, and markedly improve the prognosis of, renal pelvic SCC. PMID:26029303

  10. Small renal tumor with lymph nodal enlargement: A histopathological surprise

    PubMed Central

    Thottathil, Mujeeburahiman; Verma, Ashish; D’souza, Nischith; Khan, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Renal cancer with lymph nodal mass on the investigation is clinically suggestive of an advanced tumor. Small renal cancers are not commonly associated with lymph nodal metastasis. Association of renal cell carcinoma with renal tuberculosis (TB) in the same kidney is also rare. We report here a case of small renal cancer with multiple hilar and paraaortic lymph nodes who underwent radical nephrectomy, and histopathology report showed renal and lymph nodal TB too. PMID:27453671

  11. Hypertension and Circulating Cytokines and Angiogenic Factors in Patients With Advanced Non-Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated With Sunitinib: Results From a Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bilen, Mehmet Asim; Zurita, Amado J.; Ilias-Khan, Nasreen A.; Chen, Hsiang-Chun; Wang, Xuemei; Kearney, Alper Y.; Hodges, Sherie; Jonasch, Eric; Huang, Shixia; Khakoo, Aarif Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Background. We evaluated the significance of hypertension developing during vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR-TKI) treatment and a group of cytokines and angiogenic factors (CAFs) in advanced non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma (nccRCC) patients treated with sunitinib in a phase II study. Materials and Methods. Using multiplex assays, we analyzed the levels of 38 CAFs in plasma at baseline and after 4 weeks of sunitinib therapy. Sunitinib benefit was defined as a partial response or stable disease using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors lasting ≥4 months. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the associations among hypertension, CAFs, and progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results. Fifty-seven patients were evaluable; 53 had baseline CAF levels available. The median PFS and OS were 2.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4–5.5) and 16.8 months (95% CI, 10.7–27.4), respectively. Sunitinib benefit was observed in 21 patients (37%). However, 33 patients (60%) developed hypertension during treatment, although no association was found with survival or response. Elevated baseline soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor I, interleukin-8, growth-regulated oncogene, transforming growth factor-α, and VEGFR-2 levels were associated with an increased risk of death on multivariate analysis. Conclusion. We found no association between the development of hypertension and survival or sunitinib benefit in advanced nccRCC. TNF and angiogenic/immunomodulatory mediators were identified for evaluation as markers of prognosis and VEGFR-TKI benefit in future studies. Implications for Practice: The present study describes the first analysis of hypertension and a relatively large set of circulating cytokines and angiogenic factors in patients with advanced non-clear cell renal cell carcinoma (nccRCC) treated with sunitinib. No association was found between hypertension

  12. Final Results of Sequential Doxorubicin Plus Gemcitabine and Ifosfamide, Paclitaxel, and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Patients With Metastatic or Locally Advanced Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Milowsky, Matthew I.; Nanus, David M.; Maluf, Fernando C.; Mironov, Svetlana; Shi, Weiji; Iasonos, Alexia; Riches, Jamie; Regazzi, Ashley; Bajorin, Dean F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Sequential chemotherapy with doxorubicin and gemcitabine (AG) followed by ifosfamide, paclitaxel, and cisplatin (ITP) was previously demonstrated to be well tolerated in patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). This study sought to evaluate the efficacy and to additionally define toxicity. Patients and Methods Sixty patients with advanced TCC received AG every 2 weeks for five or six cycles followed by ITP every 21 days for four cycles. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was given between cycles. Results Myelosuppression was seen with 68% of patients who experienced grades 3 to 4 neutropenia and with 25% who experienced febrile neutropenia. Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicities were infrequent. Forty (73%) of 55 evaluable patients (95% CI, 59% to 84%) demonstrated a major response (complete, n = 19; partial, n = 21) and had a median response duration of 11.3 months (range, 1.7 to ≥ 105.6 months). Twenty-seven (79%) of 34 patients with locally advanced disease (ie, T4, N0, M0) or with regional lymph node involvement (ie, T3-4, N1, M0) and 10 (56%) of 18 patients with distant metastases achieved a major response. The median progression-free survival was 12.1 months (95% CI, 9.0 to 14.8 months), and the median overall survival was 16.4 months (95% CI, 14.0 to 22.5 months). At a median follow-up of 76.4 months, seven (11.7%) patients remain alive, and all were disease free. Conclusion AG plus ITP is an active regimen in previously untreated patients with advanced TCC; however, it is associated with toxicity and does not clearly offer a benefit compared with other nonsequential, cisplatin-based regimens. PMID:19636012

  13. Efficacy and safety of capecitabine-based first-line chemotherapy in advanced or metastatic breast cancer: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Huang, Li; Gao, Shegan; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2015-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine-based therapy as first-line chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer. Randomised controlled trials of capecitabine monotherapy or combined treatment were included in the meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library database and important meeting summaries were searched systematically. Outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), overall response rate (ORR) and grades 3–4 drug-related adverse events. Nine trials with 1798 patients were included. The results indicated a significant improvement with capecitabine-based chemotherapy compared with capecitabine-free chemotherapy in ORR (relative risk [RR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03 to 1.26, P = 0.013) and PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.77, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.87, P < 0.0001). Overall survival favoured capecitabine-based chemotherapy, but this was not significant. There were more incidences of neutropenia and neutropenic fever in the capecitabine-free chemotherapy group and more vomiting, diarrhoea and hand–foot syndrome in the capecitabine-based chemotherapy group. There were no significant differences in nausea, fatigue, cardiotoxicity or mucositis/stomatitis between the two treatment regimens. Capecitabine-based chemotherapy significantly improves ORR and PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer, but has no demonstrable impact on OS. Capecitabine-based regimens are suitable as first-line treatment for patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:26420815

  14. Efficacy and safety of capecitabine-based first-line chemotherapy in advanced or metastatic breast cancer: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Yin, Weijiao; Pei, Guangsheng; Liu, Gang; Huang, Li; Gao, Shegan; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2015-11-17

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine-based therapy as first-line chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer. Randomised controlled trials of capecitabine monotherapy or combined treatment were included in the meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library database and important meeting summaries were searched systematically. Outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), overall response rate (ORR) and grades 3-4 drug-related adverse events.Nine trials with 1798 patients were included. The results indicated a significant improvement with capecitabine-based chemotherapy compared with capecitabine-free chemotherapy in ORR (relative risk [RR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03 to 1.26, P = 0.013) and PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.77, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.87, P < 0.0001). Overall survival favoured capecitabine-based chemotherapy, but this was not significant. There were more incidences of neutropenia and neutropenic fever in the capecitabine-free chemotherapy group and more vomiting, diarrhoea and hand-foot syndrome in the capecitabine-based chemotherapy group. There were no significant differences in nausea, fatigue, cardiotoxicity or mucositis/stomatitis between the two treatment regimens.Capecitabine-based chemotherapy significantly improves ORR and PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer, but has no demonstrable impact on OS. Capecitabine-based regimens are suitable as first-line treatment for patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:26420815

  15. RECIST 1.1 Compared With RECIST 1.0 in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Receiving Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Katherine M.; Nishino, Mizuki; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) is the most widely accepted method to objectively assess response to therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) treated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)–targeted therapy. Both RECIST 1.0 and 1.1 have been used to assess response to VEGF-targeted therapies; however, systematic comparisons are lacking. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty-two patients with metastatic RCC treated with VEGF-targeted therapies were retrospectively studied. Tumor measurements and response assessment according to RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 were compared, including the number of target lesions, baseline measurements, response at each follow-up, best overall response, and time to progression (TTP). Morphologic changes and new enhancement were also assessed over the course of treatment, and TTP was evaluated using morphologic change criteria in combination with RECIST 1.1. RESULTS The number of target lesions according to RECIST 1.1 was significantly fewer than by RECIST 1.0 (median, 2 vs 4; p < 0.0001). At first imaging follow-up, the percentage change of the sums of the diameter measurements by RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 were highly concordant (R = 0.857; mean shrinkage, 12.1% by RECIST 1.1 vs 10.8% by RECIST 1.0). Best response assessment was highly concordant between the two criteria (weighted κ = 0.819). There was no evidence of a difference in TTP by the two criteria, with a median TTP of 8.9 months (95% CI for the median, 5.5–13.9) by RECIST 1.1 and 8.9 months (95% CI for the median, 5.8–13.6) by RECIST 1.0. The median TTP by RECIST 1.1 alone was 8.9 months compared with 5.6 months for RECIST 1.1 and morphologic changes combined. CONCLUSION RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 response assessments were overall highly concordant in patients with RCC treated with VEGF-targeted therapy, with fewer target lesions according to RECIST 1.1 but no difference in TTP. PMID:25714313

  16. Renal arteriography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Acute arterial occlusion - kidney Acute kidney failure Aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Blood clots Renal cell carcinoma Renal venogram X-ray Update Date 4/7/2014 Updated by: Jason ... Failure Kidney Tests X-Rays Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  17. Renal venogram

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008:chap 6. Rankin S. Renal parenchymal disease, including renal failure, renovascular disease and transportation. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, eds. Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 39. Read ... arteriography Renal vein thrombosis Tumor Venogram Wilms ...

  18. Phase II trial of doxorubicin/docetaxel/cyclophosphamide for locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer: results from NSABP trial BP-58.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roy E; Anderson, Stewart J; Brown, Ann; Scholnik, Aaron P; Desai, Ajit M; Kardinal, Carl G; Lembersky, Barry C; Mamounas, Eleftherios P

    2002-12-01

    Based on the recommended phase II doses for doxorubicin (60 mg/m2) and docetaxel (60 mg/m2) and the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project's (NSABP) experience with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2), we conducted a phase II trial at 18 institutions using doxorubicin/docetaxel/cyclophosphamide (ATC) given every 21 days, in preparation for a major adjuvant breast cancer study (NSABP B-30), in which ATC would be used. Eligibility requirements included measurable stage IIIB/IV breast cancer, performance status 0-2, normal left ventricular ejection fraction, and no prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease (nontaxane adjuvant chemotherapy was allowed if completed > 12 months before entry and if the cumulative dose of doxorubicin was =240 mg/m2). Eighty-nine patients were entered who ranged in age from 30-78 years (38.2% < 50 years; 61.8% =50 years). A total of 33.7% of patients had stage IIIB disease, and 66.3% had stage IV disease. Among the stage IV patients, 20.3% had received prior adjuvant chemotherapy. Dexamethasone premedication (8 mg p.o. b.i.d. for 3 days) and prophylactic ciprofloxacin (500 mg p.o. b.i.d. days 5-15) were used. Colony-stimulating growth factors were reserved for secondary prophylaxis after prolonged or febrile neutropenia (FN) or documented severe infection in a prior cycle. After a cumulative dose of doxorubicin 480 mg/m2, patients could continue with docetaxel/cyclophosphamide alone. Eighty-nine patients and 577 courses were evaluable for toxicity. Median time on study as of May 2002 was 36.5 months (range, 28-47 months). Febrile neutropenia occurred in 34 patients (38%); 8 developed FN in the absence of prior prophylactic growth factor support; 26 developed FN despite prior growth factor support (for one patient this information was unavailable). There were no septic deaths. One patient died from pulmonary embolism. Other grade 3/4 adverse events included: nausea (9%), vomiting (7%), stomatitis (6

  19. Treatment for metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bensouda, Y; Kaikani, W; Ahbeddou, N; Rahhali, R; Jabri, M; Mrabti, H; Boussen, H; Errihani, H

    2011-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a specific entity different from head and neck carcinoma. Incidence is higher in South-East Asia and North Africa. Prognosis, especially for locally advanced stages (IIB - IVB) and metastasis, remains poor: more than third of cases will present local and/or metastatic recurrence. Overall 5-year survival for all NPC stages ranges from 50% to 70%. The role of chemotherapy in metastasis is well established, and remains an important palliative treatment, although no randomized trial has been reported comparing the different chemotherapy regimens. As 1(st)-line treatment, platin-based regimens seems optimal; in 2(nd) line and after progression under platins, there is no consensus: monotherapy with drugs such as gemcitabine, capecitabine or taxanes has been the most widely tested, with acceptable results. Future trials should integrate targeted therapy, in the light of overexpression of EGFR1 and C-kit in NPC. The present study presents a review of the literature concerning the various studies of metastatic NPC. PMID:21177151

  20. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  1. Adrenalectomy for metastatic adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masafumi; Tamaki, Gaku; Okuyama, Mitsuhiko; Saga, Yuji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2007-11-01

    The indications for adrenalectomy in cases of metastatic adrenal tumor remain controversial. To clarify indications and outcomes of adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis, we performed a retrospective review of all 8 patients who underwent adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis between 1990 and 2006 in Asahikawa Medical College Hospital. The Primary tumor was renal cell carcinoma in 2 cases, and eccrine poro carcinoma, rectal cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, bladder cancer and cancer of unknown origin in 1 case each. Open adrenalectomy was performed in all cases, including 1 case that was converted from laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Of the 4 patients with solitary adrenal metastasis, 3 were considered tumor-free after adrenalectomy, while the remaining patient was not due to unresectable primary tumor. Of the 3 patients with complete resection, one remained alive as of 88 months after adrenalectomy but was then lost to follow-up, and the other 2 patients remain alive 12 and 7 months after adrenalectomy. Of the 2 patients with other resectable metastasis who were tumor-free after removal of all metastases, one was alive 31 months postoperatively and the other died 23 months after operation. The remaining 2 cases with other unresectable metastasis died within 6 months after adrenalectomy. At least in cases of solitary adrenal metastasis, adrenalectomy can be effective if other valid methods are unavailable. PMID:18051798

  2. Randomized Phase III Placebo-Controlled Trial of Letrozole Plus Oral Temsirolimus As First-Line Endocrine Therapy in Postmenopausal Women With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Lazar, Ann A.; Bondarenko, Igor; Garin, August M.; Brincat, Stephen; Chow, Louis; Sun, Yan; Neskovic-Konstantinovic, Zora; Guimaraes, Rodrigo C.; Fumoleau, Pierre; Chan, Arlene; Hachemi, Soulef; Strahs, Andrew; Cincotta, Maria; Berkenblit, Anna; Krygowski, Mizue; Kang, Lih Lisa; Moore, Laurence; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recent data showed improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) when adding everolimus to exemestane in patients with advanced breast cancer experiencing recurrence/progression after nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy. Here, we report clinical outcomes of combining the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor temsirolimus with letrozole in AI-naive patients. Patients and Methods This phase III randomized placebo-controlled study tested efficacy/safety of first-line oral letrozole 2.5 mg daily/temsirolimus 30 mg daily (5 days every 2 weeks) versus letrozole/placebo in 1,112 patients with AI-naive, hormone receptor–positive advanced disease. An independent data monitoring committee recommended study termination for futility at the second preplanned interim analysis (382 PFS events). Results Patients were balanced (median age, 63 years; 10% stage III, 40% had received adjuvant endocrine therapy). Those on letrozole/temsirolimus experienced more grade 3 to 4 events (37% v 24%). There was no overall improvement in primary end point PFS (median, 9 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.07; P = .25) nor in the 40% patient subset with prior adjuvant endocrine therapy. An exploratory analysis showed improved PFS favoring letrozole/temsirolimus in patients ≤ age 65 years (9.0 v 5.6 months; HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.93; P = .009), which was separately examined by an exploratory analysis of 5-month PFS using subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot methodology (P = .003). Conclusion Adding temsirolimus to letrozole did not improve PFS as first-line therapy in patients with AI-naive advanced breast cancer. Exploratory analyses of benefit in younger postmenopausal patients require external confirmation. PMID:23233719

  3. Chemotherapy in metastatic retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kingston, J E; Hungerford, J L; Plowman, P N

    1987-03-01

    Eleven children with metastatic retinoblastoma diagnosed during the period 1970-1984 were treated with chemotherapy. Short-term complete responses were observed in three children treated with a four-drug combination which included cisplatinum, and in one child treated with vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The median duration of survival of the 11 children receiving chemotherapy was nine months, whilst the median survival of 13 children with metastatic retinoblastoma who were not given chemotherapy was only 2.3 months (p = 0.06). This suggests that retinoblastoma is a chemosensitive tumour and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy may have a role in children with retinoblastoma who at diagnosis are thought to be at high risk of developing metastatic disease. PMID:3587892

  4. Long-Term Outcomes After Maximal Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Recurrent or Locoregionally Advanced Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Choo, Richard; Davis, Brian J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Leibovich, Bradley C.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of a multimodality therapy combining maximal surgical resection and intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) for patients with locoregionally (LR) recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy or LR advanced primary RCC. Methods and Materials: From 1989 through 2005, a total of 22 patients with LR recurrent (n = 19) or LR advanced primary (n = 3) RCC were treated with this multimodality approach. The median patient age was 63 years (range 46-78). Twenty-one patients (95%) received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 4,500 cGy (range, 4,140-5,500). Surgical resection was R0 (negative margins) in 5 patients (23%) and R1 (residual microscopic disease) in 17 patients (77%). The median IOERT dose delivered was 1,250 cGy (range, 1,000-2,000). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) and relapse patterns were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 9.9 years (range, 3.6-20 years). The OS and DFS at 1, 5, and 10 years were 91%, 40%, and 35% and 64%, 31%, and 31%, respectively. Central recurrence (within the IOERT field), LR relapse (tumor bed or regional lymph nodes), and distant metastases at 5 years were 9%, 27%, and 64%, respectively. Mortality within 30 days of surgery and IOERT was 0%. Five patients (23%) experienced acute or late National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTCAE) Version 4 Grade 3 to 5 toxicities. Conclusions: In patients with LR recurrent or LR advanced primary RCC, a multimodality approach of perioperative EBRT, maximal surgical resection, and IOERT yielded encouraging results. This regimen warrants further investigation.

  5. MicroRNA Expression Profiling of Peripheral Blood Samples Predicts Resistance to First-line Sunitinib in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients12

    PubMed Central

    Gámez-Pozo, Angelo; Antón-Aparicio, Luis M; Bayona, Cristina; Borrega, Pablo; Gallegos Sancho, María I; García-Domínguez, Rocío; de Portugal, Teresa; Ramos-Vázquez, Manuel; Pérez-Carrión, Ramón; Bolós, María V; Madero, Rosario; Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Fresno Vara, Juan A; Arranz, Enrique Espinosa

    2012-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy benefits many patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but there is still a need for predictive markers that help in selecting the best therapy for individual patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cancer cell behavior and may be attractive biomarkers for prognosis and prediction of response. Forty-four patients with RCC were recruited into this observational prospective study conducted in nine Spanish institutions. Peripheral blood samples were taken before initiation of therapy and 14 days later in patients receiving first-line therapy with sunitinib for advanced RCC. miRNA expression in peripheral blood was assessed using microarrays and L2 boosting was applied to filtered miRNA expression data. Several models predicting poor and prolonged response to sunitinib were constructed and evaluated by binary logistic regression. Blood samples from 38 patients and 287 miRNAs were evaluated. Twenty-eight miRNAs of the 287 were related to poor response and 23 of the 287 were related to prolonged response to sunitinib treatment. Predictive models identified populations with differences in the established end points. In the poor response group, median time to progression was 3.5 months and the overall survival was 8.5, whereas in the prolonged response group these values were 24 and 29.5 months, respectively. Ontology analyses pointed out to cancer-related pathways, such angiogenesis and apoptosis. miRNA expression signatures, measured in peripheral blood, may stratify patients with advanced RCC according to their response to first-line therapy with sunitinib, improving diagnostic accuracy. After proper validation, these signatures could be used to tailor therapy in this setting. PMID:23308047

  6. Effect of Advancing Age and Multiple Chronic Conditions on Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease after Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Placement

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswami, Ashok; Kiley, Mary-Lou; Anthony, Faith F; Chen, Yuexin; Chen, Jason; Rajagopal, Sumanth; Liu, Taylor I; Young, Charlie; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is insufficient information on the effect that advancing age and multiple chronic conditions (MCC) have on mortality after placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vs non-ESRD. Objective: To assess whether a differential effect of age and MCC exists between ESRD and non-ESRD. Design: Population-based, retrospective cohort study using data from the national Kaiser Permanente Cardiac Device Registry of patients who underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013. Main Outcome Measures: All-cause mortality. Results: Of 7825 patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement, ESRD-affected patients constituted 4.0% of the cohort (n = 311), were similar in age (p = 0.91), and presented with a larger comorbidity burden (3.3 ± 1.3 vs 2.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.001). The effect of advancing age (every 5 years) on mortality in the ESRD cohort (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03–1.20) was less than in the non-ESRD cohort (HR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.25–1.32). Similarly, the effect of each additional comorbidity in the ESRD cohort was less (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.91–1.19) than in the non-ESRD group (HR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.16–1.25). Lastly, ESRD was independently associated with a 3-fold greater hazard of mortality. Conclusions: Advancing age and increasing number of MCC have a differential effect on mortality risk in patients with ESRD compared with their non-ESRD counterparts. Future studies should focus on assessment of nonlinear relationships of age, MCC, and naturally occurring clusters of MCC on mortality. PMID:26562307

  7. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-11-11

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as 'exceptional responders' or as 'rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. PMID:25225904

  8. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as ‘exceptional responders' or as ‘rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients. PMID:25225904

  9. Intracardiac Metastatic Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Ho; Sung, Kiick; Kim, Wook Sung; Lee, Young Tak; Park, Pyo Won; Jeong, Dong Seop

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old man who visited Samsung Medical Center reported experiencing palpitation for 2 weeks. He had undergone excision of a mass in the right buttock due to rhabdomyosarcoma 7 years prior to this visit. Transesophageal echocardiography showed a pedunculated mass in the left ventricle, which was thought to be a vegetation of infective endocarditis, metastasis of the primary tumor, or thrombus. He underwent removal of the cardiac tumor, and the pathologic report was metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma. Thus, here, we report a rare case of metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma in the left ventricle. PMID:26665113

  10. Pathophysiology and management of progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Crowell, W A; Brown, C A; Barsanti, J A; Finco, D R

    1997-09-01

    Recently, the hypothesis that all renal diseases are inherently progressive and self-perpetuating has focused attention on adaptive changes in renal structure and function that occur whenever renal function is reduced. These glomerular adaptations to renal disease include increases in filtration rate, capillary pressure and size, and are referred to as glomerular hyperfiltration, glomerular hypertension and glomerular hypertrophy, respectively. Extrarenal changes, such as dietary phosphate excess, systemic hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, acidosis and hyperparathyroidism occur in animals with renal disease and may be contributors to progression of renal disease. Emphasis in the management of companion animals with renal disease has shifted to identifying, understanding and controlling those processes that play a role in the progression from early to end-stage renal failure. Advances made by veterinary nephrologists in the past 15 years permit resolution of old controversies, formulation of new hypotheses and discussion of unresolved issues about the nature of progressive renal disease in dogs and cats. PMID:9308397

  11. A study to describe the health trajectory of patients with advanced renal disease who choose not to receive dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kilshaw, Lindsey; Sammut, Hannah; Asher, Rebecca; Williams, Peter; Saxena, Rema; Howse, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background Some patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF) are unlikely to benefit from dialysis and conservative management (CM) is offered as a positive alternative. Understanding the trajectory of illness by health care professionals may improve end-of-life care. Methods We aimed to describe the trajectory of functional status within our CM population through a prospective, observational study using the objective Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and subjective Barthel Index (BI) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) [EuroQol 5D-5L (EQ-5D-5L)] measurements and correlating them with demographic and laboratory data and with sentinel events. Results There was a significant increase in TUG scores over the 6 months prior to death {2.24 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–4.32], P = 0.017} and a significant decrease in EQ-5D-5L [−0.19 (95% CI −0.33 to −0.06), P = 0.006]. The only significant associations with mortality were serum albumin [hazard ratio (HR) 0.81 (95% CI 0.67–0.97), P = 0.024] and male gender [HR 5.94 (95% CI 1.50–23.5), P = 0.011]. Conclusions We have shown there is a significant decline in functional status in the last 6 months before death in the CM population. Of interest, there was a significant relationship of lower serum albumin with functional decline and risk of death. We hope that with improved insight into disease trajectories we can improve our ability to identify and respond to the changes in needs of these patients, facilitate complex and sensitive end-of-life discussions and improve end-of-life care. PMID:27274835

  12. Dose-finding study of hepatic arterial infusion of irinotecan-based treatment in patients with advanced cancers metastatic to the liver

    PubMed Central

    Said, Rabih; Kurzrock, Razelle; Naing, Aung; Hong, David S.; Fu, Siqing; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Wheler, Jennifer J; Janku, Filip; Kee, Bryan K; Bidyasar, Savita; Lim, Joann; Wallace, Michael; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Liver metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. We investigated the use of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of irinotecan combination therapy in patients with liver metastases. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients with histologically confirmed advanced cancer with liver metastases that was refractory to standard therapy were eligible. A standard “3+3” phase I study design was used to determine the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Three cohorts were evaluated: HAI of irinotecan with systemic intravenous (IV) (a) bevacizumab, (b) oxaliplatin and bevacizumab, or (c) bevacizumab and cetuximab. RESULTS From October 2009 through December 2013, 98 patients with various tumor types were enrolled (median age, 62 years, range, 34–85; and median number of prior therapies, 4, range, 1–11). In cohorts A and C, dose escalation continued until the highest dose level—considered the MTD—was reached. In cohort B, dose escalation continued until dose level 3, and dose level 2 was considered the MTD. Rates of grade 3/4 adverse events were as follows: diarrhea, 8%; fatigue, 4%; neutropenia, 4%; thrombocytopenia, 2%; and skin rash, 2%. Seventy-seven patients were evaluable for response. Partial response was noted in 5 (6.5%) patients (neuroendocrine cancer, n=2; CRC, n=2; NSCLC, n=1); and stable disease ≥ 6 months in 17 (22.1%) patients (CRC, n=13; breast, n=1; neuroendocrine, n=1; NSCLC, n=1; pancreatic, n=1). CONCLUSIONS HAI irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab; oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab; or cetuximab plus bevacizumab was safe and may be a treatment option for selected patients with advanced cancer and liver involvement. PMID:25990659

  13. A Phase II Biomarker-Embedded Study of Lapatinib plus Capecitabine as First-line Therapy in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    LaBonte, Melissa J; Yang, Dongyun; Zhang, Wu; Wilson, Peter M; Nagarwala, Yasir M; Koch, Kevin M; Briner, Colleen; Kaneko, Tomomi; Rha, Sun-Young; Gladkov, Oleg; Urba, Susan G; Sakaeva, Dina; Pishvaian, Michael J; Hsieh, Ruey-Kuen; Lee, Wei-Ping; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2016-09-01

    An exploratory phase II biomarker-embedded trial (LPT109747; NCT00526669) designed to determine the association of lapatinib-induced fluoropyrimidine gene changes with efficacy of lapatinib plus capecitabine as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma independent of tumor HER2 status. Tumor biopsies obtained before and after 7-day lapatinib (1,250 mg) to analyze changes in gene expression, followed by a 14-day course of capecitabine (1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily, 14/21 days) plus lapatinib 1,250 mg daily. Blood samples were acquired for pharmacokinetic analysis. Primary clinical objectives were response rate (RR) and 5-month progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary objectives were overall survival (OS), PFS, time to response, duration of response, toxicity, and identification of associations between lapatinib pharmacokinetics and biomarker endpoints. Primary biomarker objectives were modulation of 5-FU-pathway genes by lapatinib, effects of germline SNPs on treatment outcome, and trough steady-state plasma lapatinib concentrations. Sixty-eight patients were enrolled; (75% gastric cancer, 25% gastroesophageal junction). Twelve patients (17.9%) had confirmed partial response, 31 (46.3%) had stable disease, and 16 (23.9%) had progressive disease. Median PFS and OS were 3.3 and 6.3 months, respectively. Frequent adverse events included diarrhea (45%), decreased appetite (39%), nausea (36%), and fatigue (36%). Lapatinib induced no changes in gene expression from baseline and no significant associations were found for SNPs analyzed. Elevated baseline HER3 mRNA expression was associated with a higher RR (33% vs. 0%; P = 0.008). Lapatinib plus capecitabine was well tolerated, demonstrating modest antitumor activity in patients with advanced gastric cancer. The association of elevated HER3 and RR warrants further investigation as an important player for HER-targeted regimens in combination with capecitabine. Mol Cancer Ther

  14. Treatment patterns and clinical outcomes in patients with renal cell carcinoma in the UK: insights from the RECCORD registry

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, J.; Jones, R.; Hawkins, R.; Porfiri, E.; Pickering, L.; Bahl, A.; Brown, J.; Buchan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the RECCORD registry was to gather real-world UK data on the use of targeted therapies in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and assess clinical outcomes. Here, demographic and outcome data are presented with the treatment patterns and demographic profile of patients on the registry. Patients and methods Patients were retrospectively identified at seven UK hospitals with large cancer centres in England (5), Scotland (1) and Wales (1). Anonymised data were collected through an online registry covering demographics, treatments and outcomes. Five hundred and fourteen UK adult patients with metastatic RCC were included in the study for analysis. Patients were included if they were treated for metastatic RCC at one of the seven centres, and started systemic anti-cancer treatment from March 2009 to November 2012 inclusive. In addition to demographic factors, the principal outcome measures were overall survival (OS), time to disease progression and toxicity. Results The majority of first-line treatment was with sunitinib; first-line use of pazopanib increased as the study progressed. 15.8% of patients received second-line treatment, half of whom were prescribed everolimus. Median OS (from initiation of first-line treatment) was 23.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 18.6–29.1 months), similar to that reported for clinical trials of targeted RCC therapies [Ljungberg B, Campbell SC, Choi HY et al. The epidemiology of renal cell carcinoma. Eur Urol 2011; 60: 615–621; Abe H, Kamai T. Recent advances in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Int J Urol 2013; 20: 944–955; Motzer RJ, Hutson TE, Tomczak P et al. Overall survival and updated results for sunitinib compared with interferon alfa in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. J Clin Oncol 2009; 27: 3584–3590]. OS was significantly longer for those who received second-line treatment after disease progression (33.0 months; 95% CI 30.8–35.2 months) than those who did not (20

  15. A randomised, phase II study of nintedanib or sunitinib in previously untreated patients with advanced renal cell cancer: 3-year results

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, T; Loembé, A-B; Shparyk, Y; MacLeod, N; Jones, R J; Mazurkiewicz, M; Temple, G; Dressler, H; Bondarenko, I

    2015-01-01

    Background: This exploratory study evaluated the safety/efficacy of nintedanib or sunitinib as first-line therapy in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Ninety-six patients were randomised (2:1) to either nintedanib (200 mg twice daily) or sunitinib (50 mg kg−1 once daily (4 weeks on treatment; 2 weeks off)). Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) at 9 months. P-values reported are descriptive only; the study was not powered for such comparisons. Results: Progression-free survival at 9 months was comparable between nintedanib and sunitinib (43.1% vs 45.2%, respectively; P=0.85). Median PFS was 8.4 months in each group (hazard ratio (HR), 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.70–1.80; P=0.64). Median overall survival was 20.4 and 21.2 months for nintedanib and sunitinib, respectively (HR, 0.92; 95% CI: 0.54–1.56; P=0.76). Overall incidence of any grade adverse events (AEs) was comparable (90.6% vs 93.8%); AEs grade ⩾3 were lower with nintedanib than sunitinib (48.4% vs 59.4%). Nintedanib was associated with lower incidences of some AEs typical of antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs): hypertension, hypothyroidism, hand–foot syndrome, cardiac disorders and haematological abnormalities. Conclusions: In patients with advanced RCC, nintedanib has promising efficacy and similar tolerability to sunitinib, and a manageable safety profile with fewer TKI-associated AEs. PMID:26448178

  16. SAFETY AND ACTIVITY OF TEMSIROLIMUS AND BEVACIZUMAB IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED RENAL CELL CARCINOMA PREVIOUSLY TREATED WITH TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS: A PHASE 2 CONSORTIUM STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Merchan, Jaime R.; Qin, Rui; Pitot, Henry; Picus, Joel; Liu, Glenn; Fitch, Tom; Maples, William J.; Flynn, Patrick J.; Fruth, Briant F.; Erlichman, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bevacizumab or Temsirolimus regimens have clinical activity in the first line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). This phase I/II trial was conducted to determine the safety of combining both agents and its efficacy in RCC patients who progressed on at least one prior anti-VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (RTKI) agent. Methods In the phase I portion, eligible patients were treated with Temsirolimus (25 mg IV weekly) and escalating doses of IV Bevacizumab (level 1=5mg/kg; level 2=10 mg/kg) every other week. The primary endpoint for the phase II portion (RTKI resistant patients) was the 6-month progression free rate. Secondary endpoints were response rate, toxicity evaluation, PFS and OS. Results MTD was not reached at the maximum dose administered in 12 phase I patients. Forty evaluable patients were treated with the phase II recommended dose (Temsirolimus 25 mg IV weekly and Bevacizumab 10 mg/kg IV every two weeks). The 6-month progression free rate was 40% (16/40 pts). Median PFS was 5.9 (4-7.8) months, and median OS was 20.6 (11.5-23.7) months. Partial response/stable/progressive disease were seen in 23%/63%/14% of patients. Most common grade 3-4 AEs included fatigue (17.8%), hypertriglyceridemia (11.1%), stomatitis (8.9%), proteinuria (8.9%), abdominal pain (6.7%), and anemia (6.7%). Baseline levels of serum sFLT-1 and VEGF-A were inversely correlated with PFS and OS, respectively. Conclusions Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab is a feasible combination in patients with advanced RCC previously exposed to oral anti-VEGF agents. The safety and efficacy results warrant further confirmatory studies in this patient population. PMID:25556030

  17. A first-in-human phase I trial of LY2780301, a dual p70 S6 kinase and Akt Inhibitor, in patients with advanced or metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Azaro, Analia; Rodon, Jordi; Calles, Antonio; Braña, Irene; Hidalgo, Manuel; Lopez-Casas, Pedro P; Munoz, Manuel; Westwood, Paul; Miller, Joel; Moser, Brian A; Ohnmacht, Ute; Bumgardner, William; Benhadji, Karim A; Calvo, Emiliano

    2015-06-01

    The primary objective of this phase I study of LY2780301, a dual p70 S6 kinase and Akt inhibitor, was to determine the recommended phase II dose as a single agent in patients with advanced cancer. Secondary objectives included safety, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic analyses, and co-clinical analyses in Avatar models. Eligible patients received total daily doses of LY2780301 100-500 mg, given orally as a single dose or divided into 2 doses for 28-day cycles. Dose escalation followed 3 + 3 design. The primary pharmacodynamic endpoint was inhibition of S6 assessed by skin and tumor biopsy. Thirty-two patients were treated. Common toxicities possibly related to treatment included constipation (19 %), fatigue (13 %), nausea (9 %), and diarrhea (9 %). Grade 3/4 toxicities potentially related to treatment were anemia (n = 2), increased alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase (ALT) (n = 1), and increased gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) (n = 1). One patient experienced best overall response of prolonged stable disease for 6 cycles. Plasma exposures of LY2780301 exceeded predicted efficacious exposures, but were not dose proportional. Among patients receiving 500 mg daily >50 % exhibited reduced S6 in skin biopsies at Day 8 of treatment, but the effect was not maintained. Plasma concentrations of LY2780301 and/or its metabolites were not correlated with S6 expression in the epidermis. There was minimal antitumor activity against the model, CRC 019. Avatar models showed minimal pharmacodynamic effects consistent with the observed antitumor effects. This study suggests a dose of LY2780301 500 mg QD for future studies. PMID:25902900

  18. Metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma to the prostate presenting with bilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Evan S; Hyams, Elias S; Dulabon, Lori; Shah, Ojas

    2010-02-01

    Carcinoma metastatic to the prostate occurs rarely and is most commonly associated with malignant bladder neoplasms. We present the case of a 73-year-old male with a history of gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma and clinically symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia who underwent photoselective vaporization of the prostate and presented several months later with gross hematuria, intermittent urinary retention and bilateral ureteral obstruction causing acute renal failure. After relieving the ureteral obstruction, subsequent transurethral resection of the prostate revealed locally invasive metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of metastatic gastroesophageal carcinoma to the prostate. PMID:20156389

  19. Lack of a pharmacokinetic interaction between trastuzumab and carboplatin in the presence of docetaxel: results from a phase Ib study in patients with HER2-positive metastatic or locally advanced inoperable solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Stephen; Gordon, Michael S; Redfern, Charles H; Trudeau, Caroline; Xu, Na; Han, Kelong; Lum, Bert L

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential for a pharmacokinetic (PK) drug-drug interaction (DDI) between trastuzumab and carboplatin and to evaluate the potential effect of trastuzumab on the electrocardiogram QT interval. Here, we report the results of the PK DDI assessment and an interim safety analysis. Patients with metastatic or locally advanced, inoperable, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive cancer received docetaxel and carboplatin on cycle 1, day 1 and then on day 1 of each subsequent 3-weekly treatment cycle. Trastuzumab was administered by intravenous infusion, with an accelerated loading dose on cycle 1, day 2 and cycle 1, day 8, and then a maintenance dose on day 1 of each subsequent 3-weekly treatment cycle. Blood was collected at various time points to assess free (unbound) plasma carboplatin and serum trastuzumab PK. The study enrolled 59 patients. Carboplatin concentrations in the presence and absence of trastuzumab were similar, as demonstrated by the geometric mean ratios for PK parameters, which were close to 1.0 (no effect). The observed trastuzumab concentrations were similar to the values predicted by population PK modelling on the basis of a prediction-corrected visual predictive check, computed using the actual sampling time. In this interim safety analysis, 84.5% of patients had experienced adverse events of grade three or higher, the most common of which were hematologic and as expected. The results suggest that there is no clinically relevant PK DDI between carboplatin and trastuzumab. The safety profile of trastuzumab plus carboplatin and docetaxel was consistent with the known safety profile of this combination. PMID:25643049

  20. Hepatic metastatic disease in pediatric and adolescent solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Sandoval, John A; Davidoff, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The management of hepatic metastatic disease from solid tumors in adults has been extensively described and resection of metastatic liver lesions from colorectal adenocarcinoma, renal adenocarcinoma, breast cancer, testicular cancer, and neuroendocrine tumors (NET) have demonstrated therapeutic benefits in select patients. However, there are few reports in the literature on the management of hepatic metastatic disease in the pediatric and adolescent populations and the effectiveness of hepatic metastasectomy. This may be due to the much lower incidence of pediatric malignancies and the higher chemosensitivity of childhood tumors which make hepatic metastasectomy less likely to be required. We review liver involvement with metastatic disease from the main pediatric solid tumors, including neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor focusing on the management and treatment options. We also review other solid malignant tumors which may have liver metastases including germ cell tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, osteosarcoma, desmoplastic small round cell tumors and NET. However, these histological subtypes are so rare in the pediatric and adolescent populations that the exact incidence and best management of hepatic metastatic disease are unknown and can only be extrapolated from adult series. PMID:26207162

  1. Upfront Chemotherapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lam, Elaine T; Flaig, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the standard initial treatment for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC), with chemotherapy utilized in the castration-resistant setting. Data reported from three recent clinical trials shed new light on the role of upfront docetaxel in advanced or mHSPC. Two of these studies-CHAARTED and STAMPEDE-showed significant improvement in overall survival, while the third study, GETUG-AFU 15, showed no statistical difference. The CHAARTED study showed a 13.6-month survival improvement and the STAMPEDE study showed a 10-month survival improvement with ADT plus docetaxel, compared with ADT alone, in the hormone-sensitive setting. These numbers are remarkable when compared with the 2.9-month survival benefit from docetaxel in the metastatic castration-resistant setting, which has been the standard setting for the use of docetaxel in advanced prostate cancer. In this review, we describe the historical data for chemotherapy in the perioperative and metastatic prostate cancer settings, and the recent trials that are changing the paradigm in support of docetaxel in the upfront setting. PMID:26676900

  2. Current evidence and the evolving role of sunitinib in the management of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Noronha, V; Joshi, A; Bakshi, G; Tongaonkar, H; Prabhash, K

    2016-01-01

    The development of targeted agents has expanded the anticancer arsenal available to oncologists and revolutionized the field of cancer treatment. In patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), small molecule targeted therapies have improved clinical outcomes compared with cytokine-based treatments. Sunitinib malate is one such drug that has demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This oral, multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor is approved for use in multiple countries for the treatment of advanced RCC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients who have progressed on imatinib therapy. In patients with advanced RCC, sunitinib significantly improves clinical outcomes with a favorable safety profile compared with conventional treatment with interferon-a. The clinically proven treatment and safety outcomes have led investigators to evaluate the merits of sunitinib therapy in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting in patients with mRCC. In the neoadjuvant setting, preliminary data suggest that sunitinib can effectively reduce the primary tumor and facilitate surgical resection in patients with locally advanced and mRCC. Post-operative complications were observed in some patients, but the overall safety profile and efficacy suggests that mRCC patients with surgically inoperable tumors may benefit from neoadjuvant sunitinib therapy. Ongoing clinical trials should provide insight into the value of sunitinib as adjuvant therapy. PMID:27146754

  3. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buti, Sebastiano; Bersanelli, Melissa; Donini, Maddalena; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC. PMID:25992216

  4. Obesity and Outcomes in Patients with Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Leiter, Amanda; Doucette, John; Krege, Susan; Lin, Chia-Chia; Hahn, Noah; Ecke, Thorsten; Sonpavde, Guru; Bamias, Aristotle; Oh, William K.; Galsky, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity has been associated with worse outcomes in patients with clinically localized urothelial cancer. However, this impact has not been evaluated in metastatic disease. Objective: To assess the impact of obesity on outcomes of patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. Methods: Data from 537 patients were aggregated from eight phase II and phase III clinical trials investigating first-line cisplatin-based combination therapy in metastatic urothelial cancer. Chemotherapy regimen, adverse events, treatment response, and survival outcomes were compared across body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA) categories. Results: BMI was classified according to WHO criteria (<18.5 underweight, 18.5–24.99 normal weight, 25–29.99 overweight, >30 obese). BSA was classified as either below or greater than or equal to (average for this cohort (1.87 m2 for males and 1.66 m2 for females). There was no significant difference in number of chemotherapy cycles, adverse events, and response rate or survival outcomes (overall and progression-free) across BMI and BSA categories. There was no significant difference in adverse events across BMI categories, but the incidences of embolic events and renal failure were higher in patients with an average or higher BSA than those with a lower than average BSA (6.6% vs. 3.1% for renal failure p = 0.06; 5.9% vs. 2.7% for renal failure, p = 0.07). There was no significant difference in response rate or survival outcomes (overall and progression-free) amongst BMI and BSA categories. Conclusions: Obese patients with metastatic urothelial cancer on cisplatin-based therapies have similar response rates, survival outcomes, and tolerability of cisplatin-based therapy to non-obese patients. PMID:27500201

  5. Metastatic carcinoma of the long bones.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Anthony I; Wodajo, Felasfa M; Malawer, Martin

    2007-11-15

    Breast, prostate, renal, thyroid, and lung carcinomas commonly metastasize to bone. Managing skeletal metastatic disease can be complex. Pain is the most common presenting symptom and requires thorough radiographic and laboratory evaluation. If plain-film radiography is not sufficient for diagnosis, a bone scan may detect occult lesions. Patients with lytic skeletal metastases may be at risk for impending fracture. Destructive lesions in the proximal femur and hip area are particularly worrisome. High-risk patients require immediate referral to an orthopedic surgeon. Patients who are not at risk for impending fracture can be treated with a combination of radiotherapy and adjuvant drug therapy. Bisphosphonates diminish pain and prolong the time to significant skeletal complications. PMID:18052014

  6. Sorafenib and sunitinib: novel targeted therapies for renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Grandinetti, Cheryl A; Goldspiel, Barry R

    2007-08-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is a relatively uncommon malignancy, with 51,190 cases expected to be diagnosed in 2007. Localized disease is curable by surgery; however, locally advanced or metastatic disease is not curable in most cases and, until recently, had a limited response to drug treatment. Historically, biologic response modifiers or immunomodulating agents were tested in clinical trials based on observations that some cases of RCC can spontaneously regress. High-dose aldesleukin is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for advanced RCC; however, the drug is associated with a high frequency of severe adverse effects. Responses have been observed with low-dose aldesleukin and interferon alfa, but with little effect on overall survival. Sorafenib and sunitinib are novel therapies that target growth factor receptors known to be activated by the hypoxia-inducible factor and the Ras-Raf/MEK/ERK pathways. These pathways are important in the pathophysiology of RCC. Sorafenib and sunitinib have shown antitumor activity as first- and second-line therapy in patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic RCC who have clear-cell histology. Although complete responses are not common, both drugs promote disease stabilization and increase progression-free survival. This information suggests that disease stabilization may be an important determinant for response in RCC and possibly other cancers. Sorafenib and sunitinib are generally well tolerated and are considered first- and second-line treatment options for patients with advanced clear cell RCC. In addition, sorafenib and sunitinib have shown promising results in initial clinical trials evaluating antitumor activity in patients who are refractory to other antiangiogenic therapy. The most common toxicities with both sorafenib and sunitinib are hand-foot syndrome, rash, fatigue, hypertension, and diarrhea. Research is directed toward defining the optimal use of these new agents. PMID:17655513

  7. Phase IB study of doxorubicin in combination with the multidrug resistance reversing agent S9788 in advanced colorectal and renal cell cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Punt, C. J.; Voest, E. E.; Tueni, E.; Van Oosterom, A. T.; Backx, A.; De Mulder, P. H.; Hecquet, B.; Lucas, C.; Gerard, B.; Bleiberg, H.

    1997-01-01

    S9788 is a new triazineaminopiperidine derivate capable of reversing multidrug resistance (MDR) in cells resistant to chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin. It does not belong to a known class of MDR revertants, but its action involves the binding of P-glycoprotein. Thirty-eight evaluable patients with advanced colorectal or renal cell cancer were treated with doxorubicin alone (16 patients) followed after disease progression with combination treatment of doxorubicin plus S9788 (12 patients) or upfront with the combination of doxorubicin plus S9788 (22 patients). S9788 was given i.v. as a loading dose of 56 mg m-2 over 30 min followed by doxorubicin given at 50 mg m-2 as a bolus infusion. Thereafter, a 2-h infusion of S9788 was administered at escalating doses ranging from 24 to 120 mg m-2 in subsequent cohorts of 4-10 patients. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that concentrations of S9788 that are known to reverse MDR in vitro were achieved in patients at non-toxic doses. Compared with treatment with doxorubicin alone, treatment with the combination of doxorubicin and S9788 produced a significant increase in the occurrence of WHO grade 3-4 granulocytopenia. Treatment with S9788 was cardiotoxic as it caused a dose-dependent and reversible increase in corrected QT intervals as well as clinically non-significant arrhythmias on 24- or 48-h Holter recordings. Although clinically relevant cardiac toxicities did not occur, the study was terminated as higher doses of S9788 may increase the risk of severe cardiac arrhythmias. Twenty-nine patients treated with S9788 plus doxorubicin were evaluable for response, and one patient, who progressed after treatment with doxorubicin alone, achieved a partial response. We conclude that S9788 administered at the doses and schedule used in this study results in relevant plasma concentrations in humans and can safely be administered in combination with doxorubicin. PMID:9374386

  8. Renal disease and chronic renal failure in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J J; Wilson, M H; McArdle, N S; Stassen, L F A

    2008-01-01

    Patients with renal diseases are increasingly common in dental practice. This is due to advances in medicine, and the increasing life expectancy of western populations. Chronic renal failure is a serious condition that general dental practitioners may see in their practice. This article discusses the functions of the kidney, and the causes and medical management of chronic renal failure, as well as considerations in the dental management of these patients. Common complications such as infection and bleeding are discussed. General recommendations are made, based on current evidence with respect to prescribing of medications. PMID:18986093

  9. [Panitumumab-treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Pikó, Béla

    2009-06-01

    In the molecular target treatment strategy of metastatic colorectal cancer patients panitumumab represents a new class of drugs due to its fully human nature, and no need for premedication and loading dose. Panitumumab binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) selectively. In registration pivotal studies the analysis of patient subgroups for KRAS status gives strong evidence for the important role of RAS oncogene: median progression-free survival was 16 weeks on panitumumab arm in KRAS wild-type patients (8 weeks in best supportive care), while in KRAS mutant patients panitumumab showed no efficacy, however adverse events were more frequent and severe. According to SmPC, panitumumab is indicated as monotherapy for the treatment of patients with EGFR expressing metastatic colorectal carcinoma with non-mutated (wild-type) KRAS after failure of fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin- , and irinotecan-containing chemotherapy regimens. Adverse events are similar as with other EGFR inhibitors: skin symptoms (rash), lung infiltrates, diarrhoea, ion abnormalities of renal origin. The drug was formerly available via named patient reimbursement, and now is financed by diagnosis-related group (DRG) system. PMID:19581179

  10. [Renal elastography].

    PubMed

    Correas, Jean-Michel; Anglicheau, Dany; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-04-01

    Renal elastography has become available with the development of noninvasive quantitative techniques (including shear-wave elastography), following the rapidly growing field of diagnosis and quantification of liver fibrosis, which has a demonstrated major clinical impact. Ultrasound or even magnetic resonance techniques are leaving the pure research area to reach the routine clinical use. With the increased incidence of chronic kidney disease and its specific morbidity and mortality, the noninvasive diagnosis of renal fibrosis can be of critical value. However, it is difficult to simply extend the application from one organ to the other due to a large number of anatomical and technical issues. Indeed, the kidney exhibits various features that make stiffness assessment more complex, such as the presence of various tissue types (cortex, medulla), high spatial orientation (anisotropy), local blood flow, fatty sinus with variable volume and echotexture, perirenal space with variable fatty content, and the variable depth of the organ. Furthermore, the stiffness changes of the renal parenchyma are not exclusively related to fibrosis, as renal perfusion or hydronephrosis will impact the local elasticity. Renal elastography might be able to diagnose acute or chronic obstruction, or to renal tumor or pseudotumor characterization. Today, renal elastography appears as a promising application that still requires optimization and validation, which is the contrary for liver stiffness assessment. PMID:26976058

  11. Renal tumors: diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Puay Hoon; Cheng, Liang; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Merino, Maria J; Netto, George; Reuter, Victor E; Shen, Steven S; Grignon, David J; Montironi, Rodolfo; Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Moch, Holger

    2013-10-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology convened a consensus conference on renal cancer, preceded by an online survey, to address issues relating to the diagnosis and reporting of renal neoplasia. In this report, the role of biomarkers in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of renal tumors is addressed. In particular we focused upon the use of immunohistochemical markers and the approach to specific differential diagnostic scenarios. We enquired whether cytogenetic and molecular tools were applied in practice and asked for views on the perceived prognostic role of biomarkers. Both the survey and conference voting results demonstrated a high degree of consensus in participants' responses regarding prognostic/predictive markers and molecular techniques, whereas it was apparent that biomarkers for these purposes remained outside the diagnostic realm pending clinical validation. Although no individual antibody or panel of antibodies reached consensus for classifying renal tumors, or for confirming renal metastatic disease, it was noted from the online survey that 87% of respondents used immunohistochemistry to subtype renal tumors sometimes or occasionally, and a majority (87%) used immunohistochemical markers (Pax 2 or Pax 8, renal cell carcinoma [RCC] marker, panel of pan-CK, CK7, vimentin, and CD10) in confirming the diagnosis of metastatic RCC. There was consensus that immunohistochemistry should be used for histologic subtyping and applied before reaching a diagnosis of unclassified RCC. At the conference, there was consensus that TFE3 and TFEB analysis ought to be requested when RCC was diagnosed in a young patient or when histologic appearances were suggestive of the translocation subtype; whereas Pax 2 and/or Pax 8 were considered to be the most useful markers in the diagnosis of a renal primary. PMID:24025522

  12. Evolving Immunotherapy Approaches for Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Susanna A; Cohen, Justine V; Kluger, Harriet M

    2016-09-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) continues to be associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is typically resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapy, and while targeted therapies have activity and prolong progression-free and overall survival, responses are usually not durable. Modulating the immune system with cytokine therapy, vaccine therapy, cell therapy, and checkpoint inhibitors offers hope of prolonged survival. Standard and emerging immune therapy approaches and combinations of immune therapies and other modalities are reviewed. PMID:27475806

  13. Computational Modelling of Metastasis Development in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baratchart, Etienne; Benzekry, Sébastien; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Colin, Thierry; Cooley, Lindsay S.; Pineau, Raphäel; Ribot, Emeline J; Saut, Olivier; Souleyreau, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    The biology of the metastatic colonization process remains a poorly understood phenomenon. To improve our knowledge of its dynamics, we conducted a modelling study based on multi-modal data from an orthotopic murine experimental system of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The standard theory of metastatic colonization usually assumes that secondary tumours, once established at a distant site, grow independently from each other and from the primary tumour. Using a mathematical model that translates this assumption into equations, we challenged this theory against our data that included: 1) dynamics of primary tumour cells in the kidney and metastatic cells in the lungs, retrieved by green fluorescent protein tracking, and 2) magnetic resonance images (MRI) informing on the number and size of macroscopic lesions. Critically, when calibrated on the growth of the primary tumour and total metastatic burden, the predicted theoretical size distributions were not in agreement with the MRI observations. Moreover, tumour expansion only based on proliferation was not able to explain the volume increase of the metastatic lesions. These findings strongly suggested rejection of the standard theory, demonstrating that the time development of the size distribution of metastases could not be explained by independent growth of metastatic foci. This led us to investigate the effect of spatial interactions between merging metastatic tumours on the dynamics of the global metastatic burden. We derived a mathematical model of spatial tumour growth, confronted it with experimental data of single metastatic tumour growth, and used it to provide insights on the dynamics of multiple tumours growing in close vicinity. Together, our results have implications for theories of the metastatic process and suggest that global dynamics of metastasis development is dependent on spatial interactions between metastatic lesions. PMID:26599078

  14. Health-related quality of life in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer treated with eribulin mesylate or capecitabine in an open-label randomized phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Javier; Hudgens, Stacie; Twelves, Chris; Perez, Edith A; Awada, Ahmad; Yelle, Louise; McCutcheon, Susan; Kaufman, Peter A; Forsythe, Anna; Velikova, Galina

    2015-12-01

    The clinical benefit of eribulin versus capecitabine was evaluated using health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data from a phase 3 randomized trial in patients with pretreated advanced/metastatic breast cancer (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00337103). The study population has been described previously (Kaufman et al. in J Clin Oncol 33:594-601, 2015). Eligible patients received eribulin (1.4 mg/m(2) intravenously on days 1 and 8) or capecitabine (1.25 g/m(2) orally twice daily on days 1-14) per 21-day cycles. HRQoL was assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality-of-life Questionnaire-Core 30 questions (QLQ-C30) and breast module-23 questions (QLQ-BR23), administered at baseline through 24 months, until disease progression or other antitumor treatment initiation. Minimally important difference (MID) and time to symptom worsening (TSW) were investigated. 1062 (96.4 %) Patients completed the EORTC questionnaire at baseline; overall, compliance was ≥80 %. Patients receiving capecitabine versus eribulin had significantly worse symptoms (higher scores) for nausea/vomiting (MID 8; P < 0.05) and diarrhea (MID 7; P < 0.05). Treatment with eribulin versus capecitabine, led to worse systemic therapy side-effects (dry mouth, different tastes, irritated eyes, feeling ill, hot flushes, headaches, and hair loss; MID 10; P < 0.01). Clinically meaningful worsening was observed for future perspective (MID 10; P < 0.05) with capecitabine and for systemic therapy side-effects scale (MID 10; P < 0.01) with eribulin. Patients receiving capecitabine experienced more-rapid deterioration in body image (by 2.9 months) and future perspective (by 1.4 months; P < 0.05) compared with those on eribulin; the opposite was observed for systemic side-effects where patients receiving eribulin experienced more-rapid deterioration than those receiving capecitabine (by 2 months; P < 0.05). Eribulin and capecitabine were found to have similar

  15. Trastuzumab Emtansine for Treating HER2-Positive, Unresectable, Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer After Treatment with Trastuzumab and a Taxane: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Squires, Hazel; Stevenson, Matt; Simpson, Emma; Harvey, Rebecca; Stevens, John

    2016-07-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) (Kadcyla(®); Roche) to submit evidence of its clinical and cost-effectiveness for treating human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive, unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer after treatment with trastuzumab and a taxane. The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group (ScHARR-TAG) at the University of Sheffield were the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG) who produced a critical review of the company's submission to NICE. The ERG also independently searched for relevant evidence and modified the submitted decision analytic model to produce a revised estimate of cost-effectiveness and examine the impact of altering some of the key assumptions. The clinical effectiveness data were taken from two randomised controlled trials that reported a significant advantage in progression-free survival (PFS) for T-DM1 over lapatinib in combination with capecitabine (EMILIA trial), and over the treatment of physician's choice (TH3RESA trial). A network meta-analysis suggested T-DM1 was the best treatment in terms of both overall survival and PFS compared with lapatinib in combination with capecitabine; trastuzumab in combination with capecitabine; and capecitabine monotherapy. Adverse event (AE) data were taken from a pooled analysis of additional trials of T-DM1 as a single agent. The most common grade 3 or greater AEs for T-DM1 were thrombocytopenia and hepatotoxicity. Following the clarification process, the manufacturer reported a deterministic incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for T-DM1 compared with lapatinib in combination with capecitabine of £167,236, the latter of which was estimated to have an ICER of £49,798 compared with capecitabine monotherapy. The ERG produced similar values of £166,429 and £50,620 respectively. All other comparators were dominated. During the appraisal, the

  16. Origins of Metastatic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Vanharanta, Sakari; Massagué, Joan

    2014-01-01

    How cancer cells acquire the competence to colonize distant organs remains a central question in cancer biology. Tumors can release large numbers of cancer cells into the circulation, but only a small proportion of these cells survive on infiltrating distant organs and even fewer form clinically meaningful metastases. During the past decade, many predictive gene signatures and specific mediators of metastasis have been identified, yet how cancer cells acquire these traits has remained obscure. Recent experimental work and high-resolution sequencing of human tissues have started to reveal the molecular and tumor evolutionary principles that underlie the emergence of metastatic traits. PMID:24135279

  17. Mipsagargin, a novel thapsigargin-based PSMA-activated prodrug: results of a first-in-man phase I clinical trial in patients with refractory, advanced or metastatic solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, D; Wilding, G; Denmeade, S; Sarantopoulas, J; Cosgrove, D; Cetnar, J; Azad, N; Bruce, J; Kurman, M; Allgood, V E; Carducci, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mipsagargin (G-202; (8-O-(12-aminododecanoyl)-8-O-debutanoyl thapsigargin)-Asp-γ-Glu-γ-Glu-γ-GluGluOH)) is a novel thapsigargin-based targeted prodrug that is activated by PSMA-mediated cleavage of an inert masking peptide. The active moiety is an inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump protein that is necessary for cellular viability. We evaluated the safety of mipsagargin in patients with advanced solid tumours and established a recommended phase II dosing (RP2D) regimen. Methods: Patients with advanced solid tumours received mipsagargin by intravenous infusion on days 1, 2 and 3 of 28-day cycles and were allowed to continue participation in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The dosing began at 1.2 mg m−2 and was escalated using a modified Fibonacci schema to determine maximally tolerated dose (MTD) with an expansion cohort at the RP2D. Plasma was analysed for mipsagargin pharmacokinetics and response was assessed using RECIST criteria. Results: A total of 44 patients were treated at doses ranging from 1.2 to 88 mg m−2, including 28 patients in the dose escalation phase and 16 patients in an expansion cohort. One dose-limiting toxicity (DLT; Grade 3 rash) was observed in the dose escalation portion of the study. At 88 mg m−2, observations of Grade 2 infusion-related reaction (IRR, 2 patients) and Grade 2 creatinine elevation (1 patient) led to declaration of 66.8 mg m−2 as the recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Across the study, the most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were fatigue, rash, nausea, pyrexia and IRR. Two patients developed treatment-related Grade 3 acute renal failure that was reversible during the treatment-free portion of the cycle. To help ameliorate the IRR and creatinine elevations, a RP2D of 40 mg m−2 on day 1 and 66.8 mg m−2 on days 2 and 3 with prophylactic premedications and hydration on each

  18. Phase Ib, Dose Escalation Study of Oral LDE225 in Combination With BKM120 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Dose Escalation; Safety; Preliminary Efficacy; Advanced Solid Tumors; Metastatic Breast Cancer; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Colorectal Cancer; Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme; Gastric Cancer; Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer; Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Hormone Receptor Positive (ER+/PR+, and Her2-) Metastatic Breast Cancer

  19. Therapy for metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Massironi, Sara; Conte, Dario; Peracchi, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are frequently malignant (50-80%, except for insulinoma) and may show an aggressive course with metastases to the liver as well as more distant sites. These heterogeneous neoplasms include functioning tumors, which secrete a variety of peptide hormones, and non-functioning tumors (up to 90% of pNETs), which often show metastases at the time of diagnosis. Methods A PubMed search was performed for English-language publications from 1995 through December 2012. Reference lists from studies selected were manually searched to identify further relevant reports. Manuscripts comparing different therapeutic options and advances for metastatic pNETs were selected. Results The therapeutic options for metastatic pNETs are expanding and include surgery, which remains the only curative approach, liver-directed therapies, and medical therapy. In selected cases also liver transplantation (OLT) may be considered. The option of OLT for metastatic disease is unique to neuroendocrine tumors. Recently, novel promising targeted therapies have been proposed for progressive well-differentiated pNETs. Conclusions The best therapeutic approach for pNETs is still matter of debating. However, since pNETs often show a more indolent behavior compared to other malignancies, the preservation of the quality of life of the patient and the personalization of the therapy according to tumor’s and patient’s features are mandatory. PMID:25332984

  20. PD-1 as an emerging therapeutic target in renal cell carcinoma: current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Tykodi, Scott S

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the kidney in adults, representing approximately 4% of all adult cancers in the United States. Metastatic RCC is poorly responsive to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapies but can be sensitive to T-cell-directed immunotherapies such as interferon-α or interleukin-2. Despite recent progress in the application of antiangiogenic “targeted therapies” for metastatic RCC, high-dose interleukin-2 remains an appropriate first-line therapy for select patients and is associated with durable complete remissions in a small fraction of treated patients. Thus, advanced RCC provides a unique opportunity to investigate the requirements for effective antitumor immunotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that resistance mechanisms exploited by RCC and other tumor types may play a dominant role in limiting the effectiveness of tumor-reactive adaptive immune responses. Expression of the inhibitory coreceptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within RCC tumors, as well as the expression of the PD-1 ligand (PD-L1) on RCC tumor cells, are strong negative prognostic markers for disease-specific death in RCC patients. Monoclonal antibodies targeting either PD-1 or PD-L1 have now entered clinic trials and have demonstrated promising antitumor effects for refractory metastatic RCC. This review summarizes the results of published and reported studies of PD-1- and PD-L1-targeted therapies enrolling patients with advanced RCC, focusing on key safety, toxicity, and efficacy end points. Prospects for advanced phase clinical testing and novel therapy combinations with PD-1- and PD-L1-targeted agents are discussed. PMID:25114573

  1. Embolization for Treatment of Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Secondary to Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kobak, Jeff; Gandras, Eric J. Fleury, Linwald; Macura, Jerzy; Shams, Joseph

    2006-12-15

    Massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to metastatic renal cell carcinoma involving the jejunum is rare but has been previously described in the medical literature. Treatment options for metastatic renal cell carcinoma are limited, but transcatheter arterial embolization can be performed to control gastrointestinal hemorrhage either alone or prior to surgical resection. We describe a case of successful transcatheter arterial embolization for control of massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma invading the jejunum and review the literature. Arteriography provided both the diagnosis of recurrent disease and the means of therapy.

  2. Renal dysfunction associated with liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, R. M.; Popescu, I.

    1995-01-01

    It has been known for some time that a variety of liver diseases affect kidney function, but renal dysfunction associated with orthotopic liver transplantation has received scant attention. Although the mechanisms mediating these abnormalities are incompletely defined, advances in the understanding of renal pathophysiology after liver transplantation have made it possible to develop new treatment strategies. Aggressive and early intervention to diagnose and treat renal complications associated with liver transplantation should be the goal for transplant centres. PMID:7479462

  3. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients. PMID:26939741

  4. Unusual case of calciphylaxis associated with metastatic breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bosler, David S; Amin, Mitual B; Gulli, Farris; Malhotra, Rajwant K

    2007-08-01

    Calciphylaxis is a relatively rare disorder associated with calcification of small- and medium-sized blood vessels, progressive ischemic skin necrosis, and ulcerations. It is usually seen in patients with end-stage renal disease with secondary hyperparathyroidism and is occasionally seen in primary hyperparathyroidism, hypercalcemia of malignancy, and end-stage liver disease. We report an unusual case of calciphylaxis seen in association with metastatic breast carcinoma in the absence of end-stage renal or parathyroid disease. A 73-year-old woman presented with painful leg ulcers. Serum calcium levels and parathormone levels were within normal limits. Skin biopsies from the ulcers revealed small- to medium-sized subcutaneous arteries with calcification of the media. Some of the arteries were narrowed by fibrointimal hyperplasia and fibrin thrombi. Calcification of the subcutaneous fat, fat necrosis, and suppuration were also seen. Calciphylaxis associated with metastatic osteolytic breast carcinoma is rare. Although end stage renal disease with secondary hyperparathyroidism is the most common cause of calciphylaxis, this case demonstrates that less common conditions with normal serum calcium and parathormone levels may also cause it. PMID:17667177

  5. Immunotherapy advances in uro-genital malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ratta, Raffaele; Zappasodi, Roberta; Raggi, Daniele; Grassi, Paolo; Verzoni, Elena; Necchi, Andrea; Di Nicola, Massimo; Salvioni, Roberto; de Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer has made significant progresses over the last 20 years. Multiple efforts have been attempted to restore immune-mediated tumor elimination, leading to the development of several targeted immunotherapies. Data from recent clinical trials suggest that these agents might improve the prognosis of patients with advanced genito-urinary (GU) malignancies. Nivolumab has been the first immune checkpoint-inhibitor approved for pre-treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Pembrolizumab and atezolizumab have shown promising results in both phase I and II trials in urothelial carcinoma. Brentuximab vedotin has demonstrated early signals of clinical activity and immunomodulatory effects in highly pre-treated patients with testicular germ cell tumors. In this review, we have summarized the major clinical achievements of immunotherapy in GU cancers, focusing on immune checkpoint blockade as well as the new immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under clinical evaluation for these malignancies. PMID:27372200

  6. CREATE: Cross-tumoral Phase 2 With Crizotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma Type 1; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Clear Cell Sarcoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma

  7. Everolimus and Vatalanib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. [Renal disease].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cuevas, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-09-01

    Chronic renal failure in its various stages, requires certain nutritional restrictions associated with the accumulation of minerals and waste products that cannot be easily eliminated by the kidneys. Some of these restrictions modify the intake of proteins, sodium, and phosphorus. Milk and dairy products are sources of these nutrients. This article aims to inform the reader about the benefits including milk and dairy products relying on a scientific and critical view according to the clinical conditions and the stage of renal disease in which the patient is. PMID:27603894

  9. [Renal colic].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, J M

    1999-01-01

    The appropriate approach to renal colic, which should be known by the family doctor, is presented. The incidence of this condition in the emergency department of a large general hospital is described as well as the physiopathology of pain, its clinical aspects and the therapeutic attitudes. Renal colic is frequent, it is often possible to diagnose the clinical aspects and general practitioners have the competence for treatment. The use of analgesic drugs, in the correct dosage, is enough to relieve pain and suffering in most of the patients. PMID:10423866

  10. Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kah Poh; Mohile, Supriya G; Kessler, Elizabeth; Fung, Chunkit

    2016-10-01

    The aging of the population, along with rising life expectancy, means that increasing numbers of older men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and a large proportion of these men will present with metastatic disease. In this paper, we discuss recent advances in prostate cancer treatment. In particular, we review management approaches for older patients with metastatic prostate cancer based on the decision tree developed by the International Society of Geriatric Oncology, which categorized older men as "fit," "vulnerable," and "frail" according to comprehensive geriatric assessment. PMID:27586377

  11. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sustarsic, Elahu G.; Junnila, Riia K.; Kopchick, John J.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  12. High-grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma With Focal Squamous Metaplasia of Renal Pelvis Associated With Renal Calculus: Study of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Ping; Chen, Bin; Sun, Xiang-Zhou; Guo, Yan; Yang, Shi-Cong; Deng, Chun-Hua; Huang, Yi-Ran

    2014-01-01

    Mixed neuroendocrine and non-neuroendocrine type of tumor in renal pelvis is rare and presents a high-grade malignancy. We present a case report that a 57-year-old man had no history of small cell cancer but presented a high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma with focal squamous metaplasia and multiple stones simultaneously in the right renal pelvis. The patient underwent nephroureterocystectomy 9 months before this presentation, with evidence of multiple metastatic tumors in various parts of the body. The case of mixed neuroendocrine tumor with stones in the renal pelvis carries a poor prognosis and poses a therapeutic challenge to urologists. PMID:26952913

  13. Multiple bone lesions resembling a metastatic origin. An unexpected diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Garrido, M José; Mora, A; Andrada, Encarna; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Cánovas, Víctor; Guirado-Risueño, M; Pastor, Elisa; Molina, M Angeles; Molina, M Jesús; Martín Hidalgo, Alberto; Carrato, Alfredo

    2008-04-01

    Lytic and blastic lesions have been associated to malignant tumours, such as solid cancer (breast cancer, renal cancer, prostate cancer, malignant melanoma or thyroid tumours). Although a mixed pattern with lytic and blastic lesions is due to metastatic tumour, this is not the only possible origin. The following case shows a systematic. This case report shows the number of tests that were made in order to discover the origin of osteolytic and osteoblastic lesions and it is notable that there is not an occult neoplasia on every occasion. PMID:18411200

  14. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Metastatic, Persistent, Recurrent, or Progressive Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Colorectal Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer

  15. Pulmonary manifestations of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Sahni, Sonu; Iftikhar, Asma; Talwar, Arunabh

    2015-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for majority of all primary renal neoplasms. Classic manifestations of RCC include the triad of flank pain, hematuria and a palpable renal mass. Patients with RCC can develop various extra renal manifestations including involvements of the lungs, inferior vena cava, liver and the bones. The pulmonary manifestations of renal cell carcinoma include metastatic disease including endobronchial, pleural, parenchymal or lymph node metastasis, pleural effusion or hemothorax. Pulmonary embolism and tumor embolism is another common manifestation of renal cell carcinoma. RCC is a highly vascular tumor and can cause pulmonary arterio-venous fistulas leading to high output failure. Rarely, RCC can also present with paraneoplastic presentations including cough or bilateral diaphragm paralysis. Drugs used to treat RCC have been associated with drug related pneumonitis and form an important differential diagnosis in patients with RCC on therapy presenting with shortness of breath. In this review we discuss the various pulmonary manifestations of RCC. A high index of suspicion with these presentations can lead to an early diagnosis and assist in instituting an appropriate intervention. PMID:26525375

  16. Current Standards and Novel Treatment Options for Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Benjamin A; Yabar, Cinthya S; Brody, Jonathan R; Pishvaian, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal solid tumors. The prognosis of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains dismal, with a median survival of less than 1 year, due in large part to the fact that pancreatic adenocarcinoma is notoriously refractory to chemotherapy. However, there recently have been significant improvements in outcomes for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: ongoing trials have shown promise, and these may lead to still further progress. Here we review the current treatment paradigms for metastatic disease, focusing on ways to ameliorate symptoms and lengthen survival. We then summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular aspects of pancreatic cancer. Finally, we outline new approaches currently under development for the treatment of metastatic disease, arising from our improved understanding of the genetic and nongenetic alterations within pancreatic cancer cells-and of interactions between cancer cells, the tumor microenvironment, and the immune system. PMID:26573060

  17. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  18. The brain metastatic niche.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Metastasizing cancer cells that arrest in brain microvessels have to face an organ microenvironment that is alien, and exclusive. In order to survive and thrive in this foreign soil, the malignant cells need to successfully master a sequence of steps that includes close interactions with pre-existing brain microvessels, and other nonmalignant cell types. Unfortunately, a relevant number of circulating cancer cells is capable of doing so: brain metastasis is a frequent and devastating complication of solid tumors, becoming ever more important in times where the systemic tumor disease is better controlled and life of cancer patients is prolonged. Thus, it is very important to understand which environmental cues are necessary for effective brain colonization. This review gives an overview of the niches we know, including those who govern cancer cell dormancy, survival, and proliferation in the brain. Colonization of pre-existing niches related to stemness and resistance is a hallmark of successful brain metastasis. A deeper understanding of those host factors can help to identify the most vulnerable steps of the metastatic cascade, which might be most amenable to therapeutic interventions. PMID:26489608

  19. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC): renal cancer risk, surveillance and treatment.

    PubMed

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R; Schmidt, Laura S; Middelton, Lindsay A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Tomlinson, Ian; Richard, Stéphane; Linehan, W Marston

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant condition in which susceptible individuals are at risk for the development of cutaneous leiomyomas, early onset multiple uterine leiomyomas and an aggressive form of type 2 papillary renal cell cancer. HLRCC is caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene which inactivate the enzyme and alters the function of the tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle. Issues surrounding surveillance and treatment for HLRCC-associated renal cell cancer were considered as part of a recent international symposium on HLRCC. The management protocol proposed in this article is based on a literature review and a consensus meeting. The lifetime renal cancer risk for FH mutation carriers is estimated to be 15 %. In view of the potential for early onset of RCC in HLRCC, periodic renal imaging and, when available, predictive testing for a FH mutation is recommended from 8 to 10 years of age. However, the small risk of renal cell cancer in the 10-20 years age range and the potential drawbacks of screening should be carefully discussed on an individual basis. Surveillance preferably consists of annual abdominal MRI. Treatment of renal tumours should be prompt and generally consist of wide-margin surgical excision and consideration of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. The choice for systemic treatment in metastatic disease should, if possible, be part of a clinical trial. Screening procedures in HLRCC families should preferably be evaluated in large cohorts of families. PMID:25012257

  20. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). Renal cancer risk, surveillance and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Menko, Fred H.; Maher, Eamonn; Schmidt, Laura S.; Middelton, Lindsay A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Tomlinson, Ian; Richard, Stéphane; Linehan, W. Marston

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant condition in which susceptible individuals are at risk for the development of cutaneous leiomyomas, early onset multiple uterine leiomyomas and an aggressive form of type 2 papillary renal cell cancer. HLRCC is caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene, which inactivates the enzyme and alters the function of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA/ Krebs) cycle. Issues surrounding surveillance and treatment for HLRCC-associated renal cell cancer were considered as part of a recent international symposium on HLRCC. The management protocol proposed in this article is based on a literature review and a consensus meeting. The estimated lifetime renal cancer risk for FH mutation carriers is estimated to be 15%. In view of the potential for early onset of RCC in HLRCC, periodic renal imaging and, when available, predictive testing for a FH mutation is recommended from 8 to 10 years of age. However, the small risk of renal cell cancer in the 10-20 years age range and the potential drawbacks of screening should be carefully discussed on an individual basis. Surveillance preferably consists of annual abdominal MRI. Treatment of renal tumours should be prompt and generally consist of wide-margin surgical excision and consideration of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. The choice for systemic treatment in metastatic disease should, if possible, be part of a clinical trial. Screening procedures in HLRCC families should preferably be evaluated in large cohorts of families. PMID:25012257

  1. Immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, R M

    1999-06-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma continue to present a therapeutic challenge. Current therapeutic approaches involve surgery and various types of immunotherapy. The rationale for this latter form of therapy include the observations of spontaneous tumor regression, the presence of a T-cell-mediated immune response, and the tumor responses observed in patients receiving cytokine therapy. Analysis of prognostic factors in these patients demonstrates that clinical responses occur most frequently in individuals with good performance status. The cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2, aldesleukin [Proleukin], interferon-alfa (Intron A, Roferon-A), or the combination produce responses in 15% to 20% of patients. Randomized trials suggest that administration of interferon-alfa may result in a modest improvement in median survival. Investigation of the molecular genetics of renal cell carcinoma and the presence of T-lymphocyte immune dysregulation have suggested new therapeutic strategies. Further preclinical and clinical studies investigating inhibitors of angiogenesis or pharmacologic methods to reverse immune dysregulation are ongoing. Therapeutic results in patients with renal cell carcinoma remain limited, and investigational approaches are warranted. PMID:10378218

  2. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure. PMID:26798459

  3. A Phase Ib Study of BEZ235, a Dual Inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Carlo, Maria I.; Molina, Ana M.; Lakhman, Yulia; Patil, Sujata; Woo, Kaitlin; DeLuca, John; Lee, Chung-Han; Hsieh, James J.; Feldman, Darren R.; Motzer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Our results highlight additional toxicities of dual PI3K/mTOR inhibition in the clinical setting that were unforeseen from preclinical models. Because of toxicity and lack of efficacy, BEZ235 should not be further developed in the current formulation for patients with renal cell carcinoma. Background. Allosteric inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are approved for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Preclinical models have suggested that dual inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mTOR kinase may establish superior anticancer effect. We aimed to establish safety for BEZ235, a potent inhibitor of both PI3K and mTOR, in advanced RCC. Methods. Patients with advanced RCC who had previously failed standard therapy received escalating doses of BEZ235 in sachet formulation twice daily until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Primary endpoints were to identify the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) and to determine the recommended dose for the phase II study. Results. The study was terminated early because of high incidence of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) across all dose levels tested. Ten patients were treated with BEZ235—six with clear cell and four with non-clear cell subtypes. Five of these patients suffered DLTs: 2 of 2 patients in the original 400 mg b.i.d. cohort, 1 of 6 in the 200 mg b.i.d. cohort, and 2 of 2 in the 300 mg b.i.d. cohort. DLTs included fatigue, rash, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, mucositis, anorexia, and dysgeusia. Five patients were evaluable for response: Two had stable disease as best response, and three had progressive disease. Conclusion. BEZ235 twice daily resulted in significant toxicity without objective responses; further development of this compound will not be pursued in this disease. PMID:27286790

  4. Is the Blood-Brain Barrier Relevant in Metastatic Germ Cell Tumor?

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, Jose M. Schneider, Bryan P.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Germ cell tumors are uniquely chemosensitive and curable, even with advanced metastatic disease. Central nervous system recurrence can terminate a complete remission in other chemosensitive tumors, such as small cell lung cancer, because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We propose to document that the BBB is also relevant in germ cell tumors despite their dramatic chemosensitivity. Methods and Materials: We present five cases illustrating the concept of the BBB in patients with metastatic testicular cancer treated with chemotherapy. Results: In our large series of patients with metastatic testicular cancer treated with chemotherapy, we identified 5 unique patients. These patients were rendered free of disease only to experience relapse in the brain alone. This included 1 patient who initially had good-risk metastatic disease by means of the International Germ Cell Collaborative Group staging system at the onset of chemotherapy. Conclusions: The BBB is relevant in patients with metastatic testicular cancer.

  5. 10% Tumor Diameter Shrinkage on the First Follow-Up Computed Tomography Predicts Clinical Outcome in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated With Angiogenesis Inhibitors: A Follow-Up Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Franchetti, Yoko; Nishino, Mizuki; Fay, André P.; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted agents are standard therapies for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), associated with variable tumor shrinkage. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) is of limited utility in this setting, and other imaging changes are sought to reliably predict outcome early. We aim to validate 10% tumor shrinkage as the best early indicator of outcome. Methods. In this institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study, 66 mRCC patients with 165 lesions on clinical trials of VEGF-targeted agents underwent thoracic and abdominal computed tomography at baseline and at first follow-up after therapy. Measurements were performed according to RECIST and tumor shrinkage of ≥10% decrease in sum of the longest diameter (−10%SLD). Correlation with time-to-treatment failure (TTF) and overall survival (OS) were compared and stratified by response to the radiologic criteria. Receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis yielded the optimal threshold change in SLD, defining patients with prolonged survival. Results. More than −10%SLD significantly differentiated responders from nonresponders (median TTF 8.4 vs. 4.1 months, p = .001), whereas partial response by RECIST did not (median TTF 6.9 vs. 5.5 months in responders vs. nonresponders, p = .34). −10%SLD was also significantly predictive of OS (median OS 35.1 vs. 15.0 months in responders vs. nonresponders, p = .003). ROC curve analysis yielded −9.3% in SLD as the optimal threshold for response/no response. Conclusion. Ten percent tumor shrinkage is validated as a reliable early predictor of outcome in mRCC patients receiving VEGF-targeted therapies and may provide a practical measure to guide therapeutic decisions. PMID:24755461

  6. Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeisberg, Michael; Maeshima, Yohei; Mosterman, Barbara; Kalluri, Raghu

    2002-01-01

    During progression of chronic renal disease, qualitative and quantitative changes in the composition of tubular basement membranes (TBMs) and interstitial matrix occur. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated activation of tubular epithelial cells (TECs) is speculated to be a key contributor to the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. To further understand the pathogenesis associated with renal fibrosis, we developed an in vitro Boyden chamber system using renal basement membranes that partially mimics in vivo conditions of TECs during health and disease. Direct stimulation of TECs with TGF-β1/epithelial growth factor results in an increased migratory capacity across bovine TBM preparations. This is associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production, namely MMP-2 and MMP-9. Indirect chemotactic stimulation by TGF-β1/EGF or collagen type I was insufficient in inducing migration of untreated TECs across bovine TBM preparation, suggesting that basement membrane integrity and composition play an important role in protecting TECs from interstitial fibrotic stimuli. Additionally, neutralization of MMPs by COL-3 inhibitor dramatically decreases the capacity of TGF-β1-stimulated TECs to migrate through bovine TBM preparation. Collectively, these results demonstrate that basement membrane structure, integrity, and composition play an important role in determining interstitial influences on TECs and subsequent impact on potential aberrant cell-matrix interactions. PMID:12057905

  7. Renal Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Yendt, E. R.

    1970-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal calculi is reviewed in general terms followed by the results of investigation of 439 patients with renal calculi studied by the author at Toronto General Hospital over a 13-year period. Abnormalities of probable pathogenetic significance were encountered in 76% of patients. Idiopathic hypercalciuria was encountered in 42% of patients, primary hyperparathyroidism in 11%, urinary infection in 8% and miscellaneous disorders in 8%. The incidence of uric acid stones and cystinuria was 5% and 2% respectively. In the remaining 24% of patients in whom no definite abnormalities were encountered the mean urinary magnesium excretion was less than normal. Of 180 patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria, only 24 were females. In the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism, the importance of detecting minimal degrees of hypercalcemia is stressed; attention is also drawn to the new observation that the upper limit of normal for serum calcium is slightly lower in females than in males. The efficacy of various measures advocated for the prevention of renal calculi is also reviewed. In the author's experience the administration of thiazides has been particularly effective in the prevention of calcium stones. Thiazides cause a sustained reduction in urinary calcium excretion and increase in urinary magnesium excretion. These agents also appear to affect the skeleton by diminishing bone resorption and slowing down bone turnover. PMID:5438766

  8. A Decade of Experience in Developing Preclinical Models of Advanced- or Early-Stage Spontaneous Metastasis to Study Antiangiogenic Drugs, Metronomic Chemotherapy, and the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kerbel, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The clinical circumstance of treating spontaneous metastatic disease, after resection of primary tumors, whether advanced/overt or microscopic in nature, is seldom modeled in mice and may be a major factor in explaining the frequent discordance between preclinical and clinical therapeutic outcomes where the trend is "overprediction" of positive results in preclinical mouse model studies. To evaluate this hypothesis, a research program was initiated a decade ago to develop multiple models of metastasis in mice, using variants of human tumor cell lines selected in vivo for enhanced spontaneous metastatic aggressiveness after surgical resection of established orthotopic primary tumors. These models have included breast, renal, and colorectal carcinomas; ovarian cancer (but without prior surgery); and malignant melanoma. They have been used primarily for experimental therapeutic investigations involving various antiangiogenic drugs alone or with chemotherapy, especially "metronomic" low-dose chemotherapy. The various translational studies undertaken have revealed a number of clinically relevant findings. These include the following: (i) the potential of metronomic chemotherapy, especially when combined with a vascular endothelial growth factor pathway targeting drug to successfully treat advanced metastatic disease; (ii) the development of relapsed spontaneous brain metastases in mice with melanoma or breast cancer whose systemic metastatic disease is successfully controlled for a period with a given therapy; (iii) foreshadowing the failure of adjuvant antiangiogenic drug-based phase III trials; (iv) recapitulating the failure of oral antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors plus standard chemotherapy in contrast to the modest successes of antiangiogenic antibodies plus chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer; and (v) revealing "vessel co-option" and absence of angiogenesis as a determinant of intrinsic resistance or minimal responsiveness to antiangiogenic therapy

  9. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma: a potential mimic of conventional clear cell renal carcinoma on core biopsy.

    PubMed

    Liddell, Heath; Mare, Anton; Heywood, Sean; Bennett, Genevieve; Chan, Hin Fan

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCP-RCC) is a recently described, relatively uncommon variant of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with a reported incidence of 4.1%. Thought to only arise in those with end stage renal disease, CCP-RCC is increasingly identified in those without renal impairment. CCP-RCCs have unique morphologic, genetic, and immunohistochemical features distinguishing them from both conventional clear cell renal cell carcinomas and papillary renal cell carcinomas. Immunohistochemically, these tumors are positive for CK7 and negative for CD10 and racemase. This is in contrast to conventional cell renal cell carcinomas (CK7 negative, CD10 positive) and papillary cell carcinomas (CK7, CD10, and racemase positive). These tumours appear to be indolent in nature, with no current documented cases of metastatic spread. We present the case of a 42-year-old female who presented with an incidental finding of a renal mass that on a core biopsy was reported as clear cell carcinoma, Fuhrman grade 1. She subsequently underwent a radical nephrectomy and further histological examination revealed the tumor to be a clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma, Fuhrman grade 1. PMID:25709850

  10. Management of renal collecting duct carcinoma: a systematic review and the McMaster experience

    PubMed Central

    Dason, S.; Allard, C.; Sheridan–Jonah, A.; Gill, J.; Jamshaid, H.; Aziz, T.; Kajal, B.; Kapoor, A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Collecting duct carcinoma (cdc) is a rare, aggressive form of renal carcinoma that presents at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis. Little is known concerning the optimal management of cdc. We present the results of a systematic review addressing the management of cdc and the McMaster University cdc series. Methods The medline, Cochrane Library, and embase databases and conference proceedings were searched to identify studies relating to the management of cdc. Included studies reported on a minimum of 10 subjects receiving a single intervention. Series in which an evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness was not possible were excluded. The McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario) series of 6 cases of cdc were retrospectively reviewed. Results We identified 3 studies relevant to the management of cdc that included a total of 72 patients. A gemcitabine–cisplatin or –carboplatin regimen resulted in a 26% objective response rate in 23 patients with metastatic cdc. Two additional studies indicated that 49 patients treated with immunotherapy achieved no response. In the McMaster series, cytoreductive nephrectomy was performed in 4 of 6 patients. In 2 patients, mvac therapy (methotrexate–vinblastine–doxorubicin–cisplatin) achieved no response. No significant therapeutic complications occurred, but survival was poor (median: 11 months; range: 10–33 months). Conclusions Our review and clinical experience suggest that the current standard of care for metastatic cdc is a gemcitabine–cisplatin regimen. PMID:23737692

  11. Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ballarin, Roberto; Spaggiari, Mario; Cautero, Nicola; De Ruvo, Nicola; Montalti, Roberto; Longo, Cristina; Pecchi, Anna; Giacobazzi, Patrizia; De Marco, Giuseppina; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Gerunda, Giorgio Enrico; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio

    2011-11-21

    Pancreatic metastases are rare, with a reported incidence varying from 1.6% to 11% in autopsy studies of patients with advanced malignancy. In clinical series, the frequency of pancreatic metastases ranges from 2% to 5% of all pancreatic malignant tumors. However, the pancreas is an elective site for metastases from carcinoma of the kidney and this peculiarity has been reported by several studies. The epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are known from single-institution case reports and literature reviews. There is currently very limited experience with the surgical resection of isolated pancreatic metastasis, and the role of surgery in the management of these patients has not been clearly defined. In fact, for many years pancreatic resections were associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, and metastatic disease to the pancreas was considered to be a terminal-stage condition. More recently, a significant reduction in the operative risk following major pancreatic surgery has been demonstrated, thus extending the indication for these operations to patients with metastatic disease. PMID:22147975

  12. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Renal tubular acidosis - proximal; Type II RTA; RTA - proximal; Renal tubular acidosis type II ... by alkaline substances, mainly bicarbonate. Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Type II RTA) occurs when bicarbonate is not ...

  13. Overall survival should be the primary endpoint in clinical trials for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, P.K.; Burkes, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    An article in a recent edition of Current Oncology explored the validation of progression-free survival (pfs) as an endpoint in clinical trials of antineoplastic agents for metastatic colorectal cancer, metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and ovarian cancer. The support for pfs as a surrogate endpoint for overall survival (os) was elucidated. As with the aforementioned tumour types, advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) has seen a rise in active agents since the year 2000. Those agents range from improved cytotoxics such as pemetrexed, to targeted therapies such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor and agents that target the EML4–ALK gene mutation. More recently, it has also become apparent that histology plays an important role in the response to and outcomes of treatment. With the therapeutic options for patients with advanced nsclc increasing, concerns are being raised that the efficacy of drugs measured by os may be diluted in clinical trials, thereby underestimating their true clinical benefit. That possibility, together with the need to have efficacious drugs available to patients earlier, has resulted in the search for a surrogate to the os endpoint in advanced nsclc. The present article follows up the recent article on pfs as a surrogate. Although advances in identifying pfs as a valid surrogate endpoint for os have been made in other tumour types, in advanced nsclc, such surrogacy has not been formally validated. Until it has, os should remain the primary endpoint of clinical trials in advanced nsclc. PMID:23559882

  14. The European Medicines Agency review of pazopanib for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma: summary of the scientific assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Maria; Borregaard, Jeanett; Ersbøll, Jens; ten Bosch, George J A; van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Abadie, Eric; Schellens, Jan H M; Pignatti, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    On June 14, 2010, the European Commission issued a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union for pazopanib for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Pazopanib is an antineoplastic agent that inhibits multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. The recommended oral dose is 800 mg once daily. The benefit of pazopanib is an increased progression-free survival. In the pivotal trial VEG105192, the median progression-free survival was 9.2 months (95% confidence interval, 7.4-12.9) in the pazopanib arm compared with 4.2 months (95% confidence interval, 2.8-4.2) in the placebo arm. The most common side effects include diarrhea, hair color change, hypertension, nausea, fatigue, anorexia, vomiting, dysgeusia, elevated alanine aminotransferase, elevated aspartate aminotransferase, and abdominal pain. The objective of this article is to summarize the scientific review of the application that led to approval in the European Union. PMID:21976546

  15. Surgical Management of Metastatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Keung, Emily Z; Fairweather, Mark; Raut, Chandrajit P

    2016-10-01

    Sarcomas are rare cancers of mesenchymal cell origin that include many histologic subtypes and molecularly distinct entities. For primary resectable sarcoma, surgery is the mainstay of treatment. Despite treatment, approximately 50% of patients with soft tissue sarcoma are diagnosed with or develop distant metastases, significantly affecting their survival. Although systemic therapy with conventional chemotherapy remains the primary treatment modality for those with metastatic sarcoma, increased survival has been achieved in select patients who receive multimodality therapy, including surgery, for their metastatic disease. This article provides an overview of the literature on surgical management of pulmonary and hepatic sarcoma metastases. PMID:27542649

  16. Dual VEGF/VEGFR inhibition in advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kriti; Koon, Henry; Elson, Paul; Triozzi, Pierre; Dowlati, Afshin; Chen, Helen; Borden, Ernest C; Rini, Brian I

    2014-01-01

    Our prior phase I study of the combination of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody, bevacizumab, and VEGF receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor, sunitinib, in advanced solid tumors identified an encouraging response evaluation. An expansion phase of this study was thus undertaken to obtain further safety data, response assessment and characterization of pharmacodynamic biomarkers in melanoma, renal, and adrenal carcinoma patients. Patients with metastatic solid tumors received sunitinib (37.5 mg/d, 4 wk on/2 wk off) and bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 wk). Responses were assessed every 2 cycles. Serum levels of angiogenic molecules were measured using ELISA assays. Twenty-two patients were enrolled, including 11 melanoma, 5 renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 5 adrenal cancer, and 1 angiosarcoma. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were observed in 15 patients, including hypertension (41%), thrombocytopenia (23%), and fatigue (14%). Three RCC patients, and 1 melanoma patient developed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Partial response (PR) occurred in 21% patients, including melanoma (2), adrenal (1), and renal (1) carcinomas. Overall, 6 patients demonstrated some reduction in their tumor burden. Serum VEGF and several other proangiogenic proteins declined over the first 4 wk of treatment whereas the putative VEGF-resistant protein, prokineticin-2, increased over 10-fold. Occurrence of TMA related to dual VEGF/VEGFR inhibition can result from systemic or nephron specific injury even in non-renal malignancies. While the combination of sunitinib and bevacizumab was clinically efficacious in renal cell carcinoma and melanoma, the observance of microangiopathy, even in non-RCC patients, is a significant toxicity that precludes further clinical development. PMID:24842548

  17. [Outlook: Future therapy of renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Lothar; Miller, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Targeted therapies have fundamentally altered the therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Sunitinib today is an internationally recommended reference standard in first-line therapy; other drugs such as Temsirolimus, Everolimus, Bevacizumab (in combination with Interferon-alpha) and Sorafenib are part of the therapeutic arsenal. Practitioners thus have now more and better therapeutic options at hand, leading to a significantly improved prognosis for mRCC patients. Numerous ongoing research activities aim at the improvement of the benefits of the new compounds in the metastatic situation or application earlier in the course of the disease. Key aspects of future development in RCC are the optimization of the current therapy options by developing new targeted therapies, the search for the best combinations and sequences including the role of nephrectomy and the assessment in the adjuvant or neo-adjuvant setting. The following contribution provides an overview of ongoing studies, thus giving insight into the future therapy of RCC. PMID:20164673

  18. Renal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The term “ultima ratio” has multiple, though related, meanings. The motto “ultima ratio regum,” cast on the cannons of the French army of King Louis XIV, meant that war is the last argument of kings, that is, the one to be used after all diplomatic arguments have failed. Along similar lines, we propose that, given the current evidence, renal denervation should be used as a last resort, after state-of-the-art drug treatment optimized at expert centers failed to control blood pressure. PMID:22851728

  19. Management of diabetic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Eboh, Cecil

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end stage renal failure (ESRF) worldwide, representing over 50% of patients on renal replacement therapy in so