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Sample records for advanced micro devices

  1. 78 FR 3319 - Amendments to Existing Validated End User Authorizations: Advanced Micro Devices China, Inc., Lam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Authorizations: Advanced Micro Devices China, Inc., Lam Research Corporation, SK hynix Semiconductor (China) Ltd... Advanced Micro Devices China Inc.'s (AMD China) current list of eligible destinations. BIS also amends the...-User Authorizations in the PRC Revisions to the List of Eligible Destinations for Advanced...

  2. Return on Investment and Technology-Based Training--An Introduction and a Case Study at Advanced Micro Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masumian, Bijan

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes findings from studies comparing classroom and technology-based approaches to training and the respective Return on Investment (ROI) data. Highlights several advantages of technology-based training. Offers information and initial ROI numbers on the use of technology-based training at Advanced Micro Devices, a global manufacturer of…

  3. Micro-organ device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); von Gustedt-Gonda, legal representative, Iris (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  4. Micro-Organ Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Chang, Robert C. (Inventor); Starly, Binil (Inventor); Culbertson, Christopher (Inventor); Holtorf, Heidi L. (Inventor); Sun, Wei (Inventor); Leslie, Julia (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for fabricating a micro-organ device comprises providing a microscale support having one or more microfluidic channels and one or more micro-chambers for housing a micro-organ and printing a micro-organ on the microscale support using a cell suspension in a syringe controlled by a computer-aided tissue engineering system, wherein the cell suspension comprises cells suspended in a solution containing a material that functions as a three-dimensional scaffold. The printing is performed with the computer-aided tissue engineering system according to a particular pattern. The micro-organ device comprises at least one micro-chamber each housing a micro-organ; and at least one microfluidic channel connected to the micro-chamber, wherein the micro-organ comprises cells arranged in a configuration that includes microscale spacing between portions of the cells to facilitate diffusion exchange between the cells and a medium supplied from the at least one microfluidic channel.

  5. Micro-Organ Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steven R.; Leslie, Julia; Chang, Robert C.; Starly, Binil; Sun, Wei; Culbertson, Christopher; Holtorf, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Micro-organ devices (MODs) are being developed to satisfy an emerging need for small, lightweight, reproducible, biological-experimentati on apparatuses that are amenable to automated operation and that imp ose minimal demands for resources (principally, power and fluids). I n simplest terms, a MOD is a microfluidic device containing a variety of microstructures and assemblies of cells, all designed to mimic a complex in vivo microenvironment by replicating one or more in vivo micro-organ structures, the architectures and composition of the extr acellular matrices in the organs of interest, and the in vivo fluid flows. In addition to microscopic flow channels, a MOD contains one or more micro-organ wells containing cells residing in microscopic e xtracellular matrices and/or scaffolds, the shapes and compositions o f which enable replication of the corresponding in vivo cell assembl ies and flows.

  6. 75 FR 25763 - Addition to the List of Validated End-Users: Advanced Micro Devices China, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... ``development'' and ``production'' of integrated circuits for commercial applications), 4D001, 4D002, 4D003 and... to the ``development'' 215021. and ``production'' of integrated Advanced Micro circuits...

  7. Micro environmental sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Lukens, Laurance L.

    2006-05-02

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) acceleration switch is disclosed which includes a proof mass flexibly connected to a substrate, with the proof mass being moveable in a direction substantially perpendicular to the substrate in response to a sensed acceleration. An electrode on the proof mass contacts one or more electrodes located below the proof mass to provide a switch closure in response to the sensed acceleration. Electrical latching of the switch in the closed position is possible with an optional latching electrode. The MEM acceleration switch, which has applications for use as an environmental sensing device, can be fabricated using micromachining.

  8. Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen; Niebuhr, Jason; Cruz, Santana; Lamoreaux, chris

    2007-01-01

    The advanced resistive exercise device (ARED), now at the prototype stage of development, is a versatile machine that can be used to perform different customized exercises for which, heretofore, it has been necessary to use different machines. Conceived as a means of helping astronauts and others to maintain muscle and bone strength and endurance in low-gravity environments, the ARED could also prove advantageous in terrestrial settings (e.g., health clubs and military training facilities) in which many users are exercising simultaneously and there is heavy demand for use of exercise machines.

  9. Pneumatic Micro Dispenser Chip for Portable Micro Analysis Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tadahiro; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Ikuta, Koji

    The prototype of the pneumatic micro dispenser chip for portable micro analysis devices was developed successfully. This micro dispenser succeeded to divide liquid into 1µL without any dead volume by decompressing and the compressing air in only one micro pump. The dispensing operation is achieved by the original micro liquid detecting method and four hat-shaped check valves. The detecting method utilized the refraction of the infrared rays LED. Not only passage of the fluid into the channel but also its existence can be detected as TTL level signal. The hat-shaped silicone rubber valve which functions itself as a unidirectional passive valve was proposed. The check valve with low opening pressure (3kPa) and high inverse pressure (over 300kPa) was developed successfully. This micro dispenser chip is useful for portable micro analysis devices.

  10. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  11. Advanced underwater lift device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible underwater lift devices ('lift bags') are used in underwater operations to provide buoyancy to submerged objects. Commercially available designs are heavy, bulky, and awkward to handle, and thus are limited in size and useful lifting capacity. An underwater lift device having less than 20 percent of the bulk and less than 10 percent of the weight of commercially available models was developed. The design features a dual membrane envelope, a nearly homogeneous envelope membrane stress distribution, and a minimum surface-to-volume ratio. A proof-of-concept model of 50 kg capacity was built and tested. Originally designed to provide buoyancy to mock-ups submerged in NASA's weightlessness simulators, the device may have application to water-landed spacecraft which must deploy flotation upon impact, and where launch weight and volume penalties are significant. The device may also be useful for the automated recovery of ocean floor probes or in marine salvage applications.

  12. Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael S.; Maki, Paul A.; Kolodzey, James

    2007-06-01

    I. Wide band gap devices. Wide-Bandgap Semiconductor devices for automotive applications / M. Sugimoto ... [et al.]. A GaN on SiC HFET device technology for wireless infrastructure applications / B. Green ... [et al.]. Drift velocity limitation in GaN HEMT channels / A. Matulionis. Simulations of field-plated and recessed gate gallium nitride-based heterojunction field-effect transistors / V. O. Turin, M. S. Shur and D. B. Veksler. Low temperature electroluminescence of green and deep green GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / Y. Li ... [et al.]. Spatial spectral analysis in high brightness GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / T. Detchprohm ... [et al.]. Self-induced surface texturing of Al2O3 by means of inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching in Cl2 chemistry / P. Batoni ... [et al.]. Field and termionic field transport in aluminium gallium arsenide heterojunction barriers / D. V. Morgan and A. Porch. Electrical characteristics and carrier lifetime measurements in high voltage 4H-SiC PiN diodes / P. A. Losee ... [et al.]. Geometry and short channel effects on enhancement-mode n-Channel GaN MOSFETs on p and n- GaN/sapphire substrates / W. Huang, T. Khan and T. P. Chow. 4H-SiC Vertical RESURF Schottky Rectifiers and MOSFETs / Y. Wang, P. A. Losee and T. P. Chow. Present status and future Directions of SiGe HBT technology / M. H. Khater ... [et al.]Optical properties of GaInN/GaN multi-quantum Wells structure and light emitting diode grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy / J. Senawiratne ... [et al.]. Electrical comparison of Ta/Ti/Al/Mo/Au and Ti/Al/Mo/Au Ohmic contacts on undoped GaN HEMTs structure with AlN interlayer / Y. Sun and L. F. Eastman. Above 2 A/mm drain current density of GaN HEMTs grown on sapphire / F. Medjdoub ... [et al.]. Focused thermal beam direct patterning on InGaN during molecular beam epitaxy / X. Chen, W. J. Schaff and L. F. Eastman -- II. Terahertz and millimeter wave devices. Temperature-dependent microwave performance of

  13. Recent advances in micro- and nano-machining technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shang; Huang, Han

    2016-12-01

    Device miniaturization is an emerging advanced technology in the 21st century. The miniaturization of devices in different fields requires production of micro- and nano-scale components. The features of these components range from the sub-micron to a few hundred microns with high tolerance to many engineering materials. These fields mainly include optics, electronics, medicine, bio-technology, communications, and avionics. This paper reviewed the recent advances in micro- and nano-machining technologies, including micro-cutting, micro-electrical-discharge machining, laser micro-machining, and focused ion beam machining. The four machining technologies were also compared in terms of machining efficiency, workpiece materials being machined, minimum feature size, maximum aspect ratio, and surface finish.

  14. Advanced Modeling of Micromirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Sene, Darren E.; Bright, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    The flexure-beam micromirror device (FBMD) is a phase only piston style spatial light modulator demonstrating properties which can be used for phase adaptive corrective optics. This paper presents a complete study of a square FBMD, from advanced model development through final device testing and model verification. The model relates the electrical and mechanical properties of the device by equating the electrostatic force of a parallel-plate capacitor with the counter-acting spring force of the device's support flexures. The capacitor solution is derived via the Schwartz-Christoffel transformation such that the final solution accounts for non-ideal electric fields. The complete model describes the behavior of any piston-style device, given its design geometry and material properties. It includes operational parameters such as drive frequency and temperature, as well as fringing effects, mirror surface deformations, and cross-talk from neighboring devices. The steps taken to develop this model can be applied to other micromirrors, such as the cantilever and torsion-beam designs, to produce an advanced model for any given device. The micromirror devices studied in this paper were commercially fabricated in a surface micromachining process. A microscope-based laser interferometer is used to test the device in which a beam reflected from the device modulates a fixed reference beam. The mirror displacement is determined from the relative phase which generates a continuous set of data for each selected position on the mirror surface. Plots of this data describe the localized deflection as a function of drive voltage.

  15. Advanced packaging for Integrated Micro-Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyke, James L.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between packaging, microelectronics, and micro-electrical-mechanical systems (MEMS) is an important one, particularly when the edges of performance boundaries are pressed, as in the case of miniaturized systems. Packaging is a sort of physical backbone that enables the maximum performance of these systems to be realized, and the penalties imposed by conventional packing approaches is particularly limiting for MEMS devices. As such, advanced packaging approaches, such as multi-chip modules (MCM's) have been touted as a true means of electronic 'enablement' for a variety of application domains. Realizing an optimum system of packaging, however, in not as simple as replacing a set of single chip packages with a substrate of interconnections. Research at Phillips Laboratory has turned up a number of integrating options in the two- and three-dimensional rending of miniature systems with physical interconnection structures with intrinsically high performance. Not only do these structures motivate the redesign of integrated circuits (IC's) for lower power, but they possess interesting features that provide a framework for the direct integration of MEMS devices. Cost remains a barrier to the application of MEMS devices, even in space systems. Several innovations are suggested that will result in lower cost and more rapid cycle time. First, the novelty of a 'constant floor plan' MCM which encapsulates a variety of commonly used components into a stockable, easily customized assembly is discussed. Next, the use of low-cost substrates is examined. The anticipated advent of ultra-high density interconnect (UHDI) is suggested as the limit argument of advanced packaging. Finally, the concept of a heterogeneous 3-D MCM system is outlined that allows for the combination of different compatible packaging approaches into a uniformly dense structure that could also include MEMS-based sensors.

  16. Quantum functional devices for advanced electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, N.; Muto, S.; Imamura, K.; Takatsu, M.; Mori, T.; Sugiyama, Y.; Sakuma, Y.; Nakao, H.; Adachihara, T.

    Recent research in semiconductor device technology seems to be focused on reducing the cost and power dissipation of traditional Si CMOS integrated circuits, rather than developing new and advanced semiconductor devices. We believe however, that devices enter the nanometer-scale regime in the next century, where quantum mechanical effects play an important role in the device's function; therefore, it is important to continue basic research into the physics and technology of nanometer scale structures and device applications in order to cultivate "nanoelectronics". This paper reviews our research activities on quantum functional devices and discusses our future research direction.

  17. Thermoelectric Devices Advance Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices heat, cool, and generate electricity when a temperature differential is provided between the two module faces. In cooperation with NASA, Chico, California-based United States Thermoelectric Consortium Inc. (USTC) built a gas emissions analyzer (GEA) for combustion research. The GEA precipitated hydrocarbon particles, preventing contamination that would hinder precise rocket fuel analysis. The USTC research and design team uses patent-pending dimple, pin-fin, microchannel and microjet structures to develop and design heat dissipation devices on the mini-scale level, which not only guarantee high performance of products, but also scale device size from 1 centimeter to 10 centimeters. USTC continues to integrate the benefits of TE devices in its current line of thermal management solutions and has found the accessibility of NASA technical research to be a valuable, sustainable resource that has continued to positively influence its product design and manufacturing

  18. Micro Computer Tomography for medical device and pharmaceutical packaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Hindelang, Florine; Zurbach, Raphael; Roggo, Yves

    2015-04-10

    Biomedical device and medicine product manufacturing are long processes facing global competition. As technology evolves with time, the level of quality, safety and reliability increases simultaneously. Micro Computer Tomography (Micro CT) is a tool allowing a deep investigation of products: it can contribute to quality improvement. This article presents the numerous applications of Micro CT for medical device and pharmaceutical packaging analysis. The samples investigated confirmed CT suitability for verification of integrity, measurements and defect detections in a non-destructive manner.

  19. Center for advanced microstructures and devices (CAMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, B. C.; Feldman, M.; Morikawa, E.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Saile, V.; Scott, J. D.; Stockbauer, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The new synchrotron-radiation facility, Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, at Louisiana State University is described with regard to the status of installation of the storage ring, implementation of the various programs, and construction of the first beamlines.

  20. Insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Moog, E.R.

    1996-07-01

    The insertion devices being installed at the Advanced Photon Source cause the stored particle beam to wiggle, emitting x-rays with each wiggle. These x-rays combine to make an intense beam of radiation. Both wiggler and undulator types of insertion devices are being installed; the characteristics of the radiation produced by these two types of insertion devices are discussed, along with the reasons for those characteristics.

  1. Recent advances in micro-vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunchuan; Jing, Xingjian; Daley, Steve; Li, Fengming

    2015-05-01

    Micro-vibration caused by disturbance sources onboard spacecraft can severely degrade the working environment of sensitive payloads. Some notable vibration control methods have been developed particularly for the suppression or isolation of micro-vibration over recent decades. Usually, passive isolation techniques are deployed in aerospace engineering. Active isolators, however, are often proposed to deal with the low frequency vibration that is common in spacecraft. Active/passive hybrid isolation has also been effectively used in some spacecraft structures for a number of years. In semi-active isolation systems, the inherent structural performance can be adjusted to deal with variation in the aerospace environment. This latter approach is potentially one of the most practical isolation techniques for micro-vibration isolation tasks. Some emerging advanced vibration isolation methods that exploit the benefits of nonlinearity have also been reported in the literature. This represents an interesting and highly promising approach for solving some challenging problems in the area. This paper serves as a state-of-the-art review of the vibration isolation theory and/or methods which were developed, mainly over the last decade, specifically for or potentially could be used for, micro-vibration control.

  2. Improved Thermoelectric Devices: Advanced Semiconductor Materials for Thermoelectric Devices

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Phononic Devices is working to recapture waste heat and convert it into usable electric power. To do this, the company is using thermoelectric devices, which are made from advanced semiconductor materials that convert heat into electricity or actively remove heat for refrigeration and cooling purposes. Thermoelectric devices resemble computer chips, and they manage heat by manipulating the direction of electrons at the nanoscale. These devices aren’t new, but they are currently too inefficient and expensive for widespread use. Phononic Devices is using a high-performance, cost-effective thermoelectric design that will improve the device’s efficiency and enable electronics manufacturers to more easily integrate them into their products.

  3. Micro devices using shape memory polymer patches for mated connections

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Fitch, Joseph P.

    2000-01-01

    A method and micro device for repositioning or retrieving miniature devices located in inaccessible areas, such as medical devices (e.g., stents, embolic coils, etc.) located in a blood vessel. The micro repositioning or retrieving device and method uses shape memory polymer (SMP) patches formed into mating geometries (e.g., a hoop and a hook) for re-attachment of the deposited medical device to a catheter or guidewire. For example, SMP or other material hoops are formed on the medical device to be deposited in a blood vessel, and SMP hooks are formed on the micro device attached to a guidewire, whereby the hooks on the micro device attach to the hoops on the medical device, or vice versa, enabling deposition, movement, re-deposit, or retrieval of the medical device. By changing the temperature of the SMP hooks, the hooks can be attached to or released from the hoops located on the medical device. An exemplary method for forming the hooks and hoops involves depositing a sacrificial thin film on a substrate, patterning and processing the thin film to form openings therethrough, depositing or bonding SMP materials in the openings so as to be attached to the substrate, and removing the sacrificial thin film.

  4. Integration of suspended carbon nanotubes into micro-fabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Gabriel A.; Ya'akobovitz, Assaf; David-Pur, Moshe; Ioffe, Zvi; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Krylov, Slava; Hanein, Yael

    2009-08-01

    The integration of suspended carbon nanotubes into micron-scale silicon-based devices offers many exciting advantages in the realm of nano-scale sensing and micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). To realize such devices, simple fabrication schemes are needed. Here we present a new method to integrate carbon nanotubes into silicon-based devices by applying conventional micro-fabrication methods combined with a guided chemical vapor deposition growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes. The described procedure yields clean, long, taut and well-positioned tubes in electrical contact to conducting electrodes. The positioning, alignment and tautness of the tubes are all controlled by the structural and chemical features of the micro-fabricated substrate. As the approach described consists of common micro-fabrication and chemical vapor deposition growth procedures, it offers a viable route toward MEMS-NEMS integration and commercial utilization of carbon nanotubes as nano-electromechanical transducers.

  5. Fabrication of micro-optical devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. W.; Marley, J.; Gal, George; Purdy, Don

    1993-01-01

    We have fabricated a variety of micro-optic components including Fresnel and non-Frensel lenses, off-axis and dispersive lenses with binary stepped contours, and analog contours. Process details for all lens designs fabricated are given including multistep photolithography for binary fabrication and grayscale mask photolithography for analog fabrication. Reactive ion etching and ion beam milling are described for the binary fabrication process, while ion beam milling was used for the analog fabrication process. Examples of micro-optic components fabricated in both Si and CdTe substrates are given.

  6. Directional emission micro-cavity lasers with different device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chang-ling; Shi, Jian-wei; Feng, Yuan; Hao, Yong-qin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jian-jia; Li, Peng; Wang, Jia-bin

    2016-10-01

    The micro-cavity lasers support the ultra-low threshold and ultrahigh Q-factor, but several disadvantages impede further development, such as isotropic far-field profile pattern and low optical power output. To overcome the intrinsic problems, several deformed structures were proposed and investigated. In this paper we present directional emission micro-cavity lasers with limason-shaped, triangle-shaped, and ellipse shaped cavity structures. In experiment, mid-infrared InGaAs/InAlAs quantum cascade material was employed to fabricate these micro-cavity lasers, due to its advantages of lack of surface recombination, and inherently in-plane with transverse magnetic (TM) mode emission. The micro-cavity lasers with different device structures were operated and compared at room temperature, and a higher output power was also achieved by increasing the device structure size.

  7. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  8. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  9. Silicon Nanotips and Related Nano-Systems Involving Fluid and Carrier Transport and Their Micro-Devices for Power and Sensing Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-10

    number of micro -/ nano -devices using arrayed silicon nanotips (SiNTs), ZnO nanorods and related advanced nano -composites as their key components have...approach to fabricate micro -/ nano -fluidic devices involving fluid and carrier transport, such as the electrochemical power and sensing has been...Related Nano -Systems Involving Fluid and Carrier Transport and Their Micro -Devices for Power and Sensing Applications 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA23861014056

  10. Method and apparatus for actively controlling a micro-scale flexural plate wave device

    DOEpatents

    Dohner, Jeffrey L.

    2001-01-01

    An actively controlled flexural plate wave device provides a micro-scale pump. A method of actively controlling a flexural plate wave device produces traveling waves in the device by coordinating the interaction of a magnetic field with actively controlled currents. An actively-controlled flexural plate wave device can be placed in a fluid channel and adapted for use as a micro-scale fluid pump to cool or drive micro-scale systems, for example, micro-chips, micro-electrical-mechanical devices, micro-fluid circuits, or micro-scale chemical analysis devices.

  11. Tunable photonic devices and modules based on micro-optomechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, Yoshitada

    2001-10-01

    Photonic devices with ultra-wide and precise controllability for lightwaves are essential for constructing flexible optical networks to serve versatile multimedia applications. However, conventional monolithically fabricated photonic devices suffer from their controllability being limited by the physical characteristics. Micro-optomechatronics based on precise positional control of optical elements is a promising method of meeting the above requirements. This paper presents typical examples, which include repetition- rate tunable optical pulse sources with a micro mechanically controllable cavity length and synchro-scanned tunable disk- shaped optical fiber modules. The operations of these modules were demonstrated to confirm the validity of micro- optomechatronics as the ultimate lightwave control scheme, which will be useful for future optical telecommunications systems.

  12. Micro-power dissipation device described

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, X.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, J.

    1985-11-01

    The common-emitter current gain beta of a common two-pole transistor is generally below 250. They are referred to as high-beta or high gain transistors when the beta of such transistors exceeds 300. When the beta of a transistor is higher than 1,000, it is called a super-beta transistor (SBT) or supergain transistor. The micropower dissipation type has the widest applications among the high-beta. Micropower dissipation high-beta means that there is a high gain or a superhigh gain under a microcurrent. The device is widely used in small signal-detection systems and stereo audio equipment because of their characteristics of high gain, low frequency and low noise under small signals.

  13. Micro-engineered remote palpation device for assessing tissue compliance.

    PubMed

    Hien, M; Yang, T H J; Leung, S K W; Reuben, R L; Habib, F K; McNeill, S A; Schneider, A; McBride, G; Stevens, R; Else, R W

    2008-01-01

    This paper concerns the operation of the actuator for a prototype micro-engineered mechanical palpation device for deployment via a cystoscope to measure the dynamic mechanical properties of the prostate gland in vivo. The subassembly consists of a 400x200 microm silicon (Si) piston manufactured using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) housed within an anodically bonded glass-Si-glass sandwiched housing. The micro-channel on the Si layer was formed by powder blasting and contains the micro-piston with one end pointing to the side of the housing and the other facing a via hole leading to a capillary tube. The opening on the side of the housing was sealed by a 5 microm thick silicone membrane which acts to retain the micro-piston and act as a return spring. A 320 microm diameter capillary forms the connection between the micro-channel and a micro-syringe which is operated by a programmable syringe pump to produce a reciprocating action. A pressure sensor is connected along the capillary tube to measure the dynamic pressure within the system. The micro-piston has already been used, separately actuated to measure the dynamic mechanical properties of known viscoelastic materials and prostate tissue. The purpose of the present work is to assess the functionality of the actuator assembly.

  14. Micro Data: Wearable Devices Contribute to Improved Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Andria; Parke, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Issues involving chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) are prevalent in today's aging society, and suggestions for improvement are essential to treat this patient demographic effectively. This article addresses the use of wearable devices for the medical community to improve CDPM by relying on the accumulation of micro data. For the patient, we recognize that these devices can be an effective tool to facilitate real-time monitoring of their vital signs and activity levels. With real-time monitoring and earlier responses, individuals can benefit by preventing, delaying or reducing exacerbations of chronic diseases. Use of these devices also has great benefit to the person and has the potential to decrease the individual's emergency room visits, hospital admissions and re-admissions. As patients and their healthcare providers work together to identify cumulative trends in their micro data, transitions in care planning will be enhanced, further contributing to improved chronic disease management.

  15. Micro-scale and microfluidic devices for neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Anne M; Jeon, Noo Li

    2010-10-01

    The precise spatial and temporal control afforded by microfluidic devices make them uniquely suited as experimental tools for cellular neuroscience. Micro-structures have been developed to direct the placement of cells and small organisms within a device. Microfluidics can precisely define pharmacological microenvironments, mimicking conditions found in vivo with the advantage of defined parameters which are usually difficult to control and manipulate in vivo. These devices are compatible with high-resolution microscopy, are simple to assemble, and are reproducible. In this review we will focus on microfluidic devices that have recently been developed for small, whole organisms such as C. elegans and dissociated cultured neurons. These devices have improved control over the placement of cells or organisms and allowed unprecedented experimental access, enabling novel investigations in neurobiology.

  16. Micro-optics metrology using advanced interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichelt, Stephan; Bieber, Alexander; Aatz, Bernd; Zappe, Hans

    2005-06-01

    Interferometric testing of micro-optical components involves some challenges due to problems such as Fresnel diffraction artefacts, the non-common path interferometer configuration, coherent noise as well disturbing interferences, and uncertainties in distance measurements. Recently we have developed a versatile Mach-Zehnder / Twyman-Green hybride interferometer for micro-optics testing. The system combines the advantages of both interferometer types and allows full characterization of lens and surface figure errors as well as radius of curvature and focal length measurements. The interferometer system is explained and measurement results of micro-lenses are presented. Furthermore, this paper is concerned with the metrology challenges of interferometric testing on microscopic scales.

  17. Plasma etching for advanced polymer optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitting, Donald S.

    Plasma etching is a common microfabrication technique which can be applied to polymers as well as glasses, metals, and semiconductors. The fabrication of low loss and reliable polymer optical devices commonly makes use of advanced microfabrication processing techniques similar in nature to those utilized in standard semiconductor fabrication technology. Among these techniques, plasma/reactive ion etching is commonly used in the formation of waveguiding core structures. Plasma etching is a powerful processing technique with many potential applications in the emerging field of polymer optical device fabrication. One such promising application explored in this study is in the area of thin film-substrate adhesion enhancement. Two approaches involving plasma processing were evaluated to improve substrate-thin film adhesion in the production of polymer waveguide optical devices. Plasma treatment of polymer substrates such as polycarbonate has been studied to promote the adhesion of fluoropolymer thin film coatings for waveguide device fabrication. The effects of blanket oxygen plasma etchback on substrate, microstructural substrate feature formation, and the long term performance and reliability of these methods were investigated. Use of a blanket oxygen plasma to alter the polycarbonate surface prior to fluoropolymer casting was found to have positive but limited capability to improve the adhesive strength between these polymers. Experiments show a strong correlation between surface roughness and adhesion strength. The formation of small scale surface features using microlithography and plasma etching on the polycarbonate surface proved to provide outstanding adhesion strength when compared to any other known treatment methods. Long term environmental performance testing of these surface treatment methods provided validating data. Test results showed these process approaches to be effective solutions to the problem of adhesion between hydrocarbon based polymer

  18. Catalyzed Combustion In Micro-Propulsion Devices: Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, C. J.; Schneider, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a tendency toward shrinking the size of spacecraft. New classes of spacecraft called micro-spacecraft have been defined by their mass, power, and size ranges. Spacecraft in the range of 20 to 100 kg represent the class most likely to be utilized by most small sat users in the near future. There are also efforts to develop 10 to 20 kg class spacecraft for use in satellite constellations. More ambitious efforts will be to develop spacecraft less than 10 kg, in which MEMS fabrication technology is required. These new micro-spacecraft will require new micro-propulsion technology. Although micro-propulsion includes electric propulsion approaches, the focus of this proposed program is micro-chemical propulsion which requires the development of microcombustors. As combustors are scaled down, the surface to volume ratio increases. The heat release rate in the combustor scales with volume, while heat loss rate scales with surface area. Consequently, heat loss eventually dominates over heat release when the combustor size becomes smaller, thereby leading to flame quenching. The limitations imposed on chamber length and diameter has an immediate impact on the degree of miniaturization of a micro-combustor. Before micro-combustors can be realized, such a difficulty must be overcome. One viable combustion alternative is to take advantage of surface catalysis. Micro-chemical propulsion for small spacecraft can be used for primary thrust, orbit insertion, trajectory-control, and attitude control. Grouping micro-propulsion devices in arrays will allow their use for larger thrust applications. By using an array composed of hundreds or thousands of micro-thruster units, a particular configuration can be arranged to be best suited for a specific application. Moreover, different thruster sizes would provide for a range of thrust levels (from N s to mN s) within the same array. Several thrusters could be fired simultaneously for thrust levels higher than

  19. Infrared micro-thermography of an actively heated preconcentrator device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2008-03-01

    We report infrared micro-thermography measurements and analysis of static and transient temperature maps of an actively heated micro-fabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a dual serpentine platinum heater trace deposited on a perforated polyimide membrane and suspended over a silicon frame. The sorbent coated perforated membrane is used to collect vapors and gases that flow through the preconcentrator. After heating, a concentrated pulse of analyte is released into the detector. Due to its small thermal mass, precise thermal management of the preconcentrator is critical to its performance. The sizes of features, the semi-transparent membrane, the need to flow air through the device, and changes in surface emissivity on a micron scale present many challenges for traditional infrared micro-thermography. We report an improved experimental test-bed. The hardware incorporates a custom-designed miniature calibration oven which, in conjunction with spatial filtering and a simple calibration algorithm, allows accurate temperature maps to be obtained. The test-bed incorporates a micro-bolometer array as the infrared imager. Instrumentation design, calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometers arrays can be used in certain radiometric applications. Heating profiles were examined with both uniform and non-uniform air flow through the device. The conclusions from this study provide critical information for optimal integration of the preconcentrator within a detection system, and in the design of the heater trace layout to achieve a more even temperature distribution across the device.

  20. Polycaprolactone Thin-Film Micro- and Nanoporous Cell-Encapsulation Devices.

    PubMed

    Nyitray, Crystal E; Chang, Ryan; Faleo, Gaetano; Lance, Kevin D; Bernards, Daniel A; Tang, Qizhi; Desai, Tejal A

    2015-06-23

    Cell-encapsulating devices can play an important role in advancing the types of tissue available for transplantation and further improving transplant success rates. To have an effective device, encapsulated cells must remain viable, respond to external stimulus, and be protected from immune responses, and the device itself must elicit a minimal foreign body response. To address these challenges, we developed a micro- and a nanoporous thin-film cell encapsulation device from polycaprolactone (PCL), a material previously used in FDA-approved biomedical devices. The thin-film device construct allows long-term bioluminescent transfer imaging, which can be used for monitoring cell viability and device tracking. The ability to tune the microporous and nanoporous membrane allows selective protection from immune cell invasion and cytokine-mediated cell death in vitro, all while maintaining typical cell function, as demonstrated by encapsulated cells' insulin production in response to glucose stimulation. To demonstrate the ability to track, visualize, and monitor the viability of cells encapsulated in implanted thin-film devices, we encapsulated and implanted luciferase-positive MIN6 cells in allogeneic mouse models for up to 90 days. Lack of foreign body response in combination with rapid neovascularization around the device shows promise in using this technology for cell encapsulation. These devices can help elucidate the metrics required for cell encapsulation success and direct future immune-isolation therapies.

  1. Near net shape forming of advanced structural ceramic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Chih

    This research applied a combination of rapid prototyping techniques and ceramic gelcasting processes in the design and manufacturing of advanced structural ceramic components that cannot be fabricated by other shape-forming processes. An Assembly Mold SDM process, a derivative process of Shape Deposition Manufacturing, was adopted along with modified gelcasting with great success. The fabricated gas turbine rotors, inlet nozzles, and mesoscale burner arrays have demonstrated superior shape accuracy, mechanical strength, and surface smoothness with a feature size of 200 mum. The design concepts and functionalities of the ceramic devices were verified with performance tests. The shape complexity and surface quality of ceramic parts have been further improved by the use of a mold assembly made of a low melting temperature metal alloy. The introduction of metal alloy required modifications in the mold design, machining procedure, and ceramic processing. A complete shape forming process (from slurry to final parts) was developed for the low melting temperature metal alloy. In addition, the choice of ceramic material now includes SiC, which is critical to the development of micro heat exchangers. Forty-channel, high-aspect-ratio structured SiC heat exchangers were fabricated, and the thermal conductivity value of SiC was found to be comparable to that of steel. The catalyst deposition and ceramic precursor impregnation processes were proposed to enable use of the SiC heat exchangers as micro reactors. Micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS)-related techniques such as SU-8 deep photolithography and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography were combined with gelcasting to make micro patterns on structural ceramics. A feature size of 125 mum and aspect ratio of 8 have been achieved in the preliminary experiments. Based on the fabricated ceramic devices, a graphical method to characterize the shape attributes of complex-shaped components was proposed and used to compare

  2. Fabrication Techniques for Micro-Optical Device Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    lasers , the first to be commercialized and most common semiconductor laser in use today, can be found in bar code scanners, laser pointers , advanced...such as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers . Using a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) foundry process, I design a test chip that consists of...2.2 Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs)...................................... 6 2.2.1 DBRs

  3. Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) Based Microfluidic Devices for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Waseem; Tayyaba, Shahzadi; Afzulpurkar, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) based microfluidic devices have gained popularity in biomedicine field over the last few years. In this paper, a comprehensive overview of microfluidic devices such as micropumps and microneedles has been presented for biomedical applications. The aim of this paper is to present the major features and issues related to micropumps and microneedles, e.g., working principles, actuation methods, fabrication techniques, construction, performance parameters, failure analysis, testing, safety issues, applications, commercialization issues and future prospects. Based on the actuation mechanisms, the micropumps are classified into two main types, i.e., mechanical and non-mechanical micropumps. Microneedles can be categorized according to their structure, fabrication process, material, overall shape, tip shape, size, array density and application. The presented literature review on micropumps and microneedles will provide comprehensive information for researchers working on design and development of microfluidic devices for biomedical applications.

  4. Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) Based Microfluidic Devices for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Muhammad Waseem; Tayyaba, Shahzadi; Afzulpurkar, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) based microfluidic devices have gained popularity in biomedicine field over the last few years. In this paper, a comprehensive overview of microfluidic devices such as micropumps and microneedles has been presented for biomedical applications. The aim of this paper is to present the major features and issues related to micropumps and microneedles, e.g., working principles, actuation methods, fabrication techniques, construction, performance parameters, failure analysis, testing, safety issues, applications, commercialization issues and future prospects. Based on the actuation mechanisms, the micropumps are classified into two main types, i.e., mechanical and non-mechanical micropumps. Microneedles can be categorized according to their structure, fabrication process, material, overall shape, tip shape, size, array density and application. The presented literature review on micropumps and microneedles will provide comprehensive information for researchers working on design and development of microfluidic devices for biomedical applications. PMID:21747700

  5. Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Capstone Turbine Corporation

    2007-12-31

    In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

  6. 3D Printed Micro Free-Flow Electrophoresis Device.

    PubMed

    Anciaux, Sarah K; Geiger, Matthew; Bowser, Michael T

    2016-08-02

    The cost, time, and restrictions on creative flexibility associated with current fabrication methods present significant challenges in the development and application of microfluidic devices. Additive manufacturing, also referred to as three-dimensional (3D) printing, provides many advantages over existing methods. With 3D printing, devices can be made in a cost-effective manner with the ability to rapidly prototype new designs. We have fabricated a micro free-flow electrophoresis (μFFE) device using a low-cost, consumer-grade 3D printer. Test prints were performed to determine the minimum feature sizes that could be reproducibly produced using 3D printing fabrication. Microfluidic ridges could be fabricated with dimensions as small as 20 μm high × 640 μm wide. Minimum valley dimensions were 30 μm wide × 130 μm wide. An acetone vapor bath was used to smooth acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) surfaces and facilitate bonding of fully enclosed channels. The surfaces of the 3D-printed features were profiled and compared to a similar device fabricated in a glass substrate. Stable stream profiles were obtained in a 3D-printed μFFE device. Separations of fluorescent dyes in the 3D-printed device and its glass counterpart were comparable. A μFFE separation of myoglobin and cytochrome c was also demonstrated on a 3D-printed device. Limits of detection for rhodamine 110 were determined to be 2 and 0.3 nM for the 3D-printed and glass devices, respectively.

  7. Micro and nano devices in passive millimetre wave imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, R.

    2013-06-01

    The impact of micro and nano technology on millimetre wave imaging from the post war years to the present day is reviewed. In the 1950s whisker contacted diodes in mixers and vacuum tubes were used to realise both radiometers and radars but required considerable skill to realise the performance needed. Development of planar semiconductor devices such as Gunn and Schottky diodes revolutionised mixer performance and provided considerable improvement. The next major breakthrough was high frequency transistors based on gallium arsenide which were initially used at intermediate frequencies but later after further development at millimeter wave frequencies. More recently Monolithic Microwave Integrated circuits(MMICs) offer exceptional performance and the opportunity for innovative design in passive imaging systems. In the future the use of micro and nano technology will continue to drive system performance and we can expect to see integration of antennae, millimetre wave and sub millimetre wave circuits and signal processing.

  8. Verification, Validation and Credibility Assessment of a Computational Model of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, C. R.; Humphreys, B. T.; Mulugeta, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the resistive exercise device used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to mitigate bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to microgravity (micro g). The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a multi-body dynamics model of biomechanics models for use in spaceflight exercise physiology research and operations. In an effort to advance model maturity and credibility of the ARED model, the DAP performed verification, validation and credibility (VV and C) assessment of the analyses of the model in accordance to NASA-STD-7009 'Standards for Models and Simulations'.

  9. Liquid as template for next generation micro devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmet, Jérôme; Haquette, Henri; Laux, Edith; Gorodyska, Ganna; Textor, Marcus; Spinola Durante, Guido; Portuondo-Campa, Erwin; Knapp, Helmut; Bitterli, Roland; Noell, Wilfried; Keppner, Herbert

    2009-08-01

    Liquids have fascinated generations of scientists and engineers. Since ancient Greece, the perfect natural shape of liquids has been used to create optical systems. Nowadays, the natural shape of liquid is used in the fabrication of microlens arrays that rely on the melting of glass or photoresist to generate high quality lenses. However shrinkage normally associated to the liquid to solid phase transition will affect the initial shape and quality of the liquid structure. In this contribution, a novel fabrication technique that enables the encapsulation and replication of liquid templates without affecting their natural shape is presented. The SOLID (SOlid on LIquid Deposition) process [1] allows for a transparent solid film to be deposited and grown onto a liquid template (droplet, film, line) in a way that the liquid shapes the overgrowing solid layer. The resulting configuration of the SOLID devices is chemically and mechanically stable and is the base of a huge variety of new micro-nano systems in the field of microfluidics, biomedical devices and micro-optics among others. The SOLID process enables in a one step process the encapsulation of liquid microlenses, fluidics channels, drug reservoir or any naturally driven liquid structure. The phenomenon and solid-liquid interface resulting from the SOLID process is new and still unexploited. The solid layer used for the SOLID process chosen in this paper is poly-para-xylylene called Parylene, a transparent biocompatible polymer with excellent mechanical and chemical properties. Moreover, as the solid layer is growing over a liquid template, atomically smooth surfaces channels can be obtained [2]. The polymerization of Parylene does not exert stress and does not change the shape of the liquid; this latter aspect is particularly interesting for manufacturing naturally driven liquid structures. In this paper the authors explore the limits of this new method by testing different designs of SOLID encapsulated

  10. Rapid biocompatible micro device fabrication by micro electro-discharge machining.

    PubMed

    Murali, M; Yeo, S H

    2004-03-01

    Fabrication of a biocompatible micro device is predominantly done by silicon micromachining techniques. The lithographic and etching techniques require preparation and the use of masks which are time consuming and costly. Since bio research involves highly complex mechanisms, the modeling and simulation is difficult and experimental study is inevitable. To incorporate frequent design changes and to realize the hardware quickly, fabrication processes, complementary to the silicon micromachining techniques are required. In the present work the feasibility of using micro electro-discharge machining (EDM) for the fabrication of biocompatible microdevice has been studied. Micro channels with feature size as small as 25 microm are realized. The process is further improved by the introduction of ultrasonic vibration of the workpiece and the total time taken for the hardware realization is about 4 hours. The effects of ultrasonic vibration on the roughness of the spark eroded surface has been studied and reported. The potential of using micro EDM for making biocompatible devices for bio experiments is demonstrated and the surface finish achieved is well within the recommended Rz and Ra values of 3.4 and 0.4 microm respectively for biological studies like implant abutment.

  11. Micro-capillary aerosol focusing device: theoretical modeling, experimental verification, and device fabrication.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoey, Justin; Akhatov, Iskander; Swenson, Orven; Schulz, Doug

    2007-11-01

    A theoretical model for the focusing of aerosol particles in a linearly-varying micro-capillary with a diameter on the order of 100 microns is presented. This theoretical model is experimentally verified by visualizing an aerosol beam of silver-ink aerosol particles of approximately 1 micron in diameter emitted from a micro-capillary. Additional validation is presented in the deposited lines where linewidth is a function of aerosol beamwidth. From the theoretical model a new design for the focusing of aerosol particles is developed, physically produced, and experimentally validated. The new device will be implemented in the areas of high frequency RFID manufacturing, and the semiconductor industry.

  12. Advanced coupled-micro-resonator architectures for dispersion and spectral engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van, Vien

    2009-02-01

    We report recent progress in the design and fabrication of coupled optical micro-resonators and their applications in realizing compact OEIC devices for optical spectral engineering. By leveraging synthesis techniques for analog and digital electrical circuits, advanced coupled-microring device architectures can be realized with the complexity and functionality approaching that of state-of-the-art microwave filters. In addition, the traveling wave nature of microring resonators can be exploited to realize novel devices not possible with standing wave resonators. Applications of coupledmicro- resonator devices in realizing complex optical transfer functions for amplitude, phase and group delay engineering will be presented. Progress in the practical implementation of these devices in the Silicon-on-Insulator OEIC platform will be highlighted along with the challenges and potential for constructing very high order optical filters using coupledmicroring architectures.

  13. Biomimetic patterned surfaces for controllable friction in micro- and nanoscale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arvind; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-12-01

    Biomimetics is the study and simulation of biological systems for desired functional properties. It involves the transformation of underlying principles discovered in nature into man-made technologies. In this context, natural surfaces have significantly inspired and motivated new solutions for micro- and nano-scale devices (e.g., Micro/Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems, MEMS/NEMS) towards controllable friction, during their operation. As a generic solution to reduce friction at small scale, various thin films/coatings have been employed in the last few decades. In recent years, inspiration from `Lotus Effect' has initiated a new research direction for controllable friction with biomimetic patterned surfaces. By exploiting the intrinsic hydrophobicity and ability to reduce contact area, such micro- or nano-patterned surfaces have demonstrated great strength and potential for applications in MEMS/NEMS devices. This review highlights recent advancements on the design, development and performance of these biomimetic patterned surfaces. Also, we present some hybrid approaches to tackle current challenges in biomimetic tribological applications for MEMS/NEMS devices.

  14. Nano/micro-scale magnetophoretic devices for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Byeonghwa; Vavassori, Paolo; Sooryakumar, R.; Kim, CheolGi

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there have been tremendous advances in the versatility of magnetic shuttle technology using nano/micro-scale magnets for digital magnetophoresis. While the technology has been used for a wide variety of single-cell manipulation tasks such as selection, capture, transport, encapsulation, transfection, or lysing of magnetically labeled and unlabeled cells, it has also expanded to include parallel actuation and study of multiple bio-entities. The use of nano/micro-patterned magnetic structures that enable remote control of the applied forces has greatly facilitated integration of the technology with microfluidics, thereby fostering applications in the biomedical arena. The basic design and fabrication of various scaled magnets for remote manipulation of individual and multiple beads/cells, and their associated energies and forces that underlie the broad functionalities of this approach, are presented. One of the most useful features enabled by such advanced integrated engineering is the capacity to remotely tune the magnetic field gradient and energy landscape, permitting such multipurpose shuttles to be implemented within lab-on-chip platforms for a wide range of applications at the intersection of cellular biology and biotechnology.

  15. ARED (Advanced-Resistive Exercise Device) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes ARED which is a new hardware exercise device for use on the International Space Station. Astronaut physiological adaptations, muscle parameters, and cardiovascular parameters are also reviewed.

  16. [Development of micro/nano devices for cancer diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dae Sung; Kang, Ji Yoon; Kim, Tae Song

    2007-05-01

    In order to rapidly detect and analyze the presence of a target ligand of interests in environmental or industrial fluids as well as biological samples, numerous test systems have been designed and developed, which have been based on the combination of a test reagent and absorbing paper or membrane. The main limitations of these conventional devices are the difficulty of quantitative or semi-quantitative detection and poor detection limit (around nanogram/ml range detection capability). In this paper, new approaches and research trends which use nano/MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) technology is introduced, which has a concept of fast, precise, and massive diagnosis and analysis of target molecules using very small amount of samples.

  17. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery.

    PubMed

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  18. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  19. Advances in nonlinear optical materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The recent progress in the application of nonlinear techniques to extend the frequency of laser sources has come from the joint progress in laser sources and in nonlinear materials. A brief summary of the progress in diode pumped solid state lasers is followed by an overview of progress in nonlinear frequency extension by harmonic generation and parametric processes. Improved nonlinear materials including bulk crystals, quasiphasematched interactions, guided wave devices, and quantum well intersubband studies are discussed with the idea of identifying areas of future progress in nonlinear materials and devices.

  20. Guidewire-Controlled Advancement of the Amplatz Thrombectomy Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Schwarzenberg, Helmut; Heller, Martin

    1998-01-15

    The Amplatz Thrombectomy Device (ATD) is a percutaneous rotational catheter proven to homogenize thrombus. The catheter design allows neither application over a coaxial running guidewire nor the use of the device as a monorail system. We report a technical modification that provides guided advancement of the catheter over a wire in order to prevent failure of application and to facilitate the interventional procedure.

  1. Femtosecond Optics: Advanced Devices and Ultrafast Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-31

    periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN), which already represents a significant advance . Gain is given by G=0.25(1+ exp(gl)), where for 7 t2 PPLN, g...H. Sotobayashi, J.T. Gopinath, and E.P. Ippen, ൟ cm long Bi20 3-based EDFA for picosecond pulse amplification with 80 nm gain bandwidth," IEEE...will be minimized by keeping the data in the optical domain. Such all- optical networks require advanced photonic technologies for a variety of

  2. Porous graphene materials for advanced electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices.

    PubMed

    Han, Sheng; Wu, Dongqing; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Fan; Feng, Xinliang

    2014-02-12

    Combining the advantages from both porous materials and graphene, porous graphene materials have attracted vast interests due to their large surface areas, unique porous structures, diversified compositions and excellent electronic conductivity. These unordinary features enable porous graphene materials to serve as key components in high-performance electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells. This progress report summarizes the typical fabrication methods for porous graphene materials with micro-, meso-, and macro-porous structures. The structure-property relationships of these materials and their application in advanced electrochemical devices are also discussed.

  3. Advanced silicon device technologies for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosinski, Lech; Wang, Zhechao; Lou, Fei; Dai, Daoxin; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Thylen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Silicon photonics is an emerging technology offering novel solutions in different areas requiring highly integrated communication systems for optical networking, sensing, bio-applications and computer interconnects. Silicon photonicsbased communication has many advantages over electric wires for multiprocessor and multicore macro-chip architectures including high bandwidth data transmission, high speed and low power consumption. Following the INTEL's concept to "siliconize" photonics, silicon device technologies should be able to solve the fabrication problems for six main building blocks for realization of optical interconnects: light generation, guiding of light including wavelength selectivity, light modulation for signal encoding, detection, low cost assembly including optical connecting of the devices to the real world and finally the electronic control systems.

  4. Advanced Interconnect and Device-Field Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-15

    Essaaidi NATO Advanced Research Workshop : Bianisotropics 2002, 99th Conference on Electromagnetics of Complex Media 8-11May, 2002, Marrakech , Morocco...Bianisotropics 2002, 99th Conference on Electromagnetics of Complex Media 8-11May, 2002, Marrakech , Morocco. Study of Substrates Bi-anisotropy Effects on...Conference on Electromagnetics of Complex Media 8-11May, 2002, Marrakech , Morocco. Dielectric Substrates Anisotropic Effects on The Characteristics of

  5. Methods and Devices for Micro-Isolation, Extraction, and/or Analysis of Microscale Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartalov, Emil P. (Inventor); Shibata, Darryl (Inventor); Taylor, Clive (Inventor); Wade, Lawrence A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are devices and methods for the micro-isolation of biological cellular material. A micro-isolation apparatus described can comprise a photomask that protects regions of interest against DNA-destroying illumination. The micro-isolation apparatus can further comprise photosensitive material defining access wells following illumination and subsequent developing of the photosensitive material. The micro-isolation apparatus can further comprise a chambered microfluidic device comprising channels providing access to wells defined in photosensitive material. The micro-isolation apparatus can comprise a chambered microfluidic device without access wells defined in photosensitive material where valves control the flow of gases or liquids through the channels of the microfluidic device. Also included are methods for selectively isolating cellular material using the apparatuses described herein, as are methods for biochemical analysis of individual regions of interest of cellular material using the devices described herein. Further included are methods of making masking arrays useful for the methods described herein.

  6. Advanced colour processing for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillich, Eugen; Dörksen, Helene; Lohweg, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones are going to play an important role in professionally image processing tasks. However, mobile systems were not designed for such applications, especially in terms of image processing requirements like stability and robustness. One major drawback is the automatic white balance, which comes with the devices. It is necessary for many applications, but of no use when applied to shiny surfaces. Such an issue appears when image acquisition takes place in differently coloured illuminations caused by different environments. This results in inhomogeneous appearances of the same subject. In our paper we show a new approach for handling the complex task of generating a low-noise and sharp image without spatial filtering. Our method is based on the fact that we analyze the spectral and saturation distribution of the channels. Furthermore, the RGB space is transformed into a more convenient space, a particular HSI space. We generate the greyscale image by a control procedure that takes into account the colour channels. This leads in an adaptive colour mixing model with reduced noise. The results of the optimized images are used to show how, e. g., image classification benefits from our colour adaptation approach.

  7. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-10-25

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  8. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-11-22

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  9. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  10. Future opportunities for advancing glucose test device electronics.

    PubMed

    Young, Brian R; Young, Teresa L; Joyce, Margaret K; Kennedy, Spencer I; Atashbar, Massood Z

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in the field of printed electronics can be applied to the field of diabetes testing. A brief history and some new developments in printed electronics components applicable to personal test devices, including circuitry, batteries, transmission devices, displays, and sensors, are presented. Low-cost, thin, and lightweight materials containing printed circuits with energy storage or harvest capability and reactive/display centers, made using new printing/imaging technologies, are ideal for incorporation into personal-use medical devices such as glucose test meters. Semicontinuous rotogravure printing, which utilizes flexible substrates and polymeric, metallic, and/or nano "ink" composite materials to effect rapidly produced, lower-cost printed electronics, is showing promise. Continuing research advancing substrate, "ink," and continuous processing development presents the opportunity for research collaboration with medical device designers.

  11. Future Opportunities for Advancing Glucose Test Device Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brian R; Young, Teresa L; Joyce, Margaret K; Kennedy, Spencer I; Atashbar, Massood Z

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in the field of printed electronics can be applied to the field of diabetes testing. A brief history and some new developments in printed electronics components applicable to personal test devices, including circuitry, batteries, transmission devices, displays, and sensors, are presented. Low-cost, thin, and lightweight materials containing printed circuits with energy storage or harvest capability and reactive/display centers, made using new printing/imaging technologies, are ideal for incorporation into personal-use medical devices such as glucose test meters. Semicontinuous rotogravure printing, which utilizes flexible substrates and polymeric, metallic, and/or nano “ink” composite materials to effect rapidly produced, lower-cost printed electronics, is showing promise. Continuing research advancing substrate, “ink,” and continuous processing development presents the opportunity for research collaboration with medical device designers. PMID:22027300

  12. Design, fabrication and characterization of an air-driven micro turbine device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, X. C.; Zhang, Qide; Sun, Yaofeng; Wang, Zhenfeng

    2006-04-01

    Micro turbine is one of the important components in a micro gas turbine engine. This paper reports on the development and investigations of a micro turbine device driven by compressed air, which consists of three layers of silicon wafers and two layers of acrylic plates. The rotor has an outer diameter of 8.4 mm with a thickness of 0.76 mm. The key challenges to develop a successful high-speed turbine device are geometry design and fabrication of micro blade profiles as well as air-bearings. The micro air bearings have been designed, and a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process has been used for fabricating micro journal bearings with high aspect ratio. The micro turbine has reached a rotating speed of 9,000 rpm during test.

  13. Rapidly patterning micro/nano devices by directly assembling ions and nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Wang, Feifei; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Haibo; Xie, Shaorong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yuechao; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Li, Wen J.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and assembly of components are key steps in micro/nano device manufacturing. In this article, we report an optically controlled assembly method that can rapidly pattern micro/nano devices by directly assembling ions and nanomaterials without expensive physical masks and complex etching processes. Utilizing this controllable process, different types of device components (e.g., metallic and semiconductor) can be fabricated and assembled in 10–30 seconds, which is far more rapid and cost-effective than any other micro/nano fabrication method. PMID:27561917

  14. Rapidly patterning micro/nano devices by directly assembling ions and nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Wang, Feifei; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Haibo; Xie, Shaorong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yuechao; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Li, Wen J

    2016-08-26

    The synthesis and assembly of components are key steps in micro/nano device manufacturing. In this article, we report an optically controlled assembly method that can rapidly pattern micro/nano devices by directly assembling ions and nanomaterials without expensive physical masks and complex etching processes. Utilizing this controllable process, different types of device components (e.g., metallic and semiconductor) can be fabricated and assembled in 10-30 seconds, which is far more rapid and cost-effective than any other micro/nano fabrication method.

  15. Digital micro-mirror devices in digital optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeyemi, Adekunle Adesanya

    In this thesis, studies on the applications of digital micro-mirror devices (DMD) to enhancement of digital optical microscope images are presented. This involves adaptation of the fast switching capability and high optical efficiency of DMD to control the spatial illumination of the specimen. The first study focuses on a method of using DMD to enhance the dynamic range of a digital optical microscope. Our adaptive feedback illumination control method generates a high dynamic range image through an algorithm that combines the DMD-to-camera pixel geometrical mapping and a feedback operation. The feedback process automatically generates an illumination pattern in an iterative fashion that spatially modulates the DMD array elements on a pixel-by-pixel level. Via experiment, we demonstrate a transmitted-light microscope system that uses precise DMD control of a DMD-based projector to enhance the dynamic range ideally by a factor of 573. Results are presented showing approximately 5 times the camera dynamic range, enabling visualization over a wide range of specimen characteristics. The second study presents a technique for programming the source of the spherical reference illumination in a digital in-line holographic microscope using DMD. The programmable point source is achieved by individually addressing the elements of a DMD to spatially control the illumination of the object located at some distance from the source of the spherical reference field. Translation of the ON-state DMD mirror element changes the spatial location of the point source and consequently generates a sequence of translated holograms of the object. The experimental results obtained through numerical reconstruction of translated holograms of Latex microspheres shows the possibility of expanding the field of view by about 263% and also extracting depth information between features in an object volume. The common challenges associated with the use of DMD in coherent and broadband illumination

  16. Recent Advances in Micro/Nanotechnologies for Global Control of Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, U. Hakan; Inci, Fatih; Wang, ShuQi; Toy, Mehlika; Tekin, H. Cumhur; Javaid, Asad; Lau, Daryl T.-Y.; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    The control of Hepatits B virus (HBV) infection is a challenging task, specifically in developing countries where there is limited access to diagnostics and antiviral treatment mainly due to high costs and insufficient healthcare infrastructure. Although current diagnostic technologies can reliably detect HBV, they are relatively laborious, impractical and expensive for resource-limited settings. Advances in micro/nanotechnology are pioneering the development of new generation methodologies in diagnosis and screening of HBV. Owing to combination of nanomaterials (metal/inorganic nanopaticles, carbon nanotubes, etc.) with microfabrication technologies, utilization of miniaturized sensors detecting HBV and other viruses from ultra-low volume of blood, serum and plasma is realized. The state-of-the-art microfluidic devices with integrated nanotechnologies potentially allow for HBV screening at low cost. This review aims to highlight recent advances in nanotechnology and microfabrication processes that are employed for developing point-of-care (POC) HBV assays. PMID:25450190

  17. Advances in lasers and optical micro-nano-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurell, F.; Fazio, E.

    2010-09-01

    manipulation of the writing-reading optical beam can push holography toward storages at higher data densities, as presented by Norihiko Ishii et al (Wavefront compensation method using novel index in holographic data storage). Along a similar direction Furlan et al describe a very innovative technique for producing optical traps using novel Devil micro-lenses (Volumetric multiple optical traps produced by Devil's lenses). Vynnyk et al presented an interesting application of electron microscopy for monitoring sub-micrometric structures in 3D configurations (3D-measurement with the stereo scanning electron microscope on sub-micrometer structure). Finally, S. Rao et al present two interesting papers on integrated structures compatible with silicon technology: one describes the realisation of low-loss waveguides using amorphous silicon, a relatively novel material with many applications in very different domains (Low-loss amorphous silicon waveguid! es grown by PECVD on indium tin oxide), and one on the realisation of a electrically drivable device with affective compatibility with CMOS technology (Electro-optical modulating multistack device based on the CMOS-compatible technology of amorphous silicon). We hope that this special issue of the Journal of the European Optical Society will reflect the interest of the European Scientific Community toward these fundamental and applied topics and will demonstrate to readers some of the actual directions of research. We express our full appreciation to the authors that participated to this initiative which acts only as a primer for the vast amount of work now being undertaken in laser physics and applications in micro- and nano-systems. We would like to give a special thank to the paper reviewers for their important role in the paper selection process and all the journal staff for their very professional support, dedication and energy, which made this special issue feasible.

  18. Development of the Vibration Isolation System for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebuhr, Jason H.; Hagen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Vibration Isolation System for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device from conceptual design to lessons learned. Maintaining a micro-g environment on the International Space Station requires that experiment racks and major vibration sources be isolated. The challenge in characterizing exercise loads and testing the system in the presence of gravity led to a decision to qualify the system by analysis. Available data suggests that the system is successful in attenuating loads, yet there has been a major component failure and several procedural issues during its 3 years of operational use.

  19. Biodegradable three-dimension micro-device delivering 5-fluorouracil in tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaojiao; Zheng, Na; Gao, Yang; Chen, Tianning; Lu, Wen

    2012-01-01

    A novel three-dimension micro-device was formulated to control delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for the treatment of solid tumors. The poly-(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), which is both biocompatible and biodegradable, was used as carrier material. The characteristics of drug release in vitro and in vivo and the performance of the micro-device after implantation in tumor bearing mice were evaluated. A constant release profile from in vitro test was obtained for a period of 7 days, and it correlated well with the in vivo release profile. In the distribution experiment of 5-FU micro-device, it was demonstrated that 5-FU remained in the tumor tissues for more than 7 days after implantation. Likewise, we found that the 5-FU concentration in tumor correlated well with the in vivo release. Tumors treated with 5-FU loaded micro-device of three different dosages showed significant tumor reduction (P < 0.05) compared with empty control micro-device 7 days after administration. Moreover, the implantation treatment showed enhanced efficacy compared with the intraperitoneal administration with the same dosage. These results suggested that the three-dimensional micro-device may provide a promising local and controlled release drug delivery system, which may enable delivery of multiple drugs for post-surgical chemotherapy against solid tumor.

  20. Manufacture of micro fluidic devices by laser welding using thermal transfer printing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R.; Klein, K. F.; Tobisch, T.; Thoelken, D.; Belz, M.

    2016-03-01

    Micro-fluidic devices are widely used today in the areas of medical diagnostics and drug research, as well as for applications within the process, electronics and chemical industry. Microliters of fluids or single cell to cell interactions can be conveniently analyzed with such devices using fluorescence imaging, phase contrast microscopy or spectroscopic techniques. Typical micro-fluidic devices consist of a thermoplastic base component with chambers and channels covered by a hermetic fluid and gas tight sealed lid component. Both components are usually from the same or similar thermoplastic material. Different mechanical, adhesive or thermal joining processes can be used to assemble base component and lid. Today, laser beam welding shows the potential to become a novel manufacturing opportunity for midsize and large scale production of micro-fluidic devices resulting in excellent processing quality by localized heat input and low thermal stress to the device during processing. For laser welding, optical absorption of the resin and laser wavelength has to be matched for proper joining. This paper will focus on a new approach to prepare micro-fluidic channels in such devices using a thermal transfer printing process, where an optical absorbing layer absorbs the laser energy. Advantages of this process will be discussed in combination with laser welding of optical transparent micro-fluidic devices.

  1. Are bioresorbable polylactate devices comparable to titanium devices for stabilizing Le Fort I advancement?

    PubMed

    Blakey, G H; Rossouw, E; Turvey, T A; Phillips, C; Proffit, W R; White, R P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether skeletal and dental outcomes following Le Fort I surgery differed when stabilization was performed with polylactate bioresorbable devices or titanium devices. Fifty-seven patients with preoperative records and at least 1 year postoperative records were identified and grouped according to the stabilization method. All cephalometric X-rays were traced and digitized by a single operator. Analysis of covariance was used to compare the postsurgical change between the two stabilization methods. Twenty-seven patients received bioresorbable devices (group R), while 30 received titanium devices (group M). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with respect to gender, race/ethnicity, age, or dental and skeletal movements during surgery. Subtle postsurgical differences were noted, but were not statistically significant. Stabilization of Le Fort I advancement with polylactate bioresorbable and titanium devices produced similar clinical outcomes at 1 year following surgery.

  2. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Grimmer, J.; Xu, S.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Wiemerslage, G.

    1997-08-01

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured.

  3. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  4. An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to Control Micro Aerial Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to Control Micro Aerial Vehicles Ming Hou...Report DRDC Toronto TR 2010-075 October 2010 An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to...drives the need for a small and light controller which will not hinder a soldier carrying it. This requirement brings an issue of designing an

  5. Mandibular Advancing Positive Pressure Apnea Remediation Device (MAPPARD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    wiki/Starling_resistor Lankford, D. A., Proctor, C. D., & Richard, R. (2005). Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) changes in bariatric surgery ...Mandibular Advancing Device (after Schlaflabor-Saletu, n.d.). ............ 8  Figure 4.  Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (before and after surgery ) (from...Lastly, when behavioral and medical techniques have been exhausted the last OSA reduction technique is surgery . Within the last 25 years, the

  6. Insertion devices for the Advanced Light Source at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Savoy, R.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will be the first of the new generation of dedicated synchrotron light sources to be put into operation. Specially designed insertion devices will be required to realize the high brightness photon beams made possible by the low emittance of the electron beam. The complement of insertion devices on the ALS will include undulators with periods as short as 3.9 cm and one or more high field wigglers. The first device to be designed is a 5 m long, 5 cm period, hybrid undulator. The goal of very high brightness and high harmonic output imposes unusually tight tolerances on the magnetic field quality and thus on the mechanical structure. The design process, using a generic structure for all undulators, is described. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Materials Advances for Next-Generation Ingestible Electronic Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Electronic medical implants have collectively transformed the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, but have many inherent limitations. Electronic implants require invasive surgeries, operate in challenging microenvironments, and are susceptible to bacterial infection and persistent inflammation. Novel materials and nonconventional device fabrication strategies may revolutionize the way electronic devices are integrated with the body. Ingestible electronic devices offer many advantages compared with implantable counterparts that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies ranging from gastrointestinal infections to diabetes. This review summarizes current technologies and highlights recent materials advances. Specific focus is dedicated to next-generation materials for packaging, circuit design, and on-board power supplies that are benign, nontoxic, and even biodegradable. Future challenges and opportunities are also highlighted.

  8. Saga, A Small Advanced Geochemistry Assembly With Micro-rover For The Exploration Of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckner, J.; Saga Team

    During future lander missions on Mars, Moon, or Mercury, it is highly advisable to extend the reach of instruments and to bring them to the actual sites of interest to measure in-situ selected surface samples (rocks, soils, or regolith). Particularly, geo- chemical measurements (determination of chemistry, mineralogy, and surface texture) are of utmost importance, because they provide key data on the nature of the sur- face samples. The obtained data will contribute to the classification of these samples. On Mars, weathering processes can also be studied provided some grinding tools are available. Also, the existence of ancient water activities, if any, can be searched for (e.g. sediments, hydroxides, hydrated minerals, or evaporates). The combined geo- chemical data sets of several samples and one/or several landing sites provide an im- portant base for the understanding of planetary surface processes and, hence, plan- etary evolution. A light-weight integrated instrument package and a micro-rover is proposed for future geochemical investigations. SAGA (Small Advanced Geochem- istry Assembly) will consist of several small geochemistry instruments and a tool that are packaged in a compact payload cab: the chemical Alpha Particle X-Ray Spec- trometer (APXS), the mineralogical Mössbauer Spectrometer (MIMOS), the textural close-up camera (MIROCAM), and a blower/grinder tool. These instruments have or will get flight heritage on upcoming ESA and NASA missions. The modularity of the concept permits to attach SAGA to any deployment device, specially, to the pro- posed small, lightweight micro-rover (dubbed SAGA?XT). Micro-rover technology has been developed for many years in Europe. One of the most advanced concepts is the tracked micro-rover SNanokhodT, developed recently in the frame of ESASs & cedil; Technology Research Programme (TRP). It has a total mass of about 3.5 kg (includ- ing payload and parts on the lander). This micro-rover is designed to drive to

  9. Micro-and Nano-Optomechanical Devices for Sensors, Oscillators, and Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0345 (MICRO-AND NANO-OPTOMECHANICAL DEVICES FOR SENSORS , OSCILLATORS, AND PHOTONICS Oskar Painter CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF...DEVICES FOR SENSORS , OSCILLATORS, AND PHOTONICS 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0284 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S...coupling between light and mechanical motion could be realized via radiation pressure. Application of these devices to mechanical sensors , microwave

  10. Micro- and nano-scale optoelectronic devices using vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joushaghani, Arash

    Miniaturization has the potential to reduce the size, cost, and power requirements of active optical devices. However, implementing (sub)wavelength-scale electro-optic switches with high efficiency, low insertion loss, and high extinction ratios remains challenging due to their small active volumes. Here, we use the insulator-metal phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2), which exhibits a large and reversible change in the refractive index across the phase transition to demonstrate compact, broadband, and efficient switches and photodetectors with record-setting characteristics. We begin by analyzing the electrical and optical properties of VO2 thin films across the phase transition and discuss the fabrication processes that yield micron- and nano-scale VO2 devices. We then demonstrate a surface plasmon thermo-optic switch, which achieves an extinction ratio of 10 dB in a 5 um long device, a record for plasmonic devices. The switch operates over a 100 nm optical bandwidth, and exhibits a thermally limited switching time of 40 mus. We investigate the current and voltage induced switching of VO2 in nano-gap junctions and show optical switching times as short as 20 ns. The two terminal VO2 junctions are incorporated in a silicon photonics platform to yield silicon-VO2 hybrid waveguide devices with a record extinction ratio of 12 dB in a 1 mum long device. In photodetector mode, the devices exhibit a nonlinear responsivity greater than 12 A/W for optical powers less than 1 muW. This device is the smallest electrically controlled and integrated switch and photodetector capable of achieving extinction ratios > 10 dB/mum. We finally investigate the ultra-fast thermal heating in gold nano-apertures and demonstrate that electron heating can change the gold lattice temperature by 300 K in tens of picoseconds. These nano-apertures can be hybridized with VO2 to demonstrate high extinction and ultrafast optical switches.

  11. Integration of isothermal amplification methods in microfluidic devices: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Maria Chiara; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2017-04-15

    The integration of nucleic acids detection assays in microfluidic devices represents a highly promising approach for the development of convenient, cheap and efficient diagnostic tools for clinical, food safety and environmental monitoring applications. Such tools are expected to operate at the point-of-care and in resource-limited settings. The amplification of the target nucleic acid sequence represents a key step for the development of sensitive detection protocols. The integration in microfluidic devices of the most popular technology for nucleic acids amplifications, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), is significantly limited by the thermal cycling needed to obtain the target sequence amplification. This review provides an overview of recent advances in integration of isothermal amplification methods in microfluidic devices. Isothermal methods, that operate at constant temperature, have emerged as promising alternative to PCR and greatly simplify the implementation of amplification methods in point-of-care diagnostic devices and devices to be used in resource-limited settings. Possibilities offered by isothermal methods for digital droplet amplification are discussed.

  12. Microfluidic device based on a micro-hydrocyclone for particle-liquid separation.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, P; Bagdi, P; Sen, A K

    2011-12-07

    This paper presents theoretical analysis, design, simulation, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device ('Micro-hydrocyclone') for separation of micron and submicron size solid particles from liquid in a particle liquid mixture. A theoretical analysis of the micro-hydrocyclone is performed to understand the physics and develop suitable design models. The structure of the proposed device is designed based on the Bradley model, as it offers lower cut-size thus making it suitable for microfluidics applications. The operational parameters are derived from the dimensional group model. The particle separation process inside the micro-hydrocyclone is simulated by solving fluid flows using Navier-Stokes equations and particle dynamics using a Lagrangian approach in a Eulerian fluid. The influence of inlet velocity and density on separation efficiency is investigated. The device is fabricated with SU-8 photoresist on a PMMA substrate using a combination of photolithography and micro-milling. Experiments are performed to demonstrate particle-liquid separation using polystyrene microbeads suspended in PBS as the feed sample. The influence of inlet velocity and particle size on particle separation efficiency is measured and compared with that obtained from simulations and a good match was found. The proposed device can be easily integrated with micro-environments thus it is suitable for lab-on-chip and microsystems development. The device may have applications in chemical analysis, materials research, point-of-care, blood sample preparation and other biomedical applications.

  13. [An implantable micro-device using wireless power transmission for measuring aortic aneurysm sac pressure].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xudong; Ge, Bin; Wang, Wenxing

    2013-08-01

    In order to detect endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), we developed an implantable micro-device based on wireless power transmission to measure aortic aneurysm sac pressure. The implantable micro-device is composed of a miniature wireless pressure sensor, an energy transmitting coil, a data recorder and a data processing platform. Power transmission without interconnecting wires is performed by a transmitting coil and a receiving coil. The coupling efficiency of wireless power transmission depends on the coupling coefficient between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil. With theoretical analysis and experimental study, we optimized the geometry of the receiving coil to increase the coupling coefficient. In order to keep efficiency balance and satisfy the maximizing conditions, we designed a closed loop power transmission circuit, including a receiving voltage feedback module based on wireless communication. The closed loop improved the stability and reliability of transmission energy. The prototype of the micro-device has been developed and the experiment has been performed. The experiments showed that the micro-device was feasible and valid. For normal operation, the distance between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil is smaller than 8cm. Besides, the distance between the micro-device and the data recorder is within 50cm.

  14. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  15. Gas/Surface Interaction Study Applied to Si-based Materials Used in Driven Micro- and Nano-scale devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Driven Micro - and Nano -scale devices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-03-D-0001, Delivery Order 0033 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...surface atoms plays an essential role in operation of current and future micro - and nano -scale devices (MEMS) as well as in other applied problems... Micro - and Nano -scale devices Author: Prof. Sergey Borisov Institution: Ural State University General & Molecular Physics

  16. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  17. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  18. TiO2 micro-devices fabricated by laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongsheng; Miao, Junjie; Tian, Ye; Guo, Chuanfei; Zhang, Jianming; Ren, Tianling; Liu, Qian

    2011-08-29

    Constructing micro/nanostructures based on TiO2 has attracted increasing attention due to the excellent properties of TiO2. In this study, we report a simple method to directly fabricate TiO2 micro-devices, including Fresnel lens, gear structures and suspended beams only by laser direct writing and selective-etching processing. This route shows great potential in fabricating TiO2 structures for micro-electro-mechanical systems, diffractive optical elements and bio-applications, owing to its maskless process, low cost, and flexible dry/wet alternative etching treatment.

  19. Adaptive laser shock micro-forming for MEMS device applications.

    PubMed

    Zou, R; Wang, M; Wang, S L; Li, S; Zhang, C; Deng, L; Lu, Y F; Chen, K P

    2017-02-20

    Laser shock micro-forming is a non-thermal laser forming method that uses laser-induced shockwave to modify surface properties and to adjust shapes and geometry of work pieces. The magnitude and spatial distribution of the laser-induced shockwaves depend on the energy profiles of the laser beam focused on sample surfaces. In this paper, we present an adaptive optical technique to engineer spatial profiles of laser beams to control the shapes, sizes, and locations of the laser-induced shockwaves and the resulting forming features. Using a spatial light modulator, this adaptive laser beam forming tool was used to process free-standing MEMS structures in aluminum, which has led to highly uniform forming features. Shockwave simultaneously excited by multiple laser beams generated by the spatial light modulator and its effects on the micro-forming process were also studied. The results presented in this paper show that the adaptive optics laser beam forming is an effective and flexible method to generate shockwave with various shapes and sizes of wavefront and at multiple locations for laser processing at microscales.

  20. Nanowire-integrated microporous silicon membrane for continuous fluid transport in micro cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Hongyun; Cheng, Jim C.; Pisano, Albert P.

    2013-10-01

    We report an efficient passive micro pump system combining the physical properties of nanowires and micropores. This nanowire-integrated microporous silicon membrane was created to feed coolant continuously onto the surface of the wick in a micro cooling device to ensure it remains hydrated and in case of dryout, allow for regeneration of the system. The membrane was fabricated by photoelectrochemical etching to form micropores followed by hydrothermal growth of nanowires. This study shows a promising approach to address thermal management challenges for next generation electronic devices with absence of external power.

  1. Nanowire-integrated microporous silicon membrane for continuous fluid transport in micro cooling device

    SciTech Connect

    So, Hongyun; Pisano, Albert P.; Cheng, Jim C.

    2013-10-14

    We report an efficient passive micro pump system combining the physical properties of nanowires and micropores. This nanowire-integrated microporous silicon membrane was created to feed coolant continuously onto the surface of the wick in a micro cooling device to ensure it remains hydrated and in case of dryout, allow for regeneration of the system. The membrane was fabricated by photoelectrochemical etching to form micropores followed by hydrothermal growth of nanowires. This study shows a promising approach to address thermal management challenges for next generation electronic devices with absence of external power.

  2. Technical use of compact micro-onde devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sortais, P.; Lamy, T.; Medard, J.; Angot, J.

    2012-02-15

    Due to the very small size of a COMIC (Compact MIcrowave and Coaxial) device [P. Sortais, T. Lamy, J. Medard, J. Angot, L. Latrasse, and T. Thuillier, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B31 (2010)] it is possible to install such plasma or ion source inside very different technical environments. New applications of such a device are presented, mainly for industrial applications. We have now designed ion sources for highly focused ion beam devices, ion beam machining ion guns, or thin film deposition machines. We will mainly present new capabilities opened by the use of a multi-beam system for thin film deposition based on sputtering by medium energy ion beams. With the new concept of multi-beam sputtering (MBS), it is possible to open new possibilities concerning the ion beam sputtering (IBS) technology, especially for large size deposition of high uniformity thin films. By the use of multi-spots of evaporation, each one corresponding to an independent tuning of an individual COMIC ion source, it will be very easy to co-evaporate different components.

  3. Efficient Si photovoltaic devices with integrated micro/nano holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cansizoglu, Hilal; Gao, Yang; Kaya, Ahmet; Ghandiparsi, Soroush; Polat, Kazim G.; Wang, Yichuan; Zhang, Runzhou; Reggad, Hind; Mayet, Ahmed; Ponizovskaya Devine, Ekaterina; Islam, M. Saif

    2016-09-01

    Efficient light harvesting in a thin layer of crystalline Si can be realized by implementing nanoscale pillars and holes to the device structure. The major drawback of the pillars and holes based photovoltaic devices is high surface to volume ratio, contributing to an increase in surface recombination rate of the photo-generated carriers. The common techniques used in pillars/holes fabrication such as dry etching make the surface even worse by bombarding it with high energy ions. Therefore, such damaged surfaces of high aspect ratio structures need to be effectively passivated. In this study, we demonstrate a hole based thin crystalline Si photovoltaic device with enhanced open circuit voltage and short circuit current after a successful surface passivation process through a wet oxidation. In addition, the effect of passivation layer fabricated by rapid thermal oxide growth on photo response is investigated. A successful fabrication of thin crystalline Si solar cells can lead to the applications of ultra-thin, highly efficient, flexible and wearable energy sources.

  4. The development of microbatteries based on three-dimensional architectures for autonomous micro devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Hong-Seok

    2007-12-01

    The goal of fabricating three-dimensional (3D) microbatteries is to improve upon the performance of 2D microbatteries or thin-film batteries by reconfiguring existing materials in a more advanced architecture. 3D battery architectures offer a new approach for miniaturized power sources. These batteries are designed to have a small areal foot print and yet provide sufficient power and energy density to operate autonomous MEMS devices. The more convenient approaches for fabricating such batteries are based on micromachining techniques such as electrodeposition of high aspect ratio metal rods in an array configuration. Three types of three-dimensional microbatteries were fabricated and characterized: Ni-Zn, zinc-air, and Ag-Zn. These different types of microbatteries use different chemistries but all have the common feature of an out-of-plane array of micro-post electrodes. A 3D Ni-Zn microbattery was fabricated and demonstrated proper charge-discharge behavior for the first few cycles. The development of 3D zinc-air microbattery showed high discharge capability under various discharge conditions. Furthermore, performance of 3D zinc-air microbattery was demonstrated by successfully powering an electronic device. During discharge, the 3D zinc-air microbattery exhibited an electrode reaction which formed hollow ZnO electrodes by the Kirkendall effect. This electrode reaction strongly supports the functionality of the 3D microbattery. The fabrication of the Ag-Zn microbattery was accomplished by Ag electrode formation, separator coating, and Zn sedimentation. Due to imperfections in the separator coating, the 3D Ag-Zn microbattery had electrical shorts.

  5. Nanoscale Copper and Copper Compounds for Advanced Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lih-Juann

    2016-12-01

    Copper has been in use for at least 10,000 years. Copper alloys, such as bronze and brass, have played important roles in advancing civilization in human history. Bronze artifacts date at least 6500 years. On the other hand, discovery of intriguing properties and new applications in contemporary technology for copper and its compounds, particularly on nanoscale, have continued. In this paper, examples for the applications of Cu and Cu alloys for advanced device applications will be given on Cu metallization in microelectronics devices, Cu nanobats as field emitters, Cu2S nanowire array as high-rate capability and high-capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries, Cu-Te nanostructures for field-effect transistor, Cu3Si nanowires as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers, single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high-efficiency solar cell, multilevel Cu2S resistive memory, superlattice Cu2S-Ag2S heterojunction diodes, and facet-dependent Cu2O diode.

  6. [Device-aided therapies in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, A A

    2016-01-01

    Advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) is a consequence of the severe neurodegenerative process and are characterized by the development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, aggravation of non-motor symptoms. Treatment with peroral and transdermal drugs can't provide an adequate control of PD symptoms and quality-of-life of the patients at this stage of disease. Currently, three device-aided therapies: deep brain stimulation (DBS), intrajejunal infusion of duodopa, subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine can be used in treatment of patients with advanced stages of PD. Timely administration of device-aided therapies and right choice of the method determine, to a large extent, the efficacy and safety of their use. Despite the high efficacy of all three methods with respect to the fluctuation of separate symptoms, each method has its own peculiarities. The authors reviewed the data on the expediency of using each method according to the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms, patient's age, PD duration, concomitant pathology and social support of the patients.

  7. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymers for Light Emitting Devices

    PubMed Central

    AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  8. ICP etching of silicon for micro and nanoscale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Michael David

    The physical structuring of silicon is one of the cornerstones of modern microelectronics and integrated circuits. Typical structuring of silicon requires generating a plasma to chemically or physically etch silicon. Although many tools have been created to do this, the most finely honed tool is the Inductively Couple Plasma Reactive Ion Etcher. This tool has the ability to finesse structures from silicon unachievable on other machines. Extracting structures such as high aspect ratio silicon nanowires requires more than just this tool, however. It requires etch masks which can adequately protect the silicon without interacting with the etching plasma and highly tuned etch chemistry able to protect the silicon structures during the etching process. In the work presented here, three highly tuned etches for silicon, and its oxide, will be described in detail. The etches presented utilize a type of etch chemistry which provides passivation while simultaneously etching, thus permitting silicon structures previously unattainable. To cover the range of applications, one etch is tuned for deep reactive ion etching of high aspect ratio micro-structures in silicon, while another is tuned for high aspect ratio nanoscale structures. The third etch described is tuned for creating structures in silicon dioxide. Following the description of these etches, two etch masks for silicon will be described. The first mask will detail a highly selective etch mask uniquely capable of protecting silicon for both etches described while being compatible with mainstream semiconductor fabrication facilities. This mask is aluminum oxide. The second mask detailed permits for a completely dry lithography on the micro and nanoscale, FIB implanted Ga etch masks. The third chapter will describe the fabrication and in situ electrical testing of silicon nanowires and nanopillars created using the methods previously described. A unique method for contacting these nanowires is also described which has

  9. Protocol for Biofilm Streamer Formation in a Microfluidic Device with Micro-pillars

    PubMed Central

    Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Sun, Xiaohui; Valiei, Amin; Mukherjee, Partha; Thundat, Thomas; Liu, Yang; Kumar, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    Several bacterial species possess the ability to attach to surfaces and colonize them in the form of thin films called biofilms. Biofilms that grow in porous media are relevant to several industrial and environmental processes such as wastewater treatment and CO2 sequestration. We used Pseudomonas fluorescens, a Gram-negative aerobic bacterium, to investigate biofilm formation in a microfluidic device that mimics porous media. The microfluidic device consists of an array of micro-posts, which were fabricated using soft-lithography. Subsequently, biofilm formation in these devices with flow was investigated and we demonstrate the formation of filamentous biofilms known as streamers in our device. The detailed protocols for fabrication and assembly of microfluidic device are provided here along with the bacterial culture protocols. Detailed procedures for experimentation with the microfluidic device are also presented along with representative results. PMID:25178035

  10. Lattice Boltzmann Modeling of Micro-fluidic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Clague, D S

    2002-01-28

    The results to date do indeed show that the lattice Boltzmann method accurately solves relevant, non-trivial flow problems. The parallelization of both the fluid and the mobile species in flow has enhanced this capability such that it is useful for solving relevant problems in a timely fashion. The initial studies of stationary or capture species revealed evidence of hydrodynamic screening between upstream and downstream particles. Numerical studies reveal that the critical length for which the test particle is hydrodynamically decoupled from upstream and downstream particles is on the order of 30 sphere radii. For mobile species, the LB capability was shown to be naturally suited for predicting the hydrodynamic lift phenomenon (inertial lift). A conversion factor was developed based on scaling arguments to include relevant forces generated by external fields. Using this conversion, an analytic solution for the Dielectrophoretic force was included into the LB capability which enabled the study of Dielectrophoretic particle capture. The Non-Newtonian enhancements have expanded the applicability of the LB capability to more physical systems. Specifically, with the bead-n-spring representation of macromolecules researchers will be able to study chain dynamics in micro-, physiological and Bio-MEMS environments. Furthermore, the ability to capture the shear thinning behavior, without any increase in computational time, positions this capability to be applied to a whole host of new problems involving biofluids.

  11. Device and nondestructive method to determine subsurface micro-structure in dense materials

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Jiangang

    2006-05-09

    A method and a device to detect subsurface three-dimensional micro-structure in a sample by illuminating the sample with light of a given polarization and detecting light emanating from the sample that has a different direction of polarization by means of a confocal optical system.

  12. Micro-PIT/V --- Simultaneous temperature and velocity fields in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottebaum, Tait

    2008-11-01

    The use of encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC) for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields in microfluidic devices has been demonstrated. Implementation of TLC thermometry at the micro-scale is significantly different than at the macro-scale due to the constraints on imaging and illumination configurations and the proximity of the measurements to interfaces and surfaces from which light will scatter. Unlike in micro-PIV, wavelength filtering (such as with fluorescent particles) cannot be used to remove undesired reflections, because the temperature information is carried by the particle color. Therefore, circular polarization filtering is used, exploiting the circular dichroism of TLC. Micro-PIT/V will enable new investigations into the physics of microfluidic devices involving temperature gradients, such as thermocapillary actuated devices and many ``lab-on-a-chip'' applications involving temperature sensitive chemical and biological processes. In addition, the design of operational devices can be improved by applying micro-PIT/V to the characterization of prototypes.

  13. Observing the Sun with micro-interferometric devices: a didactic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrère, D.; Absil, O.; Hanot, C.; Riaud, P.; Magette, A.; Marion, L.; Wertz, O.; Finet, F.; Steenackers, M.; Habraken, S.; Surdej, A.; Surdej, J.

    2014-04-01

    Measuring the angular diameter of celestial bodies has long been the main purpose of stellar interferometry and was its historical motivation. Nowadays, stellar interferometry is widely used for various other scientific purposes that require very high angular resolution measurements. In terms of angular spatial scales probed, observing distant stars located 10 to 100~pc away with a large hectometric interferometer is equivalent to observing our Sun with a micrometric baseline. Based on this idea, we have manufactured a set of micro-interferometric devices and tested them on the sky. The micro-interferometers consist of a chrome layer deposited on a glass plate that has been drilled by laser lithography to produce micron-sized holes with configurations corresponding to proposed interferometer projects such as CARLINA, ELSA, KEOPS, and OVLA. In this paper, we describe these interferometric devices and present interferometric observations of the Sun made in the framework of Astrophysics lectures being taught at the Liège University. By means of a simple photographic camera placed behind a micro-interferometric device, we observed the Sun and derived its angular size. This experiment provides a very didactic way to easily obtain fringe patterns similar to those that will be obtained with future large imaging arrays. A program written in C also allows to reproduce the various point spread functions and fringe patterns observed with the micro-interferometric devices for different types of sources, including the Sun.

  14. Multi-layer micro/nanofluid devices with bio-nanovalves

    DOEpatents

    Li, Hao; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Auciello, Orlando H.; Firestone, Millicent A.

    2013-01-01

    A user-friendly multi-layer micro/nanofluidic flow device and micro/nano fabrication process are provided for numerous uses. The multi-layer micro/nanofluidic flow device can comprise: a substrate, such as indium tin oxide coated glass (ITO glass); a conductive layer of ferroelectric material, preferably comprising a PZT layer of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) positioned on the substrate; electrodes connected to the conductive layer; a nanofluidics layer positioned on the conductive layer and defining nanochannels; a microfluidics layer positioned upon the nanofluidics layer and defining microchannels; and biomolecular nanovalves providing bio-nanovalves which are moveable from a closed position to an open position to control fluid flow at a nanoscale.

  15. Insertion device operating experience at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmer, John; Ramanathan, Mohan; Smith, Martin; Merritt, Michael

    2002-03-01

    The Advanced Photon Source has 29 insertion devices (IDs) installed in the 7 GeV electron storage ring; 28 of these devices, most of which are 3.3 cm period undulators, use two horizontal permanent magnet structures positioned over a straight vacuum chamber. A support and drive mechanism allows the vertical gap between the magnet structures to be varied, thus changing the x-ray energy produced by the ID [J. Viccaro, Proc. SPIE 1345, 28 (1990); E. Gluskin, J. Synchrotron Radiat. 5, 189 (1998)]. Most of these IDs use a drive scheme with two stepper motors, one driving each end through a mechanism synchronizing the upper and lower magnet structures. Our experience in almost 5 yr of operating this system will be discussed. All of the IDs are in continuous operation for approximately 10 weeks at a time. Reliability of operation is of paramount importance, as access to the storage ring for servicing of a single ID inhibits operation for all users. Our experience in achieving highly reliable ID operation is reviewed. Accuracy of operation and repeatability over time are also vital. To this end, these devices use absolute optical linear encoders with submicron resolution for primary position feedback. Absolute rotary encoders are used as a backup to the linear encoders. The benefits and limitations of each type of encoder, and our experience dealing with radiation and electrical noise are reviewed. The insertion devices operate down to gaps as small as 8.5 mm, with clearance over the vacuum chamber as small as 200 μm. The vacuum chamber has a minimum wall thickness of only 1 mm. A number of levels of safeguards are used to prevent contact between the magnet structure and the vacuum chamber. These safeguards and their evolution after gaining operational experience are presented.

  16. MEMS Micro-Translation Device with Improved Linear Travel Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abushagur, Mustafa A. G. (Inventor); Ferguson, Cynthia K. (Inventor); Nordin, Gregory P. (Inventor); English, Jennifer M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A microscopic translation device for a microelectromechanical system includes a pair of linear stator assemblies disposed in spaced relation to define an elongate channel. Each assembly is formed by a plurality of stators arranged in a row along the channel. A shuttle member is disposed between the stator assemblies for translating movement along the channel. The shuttle member includes a plurality of rotors extending outwardly from opposite sides. The shuttle is grounded through the stator assemblies and includes a mounting area for an object to be translated. Electrical lines are individually connected to alternate stators of a plurality of groups of the stators. A current supply sequentially supplies current through the electrical lines to the alternate stators so as to effect charging of the stators in a predetermined sequence. This produces a tangential capacitive force that causes translation of the shuttle.

  17. All-inkjet-printed flexible ZnO micro photodetector for a wearable UV monitoring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Van-Thai; Wei, Yuefan; Yang, Hongyi; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Du, Hejun

    2017-03-01

    Fabrication of small-sized patterns of inorganic semiconductor onto flexible substrates is a major concern when manufacturing wearable devices for measuring either biometric or environmental parameters. In this study, micro-sized flexible ZnO UV photodetectors have been thoroughly prepared by a facile inkjet printing technology and followed with heat treatments. A simple ink recipe of zinc acetate precursor solution was investigated. It is found that the substrate temperature during zinc precursor ink depositing has significant effects on ZnO pattern shape, film morphology, and crystallization. The device fabricated from the additive manufacturing approach has good bendability, Ohmic contact, short response time as low as 0.3 s, and high on/off ratio of 3525. We observed the sensor’s dependence of response/decay time by the illuminating UV light intensity. The whole process is based on additive manufacturing which has many benefits such as rapid prototyping, saving material, being environmentally friendly, and being capable of creating high-resolution patterns. In addition, this method can be applied to flexible substrates, which makes the device more applicable for applications requiring flexibility such as wearable devices. The proposed all-inkjet-printing approach for a micro-sized ZnO UV photodetector would significantly simplify the fabrication process of micro-sized inorganic semiconductor-based devices. A potential application is real-time monitoring of UV light exposure to warn users about unsafe direct sunlight to implement suitable avoidance solutions.

  18. All-inkjet-printed flexible ZnO micro photodetector for a wearable UV monitoring device.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van-Thai; Wei, Yuefan; Yang, Hongyi; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Du, Hejun

    2017-03-03

    Fabrication of small-sized patterns of inorganic semiconductor onto flexible substrates is a major concern when manufacturing wearable devices for measuring either biometric or environmental parameters. In this study, micro-sized flexible ZnO UV photodetectors have been thoroughly prepared by a facile inkjet printing technology and followed with heat treatments. A simple ink recipe of zinc acetate precursor solution was investigated. It is found that the substrate temperature during zinc precursor ink depositing has significant effects on ZnO pattern shape, film morphology, and crystallization. The device fabricated from the additive manufacturing approach has good bendability, Ohmic contact, short response time as low as 0.3 s, and high on/off ratio of 3525. We observed the sensor's dependence of response/decay time by the illuminating UV light intensity. The whole process is based on additive manufacturing which has many benefits such as rapid prototyping, saving material, being environmentally friendly, and being capable of creating high-resolution patterns. In addition, this method can be applied to flexible substrates, which makes the device more applicable for applications requiring flexibility such as wearable devices. The proposed all-inkjet-printing approach for a micro-sized ZnO UV photodetector would significantly simplify the fabrication process of micro-sized inorganic semiconductor-based devices. A potential application is real-time monitoring of UV light exposure to warn users about unsafe direct sunlight to implement suitable avoidance solutions.

  19. Thermoelastic stress analysis of multilayered films in a micro-thermoelectric cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Mei; Wang, Xing-Zhe; Zhang, Wen-Jie

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical solution for the thermoelastic stress in a typical in-plane's thin-film micro-thermoelectric cooling device under different operating conditions. The distributions of the permissible temperature fields in multilayered thin-films are analytically obtained, and the characteristics, including maximum temperature difference and maximum refrigerating output of the thermoelectric device, are discussed for two operating conditions. Analytical expressions of the thermoelastic stresses in the layered thermoelectric thin-films induced by the temperature difference are formulated based on the theory of multilayer system. The results demonstrate that, the geometric dimension is a significant factor which remarkably affects the thermoelastic stresses. The stress distributions in layers of semiconductor thermoelements, insulating and supporting membrane show distinctly different features. The present work may profitably guide the optimization design of high-efficiency micro-thermoelectric cooling devices.

  20. Gas/Surface Interaction Study Applied to Si-based Materials Used in Driven Micro- and Nano-scale Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    1 Final Report Gas/Surface Interaction Study Applied to Si-based Materials Used in Driven Micro - and Nano -scale devices...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gas/Surface Interaction Study Applied to Si-based Materials Used in Driven Micro - and Nano -scale devices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Scanning Probe Microscopy open new opportunities in surface diagnostics at micro - and nano - scales. Because of essential increase in a role that gas

  1. Radiation doses to insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Moog, E.R.; Den Hartog, P.K.; Semones, E.J.; Job, P.K.

    1997-09-01

    Dose measurements made on and around the insertion devices (IDs) at the Advanced Photon Source are reported. Attempts are made to compare these dose rates to dose rates that have been reported to cause radiation-induced demagnetization, but comparisons are complicated by such factors as the particular magnet material and the techniques used in its manufacture, the spectrum and type of radiation, and the demagnetizing field seen by the magnet. The spectrum of radiation at the IDs. It has almost no effect on the dose to the downstream ends of the IDs, however, since much of the radiation travels through the ID vacuum chamber and cannot be readily shielded. Opening the gaps of the IDs during injection and at other times also helps decrease the radiation exposure.

  2. Micro- and Macrointegration Profiles for Medical Devices and Medical IT Systems.

    PubMed

    Pahontu, Raluca; Merzweiler, Angela; Schneider, Gerd; Bergh, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Collecting, saving, and providing patient data are essential processes of documentation in a hospital. Many IT systems have evolved to provide solutions in this area. The automatic transfer of medical device data to these information systems is a new challenge for hospital IT systems. Some vendors are focused on the integration of medical IT systems and medical devices. They provide great solutions with magnificent features. Nevertheless, those integration solutions are proprietary and isolated, limiting the operator's selection of his medical devices and medical IT systems. Standardizing communication processes within the operating room and between medical devices and medical IT systems brings benefits for both patient and hospital staff. This work identifies and proposes micro- and macrointegration profiles as a basis for new IHE Integration Profiles for both medical IT systems and medical devices of the operating room.

  3. Mechanism Development, Testing, and Lessons Learned for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamoreaux, Christopher D.; Landeck, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) has been developed at NASA Johnson Space Center, for the International Space Station (ISS) program. ARED is a multi-exercise, high-load resistive exercise device, designed for long duration, human space missions. ARED will enable astronauts to effectively maintain their muscle strength and bone mass in the micro-gravity environment more effectively than any other existing devices. ARED's resistance is provided via two, 20.3 cm (8 in) diameter vacuum cylinders, which provide a nearly constant resistance source. ARED also has a means to simulate the inertia that is felt during a 1-G exercise routine via the flywheel subassembly, which is directly tied to the motion of the ARED cylinders. ARED is scheduled to fly on flight ULF 2 to the ISS and will be located in Node 1. Presently, ARED is in the middle of its qualification and acceptance test program. An extensive testing program and engineering evaluation has increased the reliability of ARED by bringing potential design issues to light before flight production. Some of those design issues, resolutions, and design details will be discussed in this paper.

  4. Preparation of micro gold devices on poly(dimethylsiloxane) chips with region-selective electroless plating.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhenxia; Chen, Hengwu; Ma, Dan

    2009-10-15

    A novel protocol for fabrication of micro gold devices on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrates was developed on the basis of region-selective electroless plating. The layout of a micro gold device was first photochemically patterned onto the PDMS surface through a UV induced poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) grafting process. The carboxylic moieties on the grafted PAA served as the scaffold for a series of wet chemical reactions that led to the immobilization of gold nanoparticles in the UV-exposed region, where electroless plating then occurred under the catalysis of the nanoparticles. Gold devices fabricated with such a protocol could tolerate the Scotch tape test and survive in a repeated bending-straightening test. They also showed good stability in acidic and alkaline solutions, possessed almost the same electrochemical properties as a standard gold disk electrode, and allowed thiol-compounds to form a perfect self-assembled monolayer on their surfaces. The fabricated micro gold electrode was demonstrated to be suitable as the integrated amperometric detection element in a full PDMS micro electrophoresis chip.

  5. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  6. DNA Translocation and Cell Electroporation in Micro and Nanofluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Cherry

    The cell membrane is made of a thin (˜ 5nm) lipid bilayer which serves as an effective insulator and diffusion barrier for entities external to the cell from entering the cell. However, for research, diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, there is a need to deliver molecules of interest to the interior of live cells. This is usually accomplished by two methods: (a) carrier mediated delivery which consists of encapsulating the gene/molecule of interest either in an empty viral capsid or in chemically formulated lipoplex or polyplex nanoparticles, or (b) physical methods of delivery, which include the use of different kinds of forces to create reversible pores on the cell membrane (sonoporation, electroporation) or directly inject molecules to the cell cytosol (Gene Gun, microinjection). Of the aforementioned techniques, electroporation is the most commonly used due to it simplicity and ease of use. Our group recently demonstrated a nanochannel based electroporation (NEP) technique, in which two microchannels (˜40 m diameter) are connected by a nanochannel (˜ 200-400 mum diameter) in the center. A cell is positioned in one microchannel such that it makes contact with the nanochannel and transfection agents are placed in the other microchannel. An external electric field applied across the device locally porates the cell where it touches the nancohannel and drives the transfection agents into the cell. Besides maintaining high cell viability and achieving dose control, an important feature of NEP is the delivery of large molecules such as plasmids and quantum dots directly into the cell cytosol. In contrast, delivery of large plasmids during bulk electroporation, wherein cells and genes/plasmids are mixed in a buffered medium and an external electric field is applied across the mixture which electroporates the cells, is via formation of cell membrane bound aggregates which get endocytosed post pulsation. Various mechanisms of DNA transport across the membrane have

  7. Self-Transport of Condensed Liquid in Micro Cooling Device Using Distributed Meniscus Pumping.

    PubMed

    So, Hongyun; Pisano, Albert P

    2015-06-16

    This paper reports a reliable passive micro pump system combining the physical properties of a tapered microchannel and sharp microstructures. This tailored microchannel with triple-spike microstructures was created to transport condensed liquid into the reservoir chamber in a micro cooling device and in the case of chip off-mode prepare the next cooling cycle before chip on-mode, allowing the reliable and continuous circulation of coolant without liquid being trapped in the vapor channel causing dryout limitation. At the tapered channel end, the pinned liquid meniscus was distributed by a middle spike and then continued to overflow into the condenser chamber due to extended capillary action.

  8. Micro-opto-mechanical devices and systems using epitaxial lift off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camperi-Ginestet, C.; Kim, Young W.; Wilkinson, S.; Allen, M.; Jokerst, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    The integration of high quality, single crystal thin film gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium phosphide (InP) based photonic and electronic materials and devices with host microstructures fabricated from materials such as silicon (Si), glass, and polymers will enable the fabrication of the next generation of micro-opto-mechanical systems (MOMS) and optoelectronic integrated circuits. Thin film semiconductor devices deposited onto arbitrary host substrates and structures create hybrid (more than one material) near-monolithic integrated systems which can be interconnected electrically using standard inexpensive microfabrication techniques such as vacuum metallization and photolithography. These integrated systems take advantage of the optical and electronic properties of compound semiconductor devices while still using host substrate materials such as silicon, polysilicon, glass and polymers in the microstructures. This type of materials optimization for specific tasks creates higher performance systems than those systems which must use trade-offs in device performance to integrate all of the function in a single material system. The low weight of these thin film devices also makes them attractive for integration with micromechanical devices which may have difficulty supporting and translating the full weight of a standard device. These thin film devices and integrated systems will be attractive for applications, however, only when the development of low cost, high yield fabrication and integration techniques makes their use economically feasible. In this paper, we discuss methods for alignment, selective deposition, and interconnection of thin film epitaxial GaAs and InP based devices onto host substrates and host microstructures.

  9. Lightweight carbon nanotube-based structural-energy storage devices for micro unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Monica; Cole, Daniel P.; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Reddy, Arava L. M.; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Karna, Shashi P.; Bundy, Mark L.

    2012-06-01

    There is a strong need for small, lightweight energy storage devices that can satisfy the ever increasing power and energy demands of micro unmanned systems. Currently, most commercial and developmental micro unmanned systems utilize commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) lithium polymer batteries for their energy storage needs. While COTS lithium polymer batteries are the industry norm, the weight of these batteries can account for up to 60% of the overall system mass and the capacity of these batteries can limit mission durations to the order of only a few minutes. One method to increase vehicle endurance without adding mass or sacrificing payload capabilities is to incorporate multiple system functions into a single material or structure. For example, the body or chassis of a micro vehicle could be replaced with a multifunctional material that would serve as both the vehicle structure and the on-board energy storage device. In this paper we present recent progress towards the development of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based structural-energy storage devices for micro unmanned systems. Randomly oriented and vertically aligned CNT-polymer composite electrodes with varying degrees of flexibility are used as the primary building blocks for lightweight structural-supercapacitors. For the purpose of this study, the mechanical properties of the CNT-based electrodes and the charge-discharge behavior of the supercapacitor devices are examined. Because incorporating multifunctionality into a single component often degrades the properties or performance of individual structures, the performance and property tradeoffs of the CNT-based structural-energy storage devices will also be discussed.

  10. 76 FR 48169 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... following public meeting: ``Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical... multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application and public...

  11. Strategies to identify microRNA targets: New advances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNA molecules functioning to modulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, and playing an important role in many developmental and physiological processes. Ten thousand miRNAs have been discovered in various organisms. Although considerable progr...

  12. Comprehensive design and process flow configuration for micro and nano tech devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Kai; Schmidt, Thilo; Mielke, Matthias; Ortloff, Dirk; Popp, Jens; Brück, Rainer

    2010-04-01

    The development of micro and nano tech devices based on semiconductor manufacturing processes comprises the structural design as well as the definition of the manufacturing process flow. The approach is characterized by application specific fabrication flows, i.e. fabrication processes (built up by a large variety of process steps and materials) depending on the later product. Technology constraints have a great impact on the device design and vice-versa. In this paper we introduce a comprehensive methodology and based on that an environment for customer-oriented product engineering of MEMS products. The development is currently carried out in an international multi-site research project.

  13. Controlled aniline polymerization strategies for polyaniline micro- and nano self-assembling into practical electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Sami; Attout, Anne; Bertrand, Patrick

    2009-02-03

    Electroless polymerization of aniline on platinum is investigated for polyaniline micro- and nanostructuring into practical electronic devices. This type of reaction is adapted to estimate its usefulness in a lithographic process. For practical electronic device fabrication, electroless polymerization of aniline can be used to electrically bridge initially independent platinum electrodes. As this application requires a polyaniline bridge to form over a nonconductive material before an electrical contact is obtained, polyaniline growth using chemical oxidative reaction is investigated on substrates presenting surface-tension contrast patterns.

  14. Advanced Exploration Technologies: Micro and Nano Technologies Enabling Space Missions in the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabach, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    Some of the many new and advanced exploration technologies which will enable space missions in the 21st century and specifically the Manned Mars Mission are explored in this presentation. Some of these are the system on a chip, the Computed-Tomography imaging Spectrometer, the digital camera on a chip, and other Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology for space. Some of these MEMS are the silicon micromachined microgyroscope, a subliming solid micro-thruster, a micro-ion thruster, a silicon seismometer, a dewpoint microhygrometer, a micro laser doppler anemometer, and tunable diode laser (TDL) sensors. The advanced technology insertion is critical for NASA to decrease mass, volume, power and mission costs, and increase functionality, science potential and robustness.

  15. Injectable Ceramic Microcast Silicon Carbonitride (SiCN) Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) for Extreme Temperature Environments with Extension: Micro Packages for Nano-Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEM (MEMS) FOR EXTREME TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENTS WITH EXTENSION: MICRO -PACKAGES FOR NANO -DEVICES University of Colorado at Boulder...MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEM (MEMS) FOR EXTREME TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENTS WITH EXTENSION: MICRO -PACKAGES FOR NANO -DEVICES 6. AUTHOR(S) Victor M...investigate a new micro -packaging technology to create a high-vacuum, sealed environment for nano -devices integrated with other electronic or RF

  16. Advanced Micro/Nanostructures for Lithium Metal Anodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Nian‐Wu; Cheng, Xin‐Bing; Yin, Ya‐Xia

    2017-01-01

    Owning to their very high theoretical capacity, lithium metal anodes are expected to fuel the extensive practical applications in portable electronics and electric vehicles. However, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and lithium dendrite growth during lithium plating/stripping induce poor safety, low Coulombic efficiency, and short span life of lithium metal batteries. Lately, varies of micro/nanostructured lithium metal anodes are proposed to address these issues in lithium metal batteries. With the unique surface, pore, and connecting structures of different nanomaterials, lithium plating/stripping processes have been regulated. Thus the electrochemical properties and lithium morphologies have been significantly improved. These micro/nanostructured lithium metal anodes shed new light on the future applications for lithium metal batteries. PMID:28331792

  17. Advanced Micro/Nanostructures for Lithium Metal Anodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Nian-Wu; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2017-03-01

    Owning to their very high theoretical capacity, lithium metal anodes are expected to fuel the extensive practical applications in portable electronics and electric vehicles. However, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and lithium dendrite growth during lithium plating/stripping induce poor safety, low Coulombic efficiency, and short span life of lithium metal batteries. Lately, varies of micro/nanostructured lithium metal anodes are proposed to address these issues in lithium metal batteries. With the unique surface, pore, and connecting structures of different nanomaterials, lithium plating/stripping processes have been regulated. Thus the electrochemical properties and lithium morphologies have been significantly improved. These micro/nanostructured lithium metal anodes shed new light on the future applications for lithium metal batteries.

  18. Using Micro-Synchrophasor Data for Advanced Distribution Grid Planning and Operations Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila; McParland, Charles; Roberts, Ciaran

    2014-07-01

    This report reviews the potential for distribution-grid phase-angle data that will be available from new micro-synchrophasors (µPMUs) to be utilized in existing distribution-grid planning and operations analysis. This data could augment the current diagnostic capabilities of grid analysis software, used in both planning and operations for applications such as fault location, and provide data for more accurate modeling of the distribution system. µPMUs are new distribution-grid sensors that will advance measurement and diagnostic capabilities and provide improved visibility of the distribution grid, enabling analysis of the grid’s increasingly complex loads that include features such as large volumes of distributed generation. Large volumes of DG leads to concerns on continued reliable operation of the grid, due to changing power flow characteristics and active generation, with its own protection and control capabilities. Using µPMU data on change in voltage phase angle between two points in conjunction with new and existing distribution-grid planning and operational tools is expected to enable model validation, state estimation, fault location, and renewable resource/load characterization. Our findings include: data measurement is outstripping the processing capabilities of planning and operational tools; not every tool can visualize a voltage phase-angle measurement to the degree of accuracy measured by advanced sensors, and the degree of accuracy in measurement required for the distribution grid is not defined; solving methods cannot handle the high volumes of data generated by modern sensors, so new models and solving methods (such as graph trace analysis) are needed; standardization of sensor-data communications platforms in planning and applications tools would allow integration of different vendors’ sensors and advanced measurement devices. In addition, data from advanced sources such as µPMUs could be used to validate models to improve

  19. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhiche, Mike; Dufera, Hiz; Montagna, Deb

    2012-10-29

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE‐EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven‐stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling‐up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke‐ unlimited Power Take‐Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  20. Silicon high speed modulator for advanced modulation: device structures and exemplary modulator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milivojevic, Biljana; Wiese, Stefan; Whiteaway, James; Raabe, Christian; Shastri, Anujit; Webster, Mark; Metz, Peter; Sunder, Sanjay; Chattin, Bill; Anderson, Sean P.; Dama, Bipin; Shastri, Kal

    2014-03-01

    Fiber optics is well established today due to the high capacity and speed, unrivaled flexibility and quality of service. However, state of the art optical elements and components are hardly scalable in terms of cost and size required to achieve competitive port density and cost per bit. Next-generation high-speed coherent optical communication systems targeting a data rate of 100-Gb/s and beyond goes along with innovations in component and subsystem areas. Consequently, by leveraging the advanced silicon micro and nano-fabrication technologies, significant progress in developing CMOS platform-based silicon photonic devices has been made all over the world. These achievements include the demonstration of high-speed IQ modulators, which are important building blocks in coherent optical communication systems. In this paper, we demonstrate silicon photonic QPSK modulator based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure, address different modulator configuration structures and report our progress and research associated with highspeed advanced optical modulation in silicon photonics

  1. The advance of tomato disease-related microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weichen; Luan, Yushi

    2015-07-01

    Tomato is a model plant for studying plant-pathogen interactions. As regulatory factors, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely identified and play crucial roles in tomato-pathogen interactions, including host defense and pathogen counter-defense. Here, the review summarizes the discoveries and highlights of miRNAs in tomato diseases. Roles of artificial miRNAs in disease resistance are further discussed. Hence, a better understanding of the contribution of miRNAs in tomato disease will shed light on strategies in enhancing tomato-pathogen resistance.

  2. A Wirelessly Powered Micro-Spectrometer for Neural Probe-Pin Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Min Hyuck; Song, Kyo D.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Lee, Uhn

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of neurological anomalies, places stringent demands on device functionality and size. A micro-spectrometer has been developed for use as an implantable neural probe to monitor neuro-chemistry in synapses. The microspectrometer, based on a NASA-invented miniature Fresnel grating, is capable of differentiating the emission spectra from various brain tissues. The micro-spectrometer meets the size requirements, and is able to probe the neuro-chemistry and suppression voltage typically associated with a neural anomaly. This neural probe-pin device (PPD) is equipped with wireless power technology (WPT) enabling operation in a continuous manner without requiring an implanted battery. The implanted neural PPD, together with a neural electronics interface and WPT, allow real-time measurement and control/feedback for remediation of neural anomalies. The design and performance of the combined PPD/WPT device for monitoring dopamine in a rat brain will be presented to demonstrate the current level of development. Future work on this device will involve the addition of an embedded expert system capable of performing semi-autonomous management of neural functions through a routine of sensing, processing, and control.

  3. Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice--the views of nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pauline; Petersson, Göran; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2014-09-01

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses' and nursing students' views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research.

  4. WIMP-wind detection with an advanced gaseous tracking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Hattori, Kaori; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Tanimori, Toru

    Measuring a wind of weakly interaction massive particles (WIMPs) blowing from the direction of the solar motion is said to be one of the most reliable methods to identify a signature of WIMPs. We have developed a micro time projection chamber (μ-TPC) with a gaseous two-dimensional micro pixel chamber (μ-PIC) readout and studied its performance as a WIMP-wind detector.

  5. Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    McEntee, Jarlath; Polagye, Brian; Fabien, Brian; Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Marnagh, Cian; Donegan, James

    2016-03-31

    The Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices (Project) investigated, analyzed and modeled advanced turbine control schemes with the objective of increasing the energy harvested by hydrokinetic turbines in turbulent flow. Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) implemented and validated a feedforward controller to increase power capture; and applied and tested the controls on ORPC’s RivGen® Power Systems in Igiugig, Alaska. Assessments of performance improvements were made for the RivGen® in the Igiugig environment and for ORPC’s TidGen® Power System in a reference tidal environment. Annualized Energy Production (AEP) and Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) improvements associated with implementation of the recommended control methodology were made for the TidGen® Power System in the DOE reference tidal environment. System Performance Advancement (SPA) goals were selected for the project. SPA targets were to improve Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) and system Availability, with the intention of reducing Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). This project focused primarily reducing in PWR. Reductions in PWR of 25.5% were achieved. Reductions of 20.3% in LCOE were achieved. This project evaluated four types of controllers which were tested in simulation, emulation, a laboratory flume, and the field. The adaptive Kω2 controller performs similarly to the non-adaptive version of the same controller and may be useful in tidal channels where the mean velocity is continually evolving. Trends in simulation were largely verified through experiments, which also provided the opportunity to test assumptions about turbine responsiveness and control resilience to varying scales of turbulence. Laboratory experiments provided an essential stepping stone between simulation and implementation on a field-scale turbine. Experiments also demonstrated that using “energy loss” as a metric to differentiate between well-designed controllers operating at

  6. Advanced fiber lasers and related all-fiber devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Balaji

    2000-11-01

    :ZBLAN. The demonstration of substantial second order nonlinearities (~1 pm/V) at UNM using thermal- assisted poling in normally symmetry forbidden silica glass has inspired worldwide research efforts aimed at achieving similar nonlinearities in fibers. All-fiber electro-optic devices based on such poled fibers are anticipated to enhance the performance of various lasers, including modelocked and tunable fiber lasers. This dissertation presents the first demonstration of stable, electro-optically tunable fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) with a tuning range of 20 pm (2.5 GHz), which should enable applications such as reconfigurable add/drop filters and actively modelocked all-fiber lasers. Two key steps in the fabrication of the tunable FBGs viz. the fabrication of thermally stable FBGs, and a novel method for in-situ monitoring of fiber polishing are also demonstrated. Finally, this dissertation discusses issues related to the demonstration of all-fiber electro- optically tunable polarization rotators and their possible impact on future advanced fiber lasers.

  7. Point-of-Care (POC) Devices by Means of Advanced MEMS

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Stanislav L.; Tarhan, Mehmet C.; Kudo, Lili C.; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have become an invaluable technology to advance the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for diagnostics and sample analyses. MEMS can transform sophisticated methods into compact and cost-effective microdevices that offer numerous advantages at many levels. Such devices include microchannels, microsensors, etc., that have been applied to various miniaturized POC products. Here we discuss some of the recent advances made in the use of MEMS devices for POC applications. PMID:26459443

  8. Durable left ventricular assist device therapy in advanced heart failure: Patient selection and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sachin P.; Mehra, Mandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing adoption of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) into clinical practice is related to a combination of engineering advances in pump technology and improvements in understanding the appropriate clinical use of these devices in the management of patients with advanced heart failure. This review intends to assist the clinician in identifying candidates for LVAD implantation, to examine long-term outcomes and provide an overview of the common complications related to use of these devices. PMID:27056652

  9. Micro Navigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B. R.; Kia, T.; Chau, S. N.

    2001-01-01

    Miniature high-performance low-mass space avionics systems are desired for planned future outer planetary exploration missions (i.e. Europa Orbiter/Lander, Pluto-Kuiper Express). The spacecraft fuel and mass requirements enabling orbit insertion is the driving requirement. The Micro Navigator is an integrated autonomous Guidance, Navigation & Control (GN&C)micro-system that would provide the critical avionics function for navigation, pointing, and precision landing. The Micro Navigator hardware and software allow fusion of data from multiple sensors to provide a single integrated vehicle state vector necessary for six degrees of freedom GN&C. The benefits of this MicroNavigator include: 1) The Micro Navigator employs MEMS devices that promise orders of magnitude reductions in mass power and volume of inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes), celestial sensing devices (startracker, sun sensor), and computing element; 2) The highly integrated nature of the unit will reduce the cost of flight missions. a) The advanced miniaturization technologies employed by the Micro Navigator lend themselves to mass production, and therefore will reduce production cost of spacecraft. b) The integral approach simplifies interface issues associated with discrete components and reduces cost associated with integration and test of multiple components; and 3) The integration of sensors and processing elements into a single unit will allow the Micro Navigator to encapsulate attitude information and determination functions into a single object. This is particularly beneficial for object-oriented software architectures that are used in advanced spacecraft. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Electric-field-driven Phenomena for Manipulating Particles in Micro-Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khusid, Boris; Acrivos, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Compared to other available methods, ac dielectrophoresis is particularly well-suited for the manipulation of minute particles in micro- and nano-fluidics. The essential advantage of this technique is that an ac field at a sufficiently high frequency suppresses unwanted electric effects in a liquid. To date very little has been achieved towards understanding the micro-scale field-and shear driven behavior of a suspension in that, the concepts currently favored for the design and operation of dielectrophoretic micro-devices adopt the approach used for macro-scale electric filters. This strategy considers the trend of the field-induced particle motions by computing the spatial distribution of the field strength over a channel as if it were filled only with a liquid and then evaluating the direction of the dielectrophoretic force, exerted on a single particle placed in the liquid. However, the exposure of suspended particles to a field generates not only the dielectrophoretic force acting on each of these particles, but also the dipolar interactions of the particles due to their polarization. Furthermore, the field-driven motion of the particles is accompanied by their hydrodynamic interactions. We present the results of our experimental and theoretical studies which indicate that, under certain conditions, these long-range electrical and hydrodynamic interparticle interactions drastically affect the suspension behavior in a micro-channel due to its small dimensions.

  11. Laser direct writing of micro- and nano-scale medical devices.

    PubMed

    Gittard, Shaun D; Narayan, Roger J

    2010-05-01

    Laser-based direct writing of materials has undergone significant development in recent years. The ability to modify a variety of materials at small length scales and using short production times provides laser direct writing with unique capabilities for fabrication of medical devices. In many laser-based rapid prototyping methods, microscale and submicroscale structuring of materials is controlled by computer-generated models. Various laser-based direct write methods, including selective laser sintering/melting, laser machining, matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct write, stereolithography and two-photon polymerization, are described. Their use in fabrication of microstructured and nanostructured medical devices is discussed. Laser direct writing may be used for processing a wide variety of advanced medical devices, including patient-specific prostheses, drug delivery devices, biosensors, stents and tissue-engineering scaffolds.

  12. Laser direct writing of micro- and nano-scale medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Gittard, Shaun D; Narayan, Roger J

    2010-01-01

    Laser-based direct writing of materials has undergone significant development in recent years. The ability to modify a variety of materials at small length scales and using short production times provides laser direct writing with unique capabilities for fabrication of medical devices. In many laser-based rapid prototyping methods, microscale and submicroscale structuring of materials is controlled by computer-generated models. Various laser-based direct write methods, including selective laser sintering/melting, laser machining, matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct write, stereolithography and two-photon polymerization, are described. Their use in fabrication of microstructured and nanostructured medical devices is discussed. Laser direct writing may be used for processing a wide variety of advanced medical devices, including patient-specific prostheses, drug delivery devices, biosensors, stents and tissue-engineering scaffolds. PMID:20420557

  13. Micro-textured conductive polymer/silicon heterojunction photovoltaic devices with high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting-Gang; Huang, Bo-Yu; Chen, En-Chen; Yu, Peichen; Meng, Hsin-Fei

    2012-07-01

    In this work, hybrid heterojunction solar cells are demonstrated based on a conjugate polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) directly spun-cast on micro-textured n-type crystalline silicon wafers. The fabrication conditions suggest that the organic coverage on the micro-textured surface is excellent and key to achieve high efficiency, leading to an average power conversion efficiency of 9.84%. A one-dimensional drift-diffusion model is then developed based on fitting the device characteristics with experimentally determined PEDOT:PSS parameters and projects an ultimate efficiency above 20% for organic/inorganic hybrid photovoltaics. The simulation results reveal the impacts of defect densities, back surface recombination, doping concentration, and band alignment.

  14. X-ray micro-Tomography at the Advanced Light Source

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The X-ray micro-Tomography Facility at the Advanced Light Source has been in operation since 2004. The source is a superconducting bend magnet of critical energy 10.5KeV; photon energy coverage is 8-45 KeV in monochromatic mode, and a filtered white light option yields useful photons up to 50 KeV. A...

  15. A cranial window imaging method for monitoring vascular growth around chronically implanted micro-ECoG devices

    PubMed Central

    Schendel, Amelia A.; Thongpang, Sanitta; Brodnick, Sarah K.; Richner, Thomas J.; Lindevig, Bradley D.B.; Krugner-Higby, Lisa; Williams, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable neural micro-electrode arrays have the potential to restore lost sensory or motor function to many different areas of the body. However, the invasiveness of these implants often results in scar tissue formation, which can have detrimental effects on recorded signal quality and longevity. Traditional histological techniques can be employed to study the tissue reaction to implanted micro-electrode arrays, but these techniques require removal of the brain from the skull, often causing damage to the meninges and cortical surface. This is especially unfavorable when studying the tissue response to electrode arrays such as the micro-electrocorticography (micro-ECoG) device, which sits on the surface of the cerebral cortex. In order to better understand the biological changes occurring around these types of devices, a cranial window implantation scheme has been developed, through which the tissue response can be studied in vivo over the entire implantation period. Rats were implanted with epidural micro-ECoG arrays, over which glass coverslips were placed and sealed to the skull, creating cranial windows. Vascular growth around the devices was monitored for one month after implantation. It was found that blood vessels grew through holes in the micro-ECoG substrate, spreading over the top of the device. Micro-hematomas were observed at varying time points after device implantation in every animal, and tissue growth between the micro-ECoG array and the window occurred in several cases. Use of the cranial window imaging technique with these devices enabled the observation of tissue changes that would normally go unnoticed with a standard device implantation scheme. PMID:23769960

  16. Digital micro-mirror device-based detector for particle-sizing instruments via Fraunhofer diffraction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiayi; Cao, Zhang; Xie, Heng; Xu, Lijun

    2015-06-20

    In this paper, a digital micro-mirror device (DMD)-based detector is proposed for the detection of light intensity in particle-sizing instruments using Fraunhofer diffraction. The detector consists of only one photodiode, which eliminates the distortions caused by the nonuniformity of the detector arrays used in traditional instruments. The center of the diffraction pattern was accurately located to distribute the optimized arc-shaped mirror arrays for the intensity detection. Both simulated and experimental results showed that the proposed detector was superior to the classical one as it was less sensitive to noise than the detector arrays used in traditional systems.

  17. Shaping perfect optical vortex with amplitude modulated using a digital micro-mirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chonglei; Min, Changjun; Yuan, X.-C.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a technique to generate of perfect optical vortex (POV) via Fourier transformation of Bessel-Gauss (BG) beams through encoding of the amplitude of the optical field with binary amplitude digital micro-mirrors device (DMD). Furthermore, we confirm the correct phase patterns of the POV with the method of Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Our approach to generate the POV has the advantages that rapidly switch among the different modes, wide spectral regions and high energy tolerance. Since the POV possess propagation properties that not shape-invariant, we therefore suppose that our proposed approach will find potential applications in optical microscopy, optical fabrication, and optical communication.

  18. Advanced Materials for Use in Soft Self-Healing Devices.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tan-Phat; Sonar, Prashant; Haick, Hossam

    2017-02-23

    Devices integrated with self-healing ability can benefit from long-term use as well as enhanced reliability, maintenance and durability. This progress report reviews the developments in the field of self-healing polymers/composites and wearable devices thereof. One part of the progress report presents and discusses several aspects of the self-healing materials chemistry (from non-covalent to reversible covalent-based mechanisms), as well as the required main approaches used for functionalizing the composites to enhance their electrical conductivity, magnetic, dielectric, electroactive and/or photoactive properties. The second and complementary part of the progress report links the self-healing materials with partially or fully self-healing device technologies, including wearable sensors, supercapacitors, solar cells and fabrics. Some of the strong and weak points in the development of each self-healing device are clearly highlighted and criticized, respectively. Several ideas regarding further improvement of soft self-healing devices are proposed.

  19. Micro- and nanoscale devices for the investigation of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Carlos A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2013-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the blueprint on which life is based and transmitted, but the way in which chromatin -- a dynamic complex of nucleic acids and proteins -- is packaged and behaves in the cellular nucleus has only begun to be investigated. Epigenetic modifications sit 'on top of' the genome and affect how DNA is compacted into chromatin and transcribed into ribonucleic acid (RNA). The packaging and modifications around the genome have been shown to exert significant influence on cellular behaviour and, in turn, human development and disease. However, conventional techniques for studying epigenetic or conformational modifications of chromosomes have inherent limitations and, therefore, new methods based on micro- and nanoscale devices have been sought. Here, we review the development of these devices and explore their use in the study of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and higher-order chromatin structures.

  20. Development of FDTD simulation tool for designing micro-nanostructured based optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Anil; Mizuno, Genki; Oduor, Patrick; Islam, Saif; Dutta, Achyut K.; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2016-05-01

    The use of Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for computational work has revolutionized how complex electromagnetic problems are solved. Complex problems which required supercomputers in the past for analysis can now be tackled and solved using personal computers by channeling the computational work towards GPUs instead of the traditional computer Central Processing Unit (CPU). Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) analysis, which is a computationally expensive method of solving electromagnetic problems is highly parallel in nature and can be readily executed in a GPU. We have developed an algorithm for three dimensional FDTD analysis of optical devices with micro and nano-structures using Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The developed algorithm exploits the benefits of multiple cores of GPU chips and boosts the speed of simulation without sacrificing its accuracy. We achieved a 25-fold speed up of simulation using CUDA compared to MATLAB code in CPU.

  1. Basic Research of Vibration Energy Harvesting Micro Device using Vinylidene Fluoride / Trifluoroethylene Copolymer Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, T.; Sasaki, T.; Nakajima, T.; Yamaura, S.; Sekiguchi, T.; Shoji, S.

    2014-11-01

    Basic research of MEMS based micro devices for vibration energy harvesting using vinylidene fluoride / trifluoroethylene (VDF/TrFE) copolymer thin film was investigated. The VDF/TrFE copolymer thin film was formed by spin coating. Thickness of VDF/TrFE copolymer thin film was ranged from 375 nm to 2793 nm. Impedance of VDF/TrFE copolymer thin film was measured by LCR meter. Thin film in each thickness was fully poled by voltage based on C-V characteristics result. Generated power of the devices under applied vibration was observed by an oscilloscope. When the film thickness is 2793 nm, the generated power was about 0.815 μJ.

  2. Note: Suppression of kHz-frequency switching noise in digital micro-mirror devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueck, Klaus; Mazurenko, Anton; Luick, Niclas; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2017-01-01

    High resolution digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) make it possible to produce nearly arbitrary light fields with high accuracy, reproducibility, and low optical aberrations. However, using these devices to trap and manipulate ultracold atomic systems for, e.g., quantum simulation is often complicated by the presence of kHz-frequency switching noise. Here we demonstrate a simple hardware extension that solves this problem and makes it possible to produce truly static light fields. This modification leads to a 47 fold increase in the time that we can hold ultracold 6Li atoms in a dipole potential created with the DMD. Finally, we provide reliable and user friendly APIs written in Matlab and Python to control the DMD.

  3. Micro- and nanoscale devices for the investigation of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Carlos A; Craighead, Harold G

    2013-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the blueprint on which life is based and transmitted, but the way in which chromatin - a dynamic complex of nucleic acids and proteins - is packaged and behaves in the cellular nucleus has only begun to be investigated. Epigenetic modifications sit 'on top of' the genome and affect how DNA is compacted into chromatin and transcribed into ribonucleic acid (RNA). The packaging and modifications around the genome have been shown to exert significant influence on cellular behaviour and, in turn, human development and disease. However, conventional techniques for studying epigenetic or conformational modifications of chromosomes have inherent limitations and, therefore, new methods based on micro- and nanoscale devices have been sought. Here, we review the development of these devices and explore their use in the study of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and higher-order chromatin structures.

  4. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  5. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Philip R.

    2011-09-27

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics device design projects to scale up the current Ocean Power Technology PowerBuoy from 150kW to 500kW.

  6. A servomechanism for a micro-electro-mechanical-system-based scanning-probe data storage device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantazi, A.; Lantz, M. A.; Cherubini, G.; Pozidis, H.; Eleftheriou, E.

    2004-10-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS)-based scanning-probe data storage devices are emerging as potential ultra-high-density, low-access-time, and low-power alternatives to conventional data storage. One implementation of probe-based storage uses thermomechanical means to store and retrieve information in thin polymer films. One of the challenges in building such devices is the extreme accuracy and the short latency required in the navigation of the probes over the polymer medium. This paper focuses on the design and characterization of a servomechanism to achieve such accurate positioning in a probe-based storage prototype. In our device, the polymer medium is positioned on a MEMS scanner with x/y-motion capabilities of about 100 µm. The device also includes thermal position sensors that provide x/y-position information to the servo controller. Based on a discrete state-space model of the scanner dynamics, a controller is designed using the linear quadratic Gaussian approach with state estimation. The random seek performance of this approach is evaluated and compared with that of the conventional proportional, integrator, and derivative (PID) approach. The results demonstrate the superiority of the state-space approach, which achieves seek times of about 4 ms in a ± 50 µm range. Finally, the experimental results show that closed-loop track following using the thermal position-sensor signals is feasible and yields a position-error standard deviation of approximately 2 nm.

  7. Development of a polymer-based easy-to-fabricate micro-free-flow electrophoresis device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Takanori; Kubota, Ryosuke; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-06-01

    Since 1990s, micro-free-flow electrophoresis (µFFE) devices have been developed to allow for smaller sample volume and reagent consumption. To solve several technical problems involving the generation of electrolysis gas on the electrodes, most of the µFFE devices reported in the past were fabricated using elaborate micromachining process on silicon or glass substrates. However, high-cost micromachining processes were required and these were not suitable for mass production. In this paper, we report a polymer-based easy-to-fabricate µFFE device using a poly(methyl methacrylate-co-styrene), P(MMA-co-S), substrate and tetra-PEG gel for preventing the invasion of electrolysis gas into the separation chamber. In the separation experiment using a mixture of rhodamine B and sulforhodamine B, the resolution increased linearly with the increase of the applied voltages up to 50 V, whereas a deviation from the linear relation was observed above 50 V, which is possibly the Joule heating. These results indicate that this device could be applicable to separation of biological samples.

  8. Passive cathodic water/air management device for micro-direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hsien-Chih; Chen, Po-Hon; Chen, Hung-Wen; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Pan, Chin; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    A high efficient passive water/air management device (WAMD) is proposed and successfully demonstrated in this paper. The apparatus consists of cornered micro-channels and air-breathing windows with hydrophobicity arrangement to regulate liquids and gases to flow on their predetermined pathways. A high performance water/air separation with water removal rate of about 5.1 μl s -1 cm -2 is demonstrated. The performance of the proposed WAMD is sufficient to manage a cathode-generated water flux of 0.26 μl s -1 cm -2 in the micro-direct methanol fuel cells (μDMFCs) which are operated at 100 mW cm -2 or 400 mA cm -2. Furthermore, the condensed vapors can also be collected and recirculated with the existing micro-channels which act as a passive water recycling system for μDMFCs. The durability testing shows that the fuel cells equipped with WAMD exhibit improved stability and higher current density.

  9. Fabricated micro-nano devices for in vivo and in vitro biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Barkam, Swetha; Saraf, Shashank; Seal, Sudipta

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the innovative use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMSs) and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMSs) in biomedical applications has opened wide opportunities for precise and accurate human diagnostics and therapeutics. The introduction of nanotechnology in biomedical applications has facilitated the exact control and regulation of biological environments. This ability is derived from the small size of the devices and their multifunctional capabilities to operate at specific sites for selected durations of time. Researchers have developed wide varieties of unique and multifunctional MEMS/NEMS devices with micro and nano features for biomedical applications (BioMEMS/NEMS) using the state of the art microfabrication techniques and biocompatible materials. However, the integration of devices with the biological milieu is still a fundamental issue to be addressed. Devices often fail to operate due to loss of functionality, or generate adverse toxic effects inside the body. The in vitro and in vivo performance of implantable BioMEMS such as biosensors, smart stents, drug delivery systems, and actuation systems are researched extensively to understand the interaction of the BioMEMS devices with physiological environments. BioMEMS developed for drug delivery applications include microneedles, microreservoirs, and micropumps to achieve targeted drug delivery. The biocompatibility of BioMEMS is further enhanced through the application of tissue and smart surface engineering. This involves the application of nanotechnology, which includes the modification of surfaces with polymers or the self-assembly of monolayers of molecules. Thereby, the adverse effects of biofouling can be reduced and the performance of devices can be improved in in vivo and in vitro conditions.

  10. Multifunctional semiconductor micro-Hall devices for magnetic, electric, and photo-detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, A. M.; Cohen, L. F.; Sadeghi, Hatef; Lambert, C. J.; Panchal, V.; Kazakova, O.; Solin, S. A.

    2015-12-07

    We report the real-space voltage response of InSb/AlInSb micro-Hall devices to local photo-excitation, electric, and magnetic fields at room temperature using scanning probe microscopy. We show that the ultrafast generation of localised photocarriers results in conductance perturbations analogous to those produced by local electric fields. Experimental results are in good agreement with tight-binding transport calculations in the diffusive regime. The magnetic, photo, and charge sensitivity of a 2 μm wide probe are evaluated at a 10 μA bias current in the Johnson noise limit (valid at measurement frequencies > 10 kHz) to be, respectively, 500 nT/√Hz; 20 pW/√Hz (λ = 635 nm) comparable to commercial photoconductive detectors; and 0.05 e/√Hz comparable to that of single electron transistors. These results demonstrate the remarkably versatile sensing attributes of simple semiconductor micro-Hall devices that can be applied to a host of imaging and sensing applications.

  11. Study of 3D printing method for GRIN micro-optics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. J.; Yeh, J. A.; Hsu, W. Y.; Cheng, Y. C.; Lee, W.; Wu, N. H.; Wu, C. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional optical elements are based on either refractive or reflective optics theory to fulfill the design specifications via optics performance data. In refractive optical lenses, the refractive index of materials and radius of curvature of element surfaces determine the optical power and wavefront aberrations so that optical performance can be further optimized iteratively. Although gradient index (GRIN) phenomenon in optical materials is well studied for more than a half century, the optics theory in lens design via GRIN materials is still yet to be comprehensively investigated before realistic GRIN lenses are manufactured. In this paper, 3D printing method for manufacture of micro-optics devices with special features has been studied based on methods reported in the literatures. Due to the additive nature of the method, GRIN lenses in micro-optics devices seem to be readily achievable if a design methodology is available. First, derivation of ray-tracing formulae is introduced for all possible structures in GRIN lenses. Optics simulation program is employed for characterization of GRIN lenses with performance data given by aberration coefficients in Zernike polynomial. Finally, a proposed structure of 3D printing machine is described with conceptual illustration.

  12. Multifunctional semiconductor micro-Hall devices for magnetic, electric, and photo-detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbertson, A. M.; Sadeghi, Hatef; Panchal, V.; Kazakova, O.; Lambert, C. J.; Solin, S. A.; Cohen, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    We report the real-space voltage response of InSb/AlInSb micro-Hall devices to local photo-excitation, electric, and magnetic fields at room temperature using scanning probe microscopy. We show that the ultrafast generation of localised photocarriers results in conductance perturbations analogous to those produced by local electric fields. Experimental results are in good agreement with tight-binding transport calculations in the diffusive regime. The magnetic, photo, and charge sensitivity of a 2 μm wide probe are evaluated at a 10 μA bias current in the Johnson noise limit (valid at measurement frequencies > 10 kHz) to be, respectively, 500 nT/√Hz; 20 pW/√Hz (λ = 635 nm) comparable to commercial photoconductive detectors; and 0.05 e/√Hz comparable to that of single electron transistors. These results demonstrate the remarkably versatile sensing attributes of simple semiconductor micro-Hall devices that can be applied to a host of imaging and sensing applications.

  13. Micro-Hall devices for magnetic, electric and photo-detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbertson, A.; Sadeghi, H.; Panchal, V.; Kazakova, O.; Lambert, C. J.; Solin, S. A.; Cohen, L. F.

    Multifunctional mesoscopic sensors capable of detecting local magnetic (B) , electric (E) , and optical fields can greatly facilitate image capture in nano-arrays that address a multitude of disciplines. The use of micro-Hall devices as B-field sensors and, more recently as E-field sensors is well established. Here we report the real-space voltage response of InSb/AlInSb micro-Hall devices to not only local E-, and B-fields but also to photo-excitation using scanning probe microscopy. We show that the ultrafast generation of localised photocarriers results in conductance perturbations analogous to those produced by local E-fields. Our experimental results are in good agreement with tight-binding transport calculations in the diffusive regime. At room temperature, samples exhibit a magnetic sensitivity of >500 nT/ √Hz, an optical noise equivalent power of >20 pW/ √Hz (λ = 635 nm) comparable to commercial photoconductive detectors, and charge sensitivity of >0.04 e/ √Hz comparable to that of single electron transistors. Work done while on sabbatical from Washington University. Co-founder of PixelEXX, a start-up whose focus is imaging nano-arrays.

  14. Optical scanning holography based on compressive sensing using a digital micro-mirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A-qian, Sun; Ding-fu, Zhou; Sheng, Yuan; You-jun, Hu; Peng, Zhang; Jian-ming, Yue; xin, Zhou

    2017-02-01

    Optical scanning holography (OSH) is a distinct digital holography technique, which uses a single two-dimensional (2D) scanning process to record the hologram of a three-dimensional (3D) object. Usually, these 2D scanning processes are in the form of mechanical scanning, and the quality of recorded hologram may be affected due to the limitation of mechanical scanning accuracy and unavoidable vibration of stepper motor's start-stop. In this paper, we propose a new framework, which replaces the 2D mechanical scanning mirrors with a Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD) to modulate the scanning light field, and we call it OSH based on Compressive Sensing (CS) using a digital micro-mirror device (CS-OSH). CS-OSH can reconstruct the hologram of an object through the use of compressive sensing theory, and then restore the image of object itself. Numerical simulation results confirm this new type OSH can get a reconstructed image with favorable visual quality even under the condition of a low sample rate.

  15. Overview of micro- and nano-technology tools for stem cell applications: micropatterned and microelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Cagnin, Stefano; Cimetta, Elisa; Guiducci, Carlotta; Martini, Paolo; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

    2012-11-19

    In the past few decades the scientific community has been recognizing the paramount role of the cell microenvironment in determining cell behavior. In parallel, the study of human stem cells for their potential therapeutic applications has been progressing constantly. The use of advanced technologies, enabling one to mimic the in vivo stem cell microenviroment and to study stem cell physiology and physio-pathology, in settings that better predict human cell biology, is becoming the object of much research effort. In this review we will detail the most relevant and recent advances in the field of biosensors and micro- and nano-technologies in general, highlighting advantages and disadvantages. Particular attention will be devoted to those applications employing stem cells as a sensing element.

  16. Conceptual design of a device to measure hand swelling in a micro-gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hysinger, Christopher L.

    1993-01-01

    In the design of pressurized suits for use by astronauts in space, proper fit is an important consideration. One particularly difficult aspect of the suit design is the design of the gloves. If the gloves of the suit do not fit properly, the grip strength of the astronaut can be decreased by as much as fifty percent. These gloves are designed using an iterative process and can cost over 1.5 million dollars. Glove design is further complicated by the way the body behaves in a micro-gravity environment. In a micro-gravity setting, fluid from the lower body tends to move into the upper body. Some of this fluid collects in the hands and causes the hands to swell. Therefore, a pair of gloves that fit well on earth may not fit well when they are used in space. The conceptual design process for a device which can measure the swelling that occurs in the hands in a micro-gravity environment is described. This process involves developing a specifications list and function structure for the device and generating solution variants for each of the sub functions. The solution variants are then filtered, with the variants that violate any of the specifications being discarded. After acceptable solution variants are obtained, they are combined to form design concepts. These design concepts are evaluated against a set of criteria and the design concepts are ranked in order of preference. Through this process, the two most plausible design concepts were an ultrasonic imaging technique and a laser mapping technique. Both of these methods create a three dimensional model of the hand, from which the amount of swelling can be determined. In order to determine which of the two solutions will actually work best, a further analysis will need to be performed.

  17. To ventricular assist devices or not: When is implantation of a ventricular assist device appropriate in advanced ambulatory heart failure?

    PubMed Central

    Cerier, Emily; Lampert, Brent C; Kilic, Arman; McDavid, Asia; Deo, Salil V; Kilic, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Advanced heart failure has been traditionally treated via either heart transplantation, continuous inotropes, consideration for hospice and more recently via left ventricular assist devices (LVAD). Heart transplantation has been limited by organ availability and the futility of other options has thrust LVAD therapy into the mainstream of therapy for end stage heart failure. Improvements in technology and survival combined with improvements in the quality of life have made LVADs a viable option for many patients suffering from heart failure. The question of when to implant these devices in those patients with advanced, yet still ambulatory heart failure remains a controversial topic. We discuss the current state of LVAD therapy and the risk vs benefit of these devices in the treatment of heart failure. PMID:28070237

  18. Devices in the management of advanced, chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, William T.; Smith, Sakima A.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a global phenomenon, and the overall incidence and prevalence of the condition are steadily increasing. Medical therapies have proven efficacious, but only a small number of pharmacological options are in development. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy, cardiac resynchronization therapy has been shown to improve symptoms, reduce hospitalizations, promote reverse remodelling, and decrease mortality. However, challenges remain in identifying the ideal recipients for this therapy. The field of mechanical circulatory support has seen immense growth since the early 2000s, and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have transitioned over the past decade from large, pulsatile devices to smaller, more-compact, continuous-flow devices. Infections and haematological issues are still important areas that need to be addressed. Whereas LVADs were once approved only for ‘bridge to transplantation’, these devices are now used as destination therapy for critically ill patients with HF, allowing these individuals to return to the community. A host of novel strategies, including cardiac contractility modulation, implantable haemodynamic-monitoring devices, and phrenic and vagus nerve stimulation, are under investigation and might have an impact on the future care of patients with chronic HF. PMID:23229137

  19. In vivo distribution of 5-Fluorouracil after peritumoral implantation using a biodegradable micro-device in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Na; Zhou, Mingyao; Lu, Wen

    2013-09-01

    A novel implantable micro-device was used for delivery of 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu), which was often used in the treatment of various human malignancies. The biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) was used as material. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency of delivery of 5-Fu to the tumor via this delivery system. The distribution characters of the 5-Fu in tumor, plasma, peritumoral tissue, liver and kidney were compared after peritumoral implantation of micro-device and intraperitoneal injection of solution. After administration of micro-device, the 5-Fu was absorbed into the tumor on Day 1, and Cmax (4.14 μg/g) was reached on Day 6. The half life for the elimination was 4.48 d and the AUC was 46.78 μg × d/g. Similar pharmacokinetic behaviors were observed in plasma, peritumoral tissue, kidney and liver, while the Cmax and the AUC of plasma and these tissues were lower than those of tumor. When administered the solution, 5-Fu was rapidly absorbed into plasma, liver, kidney, spleen and tumor, and rapidly cleared from these tissues after 2 or 4 h. And the AUC in tumor of 5-Fu solution was significantly lower than that of the micro-device. These results indicated that 5-Fu loaded biodegradable micro-device offered a relatively high concentration and long-term delivery of the drug to the tumor site.

  20. The empirical validation of a model for simulating the thermal and electrical performance of fuel cell micro-cogeneration devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beausoleil-Morrison, Ian

    Fuel cell micro-cogeneration is a nascent technology that can potentially reduce the energy consumption and environmental impact associated with serving building electrical and thermal demands. Accurately assessing these potential benefits and optimizing the integration of micro-cogeneration within buildings requires simulation methods that enable the integrated modelling of fuel cell micro-cogeneration devices with the thermal and electrical performance of the host building and other plant components. Such a model has recently been developed and implemented into a number of building simulation programs as part of an International Energy Agency research project. To date, the model has been calibrated (tuned) for one particular prototype 2.8 kWAC solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) micro-cogeneration device. The current paper examines the validity of this model by contrasting simulation predictions to measurements from the 2.8 kWAC prototype device. Good agreement was found in the predictions of DC power production, the rate of fuel consumption, and energy conversion efficiencies. Although there was greater deviation between simulation predictions and measurements in the predictions of useful thermal output, acceptable agreement was found within the uncertainty of the model and the measurements. It is concluded that the form of the mathematical model can accurately represents the performance of SOFC micro-cogeneration devices and that detailed performance assessments can now be performed with the calibrated model to examine the applicability of the 2.8 kWAC prototype device for supplying building electrical and thermal energy requirements.

  1. Aircrew Training Devices: Utility and Utilization of Advanced Instructional Features. Phase 4. Summary Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    the automated instructional system on the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) at Williams AF8, Arizona (Faconti & Epps, 1975; Faconti...Nortimer, & Simpson, 1970; Fuller, Waag, & Martin, 1980; Knoop, 1973). The ASPT is a sophisticated research device that incorporates advanced visual and...potential of the ASPT , Gray, Chun, Warner, and Eubanks (1981) found that SIs tended to use the device in a fairly conventional manner. with few

  2. Ferrite-superconductor devices for advanced microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, G.F.; Oates, D.E.; Temme, D.H.; Weiss, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Microwave devices comprising magnetized ferrite in contact with superconductor circuits designed to eliminate magnetic field penetration of the superconductor have demonstrated phase shift without significant conduction losses. The device structures are adaptable to low- or high-{Tc} superconductors. A nonoptimized design of a ferrite phase shifter that employs niobium or YBCO meanderlines has produced over 1,000 degrees of differential phase shift with a figure of merit exceeding 1,000 degrees/dB at X band. By combining superconductor meanderline sections with alternating T junctions on a ferrite substrate in a configuration with three-fold symmetry, a low-loss three-port switching circulator has been demonstrated.

  3. Advanced image analysis verifies geometry performance of micro-milling systems.

    PubMed

    Daemi, Bita; Ekberg, Peter; Mattsson, Lars

    2017-04-01

    Accurate dimensional measurement of micro-milled items is a challenge and machine specifications do not include operational parameters in the workshop. Therefore, a verification test that shows the machine's overall geometrical performance over its working area would help machine users in the assessment and adjustment of their equipment. In this study, we present an optical technique capable of finding micro-milled features at submicron uncertainty over working areas >10  cm2. The technique relies on an ultra-precision measurement microscope combined with advanced image analysis to get the center of gravity of milled cross-shaped features at subpixel levels. Special algorithms had to be developed to handle the disturbing influence of burr and milling marks. The results show repeatability, reproducibility, and axis straightness for three micro-milling facilities and also discovered an unknown 2 μm amplitude undulation in one of them.

  4. Characterization and optimization of low cost microfluidic thread based electroanalytical device for micro flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Agustini, Deonir; Bergamini, Márcio F; Marcolino-Junior, Luiz Humberto

    2017-01-25

    The micro flow injection analysis (μFIA) is a powerful technique that uses the principles of traditional flow analysis in a microfluidic device and brings a number of improvements related to the consumption of reagents and samples, speed of analysis and portability. However, the complexity and cost of manufacturing processes, difficulty in integrating micropumps and the limited performance of systems employing passive pumps are challenges that must be overcome. Here, we present the characterization and optimization of a low cost device based on cotton threads as microfluidic channel to perform μFIA based on passive pumps with good analytical performance in a simple, easy and inexpensive way. The transport of solutions is made through cotton threads by capillary force facilitated by gravity. After studying and optimizing several features related to the device, were obtained a flow rate of 2.2 ± 0.1 μL s(-1), an analytical frequency of 208 injections per hour, a sample injection volume of 2.0 μL and a waste volume of approximately 40 μL per analysis. For chronoamperometric determination of naproxen, a detection limit of 0.29 μmol L(-1) was reached, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.69% between injections and a RSD of 3.79% with five different devices. Thus, based on the performance presented by proposed microfluidic device, it is possible to overcome some limitations of the μFIA systems based on passive pumps and allow expansion in the use of this technique.

  5. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  6. Recent advances in microfluidic actuation and micro-object manipulation via surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-07-07

    The realization of microscale total analysis systems and lab-on-a-chip technologies requires efficient actuation (mixing, pumping, atomizing, nebulizing, driving, etc.) of fluids on the microscopic scale and dexterous manipulation (separation, sorting, trapping, concentration, merging, patterning, aligning, focusing, etc.) of micro-objects (cells, droplets, particles, nanotubes, etc.) in open (sessile droplets) as well as confined spaces (microchannels/chambers). These capabilities have been recently achieved using powerful acoustofluidic techniques based on high-frequency (10-1000 MHz) surface acoustic waves (SAWs). SAW-based miniaturized microfluidic devices are best known for their non-invasive properties, low costs, and ability to manipulate micro-objects in a label-free manner. The energy-efficient SAWs are also compatible with conventional microfabrication technologies. The present work critically analyses recent reports describing the use of SAWs in microfluidic actuation and micro-object manipulation. Acoustofluidic techniques may be categorized according to the use of travelling SAWs (TSAWs) or standing SAWs (SSAWs). TSAWs are used to actuate fluids and manipulate micro-objects via acoustic streaming flow (ASF) as well as acoustic radiation force (ARF). SSAWs are mainly used for micro-object manipulation and are rarely employed for microfluidic actuation. We have reviewed reports of new technological developments that have not been covered in other recent reviews. In the end, we describe the future prospects of SAW-based acoustofluidic technologies.

  7. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  8. Proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Network and Technology Concepts for Mobile, Micro, and Personal Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Lori (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Workshop on Advanced Network and Technology Concepts for Mobile, Micro, and Personal Communications was held at NASA's JPL Laboratory on 30-31 May 1991. It provided a forum for reviewing the development of advanced network and technology concepts for turn-of-the-century telecommunications. The workshop was organized into three main categories: (1) Satellite-Based Networks (L-band, C-band, Ku-band, and Ka-band); (2) Terrestrial-Based Networks (cellular, CT2, PCN, GSM, and other networks); and (3) Hybrid Satellite/Terrestrial Networks. The proceedings contain presentation papers from each of the above categories.

  9. BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

    2010-11-01

    This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

  10. A band-modulation device in advanced FDSOI technology: Sharp switching characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Dirani, Hassan; Solaro, Yohann; Fonteneau, Pascal; Legrand, Charles-Alex; Marin-Cudraz, David; Golanski, Dominique; Ferrari, Philippe; Cristoloveanu, Sorin

    2016-11-01

    A band-modulation device is demonstrated experimentally in advanced FDSOI (Fully Depleted SOI). The Z2-FET (Zero Impact Ionization and Zero Subthreshold Slope FET) is a very recent sharp switching device which achieves remarkable performance in terms of leakage current and triggering control. The device is fabricated with Ultra-Thin Body and Buried Oxide (UTBB) Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology, features an extremely sharp on-switch, low leakage and an adjustable triggering voltage (VON). The Z2-FET operation relies on the modulation of electrons and holes injection barriers. In this paper, we show, for the first time, experimental data obtained with the most advanced FDSOI node.

  11. Advanced biomaterial strategies to transplant preformed micro-tissue engineered neural networks into the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. P.; Struzyna, L. A.; Murphy, P. L.; Adewole, D. O.; Kuo, E.; Cullen, D. K.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Connectome disruption is a hallmark of many neurological diseases and trauma with no current strategies to restore lost long-distance axonal pathways in the brain. We are creating transplantable micro-tissue engineered neural networks (micro-TENNs), which are preformed constructs consisting of embedded neurons and long axonal tracts to integrate with the nervous system to physically reconstitute lost axonal pathways. Approach. We advanced micro-tissue engineering techniques to generate micro-TENNs consisting of discrete populations of mature primary cerebral cortical neurons spanned by long axonal fascicles encased in miniature hydrogel micro-columns. Further, we improved the biomaterial encasement scheme by adding a thin layer of low viscosity carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to enable needle-less insertion and rapid softening for mechanical similarity with brain tissue. Main results. The engineered architecture of cortical micro-TENNs facilitated robust neuronal viability and axonal cytoarchitecture to at least 22 days in vitro. Micro-TENNs displayed discrete neuronal populations spanned by long axonal fasciculation throughout the core, thus mimicking the general systems-level anatomy of gray matter—white matter in the brain. Additionally, micro-columns with thin CMC-coating upon mild dehydration were able to withstand a force of 893 ± 457 mN before buckling, whereas a solid agarose cylinder of similar dimensions was predicted to withstand less than 150 μN of force. This thin CMC coating increased the stiffness by three orders of magnitude, enabling needle-less insertion into brain while significantly reducing the footprint of previous needle-based delivery methods to minimize insertion trauma. Significance. Our novel micro-TENNs are the first strategy designed for minimally invasive implantation to facilitate nervous system repair by simultaneously providing neuronal replacement and physical reconstruction of long-distance axon pathways in the brain

  12. Mini and micro spectrometers pave the way to on-field advanced analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyé, Clémentine; Kolb, Hugo; d'Humières, Benoît.

    2016-03-01

    First introduced in the 1990's, miniature optical spectrometers were compact, portable devices brought on the market by the desire to move from time-consuming lab-based analyses to on-field and in situ measurements. This goal of getting spectroscopy into the hands of non-specialists is driving current technical and application developments, the ultimate goal being, in a far future, the integration of a spectrometer into a smartphone or any other smart device (tablet, watch, …). In this article, we present the results of our study on the evolution of the compact spectrometers market towards widespread industrial use and consumer applications. Presently, the main market of compact spectrometers remains academic labs. However, they have been adopted on some industrial applications such as optical source characterization (mainly laser and LEDs). In a near future, manufacturers of compact spectrometers target the following industrial applications: agriculture crop monitoring, food process control or pharmaceuticals quality control. Next steps will be to get closer to the consumer market with point-of-care applications such as glucose detection for diabetics, for example. To reach these objectives, technological breakthroughs will be necessary. Recent progresses have already allowed the release of micro-spectrometers. They take advantage of new micro-technologies such as MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), MOEMS (Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems), micro-mirrors arrays to reduce cost and size while allowing good performance and high volume manufacturability. Integrated photonics is being investigated for future developments. It will also require new business models and new market approaches. Indeed, spreading spectroscopy to more industrial and consumer applications will require spectrometers manufacturers to get closer to the end-users and develop application-oriented products.

  13. Generation-3 programmable array microscope (PAM) with digital micro-mirror device (DMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beule, Pieter A. A.; de Vries, Anthony H. B.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Jovin, Thomas M.

    2011-03-01

    We report progress on the construction of an optical sectioning programmable array microscope (PAM) implemented with a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) spatial light modulator (SLM) utilized for both fluorescence illumination and detection. The introduction of binary intensity modulation at the focal plane of a microscope objective in a computer controlled pixilated mode allows the recovery of an optically sectioned image. Illumination patterns can be changed very quickly, in contrast to static Nipkow disk or aperture correlation implementations, thereby creating an optical system that can be optimized to the optical specimen in a convenient manner, e.g. for patterned photobleaching, photobleaching reduction, or spatial superresolution. We present a third generation (Gen-3) dual path PAM module incorporating the 25 kHz binary frame rate TI 1080p DMD and a newly developed optical system that offers diffraction limited imaging with compensation of tilt angle distortion.

  14. Environment for thin-film manufacturing process development for product engineering of micro and nano devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortloff, Dirk; Hahn, Kai; Popp, Jens; Schmidt, Thilo; Brück, Rainer

    2009-08-01

    Product engineering of micro and nano technology (MNT) devices differs substantially from product engineering in more traditional industries. The general development approach is mostly bottom up, as it centers around the available fabrication techniques and is characterised by application specific fabrication flows, i.e. fabrication processes depending on the later product. In the first part of this paper we introduce a comprehensive customer-oriented product engineering methodology for MNT products that regards the customer as the driving force behind new product developments. The MNT product engineering process is analyzed with regard to application-specific procedures and interfaces. An environment for the development of MNT manufacturing processes has been identified as a technical foundation for the methodology and will be described in the second part of this paper.

  15. Predicting therapy response in live tumor cells isolated with the flexible micro spring array device

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, Jean-Nicolas; Matthew, Elizabeth M; Cheng, Hairong; Harouaka, Ramdane; Lamparella, Nicholas E.; Kunkel, Miriam; Yang, Zhaohai; Harvey, Harold A.; Cream, Leah V.; Kumar, Suresh M.; Robertson, Gavin P.; Zheng, Siyang; Drabick, Joseph J.; Truica, Cristina I.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2013-01-01

    Cells disseminated from primary epithelial tumors into peripheral blood, called circulating tumor cells (CTCs), can be monitored to assess metastases and to provide a surrogate marker of treatment response. Here, we demonstrate how the flexible micro spring array (FMSA) device—a novel microfluidic device that enriches CTCs by two physical parameters: size and deformability—could be used in the rational development of treatment intervention and as a method to study the fundamental biology of CTCs. Cancer cells of different origins were spiked into healthy samples of donor blood to mimic blood samples of metastatic cancer patients. This spiked human blood was filtered using the FMSA device, and the recovered cells were successfully expanded in vitro and in a novel in vivo system. A series of experiments were performed to characterize these cells and to investigate the effect of chemotherapy on the resulting cultures. As few as 20 colon cancer cells in 7.5 mL blood could be isolated with the FMSA device, expanded both in vitro and in vivo and used at 25 cells per well to obtain significant and reliable chemosensitivity data. We also show that isolating a low number of viable patient CTCs and maintaining them in culture for a few weeks is possible. The isolation of viable cancer cells from human blood using the FMSA device provides a novel and realistic means for studying the biology of viable CTCs and for testing drug efficacy on these rare cells—a hypothesis that can be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:23759587

  16. A spontaneous and passive waste-management device (PWMD) for a micro direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yun-Ju; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Pan, Chin; Luo, Shih-Jin; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2007-05-01

    This paper introduces a passive waste-management device (PWMD) for a micro direct methanol fuel cell to exhale CO2 gas and to gather and transport water and methanol residue during operation. It passively employs condensation, temperature gradient, surface tension gradient and droplet coalescence to accumulate liquid, separate liquid and gas, and transport droplets without the need of external power. CO2 gas can be breathed out through hydrophobic micro holes with the assistance of buoyancy force while water/methanol vapor is condensing into droplets, coalescing with smaller droplets and is transported toward a cooler and more hydrophilic waste tank through wettability gradient. The wettability gradient is prepared by diffusion-controlled silanization with a gradient from 117° to 28° and is radial toward the outer boundary, which can drive droplets down to 1 µl with a speed of up to 20 mm s-1. With the assistance of coalescence along with the wettability gradient, the condensed water droplets can reach a double speed of 40 mm s-1. The maximum water removal rate of the PWMD can approach 6.134 µl s-1 cm-2, which is at least one order of magnitude higher than the demand of a standard µDMFC with power generation ability of 100 mW cm-2.

  17. Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Semiconductor Micro- And Nanocrystals: From Colloidal Syntheses to (Opto-)Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Organic pigments such as indigos, quinacridones, and phthalocyanines are widely produced industrially as colorants for everyday products as various as cosmetics and printing inks. Herein we introduce a general procedure to transform commercially available insoluble microcrystalline pigment powders into colloidal solutions of variously sized and shaped semiconductor micro- and nanocrystals. The synthesis is based on the transformation of the pigments into soluble dyes by introducing transient protecting groups on the secondary amine moieties, followed by controlled deprotection in solution. Three deprotection methods are demonstrated: thermal cleavage, acid-catalyzed deprotection, and amine-induced deprotection. During these processes, ligands are introduced to afford colloidal stability and to provide dedicated surface functionality and for size and shape control. The resulting micro- and nanocrystals exhibit a wide range of optical absorption and photoluminescence over spectral regions from the visible to the near-infrared. Due to excellent colloidal solubility offered by the ligands, the achieved organic nanocrystals are suitable for solution processing of (opto)electronic devices. As examples, phthalocyanine nanowire transistors as well as quinacridone nanocrystal photodetectors, with photoresponsivity values by far outperforming those of vacuum deposited reference samples, are demonstrated. The high responsivity is enabled by photoinduced charge transfer between the nanocrystals and the directly attached electron-accepting vitamin B2 ligands. The semiconducting nanocrystals described here offer a cheap, nontoxic, and environmentally friendly alternative to inorganic nanocrystals as well as a new paradigm for obtaining organic semiconductor materials from commercial colorants. PMID:25253644

  18. Suction detection for the MicroMed DeBakey Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Oliver; Benkowski, Robert J; Morello, Gino F

    2005-01-01

    The MicroMed DeBakey Ventricular Assist Device (MicroMed Technology, Inc., Houston, TX) is a continuous axial flow pump designed for long-term circulatory support. The system received CE approval in 2001 as a bridge to transplantation and in 2004 as an alternative to transplantation. Low volume in the left ventricle or immoderate pump speed may cause ventricular collapse due to excessive suction. Suction causes decreased flow and may result in patient discomfort. Therefore, detection of this critical condition and immediate adaptive control of the device is desired. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and validate system parameters suitable for the reliable detection of suction. In vitro studies have been performed with a mock loop allowing pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow. Evidence of suction is clearly shown by the flow waveform reported by the implanted flow probe of the system. For redundancy to the implanted flow probe, it would be desirable to use the electronic motor signals of the pump for suction detection. The continuously accessible signals are motor current consumption and rotor/impeller speed. The influence of suction on these parameters has been investigated over a wide range of hydrodynamic conditions, and the significance of the respective signals individually or in combination has been explored. The reference signal for this analysis was the flow waveform of the ultrasonic probe. To achieve high reliability under both pulsatile and nonpulsatile conditions, it was determined that motor speed and current should be used concurrently for suction detection. Using the amplified differentiated current and speed signals, a suction-detection algorithm has been optimized, taking into account two different working points, defined by the value of the current input. The safety of this algorithm has been proven in vitro under pulsatile and nonpulsatile conditions over the full spectrum of possible speed and differential pressure variations. The algorithm

  19. Microfluidic device incorporating closed loop feedback control for uniform and tunable production of micro-droplets.

    PubMed

    Miller, Erik; Rotea, Mario; Rothstein, Jonathan P

    2010-05-21

    Both micro- and nanofluidics are finding increasing use in the growing toolbox of nanotechnology; for the production of nanoparticles, and as micro-reactors for carefully controlled chemical reactions. These laboratories-on-a-chip hold vast potential for industrial application, however, only the most simple are truly starting to emerge as commercially viable, particularly in the area of droplet formation and emulsion creation. In order to automate droplet production with a desired size and dispersity, we have designed a microfluidic-based technology utilizing elementary microchannel geometries in combination with a closed loop feedback system to control the continuous- and dispersed-phase flow rates. Both the device geometry and control system have been optimized to allow for the production of a tunable emulsion. By utilizing discrete linear control theory, the device is able to produce the desired results with little to no prior knowledge of the fluid material properties to be used in either phase. We present our results from initial development using flow-focusing microfluidic geometry for droplet formation, computer-tethered syringe pumps to individually control the continuous and dispersed phase flow rates, a high-speed camera, and a controller and driver system for the optical measurements and pumps, respectively. We will show the efficacy of this technique for Newtonian and viscoelastic liquids, with and without the presence of surfactants. It can be envisioned that through careful control optimization, such a system can be developed to a point that will allow the production of "designer" emulsions with droplets eventually reaching the nanoscale.

  20. Advances in nanoimprint lithography and applications in nanofluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaogan

    The research work presented in this thesis focuses on three topics: (1) studies of several critical aspects of nanoimprint lithography (NIL), including methods of mold pressing, air bubble defects, and dynamic behaviors of liquid resist flow; (2) applications of NIL to the fabrication of novel nanofluidic devices, which can be used for real-time DNA detection; and (3) additional applications of structured stamps or templates in the direct engineering of functional materials. Based upon these topics, the thesis is divided into three parts. The first part describes recent studies of critical techniques of NIL. First, a novel imprint approach using electrostatic force was developed to pattern spin-on resists in ambient environment. Using this Electrostatic Force-Assisted NIL (EFAN) approach, highly uniform imprints over a 4" diameter wafer area and sub-0.5 mum overlay precision were obtained using very simple equipment. Second, another important method for performing step-and-repeat imprint in the atmosphere, dispensing-based NIL, still suffers from air bubble defects formed by feature pinning and the circling of residual air by the merge of multiple resist droplets. However, it was found that the tiny bubbles can be completely absorbed by the liquid resist. The effects of several key parameters, such as bubble size, imprinting pressure, resist viscosity and solubility, and residual layer thickness, on the air dissolution rate were studied experimentally and theoretically. Their impact to the yield and throughput of NIL was also analyzed. Third, a novel method was developed for filling liquid resists into the air gap between the structured mold and the substrate. The method is assisted by dielectrophoresis, caused by electrohydrodynamic force. The second part describes the applications of NIL to making nanofluidic channel devices and device integration. First, a novel imprint-based method was developed to fabricate precisely positioned single nanofluidic channels of

  1. Advanced semiconductor quantum well devices for infrared applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir V.

    High performance mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) light emitting diodes (LEDs) are needed for chemical sensing, analysis and medical imaging. Efficient long wavelength infrared (LWIR) photodetectors are highly desirable for remote sensing and space exploration. The goal of this work is to investigate new mid-infrared LEDs and to optimize existing LWIR quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs). Type-II "W" InAs/InGaSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells were incorporated as optically active layers in MWIR LEDs. Influence of MBE crystal growth conditions on the density of Shockley-Read-Hall centers in the "W" quantum wells was studied and the optimal growth conditions were identified. A qualitative physical model was developed to describe relative importance of the radiative and non-radiative processes for various temperature ranges. MWIR LED structures lattice-matched to InAs and GaSb substrates were grown. Devices on InAs substrates were found to be at least twice as efficient as devices grown on GaSb. LEDs on InAs had 4.5 mum emission wavelength and 26.5 muW/A external efficiency. Possibility to operate GaAs/AIGaAs QWIP under normal-to-surface light incidence was studied. Metal nano-particle surface coating was developed and processes responsible for, light coupling into the QWIP were investigated. QWIP structure itself was optimized to eliminate Si-diffusion-assisted dark current enhancement by employing a new doping profile in the quantum wells. Devices with the new doping profile had an order of magnitude lower dark current and 20% higher photoresponse than commercially available QWIPs.

  2. River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials (River DREAM)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Daniel P.

    2013-07-03

    The purpose of this project is to develop a generator called a Galloping Hydroelectric Energy Extraction Device (GHEED). It uses a galloping prism to convert water flow into linear motion. This motion is converted into electricity via a dielectric elastomer generator (DEG). The galloping mechanism and the DEG are combined to create a system to effectively generate electricity. This project has three research objectives: 1. Oscillator development and design a. Characterize galloping behavior, evaluate control surface shape change on oscillator performance and demonstrate shape change with water flow change. 2. Dielectric Energy Generator (DEG) characterization and modeling a. Characterize and model the performance of the DEG based on oscillator design 3. Galloping Hydroelectric Energy Extraction Device (GHEED) system modeling and integration a. Create numerical models for construction of a system performance model and define operating capabilities for this approach Accomplishing these three objectives will result in the creation of a model that can be used to fully define the operating parameters and performance capabilities of a generator based on the GHEED design. This information will be used in the next phase of product development, the creation of an integrated laboratory scale generator to confirm model predictions.

  3. Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard; Mahorter, Robert G.; Siergiej, Richard; Link, Samuel D.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Belanger, Sean J.; Fourspring, Patrick; Murray, Susan; Newman, Fred; Taylor, Dan; Rahmlow, Tom

    2005-02-06

    Advanced thermophotovoltaic (TPV) modules capable of producing > 0.3 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 22% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1228 K and 325 K, respectively, have been made. These advanced TPV modules are projected to produce > 0.9 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 24% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1373 K and 325 K, respectively. Radioisotope and nuclear (fission) powered space systems utilizing these advanced TPV modules have been evaluated. For a 100 We radioisotope TPV system, systems utilizing as low as 2 general purpose heat source (GPHS) units are feasible, where the specific power for the 2 and 3 GPHS unit systems operating in a 200 K environment is as large as {approx} 16 We/kg and {approx} 14 We/kg, respectively. For a 100 kWe nuclear powered (as was entertained for the thermoelectric SP-100 program) TPV system, the minimum system radiator area and mass is {approx} 640 m2 and {approx} 1150 kg, respectively, for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 435 K and 200 K, respectively. Also, for a converter radiator temperature of 1373 K, the converter volume and mass remains less than 0.36 m3 and 640 kg, respectively. Thus, the minimum system radiator + converter (reactor and shield not included) specific mass is {approx} 16 kg/kWe for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 425 K and 200 K, respectively. Under this operating condition, the reactor thermal rating is {approx} 1110 kWt. Due to the large radiator area, the added complexity and mission risk needs to be weighed against reducing the reactor thermal rating to determine the feasibility of using TPV for space nuclear (fission) power systems.

  4. Advances in graphene-related technologies: synthesis, devices and outlook.

    PubMed

    Frazier, R M; Hough, W L; Chopra, N; Hathcock, K W

    2012-06-01

    Graphene has been the subject of many scientific investigations since exfoliation methods facilitated isolation of the two-dimensional material. During this time, new synthesis methods have been developed which have opened technological opportunities previously hindered by synthetic constraints. An update on the recent advances in graphene-based technologies, including synthesis and applications into electrical, mechanical and thermal uses will be covered. A special focus on the patent space and commercial landscape will be given in an effort to identify current trends and future commercialization of graphene-related technologies.

  5. Monitoring critical facilities by using advanced RF devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Hanchung; Liu, Yung Y.; Shuler, James

    2013-07-01

    The ability to monitor critical environment parameters of nuclear plants at all times, particularly during and after a disruptive accident, is vital for the safety of plant personnel, rescue and recovery crews, and the surrounding communities. Conventional hard-wired assets that depend on supplied power may be decimated as a result of such events, as witnessed in the Japanese Fukushima nuclear power plant in March 2011. Self-powered monitoring devices operating on a wireless platform, on the other hand, may survive such calamity and remain functional. The devices would be pre-positioned at strategic locations, particularly where the dangerous build-up of contamination and radiation may preclude subsequent manned entrance and surveillance. Equipped with sensors for β-γ radiation, neutrons, hydrogen gas, temperature, humidity, pressure, and water level, as well as with criticality alarms and imaging equipment for heat, video, and other capabilities, these devices can provide vital surveillance information for assessing the extent of plant damage, mandating responses (e.g., evacuation before impending hydrogen explosion), and enabling overall safe and efficient recovery in a disaster. A radio frequency identification (RFID)-based system - called ARG-US - may be modified and adapted for this task. Developed by Argonne for DOE, ARG-US (meaning 'watchful guardian') has been used successfully to monitor and track sensitive nuclear materials packages at DOE sites. It utilizes sensors in the tags to continuously monitor the state of health of the packaging and promptly disseminates alarms to authorized users when any of the preset sensor thresholds is violated. By adding plant-specific monitoring sensors to the already strong sensor suite and adopting modular hardware, firmware, and software subsystems that are tailored for specific subsystems of a plant, a Remote Area Modular Monitoring (RAMM) system, built on a wireless sensor network (WSN) platform, is being developed

  6. Micro-scale piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting: From fixed-frequency to adaptable-frequency devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lindsay Margaret

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have the potential to transform engineering infrastructure, manufacturing, and building controls by allowing condition monitoring, asset tracking, demand response, and other intelligent feedback systems. A wireless sensor node consists of a power supply, sensor(s), power conditioning circuitry, radio transmitter and/or receiver, and a micro controller. Such sensor nodes are used for collecting and communicating data regarding the state of a machine, system, or process. The increasing demand for better ways to power wireless devices and increase operation time on a single battery charge drives an interest in energy harvesting research. Today, wireless sensor nodes are typically powered by a standard single-charge battery, which becomes depleted within a relatively short timeframe depending on the application. This introduces tremendous labor costs associated with battery replacement, especially when there are thousands of nodes in a network, the nodes are remotely located, or widely-distributed. Piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting presents a potential solution to the problems associated with too-short battery life and high maintenance requirements, especially in industrial environments where vibrations are ubiquitous. Energy harvester designs typically use the harvester to trickle charge a rechargeable energy storage device rather than directly powering the electronics with the harvested energy. This allows a buffer between the energy harvester supply and the load where energy can be stored in a "tank". Therefore, the harvester does not need to produce the full required power at every instant to successfully power the node. In general, there are tens of microwatts of power available to be harvested from ambient vibrations using micro scale devices and tens of milliwatts available from ambient vibrations using meso scale devices. Given that the power requirements of wireless sensor nodes range from several microwatts to about one

  7. Application of micro- and nano-electromechanical devices to drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Staples, Mark; Daniel, Karen; Cima, Michael J; Langer, Robert

    2006-05-01

    Micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS)-based drug delivery devices have become commercially-feasible due to converging technologies and regulatory accommodation. The FDA Office of Combination Products coordinates review of innovative medical therapies that join elements from multiple established categories: drugs, devices, and biologics. Combination products constructed using MEMS or NEMS technology offer revolutionary opportunities to address unmet medical needs related to dosing. These products have the potential to completely control drug release, meeting requirements for on-demand pulsatile or adjustable continuous administration for extended periods. MEMS or NEMS technologies, materials science, data management, and biological science have all significantly developed in recent years, providing a multidisciplinary foundation for developing integrated therapeutic systems. If small-scale biosensor and drug reservoir units are combined and implanted, a wireless integrated system can regulate drug release, receive sensor feedback, and transmit updates. For example, an "artificial pancreas" implementation of an integrated therapeutic system would improve diabetes management. The tools of microfabrication technology, information science, and systems biology are being combined to design increasingly sophisticated drug delivery systems that promise to significantly improve medical care.

  8. Advanced Silicon Microring Resonator Devices for Optical Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masilamani, Ashok Prabhu

    Chip level optical interconnects has gained momentum with recent demonstrations of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based photonic modules such as lasers, modulators, wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) filters, etc. A fundamental building block that has enabled many of these silicon photonic modules is the compact, high Q factor microring resonator cavity. However, most of these demonstrations have WDM processing components based on simple add-drop filters that cannot realize the dense WDM systems required for the chip level interconnects. Dense WDM filters have stringent spectral shape requirements such as flat-top filter passband, steep band transition etc. Optical filters that can meet these specifications involve precise placement of the poles and zeros of the filter transfer function. Realization of such filters requires the use of multiple coupled microring resonators arranged in complex coupling topologies. In this thesis we have proposed and demonstrated new multiple coupled resonator topologies based on compact microring resonators in SOI material system. First we explored novel microring architectures which resulted in the proposal of two new coupled microring architectures, namely, the general 2D microring array topology and the general cascaded microring network topology. We also developed the synthesis procedures for these two microring architectures. The second part of this thesis focussed on the demonstration of the proposed architectures in the SOI material system. To accomplish this, a fabrication process for SOI was developed at the UofA Nanofab facility. Using this process, ultra-compact single microring filters with microring radii as small as 1mum were demonstrated. Higher order filter demonstration with multiple microrings necessitated post-fabrication microring resonance tuning. We developed additional fabrication steps to install micro heaters on top of the microrings to thermally tune its resonance. Subsequently, a thermally tuned fourth

  9. Advanced nanoporous materials for micro-gravimetric sensing to trace-level bio/chemical molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin; Yu, Haitao; Xu, Tiegang

    2014-10-13

    Functionalized nanoporous materials have been developed recently as bio/chemical sensing materials. Due to the huge specific surface of the nano-materials for molecular adsorption, high hopes have been placed on gravimetric detection with micro/nano resonant cantilevers for ultra-sensitive sensing of low-concentration bio/chemical substances. In order to enhance selectivity of the gravimetric resonant sensors to the target molecules, it is crucial to modify specific groups onto the pore-surface of the nano-materials. By loading the nanoporous sensing material onto the desired region of the mass-type transducers like resonant cantilevers, the micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors can be formed. Recently, such micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors have been successfully applied for rapid or on-the-spot detection of various bio/chemical molecules at the trace-concentration level. The applicable nanoporous sensing materials include mesoporous silica, zeolite, nanoporous graphene oxide (GO) and so on. This review article focuses on the recent achievements in design, preparation, functionalization and characterization of advanced nanoporous sensing materials for micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensing.

  10. Advanced Nanoporous Materials for Micro-Gravimetric Sensing to Trace-Level Bio/Chemical Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin; Yu, Haitao; Xu, Tiegang

    2014-01-01

    Functionalized nanoporous materials have been developed recently as bio/chemical sensing materials. Due to the huge specific surface of the nano-materials for molecular adsorption, high hopes have been placed on gravimetric detection with micro/nano resonant cantilevers for ultra-sensitive sensing of low-concentration bio/chemical substances. In order to enhance selectivity of the gravimetric resonant sensors to the target molecules, it is crucial to modify specific groups onto the pore-surface of the nano-materials. By loading the nanoporous sensing material onto the desired region of the mass-type transducers like resonant cantilevers, the micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors can be formed. Recently, such micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensors have been successfully applied for rapid or on-the-spot detection of various bio/chemical molecules at the trace-concentration level. The applicable nanoporous sensing materials include mesoporous silica, zeolite, nanoporous graphene oxide (GO) and so on. This review article focuses on the recent achievements in design, preparation, functionalization and characterization of advanced nanoporous sensing materials for micro-gravimetric bio/chemical sensing. PMID:25313499

  11. The advanced Moon micro-imager experiment (AMIE) on SMART-1: Scientific goals and expected results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, P.; Cerroni, P.; Josset, J.-L.; Beauvivre, S.; Chevrel, S.; Muinonen, K.; Langevin, Y.; Barucci, M. A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Shkuratov, Yu.; Shevchenko, V.; Plancke, P.; Hofmann, B. A.; Josset, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Sodnik, Z.; Koschny, D.; Almeida, M.; Foing, B.

    2005-11-01

    The advanced Moon micro-imager experiment (AMIE) is the imaging system on board ESA mission to the Moon SMART-1; it makes use of a miniaturised detector and micro-processor electronics developed by SPACE X in the frame of the ESA technical programme. The AMIE micro-imager will provide high resolution CCD images of selected lunar areas and it will perform colour imaging through three filters at 750, 915 and 960 nm with a maximum resolution of 46 m/pixel at the perilune of 500 km. Specific scientific objectives will include (1) imaging of high latitude regions in the southern hemisphere, in particular the South Pole Aitken basin (SPA) and the permanently shadowed regions close to the South Pole, (2) determination of the photometric properties of the lunar surface from observations at different phase angles (physical properties of the regolith), (3) multi-band imaging for constraining the chemical and mineral composition of the surface, (4) detection and characterisation of lunar non-mare volcanic units, (5) study of lithological variations from impact craters and implications for crustal heterogeneity. The AMIE micro-imager will also support a Laser-link experiment to Earth, an On Board Autonomous Navigation investigation and a Lunar libration experiment coordinated with radio science measurements.

  12. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  13. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  14. Case studies in advanced monitoring with the Chronicle device.

    PubMed

    Bourge, Robert C

    2006-01-01

    Three case studies illustrate the utility of advanced implantable hemodynamic monitors (IHMs). The cases include a 70-year-old with ischemic cardiomyopathy, chronic kidney disease, and recurrent volume overload; a 53-year-old with ischemic heart disease, mild effort-related angina, and New York Heart Association class III chronic heart failure; and a 21-year-old with severe dilated cardiomyopathy, all 3 patients having an IHM. The outcomes in these cases illustrate the capability of the IHM system for monitoring and detecting early changes in hemodynamic data and the use of these data to adjust medical therapies and reduce morbidity and risk of hospitalization. When pathologic hemodynamic changes are observed, this alerts the cardiologist to search for underlying causes, even when a patient on initial questioning denies any change in compliance or symptoms.

  15. A tunable microflow focusing device utilizing controllable moving walls and its applications for formation of micro-droplets in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chun-Hong; Hsiung, Suz-Kai; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-06-01

    This study reports a new microfluidic device capable of fine-tuned sample-flow focusing and generation of micro-droplets in liquids by controlling moving wall structures. Two microfluidic components including an 'active microchannel width controller' and a 'micro chopper' can be used to fine-tune the width of the hydrodynamically pre-focused stream and subsequently generate micro-droplets. In this study, a basic concept of a 'controllable moving wall' structure was addressed and applied as the active microchannel width controller and the micro chopper to generate the proposed function. Pneumatic side chambers were placed next to a main flow channel to construct the controllable moving wall structures. The deformation of the controllable moving wall structure can be generated by the pressurized air injected into the pneumatic side chambers. The proposed chip device was fabricated utilizing polymer material such as PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) to provide the flexibility of the controllable moving wall deformation. The microfluidic chip device with dimensions of 2.5 cm in width and 3.0 cm in length can be fabricated using a simple fabrication process. Experimental data showed that the deformation of the controllable moving wall structure can be adjusted by applying different air pressures, so that the width of the main flow channel can be controlled accordingly. By utilizing the proposed mechanism, the pre-focused dispersed phase stream could be actively focused into a narrower stream, and well-controlled micro-droplets with smaller diameters could be generated. The stream width can be reduced from 30 µm to 9 µm and micro-droplets with a diameter of 76 µm could be generated by utilizing the proposed device. In addition, to generate micro-droplets within smaller diameters, uniform size distribution of the micro-droplets can be obtained. According to the experimental results, development of the microfluidic device could be promising for a variety of applications such

  16. Advance in novel boron nitride nanosheets to nanoelectronic device applications.

    PubMed

    Sajjad, Muhammad; Morell, Gerardo; Feng, Peter

    2013-06-12

    We report low-temperature synthesis of large-scale boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) and their applications for high-performance Schottky diode and gas sensor. Ten minutes of synthesis with a short-pulse-laser-produced plasma deposition technique yields a large amount of highly flat, transparent BNNSs. A basic reason for using short-pulse plasma beams is to avoid nanosheet thermal ablation or have low heat generated. Consequently, it greatly reduces the stress and yield large, flat BNNSs. The average size of obtained BNNS is around 10 μm and thickness is around 1.7 nm. Carbon element has been used for doping BNNSs and achieving BNNSs-based Schottky diode and gas sensing device. Typical current versus voltage characteristics of diode are examined. The breakdown reverse voltage is around -70 V. This probably indicates that the breakdown electric field of BNNSs-based diode is up to 1 × 10(8) V/cm. Sensing behavior of BNNSs-based gas sensor toward methane diluted with dry air is also characterized. The response time and recovery time are around 3 and 5 s at the operating temperature of 150 °C. Relatively, the sensor has poor sensitivity to oxygen gas.

  17. Advanced numerical methods and software approaches for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    CAREY,GRAHAM F.; PARDHANANI,A.L.; BOVA,STEVEN W.

    2000-03-23

    In this article the authors concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to drift-dominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the drift-diffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of upwind and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter-Gummel approach, Petrov-Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), entropy variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of the methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. They have included numerical examples from the recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and they emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, they briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.

  18. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  19. Advanced Controls for the Multi-pod Centipod WEC device

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Alan; Fleming, Alex

    2016-02-15

    Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) has developed a Wave Energy Converter (WEC), Centipod, which is a multiple point absorber, extracting wave energy primarily in the heave direction through a plurality of point absorber floats sharing a common stable reference structure. The objective of this project was to develop advanced control algorithms that will be used to reduce Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE). This project investigated the use of Model Predictive Control (MPC) to improve the power capture of the WEC. The MPC controller developed in this work is a state-space, “look ahead” controller approach using knowledge of past and current states to predict future states to take action with the PTO to maximize power capture while still respecting system constraints. In order to maximize power, which is the product of force and velocity, the controller must aim to create phase alignment between excitation force and velocity. This project showed a 161% improvement in the Annual Energy Production (AEP) for the Centipod WEC when utilizing MPC, compared to a baseline, fixed passive damping control strategy. This improvement in AEP was shown to provide a substantial benefit to the WEC’s overall Cost of Energy, reducing LCOE by 50% from baseline. The results of this work proved great potential for the adoption of Model Predictive Controls in Wave Energy Converters.

  20. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  1. Co-Extrusion: Advanced Manufacturing for Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, Corie Lynn

    2016-11-18

    The development of mass markets for large-format batteries, including electric vehicles (EVs) and grid support, depends on both cost reductions and performance enhancements to improve their economic viability. Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) has developed a multi-material, advanced manufacturing process called co-extrusion (CoEx) to remove multiple steps in a conventional battery coating process with the potential to simultaneously increase battery energy and power density. CoEx can revolutionize battery manufacturing across most chemistries, significantly lowering end-product cost and shifting the underlying economics to make EVs and other battery applications a reality. PARC’s scale-up of CoEx for electric vehicle (EV) batteries builds on a solid base of experience in applying CoEx to solar cell manufacturing, deposition of viscous ceramic pastes, and Li-ion battery chemistries. In the solar application, CoEx has been deployed commercially at production scale where multi-channel CoEx printheads are used to print viscous silver gridline pastes at full production speeds (>40 ft/min). This operational scale-up provided invaluable experience with the nuances of speed, yield, and maintenance inherent in taking a new technology to the factory floor. PARC has leveraged this experience, adapting the CoEx process for Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery manufacturing. To date, PARC has worked with Li-ion battery materials and structured cathodes with high-density Li-ion regions and low-density conduction regions, documenting both energy and power performance. Modeling results for a CoEx cathode show a path towards a 10-20% improvement in capacity for an EV pouch cell. Experimentally, we have realized a co-extruded battery structure with a Lithium Nickel Manganese Cobalt (NMC) cathode at print speeds equivalent to conventional roll coating processes. The heterogeneous CoEx cathode enables improved capacity in thick electrodes at higher C-rates. The proof-of-principle coin cells

  2. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation.

  3. Optical Modification of Casimir Forces for Improved Function of Micro-and Nano-Scale Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been a considerable effort to study the Casimir and van der Waals forces, enabled by the improved ability to measure small forces near surfaces. Because of the continuously growing role of micro- and nanomechanical devices, the focus of this activity has shifted towards the ability to control these forces. Possible approaches to manipulating the Casimir force include development of composite materials, engineered nanostructures, mixed-phase materials, or active elements. So far, practical success has been limited. The role of geometrical factors in the Casimir force is significant. It is known, for example, that the Casimir force between two spherical shells enclosed one into the other is repulsive instead of normal attractive. Unfortunately, nanosurfaces with this topology are very difficult to make. A more direct approach to manipulating and neutralizing the Casimir force is using external mechanical or electromagnetic forces. Unfortunately, the technological overhead of such an approach is quite large. Using electromagnetic compensation instead of mechanical will considerably reduce this overhead and at the same time provide the degree of control over the Casimir force that mechanical springs cannot provide. A mechanical analog behind Casimir forces is shown.

  4. Recent advances in nanoparticle preparation by spray and micro-emulsion methods.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Morteza; Shekarriz, Marzieh

    2009-01-01

    Micro- and nano-sized metal, semiconductor, pharmaceutical, and simple or complex ceramic particles have numerous applications in the development of sensors, thermal barrier coatings, catalysts, pigments, drugs, etc. The challenges include controlling the particle size, size distribution, particle crystallinity, morphology and shape, being able to use the nanoparticles for a given purpose, and to produce them from a variety of precursors. There are several methods to produce nanoparticles, each suitable for a range of applications. In this article, two methods that are receiving increasing attention are considered: spray and microemulsion methods. Spray techniques are single-step methods of producing a broad spectrum of simple to multicomponent functional micro and nanoparticles and quantum dots. Microemulsion is a wet chemistry method. A micro-emulsion system consists of aqueous domains, called reverse micelles, dispersed in a continuous oil phase. In this article, the above mentioned methods of nanoparticle production are introduced and recent advances, research directions and challenges, and the pertinent patents are reviewed and discussed.

  5. Applications of Gas Imaging Micro-Well Detectors to an Advanced Compton Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Hunter, S. D.; Ryan, J. M.; McConnell, M. L.; Miller, R. S.; Jackson, T. N.; Bai, B.; Jung, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a concept for an Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) based on the use of pixelized gas micro-well detectors to form a three-dimensional electron track imager. A micro-well detector consists of an array of individual micro-patterned proportional counters opposite a planar drift electrode. When combined with thin film transistor array readouts, large gas volumes may be imaged with very good spatial and energy resolution at reasonable cost. The third dimension is determined by timing the drift of the ionization electrons. The primary advantage of this approach is the excellent tracking of the Compton recoil electron that is possible in a gas volume. Such good electron tracking allows us to reduce the point spread function of a single incident photon dramatically, greatly improving the imaging capability and sensitivity. The polarization sensitivity, which relies on events with large Compton scattering angles, is particularly enhanced. We describe a possible ACT implementation of this technique, in which the gas tracking volume is surrounded by a CsI calorimeter, and present our plans to build and test a small prototype over the next three years.

  6. "Optical communication with brain cells by means of an implanted duplex micro-device with optogenetics and Ca(2+) fluoroimaging".

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Haruta, Makito; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Matsumata, Miho; Eizumi, Kawori; Kitsumoto, Chikara; Motoyama, Mayumi; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Jun

    2016-02-16

    To better understand the brain function based on neural activity, a minimally invasive analysis technology in a freely moving animal is necessary. Such technology would provide new knowledge in neuroscience and contribute to regenerative medical techniques and prosthetics care. An application that combines optogenetics for voluntarily stimulating nerves, imaging to visualize neural activity, and a wearable micro-instrument for implantation into the brain could meet the abovementioned demand. To this end, a micro-device that can be applied to the brain less invasively and a system for controlling the device has been newly developed in this study. Since the novel implantable device has dual LEDs and a CMOS image sensor, photostimulation and fluorescence imaging can be performed simultaneously. The device enables bidirectional communication with the brain by means of light. In the present study, the device was evaluated in an in vitro experiment using a new on-chip 3D neuroculture with an extracellular matrix gel and an in vivo experiment involving regenerative medical transplantation and gene delivery to the brain by using both photosensitive channel and fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator. The device succeeded in activating cells locally by selective photostimulation, and the physiological Ca(2+) dynamics of neural cells were visualized simultaneously by fluorescence imaging.

  7. Electrowetting-Controlled and Electrically-Tunable Bio-Inspired Micro/Nanostructures and Optofluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manakasettharn, Supone

    Many man-made structures and devices have been inspired by the ingenious structures, mechanisms, properties, and functions of plants and animals. This work has been inspired by a number of unique properties, which biological organisms possess such as dynamic tunable iridescence, self-cleaning properties, and brilliant structural color. The objective of this work is to model, design, fabricate, and characterize novel bio-inspired micro-/nanostructures and optofluidic devices. To conceptually mimic the iridescence of cephalopods, microflowers have been modeled and designed based on elasto-capillary bending, which is the interplay between the elastic energy of petals and the capillary energy of a liquid droplet, which is used to actuate petal movement. After microfabrication of the polycrystalline Si microflowers, two methods of petal actuation have been demonstrated---one by volume change of the water droplet and the other by change of water contact angle on the petals using the electrowetting process. The experimental results are in good agreement with a theoretical model. By taking into account the self-cleaning properties of lotus leaves, transparent Ta2O5 nanostructured thin films have been fabricated using a multi-step anodization process of sputter-deposited Al-Ta bilayers on a quartz substrate. The films then have been made superhydrophobic by using a combination of nanostructures, called nanograss, along with the deposition of hydrophobic coatings. The films also have been characterized by measuring water contact angles and by obtaining optical transmittance spectra and SEM micrographs. The measured contact angles and transmittance spectra are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. Inspired by biological nanostructured surfaces possessing structural color and wettability control, reflective Ta2O5 nanostructured thin films have been fabricated using the multi-step anodization process of sputter-deposited Al-Ta bilayers on a Si substrate. The films

  8. Aircrew Training Devices: Utility and Utilization of Advanced Instructional Features (Phase IV--Summary Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polzella, Donald J.; And Others

    Modern aircrew training devices (ATDs) are equipped with sophisticated hardware and software capabilities, known as advanced instructional features (AIFs), that permit a simulator instructor to prepare briefings, manage training, vary task difficulty/fidelity, monitor performance, and provide feedback for flight simulation training missions. The…

  9. Development of Micro Air Reconnaissance Vehicle as a Test Bed for Advanced Sensors and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Vranas, Thomas L.; Fox, Robert L.; Kuhn, Theodore R.; Ingham, John; Logan, Michael J.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Guenther, Benjamin F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Micro/Mini Air Reconnaissance Vehicle for advanced sensors and electronics at NASA Langley Research Center over the last year. This vehicle is expected to have a total weight of less than four pounds, a design velocity of 40 mph, an endurance of 15-20 minutes, and a maximum range of 5km. The vehicle has wings that are simple to detach yet retain the correct alignment. The upper fuselage surface has a quick release hatch used to access the interior and also to mount the varying propulsion systems. The sensor suite developed for this vehicle consists of a Pitot-static measurement system for determining air speed, an absolute pressure measurement for determining altitude, magnetic direction measurement, and three orthogonal gyros to determine body angular rates. Swarming GPS-guidance and in-flight maneuvering is discussed, as well as design and installation of some other advance sensors like MEMS microphones, infrared cameras, GPS, humidity sensors, and an ultrasonic sonar sensor. Also low cost, small size, high performance control and navigation system for the Micro Air Vehicle is discussed. At the end, laboratory characterization of different sensors, motors, propellers, and batteries will be discussed.

  10. Non-CPAP therapies in obstructive sleep apnoea: mandibular advancement device therapy.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Marie; Verbraecken, Johan; Randerath, Winfried

    2012-05-01

    Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) represent the main non-continuous positive airway pressure (non-CPAP) therapy for patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The aim of the European Respiratory Society Task Force was to review the evidence in favour of MAD therapy. Effects of tongue-retaining devices are not included in this report. Custom-made MADs reduce apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) and daytime sleepiness compared with placebo devices. CPAP more effectively diminishes AHI, while increasing data suggest fairly similar outcomes in relation to symptoms and cardiovascular health from these treatments. Patients often prefer MADs to CPAP. Milder cases and patients with a proven increase in upper airway size as a result of mandibular advancement are most likely to experience treatment success with MADs. A custom-made device titrated from an initial 50% of maximum mandibular advancement has been recommended. More research is needed to define the patients who will benefit from MAD treatment compared with CPAP, in terms of the effects on sleep-disordered breathing and on other diseases related to OSA. In conclusion, MADs are recommended for patients with mild to moderate OSA (Recommendation Level A) and for those who do not tolerate CPAP. The treatment must be followed up and the device adjusted or exchanged in relation to the outcome.

  11. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  12. Low-Cost Photolithographic Fabrication of Nanowires and Microfilters for Advanced Bioassay Devices

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Nhi M.; Qiang, Liangliang; Li, Zhe; Vaddiraju, Santhisagar; Bishop, Gregory W.; Rusling, James F.; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2015-01-01

    Integrated microfluidic devices with nanosized array electrodes and microfiltration capabilities can greatly increase sensitivity and enhance automation in immunoassay devices. In this contribution, we utilize the edge-patterning method of thin aluminum (Al) films in order to form nano- to micron-sized gaps. Evaporation of high work-function metals (i.e., Au, Ag, etc.) on these gaps, followed by Al lift-off, enables the formation of electrical uniform nanowires from low-cost, plastic-based, photomasks. By replacing Al with chromium (Cr), the formation of high resolution, custom-made photomasks that are ideal for low-cost fabrication of a plurality of array devices were realized. To demonstrate the feasibility of such Cr photomasks, SU-8 micro-pillar masters were formed and replicated into PDMS to produce micron-sized filters with 3–4 µm gaps and an aspect ratio of 3. These microfilters were capable of retaining 6 µm beads within a localized site, while allowing solvent flow. The combination of nanowire arrays and micro-pillar filtration opens new perspectives for rapid R&D screening of various microfluidic-based immunoassay geometries, where analyte pre-concentration and highly sensitive, electrochemical detection can be readily co-localized. PMID:25774709

  13. Device of dispensing micro doses of aqueous solutions of substances onto a carrier and device for carrying out said method

    DOEpatents

    Ershow, Gennady Moiseevich; Kirillov, Evgenii Vladislavovich; Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich

    1998-01-01

    A device for dispensing microdoses of aqueous solutions are provided, whereby the substance is transferred by the free surface end of a rodlike transferring element; the temperature of the transferring element is maintained at essentially the dew point of the ambient air during the transfer. The device may comprise a plate-like base to which are affixed a plurality of rods; the unfixed butt ends of the rods are coplanar. The device further comprises a means for maintaining the temperature of the unfixed butt ends of the rods essentially equal to the dew point of the ambient air during transfer of the aqueous substance.

  14. Research on the Injection Performance of a Novel Lubricating Device Based on Piezoelectric Micro-Jet Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Liu, Jun-kao; Chen, Wei-shan; Ye, Le; Zhang, Lu

    2016-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of lubrication failure in bearing systems, a novel lubricating device which can achieve drop-on-demand lubrication is proposed based on piezoelectric micro-jet technology. The injection performance of the novel piezoelectric micro-jet lubricating device are analyzed in this paper. The influences of the fluid-structure interaction to the working frequency are studied by comparing the results of tests with simulations. A method used to forecast the working frequency of the micro-jet is proved to be available. A velocity inlet boundary model at the nozzle is derived under the assumption that the lubricating oil cannot be pressed. Combined with this model, the influences of density, dynamic viscosity and surface tension of the lubricating oil on the injection performance are discussed according to the simulation results. An experiment on the injection performance of the micro-jet for ejecting lubricating oil with different dilution ratios is performed. The recommended excitations are given for ejecting lubricating oil with different properties by analyzing the results.

  15. AN ADVANCED CALIBRATION PROCEDURE FOR COMPLEX IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Morrison; Jon P. Christophersen; Patrick Bald; John L. Morrison

    2012-06-01

    With the increasing demand for electric and hybrid electric vehicles and the explosion in popularity of mobile and portable electronic devices such as laptops, cell phones, e-readers, tablet computers and the like, reliance on portable energy storage devices such as batteries has likewise increased. The concern for the availability of critical systems in turn drives the availability of battery systems and thus the need for accurate battery health monitoring has become paramount. Over the past decade the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Montana Tech of the University of Montana (Tech), and Qualtech Systems, Inc. (QSI) have been developing the Smart Battery Status Monitor (SBSM), an integrated battery management system designed to monitor battery health, performance and degradation and use this knowledge for effective battery management and increased battery life. Key to the success of the SBSM is an in-situ impedance measurement system called the Impedance Measurement Box (IMB). One of the challenges encountered has been development of an accurate, simple, robust calibration process. This paper discusses the successful realization of this process.

  16. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events.

  17. Recent advancement on micro-/nano-spherical lens photolithography based on monolayer colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziming; Geng, Chong; Hao, Zhibiao; Wei, Tongbo; Yan, Qingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Highly ordered nanostructures have gained substantial interest in the research community due to their fascinating properties and wide applications.Micro-/nano-spherical lens photolithography (SLPL) has been recognized as an inexpensive, inherently parallel, and high-throughput approach to the creation of highly ordered nanostructures. SLPL based on monolayer colloidal crystals (MCCs) of self-assembled colloidal micro-/nano-spheres have recently made remarkable progress in overcoming the constraints of conventional photolithography in terms of cost, feature size, tunability, and pattern complexity. In this review, we highlight the current state-of-the-art in this field with an emphasis on the fabrication of a variety of highly ordered nanostructures based on this technique and their demonstrated applications in light emitting diodes, nano-patterning semiconductors, and localized surface plasmon resonance devices. Finally, we present a perspective on the future development of MCC-based SLPL technique, including a discussion on the improvement of the quality of MCCs and the compatibility of this technique with other semiconductor micromachining process for nanofabrication.

  18. The Hopper: A Wearable Robotic Device Testbed for Micro-Gravity Bone-Loading Proof-of-Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, C. E.; Rovekamp, R. N.; Neuhaus, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    Wearable robotic systems are showing increased potential for addressing crew countermeasures needs. Wearable robots offer a compactness, programmability, and eccentric loading capability not present in more conventional exercise equipment. Correspondingly, advancements in the man to machine interface has progressed, allowing for higher loads to be applied directly to the person in new and novel ways. Recently, the X1 exoskeleton, a lower extremity wearable robot originally designed for mobility assistance and rehabilitation, underwent human subject testing to assess its potential as a knee dynamometer. This was of interest to NASA physiologists because currently strength is not assessed in flight due to hardware limitations, and thus there is a poor understanding of the time course of in-flight changes to muscle strength. The study concluded that the X1 compared well with the Biodex, the "gold standard" in terrestrial dynamometry, with coefficients of variation less than 6.0%. In a following study, the X1 powered ankle was evaluated for its efficacy in exercising calf muscles. Current on-orbit countermeasures equipment does not adequately protect the calf from atrophy. The results of this study were also positive (targeted muscle activity demonstrated via comparing pre- and post-exercise magnetic resonance imaging T2 measurements), again showing the efficacy of wearable robotic devices for addressing the countermeasure needs of our astronauts. Based on these successes and lessons learned, the Grasshopper was co-developed between IHMC (Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition) and NASA. The Grasshopper, or the Hopper for short, is a wearable robotic device designed to address muscle and bone density loss for astronauts spending extended periods of time in micro-gravity. The Grasshopper connects to the user's torso like a hiking backpack, over the shoulders and around the waist. At the feet are footplates that strap to the user. There are two actuators, one

  19. Advanced Technology for Improved Quantum Device Properties Using Highly Strained Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    Improved Quantum PE 61153N Device Properties Using Highly Strained Materials PE 1401N~R&T 414s 001-02 IN G. AUTHOR(S) (William J. Schaff , S.D. Offsey and...DECEMBER 15, 1989 CORNELL UNIVERSITY.......................... ITHACA, NY 14853-5401 PREPARED BY: WJ. Schaff ........ S.D. Offsey I - L.F. Eastman D ’’. i...Mandeville, R. Saito, P.J. Tasker, W.J. Schaff and L.F. Eastman, 12th IEEE/Comell Conference on’Advanced Concepts in High Speed Semiconductor Devices

  20. Development of advanced electron holographic techniques and application to industrial materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Tanji, Takayoshi

    2013-06-01

    The development of a transmission electron microscope equipped with a field emission gun paved the way for electron holography to be put to practical use in various fields. In this paper, we review three advanced electron holography techniques: on-line real-time electron holography, three-dimensional (3D) tomographic holography and phase-shifting electron holography, which are becoming important techniques for materials science and device engineering. We also describe some applications of electron holography to the analysis of industrial materials and devices: GaAs compound semiconductors, solid oxide fuel cells and all-solid-state lithium ion batteries.

  1. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description: MicroVAX system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Display MicroVAX computer used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery of February 27, 1991, known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global references section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  2. Advances with microRNAs in Parkinson’s disease research

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liuqing; Wei, Liangming; Wu, Fei; Hu, Zhenhua; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second-most common age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder and is caused by severe degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Unfortunately, current treatment only targets symptoms and involves dopamine replacement therapy, which does not counteract progressive degeneration. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNA molecules implicated in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression during development. Recent studies show that miRNAs are playing an important role in the pathophysiology of PD. miRNA-based therapy is a powerful tool with which to study gene function, investigate the mechanism of the disease, and validate drug targets. In this review, we focus on the recent advances of the use of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:24109179

  3. Development of automatic blood extraction device with a micro-needle for blood-sugar level measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanaka, Kaichiro; Uetsuji, Yasutomo; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2008-12-01

    In this study, a portable type HMS (Health Monitoring System) device is newly developed. It has features 1) puncturing a blood vessel by using a minimally invasive micro-needle, 2) extracting and transferring human blood and 3) measuring blood glucose level. This miniature SMBG (Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose) device employs a syringe reciprocal blood extraction system equipped with an electro-mechanical control unit for accurate and steady operations. The device consists of a) a disposable syringe unit, b) a non-disposable body unit, and c) a glucose enzyme sensor. The syringe unit consists of a syringe itself, its cover, a piston and a titanium alloy micro-needle, whose inner diameter is about 100µm. The body unit consists of a linear driven-type stepping motor, a piston jig, which connects directly to the shaft of the stepping motor, and a syringe jig, which is driven by combining with the piston jig and slider, which fixes the syringe jig. The required thrust to drive the slider is designed to be greater than the value of the blood extraction force. Because of this driving mechanism, the automatic blood extraction and discharging processes are completed by only one linear driven-type stepping motor. The experimental results using our miniature SMBG device was confirmed to output more than 90% volumetric efficiency under the driving speed of the piston, 1.0mm/s. Further, the blood sugar level was measured successfully by using the glucose enzyme sensor.

  4. Active flow control of subsonic flow in an adverse pressure gradient using synthetic jets and passive micro flow control devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, Michael E.

    Several recent studies have shown the advantages of active and/or passive flow control devices for boundary layer flow modification. Many current and future proposed air vehicles have very short or offset diffusers in order to save vehicle weight and create more optimal vehicle/engine integration. Such short coupled diffusers generally result in boundary layer separation and loss of pressure recovery which reduces engine performance and in some cases may cause engine stall. Deployment of flow control devices can alleviate this problem to a large extent; however, almost all active flow control devices have some energy penalty associated with their inclusion. One potential low penalty approach for enhancing the diffuser performance is to combine the passive flow control elements such as micro-ramps with active flow control devices such as synthetic jets to achieve higher control authority. The goal of this dissertation is twofold. The first objective is to assess the ability of CFD with URANS turbulence models to accurately capture the effects of the synthetic jets and micro-ramps on boundary layer flow. This is accomplished by performing numerical simulations replicating several experimental test cases conducted at Georgia Institute of Technology under the NASA funded Inlet Flow Control and Prediction Technologies Program, and comparing the simulation results with experimental data. The second objective is to run an expanded CFD matrix of numerical simulations by varying various geometric and other flow control parameters of micro-ramps and synthetic jets to determine how passive and active control devices interact with each other in increasing and/or decreasing the control authority and determine their influence on modification of boundary layer flow. The boundary layer shape factor is used as a figure of merit for determining the boundary layer flow quality/modification and its tendency towards separation. It is found by a large number of numerical experiments and

  5. Effect of Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy on the Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Raunio, Antti; Sipilä, Kirsi; Raustia, Aune

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Mandibular advancement device therapy is effectively used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, but also several side effects in the masticatory system have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders connected to mandibular advancement device therapy. Material and Methods The material consisted of 15 patients (9 men and 6 women, mean age 51.1 years, range 21 to 70 years) diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Subjective symptoms and clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMD) signs were recorded at the beginning of the treatment (baseline) and at 1-month, 3-month, 6-month and 24-month follow-ups. The degree of TMD was assessed using the anamnestic (Ai) and the clinical dysfunction index (Di) of Helkimo. For assessing the effect of TMD the patients were divided in discontinuing and continuing groups. Results According to Ai and Di, the severity of TMD remained unchanged during the follow-up in most of the patients. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) crepitation was found more frequently in discontinuing patients at all follow-ups. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05) at the six-month follow-up. Masticatory muscle pain during palpation was a frequent clinical sign at the baseline and during the follow-up period but the difference between discontinuing and continuing patients was not significant. Conclusions It seems that signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders do not necessarily increase during long-term mandibular advancement device therapy. However, it seems that patients with clinically assessed temporomandibular joint crepitation may discontinue their mandibular advancement device therapy due to temporomandibular disorders. PMID:24422023

  6. Aircrew Training Devices: Utility and Utilization of Advanced Instructional Features. Phase III. Electronic Warfare Trainers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    Devices: Utility and Utilization of Advanced Instructional Features (Phase III- Electronic Warfare Trainers) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Polzella . Donald J...Features, addressed a portion of this subthrust. Dr. Wayne Waag (AFHRL/OTU) was the Contract Monitor and Dr. Donald J. Polzella and Dr. David C. Hubbard...training is practicable (see Polzella , 1983, p.8). However, instructional features are expensive to implement, especially those features that require the

  7. Investigations on MGy ionizing dose effects in thin oxides of micro-electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillardin, M.; Paillet, P.; Raine, M.; Martinez, M.; Marcandella, C.; Duhamel, O.; Richard, N.; Leray, J.L.; Goiffon, V.; Corbiere, F.; Rolando, S.; Molina, R.; Magnan, P.; Girard, S.; Ouerdane, Y.; Boukenter, A.

    2015-07-01

    Total ionizing dose (TID) effects have been studied for a long time in micro-electronic components designed to operate in natural and artificial environments. In most cases, TID induces both charge trapping in the bulk of irradiated oxides and the buildup of interface traps located at semiconductor/dielectric interfaces. Such effects result from basic mechanisms driven by both the shape of the electric field which stands into the oxide and by fabrication process parameters inducing pre-existing traps in the oxide's bulk. From the pioneering studies based on 'thick' oxide technologies to the most recent ones dedicated to innovative technologies, most studies concluded that the impact of total ionizing dose effects reduces with the oxide thinning. This is specifically the case for the gate-oxide of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET) for which it is generally considered that TID is not a major issue anymore at kGy dose ranges. TID effects are now mainly due to charge trapping in the field oxides such as Shallow Trench Isolation. This creates either parasitic conduction paths or Radiation-Induced Narrow Channel Effects (RINCE). Static current-voltage (I-V) electrical characteristics are then modified through a significant increase of the off-current of NMOS transistors or by shifting the whole I-V curves (of both NMOS and PMOS transistors). Based on these assumptions, no significant shift of I-V curves should be observed in modern bulk CMOS technologies. However, such phenomenon may not be directly extrapolated to higher TID ranges, typically of several MGy for which only few data are available in the literature. This paper presents evidences of large threshold voltage shifts measured at MGy dose levels despite the fact that transistors are designed in a submicron bulk technology which features a 7-nm thin gate-oxide on GO2 transistors dedicated to mixed analog/digital integrated circuits. Such electrical shifts are encountered on PMOS

  8. Application of Micro-ramp Flow Control Devices to an Oblique Shock Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirt, Stefanie; Anderson, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Tests are planned in the 15cm x 15cm supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn to demonstrate the applicability of micro-ramp flow control to the management of shock wave boundary layer interactions. These tests will be used as a database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation and Design of Experiments (DoE) design information. Micro-ramps show potential for mechanically simple and fail-safe boundary layer control.

  9. MicroRNA signatures and treatment response in patients with advanced classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Espiridión, Beatriz; Martín-Moreno, Ana M; Montalbán, Carlos; Figueroa, Vianihuini; Vega, Francisco; Younes, Anas; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Alvés, Francisco J; Canales, Miguel; Estévez, Mónica; Menarguez, Javier; Sabín, Pilar; Ruiz-Marcellán, María C; Lopez, Andrés; Sánchez-Godoy, Pedro; Burgos, Fernando; Santonja, Carlos; López, José L; Piris, Miguel A; Garcia, Juan F

    2013-08-01

    Although specific microRNA (miRNA) signatures in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) have been proposed, their relationship with clinical outcome remains unclear. Despite treatment advances, a substantial subset of patients with advanced cHL are refractory to standard therapies based on adriamycin and its variants. Global miRNA expression data of 29 advanced cHL patients and five cHL-derived cell lines were used to identify profiles from Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells and their non-tumoural microenvironment. A cHL-miRNA signature was identified with 234 miRNAs differentially expressed. A subset of these miRNAs was associated with outcome and selected for study in an independent set of 168 cHL samples using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Multivariate Cox regression analyses including cross-validation with failure-free survival (FFS) as clinical endpoint revealed a miRNA signature with MIR21, MIR30E, MIR30D and MIR92B* that identified two risk-groups with significant differences in 5-year FFS (81% vs. 35.7%; P < 0.001). Additionally, functional silencing of MIR21 and MIR30D in L428 cells showed increased sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, pointing towards abnormalities of mitochondrial intrinsic and TP53-CDKN1A pathways as related to miRNA deregulation in cHL. These results suggest that clinical outcome in cHL is associated with a specific miRNA signature. Moreover, functional analyses suggest a role for MIR21 and MIR30D in cHL pathogenesis and therapeutic resistance.

  10. MicroRNA signatures and treatment response in patients with advanced classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Espiridión, Beatriz; Martín-Moreno, Ana M.; Montalbán, Carlos; Figueroa, Vianihuini; Vega, Francisco; Younes, Anas; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Alvés, Francisco J.; Canales, Miguel; Estévez, Mónica; Menarguez, Javier; Sabín, Pilar; Ruiz-Marcellán, María C.; Lopez, Andrés; Sánchez-Godoy, Pedro; Burgos, Fernando; Santonja, Carlos; López, José L.; Piris, Miguel A.; Garcia, Juan F.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Although specific microRNA (miRNA) signatures in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) have been proposed, their relationship with clinical outcome remains unclear. Despite treatment advances, a substantial subset of patients with advanced cHL are refractory to standard therapies based on adriamycin and its variants. Global miRNA expression data of 29 advanced cHL patients and five cHL-derived cell lines were used to identify profiles from Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells and their non-tumoural microenvironment. A cHL-miRNA signature was identified with 234 miRNAs differentially expressed. A subset of these miRNAs was associated with outcome and selected for study in an independent set of 168 cHL samples using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Multivariate Cox regression analyses including cross-validation with failure-free survival (FFS) as clinical endpoint revealed a miRNA signature with MIR21, MIR30E, MIR30D and MIR92B* that identified two risk-groups with significant differences in 5-year FFS (81% vs. 35% 7%; P < 0·001). Additionally, functional silencing of MIR21 and MIR30D in L428 cells showed increased sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, pointing towards abnormalities of mitochondrial intrinsic and TP53-CDKN1A pathways as related to miRNA deregulation in cHL. These results suggest that clinical outcome in cHL is associated with a specific miRNA signature. Moreover, functional analyses suggest a role for MIR21 and MIR30D in cHL pathogenesis and therapeutic resistance. PMID:23725219

  11. Reliability of Strength Testing using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Kirk L.; Loehr, James A.; Laughlin, Mitzi A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) was developed for use on the International Space Station as a countermeasure against muscle atrophy and decreased strength. This investigation examined the reliability of one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength testing using ARED and traditional free weight (FW) exercise. Methods: Six males (180.8 +/- 4.3 cm, 83.6 +/- 6.4 kg, 36 +/- 8 y, mean +/- SD) who had not engaged in resistive exercise for at least six months volunteered to participate in this project. Subjects completed four 1RM testing sessions each for FW and ARED (eight total sessions) using a balanced, randomized, crossover design. All testing using one device was completed before progressing to the other. During each session, 1RM was measured for the squat, heel raise, and deadlift exercises. Generalizability (G) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for each exercise on each device and were used to predict the number of sessions needed to obtain a reliable 1RM measurement (G . 0.90). Interclass reliability coefficients and Pearson's correlation coefficients (R) also were calculated for the highest 1RM value (1RM9sub peak)) obtained for each exercise on each device to quantify 1RM relationships between devices.

  12. Note: Experimental study on feasibility of a flexural traveling wave piezoelectric device for biomedical micro-electromechanical system.

    PubMed

    Marinozzi, F; Bini, F

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to experimentally show that polyvinylidene fluoride biaxially oriented in bimorph configuration is a suitable flexural traveling wave device. Piezoelectric ceramic is promising, however the lack biocompatibility is the main drawback for biomedical micro-electromechanical system. A prototype of 20 mm diameter was designed, constructed, and tested via an optical method. A first investigation was performed on two standing waves which were excited to generate the traveling wave. The findings of amplitude and phase have revealed a B31 vibration mode at 7.2 kHz and a maximum amplitude of roughly 40 nm. The flexural traveling wave was confirmed experimentally.

  13. Strategies on improving the micro-fluidic devices using the nonlinear electro- and thermo-kinetic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2015-12-01

    Surface science is key to innovations on microfluidics, smart materials, and future non-equilibrium systems. However, challenging issues still exist in this field. In this article, from the viewpoint of the fundamental design, we will briefly review our strategies on improving the micro-fluidic devices using the nonlinear electro- and thermo-kinetic phenomena. In particular, we will review the microfluidic applications using ICEO, the correction based on the ion-conserving Poisson-Boltzmann theory, the direct simulation on ICEO, and the new horizon such as nonlinear thermo-kinetic phenomena and the artificial cilia.

  14. [Research progress on the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome with mandibular advancement device].

    PubMed

    Li, De-hong; Yang, Xiang-hong; Guo, Tian-wen

    2010-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterized by obstruction of upper airway and respiratory disturbance, excessive daytime sleepiness and tiredness.The possible causes are obesity, hypertension, and upper airway malformations,etc. The location and degree of upper airway structure narrowing in patients have been investigated in many ways, such as X-ray, multi-slices spiral computed tomography, etc. With multi-planar reconstruction technique,3-dimensional construction of upper airway can be established which shows the delicate changes of the upper airway structure. Mandibular advancement device is known as an effective treatment on mild and moderate OSAHS. By advancing the mandible forward, it can increase the space of upper airway, especially the oropharyngeal space. This paper reviewed the methods of investigating on OSAHS and the change of upper airway structure in OSAHS patients treated with mandibular advancement device. Supported by Combined Research Fund of Bureau of Health, Yunan Province and Kunming Medical College(Grant No.2009CD205).

  15. Launch Vehicles Based on Advanced Hybrid Rocket Motors: An Enabling Technology for the Commercial Small and Micro Satellite Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabeyoglu, Arif; Tuncer, Onur; Inalhan, Gokhan

    2016-07-01

    Mankind is relient on chemical propulsion systems for space access. Nevertheless, this has been a stagnant area in terms of technological development and the technology base has not changed much almost for the past forty years. This poses a vicious circle for launch applications such that high launch costs constrain the demand and low launch freqencies drive costs higher. This also has been a key limiting factor for small and micro satellites that are geared towards planetary science. Rather this be because of the launch frequencies or the costs, the access of small and micro satellites to orbit has been limited. With today's technology it is not possible to escape this circle. However the emergence of cost effective and high performance propulsion systems such as advanced hybrid rockets can decrease launch costs by almost an order or magnitude. This paper briefly introduces the timeline and research challenges that were overcome during the development of advanced hybrid LOX/paraffin based rockets. Experimental studies demonstrated effectiveness of these advanced hybrid rockets which incorporate fast burning parafin based fuels, advanced yet simple internal balistic design and carbon composite winding/fuel casting technology that enables the rocket motor to be built from inside out. A feasibility scenario is studied using these rocket motors as building blocks for a modular launch vehicle capable of delivering micro satellites into low earth orbit. In addition, the building block rocket motor can be used further solar system missions providing the ability to do standalone small and micro satellite missions to planets within the solar system. This enabling technology therefore offers a viable alternative in order to escape the viscous that has plagued the space launch industry and that has limited the small and micro satellite delivery for planetary science.

  16. Manipulation of micro-particles through optical interference patterns generated by integrated photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Chung; Chen, Te-Chang; Yang, Yao-Tsu; Huang, Chieh-Yang; Shen, Da-Wei; Chen, Ya-Tzu; Lee, Ming-Chang M

    2013-03-21

    Micro-particle transport and switch governed by guided-wave optical interference are presented. The optical interference, occurring in a directional coupler and a multi-mode interferometer made by inverted rib waveguides, results in a specific evanescent field dependent on wavelength. Through a detailed theoretical analysis, the field of induced optical force shows a correlative pattern associated with the evanescent field. Experimental results demonstrate that 10 μm polystyrene beads are propelled with a trajectory subject to the interference pattern accordingly. By launching different wavelengths, the polystyrene beads can be delivered to different output waveguide ports. Massive micro-particle manipulation is applicable.

  17. Lab-on-a-brain: Implantable micro-optical fluidic devices for neural cell analysis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagaoka, Akira; Noguchi, Jun; Akagi, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2014-10-01

    The high-resolution imaging of neural cells in vivo has brought about great progress in neuroscience research. Here, we report a novel experimental platform, where the intact brain of a living mouse can be studied with the aid of a surgically implanted micro-optical fluidic device; acting as an interface between neurons and the outer world. The newly developed device provides the functions required for the long-term and high-resolution observation of the fine structures of neurons by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and the microfluidic delivery of chemicals or drugs directly into the brain. A proof-of-concept experiment of single-synapse stimulation by two-photon uncaging of caged glutamate and observation of dendritic spine shrinkage over subsequent days demonstrated a promising use for the present technology.

  18. Quality Control Method for a Micro-Nano-Channel Microfabricated Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grattoni, Alessandro; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Xuewu

    2012-01-01

    A variety of silicon-fabricated devices is used in medical applications such as drug and cell delivery, and DNA and protein separation and analysis. When a fluidic device inlet is connected to a compressed gas reservoir, and the outlet is at a lower pressure, a gas flow occurs through the membrane toward the outside. The method relies on the measurement of the gas pressure over the elapsed time inside the upstream and downstream environments. By knowing the volume of the upstream reservoir, the gas flow rate through the membrane over the pressure drop can be calculated. This quality control method consists of measuring the gas flow through a device and comparing the results with a standard curve, which can be obtained by testing standard devices. Standard devices can be selected through a variety of techniques, both destructive and nondestructive, such as SEM, AFM, and standard particle filtration.

  19. Descriptions of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Lee, K D; Seo, D C; Nam, Y U; Ko, W H; Lee, J H; Choi, M C

    2009-10-01

    The research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics (RAPID) device is a newly developed linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device. It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. A 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state ECR plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). The cylindrical stainless steel vacuum chamber is 300 mm in diameter and 750 mm in length and has eight radial and ten axial ports including 6-in. and 8-in. viewing windows for heating and diagnostics. Experimental observation of ECR plasma heating has been recently carried out during the initial plasma operation. The main diagnostic systems including a 94 GHz heterodyne interferometer, a high-resolution 25 channel one-dimensional array spectrometer, a single channel survey spectrometer, and an electric probe have been also prepared. The RAPID device is a flexible simulator for the understanding of tokamak edge plasma physics and new diagnostic system development. In this work, we describe the RAPID device and initial operation results.

  20. Descriptions of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.; Lee, K. D.; Seo, D. C.; Nam, Y. U.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, J. H.; Choi, M. C.

    2009-10-15

    The research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics (RAPID) device is a newly developed linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device. It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. A 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state ECR plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). The cylindrical stainless steel vacuum chamber is 300 mm in diameter and 750 mm in length and has eight radial and ten axial ports including 6-in. and 8-in. viewing windows for heating and diagnostics. Experimental observation of ECR plasma heating has been recently carried out during the initial plasma operation. The main diagnostic systems including a 94 GHz heterodyne interferometer, a high-resolution 25 channel one-dimensional array spectrometer, a single channel survey spectrometer, and an electric probe have been also prepared. The RAPID device is a flexible simulator for the understanding of tokamak edge plasma physics and new diagnostic system development. In this work, we describe the RAPID device and initial operation results.

  1. Characterization of organic and inorganic optoelectronic semiconductor devices using advanced spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Raoul

    In this thesis, advanced spectroscopy methods are discussed and applied to gain understanding of the physical properties of organic conjugated molecules, II-VI thin film semiconductors, and vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL). Experiments include single photon and two-photon excitation with lasers, with subsequent measurements of the absorption and photoluminescence, as well as photocurrent measurements using tungsten and xenon lamps, measuring the direct current and the alternating current of the devices. The materials are investigated in dissolved form (conjugated polymers), thin films (polymers, II-VI semiconductors), and complex layer structures (hybrid device, VCSEL). The experiments are analyzed and interpreted by newly developed or applied theories for two-photon saturation processes in semiconductors, bandgap shrinkage due to optically induced electron hole pairs, and the principle of detailed balance to describe the photoluminescence in thin film cadmium sulfide.

  2. Centre for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) at Louisiana State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockbauer, Roger L.; Poliakoff, Erwin D.; Ajmera, Pratul; Craft, Ben C.; Saile, Volker

    1990-06-01

    The Centre for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) has been established by the Department of Energy at Louisiana State University for the expressed purpose of developing X-ray lithography based techniques for manufacturing microcircuits. The heart of the Center will be a synchrotron light source optimized for the soft X-ray region and will be the first commercially manufactured electron storage ring in the United States. The magnet lattice is based on a design developed by Chasman and Green and will be similar to the VUV ring at Brookhaven NSLS and will operate at 1.2 GeV with a critical wavelength of 9.5 Å. Straight sections will allow up to three insertion devices to be installed for higher energy and higher intensity radiation. In addition to the lithography effort, experimental programs are being established in physics, chemistry, and related areas.

  3. A new synchrotron light source at Louisiana State University's Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockbauer, Roger L.; Ajmera, Pratul; Poliakoff, Erwin D.; Craft, Ben C.; Saile, Volker

    1990-05-01

    A 1.2-GeV synchrotron light source is being constructed at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) at Louisiana State University. The expressed purpose of the center, which has been funded by a grant from the US Department of Energy, is to develop X-ray lithography techniques for manufacturing microcircuits, although basic science programs are also being established. The storage ring will be optimized for the soft-X-ray region and will be the first commercially manufactured electron storage ring in the United States. The magnetic lattice is based on a design developed by Chasman and Green and will allow up to three insertion devices to be installed for higher-energy and higher-intensity radiation. In addition to the lithography effort, experimental programs are being established in physics, chemistry, and related areas.

  4. Sharp-switching band-modulation back-gated devices in advanced FDSOI technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Dirani, Hassan; Fonteneau, Pascal; Solaro, Yohann; Legrand, Charles-Alex; Marin-Cudraz, David; Ferrari, Philippe; Cristoloveanu, Sorin

    2017-02-01

    A band-modulation device with a free top surface, named Z3-FET (Zero front-gate, Zero swing slope and Zero impact ionization) and fabricated in the most advanced Fully Depleted Silicon-On-Insulator technology, is demonstrated experimentally. Since the device has no front gate, the operation mechanism is controlled by two adjacent heavily doped buried ground planes acting as back-gates. Characteristics such as sharp quasi-vertical switching, low leakage, and tunable trigger voltage are measured and discussed. We explore several variants (thin and thick silicon or SiGe body) and show promising results in terms of high current, switching performance and ESD capability with relatively low back-gate and drain bias operation.

  5. Left ventricular assist device driveline infections: recent advances and future goals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have revolutionized the treatment of advanced heart failure, but infection remains a substantial risk. LVAD driveline infections (DLIs) are the most common type of LVAD-associated infection (LVADI). In the past several years we have expanded our understanding of DLI epidemiology, standardized the definition of LVADIs, improved infection rates through changes in implantation techniques, and investigated potential new modalities for DLI diagnosis. However, significant challenges remain for optimizing DLI prevention and treatment. These challenges include standardizing and improving both empiric and targeted antimicrobial therapy, expanding our understanding of effective driveline exit site dressings and topical therapies, and defining the patient population that benefits from device exchange and transplant. Additionally, in an era of expanding antibiotic resistance we need to continue investigating novel, non-antibiotic therapies for prevention and treatment of DLIs. PMID:26793335

  6. Management of severe obstructive sleep apnea using mandibular advancement devices with auto continuous positive airway pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Dubey, Abhishek; Kant, Surya; Singh, Balendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The use of continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) is considered standard treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Treatment of the disease poses a great challenge not only for its diagnostic purpose but also for its treatment part. In about 29-83% of the patients, treatment is difficult because of non-compliance resulting due to high pressures, air leaks and other related issues. In such situations, alternative methods of treatment need to be looked for so as to ascertain better management. Mandibular advancement devices along with CPAP may show better treatment outcome in specific situations. PMID:25814802

  7. Computational Models of Exercise on the Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nate; Caldwell, Erin; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Peters,Brian; Fincke, Renita; DeWitt, John; Poutz-Snyder, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Muscle and bone loss remain a concern for crew returning from space flight. The advanced resistance exercise device (ARED) is used for on-orbit resistance exercise to help mitigate these losses. However, characterization of how the ARED loads the body in microgravity has yet to be determined. Computational models allow us to analyze ARED exercise in both 1G and 0G environments. To this end, biomechanical models of the squat, single-leg squat, and deadlift exercise on the ARED have been developed to further investigate bone and muscle forces resulting from the exercises.

  8. [Objective surgery -- advanced robotic devices and simulators used for surgical skill assessment].

    PubMed

    Suhánszki, Norbert; Haidegger, Tamás

    2014-12-01

    Robotic assistance became a leading trend in minimally invasive surgery, which is based on the global success of laparoscopic surgery. Manual laparoscopy requires advanced skills and capabilities, which is acquired through tedious learning procedure, while da Vinci type surgical systems offer intuitive control and advanced ergonomics. Nevertheless, in either case, the key issue is to be able to assess objectively the surgeons' skills and capabilities. Robotic devices offer radically new way to collect data during surgical procedures, opening the space for new ways of skill parameterization. This may be revolutionary in MIS training, given the new and objective surgical curriculum and examination methods. The article reviews currently developed skill assessment techniques for robotic surgery and simulators, thoroughly inspecting their validation procedure and utility. In the coming years, these methods will become the mainstream of Western surgical education.

  9. Evaluation of Manufacturing Processes for Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laura Jáuregui, Ana; Siller, Héctor R.; Rodriguez, Ciro A.; Elías-Zúñiga, Alex

    2009-11-01

    In this paper several micro-mechanical manufacturing technologies were studied in order to characterize their performance for making miniaturized geometries known as micro-channels, which are the main geometric features of micro-fluidic devices. The technologies used were Micro-End Milling, Wire Electro Discharge Machiningesol Sandblasting and Abrasive Water Jet. Their capabilities were compared with Lithography capabilities, which is the conventional process for micro-channel manufacturing. The evaluation consists in a comprehensive study of surface quality and topography, made with the help of advanced contact and non-contact devices over each prototype made by each technology. Also economical considerations have been taken into account in order to choose the most appropriate manufacturing process for the prototyping of micro-fluidic devices. The results show that Micro-End Milling process can compete with Lithography, in terms of achieving acceptable levels of product quality and economics.

  10. A Low Power Micro Deep Brain Stimulation Device for Murine Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Abulseoud, Osama A.; Tye, Susannah J.; Hosain, Md Kamal; Berk, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation has emerged as an effective medical procedure that has therapeutic efficacy in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Preclinical research involving laboratory animals is being conducted to study the principles, mechanisms, and therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation. A bottleneck is, however, the lack of deep brain stimulation devices that enable long term brain stimulation in freely moving laboratory animals. Most of the existing devices employ complex circuitry, and are thus bulky. These devices are usually connected to the electrode that is implanted into the animal brain using long fixed wires. In long term behavioral trials, however, laboratory animals often need to continuously receive brain stimulation for days without interruption, which is difficult with existing technology. This paper presents a low power and lightweight portable microdeep brain stimulation device for laboratory animals. Three different configurations of the device are presented as follows: 1) single piece head mountable; 2) single piece back mountable; and 3) two piece back mountable. The device can be easily carried by the animal during the course of a clinical trial, and that it can produce non-stop stimulation current pulses of desired characteristics for over 12 days on a single battery. It employs passive charge balancing to minimize undesirable effects on the target tissue. The results of bench, in-vitro, and in-vivo tests to evaluate the performance of the device are presented. PMID:27170861

  11. Rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices with integrated wrinkled gold micro-/nano textured electrodes for electrochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Gabardo, C M; Adams-McGavin, R C; Vanderfleet, O M; Soleymani, L

    2015-08-21

    Fully-integrated electro-fluidic systems with micro-/nano-scale features have a wide range of applications in lab-on-a-chip systems used for biosensing, biological sample processing, and environmental monitoring. Rapid prototyping of application-specific electro-fluidic systems is envisioned to facilitate the testing, validation, and market translation of several lab-on-a-chip systems. Towards this goal, we developed a rapid prototyping process for creating wrinkled micro-/nano-textured electrodes on shrink memory polymers, fabricating microfluidics using molds patterned by a craft-cutter, and bonding electrical and fluidic circuitries using a PDMS partial curing method optimized for creating void-free bonds at the side walls and surfaces of tall (>5 μm) micro-/nano-textured wrinkled electrodes. The resulting electro-fluidic devices, featuring closely spaced high topography electrodes for electrochemical analysis, can withstand flow-rates and burst pressures larger than 25 mL min(-1) and 125 kPa, respectively. In addition, the fully-integrated electrochemical flow-cell developed here demonstrates excellent electrochemical behaviour, with negligible scan to scan variation for over 100 cyclic voltammetry scans, and expected redox signatures measured under various voltage scan rates and fluidic flow rates.

  12. Measurement of the Radiation Incident on NbFeB Insertion Devices at the Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, Gary; Holmes, Michael

    1997-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories Advanced Light Source is a third generation light source containing NdFeB permanent magnet insertion devices.The lifetime of the permanent magnets in a radiation environment is of paramount importance. Measurements of the radiation incident on the insertion device magnets under various operating conditions are presented.

  13. Eat-by-light fiber-optic and micro-optic devices for food quality and safety assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Cucci, C.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Cimato, A.; Attilio, C.; Thienpont, H.; Ottevaere, H.; Paolesse, R.; Mastroianni, M.; Monti, D.; Buonocore, G.; Del Nobile, A.; Mentana, A.; Grimaldi, M. F.; Dall'Asta, C.; Faccini, A.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.

    2007-06-01

    A selection is presented of fiber-optic and micro-optic devices that have been designed and tested for guaranteeing the quality and safety of typical foods, such as extra virgin olive oil, beer, and milk. Scattered colorimetry is used to authenticate various types of extra virgin olive oil and beer, while a fiber-optic-based device for UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy is exploited in order to obtain the hyperspectral optical signature of olive oil. This is done not only for authentication purposes, but also so as to correlate the spectral data with the content of fatty acids, which are important nutritional factors. A micro-optic sensor for the detection of olive oil aroma that is capable of distinguishing different ageing levels of extra virgin olive oil is also presented. It shows effective potential for acting as a smart cap of bottled olive oil in order to achieve a non-destructive olfactory perception of oil ageing. Lastly, a compact portable fluorometer for the rapid monitoring of the carcinogenic M1 aflatoxin in milk, is experimented.

  14. Eat-by-light: fiber-optic and micro-optic devices for food safety and quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Cucci, C.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Cimato, A.; Attilio, C.; Thienpont, H.; Ottevaere, H.; Paolesse, R.; Mastroianni, M.; Monti, D.; Buonocore, G.; Del Nobile, A.; Mentana, A.; Dall'Asta, C.; Faccini, A.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.

    2007-07-01

    A selection of fiber-optic and micro-optic devices is presented designed and tested for monitoring the quality and safety of typical foods, namely the extra virgin olive oil, the beer, and the milk. Scattered colorimetry is used for the authentication of various types of extra virgin olive oil and beer, while a fiber-optic-based device for UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy is exploited in order to obtain the hyperspectral optical signature of olive oil. This is done not only for authentication purposes, but also so as to correlate the spectral data with the content of fatty acids that are important nutritional factors. A micro-optic sensor for the detection of olive oil aroma is presented. It is capable of distinguishing different ageing levels of extra virgin olive oil. It shows effective potential for acting as a smart cap of bottled olive oil in order to achieve a non-destructive olfactory perception of oil ageing. Lastly, a compact portable fluorometer is experimented for the rapid monitoring of the carcinogenic M1 aflatoxin in milk.

  15. Advanced Autonomous Formation Control and Trajectory Management Techniques for Multiple Micro UAV Applications (Controle d’une formation autonome evoluee, et gestion des trajectoires. Techniques d’applications pour micro UAV multiples)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Formation Control and Trajectory Management Techniques for Multiple Micro UAV Applications ( Contrôle d’une formation autonome évoluée, et gestion des...EN-SCI-195 Advanced Autonomous Formation Control and Trajectory Management Techniques for Multiple Micro UAV Applications ( Contrôle d’une formation...autonome évoluée, et gestion des trajectoires. Techniques d’applications pour micro UAV multiples) The material in this publication was

  16. An economical device for carbon supplement in large-scale micro-algae production.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhenfeng; Kang, Ruijuan; Shi, Shaoyuan; Cong, Wei; Cai, Zhaoling

    2008-10-01

    One simple but efficient carbon-supplying device was designed and developed, and the correlative carbon-supplying technology was described. The absorbing characterization of this device was studied. The carbon-supplying system proved to be economical for large-scale cultivation of Spirulina sp. in an outdoor raceway pond, and the gaseous carbon dioxide absorptivity was enhanced above 78%, which could reduce the production cost greatly.

  17. Micro/nanostructured surface modification using femtosecond laser pulses on minimally invasive electrosurgical devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Cheng; Lin, Hao-Jan; Lin, Yun-Ho; Sugiatno, Erwan; Ruslin, Muhammad; Su, Chen-Yao; Ou, Keng-Liang; Cheng, Han-Yi

    2016-01-29

    The purpose of the present study was to examine thermal damage and a sticking problem in the tissue after the use of a minimally invasive electrosurgical device with a nanostructured surface treatment that uses a femtosecond laser pulse (FLP) technique. To safely use an electrosurgical device in clinical surgery, it is important to decrease thermal damage to surrounding tissues. The surface characteristics and morphology of the FLP layer were evaluated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy; element analysis was performed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In the animal model, monopolar electrosurgical devices were used to create lesions in the legs of 30 adult rats. Animals were sacrificed for investigations at 0, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days postoperatively. Results indicated that the thermal damage and sticking situations were reduced significantly when a minimally invasive electrosurgical instrument with an FLP layer was used. Temperatures decreased while film thickness increased. Thermographic data revealed that surgical temperatures in an animal model were significantly lower in the FLP electrosurgical device compared with that in the untreated one. Furthermore, the FLP device created a relatively small area of thermal damage. As already mentioned, the biomedical nanostructured layer reduced thermal damage and promoted the antisticking property with the use of a minimally invasive electrosurgical device. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  18. Stress-induced Effects Caused by 3D IC TSV Packaging in Advanced Semiconductor Device Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, V.; Kteyan, A.; Choy, J.-H.; Hovsepyan, H.; Markosian, A.; Zschech, E.; Huebner, R.

    2011-11-01

    Potential challenges with managing mechanical stress and the consequent effects on device performance for advanced 3D through-silicon-via (TSV) based technologies are outlined. The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze a design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-die out-of-spec variations in device electrical characteristics caused by the layout and through-silicon-via (TSV)/package-induced mechanical stress. The limited characterization/measurement capabilities for 3D IC stacks and a strict "good die" requirement make this type of analysis critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation to assess the mechanical stress across the device layers in silicon chips stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology is proposed. A calibration technique based on fitting to measured stress components and electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices is presented. A strategy for generation of a simulation feeding data and respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to generate a database for multi-scale material parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. For model validation, high-resolution strain measurements in Si channels of the test-chip devices are needed. At the nanoscale, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is the only technique available for sub-10 nm strain measurements so far.

  19. Total ionizing dose radiation effects on NMOS parasitic transistors in advanced bulk CMOS technology devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoping, He; Zujun, Wang; Jiangkun, Sheng; Shaoyan, Huang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, total ionizing dose effect of NMOS transistors in advanced CMOS technology are examined. The radiation tests are performed at 60Co sources at the dose rate of 50 rad (Si)/s. The investigation's results show that the radiation-induced charge buildup in the gate oxide can be ignored, and the field oxide isolation structure is the main total dose problem. The total ionizing dose (TID) radiation effects of field oxide parasitic transistors are studied in detail. An analytical model of radiation defect charge induced by TID damage in field oxide is established. The I - V characteristics of the NMOS parasitic transistors at different doses are modeled by using a surface potential method. The modeling method is verified by the experimental I - V characteristics of 180 nm commercial NMOS device induced by TID radiation at different doses. The model results are in good agreement with the radiation experimental results, which shows the analytical model can accurately predict the radiation response characteristics of advanced bulk CMOS technology device. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11305126).

  20. Advances in Resistive Pulse Sensors: Devices bridging the void between molecular and microscopic detection

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Darby; Anderson, Will; Vogel, Robert; Trau, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Since the first reported use of a biological ion channel to detect differences in single stranded genomic base pairs in 1996, a renaissance in nanoscale resistive pulse sensors has ensued. This resurgence of a technique originally outlined and commercialized over fifty years ago has largely been driven by advances in nanoscaled fabrication, and ultimately, the prospect of a rapid and inexpensive means for genomic sequencing as well as other macromolecular characterization. In this pursuit, the potential application of these devices to characterize additional properties such as the size, shape, charge, and concentration of nanoscaled materials (10 – 900 nm) has been largely overlooked. Advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology are driving the need for simple yet sensitive individual object readout devices such as resistive pulse sensors. This review will examine the recent progress in pore-based sensing in the nanoscale range. A detailed analysis of three new types of pore sensors – in-series, parallel, and size-tunable pores – has been included. These pores offer improved measurement sensitivity over a wider particle size range. The fundamental physical chemistry of these techniques, which is still evolving, will be reviewed. PMID:22034585

  1. Evaluation of ExPress glaucoma filtration device in Indian patients with advanced glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Angmo, Dewang; Sharma, Reetika; Temkar, Shreyas; Dada, Tanuj

    2015-05-01

    ExPress glaucoma filtration device (GFD) has recently become available in India as a surgical option for glaucoma patients. We retrospectively evaluated the outcome of ExPress GFD in 12 eyes with advanced glaucoma with intraocular pressures (IOPs) not controlled on maximal tolerable medical therapy. The mean preoperative IOP of 29.58 ± 7.13 mmHg decreased to 17.0 ± 2.67 and 17.40 ± 0.89 mmHg at 6 and 12 months after surgery. Absolute success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with no additional glaucoma medications) was achieved in eight cases (66.7%) and qualified success (IOP ≤ 18 mmHg, with additional glaucoma medications) in two cases (16.7%) at 1-year after surgery. Early intervention was needed in 4 patients; two underwent anterior chamber reformation while the other two required needling. Two patients required resurgery. There was no significant change in the best corrected visual acuity postoperatively (P = 0.37). ExPress GFD does not seem to offer a benefit over standard trabeculectomy in patients with advanced glaucomatous disease in terms of IOP control or complication rate. However, due to the small sample size with a heterogeneous mixture of primary and secondary glaucoma's, we await further studies with a larger sample size and long-term follow-up, to see how the device performs.

  2. Recent advances in computational methodology for simulation of mechanical circulatory assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Alison L.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Long, Christopher C.; Behr, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to offload the work of one or both ventricles during heart failure. They are used in the clinical setting as destination therapy, as bridge to transplant, or more recently as bridge to recovery to allow for myocardial remodeling. Recent developments in computational simulation allow for detailed assessment of VAD hemodynamics for device design and optimization for both children and adults. Here, we provide a focused review of the recent literature on finite element methods and optimization for VAD simulations. As VAD designs typically fall into two categories, pulsatile and continuous flow devices, we separately address computational challenges of both types of designs, and the interaction with the circulatory system with three representative case studies. In particular, we focus on recent advancements in finite element methodology that has increased the fidelity of VAD simulations. We outline key challenges, which extend to the incorporation of biological response such as thrombosis and hemolysis, as well as shape optimization methods and challenges in computational methodology. PMID:24449607

  3. Waves and Wine: Advanced approaches for characterizing and exploiting micro-terroir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S. S.; Grote, K. R.; Freese, P.; Peterson, J. E.; Rubin, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Development of viticultural strategies that are focused on promoting uniformly high quality wine grapes requires an understanding of the properties that influence wine grape development. Our objective is to explore the spatial and temporal variability of above and below ground factors that can influence grape variability at the block scale (or micro-terroir) using a combination of conventional point measurements and non-invasive geophysical approaches, and to use that information to guide the development of new vineyards or the management of existing vineyards. Climate clearly plays a dominant role in determining the success of certain viticultural regions or vintages. However, wine grapes of the same variety, which are grown in the same microclimate region and cultivated and made into wine using identical practices, can lead to remarkably different wines when the grapes are grown on different types of soils. The soil texture controls soil water availability, which greatly influences grapevine physiological status, vegetative and reproductive growth, and ultimately red wine grape quality. One aspect of our research has focused on developing surface geophysical methods, particularly ground penetrating radar (GPR), to characterize soil texture variability and to monitor vineyard water content. Through testing the approaches in three California wineries, we find that analysis of GPR groundwave and reflected waves enable mapping of shallow soil water content in high resolution, with acceptable accuracy, and in a non-invasive manner, and that use of multiple GPR methods and frequencies offer the potential to characterize the soil in 3-D space. We use the dense data to explore spatial and temporal correlations in soil water content, soil texture, and vegetation vigor and the associated implications for vineyard management. We also describe a new zonal-based vineyard development strategy that honors the natural variability of the site, or the micro-terrior. The approach

  4. Micro-Fresnel Zone Plate Optical Devices Using Densely Accumulated Ray Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An embodiment generally relates to an optical device suitable for use with an optical medium for the storage and retrieval of data. The optical device includes an illumination means for providing a beam of optical radiation of wavelength .lamda. and an optical path that the beam of optical radiation follows. The optical device also includes a diffractive optical element defined by a plurality of annular sections. The plurality of annular sections having a first material alternately disposed with a plurality of annular sections comprising a second material. The diffractive optical element generates a plurality of focal points and densely accumulated ray points with phase contrast phenomena and the optical medium is positioned at a selected focal point or ray point of the diffractive optical element.

  5. Advances in micro/nano scale materials processing by ultrafast lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotakis, Costas

    2009-03-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several attractive possibilities for micro/nano scale applications based on surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. The origin of these applications lies in the reduction of undesirable thermal effects, the non-equilibrium surface and volume structural modifications which may give rise to complex and unusual structures, the supression of photochemical effects in molecular substrates, the possibility of optimization of energy dissipation by temporal pulse shaping and the exploitation of filamentation effects. Diverse applications will be discussed, including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by multiphoton stereolithography. Two examples will be presented in this context: A new approach for the development of superhydrophobic, self-cleaning surfaces [1,2] and the fabrication of functional scaffolds for tissue engineering applications [3-5]. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] V. Zorba et al., ``Biomimetic artificial surfaces quantitatively reproduce the water repellency of a Lotus leaf'', Advanced Materials 20, 4049 (2008).[0pt] [2] V. Zorba et al., ``Tailoring the wetting response of silicon surfaces via fs laser structuring'', Applied Physics A 93, 819 (2008).[0pt] [3] V. Dinca et al., ``Quantification of the activity of biomolecules in microarrays obtained by direct laser transfer'', Biomedical Microdevices 10, 719 (2008).[0pt] [4] B. Hopp et al., ``Laser-based techniques for living cell pattern formation'', Applied Physics A 93, 45 (2008).[0pt] [5] V. Dinca et al., ``Directed three-dimensional patterning of self-assembled peptide fibrils'', Nano Letters 8, 538 (2008).

  6. WE-DE-207A-03: Recent Advances in Devices Used in Neuro--Interventions.

    PubMed

    Gounis, M

    2016-06-01

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT.

  7. Encapsulated, High-Performance, Stretchable Array of Stacked Planar Micro-Supercapacitors as Waterproof Wearable Energy Storage Devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoungjun; Yoon, Jangyeol; Lee, Geumbee; Paik, Seung-Ho; Choi, Gukgwon; Kim, Daeil; Kim, Beop-Min; Zi, Goangseup; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2016-06-29

    We report the fabrication of an encapsulated, high-performance, stretchable array of stacked planar micro-supercapacitors (MSCs) as a wearable energy storage device for waterproof applications. A pair of planar all-solid-state MSCs with spray-coated multiwalled carbon nanotube electrodes and a drop-cast UV-patternable ion-gel electrolyte was fabricated on a polyethylene terephthalate film using serial connection to increase the operation voltage of the MSC. Additionally, multiple MSCs could be vertically stacked with parallel connections to increase both the total capacitance and the areal capacitance owing to the use of a solid-state patterned electrolyte. The overall device of five parallel-connected stacked MSCs, a microlight-emitting diode (μ-LED), and a switch was encapsulated in thin Ecoflex film so that the capacitance remained at 82% of its initial value even after 4 d in water; the μ-LED was lit without noticeable decrease in brightness under deformation including bending and stretching. Furthermore, an Ecoflex encapsulated oximeter wound around a finger was operated using the stored energy of the MSC array attached to the hand (even in water) to give information on arterial pulse rate and oxygen saturation in the blood. This study suggests potential applications of our encapsulated MSC array in wearable energy storage devices especially in water.

  8. Development of a High Fidelity Dynamic Module of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Using Adams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, B. T.; Thompson, W. K.; Lewandowski, B. E.; Cadwell, E. E.; Newby, N. J.; Fincke, R. S.; Sheehan, C.; Mulugeta, L.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) implements well-vetted computational models to predict and assess spaceflight health and performance risks, and enhance countermeasure development. DAP provides expertise and computation tools to its research customers for model development, integration, or analysis. DAP is currently supporting the NASA Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures (ExPC) project by integrating their biomechanical models of specific exercise movements with dynamic models of the devices on which the exercises were performed. This presentation focuses on the development of a high fidelity dynamic module of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on board the ISS. The ARED module, illustrated in the figure below, was developed using the Adams (MSC Santa Ana, California) simulation package. The Adams package provides the capabilities to perform multi rigid body, flexible body, and mixed dynamic analyses of complex mechanisms. These capabilities were applied to accurately simulate: Inertial and mass properties of the device such as the vibration isolation system (VIS) effects and other ARED components, Non-linear joint friction effects, The gas law dynamics of the vacuum cylinders and VIS components using custom written differential state equations, The ARED flywheel dynamics, including torque limiting clutch. Design data from the JSC ARED Engineering team was utilized in developing the model. This included solid modeling geometry files, component/system specifications, engineering reports and available data sets. The Adams ARED module is importable into LifeMOD (Life Modeler, Inc., San Clemente, CA) for biomechanical analyses of different resistive exercises such as squat and dead-lift. Using motion capture data from ground test subjects, the ExPC developed biomechanical exercise models in LifeMOD. The Adams ARED device module was then integrated with the exercise subject model into one integrated dynamic model. This presentation will describe the

  9. Micro-Laser-Based Devices Allowing Optical Wavelength-Packing Densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Jones, Darryl K.; Fork, Richard L.

    1998-01-01

    We examine theoretically and experimentally the space-time domain properties of high-speed electro-optically switched microlaser devices susceptible of construction at optical wavelength-packing densities. We address adjustable phase and group delays with wide dynamic range, coherent logic, temporal storage and reconfiguration of pulse arrays and applications to optical phased arrays.

  10. Fabrication of three-dimensional micro-nanofiber structures by a novel solution blow spinning device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng; Fang, Feiyu; Zeng, Jun; Wang, Zhifeng; Ou, Weijun; Chen, Xindu; Wu, Peixuan; Wang, Han; Zhang, Lin

    2017-02-01

    The fabrication of three-dimensional scaffolds has attracted more attention in tissue engineering. The purpose of this study is to explore a new method for the fabrication of three-dimensional micro-nanofiber structures by combining solution blow spinning and rotating collector. In this study, we successfully fabricated fibers with a minimum diameter of 200 nm and a three-dimensional structure with a maximum porosity of 89.9%. At the same time, the influence of various parameters such as the solvent volatility, the shape of the collector, the feed rate of the solution and the applied gas pressure were studied. It is found that solvent volatility has large effect on the formation of the three-dimensional shape of the structure. The shape of the collector affects the porosity and fiber distribution of the three-dimensional structure. The fiber diameter and fiber uniformity can be controlled by adjusting the solution feed rate and the applied gas pressure. It is feasible to fabricate high-quality three-dimensional micro-nanofiber structure by this new method, which has great potential in tissue engineering.

  11. Beam steering and deflecting device using step-based micro-blazed grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junbo; Su, Xianyu; Xu, Ping; Gu, Zheng

    2008-08-01

    The rapidly evolving demands of optical communications and optical switching systems have created a new market for high capacity all-optical beam steering and deflecting techniques. One technology potentially capable of realizing such systems uses the multistep micro-blazed grating optical beam deflectors based on binary and multiple-phase modulation methods. The micro-optical element has been fabricated by introducing very large scale integration (VLSI), stepping photolithography and reactive ion etching (RIE), which can realize beam steering, deflecting, splitting, and switching in free space, and its diffraction properties are determined by the blazed-grating parameters, such as the number of steps, grating depth, grating period, as well as blazed profile. The theoretical analysis and primarily experimental result show that this phase-type element has the advantages of high diffractive efficiency, low cross talk, small feature size, and high reliability due to nonmechanical beam steering without any moving parts. Hence it is ideally suited to applications in optical communication and optical interconnection network.

  12. Silicon Carbide Micro-devices for Combustion Gas Sensing under Harsh Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby Ghosh; Reza Loloee; Roger Tobin

    2008-09-30

    A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device, Pt/SiO{sub 2}/SiC that can detect hydrogen-containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature (600 C) environments. We demonstrate that the device can be used as a hydrogen monitor in syngas applications of common interferants as well as sulfur and water vapor. These measurements were made in the Catalyst Screening Unit at NETL, Morgantown under atmospheric conditions. The sensor response to hydrogen gas at 350 C is 240 mV/decade, this is significantly higher than the device response to room temperature gas or that predicted from vacuum chamber studies. The enhanced catalytic activity of the platinum sensing film under energy plant operating conditions was investigated via AFM, x-ray diffraction, TEM and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Our characterization indicated that exposure to high temperature gases significantly modifies the morphology of the Pt catalytic film and the Pt/SiO{sub 2} interfacial region, which we tentatively attribute to the enhanced hydrogen sensitivity of the sensing film. A model for the hydrogen/oxygen response of the SiC device under atmospheric conditions was developed. It is based on two independent phenomena: a chemically induced shift in the metal-semiconductor work function difference and the passivation/creation of charged states at the SiO{sub 2}-SiC interface. The optimum operating set point for the SiC sensor with respect to response time and long term reliability was determined to be close to mid-gap. Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) techniques were used to investigate the effects of sulfur contamination on the Pt gate. Exposure to hydrogen sulfide, even in the presence of hydrogen or oxygen at partial pressures of 20-600 times greater than the H2S level, rapidly coated the gate with a monolayer of sulfur. Although

  13. Laser micro-machining of waveguide devices for sub-mm and far IR interferometry and detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drou't d'Aubigny, Christian Y.; Walker, Christopher K.; Golish, Dathon; Swain, Mark R.; Dumont, Philip J.; Lawson, Peter R.

    2003-02-01

    Laser induced, micro-chemical etching is a promising new technology that can be used to fabricate three dimensional structures many millimeters across with micrometer accuracy. Laser micromachining possesses a significant edge over more conventional techniques. It does not require the use of masks and is not confined to crystal planes. A non-contact process, it eliminates tool wear and vibration problems associated with classical milling machines. At the University of Arizona we have constructed the first such laser micromaching system optimized for the fabrication of THz and far IR waveguide and quasi-optical components. Our system can machine many millimeters across down to a few microns accuracy in a short time, with a remarkable surface finish. This paper presents the design, operation and performance of our system, and its applications to waveguide devices for sub millimeter and far IR interferometry.

  14. SILICON CARBIDE MICRO-DEVICES FOR COMBUSTION GAS SENSING UNDER HARSH CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby N. Ghosh; Peter Tobias; Roger G. Tobin

    2004-04-01

    A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device that can detect hydrogen containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature environments. Robust metallization and electrical contacting techniques have been developed for device operation at elevated temperatures. To characterize the time response of the sensor responses in the millisecond range, a conceptually new apparatus has been built. Software has been developed to cope with the requirements of fast sensor control and data recording. In addition user friendly software has been developed to facilitate use of the SiC sensors for industrial process control applications.

  15. Advanced techniques for latent fingerprint detection and validation using a CWL device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrushin, Andrey; Hildebrandt, Mario; Fischer, Robert; Kiertscher, Tobias; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2012-06-01

    The technology-aided support of forensic experts while investigating crime scenes and collecting traces becomes a more and more important part in the domains of image acquisition and signal processing. The manual lifting of latent fingerprints using conventional methods like the use of carbon black powder is time-consuming and very limited in its scope of application. New technologies for a contact-less and non-invasive acquisition and automatic processing of latent fingerprints, promise the possibilities to inspect much more and larger surface areas and can significantly simplify and speed up the workflow. Furthermore, it allows multiple investigations of the same trace, subsequent chemical analysis of the residue left behind and the acquisition of latent fingerprints on sensitive surfaces without destroying the surface itself. In this work, a FRT MicroProf200 surface measurement device equipped with a chromatic white-light sensor CWL600 is used. The device provides a gray-scale intensity image and 3D-topography data simultaneously. While large area scans are time-consuming, the detection and localization of finger traces are done based on low-resolution scans. The localized areas are scanned again with higher resolution. Due to the broad variety of different surface characteristics the fingerprint pattern is often overlaid by the surface structure or texture. Thus, image processing and classification techniques are proposed for validation and visualization of ridge lines in high-resolution scans. Positively validated regions containing complete or sufficient partial fingerprints are passed on to forensic experts. The experiments are provided on a set of three surfaces with different reflection and texture characteristics, and fingerprints from ten different persons.

  16. Active Fail-Safe Micro-Array Flow Control for Advanced Embedded Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Mace, James L.; Mani, Mori

    2009-01-01

    The primary objective of this research effort was to develop and analytically demonstrate enhanced first generation active "fail-safe" hybrid flow-control techniques to simultaneously manage the boundary layer on the vehicle fore-body and to control the secondary flow generated within modern serpentine or embedded inlet S-duct configurations. The enhanced first-generation technique focused on both micro-vanes and micro-ramps highly-integrated with micro -jets to provide nonlinear augmentation for the "strength' or effectiveness of highly-integrated flow control systems. The study focused on the micro -jet mass flow ratio (Wjet/Waip) range from 0.10 to 0.30 percent and jet total pressure ratios (Pjet/Po) from 1.0 to 3.0. The engine bleed airflow range under study represents about a 10 fold decrease in micro -jet airflow than previously required. Therefore, by pre-conditioning, or injecting a very small amount of high-pressure jet flow into the vortex generated by the micro-vane and/or micro-ramp, active flow control is achieved and substantial augmentation of the controlling flow is realized.

  17. SILICON CARBIDE MICRO-DEVICES FOR COMBUSTION GAS SENSING UNDER HARSH CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby N. Ghosh; Peter Tobias; Roger G. Tobin

    2004-10-01

    A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device that can detect hydrogen containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature environments. For these capacitive sensors we have determined that the optimum sensor operating point in terms of sensor lifetime and response time is at midgap. Detailed measurements of the oxide leakage current as a function of temperature were performed to investigate the high temperature reliability of the devices. In addition, robust metallization and electrical contacting techniques have been developed for device operation at elevated temperatures. To characterize the time response of the sensor responses in the millisecond range, a conceptually new apparatus has been built. Using laser induced fluorescence imaging techniques we have shown that the gas underneath the sensor can be completely exchanged with a time constant under 1 millisecond. Ultrahigh vacuum studies of the surface chemistry of the platinum gate have shown that sensor deactivation by adsorbed sulfur is a possible problem. Investigations on the chemical removal of sulfur by catalytic oxidation or reduction are continuing.

  18. Analysis of insertion device magnet measurements for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.M.; Schlueter, R.; Wang, C.

    1993-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), which is currently being commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a third generation light source designed to produce XUV radiation of unprecedented brightness. To meet the high brightness goal the storage ring has been designed for very small electron beam emittance and the undulators installed in the ALS are built to a high degree of precision. The allowable magnetic field errors are driven by electron beam and radiation requirements. Detailed magnetic measurements and adjustments are performed on each undulator to qualify it for installation in the ALS. The first two ALS undulators, IDA and IDB, have been installed. This paper describes the program of measurements, data analysis, and adjustments carried out for these two devices. Calculations of the radiation spectrum, based upon magnetic measurements, are included. Final field integral distributions are also shown. Good field integral uniformity has been achieved using a novel correction scheme, which is also described.

  19. Analysis of insertion device magnet measurements for the advanced light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Steve; Humphries, David E.; Kincaid, Brian M.; Schlueter, Ross D.; Wang, Chunxi

    1993-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), which is currently being commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a third generation light source designed to produce XUV radiation of unprecedented brightness. To meet the high brightness goal the storage ring has been designed for very small electron beam emittance and the undulators installed in the ALS are built to a high degree of precision. The allowable magnetic field errors are driven by electron beam and radiation requirements. Detailed magnetic measurements and adjustments are performed on each undulator to qualify it for installation in the ALS. The first two ALS undulators, IDA and IDB, have been installed. This paper describes the program of measurements, data analysis, and adjustments carried out for these two devices. Calculations of the radiation spectrum, based upon magnetic measurements, are included. Final field integral distributions are also shown. Good field integral uniformity has been achieved using a novel correction scheme, which is also described.

  20. Advance ultra sensitive multi-layered nano plasmonic devices for label free biosensing targeting immunodiagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Divya; Dwivedi, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    The rapid advancement in technology has envisaged and drafted the use of optical bio-sensing units into label free and multiplexed bio-sensing, exploring the surface plasmon polaritons, which has turned into a gold standard on the commercial basis, but they are bulky and find difficulty in scaling up for the throughput detection. The integration of plasmonic crystals with microfluidics on the bio-sensing frontier offers a multi-level validation of results with the ease of real-time detection and imaging and holds a great promise to develop ultra-sensitive, fast, portable device for the point-of-care diagnostics. The paper describes the fast, low cost approach of designing and simulating label free biosensor using open source MEEP and other software tools targeting Immunodiagnostics.

  1. Adaptive laser beam forming for laser shock micro-forming for 3D MEMS devices fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ran; Wang, Shuliang; Wang, Mohan; Li, Shuo; Huang, Sheng; Lin, Yankun; Chen, Kevin P.

    2016-07-01

    Laser shock micro-forming is a non-thermal laser forming method that use laser-induced shockwave to modify surface properties and to adjust shapes and geometry of work pieces. In this paper, we present an adaptive optical technique to engineer spatial profiles of the laser beam to exert precision control on the laser shock forming process for free-standing MEMS structures. Using a spatial light modulator, on-target laser energy profiles are engineered to control shape, size, and deformation magnitude, which has led to significant improvement of the laser shock processing outcome at micrometer scales. The results presented in this paper show that the adaptive-optics laser beam forming is an effective method to improve both quality and throughput of the laser forming process at micrometer scales.

  2. High pressure capillary micro-fluidic valve device and a method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Crocker, Robert W.; Caton, Pamela F.; Gerhardt, Geoff C.

    2007-04-17

    A freeze-thaw valve and a method of micro-machining the freeze-thaw valve is provided and includes a valve housing, wherein the valve housing defines a housing cavity and includes a housing inlet, a housing vent, a capillary tubing inlet and a capillary tubing outlet. A valve body is provided, at least a portion of which is lithographically constructed, wherein the valve body includes a refrigerant inlet, a refrigerant outlet and an expansion chamber. The expansion chamber is disposed to communicate the refrigerant inlet with the refrigerant outlet and includes a restriction region having a flow restriction. Additionally, the valve body is disposed within the housing cavity to form an insulating channel between the valve housing and the valve body.

  3. Two-phase pressure drop across a hydrofoil-based micro pin device using R-123

    SciTech Connect

    Kosar, Ali

    2008-05-15

    The two-phase pressure drop in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink has been investigated using R-123 as the working fluid. Two-phase frictional multipliers have been obtained over mass fluxes from 976 to 2349 kg/m{sup 2} s and liquid and gas superficial velocities from 0.38 to 1.89 m/s and from 0.19 to 24 m/s, respectively. It has been found that the two-phase frictional multiplier is strongly dependent on flow pattern. The theoretical prediction using Martinelli parameter based on the laminar fluid and laminar gas flow represented the experimental data fairly well for the spray-annular flow. For the bubbly and wavy-intermittent flow, however, large deviations from the experimental data were recorded. The Martinelli parameter was successfully used to determine the flow patterns, which were bubbly, wavy-intermittent, and spray-annular flow in the current study. (author)

  4. Millisecond analysis of double stranded DNA with fluorescent intercalator by micro-thermocontrol-device.

    PubMed

    Arata, Hideyuki F; Gillot, Frederic; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2009-08-15

    Study of interaction between DNA and intercalator at molecular level is important to understand the mechanisms of DNA replication and repair. A micro-fabricated local heating thermodevice was adapted to perform denaturation experiments of DNA with fluorescent intercalator on millisecond time scale. Response time of complete unzipping of double stranded DNA, 16 microm in length, was measured to be around 5 min by commercial thermocycler. Response time of quenching of double stranded DNA with fluorescent intercalator SYBR Green was measured to be 10 ms. Thus, quenching properties owing to strand unzipping and denaturation at base pair level were distinguished. This method has provided easy access to measure this parameter and may be a powerful methodology in analyzing biomolecules on millisecond time scale.

  5. Tunable and reconfigurable THz devices for advanced imaging and adaptive wireless communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Shams, M. I. B.; Jiang, Z.; Rahman, S.; Hesler, J. L.; Cheng, L.-J.; Fay, P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report on two different approaches that have been explored to realize tunable and reconfigurable THz devices for advanced imaging and adaptive wireless communication. The first approach makes use of electronically tunable varactor diodes. Frequency tunable THz antennas based on this approach have been successfully demonstrated for the first time in G-band, enabling the development of spectroscopic THz detectors and focal-plane imaging arrays. The second approach takes advantages of optical THz spatial modulation based on photo-induced free carriers in semiconductors. Using this approach, high-performance tunable THz modulators/attenuators, reconfigurable masks for THz coded aperture imaging, and photo-induced Fresnel-zone-plate antennas for dynamic THz beam steering and forming have been successfully demonstrated. Our recent study also shows that by employing the so-called mesa array technique, sub-wavelength spatial resolution and higher than 100 dB modulation depth can be achieved, making it possible to develop tunable THz devices (e.g., tunable filters) with performance and versatility far beyond those realized by conventional approaches. On the basis of the above investigation, the prospects of high-speed near-field THz imaging, real-time ultra-sensitive heterodyne imaging and prototype adaptive THz wireless communication links will be discussed.

  6. Advances in Ch-LCD devices using plastic substrates with conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, William J.; Wonderly, H.; Smith, Steven W.; Kim, Yoan; Chonko, Jason; Doane, J. William; Shashidhar, Ranganathan; O'Ferrall, Catherine E.; Cuttino, David S.

    1999-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystal display (Ch-LCD) are lightweight, low power, sunlight readable displays. In addition, they can serve a dual function as pen-input device switch no additional hardware. Because of the unique properties of this technology, Ch-LCDs can be made with plastic substrates thus making the displayed extremely lightweight, compact and unbreakable. We discuss in this paper cent advances in merging Ch-LCD technology with conducting polymer electrodes. Conducting polymer provides potential benefits over the use of the standard display electrode materials, indium tin oxide, by improving the reliability of the display. Furthermore, the potential to print the conducting polymer electrodes could significantly increase manufacturing volume and decrease display cost. We report on scaling display size and resolution by demonstrating a 1/8 VGA Ch-LCD using polypyrrole as the conducting polymer. We fabricated these displays using either a vacuum fill or polymer wall/lamination approach and we discus subsequent failure analysis to determine the cause for the line-outs observed on these displays. We present initial results in determining the suitability for using Ch-LCD technology as a pen-input device. Finally, we discuss initial work towards printing the conducting polymer electrodes to determine the feasibility of printing electrodes on plastic substrates in a roll-to-roll, high volume, low cost process.

  7. MicroRNA changes in advanced radiotherapy techniques and its effect to secondary cancers.

    PubMed

    Sert, Fatma

    2012-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a kind of RNA, produced copies of endogenous hairpin-shaped, are 21-25 nucleotide length, small, and single chain. Recent studies have revealed that hundreds of miRNAs are found in the human genome and are responsible for diverse cellular processes including the control of developmental timing, cell proliferation, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. miRNAs can activate the initiation of apoptosis, cessation of the cell cycle and aging in case of DNA damage by stimulating the tumor suppressor target gene p53 directly and indirectly. DNA damage is composed by multiple stress factors including ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species, UV exposure and drugs like doxorubicin and camptothecin. Radiation is used widely in health, academic area, and industry for producing electricity. As a result of using radiation widely in different fields, environmental radiation exposure is increasing as well. Whereas high dose radiation exposure causes DNA damage and gives rise to ionization to molecules of living cells by accelerating malignant tumor formation. Fields receiving high dose radiation are evaluated in terms of adverse effects, therapeutic efficacy and secondary malignancies in radiotherapy applications. Dose distributions are re-created when it is required. On the other hand, fields received low dose and the doses that the patient is exposure in simulation and/or portal imaging are often overlooked. The changes in miRNA levels arising in low dose radiation field and its effect to neoplastic process in cell will be pathfinder in terms of secondary cancers or second primary cancers. It is shown that there are differences between the level changes of miRNA in low dose fields which are overlooked in daily practical applications because of not resulting with acute or chronic side effect and the level changes of miRNA in high dose fields. With the help of verifying so-called differences in low dose fields which are seen in advanced radiation techniques

  8. The Development of Advanced Passive Acoustic Monitoring Systems Using microMARS Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Systems Using microMARS Technology Marco Flagg Desert Star Systems LLC 3261 Imjin Rd Marina, CA 93933 phone: (831) 384-8000 fax: (831) 384...limited time and cost framework, the project builds on existing commercial components manufactured by Desert Star Systems, implementing modifications...enabled by multiple related Desert Star products and projects. • The microMARS receorder, which was developed under the NOAA ASTWG program and provides

  9. Silicon Carbide Micro-devices for Combustion Gas Sensing under Harsh Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby N. Ghosh; Reza Loloee; Roger G. Tobin; Yung Ho Kahng

    2006-04-01

    A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device that can detect hydrogen-containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature environments. For fast and stable sensor response measurements, a gate activation process is required. Activation of all sensors took place by switching back and forth between oxidizing (1.0% oxygen in nitrogen) and reducing (10% hydrogen in nitrogen) gases for several hours at a sensor temperature {ge}620 C. All 52 devices on the sensor chip were activated simultaneously by flooding the entire chip with gas. The effects of activation on surface morphology and structure of Pt gates before and after activation were investigated. The optical images obtained from Pt gates demonstrated a clear transition from a smooth and shiny surface to a grainy and cloudy surface morphology. XRD scans collected from Pt gates suggest the presence of an amorphous layer and species other than Pt (111) after activation. The reliability of the gate insulator of our metal-oxide-SiC sensors for long-term device operation at 630 C was studied. We find that the dielectric is stable against breakdown due to electron injection from the substrate with gate leakage current densities as low at 5nA/cm{sup 2} at 630 C. We also designed and constructed a new nano-reactor capable of high gas flow rates at elevated pressure. Our reactor, which is a miniature version of an industrial reactor, is designed to heat the flowing gas up to 700 C. Measurements in ultrahigh vacuum demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide readily deposits sulfur on the gate surface, even at the very high hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide ratios (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5}) expected in applications. Once deposited, the sulfur adversely affects sensor response, and could not be removed by exposure to hydrogen at the temperatures and pressures accessible in

  10. Developing and validating advanced divertor solutions on DIII-D for next-step fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H. Y.; Hill, D. N.; Leonard, A. W.; Allen, S. L.; Stangeby, P. C.; Thomas, D.; Unterberg, E. A.; Abrams, T.; Boedo, J.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Buchenauer, D.; Bykov, I.; Canik, J. M.; Chrobak, C.; Covele, B.; Ding, R.; Doerner, R.; Donovan, D.; Du, H.; Elder, D.; Eldon, D.; Lasa, A.; Groth, M.; Guterl, J.; Jarvinen, A.; Hinson, E.; Kolemen, E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lore, J.; Makowski, M. A.; McLean, A.; Meyer, B.; Moser, A. L.; Nygren, R.; Owen, L.; Petrie, T. W.; Porter, G. D.; Rognlien, T. D.; Rudakov, D.; Sang, C. F.; Samuell, C.; Si, H.; Schmitz, O.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wampler, W.; Wang, H.; Watkins, J. G.

    2016-09-14

    A major challenge facing the design and operation of next-step high-power steady-state fusion devices is to develop a viable divertor solution with order-of-magnitude increases in power handling capability relative to present experience, while having acceptable divertor target plate erosion and being compatible with maintaining good core plasma confinement. A new initiative has been launched on DIII-D to develop the scientific basis for design, installation, and operation of an advanced divertor to evaluate boundary plasma solutions applicable to next step fusion experiments beyond ITER. Developing the scientific basis for fusion reactor divertor solutions must necessarily follow three lines of research, which we plan to pursue in DIII-D: (1) Advance scientific understanding and predictive capability through development and comparison between state-of-the art computational models and enhanced measurements using targeted parametric scans; (2) Develop and validate key divertor design concepts and codes through innovative variations in physical structure and magnetic geometry; (3) Assess candidate materials, determining the implications for core plasma operation and control, and develop mitigation techniques for any deleterious effects, incorporating development of plasma-material interaction models. These efforts will lead to design, installation, and evaluation of an advanced divertor for DIII-D to enable highly dissipative divertor operation at core density (n e/n GW), neutral fueling and impurity influx most compatible with high performance plasma scenarios and reactor relevant plasma facing components (PFCs). In conclusion, this paper highlights the current progress and near-term strategies of boundary/PMI research on DIII-D.

  11. Developing and validating advanced divertor solutions on DIII-D for next-step fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hill, D. N.; Leonard, A. W.; Allen, S. L.; Stangeby, P. C.; Thomas, D.; Unterberg, E. A.; Abrams, T.; Boedo, J.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Buchenauer, D.; Bykov, I.; Canik, J. M.; Chrobak, C.; Covele, B.; Ding, R.; Doerner, R.; Donovan, D.; Du, H.; Elder, D.; Eldon, D.; Lasa, A.; Groth, M.; Guterl, J.; Jarvinen, A.; Hinson, E.; Kolemen, E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lore, J.; Makowski, M. A.; McLean, A.; Meyer, B.; Moser, A. L.; Nygren, R.; Owen, L.; Petrie, T. W.; Porter, G. D.; Rognlien, T. D.; Rudakov, D.; Sang, C. F.; Samuell, C.; Si, H.; Schmitz, O.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wampler, W.; Wang, H.; Watkins, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    A major challenge facing the design and operation of next-step high-power steady-state fusion devices is to develop a viable divertor solution with order-of-magnitude increases in power handling capability relative to present experience, while having acceptable divertor target plate erosion and being compatible with maintaining good core plasma confinement. A new initiative has been launched on DIII-D to develop the scientific basis for design, installation, and operation of an advanced divertor to evaluate boundary plasma solutions applicable to next step fusion experiments beyond ITER. Developing the scientific basis for fusion reactor divertor solutions must necessarily follow three lines of research, which we plan to pursue in DIII-D: (1) Advance scientific understanding and predictive capability through development and comparison between state-of-the art computational models and enhanced measurements using targeted parametric scans; (2) Develop and validate key divertor design concepts and codes through innovative variations in physical structure and magnetic geometry; (3) Assess candidate materials, determining the implications for core plasma operation and control, and develop mitigation techniques for any deleterious effects, incorporating development of plasma-material interaction models. These efforts will lead to design, installation, and evaluation of an advanced divertor for DIII-D to enable highly dissipative divertor operation at core density (n e/n GW), neutral fueling and impurity influx most compatible with high performance plasma scenarios and reactor relevant plasma facing components (PFCs). This paper highlights the current progress and near-term strategies of boundary/PMI research on DIII-D.

  12. Developing and validating advanced divertor solutions on DIII-D for next-step fusion devices

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, H. Y.; Hill, D. N.; Leonard, A. W.; ...

    2016-09-14

    A major challenge facing the design and operation of next-step high-power steady-state fusion devices is to develop a viable divertor solution with order-of-magnitude increases in power handling capability relative to present experience, while having acceptable divertor target plate erosion and being compatible with maintaining good core plasma confinement. A new initiative has been launched on DIII-D to develop the scientific basis for design, installation, and operation of an advanced divertor to evaluate boundary plasma solutions applicable to next step fusion experiments beyond ITER. Developing the scientific basis for fusion reactor divertor solutions must necessarily follow three lines of research, whichmore » we plan to pursue in DIII-D: (1) Advance scientific understanding and predictive capability through development and comparison between state-of-the art computational models and enhanced measurements using targeted parametric scans; (2) Develop and validate key divertor design concepts and codes through innovative variations in physical structure and magnetic geometry; (3) Assess candidate materials, determining the implications for core plasma operation and control, and develop mitigation techniques for any deleterious effects, incorporating development of plasma-material interaction models. These efforts will lead to design, installation, and evaluation of an advanced divertor for DIII-D to enable highly dissipative divertor operation at core density (n e/n GW), neutral fueling and impurity influx most compatible with high performance plasma scenarios and reactor relevant plasma facing components (PFCs). In conclusion, this paper highlights the current progress and near-term strategies of boundary/PMI research on DIII-D.« less

  13. The history of nuclear weapon safety devices

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, D.W.; Greenwood, W.H.

    1998-06-01

    The paper presents the history of safety devices used in nuclear weapons from the early days of separables to the latest advancements in MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Although the paper focuses on devices, the principles of Enhanced Nuclear Detonation Safety implementation will also be presented.

  14. Preliminary performance assessment of biotoxin detection for UWS applications using a MicroChemLab device.

    SciTech Connect

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Haroldsen, Brent L.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Shokair, Isaac R.

    2010-03-01

    In a multiyear research agreement with Tenix Investments Pty. Ltd., Sandia has been developing field deployable technologies for detection of biotoxins in water supply systems. The unattended water sensor or UWS employs microfluidic chip based gel electrophoresis for monitoring biological analytes in a small integrated sensor platform. This instrument collects, prepares, and analyzes water samples in an automated manner. Sample analysis is done using the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} analysis module. This report uses analysis results of two datasets collected using the UWS to estimate performance of the device. The first dataset is made up of samples containing ricin at varying concentrations and is used for assessing instrument response and detection probability. The second dataset is comprised of analyses of water samples collected at a water utility which are used to assess the false positive probability. The analyses of the two sets are used to estimate the Receiver Operating Characteristic or ROC curves for the device at one set of operational and detection algorithm parameters. For these parameters and based on a statistical estimate, the ricin probability of detection is about 0.9 at a concentration of 5 nM for a false positive probability of 1 x 10{sup -6}.

  15. QR-on-a-chip: a computer-recognizable micro-pattern engraved microfluidic device for high-throughput image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Yun, Kyungwon; Lee, Hyunjae; Bang, Hyunwoo; Jeon, Noo Li

    2016-02-21

    This study proposes a novel way to achieve high-throughput image acquisition based on a computer-recognizable micro-pattern implemented on a microfluidic device. We integrated the QR code, a two-dimensional barcode system, onto the microfluidic device to simplify imaging of multiple ROIs (regions of interest). A standard QR code pattern was modified to arrays of cylindrical structures of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Utilizing the recognition of the micro-pattern, the proposed system enables: (1) device identification, which allows referencing additional information of the device, such as device imaging sequences or the ROIs and (2) composing a coordinate system for an arbitrarily located microfluidic device with respect to the stage. Based on these functionalities, the proposed method performs one-step high-throughput imaging for data acquisition in microfluidic devices without further manual exploration and locating of the desired ROIs. In our experience, the proposed method significantly reduced the time for the preparation of an acquisition. We expect that the method will innovatively improve the prototype device data acquisition and analysis.

  16. Optics with diatoms: towards efficient, bioinspired photonic devices at the micro-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Tommasi, E.; Rea, I.; De Stefano, L.; Dardano, P.; Di Caprio, G.; Ferrara, M. A.; Coppola, G.

    2013-04-01

    Diatoms are monocellular algae responsible of 20-25% of the global oxygen produced by photosynthetic processes. The protoplasm of every single cell is enclosed in an external wall made of porous hydrogenated silica, the frustule. In recent times, many effects related to photonic properties of diatom frustules have been discovered and exploited in applications: light confinement induced by multiple diffraction, frustule photoluminescence applied to chemical and biochemical sensing, photonic-crystal-like behavior of valves and girdles. In present work we show how several techniques (e.g. digital holography) allowed us to retrieve information on light manipulation by diatom single valves in terms of amplitude, phase and polarization, both in air and in a cytoplasmatic environment. Possible applications in optical microsystems of diatom frustules and frustule-inspired devices as active photonic elements are finally envisaged.

  17. Device and programming abstractions for spatiotemporal control of active micro-particle swarms.

    PubMed

    Lam, Amy T; Samuel-Gama, Karina G; Griffin, Jonathan; Loeun, Matthew; Gerber, Lukas C; Hossain, Zahid; Cira, Nate J; Lee, Seung Ah; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H

    2017-03-21

    We present a hardware setup and a set of executable commands for spatiotemporal programming and interactive control of a swarm of self-propelled microscopic agents inside a microfluidic chip. In particular, local and global spatiotemporal light stimuli are used to direct the motion of ensembles of Euglena gracilis, a unicellular phototactic organism. We develop three levels of programming abstractions (stimulus space, swarm space, and system space) to create a scripting language for directing swarms. We then implement a multi-level proof-of-concept biotic game using these commands to demonstrate their utility. These device and programming concepts will enhance our capabilities for manipulating natural and synthetic swarms, with future applications for on-chip processing, diagnostics, education, and research on collective behaviors.

  18. A porous 3D cell culture micro device for cell migration study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Zhou, Changchun; Lin, Biaoyang; Li, Wei

    2010-08-01

    Cell migration under chemoattractant is an important biological step in cancer metastasis that causes the spread of malignant tumor cells. Porous polymeric materials are widely used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment for applications such as three dimensional (3D) cell culturing and tissue engineering. In this paper we report a novel 3D cell culture device based on porous polymeric material to study cancer migration. We fabricated a porous channel on a polymeric chip using a selective ultrasonic foaming method. We demonstrate that a chemical concentration gradient could be established through the porous channel due to the slow diffusion process. We show that significant cell migration could be observed through the porous channel within 1-2 weeks of cell culturing when metastatic M4A4-GFP breast cancer cells were induced by 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS).We also developed a mathematical model to evaluate the diffusivity and concentration gradient through the fabricated porous structure.

  19. 76 FR 71982 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices; Public Meeting; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices'' that published in... highly multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application...

  20. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, C. R.; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young’s modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa–27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (<0.13%) and low strain rates (<1/s) employed by the CEMport maintain a linear stress-to-strain relationship which provides a perturbative measurement of the Young’s modulus. Measurements of blood plasma CEM versus heparin concentration show that CEMport is sensitive to heparin levels below 0.050 U/ml, which suggests future applications in sensing heparin levels of post-surgical cardiopulmonary bypass patients. The portability, high accuracy, and high precision of this device enable new clinical and animal studies for associating CEM with blood coagulation disorders, potentially leading to improved diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring. PMID:26233406

  1. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, C. R.; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young's modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa-27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (<0.13%) and low strain rates (<1/s) employed by the CEMport maintain a linear stress-to-strain relationship which provides a perturbative measurement of the Young's modulus. Measurements of blood plasma CEM versus heparin concentration show that CEMport is sensitive to heparin levels below 0.050 U/ml, which suggests future applications in sensing heparin levels of post-surgical cardiopulmonary bypass patients. The portability, high accuracy, and high precision of this device enable new clinical and animal studies for associating CEM with blood coagulation disorders, potentially leading to improved diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring.

  2. Advances in fractal germanium micro/nanoclusters induced by gold: microstructures and properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwen; Shek, Chan-Hung; Wu, C M Lawrence; Lai, Joseph K L

    2014-02-01

    Germanium materials are a class of unique semiconductor materials with widespread technological applications because of their valuable semiconducting, electrical, optical, and thermoelectric power properties in the fields of macro/mesoscopic materials and micro/nanodevices. In this review, we describe the efforts toward understanding the microstructures and various properties of the fractal germanium micro/nanoclusters induced by gold prepared by high vacuum thermal evaporation techniques, highlighting contributions from our laboratory. First, we present the integer and non-integer dimensional germanium micro/nanoclusters such as nanoparticles, nanorings, and nanofractals induced by gold and annealing. In particular, the nonlinear electrical behavior of a gold/germanium bilayer film with the interesting nanofractal is discussed in detail. In addition, the third-order optical nonlinearities of the fractal germanium nanocrystals embedded in gold matrix will be summarized by using the sensitive and reliable Z-scan techniques aimed to determine the nonlinear absorption coefficient and nonlinear refractive index. Finally, we emphasize the thermoelectric power properties of the gold/germanium bilayer films. The thermoelectric power measurement is considered to be a more effective method than the conductivity for investigating superlocalization in a percolating system. This research may provide a novel insight to modulate their competent performance and promote rational design of micro/nanodevices. Once mastered, germanium thin films with a variety of fascinating micro/nanoclusters will offer vast and unforeseen opportunities in the semiconductor industry as well as in other fields of science and technology.

  3. Sol-Gel Deposition of Iridium Oxide for Biomedical Micro-Devices

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cuong M.; Rao, Smitha; Yang, Xuesong; Dubey, Souvik; Mays, Jeffrey; Cao, Hung; Chiao, Jung-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Flexible iridium oxide (IrOx)-based micro-electrodes were fabricated on flexible polyimide substrates using a sol-gel deposition process for utilization as integrated pseudo-reference electrodes for bio-electrochemical sensing applications. The fabrication method yields reliable miniature on-probe IrOx electrodes with long lifetime, high stability and repeatability. Such sensors can be used for long-term measurements. Various dimensions of sol-gel iridium oxide electrodes including 1 mm × 1 mm, 500 μm × 500 μm, and 100 μm × 100 μm were fabricated. Sensor longevity and pH dependence were investigated by immersing the electrodes in hydrochloric acid, fetal bovine serum (FBS), and sodium hydroxide solutions for 30 days. Less pH dependent responses, compared to IrOx electrodes fabricated by electrochemical deposition processes, were measured at 58.8 ± 0.4 mV/pH, 53.8 ± 1.3 mV/pH and 48 ± 0.6 mV/pH, respectively. The on-probe IrOx pseudo-reference electrodes were utilized for dopamine sensing. The baseline responses of the sensors were higher than the one using an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Using IrOx reference electrodes integrated on the same probe with working electrodes eliminated the use of cytotoxic Ag/AgCl reference electrode without loss in sensitivity. This enables employing such sensors in long-term recording of concentrations of neurotransmitters in central nervous systems of animals and humans. PMID:25686309

  4. Sol-gel deposition of iridium oxide for biomedical micro-devices.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong M; Rao, Smitha; Yang, Xuesong; Dubey, Souvik; Mays, Jeffrey; Cao, Hung; Chiao, Jung-Chih

    2015-02-12

    Flexible iridium oxide (IrOx)-based micro-electrodes were fabricated on flexible polyimide substrates using a sol-gel deposition process for utilization as integrated pseudo-reference electrodes for bio-electrochemical sensing applications. The fabrication method yields reliable miniature on-probe IrOx electrodes with long lifetime, high stability and repeatability. Such sensors can be used for long-term measurements. Various dimensions of sol-gel iridium oxide electrodes including 1 mm × 1 mm, 500 µm × 500 µm, and 100 µm × 100 µm were fabricated. Sensor longevity and pH dependence were investigated by immersing the electrodes in hydrochloric acid, fetal bovine serum (FBS), and sodium hydroxide solutions for 30 days. Less pH dependent responses, compared to IrOx electrodes fabricated by electrochemical deposition processes, were measured at 58.8 ± 0.4 mV/pH, 53.8 ± 1.3 mV/pH and 48 ± 0.6 mV/pH, respectively. The on-probe IrOx pseudo-reference electrodes were utilized for dopamine sensing. The baseline responses of the sensors were higher than the one using an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Using IrOx reference electrodes integrated on the same probe with working electrodes eliminated the use of cytotoxic Ag/AgCl reference electrode without loss in sensitivity. This enables employing such sensors in long-term recording of concentrations of neurotransmitters in central nervous systems of animals and humans.

  5. The Effect of an Advanced Organizer and the Predictive Ability of Micro-Learning Tasks When Utilized with Carefully Sequenced Audio-Tutorial Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahle, Jane Butler

    Four audio-tutorial units were developed as part of this study to determine the effectiveness of the use of advanced organizers, based on Ausubel's theories, for meaningful learning experiences. In this study an advanced organizer was developed and given to half of the subjects prior to the instructional sequence. A series of micro-learning tasks,…

  6. Micro, soft, windows: integrating super-resolution viewing capabilities into soft lithographic devices.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Microengineered cell culture environments afford experimentalists with the critical ability to study cells in precisely-defined, yet physiologically-realistic environments. A significant, but often overlooked, feature of these technologies is the unique ability to optically probe cellular and sub-cellular processes during culture in these complex environments, thereby obtaining information that would not be possible via conventional techniques. Motivated by the recent presentation of the Nobel prizes for super-resolution imaging and more recent technological breakthroughs in lattice-based light sheet microscopy, in this research highlight we survey recent innovations in the design of microfluidic cell culture platforms, that will ultimately allow experimentalists to probe biological activity with high-spatial and temporal-resolution. These advances will provide new technology-driven windows into biological processes and mechanisms.

  7. Simulation of self-organized waveguides for self-aligned coupling between micro- and nano-scale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Tetsuzo

    2015-05-01

    We propose an optical coupling technique based on the reflective self-organized lightwave network (R-SOLNET), where optical devices with different core sizes are connected, for nano-scale-waveguide-based optical interconnects. Growth of R-SOLNET between a 3-μm-wide waveguide and a 600-nm-wide waveguide, on the core edge of which a luminescent target has been deposited, is simulated by the finite-difference time-domain method. The two waveguides are placed with gap distances ranging from 16 to 64 μm in a photopolymer with a refractive index that increases upon exposure to a write beam and luminescence. When a 400 nm wavelength write beam is introduced from the micro-scale waveguide, 470 nm luminescence is generated from the target. In the area where the write beam and the luminescence overlap, the refractive index increases rapidly. The write beam and the luminescence thus attract each other to merge into one through the self-focusing, forming a self-aligned coupling waveguide of R-SOLNET with a coupling loss of 1.5-1.8 dB, even when a lateral misalignment of 600 nm exists between them. This indicates that the R-SOLNET can be used as an optical solder to connect a micro-scale waveguide to a nano-scale waveguide. The optimum writing time required to attain the minimum coupling loss increases with increasing lateral misalignment. The dependence of the optimum writing time on the misalignment is reduced with increasing gap distance, and it almost vanishes when the distance is 64 μm, enabling unmonitored optical solder formation. R-SOLNET utilizing the two-photon photochemistry is briefly described as the next-generation SOLNET.

  8. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Lee, K D; Seo, D C; Nam, Y U; Choi, M C

    2010-10-01

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 °C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5×10(-8) Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  9. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.; Lee, K. D.; Seo, D. C.; Nam, Y. U.; Choi, M. C.

    2010-10-15

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 deg. C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5x10{sup -8} Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  10. A microtomography beamline at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Kyungmin; Jin, Hua; Butler, Leslie G.; Kurtz, Richard L.

    2002-03-01

    A microtomography beamline has been recently assembled and is currently operating at the Louisiana State University's Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices synchrotron (CAMD). It has been installed on a bending magnet white-light beamline at port 7A. With the storage ring operating at 1.5 GeV, this beamline has a maximum usable x-ray energy of ˜15 keV. The instrumentation consists of computer-controlled positioning stages for alignment and rotation, a CsI(Tl) phosphor screen, a reflecting mirror, a microscope objective (1:1, 1:4), and Linux/LabVIEW-controlled charge coupled device. With the 1:4 objective, the maximum spatial resolution is 2.25 μm. The positioning and image acquisition computers communicate via transfer control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP). A small G4/Linux cluster has been installed for the purpose of on-site reconstruction. Instrument, alignment and reconstruction programs are written in MATLAB, IDL, and C. The applications to date are many and we present several examples. Several biological samples have been studied as part of an effort on biological visualization and computation. Future improvements to this microtomography station include the addition of a double-multilayer monochromator, allowing one to evaluate the three-dimensional elemental composition of materials. Plans also include eventual installation at the CAMD 7 T wiggler beamline, providing x rays in excess of 50 keV to provide better penetration of higher mass-density materials.

  11. The implementation of concave micro optical devices using a polymer dispensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Yi; Lee, Chih-Chun; Fang, Weileun

    2008-08-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach to implementing a double-concave (DCV) microlens using a simple polymer dispensing and sucking process. The DCV microlens is implemented at room temperature using a commercially-available pneumatic-controlled polymer dispensing system. The DCV lens profile can be tuned by varying the volume of the dispensed polymer. It is also easy to integrate the present polymer DCV microlens with other suspended micromachined devices such as silicon nitride film and silicon-on-glass (SOG) micromachined structures. This study further employs the process for DCV to implement a concave mirror. The measurement results show a typical DCV lens (made of NOA63 polymer) with negative focal lengths of -1.42 mm (red laser) and -1.17 mm (blue laser), and a concave mirror with a focal length of 3.28 mm. Moreover, this study also demonstrates the integration of a DCV microlens with other optical components, such as plano-convex and double-convex lenses.

  12. Micro-chemical synthesis of molecular probes on an electronic microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Keng, Pei Yuin; Chen, Supin; Ding, Huijiang; Sadeghi, Saman; Shah, Gaurav J.; Dooraghi, Alex; Phelps, Michael E.; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”; van Dam, R. Michael

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an all-electronic digital microfluidic device for microscale chemical synthesis in organic solvents, operated by electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD). As an example of the principles, we demonstrate the multistep synthesis of [18F]FDG, the most common radiotracer for positron emission tomography (PET), with high and reliable radio-fluorination efficiency of [18F]FTAG (88 ± 7%, n = 11) and quantitative hydrolysis to [18F]FDG (> 95%, n = 11). We furthermore show that batches of purified [18F]FDG can successfully be used for PET imaging in mice and that they pass typical quality control requirements for human use (including radiochemical purity, residual solvents, Kryptofix, chemical purity, and pH). We report statistical repeatability of the radiosynthesis rather than best-case results, demonstrating the robustness of the EWOD microfluidic platform. Exhibiting high compatibility with organic solvents and the ability to carry out sophisticated actuation and sensing of reaction droplets, EWOD is a unique platform for performing diverse microscale chemical syntheses in small volumes, including multistep processes with intermediate solvent-exchange steps. PMID:22210110

  13. High-performance computing-based exploration of flow control with micro devices

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator that controls flow separation is one of the promising technologies to realize energy savings and noise reduction of fluid dynamic systems. However, the mechanism for controlling flow separation is not clearly defined, and this lack of knowledge prevents practical use of this technology. Therefore, large-scale computations for the study of the DBD plasma actuator have been conducted using the Japanese Petaflops supercomputer ‘K’ for three different Reynolds numbers. Numbers of new findings on the control of flow separation by the DBD plasma actuator have been obtained from the simulations, and some of them are presented in this study. Knowledge of suitable device parameters is also obtained. The DBD plasma actuator is clearly shown to be very effective for controlling flow separation at a Reynolds number of around 105, and several times larger lift-to-drag ratio can be achieved at higher angles of attack after stall. For higher Reynolds numbers, separated flow is partially controlled. Flow analysis shows key features towards better control. DBD plasma actuators are a promising technology, which could reduce fuel consumption and contribute to a green environment by achieving high aerodynamic performance. The knowledge described above can be obtained only with high-end computers such as the supercomputer ‘K’. PMID:25024414

  14. Instrumentation for synchrotron based micromachining at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigeldinger, G.; Goettert, J.; Desta, Y.; Ling, Z. L.; Rupp, L.

    2002-03-01

    The J. Bennett Johnston Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) is a synchrotron radiation facility owned by Louisiana State University and operated with financial support from the State of Louisiana (for information how to submit a project proposal go to: http://www.camd.lsu.edu). The centerpiece of CAMD is a 1.3-1.5 GeV electron storage ring. CAMD supports a strong program in x-ray lithography micromachining (XRLM) or LIGA. A total of four beamlines equipped with different scanners is available for exposures. A 2.500 sq. ft class 100 clean room provides basic processing capability for MEMS including optical lithography, thin film deposition, electroplating, and metrology. Three micromachining beamlines are connected to bending magnets. All beamlines are "white light" beamlines, terminated with a beryllium window. The typical source point to scanner distance is 10 m and the horizontal acceptance ranges from 6.5 to 10 mrad. A number of low Z filters can be inserted into the beam adapting the exposure spectrum to the resist thickness. Two beamlines are equipped with commercial scanners from Jenoptik GmbH (for details see Jenoptik's webpage at www.jo-mikrotechnik.com/) and one beamline with a "vacuum" scanner designed in house. The latest model of Jenoptik's DEX02 scanner has been installed at CAMD's XRLM1 beamline in December 2000 and allows advanced exposures using overlay as well as tilt and rotate functions. In addition to these beamlines CAMD has installed a "white light" beamline at its 7 T wiggler source. Preliminary exposure tests in ultrathick samples (1 mm and thicker) have been conducted using an "air scanner." Currently this beamline is dismantled and will be reinstalled together with a PX beamline. In the article further details of the beamlines and scanners as well as some examples of applications of LIGA microstructures fabricated at CAMD will be discussed.

  15. Teaching Advanced Operation of an iPod-Based Speech-Generating Device to Two Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achmadi, Donna; Kagohara, Debora M.; van der Meer, Larah; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Sutherland, Dean; Lang, Russell; Marschik, Peter B.; Green, Vanessa A.; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a program for teaching two adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to perform more advanced operations on an iPod-based speech-generating device (SGD). The effects of the teaching program were evaluated in a multiprobe multiple baseline across participants design that included two intervention phases. The first intervention…

  16. Army Instructors’ Use of Mobile Devices in the Infantry Advanced Leaders Course

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    mobile devices in the classroom . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Training, Mobile Devices, Army Training, Adaptive Training, Blended Learning...either in a classroom or in a field location. This project explored the use of mobile devices to assist instructors as their role moves from... classroom technology infrastructure. Overall, instructors saw some promise for the future potential of tablet devices for instructor use, but encountered

  17. Budding trends in integrated pest management using advanced micro- and nano-materials: Challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Neha; Barbole, Ranjit S; Banerjee, Shashwat S; Chate, Govind P; Biradar, Ankush V; Khandare, Jayant J; Giri, Ashok P

    2016-12-15

    One of the most vital supports to sustain human life on the planet earth is the agriculture system that has been constantly challenged in terms of yield. Crop losses due to insect pest attack even after excessive use of chemical pesticides, are major concerns for humanity and environment protection. By the virtue of unique properties possessed by micro and nano-structures, their implementation in Agri-biotechnology is largely anticipated. Hence, traditional pest management strategies are now forestalling the potential of micro and nanotechnology as an effective and viable approach to alleviate problems pertaining to pest control. These technological innovations hold promise to contribute enhanced productivity by providing novel agrochemical agents and delivery systems. Application of these systems engages to achieve: i) control release of agrochemicals, ii) site-targeted delivery of active ingredients to manage specific pests, iii) reduced pesticide use, iv) detection of chemical residues, v) pesticide degradation, vi) nucleic acid delivery and vii) to mitigate post-harvest damage. Applications of micro and nano-technology are still marginal owing to the perception of low economic returns, stringent regulatory issues involving safety assessment and public awareness over their uses. In this review, we highlight the potential application of micro and nano-materials with a major focus on effective pest management strategies including safe handling of pesticides.

  18. Recent advances in the micro-modelling of cleavage fracture in steel

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, J.F.

    1997-12-31

    This paper covers two aspects of the modelling of cleavage fracture in steels. The first relates to events at the microstructural scale, where fracture initiators are smaller than 10 {micro}m (usually, smaller than 5 {micro}m) in size. Here, the discussion focuses on the ways in which the local cleavage fracture stress depends on microstructure. Attention is drawn to behavior in weld metals, where initiation sites can be clearly identified on fracture surfaces. The relation of local fracture stress to fracture toughness relies on the identification of a critical distance and the uniqueness of this distance when dealing with cleavage following warm prestressing, or cleavage ahead of a growing fibrous crack, is questioned. Comparisons are made with the so-called local approach which is statistically based. The second aspect covers events at the meso-scale: specifically, the ways in which fracture toughness results should be analyzed, when the microstructure comprises a two-phase mixture of tough and brittle areas, of order 50--200 {micro}m in size. The traditional Weibull approach is challenged, because it does not represent physical reality and because it produces ultra-pessimistic lower-bound values. The re-examination of the Weibull approach has implications with respect to micro-scale modelling.

  19. Advanced MicroObserver UGS integration with and cueing of the BattleHawk squad level loitering munition and UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, Bob; Finklea, John; Kershaw, James; Loughman, Cathy; Shaffner, Patti; Frost, Dean; Deller, Sean

    2014-06-01

    Textron's Advanced MicroObserver(R) is a next generation remote unattended ground sensor system (UGS) for border security, infrastructure protection, and small combat unit security. The original MicroObserver(R) is a sophisticated seismic sensor system with multi-node fusion that supports target tracking. This system has been deployed in combat theaters. The system's seismic sensor nodes are uniquely able to be completely buried (including antennas) for optimal covertness. The advanced version adds a wireless day/night Electro-Optic Infrared (EOIR) system, cued by seismic tracking, with sophisticated target discrimination and automatic frame capture features. Also new is a field deployable Gateway configurable with a variety of radio systems and flexible networking, an important upgrade that enabled the research described herein. BattleHawkTM is a small tube launched Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) with a warhead. Using transmitted video from its EOIR subsystem an operator can search for and acquire a target day or night, select a target for attack, and execute terminal dive to destroy the target. It is designed as a lightweight squad level asset carried by an individual infantryman. Although BattleHawk has the best loiter time in its class, it's still relatively short compared to large UAVs. Also it's a one-shot asset in its munition configuration. Therefore Textron Defense Systems conducted research, funded internally, to determine if there was military utility in having the highly persistent MicroObserver(R) system cue BattleHawk's launch and vector it to beyond visual range targets for engagement. This paper describes that research; the system configuration implemented, and the results of field testing that was performed on a government range early in 2013. On the integrated system that was implemented, MicroObserver(R) seismic detections activated that system's camera which then automatically captured images of the target. The geo-referenced and time-tagged Micro

  20. Status Report on the Development of Micro-Scheduling Software for the Advanced Outage Control Center Project

    SciTech Connect

    Germain, Shawn St.; Thomas, Kenneth; Farris, Ronald; Joe, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet, refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are difficult to coordinate. Finding ways to improve refueling outage performance while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a R&D program which works with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current NPPs. The Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, this INL R&D project is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This report describes specific recent efforts to develop a capability called outage Micro-Scheduling. Micro-Scheduling is the ability to allocate and schedule outage support task resources on a sub-hour basis. Micro-Scheduling is the real-time fine-tuning of the outage schedule to react to the actual progress of the primary outage activities to ensure that support task resources are

  1. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven Reitzenstein, Stephan; Strittmatter, André

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  2. Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Ancona, Mario G.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Yu, Zhiping

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction ot the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

  3. Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Ancona, Mario G.; Yu, Zhi-Ping

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction to the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion or quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

  4. [Treatment of advanced heart failure in women: heart transplantation and ventricular assist devices].

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Manlio; Macera, Francesca; Verde, Alessandro; Bruschi, Giuseppe; del Medico, Marta; Oliva, Fabrizio; Martinelli, Luigi; Frigerio, Maria

    2012-05-01

    Women candidates for heart transplantation are definitely less than men, just 20% of all patients transplanted; even in the INTERMACS registry they represent only 21% of all ventricular assist devices (VAD) implanted. The reasons for this big difference are discussed in this article. Why women are less frequently assessed for unconventional therapies? Are they sicker or just less regarded? Our experience and the literature show us clear epidemiological, clinical and treatment differences that could lead to a lower prevalence of end-stage disease in women of an age suitable for unconventional therapies. Once on the transplant list, women wait less than men for a heart transplant, because they present with more severe disease, have a lower body mass index and undergo less VAD implants. After transplantation women's survival is comparable to men's, although they usually complain of a lower quality of life. Females receive less often a VAD than men. The main reasons for this include presentation with advanced heart failure at an older age than men, worse outcomes related to small body surface area, and lower survival rates on VAD when implanted as bridge to heart transplantation.

  5. Advanced Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, Handling, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Englar

    2001-05-14

    Research is being conducted at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) to develop advanced aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability, handling and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles by using previously-developed and flight-tested pneumatic (blown) aircraft technology. Recent wind-tunnel investigations of a generic Heavy Vehicle model with blowing slots on both the leading and trailing edges of the trailer have been conducted under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These experimental results show overall aerodynamic drag reductions on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle of 50% using only 1 psig blowing pressure in the plenums, and over 80% drag reductions if additional blowing air were available. Additionally, an increase in drag force for braking was confirmed by blowing different slots. Lift coefficient was increased for rolling resistance reduction by blowing only the top slot, while downforce was produced for traction increase by blowing only the bottom. Also, side force and yawing moment were generated on either side of the vehicle, and directional stability was restored by blowing the appropriate side slot. These experimental results and the predicted full-scale payoffs are presented in this paper, as is a discussion of additional applications to conventional commercial autos, buses, motor homes, and Sport Utility Vehicles.

  6. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  7. Characterization of 3D Trench PZT Capacitors for High Density FRAM Devices by Synchrotron X-ray Micro-diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Sangmin; Park, Youngsoo; Han, Hee; Park, Yong Jun; Baik, Sunggi; Choi, Jae-Young

    2007-01-19

    3D trench PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT) capacitors for 256 Mbit 1T-1C FRAM devices were characterized by synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction at Pohang Light Source. Three layers, Ir/PZT/Ir were deposited on SiO2 trench holes with different widths ranging from 180 nm to 810 nm and 400 nm in depth by ALD and MOCVD. Each hole is separated from neighboring holes by 200 nm. The cross sectional TEM analysis for the trenches revealed that the PZT layers were consisted of columnar grains at the trench entrance and changes to polycrystalline granular grains at the lower part of the trench. The transition from columnar to granular grains was dependent on the trench size. The smaller trenches were favorable to granular grain formation. High resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to determine the crystal structure of each region. The beam was focused to about 500 {mu}m and the diffraction patterns were obtained from a single trench. Only the peaks corresponding to ferroelectric tetragonal phases are observed for the trenches larger than 670 nm, which consist of fully columnar grains. However, the trenches smaller than 670 nm showed the peaks corresponding the pyrochlore phases, which suggested that the granular grains are of pyrochlore phases and non-ferroelectric.

  8. Numerical study of a novel micro-diaphragm flow channel with piezoelectric device for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H. K.; Huang, S. H.; Chen, B. R.; Cheng, L. W.

    Previous studies have shown that the amplitude of the vibration of a piezoelectric (PZT) device produces an oscillating flow that changes the chamber volume along with a curvature variation of the diaphragm. In this study, an actuating micro-diaphragm with piezoelectric effects is utilized as an air-flow channel in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) systems, called PZT-PEMFC. This newly designed gas pump, with a piezoelectric actuation structure, can feed air into the system of an air-breathing PEMFC. When the actuator moves outward to increase the cathode channel volume, the air is sucked into the chamber; moving inward decreases the channel's volume and thereby compresses air into the catalyst layer and enhancing the chemical reaction. The air-standard PZT-PEMFC cycle is proposed to describe an air-breathing PZT-PEMFC. A novel design for PZT-PEMFCs has been proposed and a three-dimensional, transitional model has been successfully built to account for its major phenomena and performance. Moreover, at high frequencies, PZT actuation leads to a more stable current output, more drained water, higher sucked air, higher hydrogen consumption, and also overcomes concentration losses.

  9. Microwave Plasma Source for Fabrication of Micro- and Nano-Crystalline Diamond Thin Films for Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paosawatyanyong, Boonchoat; Rujisamphan, Nopporn; Bhanthumnavin, Worawan

    2013-01-01

    The design and utilization of an affordable compact-size high-density plasma reactor for micro- and nano-crystalline diamond (MCD/NCD) thin film deposition is presented. The system is based on a 2.45 GHz domestic microwave oven magnetron. A switching power supply module, which yields a low-voltage high-current AC filament feeding and a high-voltage low-current DC cathode bias, is constructed to serve as the magnetron power source. With a high stability of the power module combined with the usage of water cooling gaskets, over 100 h of plasma processing time was achieved without overheating or causing any damage to the magnetron. Depositions of well-faceted MCD/NCD thin films, with distinct diamond Raman characteristics, were obtained using H2-CH4 discharge with 1-5% CH4. Metal-semiconductor diode structures were fabricated using gold and aluminum as ohmic and rectifying contacts, respectively, and their responses to DC signals revealed a high rectification ratio of up to 106 in the intrinsic MCD/NCD devices.

  10. “Optical communication with brain cells by means of an implanted duplex micro-device with optogenetics and Ca2+ fluoroimaging”

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Haruta, Makito; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Matsumata, Miho; Eizumi, Kawori; Kitsumoto, Chikara; Motoyama, Mayumi; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Jun

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the brain function based on neural activity, a minimally invasive analysis technology in a freely moving animal is necessary. Such technology would provide new knowledge in neuroscience and contribute to regenerative medical techniques and prosthetics care. An application that combines optogenetics for voluntarily stimulating nerves, imaging to visualize neural activity, and a wearable micro-instrument for implantation into the brain could meet the abovementioned demand. To this end, a micro-device that can be applied to the brain less invasively and a system for controlling the device has been newly developed in this study. Since the novel implantable device has dual LEDs and a CMOS image sensor, photostimulation and fluorescence imaging can be performed simultaneously. The device enables bidirectional communication with the brain by means of light. In the present study, the device was evaluated in an in vitro experiment using a new on-chip 3D neuroculture with an extracellular matrix gel and an in vivo experiment involving regenerative medical transplantation and gene delivery to the brain by using both photosensitive channel and fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. The device succeeded in activating cells locally by selective photostimulation, and the physiological Ca2+ dynamics of neural cells were visualized simultaneously by fluorescence imaging. PMID:26878910

  11. “Optical communication with brain cells by means of an implanted duplex micro-device with optogenetics and Ca2+ fluoroimaging”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Haruta, Makito; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Matsumata, Miho; Eizumi, Kawori; Kitsumoto, Chikara; Motoyama, Mayumi; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Jun

    2016-02-01

    To better understand the brain function based on neural activity, a minimally invasive analysis technology in a freely moving animal is necessary. Such technology would provide new knowledge in neuroscience and contribute to regenerative medical techniques and prosthetics care. An application that combines optogenetics for voluntarily stimulating nerves, imaging to visualize neural activity, and a wearable micro-instrument for implantation into the brain could meet the abovementioned demand. To this end, a micro-device that can be applied to the brain less invasively and a system for controlling the device has been newly developed in this study. Since the novel implantable device has dual LEDs and a CMOS image sensor, photostimulation and fluorescence imaging can be performed simultaneously. The device enables bidirectional communication with the brain by means of light. In the present study, the device was evaluated in an in vitro experiment using a new on-chip 3D neuroculture with an extracellular matrix gel and an in vivo experiment involving regenerative medical transplantation and gene delivery to the brain by using both photosensitive channel and fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. The device succeeded in activating cells locally by selective photostimulation, and the physiological Ca2+ dynamics of neural cells were visualized simultaneously by fluorescence imaging.

  12. Ablation of intervertebral discs in dogs using a MicroJet-assisted dye-enhanced injection device coupled with the diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Kenneth E.; Henry, George A.; Dickey, D. Thomas; Stair, Ernest L.; Powell, Ronald; Schafer, Steven A.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Frederickson, Christopher J.; Hayes, Donald J.; Wallace, David B.

    1998-07-01

    Use of holmium laser energy for vaporization/coagulation of the nucleus pulposus in canine intervertebral discs has been previously reported and is currently being applied clinically in veterinary medicine. The procedure was originally developed in the canine model and intended for potential human use. Since the pulsed (15 Hz) holmium laser energy exerts photomechanical and photothermal effects, the potential for extrusion of additional disc material to the detriment of the patient is possible using the procedure developed for the dog. To reduce this potential complication, use of diode laser (805 nm - CW mode) energy, coupled with indocyanine green (ICG) as a selective laser energy absorber, was formulated as a possible alternative. Delivery of the ICG and diode laser energy was through a MicroJet device that could dispense dye interactively between individual laser 'shots.' Results have shown that it is possible to selectively ablate nucleus pulposus in the canine model using the device described. Acute observations (gross and histopathologic) illustrate that accurate placement of the spinal needle before introduction of the MicroJet device is critically dependent on the expertise of the interventional radiologist. In addition, the success of the overall technique depends on consistent delivery of both ICG and diode laser energy. Minimizing tissue carbonization on the tip of the MicroJet device is also of crucial importance for effective application of the technique in clinical veterinary medicine.

  13. Recent advances in ultrasonic-assisted machining for the fabrication of micro/nano-textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaolin; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto; Shimada, Keita; Mizutani, Masayoshi

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the state of art of ultrasonicassisted machining technologies used for fabrication of micro/nano-textured surfaces is reviewed. Diamond machining is the most widely used method in industry for manufacturing precision parts. For fabrication of fine structures on surfaces, conventional diamond machining methods are competitive by considering the precision of structures, but have limitations at machinable structures and machining efficiency, which have been proved to be partly solved by the integration of ultrasonic vibration motion. In this paper, existing ultrasonic-assisted machining methods for fabricating fine surface structures are reviewed and classified, and a rotary ultrasonic texturing (RUT) technology is mainly introduced by presenting the construction of vibration spindles, the texturing principles, and the applications of textured surfaces. Some new ideas and experimental results are presented. Finally, the challenges in using the RUT method to fabricate micro/ nano-textured surfaces are discussed with respect to texturing strategies, machinable structures, and tool wear.

  14. Design and construction of wall-less nano-electrophoretic and nano in micro array high throughput devices for single cell ‘omics' single molecule detection analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misevic, Gradimir N.; BenAssayag, Gerard; Rasser, Bernard; Sales, Philippe; Simic-Krstic, Jovana; Misevic, Nikola J.; Popescu, Octavian

    2014-09-01

    Single cell ‘omics' requires a technological platform with reliable and high throughput single cell analyses with single molecular detection and quantification. Presently available options are to either to detect many different macromolecules and metabolites extracted from many cells, thus obtaining partial ‘omics' of an average cell or to study only few single cells and be limited to semi-quantitative analyses and detection of a few abundant molecules. Here we present a new design and prototype proof of concept construction of high throughput nano-electrophoretic separation (NEA) device and nano in micro array (NiMA) affinity probe device for a complete single cell ‘omics' single bio-molecule polymers detection and quantification analyses. Prototype devices were constructed using gallium ion Focus Ion Beam (FIB), Gas Injection System (GIS) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) crossbeam instruments. The NEA device accommodates 100 different cell samplings per 1 cm2 chip with arrays of open nano-electrophoretic guides. The NiMA bio-sensor device on 1 cm2 can accommodate 2500 cells in a micro-well array which consists of 250,000 probe markers in nano-well array located in each micro-well. Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) we have demonstrated the direct detection of a single protein molecule and proved the feasibility of single bio-molecular detection and quantification concept for NEA and NIMA. Our concept validates high throughput and complete and quantitative single cell ‘omics' with single molecular detection analyses without labeling. Thus, it is superior to commonly used microfluidics, capillary electrophoresis and micro-arrays using mass spectrometry and fluorescent labeling for molecular detection.

  15. Long Term Therapeutic Efficacy of a Soft Monobloc Mandibular Advancement Device in Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ballanti, Fabiana; Ranieri, Salvatore; Cozza, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the long term (48 months) therapeutic efficacy of a soft monobloc mandibular advancement device in adult patients with mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Methods. The study population comprised 28 patients (6 female and 22 male, mean age 52.2 ± 6.8 years) affected by obstructive sleep apnea. After a baseline medical and somnographic examination, a functional examination of the stomatognathic system, and a questionnaire focused on sleep-related qualities and a daytime somnolence, each patient received an individual device. Two follow-ups were made 6 months (T1) and 48 months (T2) after soft monobloc mandibular advancement device treatment had been initiated, and all initial examinations were repeated. Results. The statistical analysis showed a significant decrease in body mass index value between T1 and T2 (ρ = 0,012), an increase of Epworth sleepiness scale value between T1 and T2 (ρ = 0,012), and a significant improvement and decrease of apnea/hypopnea index between T0 and T1 (ρ = 0,010) and between T0 and T2 (ρ = 0,013). Conclusion. Treatment with the soft monobloc mandibular advancement device is a therapeutic solution with long term and stable effects (48 months) for patients suffering from mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:25642453

  16. Large-area nanofabrication and applications in advanced nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wei

    The research work presented in this dissertation includes novel large area nanofabrication techniques and their applications in advanced nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. The fabrications and applications include: 1) high performance transparent electrodes, 2) a novel plasmonic nanocavity and its applications in organic solar cells and light emitting diodes, and 3) a bipolar plasmonic nonlinear optical device to enhance and tune second harmonic generation. Based upon these topics, the thesis is divided into the following parts. First, a novel transparent electrode (TE), metallic deep subwavelength mesh electrode is developed and fabricated, showing better transmittance and conductance than previous TEs. Its performance dependence on nanostructure geometries and materials are investigated. The deep-subwavelength mesh electrode also has excellent antiglare properties. Such electrodes are fabricated on 4" wafer by nanoimprint, scalable to meter sizes. Second, a novel plasmonic nanocavity from the MESH is developed, named "plasmonic cavity with subwavelength hole-array (PlaCSH)", consisting of a thin MESH as a transparent front electrode, a thin metal back electrode, and in-between layer of active material. This structure is used to create high performance solar cells and LEDs. PlaCSH solar cell gives a solution to three central challenges in organic solar cells (light coupling into solar cell, light trapping in a sub-absorption-length-thick layer, and replacement of the indium-tin-oxide). Experimentally, the PlaCSH polymer SCs achieve high light coupling-efficiency/absorptance/power conversion efficiency, along with broad-band, Omni angle/polarization acceptance. In OLEDs, PlaCSH shows numerous benefits with both the small- molecule and polymer active materials. Enhanced light extraction, internal quantum efficiency, ambient light absorption, contrast, viewing angle, brightness, and decreased glare are all observed. The above experiments -- along with

  17. Metrology and Standards Needs for Some Categories of Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Chiao, J. C.; Goldman, Julian M.; Heck, David A.; Kazanzides, Peter; Peine, William J.; Stiehl, James B.; Yen, Dwight; Dagalakis, Nicholas G.

    2008-01-01

    With rapid advances in meso-, micro- and nano-scale technology devices and electronics, a new generation of advanced medical devices is emerging, which promises medical treatment that is less invasive and more accurate, automated, and effective. We examined the technological and economic status of five categories of medical devices. A set of metrology needs is identified for each of these categories and suggestions are made to address them. PMID:27096115

  18. Antimicrobial effect of a novel ozone- generating device on micro-organisms associated with primary root carious lesions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baysan, A; Whiley, R A; Lynch, E

    2000-01-01

    The aims of this present study were (1) to assess the antimicrobial effect of ozone from a novel ozone-generating device (Heolozone, USA) [0.052% (v/v) in air delivered at a rate of 13.33 ml.s(-1)] on primary root carious lesions (PRCLs) and (2) to evaluate the efficacy of ozone specifically on Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. In study 1, 40 soft PRCLs from freshly extracted teeth were randomly divided into two groups to test the antimicrobial effect on PRCLs from exposure to ozonated water for either 10 or 20 s. Half of a lesion was removed using a sterile excavator. Subsequently, the remaining lesion was exposed to the ozonised water for a period of either 10 or 20 s (corresponding to 0. 069 or 0.138 ml of ozone, respectively). Using paired Student t tests, a significant (p<0.001) reduction (mean +/- SE) was observed in the ozone-treated groups with either a 10-second (log(10) 3.57+/-0.37) or 20-second (log(10) 3.77+/-0.42) ozone application compared with the control groups (log(10) 5.91+/-0.15 and log(10) 6.18+/-0.21, respectively). In study 2, 40 sterile saliva-coated glass beads were randomly divided into two groups for each micro-organism. One glass bead was put into each bijou bottle with 3 ml of Todd-Hewitt broth. S. mutans and S. sobrinus were inoculated anaerobically overnight. Each glass bead was then washed with 2 ml of phosphate-buffered saline. Immediately, 10 s of ozone gas was applied to each glass bead in the test groups. There was a significant (p<0.0001) reduction (mean +/- SE) in ozone-treated samples for S. mutans (log(10) 1.01+/-0.27) and S. sobrinus (log(10) 1.09+/-0.36) compared with the control samples (log(10) 3.93+/-0.07 and log(10) 4.61+/-0.13, respectively). This treatment regime is an effective, quick, conservative and simple method to kill micro-organisms in PRCLs. Ozone gas application for a period of 10 s was also capable of reducing the numbers of S. mutans and S. sobrinus on saliva-coated glass beads in vitro.

  19. Automated hotspot analysis with aerial image CD metrology for advanced logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Trautzsch, Thomas; Kim, Min-ho; Seo, Jung-Uk; Yoon, Young-Keun; Han, Hak-Seung; Chung, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Meyers, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Continuously shrinking designs by further extension of 193nm technology lead to a much higher probability of hotspots especially for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. The CD of these potential hotspots needs to be precisely controlled and measured on the mask. On top of that, the feature complexity increases due to high OPC load in the logic mask design which is an additional challenge for CD metrology. Therefore the hotspot measurements have been performed on WLCD from ZEISS, which provides the benefit of reduced complexity by measuring the CD in the aerial image and qualifying the printing relevant CD. This is especially of advantage for complex 2D feature measurements. Additionally, the data preparation for CD measurement becomes more critical due to the larger amount of CD measurements and the increasing feature diversity. For the data preparation this means to identify these hotspots and mark them automatically with the correct marker required to make the feature specific CD measurement successful. Currently available methods can address generic pattern but cannot deal with the pattern diversity of the hotspots. The paper will explore a method how to overcome those limitations and to enhance the time-to-result in the marking process dramatically. For the marking process the Synopsys WLCD Output Module was utilized, which is an interface between the CATS mask data prep software and the WLCD metrology tool. It translates the CATS marking directly into an executable WLCD measurement job including CD analysis. The paper will describe the utilized method and flow for the hotspot measurement. Additionally, the achieved results on hotspot measurements utilizing this method will be presented.

  20. Therapeutic outcomes of mandibular advancement devices as an initial treatment modality for obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Pona; Jeon, Hyoung Won; Han, Doo Hee; Won, Tae-Bin; Kim, Dong-Young; Rhee, Chae-Seo; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a highly efficacious treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), there is a need for alternative treatment options, such as sleep surgeries and mandibular advancement devices (MADs), to overcome the limitations of CPAP. This study aimed to analyze the therapeutic outcomes of OSA subjects who were treated with a MAD, and to estimate the clinical impact of MAD as a first-line treatment for OSA. Forty-seven patients diagnosed with OSA received an adjustable MAD as an initial treatment. Drug-induced sleep endoscopic findings and sleep parameters (both pre-MAD and post-MAD treatment), such as apnea index, oxygen saturation, and degree of daytime sleepiness, were assessed retrospectively. The MAD treatment resulted in a significant reduction in apnea–hypopnea index, and also a significant elevation in lowest oxygen saturation. Satisfactory results of MAD treatment as a first treatment modality were observed in 27 patients, and a successful outcome was reached in approximately 72% of patients. The OSA patients who had lower body mass index and upper airway narrowing at the level of palate and tongue base showed relatively higher rates of a satisfactory outcome even in cases of moderate or severe OSA. These results suggest that the use of a MAD may be an alternative treatment option in OSA patients with retropalatal and retroglossal area narrowing regardless of disease severity. Additionally, MADs can be recommended as an initial treatment modality, and the effectiveness of MADs in achieving success may not be inferior to CPAP. PMID:27861349

  1. Fabrication of a micro through-hole array by gas-blowing a PDMS-treated polyamide screen for a flexible drag-reducing skin-like device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Zhou, Kai; Zhao, Xiang; Kong, Quancun

    2017-01-01

    We propose a method for fabricating a flexible skin-like device for generating and trapping micro bubbles with the aim of reducing underwater drag. This low-cost, efficient, high-pressure gas-blow method is used to fabricate a micro through-hole array in a flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) gel-based skin. The key parameters in the gas-blowing method are investigated, such as the viscosity of PDMS and the blowing pressure in order to optimize the quality of through-hole layer. Deviation of the linear dimensions of the obtained micro holes was less than 4.5%. In addition, multiphase computational fluid dynamics models were built to analyze the drag-reduction performance of bell-shaped holes made by this method. Compared with cylindrical through holes produced by molding, the drag-reduction effect of bell-shaped holes increased as much as 34%.

  2. ISS Squat and Deadlift Kinematics on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, N.; Caldwell, E.; Sibonga, J.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2014-01-01

    Visual assessment of exercise form on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on orbit is difficult due to the motion of the entire device on its Vibration Isolation System (VIS). The VIS allows for two degrees of device translational motion, and one degree of rotational motion. In order to minimize the forces that the VIS must damp in these planes of motion, the floor of the ARED moves as well during exercise to reduce changes in the center of mass of the system. To help trainers and other exercise personnel better assess squat and deadlift form a tool was developed that removes the VIS motion and creates a stick figure video of the exerciser. Another goal of the study was to determine whether any useful kinematic information could be obtained from just a single camera. Finally, the use of these data may aid in the interpretation of QCT hip structure data in response to ARED exercises performed in-flight. After obtaining informed consent, four International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers participated in this investigation. Exercise was videotaped using a single camera positioned to view the side of the crewmember during exercise on the ARED. One crewmember wore reflective tape on the toe, heel, ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder joints. This technique was not available for the other three crewmembers, so joint locations were assessed and digitized frame-by-frame by lab personnel. A custom Matlab program was used to assign two-dimensional coordinates to the joint locations throughout exercise. A second custom Matlab program was used to scale the data, calculate joint angles, estimate the foot center of pressure (COP), approximate normal and shear loads, and to create the VIS motion-corrected stick figure videos. Kinematics for the squat and deadlift vary considerably for the four crewmembers in this investigation. Some have very shallow knee and hip angles, and others have quite large ranges of motion at these joints. Joint angle analysis showed that crewmembers

  3. Development of Magnetically Excited Flexural Plate Wave Devices for Implementation as Physical, Chemical, and Acoustic Sensors, and as Integrated Micro-Pumps for Sensored Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, W. K.; Mitchell, M. A.; Graf, D. C.; Shul, R. J.

    2002-05-01

    The magnetically excited flexural plate wave (mag-FPW) device has great promise as a versatile sensor platform. FPW's can have better sensitivity at lower operating frequencies than surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Lower operating frequency simplifies the control electronics and makes integration of sensor with electronics easier. Magnetic rather than piezoelectric excitation of the FPW greatly simplifies the device structure and processing by eliminating the need for piezoelectric thin films, also simplifying integration issues. The versatile mag-FPW resonator structure can potentially be configured to fulfill a number of critical functions in an autonomous sensored system. As a physical sensor, the device can be extremely sensitive to temperature, fluid flow, strain, acceleration and vibration. By coating the membrane with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), or polymer films with selective absorption properties (originally developed for SAW sensors), the mass sensitivity of the FPW allows it to be used as biological or chemical sensors. Yet another critical need in autonomous sensor systems is the ability to pump fluid. FPW structures can be configured as micro-pumps. This report describes work done to develop mag-FPW devices as physical, chemical, and acoustic sensors, and as micro-pumps for both liquid and gas-phase analytes to enable new integrated sensing platform.

  4. Micro-fluidic (Lab-on the- Chip) PCR Array Cartridge for Biological Screening in a Hand Held Device: FInal Report for CRADA no 264. PNNL-T2-258-RU with CombiMatrix Corp

    SciTech Connect

    Rainina, Evguenia I.

    2010-10-31

    The worldwide emergence of both new and old diseases resulting from human expansion and also human and materials mobility has and will continue to place stress on both medical and clinical diagnostics. The classical approach to bioagents detection involves the use of differential metabolic assays to determine species type in the case of most bacteria, or the use of cell culture and electron microscopy to diagnose viruses and some bacteria that are intracellular parasites. The long-term goal in bioagent detection is to develop a hand-held instrument featuring disposable cartridges which contain all the necessary reagents, reaction chambers, waste chambers, and micro-fluidics to extract, concentrate, amplify, and analyze nucleic acids. This GIPP project began development of a sensory platform using nucleic-acid based probes. Although research was not completed, initial findings indicated that an advanced sensing device could theoretically be built on a DNA/RNA-based technology platform.

  5. Advanced Micro-Polycrystalline Silicon Films Formed by Blue-Multi-Laser-Diode Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Takashi; Chen, Yi; Miyahira, Tomoyuki; de Dieu Mugiraneza, Jean; Ogino, Yoshiaki; Iida, Yasuhiro; Sahota, Eiji; Terao, Motoyasu

    2010-03-01

    Semiconductor blue-multi-laser-diode annealing (BLDA) for amorphous Si film was performed to obtain a film containing uniform polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) grains as a low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) process used for thin-film transistor (TFT). By adopting continuous wave (CW) mode at the 445 nm wavelength of the BLDA system, the light beam is efficiently absorbed into the thin amorphous silicon film of 50 nm thickness and can be crystallized stably. By adjusting simply the laser power below 6 W with controlled beam shape, the isotropic Si grains from uniform micro-grains to arbitral grain size of polycrystalline phase can be obtained with reproducible by fixing the scan speed at 500 mm/s. As a result of analysis using electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), uniform distributed micro-poly-Si grains of smooth surface were observed at a power condition below 5 W and the preferred crystal orientation of (111) face was confirmed. As arbitral grain size can be obtained stably and reproducibly merely by controlling the laser power, BLDA is promising as a next-generation LTPS process for AM OLED panel including a system on glass (SoG).

  6. Construction of a 3D porous network of copper film via a template-free deposition method with superior mechanical and electrical properties for micro-energy devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuncheng; Wang, Yao; Deng, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    With the ever increasing level of performance of energy conversion micro-devices, such as thin-film solar cells and thermoelectric micro-generators or coolers, their reliability and stability still remain a challenge. The high electrical and mechanical stability of an electrode is two of the critical factors that affect the long-term life of devices. Here we show that these factors can be achieved by constructing a 3D porous network of nanostructures in copper film using facile magnetron sputtering technology without any templates. The constructed 3D porous network of nanostructures in Cu film provides not only the advantages of light weight, prominently high conductivity, and large elastic deformation, but also the ability to absorb stress, preventing crack propagation, which is crucial for electrodes to maintain stable electrical and mechanical properties under working conditions. The nanopores inside the 3D network are capable of unrestrained deformation under applied stress resulting in strong elastic recovery. This work puts forward a feasible solution for manufacturing electrodes with excellent electrical and mechanical properties for micro-energy devices.

  7. MicroRNA-31 Emerges as a Predictive Biomarker of Pathological Response and Outcome in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Caramés, Cristina; Cristobal, Ion; Moreno, Víctor; Marín, Juan P; González-Alonso, Paula; Torrejón, Blanca; Minguez, Pablo; Leon, Ana; Martín, José I; Hernández, Roberto; Pedregal, Manuel; Martín, María J; Cortés, Delia; García-Olmo, Damian; Fernández, María J; Rojo, Federico; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-06-03

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision has emerged as the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients. However, many cases do not respond to neoadjuvant CRT, suffering unnecessary toxicities and surgery delays. Thus, identification of predictive biomarkers for neoadjuvant CRT is a current clinical need. In the present study, microRNA-31 expression was measured in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies from 78 patients diagnosed with LARC who were treated with neoadjuvant CRT. Then, the obtained results were correlated with clinical and pathological characteristics and outcome. High microRNA-31 (miR-31) levels were found overexpressed in 34.2% of cases. Its overexpression significantly predicted poor pathological response (p = 0.018) and worse overall survival (OS) (p = 0.008). The odds ratio for no pathological response among patients with miR-31 overexpression was 0.18 (Confidence Interval = 0.06 to 0.57; p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis corroborated the clinical impact of miR-31 in determining pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT as well as OS. Altogether, miR-31 quantification emerges as a novel valuable clinical tool to predict both pathological response and outcome in LARC patients.

  8. MicroRNA-31 Emerges as a Predictive Biomarker of Pathological Response and Outcome in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caramés, Cristina; Cristobal, Ion; Moreno, Víctor; Marín, Juan P.; González-Alonso, Paula; Torrejón, Blanca; Minguez, Pablo; Leon, Ana; Martín, José I.; Hernández, Roberto; Pedregal, Manuel; Martín, María J.; Cortés, Delia; García-Olmo, Damian; Fernández, María J.; Rojo, Federico; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision has emerged as the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients. However, many cases do not respond to neoadjuvant CRT, suffering unnecessary toxicities and surgery delays. Thus, identification of predictive biomarkers for neoadjuvant CRT is a current clinical need. In the present study, microRNA-31 expression was measured in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies from 78 patients diagnosed with LARC who were treated with neoadjuvant CRT. Then, the obtained results were correlated with clinical and pathological characteristics and outcome. High microRNA-31 (miR-31) levels were found overexpressed in 34.2% of cases. Its overexpression significantly predicted poor pathological response (p = 0.018) and worse overall survival (OS) (p = 0.008). The odds ratio for no pathological response among patients with miR-31 overexpression was 0.18 (Confidence Interval = 0.06 to 0.57; p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis corroborated the clinical impact of miR-31 in determining pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT as well as OS. Altogether, miR-31 quantification emerges as a novel valuable clinical tool to predict both pathological response and outcome in LARC patients. PMID:27271609

  9. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  10. Advanced characterization of carrier profiles in germanium using micro-machined contact probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarysse, T.; Konttinen, M.; Parmentier, B.; Moussa, A.; Vandervorst, W.; Impellizzeri, G.; Napolitani, E.; Privitera, V.; Nielsen, P. F.; Petersen, D. H.; Hansen, O.

    2012-11-01

    The accurate determination of the sheet resistance and carrier depth profile, i.e. active dopant profile, of shallow junction isolated structures involving new high mobility materials, such as germanium, is a crucial topic for future CMOS development. In this work, we discuss the capabilities of new concepts based on micro machined, closely spaced contact probes (10 μm pitch). When using four probes to perform sheet resistance measurements, a quantitative carrier profile extraction based on the evolution of the sheet resistance versus depth along a beveled surface is obtained. Considering the use of only two probes, a spreading resistance like setup is obtained with small spacing and drastically reduced electrical contact radii (˜10 nm) leading to a substantial reduction of the correction factors which are normally required for converting spreading resistance profiles. We demonstrate the properties of both approaches on Al+ implants in germanium with different anneal treatments.

  11. Advancing Tissue Engineering: A Tale of Nano-, Micro-, and Macroscale Integration.

    PubMed

    Leijten, Jeroen; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Nasajpour, Amir; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-27

    Tissue engineering has the potential to revolutionize the health care industry. Delivering on this promise requires the generation of efficient, controllable and predictable implants. The integration of nano- and microtechnologies into macroscale regenerative biomaterials plays an essential role in the generation of such implants, by enabling spatiotemporal control of the cellular microenvironment. Here we review the role, function and progress of a wide range of nano- and microtechnologies that are driving the advancements in the field of tissue engineering.

  12. Advancing Tissue Engineering: a Tale of Nano, Micro and Macro Scale Integration

    PubMed Central

    Leijten, Jeroen; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Nasajpour, Amir; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering has the potential to revolutionize the health care industry. Delivering on this promise requires the generation of efficient, controllable and predictable implants. The integration of nano- and microtechnologies into macroscale regenerative biomaterials is playing an essential role in the generation of such implants, by enabling spatiotemporal control of the cellular microenvironment. Here we review the role, function and progress of a wide range of nano- and microtechnologies that are driving the advancements in the field of tissue engineering. PMID:27101419

  13. Advanced Fabrication Techniques for Precisely Controlled Micro and Nano Scale Environments for Complex Tissue Regeneration and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Benjamin

    As modern medicine advances, it is still very challenging to cure joint defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The current clinical standard for catastrophic or late stage joint degradation is a total joint implant, where the damaged joint is completely excised and replaced with a metallic or artificial joint. However, these procedures still only lasts for 10-15 years, and there are hosts of recovery complications which can occur. Thus, these studies have sought to employ advanced biomaterials and scaffold fabricated techniques to effectively regrow joint tissue, instead of merely replacing it with artificial materials. We can hypothesize here that the inclusion of biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials with highly functional electrospun and 3D printed scaffold can improve physical characteristics (mechanical strength, surface interactions and nanotexture) enhance cellular growth and direct stem cell differentiation for bone, cartilage and vascular growth as well as cancer metastasis modeling. Nanomaterial inclusion and controlled 3D printed features effectively increased nano surface roughness, Young's Modulus and provided effective flow paths for simulated arterial blood. All of the approaches explored proved highly effective for increasing cell growth, as a result of increasing micro-complexity and nanomaterial incorporation. Additionally, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, cell migration, cell to cell interaction and vascular formation were enhanced. Finally, growth-factor(gf)-loaded polymer nanospheres greatly improved vascular cell behavior, and provided a highly bioactive scaffold for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) co-culture and bone formation. In conclusion, electrospinning and 3D printing when combined effectively with biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials (i.e. carbon nanomaterials, collagen, nHA, polymer

  14. The spatial and logical organization of devices in an advanced industrial robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the geometrical and device organization of a robot system which is based in part upon transformations of Cartesian frames and exchangeable device tree structures. It discusses coordinate frame transformations, geometrical device representation and solution degeneracy along with the data structures which support the exchangeable logical-physical device assignments. The system, which has been implemented in a minicomputer, supports vision, force, and other sensors. It allows tasks to be instantiated with logically equivalent devices and it allows tasks to be defined relative to appropriate frames. Since these frames are, in turn, defined relative other frames this organization provides a significant simplification in task specification and a high degree of system modularity.

  15. Shadow masked organometallic vapor phase epitaxy for advanced micro-optical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2000-12-01

    This thesis presents novel techniques and applications of nonplanar chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for optoelectronic materials and devices. Specifically, nonplanar organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) employing a shadow mask has been developed for the fabrication of integrated optoelectronic structures. Shadow masked OMVPE (SM-OMVPE) is currently the only technique known to produce thick, nonplanar layers of single crystal material without macroscopic faceting. By the use of SM-OMVPE, various microlenses, micromirrors and novel devices have been designed fabricated and tested. Shadow masked microlenses with record short focal lengths have been produced. High quality microlens arrays with accurate control of lens diameter, sagitta, focal length, astigmatism and position have been designed, fabricated and tested. The author has shown that precise three-dimensional control during crystal growth can be employed to construct useful optoelectronic structures in a reproducible manner. This work also presents novel techniques for the fabrication of shadow masks. A high aluminum- concentration spacer layer and chemical recipes for the removal of epitaxial shadow masks are reported. In addition, the first reusable shadow mask constructed by reactive ion etching has been utilized for the growth of shadow masked structures. Direct fusion wafer bonding of silicon shadow masks was first developed by the author and has proven to be a robust, clean and reliable technique for mask placement. The application of shadow masked growth to vertical cavity semiconductor lasers (VCSELs) was initiated in this work. Microlenses were designed for top-emitting VCSELs to provide focusing of the output beam and these designs are currently being fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, by introducing curvature to the distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirrors, a high power single mode VCSEL has been designed. The author has grown the first concentrically

  16. Area Reports. Advanced materials and devices research area. Silicon materials research task, and advanced silicon sheet task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Silicon Materials Task and the Advanced Silicon Sheet Task are to identify the critical technical barriers to low-cost silicon purification and sheet growth that must be overcome to produce a PV cell substrate material at a price consistent with Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project objectives and to overcome these barriers by performing and supporting appropriate R&D. Progress reports are given on silicon refinement using silane, a chemical vapor transport process for purifying metallurgical grade silicon, silicon particle growth research, and modeling of silane pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors.

  17. Electrochemical investigations of advanced materials for microelectronic and energy storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goonetilleke, Pubudu Chaminda

    A broad range of electrochemical techniques are employed in this work to study a selected set of advanced materials for applications in microelectronics and energy storage devices. The primary motivation of this study has been to explore the capabilities of certain modern electrochemical techniques in a number of emerging areas of material processing and characterization. The work includes both aqueous and non-aqueous systems, with applications in two rather general areas of technology, namely microelectronics and energy storage. The sub-systems selected for investigation are: (i) Electrochemical mechanical and chemical mechanical planarization (ECMP and CMP, respectively), (ii) Carbon nanotubes in combination with room temperature ionic liquids (ILs), and (iii) Cathode materials for high-performance Li ion batteries. The first group of systems represents an important building block in the fabrication of microelectronic devices. The second and third groups of systems are relevant for new energy storage technologies, and have generated immense interests in recent years. A common feature of these different systems is that they all are associated with complex surface reactions that dictate the performance of the devices based on them. Fundamental understanding of these reactions is crucial to further development and expansion of their associated technologies. It is the complex mechanistic details of these surface reactions that we address using a judicious combination of a number of state of the art electrochemical techniques. The main electrochemical techniques used in this work include: (i) Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and slow scan cyclic voltammetry (SSCV, a special case of CV); (ii) Galvanostatic (or current-controlled) measurements; (iii) Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), based on two different methodologies, namely, Fourier transform EIS (FT-EIS, capable of studying fast reaction kinetics in a time-resolved mode), and EIS using frequency response

  18. Recent advancements in the gas-phase MicroChemLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Wheeler, David; Sokolowski, Sara; Trudell, Dan; Byrnes, Joy; Okandan, Murat; Bauer, Joseph M.; Manley, Robert G.

    2004-12-01

    Sandia's hand-held MicroChemLabTM system uses a micromachined preconcentrator (PC), a gas chromatography channel (GC) and a quartz surface acoustic wave array (SAW) detector for sensitive/selective detection of gas-phase chemical analytes. Requisite system size, performance, power budget and time response mandate microfabrication of the key analytical system components. In the fielded system hybrid integration has been employed, permitting optimization of the individual components. Recent improvements in the hybrid-integrated system, using plastic, metal or silicon/glass manifolds, is described, as is system performance against semivolatile compounds and toxic industrial chemicals. The design and performance of a new three-dimensional micropreconcentrator is also introduced. To further reduce system dead volume, eliminate unheated transfer lines and simplify assembly, there is an effort to monolithically integrate the silicon PC and GC with a suitable silicon-based detector, such as a magnetically-actuated flexural plate wave sensor (magFPW) or a magnetically-actuated pivot plate resonator (PPR).

  19. Detecting Nano-Scale Vibrations in Rotating Devices by Using Advanced Computational Methods

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Raúl M.; Haber, Rodolfo E.; Schmittdiel, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a computational method for detecting vibrations related to eccentricity in ultra precision rotation devices used for nano-scale manufacturing. The vibration is indirectly measured via a frequency domain analysis of the signal from a piezoelectric sensor attached to the stationary component of the rotating device. The algorithm searches for particular harmonic sequences associated with the eccentricity of the device rotation axis. The detected sequence is quantified and serves as input to a regression model that estimates the eccentricity. A case study presents the application of the computational algorithm during precision manufacturing processes. PMID:22399918

  20. Advanced biosensing methodologies developed for evaluating performance quality and safety of emerging biophotonics technologies and medical devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilev, Ilko K.; Walker, Bennett; Calhoun, William; Hassan, Moinuddin

    2016-03-01

    Biophotonics is an emerging field in modern biomedical technology that has opened up new horizons for transfer of state-of-the-art techniques from the areas of lasers, fiber optics and biomedical optics to the life sciences and medicine. This field continues to vastly expand with advanced developments across the entire spectrum of biomedical applications ranging from fundamental "bench" laboratory studies to clinical patient "bedside" diagnostics and therapeutics. However, in order to translate these technologies to clinical device applications, the scientific and industrial community, and FDA are facing the requirement for a thorough evaluation and review of laser radiation safety and efficacy concerns. In many cases, however, the review process is complicated due the lack of effective means and standard test methods to precisely analyze safety and effectiveness of some of the newly developed biophotonics techniques and devices. There is, therefore, an immediate public health need for new test protocols, guidance documents and standard test methods to precisely evaluate fundamental characteristics, performance quality and safety of these technologies and devices. Here, we will overview our recent developments of novel test methodologies for safety and efficacy evaluation of some emerging biophotonics technologies and medical devices. These methodologies are based on integrating the advanced features of state-of-the-art optical sensor technologies and approaches such as high-resolution fiber-optic sensing, confocal and optical coherence tomography imaging, and infrared spectroscopy. The presentation will also illustrate some methodologies developed and implemented for testing intraocular lens implants, biochemical contaminations of medical devices, ultrahigh-resolution nanoscopy, and femtosecond laser therapeutics.

  1. The Spin Torque Lego - from spin torque nano-devices to advanced computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grollier, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Spin transfer torque (STT), predicted in 1996, and first observed around 2000, brought spintronic devices to the realm of active elements. A whole class of new devices, based on the combined effects of STT for writing and Giant Magneto-Resistance or Tunnel Magneto-Resistance for reading has emerged. The second generation of MRAMs, based on spin torque writing : the STT-RAM, is under industrial development and should be out on the market in three years. But spin torque devices are not limited to binary memories. We will rapidly present how the spin torque effect also allows to implement non-linear nano-oscillators, spin-wave emitters, controlled stochastic devices and microwave nano-detectors. What is extremely interesting is that all these functionalities can be obtained using the same materials, the exact same stack, simply by changing the device geometry and its bias conditions. So these different devices can be seen as Lego bricks, each brick with its own functionality. During this talk, I will show how spin torque can be engineered to build new bricks, such as the Spintronic Memristor, an artificial magnetic nano-synapse. I will then give hints on how to assemble these bricks in order to build novel types of computing architectures, with a special focus on neuromorphic circuits. Financial support by the European Research Council Starting Grant NanoBrain (ERC 2010 Stg 259068) is acknowledged.

  2. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A water loop maintenance device and process to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been undergoing a performance evaluation. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the water recirculation maintenance device and process is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance process further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware. This

  3. Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2011-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a clear demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  4. Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high-capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Water Loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for the ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System. The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of crewed spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System hardware.

  5. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2013-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  6. Functional imaging using computational fluid dynamics to predict treatment success of mandibular advancement devices in sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    De Backer, J W; Vanderveken, O M; Vos, W G; Devolder, A; Verhulst, S L; Verbraecken, J A; Parizel, P M; Braem, M J; Van de Heyning, P H; De Backer, W A

    2007-01-01

    Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) have emerged as a popular alternative for the treatment of sleep-disordered breathing. These devices bring the mandibula forward in order to increase upper airway (UA) volume and prevent total UA collapse during sleep. However, the precise mechanism of action appears to be quite complex and is not yet completely understood; this might explain interindividual variation in treatment success. We examined whether an UA model, that combines imaging techniques and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), allows for a prediction of the treatment outcome with MADs. Ten patients that were treated with a custom-made mandibular advancement device (MAD), underwent split-night polysomnography. The morning after the sleep study, a low radiation dose CT scan was scheduled with and without the MAD. The CT examinations allowed for a comparison between the change in UA volume and the anatomical characteristics through the conversion to three-dimensional computer models. Furthermore, the change in UA resistance could be calculated through flow simulations with CFD. Boundary conditions for the model such as mass flow rate and pressure distributions were obtained during the split-night polysomnography. Therefore, the flow modeling was based on a patient specific geometry and patient specific boundary conditions. The results indicated that a decrease in UA resistance and an increase in UA volume correlate with both a clinical and an objective improvement. The results of this pilot study suggest that the outcome of MAD treatment can be predicted using the described UA model.

  7. Inhibiting device degradation induced by surface damages during top-down fabrication of semiconductor devices with micro/nano-scale pillars and holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayet, Ahmed S.; Cansizoglu, Hilal; Gao, Yang; Kaya, Ahmet; Ghandiparsi, Soroush; Yamada, Toshishige; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Islam, M. Saif

    2016-09-01

    High-aspect ratio semiconductor pillar- and hole-based structures are being investigated for photovoltaics, energy harvesting devices, transistors, and sensors. The fabrication of pillars and holes frequently involves top-down fabrication (such as dry etching) of semiconductors. Such a process contributes to different types of crystalline defects including vacancies, interstitials, dislocations, stacking faults, surface roughness, impurities, and charging effects. These defects contribute to degraded device characteristics impacting detection sensitivity, energy conversion efficiency, etc. In this presentation, we review dry-etched semiconductor devices and demonstrate several possible methods to inhibit device degradation induced by surface damage. These methods include hydrogen passivation, the growth of oxide passivating thin films using wet furnace growth, and low-ion energy etching. These methods contributed to a leakage current reduction by as much as four orders of magnitude.

  8. Characterization of Amorphous Silicon Advanced Materials and PV Devices: Final Technical Report, 15 December 2001--31 January 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P. C.

    2005-11-01

    The major objectives of this subcontract have been: (1) understand the microscopic properties of the defects that contribute to the Staebler-Wronski effect to eliminate this effect, (2) perform correlated studies on films and devices made by novel techniques, especially those with promise to improve stability or deposition rates, (3) understand the structural, electronic, and optical properties of films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) made on the boundary between the amorphous and microcrystalline phases, (4) search for more stable intrinsic layers of a-Si:H, (5) characterize the important defects, impurities, and metastabilities in the bulk and at surfaces and interfaces in a-Si:H films and devices and in important alloy systems, and (6) make state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) devices out of new, advanced materials, when appropriate. All of these goals are highly relevant to improving photovoltaic devices based on a-Si:H and related alloys. With regard to the first objective, we have identified a paired hydrogen site that may be the defect that stabilizes the silicon dangling bonds formed in the Staebler-Wronski effect.

  9. Advances in Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensor Technology Using GaN and ZnO-Based Devices

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Travis; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen; Kang, Byoung Sam; Wang, Hung-Ta; Chang, Chih-Yang; Lin, Jenshan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we review our recent results in developing gas sensors for hydrogen using various device structures, including ZnO nanowires and GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). ZnO nanowires are particularly interesting because they have a large surface area to volume ratio, which will improve sensitivity, and because they operate at low current levels, will have low power requirements in a sensor module. GaN-based devices offer the advantage of the HEMT structure, high temperature operation, and simple integration with existing fabrication technology and sensing systems. Improvements in sensitivity, recoverability, and reliability are presented. Also reported are demonstrations of detection of other gases, including CO2 and C2H4 using functionalized GaN HEMTs. This is critical for the development of lab-on-a-chip type systems and can provide a significant advance towards a market-ready sensor application. PMID:22408548

  10. [Advances on enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices].

    PubMed

    Hou, Feng-Hua; Ye, Jian-Qing; Chen, Zuan-Guang; Cheng, Zhi-Yi

    2010-06-01

    With the continuous development in microfluidic fabrication technology, microfluidic analysis has evolved from a concept to one of research frontiers in last twenty years. The research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors based on microfluidic devices has also made great progress. Microfluidic technology improved greatly the analytical performance of the research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors by reducing the consumption of reagents, decreasing the analysis time, and developing automation. This review focuses on the development and classification of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices.

  11. Advances in microbial biofilm prevention on indwelling medical devices with emphasis on usage of acoustic energy.

    PubMed

    Dror, Naama; Mandel, Mathilda; Hazan, Zadik; Lavie, Gad

    2009-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are a major impediment to the use of indwelling medical devices, generating device-related infections with high morbidity and mortality. Major efforts directed towards preventing and eradicating the biofilm problem face difficulties because biofilms protect themselves very effectively by producing a polysaccharide coating, reducing biofilm sensitivity to antimicrobial agents. Techniques applied to combating biofilms have been primarily chemical. These have met with partial and limited success rates, leading to current trends of eradicating biofilms through physico-mechanical strategies. Here we review the different approaches that have been developed to control biofilm formation and removal, focusing on the utilization of acoustic energy to achieve these objectives.

  12. Reversible Motor Paralysis and Early Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure Receiving Left Ventricular Assist Device Therapy.

    PubMed

    Amao, Rie; Imamura, Teruhiko; Nakahara, Yasuo; Noguchi, Satoko; Kinoshita, Osamu; Yamauchi, Haruo; Ono, Minoru; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-12-02

    Advanced heart failure (HF) is sometimes complicated with brain impairment because of a microthrombosis caused by decreased left ventricular contraction or reduced brain circulation. Some patients may recover after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. However, little is known about the perioperative therapeutic strategy in patients suffering from such complications, particularly from a cardiac rehabilitation viewpoint. We report on a 58-year-old male patient with a previous history of poliomyelitis and a light paralysis in the left upper extremity, who suffered left hemiplegia with no evidence of stroke after hemodynamic deterioration. The combination therapy of perioperative cardiac rehabilitation and LVAD therapy improved his left hemiplegia as well as activities of daily living, and the patient was discharged on foot on postoperative day 72 after briefing the family on LVAD home management. Early initiation of cardiac rehabilitation before LVAD implantation may be a key for the smooth discharge and resocialization of patients suffering from brain impairment complicated with advanced HF.

  13. Efficacy of mandibular advancement device in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: A randomized controlled crossover clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Crovetto-Martínez, Rafael; Alkhraisat, Mohammad-Hamdan; Crovetto, Miguel; Municio, Antonio; Kutz, Ramón; Aizpuru, Felipe; Miranda, Erika; Anitua, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) (KlearwayTM) in the treatment of mild-to-moderate obstructive sleep apnea and chronic roncopathy. Material and Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled, double blinded, and crossover clinical trial was conducted. Placebo device (PD) defined as a splint in the centric occlusion that did not induce a mandibular advancement served as a control. The mandible was advanced to the maximum tolerable distance or to a minimum of 65% of the maximum protrusion. After each sequence of treatment, patients were assessed by questionnaires, conventional polysomnography, and objective measurement of snoring at the patient’s own home. Results Forty two patients participated in the study and 38 completed the study. Patients mean age was 46 ±9 years and the 79% were males. The mean mandibular advancement was 8.6 ±2.8 mm. Patients used the MAD and the PD for 6.4 +2.4 hours and 6.2 +2.0 hours, respectively. Secondary effects (mostly mild) occurred in the 85.7% and the 86.8% of the users of MAD and PD, respectively. The MAD induced a decrease in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) from 15.3 +10.2 to 11.9 +15.5. The 50% reduction in the AHI was achieved in the 46.2% and the 18.4% of the patients treated with MAD and PD, respectively. The use of the MAD induced a reduction in the AHI by 3.4 +15.9 while the PD induced an increase by 10.6 +26.1. The subjective evaluation of the roncopathy indicated an improvement by the MAD and an increase in the perceptive quality of sleep. However, the objective evaluation of the roncopathy did not show significant improvements. Conclusions The use of MAD is efficient to reduce the AHI and improve subjectively the roncopathy. MAD could be considered in the treatment of mild-to-moderate OSA and chronic roncopathy. Key words:Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), mandibular advance device, treatment, efficacy, clinical assay. PMID:26241460

  14. Advanced laser-based tracking device for motor vehicle lane position monitoring and steering assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachalo, William D.; Inenaga, Andrew; Schuler, Carlos A.

    1995-12-01

    Aerometrics is developing an innovative laser-diode based device that provides a warning signal when a motor-vehicle deviates from the center of the lane. The device is based on a sensor that scans the roadway on either side of the vehicle and determines the lateral position relative to the existing painted lines marking the lane. No additional markings are required. A warning is used to alert the driver of excessive weaving or unanticipated departure from the center of the lane. The laser beams are at invisible wavelengths to that operation of the device does not pose a distraction to the driver or other motorists: When appropriate markers are not present on the road, the device is capable of detecting this condition and warn the driver. The sensor system is expected to work well irrespective of ambient light levels, fog and rain. This sensor has enormous commercial potential. It could be marketed as an instrument to warn drivers that they are weaving, used as a research tool to monitor driving patterns, be required equipment for those previously convicted of driving under the influence, or used as a backup sensor for vehicle lateral position control. It can also be used in storage plants to guide robotic delivery vehicles. In this paper, the principles of operation of the sensor, and the results of Aerometrics ongoing testing will be presented.

  15. SAW-grade SiO2 for advanced microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Andreas; Menzel, Siegfried; Schmidt, Hagen

    2009-05-01

    Acoustoelectronic devices based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology are primarily used in radio frequency filters, delay lines, duplexers, amplifiers and RFID tags. Thereby, SAW's are excited at the surface of piezoelectric materials (e.g. Quartz, LiTaO3, LiNbO3) by an RF signal applied via interdigital transducers (IDTs)1. Novel SAW applications that emerged recently in the field of microfluidics such as the handling of minimum quantities of fluids or gases2,3 require a fluid compatible design approach, high power durability and long lifetime of the devices. However, conventional SAW devices with finger electrodes arranged on top of the chip surface experience acoustomigration damage4,5 at high power input and/or higher operating temperature leading to failure of the device. Additionally, inappropriate material systems or chip surface topography can limit their performance in microfluidic application. To overcome these limitations the electrodes can be buried in an acoustically suited ("SAW-grade") functional layer which moreover should be adjustable to the specific biotechnological task. Depending on the properties of this layer, it can suppress the acoustomigration impact6 and improve the power durability of the device. Also, a reduction of the thermally-induced frequency shift is possible7. The present paper describes a novel SAW based chip technology approach using a modular concept. Here, the electrodes are buried in surface polished SAW-grade SiO2 fabricated by means of reactive RF magnetron sputtering from a SiO2- target. This approach will be demonstrated for two different metallization systems based on Al or Cu thin films on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates. We also show the application of the SiO2-layer with respect to compensation of thermallyinduced frequency shift and bio /chemical surface modification. Investigations were carried out using atomic force microscopy, laser-pulse acoustic measurement, glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy

  16. Hierarchical micro-lamella-structured 3D porous copper current collector coated with tin for advanced lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeji; Um, Ji Hyun; Choi, Hyelim; Yoon, Won-Sub; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choe, Heeman

    2017-03-01

    A Novel 3D porous Sn-Cu architecture is prepared as an anode material for use in an advanced lithium-ion battery. Micro-lamellar-structured 3D porous Cu foam, which is electroless-plated with Sn as an active material, is used as anode current collector. Compared to Sn-coated Cu foil, the 3D Sn-Cu foam exhibits superior Li-ion capacity and stable capacity retention, demonstrating the advantage of 3D porous architecture by preserving its structural integrity. In addition, the effect of heat-treatment after Sn plating is investigated. Sn/Sn6Cu5 and SnO2/Cu10Sn3 were formed on and in the 3D Sn-Cu foam under the heat-treatment at 150 °C and 500 °C, respectively. The development of Cu10Sn3 in the 3D Sn-Cu foam heat-treated at 500 °C can be a key factor for the enhanced cyclic stability because the Cu10Sn3 inactively reacts with Li-ion and alleviates the volume expansion of SnO2 as an inactive matrix.

  17. Circulating serum microRNA-345 correlates with unfavorable pathological response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Li, Ning; Wang, Xin; Ren, Hua; Wang, Weihu; Wang, Shulian; Song, Yongwen; Liu, Yueping; Li, Yexiong; Zhou, Xuantong; Luo, Aiping; Liu, Zhihua; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (pre-CRT) has been represented as the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), but large variations of tumor radiation response to CRT have been reported in the clinic. To explore the function of microRNAs as potential therapeutic predictors of pre-CRT pathological response in LARC, we analyzed global miRNA expression in CRT-sensitive and CRT-resistant groups before treatment. MiR-345 was significantly elevated in the CRT-resistant group. Therefore, miR-345 was selected as a candidate for further analysis. We assessed the correlation between the miRNA signatures and the chemoradiotherapeutic response in 20 randomly selected LARC tissue samples (Validation set) and 87 serum samples (Training set) by qRT-PCR. Further, we validated the results in 42 randomly selected LARC serum samples (Validation set). High miR-345 expression was significantly correlated with unfavorable pre-CRT pathological response in tissue and serum. Moreover, low miR-345 levels predicted superior 3-year local recurrence free survival (LRFS). Taken together, circulating serum miR-345 correlates with unfavorable pre-CRT response and poor locoregional control in LARC. It might be a promising biomarker to facilitate patient stratification for personalized treatment. PMID:27572313

  18. Fabrication and integration of micro/nano-scale optical waveguides and photonic devices for application-specific planar optical integrated circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Lee, S. G.; O, B. H.; Park, S. G.; Kim, K. H.

    2006-02-01

    We present a review of our work on the micro/nano-scale design, fabrication and integration of optical waveguide arrays and devices for what we call application-specific "optical printed circuit boards" (O-PCBs). Generic O-PCBs are composed of an optical layer carrying basic forms of optical wires and devices and an electrical layer carrying arrays of electrical wires and devices. Application-specific O-PCBs carry optical layers that are composed of varied forms of optical wires and devices tailored to perform specific functions. In this paper, we present two examples of application specific O-PCB: One is a module for inter-chip optical interconnection application and the other is an all optical wavelength splitting triplexer module that we investigated for subscriber telecommunication application. The inter-chip optical interconnection module is to replace copper wires between the central processing units (CPUs) and memory chips in the computer system. The triplexer module is composed of an array of cascaded directional couplers to split the wavelengths for fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) subscriber system application. All these O-PCBs consist of planar circuits and arrays of polymer waveguides and devices of various dimensions and characteristics to perform the functions of transporting, switching, routing and distributing optical signals on flat modular boards. We fabricate polymer waveguide by way of thermal or ultraviolet (UV) embossing (or imprinting) technique. Theoretical calculations provide design rules for the miniaturization of the waveguide devices and for the maximization of the integration densities of the waveguides and devices to be placed on the O-PCBs.

  19. Harmonic balance optimization of terahertz Schottky diode multipliers using an advanced device model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, E. T.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Maestrini, A.; Pukala, D.; Gill, J.; Mehdi, I.

    2002-01-01

    Substantial proress has been made recently in the advancement of solid state terahertz sources using chains of Schottky diode frequency multipliers. We have developed a harmonic balance simulator and corresponding diode model that incorporates many other factors participating in the diode behavior.

  20. Advanced InSb monolithic Charge Coupled Infrared Imaging Devices (CCIRID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, T. L.; Thom, R. D.; Parrish, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    The continued development of monolithic InSb charge coupled infrared imaging devices (CCIRIDs) is discussed. The processing sequence and structural design of 20-element linear arrays are discussed. Also, results obtained from radiometric testing of the 20-element arrays using a clamped sample-and-hold output circuit are reported. The design and layout of a next-generation CCIRID chip are discussed. The major devices on this chip are a 20 by 16 time-delay-and-integration (TDI) area array and a 100-element linear imaging array. The development of a process for incorporating an ion implanted S(+) planar channel stop into the CCIRID structure and the development of a thin film transparent photogate are also addressed. The transparent photogates will increase quantum efficiency to greater than 70% across the 2.5 to 5.4 micrometer spectral region in future front-side illuminated CCIRIDs.

  1. Non-Intrusive Device for Real-Time Circulatory System Assessment with Advanced Signal Processing Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, E.; Postolache, O.; Girão, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a device that uses three cardiography signals to characterize several important parameters of a subject's circulatory system. Using electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmogram, and ballistocardiogram, three heart rate estimates are acquired from beat-to-beat time interval extraction. Furthermore, pre-ejection period, pulse transit time (PTT), and pulse arrival time (PAT) are computed, and their long-term evolution is analyzed. The system estimates heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) from the heart rate and PAT time series, to infer the activity of the cardiac autonomic system. The software component of the device evaluates the frequency content of HRV and BPV, and also their fractal dimension and entropy, thus providing a detailed analysis of the time series' regularity and complexity evolution, to allow personalized subject evaluation.

  2. Giga-Hertz Electromagnetic Wave Science and Devices for Advanced Battlefield Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-15

    Microwave Assisted Magnetic Reversal”, MMM Conference, Washington D. C. (2010 19. “Hexagonal barium ferrite thin film-based millimeter wave phase...International Conference on Microwave Magnetics, Boston, June 1-4, 2010. (Contributed talk) 25. “Hexagonal barium ferrite -based millimeter wave notch...Wafer Microwave Devices, Study of Material Properties in the the GHz range Z. Celinski University of Colorado - Colorado Springs Regents of the Univ

  3. Challenges of Electrical Measurements of Advanced Gate Dielectrics in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eric M.; Brown, George A.

    2003-09-01

    Experimental measurements and simulations are used to provide an overview of key issues with the electrical characterization of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with ultra-thin oxide and alternate gate dielectrics. Experimental issues associated with the most common electrical characterization method, capacitance-voltage (C-V), are first described. Issues associated with equivalent oxide thickness extraction and comparison, interface state measurement, extrinsic defects, and defect generation are then overviewed.

  4. Design and Development of Micro-Power Generating Device for Biomedical Applications of Lab-on-a-Disc.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Karunan; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Cho, Jongman; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Madou, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The development of micro-power generators for centrifugal microfluidic discs enhances the platform as a green point-of-care diagnostic system and eliminates the need for attaching external peripherals to the disc. In this work, we present micro-power generators that harvest energy from the disc's rotational movement to power biomedical applications on the disc. To implement these ideas, we developed two types of micro-power generators using piezoelectric films and an electromagnetic induction system. The piezoelectric-based generator takes advantage of the film's vibration during the disc's rotational motion, whereas the electromagnetic induction-based generator operates on the principle of current generation in stacks of coil exposed to varying magnetic flux. We have successfully demonstrated that at the spinning speed of 800 revolutions per minute (RPM) the piezoelectric film-based generator is able to produce up to 24 microwatts using 6 sets of films and the magnetic induction-based generator is capable of producing up to 125 milliwatts using 6 stacks of coil. As a proof of concept, a custom made localized heating system was constructed to test the capability of the magnetic induction-based generator. The heating system was able to achieve a temperature of 58.62 °C at 2200 RPM. This development of lab-on-a-disc micro power generators preserves the portability standards and enhances the future biomedical applications of centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

  5. Design and Development of Micro-Power Generating Device for Biomedical Applications of Lab-on-a-Disc

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Karunan; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Cho, Jongman; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Madou, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The development of micro-power generators for centrifugal microfluidic discs enhances the platform as a green point-of-care diagnostic system and eliminates the need for attaching external peripherals to the disc. In this work, we present micro-power generators that harvest energy from the disc’s rotational movement to power biomedical applications on the disc. To implement these ideas, we developed two types of micro-power generators using piezoelectric films and an electromagnetic induction system. The piezoelectric-based generator takes advantage of the film’s vibration during the disc’s rotational motion, whereas the electromagnetic induction-based generator operates on the principle of current generation in stacks of coil exposed to varying magnetic flux. We have successfully demonstrated that at the spinning speed of 800 revolutions per minute (RPM) the piezoelectric film-based generator is able to produce up to 24 microwatts using 6 sets of films and the magnetic induction-based generator is capable of producing up to 125 milliwatts using 6 stacks of coil. As a proof of concept, a custom made localized heating system was constructed to test the capability of the magnetic induction-based generator. The heating system was able to achieve a temperature of 58.62°C at 2200 RPM. This development of lab-on-a-disc micro power generators preserves the portability standards and enhances the future biomedical applications of centrifugal microfluidic platforms. PMID:26422249

  6. Eye vision system using programmable micro-optics and micro-electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, Nabeel A.; Amin, M. Junaid; Riza, Mehdi N.

    2014-02-01

    Proposed is a novel eye vision system that combines the use of advanced micro-optic and microelectronic technologies that includes programmable micro-optic devices, pico-projectors, Radio Frequency (RF) and optical wireless communication and control links, energy harvesting and storage devices and remote wireless energy transfer capabilities. This portable light weight system can measure eye refractive powers, optimize light conditions for the eye under test, conduct color-blindness tests, and implement eye strain relief and eye muscle exercises via time sequenced imaging. Described is the basic design of the proposed system and its first stage system experimental results for vision spherical lens refractive error correction.

  7. Advanced Silicon Photonic Device Architectures for Optical Communications: Proposals and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacher, Wesley David

    Photonic integrated circuits implemented on silicon (Si) hold the potential for densely integrated electro-optic and passive devices manufactured by the high-volume fabrication and sophisticated assembly processes used for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) electronics. However, high index contrast Si photonics has a number of functional limitations. In this thesis, several devices are proposed, designed, and experimentally demonstrated to overcome challenges in the areas of resonant modulation, waveguide loss, fiber-to-chip coupling, and polarization control. The devices were fabricated using foundry services at IBM and A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics (IME). First, we describe coupling modulated microrings, in which the coupler between a microring and the bus waveguide is modulated. The device circumvents the modulation bandwidth vs. resonator linewidth trade-off of conventional intracavity modulated microrings. We demonstrate a Si coupling modulated microring with a small-signal modulation response free of the parasitic resonator linewidth limitations at frequencies up to about 6x the linewidth. Comparisons of eye diagrams show that coupling modulation achieved data rates > 2x the rate attainable with intracavity modulation. Second, we demonstrate a silicon nitride (Si3N4)-on-Si photonic platform with independent Si3N4 and Si waveguides and taper transitions to couple light between the layers. The platform combines the excellent passive waveguide properties of Si3N4 and the compatibility of Si waveguides with electro-optic devices. Within the platform, we propose and demonstrate dual-level, Si3N 4-on-Si, fiber-to-chip grating couplers that simultaneously have wide bandwidths and high coupling efficiencies. Conventional Si and Si3N 4 grating couplers suffer from a trade-off between bandwidth and coupling efficiency. The dual-level grating coupler achieved a peak coupling efficiency of -1.3 dB and a 1-dB bandwidth of 80 nm, a record for the

  8. Differential Diagnosis of Malaria on Truelab Uno®, a Portable, Real-Time, MicroPCR Device for Point-Of-Care Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Chandrasekhar Bhaskaran; Manjula, Jagannath; Subramani, Pradeep Annamalai; Nagendrappa, Prakash B.; Manoj, Mulakkapurath Narayanan; Malpani, Sukriti; Pullela, Phani Kumar; Subbarao, Pillarisetti Venkata; Ramamoorthy, Siva; Ghosh, Susanta K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sensitive and specific detection of malarial parasites is crucial in controlling the significant malaria burden in the developing world. Also important is being able to identify life threatening Plasmodium falciparum malaria quickly and accurately to reduce malaria related mortality. Existing methods such as microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have major shortcomings. Here, we describe a new real-time PCR-based diagnostic test device at point-of-care service for resource-limited settings. Methods Truenat® Malaria, a chip-based microPCR test, was developed by bigtec Labs, Bangalore, India, for differential identification of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax parasites. The Truenat Malaria tests runs on bigtec’s Truelab Uno® microPCR device, a handheld, battery operated, and easy-to-use real-time microPCR device. The performance of Truenat® Malaria was evaluated versus the WHO nested PCR protocol. The Truenat® Malaria was further evaluated in a triple-blinded study design using a sample panel of 281 specimens created from the clinical samples characterized by expert microscopy and a rapid diagnostic test kit by the National Institute of Malaria Research (NIMR). A comparative evaluation was done on the Truelab Uno® and a commercial real-time PCR system. Results The limit of detection of the Truenat Malaria assay was found to be <5 parasites/μl for both P. falciparum and P. vivax. The Truenat® Malaria test was found to have sensitivity and specificity of 100% each, compared to the WHO nested PCR protocol based on the evaluation of 100 samples. The sensitivity using expert microscopy as the reference standard was determined to be around 99.3% (95% CI: 95.5–99.9) at the species level. Mixed infections were identified more accurately by Truenat Malaria (32 samples identified as mixed) versus expert microscopy and RDTs which detected 4 and 5 mixed samples, respectively. Conclusion The Truenat® Malaria microPCR test is a valuable

  9. Integration of a macro/micro architectured compartmentalised neuronal culture device using a rapid prototyping moulding process.

    PubMed

    Arundell, Martin; Perry, V Hugh; Newman, Tracey A

    2011-09-07

    The rapid prototyping of a reversible and one step moulded compartmentalised neuron glass/PDMS device with a thin wall barrier directly adjacent to the reservoirs is presented. A simple moulding technique to produce these devices results in a barrier of 560 μm where the 3 μm deep by 8 μm wide channels can be reversibly fabricated in either the glass base or PDMS compartmentalised mould depending on the type of application required. Using glass substrates with commercially laser engraved microchannels, both the PDMS planar and PDMS channelled device can be easily fabricated in a standard laboratory. The compartmentalised device has several advantages including good experimental accessibility and versatility with a variety of end user applications.

  10. Personalized biomedical devices & systems for healthcare applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, I.-Ming; Phee, Soo Jay; Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Chee Kian

    2011-03-01

    With the advancement in micro- and nanotechnology, electromechanical components and systems are getting smaller and smaller and gradually can be applied to the human as portable, mobile and even wearable devices. Healthcare industry have started to benefit from this technology trend by providing more and more miniature biomedical devices for personalized medical treatments in order to obtain better and more accurate outcome. This article introduces some recent development in non-intrusive and intrusive biomedical devices resulted from the advancement of niche miniature sensors and actuators, namely, wearable biomedical sensors, wearable haptic devices, and ingestible medical capsules. The development of these devices requires carful integration of knowledge and people from many different disciplines like medicine, electronics, mechanics, and design. Furthermore, designing affordable devices and systems to benefit all mankind is a great challenge ahead. The multi-disciplinary nature of the R&D effort in this area provides a new perspective for the future mechanical engineers.

  11. Advances in nonlinear characterization of millimetre-wave devices for telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Anthony E.

    2007-12-01

    Field Effect Transistors exhibit a variety of complicated dynamic and nonlinear interactions that affect millimetre-wave devices used for telecommunications. The dynamics include self heating, bias dependent change in trapped charge, and variations due to impact ionization. These are feedback mechanisms that contribute to intermodulation as a memory effect does. A FET is better viewed as a nonlinear system with feedback, bias dependent rates, and high-order nonlinear conductance and charge storage with specific terminal to terminal interaction. Identifying and characterizing FET dynamics and linearity is a key step in the design process. Extraction of true intrinsic characteristics is an important first step to understanding the physics of trapping and heating within the device. Standard measurement techniques tend to derive access networks with an emphasis on scaling with layout geometry. The intrinsic device is then modelled as whatever is left after de-embedding the measurements. As such, the intrinsic model exhibits significant frequency dispersions and behaviour that is not easily related to the operation of the transistor. A correct determination of the access network reveals that the dispersions within the intrinsic data are related to physical process, such as heating and trapping. Recent work has been carried out to accurately implement trapping within a circuit simulator. This is key to correct prediction of intermodulation and bias dependence effects generated by a FET. It is shown that heating significantly affects trapping and is an important factor in the transient rate dependence of the characteristics. The implementation of trapping within a circuit model, and its consequences on linearity are explored.

  12. Advanced Technology for Improved Quantum Device Properties Using Highly Strained Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-15

    PREPARED BY: W.J. Schaff S.D. OffseyI DL)L.,C ;.. $T A H. Park At~pio-ved tc- ;p7ua~ic tel-e:a~o L.F. Eastman q uoig4 04 Table of Contents Page...Graded-Index Separate-Confinement Heterostructure Single Quantum Well Lasers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy", S.D. Offsey, W.J. Schaff , P.J. Tasker, H...gle Confinement Single Quantum Well Lasers Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy", S.D. Offsey, W.J. Schaff , P.J. Tasker and L.F. Eastman, Device Research

  13. Scalable Iterative Solvers Applied to 3D Parallel Simulation of Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Loureiro, A. J.; Aldegunde, M.; Seoane, N.

    2009-08-01

    We have studied the performance of a preconditioned iterative solver to speed up a 3D semiconductor device simulator. Since 3D simulations necessitate large computing resources, the choice of algorithms and their parameters become of utmost importance. This code uses a density gradient drift-diffusion semiconductor transport model based on the finite element method which is one of the most general and complex discretisation techniques. It has been implemented for a distributed memory multiprocessor environment using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library. We have applied this simulator to a 67 nm effective gate length Si MOSFET.

  14. Improved DNA extraction efficiency from low level cell numbers using a silica monolith based micro fluidic device.

    PubMed

    Kashkary, Loay; Kemp, Cordula; Shaw, Kirsty J; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2012-10-31

    The evaluation of a micro fluidic system with an integrated silica monolith for performing DNA extraction from limited biological samples has been carried out. Low DNA target concentrations usually require the addition of carrier RNA to ensure desired extraction efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate a micro fluidic extraction system with increasingly efficient extraction performances for biological samples containing <15 ng of total DNA without the need of adding carrier nucleic acids. All extracted DNA showed successful amplification via the polymerase chain reaction demonstrating both the effectiveness of the proposed system at removing potential inhibitors and yielding good quality DNA. The work presented here beneficially identifies reduced sample volumes/concentrations as suitable for processing with respect to downstream analysis by enabling pre-concentration of the biological sample, particularly important when dealing with clinical or forensic specimens.

  15. Advances in crystal growth, device fabrication and characterization of thallium bromide detectors for room temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amlan; Moed, Demi; Becla, Piotr; Overholt, Matthew; Motakef, Shariar

    2016-10-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a promising room-temperature radiation detector candidate with excellent charge transport properties. However, several critical issues need to be addressed before deployment of this material for long-term field applications can be realized. In this paper, progress made towards solving some of these challenges is discussed. The most significant factors for achieving long-term performance stability for TlBr devices include residual stress as generated during crystal growth and fabrication processes, surface conditions, and the choice of contact metal. Modifications to the commonly used traveling molten zone growth technique for TlBr crystals can significantly minimize the stresses generated by large temperature gradients near the melt-solid interface of the growing crystal. Plasma processing techniques were introduced for the first time to modify the Br-etched TlBr surfaces, which resulted in improvements to the surface conditions, and consequently the spectroscopic response of the detectors. Palladium electrodes resulted a 20-fold improvement in the room-temperature device lifetime when compared to its Br-etched Pt counterpart.

  16. Self-assembled organic hexagonal micro-prisms with high second harmonic generation efficiency for photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Liao, Qing; Wang, Xuedong; Xu, Zhenzhen; Fu, Hongbing

    2015-06-14

    Multiwavelength coherent light sources are key components for circuit integration of nanophotonics. Here, we demonstrated highly efficient second harmonic generation (SHG) in single-crystalline hexagonal micro-prisms (HMPs) of 3-methyl-4-methoxy-4'-nitrostilbene (MMONS) prepared via a facile self-assembled method. We found that the SHG conversion efficiency (ηSHG) of MMONS HMPs increases with increasing the prism side length (d). Local electric field |E|(2) calculations suggest that the symmetrical hexagonal prism shape of HMPs supports helically propagating modes. The SHG light produced at one end of HMP can be coupled into whispering-gallery (WG) like optical modes with a coupling efficiency of 50-80% and helically propagates along the length of HMPs toward another end. Based on this unique helical propagation of SHG light, we construct an optical interconnector by placing a single MMONS HMP on the top of a single micro-ribbon of 1,2-diphenyl-2-pyrazoline (DP). These easily fabricated MMONS HMPs can act as a coherent source, which adds a key component to the tool box of organic nano- and micro-structure optoelectronics.

  17. Novel Power Conditioning Circuits for Piezoelectric Micro Power Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-31

    heat engine power generator [14]….………………. 7 1.6. Block diagram of a linear regulator……………………………………………. 7 1.7. Block diagram of a PWM switch...October 31, 2003. Title: Novel Power Conditioning Circuits for Piezoelectric Micro Power Generators . Abstract Approved...von Jouanne Advanced low power devices promote the development of micro power generators (MPGs) to

  18. Advanced devices for photoacoustic imaging to improve cancer and cerebrovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla Marien, Leonardo Gabriel

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information for breast cancer staging. Despite these promising studies, PAI remains an unfeasible option for clinics due to the cost to implement, the required large modification in user conduct and the inflexibility of the hardware to accommodate other applications for the incremental enhancement in diagnostic information. The research described in this dissertation addresses these issues by designing attachments to clinical ultrasound probes and incorporating custom detectors into commercial ultrasound scanners. The ultimate benefit of these handheld devices is to expand the capability of current ultrasound systems and facilitate the translation of PAI to enhance cancer diagnostics and neurosurgical outcomes. Photoacoustic enabling devices (PEDs) were designed as attachments to two clinical ultrasound probes optimized for breast cancer diagnostics. PAI uses pulsed laser excitation to create transient heating (<1°C) and thermoelastic expansion that is detected as an ultrasonic emission. These ultrasonic emissions are remotely sensed to construct noninvasive images with optical contrast at depths much greater than other optical modalities. The PEDs are feasible in terms of cost, user familiarity and flexibility for various applications. Another possible application for PAI is in assisting neurosurgeons treating aneurysms. Aneurysms are often treated by placing a clip to prevent blood flow into the aneurysm. However, this procedure has risks associated with damaging nearby vessels. One of the developed PEDs demonstrated the feasibility to three-dimensionally image tiny microvasculature (<0.3mm) beyond large blood occlusions (>2.4mm) in a phantom model. The capability to use this during surgery would suggest decreasing the risks associated with these treatments. However, clinical ultrasound arrays are not clinically feasible for microsurgical applications due to

  19. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawabata, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS

  20. Development and characterization of 3D, nano-confined multicellular constructs for advanced biohybrid devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaehr, Bryan James

    2011-09-01

    This is the final report for the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering (LDRD project 130813) awarded to Dr. Bryan Kaehr from 2008-2011. Biological chemistries, cells, and integrated systems (e.g., organisms, ecologies, etc.) offer important lessons for the design of synthetic strategies and materials. The desire to both understand and ultimately improve upon biological processes has been a driving force for considerable scientific efforts worldwide. However, to impart the useful properties of biological systems into modern devices and materials requires new ideas and technologies. The research herein addresses aspects of these issues through the development of (1) a rapid-prototyping methodology to build 3D bio-interfaces and catalytic architectures, (2) a quantitative method to measure cell/material mechanical interactions in situ and at the microscale, and (3) a breakthrough approach to generate functional biocomposites from bacteria and cultured cells.

  1. Advances in CO2 laser fabrication for high power fibre laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Keiron; Rees, Simon; Simakov, Nikita; Daniel, Jae M. O.; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. A.; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser processing facilitates contamination free, rapid, precise and reproducible fabrication of devices for high power fibre laser applications. We present recent progress in fibre end-face preparation and cladding surface modification techniques. We demonstrate a fine feature CO2 laser process that yields topography significantly smaller than that achieved with typical mechanical cleaving processes. We also investigate the side processing of optical fibres for the fabrication of all-glass cladding light strippers and demonstrate extremely efficient cladding mode removal. We apply both techniques to fibres with complex designs containing multiple layers of doped and un-doped silica as well as shaped and circularly symmetric structures. Finally, we discuss the challenges and approaches to working with various fibre and glass-types.

  2. Improvement of process control using wafer geometry for enhanced manufacturability of advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Lee, Jongsu; Kim, Sang Min; Lee, Changhwan; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kwon, Wontaik; Park, Sung-Ki; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Awasthi, Amartya; Kim, J. H.; Veeraraghavan, Sathish; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Dighe, Prasanna; Lee, Cheouljung; Byeon, Jungho; Dey, Soham; Sinha, Jaydeep

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive advancements in semiconductor technology have resulted in integrated chip (IC) manufacturing capability at sub-20nm half-pitch nodes. With this, lithography overlay error budgets are becoming increasingly stringent. The delay in EUV lithography readiness for high volume manufacturing (HVM) and the need for multiple-patterning lithography with 193i technology has further amplified the overlay issue. Thus there exists a need for technologies that can improve overlay errors in HVM. The traditional method for reducing overlay errors predominantly focused on improving lithography scanner printability performance. However, processes outside of the lithography sector known as processinduced overlay errors can contribute significantly to the total overlay at the current requirements. Monitoring and characterizing process-induced overlay has become critical for advanced node patterning. Recently a relatively new technique for overlay control that uses high-resolution wafer geometry measurements has gained significance. In this work we present the implementation of this technique in an IC fabrication environment to monitor wafer geometry changes induced across several points in the process flow, of multiple product layers with critical overlay performance requirement. Several production wafer lots were measured and analyzed on a patterned wafer geometry tool. Changes induced in wafer geometry as a result of wafer processing were related to down-stream overlay error contribution using the analytical in-plane distortion (IPD) calculation model. Through this segmentation, process steps that are major contributors to down-stream overlay were identified. Subsequent process optimization was then isolated to those process steps where maximum benefit might be realized. Root-cause for the within-wafer, wafer-to-wafer, tool-to-tool, and station-to-station variations observed were further investigated using local shape curvature changes - which is directly related to

  3. Advanced combined application of micro-X-ray diffraction/micro-X-ray fluorescence with conventional techniques for the identification of pictorial materials from Baroque Andalusia paintings.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L K; Montalbani, S; Chiavari, G; Cotte, M; Solé, V A; Bueno, J; Duran, A; Justo, A; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2009-11-15

    The process of investigating paintings includes the identification of materials to solve technical and historical art questions, to aid in the deduction of the original appearance, and in the establishment of the chemical and physical conditions for adequate restoration and conservation. In particular, we have focused on the identification of several samples taken from six famous canvases painted by Pedro Atanasio Bocanegra, who created a very special collection depicting the life of San Ignacio, which is located in the church of San Justo y Pastor of Granada, Spain. The characterization of the inorganic and organic compounds of the textiles, preparation layers, and pictorial layers have been carried out using an XRD diffractometer, SEM observations, EDX spectrometry, FT-IR spectrometry (both in reflection and transmission mode), pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and synchrotron-based micro-X-ray techniques. In this work, the advantages over conventional X-ray diffraction of using combined synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence in the identification of multi-layer paintings is demonstrated.

  4. Fundamentals and recent advances in X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) applied on thermal-fluid dynamics and multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well-known technique nowadays, since its first practical application by Sir. G. Hounsfield (Nobel price for medicine 1979) has continually benefited from optimising improvements, especially in medical applications. Indeed, also application of CT in various engineering research fields provides fundamental informations on a wide range of applications, considering that the technique is not destructive, allowing 3D visualization without perturbation of the analysed material. Nowadays, it is technologically possible to design and realize an equipment that achieve a micrometric resolution and even improve the sensibility in revealing differences in materials having very radiotransparency, allowing i.e. to distinguish between different fluids (with different density) or states of matter (like with two-phase flows). At the University of Bergamo, a prototype of an X-ray microCT system was developed since 2008, so being fully operative from 2012, with specific customizations for investigations in thermal-fluid dynamics and multiphase flow researches. A technical session held at the UIT International Conference in L'Aquila (Italy), at which this paper is referring, has presented some microCT fundamentals, to allow the audience to gain basics to follow the “fil-rouge” that links all the instrumentation developments, till the recent applications. Hereinafter are reported some applications currently developed at Bergamo University at the X-ray computed micro-tomography laboratory.

  5. Advances in three-dimensional rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices for biological applications

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, P. F.; Ben Azouz, A.; Vázquez, M.; Liu, J.; Marczak, S.; Slouka, Z.; Chang, H. C.; Diamond, D.; Brabazon, D.

    2014-01-01

    The capability of 3D printing technologies for direct production of complex 3D structures in a single step has recently attracted an ever increasing interest within the field of microfluidics. Recently, ultrafast lasers have also allowed developing new methods for production of internal microfluidic channels within the bulk of glass and polymer materials by direct internal 3D laser writing. This review critically summarizes the latest advances in the production of microfluidic 3D structures by using 3D printing technologies and direct internal 3D laser writing fabrication methods. Current applications of these rapid prototyped microfluidic platforms in biology will be also discussed. These include imaging of cells and living organisms, electrochemical detection of viruses and neurotransmitters, and studies in drug transport and induced-release of adenosine triphosphate from erythrocytes. PMID:25538804

  6. Advanced Biasing Experiments on the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Matthew; Korepanov, Sergey; Garate, Eusebio; Yang, Xiaokang; Gota, Hiroshi; Douglass, Jon; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Uchizono, Nolan; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    The C-2 experiment seeks to study the evolution, heating and sustainment effects of neutral beam injection on field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. Recently, substantial improvements in plasma performance were achieved through the application of edge biasing with coaxial plasma guns located in the divertors. Edge biasing provides rotation control that reduces instabilities and E × B shear that improves confinement. Typically, the plasma gun arcs are run at ~ 10 MW for the entire shot duration (~ 5 ms), which will become unsustainable as the plasma duration increases. We have conducted several advanced biasing experiments with reduced-average-power plasma gun operating modes and alternative biasing cathodes in an effort to develop an effective biasing scenario applicable to steady state FRC plasmas. Early results show that several techniques can potentially provide effective, long-duration edge biasing.

  7. Evaluation of plasma microRNA levels to predict insensitivity of patients with advanced lung adenocarcinomas to pemetrexed and platinum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinghua; Qi, Yuhua; Wu, Jianzhong; Shi, Meiqi; Feng, Jifeng; Chen, Longbang

    2016-12-01

    Pemetrexed combined with platinum is a first-line therapy used to treat patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that exhibit negative or unknown epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutational status or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the primary type of NSCLC. In order to prevent overtreatment, it is necessary to identify patients with LAC who may not benefit from certain chemotherapies. Patients recruited in the present study (n=129) were diagnosed with advanced LAC and received first-line pemetrexed and platinum-based chemotherapy. A microRNA (miR) microarray was used to screen the plasma miR expression profiles in a screening set of eight patients prior to and following treatment. Specifically, plasma miR-25, miR-21, miR-27b, miR-326, miR-483-5p and miR-920 were selected for reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis in a training set (n=44) prior to treatment. The screening and training set patients were all non-smokers with no prior history of serious or chronic disease. The ∆∆Cq values of these miRs were compared between the group that showed benefit from pemetrexed and platinum treatment and the group that did not. Consequently, the ∆∆Cq values of miR-25, miR-21, miR-27b and miR-326 were further determined in a validation set (n=77). The results of the present study demonstrate that plasma expression levels of miR-25, miR-21, miR-27b and miR-326, in the training and validation sets prior to treatment, were significantly different between the benefit and non-benefit groups (P≤0.001). The expression of miR-25, miR-21, miR-27b and miR-326 was upregulated in the non-benefit group and this elevation was positively correlated with decreased progression-free survival (PFS; P≤0.001). In addition, the predictive power of each miR was evaluated through receiver operating characteristic curves, in which miR-25 exhibited the highest degree of accuracy (area under

  8. Mandibular Advancement Device as a Comparable Treatment to Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Tsuiki, Satoru; Kobayashi, Mina; Komada, Yoko; Nakayama, Hideaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Positional obstructive sleep apnea (P-OSA) is a clinically common phenotype of OSA, which can be treated effectively with mandibular advancement devices (MADs). We hypothesized that the efficacy of an MAD is comparable to that of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in P-OSA patients. Methods: Among patients diagnosed with OSA at a single sleep center from January 2008 to May 2014, male subjects with moderate OSA were recruited and stringently categorized as having P-OSA when the ratio of their lateral apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) to supine AHI was ≤ 0.5, their lateral sleep time was > 60 minutes, and their lateral REM sleep time was longer than 10 minutes. Treatment efficacy was compared between P-OSA subjects with an MAD (n = 34) and those with nCPAP (n = 34) after matching for age, body-mass index, and baseline AHI. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline AHI (MAD: nCPAP = 20.6 ± 3.9/h: 21.3 ± 1.7/h, p = 0.35) or in follow-up AHI (MAD: nCPAP = 4.7 ± 3.5/h: 3.4 ± 3.7/h, p = 0.12) between the 2 treatment groups, and hence MADs lowered the AHI to the same extent as nCPAP. Conclusions: These findings suggest that an MAD is as efficacious as nCPAP for P-OSA patients. MAD treatment for this specific phenotype may be a promising patient-tailored and first-line approach to OSA. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1079. Citation: Takaesu Y, Tsuiki S, Kobayashi M, Komada Y, Nakayama H, Inoue Y. Mandibular advancement device as a comparable treatment to nasal continuous positive airway pressure for positional obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(8):1113–1119. PMID:27250814

  9. Moving graphene devices from lab to market: advanced graphene-coated nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Fei; Vajha, Pujashree; Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Duan, Huiling; Padovani, Andrea; Larcher, Luca; Li, Xiao Rong; Xu, Jing Juan; Lanza, Mario

    2016-04-01

    After more than a decade working with graphene there is still a preoccupying lack of commercial devices based on this wonder material. Here we report the use of high-quality solution-processed graphene sheets to fabricate ultra-sharp probes with superior performance. Nanoprobes are versatile tools used in many fields of science, but they can wear fast after some experiments, reducing the quality and increasing the cost of the research. As the market of nanoprobes is huge, providing a solution for this problem should be a priority for the nanotechnology industry. Our graphene-coated nanoprobes not only show enhanced lifetime, but also additional unique properties of graphene, such as hydrophobicity. Moreover, we have functionalized the surface of graphene to provide piezoelectric capability, and have fabricated a nano relay. The simplicity and low cost of this method, which can be used to coat any kind of sharp tip, make it suitable for the industry, allowing production on demand.After more than a decade working with graphene there is still a preoccupying lack of commercial devices based on this wonder material. Here we report the use of high-quality solution-processed graphene sheets to fabricate ultra-sharp probes with superior performance. Nanoprobes are versatile tools used in many fields of science, but they can wear fast after some experiments, reducing the quality and increasing the cost of the research. As the market of nanoprobes is huge, providing a solution for this problem should be a priority for the nanotechnology industry. Our graphene-coated nanoprobes not only show enhanced lifetime, but also additional unique properties of graphene, such as hydrophobicity. Moreover, we have functionalized the surface of graphene to provide piezoelectric capability, and have fabricated a nano relay. The simplicity and low cost of this method, which can be used to coat any kind of sharp tip, make it suitable for the industry, allowing production on demand. Electronic

  10. Stochastic modeling of filtrate alkalinity in water filtration devices: Transport through micro/nano porous clay based ceramic materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clay and plant materials such as wood are the raw materials used in manufacture of ceramic water filtration devices around the world. A step by step manufacturing procedure which includes initial mixing, molding and sintering is used. The manufactured ceramic filters have numerous pores which help i...

  11. Microgravity experiments on boiling and applications: research activity of advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Research and development on advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices has been carried out as the Project of Fundamental Technology Development for Energy Conservation, promoted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO). Based on the microgravity experiments on boiling heat transfer, the following useful results have obtained for the cooling of electronic devices. In subcooled flow boiling in a small channel, heat flux increases considerably more than the ordinary critical heat flux with microbubble emission in transition boiling, and dry out of the heating surface is disturbed. Successful enhancement of heat transfer is achieved by a capillary effect from grooved surface dual subchannels on the liquid supply. The critical heat flux increases 30-40 percent more than for ordinary subchannels. A self-wetting mechanism has been proposed, following investigation of bubble behavior in pool boiling of binary mixtures under microgravity. Ideas and a new concept have been proposed for the design of future cooling system in power electronics.

  12. Computational Analysis of Advanced Shape-Memory Alloy Devices Through a Robust Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalet, Giulia; Conti, Michele; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2017-03-01

    Shape-memory alloys (SMA) provide significant advantages in various industrial fields, but their manufacturing and commercialization are currently hindered. This is attributed mainly to the poor knowledge of material behavior and the lack of standards in its mechanical characterization. SMA products are usually developed by trial-and-error testing to address specific design requirements, thus increasing costs and time. The development of simulation tools offers a possible solution to assist engineers and designers and allows to better understand SMA transformation phenomena. Accordingly, the purpose of the present paper is to numerically analyze and predict the response of spring-like actuators and septal occluders, which are industrial components exploiting the shape-memory and pseudoelastic properties of SMAs, respectively. The methodology includes two main stages: the implementation of the three-dimensional phenomenological model known as Souza-Auricchio model and the finite element modeling of the device. A discussion about the steps of each stage, as parameter identification and model generalizations, is provided. Validation results are presented through a comparison with the results of a performed experimental campaign. The framework proves good prediction capabilities and allows to reduce the number of experimental tests in the future.

  13. A review of recent advances in the spherical harmonics expansion method for semiconductor device simulation.

    PubMed

    Rupp, K; Jungemann, C; Hong, S-M; Bina, M; Grasser, T; Jüngel, A

    The Boltzmann transport equation is commonly considered to be the best semi-classical description of carrier transport in semiconductors, providing precise information about the distribution of carriers with respect to time (one dimension), location (three dimensions), and momentum (three dimensions). However, numerical solutions for the seven-dimensional carrier distribution functions are very demanding. The most common solution approach is the stochastic Monte Carlo method, because the gigabytes of memory requirements of deterministic direct solution approaches has not been available until recently. As a remedy, the higher accuracy provided by solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation is often exchanged for lower computational expense by using simpler models based on macroscopic quantities such as carrier density and mean carrier velocity. Recent developments for the deterministic spherical harmonics expansion method have reduced the computational cost for solving the Boltzmann transport equation, enabling the computation of carrier distribution functions even for spatially three-dimensional device simulations within minutes to hours. We summarize recent progress for the spherical harmonics expansion method and show that small currents, reasonable execution times, and rare events such as low-frequency noise, which are all hard or even impossible to simulate with the established Monte Carlo method, can be handled in a straight-forward manner. The applicability of the method for important practical applications is demonstrated for noise simulation, small-signal analysis, hot-carrier degradation, and avalanche breakdown.

  14. From Microscale Devices to 3D Printing: Advances in Fabrication of 3D Cardiovascular Tissues.

    PubMed

    Borovjagin, Anton V; Ogle, Brenda M; Berry, Joel L; Zhang, Jianyi

    2017-01-06

    Current strategies for engineering cardiovascular cells and tissues have yielded a variety of sophisticated tools for studying disease mechanisms, for development of drug therapies, and for fabrication of tissue equivalents that may have application in future clinical use. These efforts are motivated by the need to extend traditional 2-dimensional (2D) cell culture systems into 3D to more accurately replicate in vivo cell and tissue function of cardiovascular structures. Developments in microscale devices and bioprinted 3D tissues are beginning to supplant traditional 2D cell cultures and preclinical animal studies that have historically been the standard for drug and tissue development. These new approaches lend themselves to patient-specific diagnostics, therapeutics, and tissue regeneration. The emergence of these technologies also carries technical challenges to be met before traditional cell culture and animal testing become obsolete. Successful development and validation of 3D human tissue constructs will provide powerful new paradigms for more cost effective and timely translation of cardiovascular tissue equivalents.

  15. New regulations for medical devices: Rationale, advances and impact on research and patient care.

    PubMed

    Labek, Gerold; Schöffl, Harald; Stoica, Christian Ioan

    2016-03-18

    A series of events relating to inferior medical devices has brought about changes in the legal requirements regarding quality control on the part of regulators. Apart from clinical studies, register and routine data will play an essential role in this context. To ensure adequate use of these data, adapted methodologies are required as register data in fact represent a new scientific entity. For the interpretation of register and routine data several limitations of published data should be taken into account. In many cases essential parameters of study cohorts - such as age, comorbidities, the patients' risk profiles or the hospital profile - are not presented. Required data and evaluation procedures differ significantly, for example, between hip and spine implants. A "one fits for all" methodology is quite unlikely to exist and vigorous efforts will be required to develop suitable standards in the next future. The new legislation will affect all high-risk products, besides joint implants also contact lenses, cardiac pacemakers or stents, for example, the new regulations can markedly enhance product quality monitoring. Register data and clinical studies should not be considered as competitors, they complement each other when used responsibly. In the future follow-up studies should increasingly focus on specific questions, while global follow-up investigations regarding product complication rates and surgical methods will increasingly be covered by registers.

  16. Introductory lecture. Advanced laser spectroscopy in combustion chemistry: from elementary steps to practical devices.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, J

    2001-01-01

    In recent years a large number of linear and nonlinear laser-based diagnostic techniques for nonintrusive measurements of species concentrations, temperatures, and gas velocities in a wide pressure and temperature range with high temporal and spatial resolution have been developed and have become extremely valuable tools to study many aspects of combustion. Beside the nonintrusive diagnostics of technical combustion devices the kinetics and microscopic dynamics of elementary chemical combustion reactions can be investigated in great detail by laser spectroscopy. These investigations show, that a small number of relatively simple elementary steps like H + O2-->OH + O, H2O2-->2OH, O + N2-->NO + N, NH2 + NO-->H2O + N2, OH + N2H control a large variety of combustion phenomena and pollutant formation processes. Laminar flames are ideal objects to develop the application of laser spectroscopic methods for practical combustion systems and to test and improve the gas-phase reaction mechanism in combustion models. Nonintrusive laser point and field measurements are of basic importance in the validation and further development of turbulent combustion models. Nonlinear laser spectroscopic techniques using infrared-visible sum-frequency generation can now bridge the pressure and materials gap to provide kinetic data for catalytic combustion. Finally, the potential of laser techniques for active combustion control in municipal waste incinerators is illustrated.

  17. Advances in molecular electronics: Synthesis and testing of potential molecular electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, David Wilson, Jr.

    New potential molecular electronics devices have been synthesized based on our knowledge of previous systems that have come out of our group. Previous studies and current studies have shown that simple molecular systems demonstrate negative differential resistance (NDR) and memory characteristics. The new systems rely primarily on the redox properties of the compounds to improve upon the solid state properties already observed. Most of these new organic compounds use thiol-based "alligator clips" for attachment to metal surfaces. Some of the compounds, however, contain different "alligator clips," primarily isonitriles, for attachment to metal substrates. It is our hope that these new "alligator clips" will offer lower conductivity barriers (higher current density). Electrochemical tests have been performed in order to evaluate those redox properties and in the hope of using those electrochemical results as a predictive tool to evaluate the usefulness of those compounds. Also, organic structures with polymerizable functionalities have been synthesized in order to cross-link the molecules once they are a part of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). This has been shown to enable the electrochemical growth of polypyrrole from a SAM in a controllable manner.

  18. Cell Phone-Based and Adherence Device Technologies for HIV Care and Treatment in Resource-Limited Settings: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cell phone-based and adherence monitoring technologies have been developed to address barriers to effective HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Because most people living with HIV and AIDS reside in resource-limited settings (RLS), it is important to understand the development and use of these technologies in RLS. Recent research on cell phone-based technologies has focused on HIV education, linkage to and retention in care, disease tracking, and antiretroviral therapy adherence reminders. Advances in adherence devices have focused on real-time adherence monitors, which have been used for both antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Real-time monitoring has recently been combined with cell phone-based technologies to create real-time adherence interventions using short message service (SMS). New developments in adherence technologies are exploring ingestion monitoring and metabolite detection to confirm adherence. This article provides an overview of recent advances in these two families of technologies and includes research on their acceptability and cost-effectiveness when available. It additionally outlines key challenges and needed research as use of these technologies continues to expand and evolve.

  19. 4D Ultrasound - Medical Devices for Recent Advances on the Etiology of Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tomasovic, Sanja; Predojevic, Maja

    2011-01-01

    Children cerebral palsy (CCP) encompasses a group of nonprogessive and noninfectious conditions, which cause light, moderate, and severe deviations in neurological development. Diagnosis of CCP is set mostly by the age of 3 years. The fact that a large number of cerebral damage occurs prenatally and the fact that early intervention in cases of neurological damage is successful, prompted some researchers to explore the possibility of detecting neurologically damaged fetus in the uterus. This research was made possible thanks to the development of two-dimensional ultrasound technology in a real time, which enabled the display of the mobility of the fetus. Advancement of the ultrasound technology has enabled the development of 4D ultrasound where a spontaneous fetal movement can be observed almost in a real time. Estimate of the number and quality of spontaneous fetal movements and stitches on the head, the neurology thumb and a high palate were included in the prenatal neurological screening of the fetus. This raises the question, as to does the fetal behavior reflect, (which was revealed in 2D or 4D ultrasound), fetal neurological development in a manner that will allow the detection of the brain damage. PMID:23407920

  20. 4D Ultrasound - Medical Devices for Recent Advances on the Etiology of Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Tomasovic, Sanja; Predojevic, Maja

    2011-12-01

    Children cerebral palsy (CCP) encompasses a group of nonprogessive and noninfectious conditions, which cause light, moderate, and severe deviations in neurological development. Diagnosis of CCP is set mostly by the age of 3 years. The fact that a large number of cerebral damage occurs prenatally and the fact that early intervention in cases of neurological damage is successful, prompted some researchers to explore the possibility of detecting neurologically damaged fetus in the uterus. This research was made possible thanks to the development of two-dimensional ultrasound technology in a real time, which enabled the display of the mobility of the fetus. Advancement of the ultrasound technology has enabled the development of 4D ultrasound where a spontaneous fetal movement can be observed almost in a real time. Estimate of the number and quality of spontaneous fetal movements and stitches on the head, the neurology thumb and a high palate were included in the prenatal neurological screening of the fetus. This raises the question, as to does the fetal behavior reflect, (which was revealed in 2D or 4D ultrasound), fetal neurological development in a manner that will allow the detection of the brain damage.

  1. Light-drive biomedical micro-tools and biochemical IC chips fabricated by 3D micro/nano stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Koji; Maruo, Shoji; Hasegawa, Tadahiro; Itho, Suenobu; Korogi, Hayato; Takahashi, Atsushi

    2004-10-01

    New concept of micro/nano tools working in water solutuon has been proposed by the author. A real three dimensional micro fabrication process using photo curable polymer named "micro/nano stereolithography" has been also developed by the author's group. The latest version of this process achieved 100 nm in 3D resolution and freely movable micro/nano mechanism are easily fabricated within 20 min. Nano tweezers and nano needle with two degrees of freedom were successfully fabricated without any assembly process. Cell and delicate biological materials can be remotely handled with neither any micro actuators nor lead wire. It was verified that this light-driven micro tool has precise force control with 10 FtN. These light-driven micro tools contribute to cellular biology as well as medical tools. The second application of microstereolithography is the biochemical IC chips for both micro chemical analysis and synthesis. Unlike conventional "lab. on a chip" and "micro total analysis system" (micro-TAS), our biochemical IC has micro pumps and active valves in one chip. Users can construct their own micro chemical device by themselves. The advanced biochemical IC chip-set for "on chip cell-free protein synthesis" has been prototyped and verified experimentally. A luminous enzyme of fire fly so called "Luciferase" and useful bio-marker protein "GFP" were synthesized successfully. According to above results, the biomchemical IC chips will be useful to "Order-made medicine" in near future.

  2. Fabrication of micro- and nanometre-scale polymer structures in liquid crystal devices for next generation photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartan, Chloe C.; Salter, Patrick S.; Booth, Martin J.; Morris, Stephen M.; Elston, Steve J.

    2016-09-01

    Direct Laser Writing (DLW) by two-photon photopolymerization (TPP) enables the fabrication of micron-scale polymeric structures in soft matter systems. The technique has implications in a broad range of optics and photonics; in particular fast-switching liquid crystal (LC) modes for the development of next generation display technologies. In this paper, we report two different methodologies using our TPP-based fabrication technique. Two explicit examples are provided of voltage-dependent LC director profiles that are inherently unstable, but which appear to be promising candidates for fast-switching photonics applications. In the first instance, 1 μm-thick periodic walls of polymer network are written into a planar aligned (parallel rubbed) nematic pi-cell device containing a nematic LC-monomer mixture. The structures are fabricated when the device is electrically driven into a fast-switching nematic LC state and aberrations induced by the device substrates are corrected for by virtue of the adaptive optics elements included within the DLW setup. Optical polarizing microscopy images taken post-fabrication reveal that polymer walls oriented perpendicular to the rubbing direction promote the stability of the so-called optically compensated bend mode upon removal of the externally applied field. In the second case, polymer walls are written in a nematic LC-optically adhesive glue mixture. A polymer- LCs-polymer-slices or `POLICRYPS' template is formed by immersing the device in acetone post-fabrication to remove any remaining non-crosslinked material. Injecting the resultant series of polymer microchannels ( 1 μm-thick) with a short-pitch, chiral nematic LC mixture leads to the spontaneous alignment of a fast-switching chiral nematic mode, where the helical axis lies parallel to the glass substrates. Optimal contrast between the bright and dark states of the uniform lying helix alignment is achieved when the structures are spaced at the order of the device thickness

  3. The Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: Micro-Gravity Experiments and Theoretical Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Ssen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid/liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the past four decades. While the original interest stemmed from geology applications (e.g., frost heaving in soil), researchers soon realized that the complex science associated with such an interaction is relevant to many other scientific fields encompassing metal matrix composites (MMCs), high temperature superconductors, inclusion management in steel, growth of monotectics, and preservation of biological cells. During solidification of a liquid containing an insoluble particle, three distinct interaction phenomena have been experimentally observed: instantaneous engulfment of the particle, continuous pushing, and particle pushing followed by engulfment. It was also observed that for given experimental conditions and particle size there is a critical solidification velocity, V(sub cr), above which a particle is engulfed. During solidification of MMCs pushing leads to particle agglomeration at the grain boundaries and this has detrimental effects on mechanical properties of the casting. Consequently, the process must be designed for instantaneous engulfment to occur. This implies the development of accurate theoretical models to predict V(sub cr), and perform benchmark experiments to test the validity of such models. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the pushing/engulfment phenomenon (PEP), its quantification in terms of the material and processing parameters remains a focus of research. Since natural convection currents occurring during terrestrial solidification experiments complicate the study of PEP, execution of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) has been approved and funded by NASA. Extensive terrestrial (1g) experiments and preliminary micro-gravity (mu g) experiments on two space shuttle missions have been conducted in preparation for future experiments on the ISS. The investigated

  4. Measurement of gas bremsstrahlung from the insertion device beamlines of the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Pisharody, M.; Job, P.K.; Magill, S.

    1997-03-01

    High energy electron storage rings generate energetic bremsstrahlung photons through radiative interaction of the electrons (or positrons) with the residual gas molecules inside the storage ring. The resulting radiation exits at an average emittance angle of (m{sub 0}c{sub 2}/E) radian with respect to the electron beam path, where m{sub 0}c{sup 2} is the rest mass of E the electron and E its kinetic energy. Thus, at straight sections of the storage rings, moving electrons will produce a narrow and intense monodirectional photon beam. At synchrotron radiation facilities, where beamlines are channeled out of the storage ring, a continuous gas bremsstrahlung spectrum, with a maximum energy of the electron beam, will be present. There are a number of compelling reasons that a measurement of the bremsstrahlung characteristics be conducted at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Although the number of residual gas molecules present in the storage ring at typical nTorr vacuum is low, because of the long straight paths of the electrons in the storage ring at APS, significant production of bremsstrahlung will be produced. This may pose a radiation hazard. It is then imperative that personnel be shielded from dose rates due to this radiation. There are not many measurements available for gas bremsstrahlung, especially for higher electron beam energies. The quantitative estimates of gas bremsstrahlung from storage rings as evaluated by Monte Carlo codes also have several uncertainties. They are in general calculated for air at atmospheric pressure, the results of which are then extrapolated to typical storage ring vacuum values (of the order of 10{sup -9} Torr). Realistically, the actual pressure profile can vary inside the narrow vacuum chamber. Also, the actual chemical composition of the residual gas inside the storage ring is generally different from that of air.

  5. Fast volumetric imaging with patterned illumination via digital micro-mirror device-based temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Lin, Chun-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Han; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Wei; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy (TFMPM) has the advantage of area excitation in an axial confinement of only a few microns; hence, it can offer fast three-dimensional (3D) multiphoton imaging. Herein, fast volumetric imaging via a developed digital micromirror device (DMD)-based TFMPM has been realized through the synchronization of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) with a dynamic piezoelectric stage for axial scanning. The volumetric imaging rate can achieve 30 volumes per second according to the EMCCD frame rate of more than 400 frames per second, which allows for the 3D Brownian motion of one-micron fluorescent beads to be spatially observed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the dynamic HiLo structural multiphoton microscope can reject background noise by way of the fast volumetric imaging with high-speed DMD patterned illumination. PMID:27231617

  6. Research and Development on Advanced Silicon Carbide Thin Film Growth Techniques and Fabrication of High Power and Microwave Frequency Silicon Carbide-Based Device Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    0W " -Annual Letter Report- N,4 Research and Developmen. on Advanced Silicon Carbide Thin Film Growth Techniques and Fabrication of High Power and...Microwave Frequency Silicon Carbide -Based Device Structures Supported under Grant #N00014-88-K-0341/P00002 Office of the Chief of Naval Research Report...SUBTITLE Research and Development on Advanced S. FUNDING NUMBERS Silicon Carbide Thin Filn.Growth Technl.ques and R&T:212k003---03 Fabrication of High

  7. Advanced Microfabricated Devices for Sensitive Biomarker Detection and Analysis on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelley, A. M.; Scherer, J. R.; Aubrey, A. D.; Grover, W. H.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Bada, J. L.; Willis, P.; Mathies, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    Detection of life on Mars requires definition of a suitable biomarker and development of sensitive instrumentation capable of performing in situ chemical analyses [1]. Our studies have focused on amino acid analysis because amino acids are more resistant to decomposition than other biomolecules, and because amino acid chirality is a well-defined biomarker. We have developed the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA), a portable amino acid analysis system that consists of a compact instrument and a novel multi-layer CE microchip, and we have performed extensive laboratory and field validation of this instrument [2]. The heart of the MOA is the 100-mm diameter, 4-mm thick microchip that contains the CE separation channels as well as microfabricated valves and pumps for automated integrated sample preparation and handling. The microfabricated device is operated by a portable instrument that performs CE separation and LIF detection. The limits of detection of fluorescamine-labeled amino acids are in the nM to pM range corresponding to part- per-trillion sensitivities. The MOA has been field tested on soil samples rich in jarosite from the Panoche Valley, CA. These results demonstrate that amines and amino acids can be extracted from sulfate-rich acidic soils such as jarosite and analyzed using the MOA. The MOA was also recently field tested in the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert in Chile. The instrument was successfully operated in this challenging environment and performed over 300 amino acid analyses in a two week period. The MOA has also been used to label and analyze two of the four nucleobases, and methods are being developed to detect PAH's [3]. This presentation will discuss the unique challenges of developing microdevices for sensitive analysis of biomarker compounds. We will also describe current efforts to develop multichannel analysis systems and microfluidic automated analysis systems that will be used to enable flight versions of this instrument. For more details

  8. Highly effective and accurate weak point monitoring method for advanced design rule (1x nm) devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeongho; Seong, ShiJin; Yoon, Minjung; Park, Il-Suk; Kim, HyungSeop; Ihm, Dongchul; Chin, Soobok; Sivaraman, Gangadharan; Li, Mingwei; Babulnath, Raghav; Lee, Chang Ho; Kurada, Satya; Brown, Christine; Galani, Rajiv; Kim, JaeHyun

    2014-04-01

    Historically when we used to manufacture semiconductor devices for 45 nm or above design rules, IC manufacturing yield was mainly determined by global random variations and therefore the chip manufacturers / manufacturing team were mainly responsible for yield improvement. With the introduction of sub-45 nm semiconductor technologies, yield started to be dominated by systematic variations, primarily centered on resolution problems, copper/low-k interconnects and CMP. These local systematic variations, which have become decisively greater than global random variations, are design-dependent [1, 2] and therefore designers now share the responsibility of increasing yield with manufacturers / manufacturing teams. A widening manufacturing gap has led to a dramatic increase in design rules that are either too restrictive or do not guarantee a litho/etch hotspot-free design. The semiconductor industry is currently limited to 193 nm scanners and no relief is expected from the equipment side to prevent / eliminate these systematic hotspots. Hence we have seen a lot of design houses coming up with innovative design products to check hotspots based on model based lithography checks to validate design manufacturability, which will also account for complex two-dimensional effects that stem from aggressive scaling of 193 nm lithography. Most of these hotspots (a.k.a., weak points) are especially seen on Back End of the Line (BEOL) process levels like Mx ADI, Mx Etch and Mx CMP. Inspecting some of these BEOL levels can be extremely challenging as there are lots of wafer noises or nuisances that can hinder an inspector's ability to detect and monitor the defects or weak points of interest. In this work we have attempted to accurately inspect the weak points using a novel broadband plasma optical inspection approach that enhances defect signal from patterns of interest (POI) and precisely suppresses surrounding wafer noises. This new approach is a paradigm shift in wafer inspection

  9. Detection and isolation of circulating exosomes and microvesicles for cancer monitoring and diagnostics using micro-/nano-based devices

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jina

    2016-01-01

    In the last several years, nanoscale vesicles that originate from tumor cells and which can be found circulating in the blood (i.e. exosomes and microvesicles) have been discovered to contain a wealth of proteomic and genetic information to monitor cancer progression, metastasis, and drug efficacy. However, the use of exosomes and microvesicles as biomarkers to improve patient care has been limited by their small size (30 nm–1 μm) and the extensive sample preparation required for their isolation and measurement. In this Critical Review, we explore the emerging use of micro and nano-technology to isolate and detect exosomes and microvesicles in clinical samples and the application of this technology to the monitoring and diagnosis of cancer. PMID:26378496

  10. Advanced finite-difference time-domain techniques for simulation of optical devices with complex material properties and geometric configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dong

    2005-11-01

    Modeling and simulation play increasingly more important roles in the development and commercialization of optical devices and integrated circuits. The current trend in photonic technologies is to push the level of integration and to utilize materials and structures of increasing complexity. On the other hand, the superb characteristics of free-space and fiber-optics continue to hold strong position to serve a wide range of applications. All these constitute significant challenges for the computer-aided modeling, simulation, and design of such optical devices and systems. The research work in this thesis deals with investigation and development of advanced finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods with focus on emerging optical devices and integrated circuits with complex material and/or structural properties. On the material aspects, we consider in a systematic fashion the dispersive and anisotropic characteristics of different materials (i.e., insulators, semiconductors, and conductors) in a broad wavelength range. The Lorentz model is examined and adapted as a general model for treating the material dispersion in the context of FDTD solutions. A dispersive FDTD method based on the multi-term Lorentz dispersive model is developed and employed for the modeling and design of the optical devices. In the FDTD scheme, the perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary condition is extended to the dispersive medium with arbitrary high order Lorentz terms. Finally, a parameter extraction scheme that links the Lorentz model to the experimental results is established. Further, the dispersive FDTD method is then applied to modeling and simulation of magneto-optical (MO) disk system, in combination of the vector diffraction theory. While the former is used for analysis of the interaction of the focused optical field interacting with the conducting materials on the surface of disk, the latter is to simulate the beam propagation from the objective lens to the disk surface. The

  11. Micro- and nanodevices integrated with biomolecular probes.

    PubMed

    Alapan, Yunus; Icoz, Kutay; Gurkan, Umut A

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how biomolecules, proteins and cells interact with their surroundings and other biological entities has become the fundamental design criterion for most biomedical micro- and nanodevices. Advances in biology, medicine, and nanofabrication technologies complement each other and allow us to engineer new tools based on biomolecules utilized as probes. Engineered micro/nanosystems and biomolecules in nature have remarkably robust compatibility in terms of function, size, and physical properties. This article presents the state of the art in micro- and nanoscale devices designed and fabricated with biomolecular probes as their vital constituents. General design and fabrication concepts are presented and three major platform technologies are highlighted: microcantilevers, micro/nanopillars, and microfluidics. Overview of each technology, typical fabrication details, and application areas are presented by emphasizing significant achievements, current challenges, and future opportunities.

  12. Micro- and nanodevices integrated with biomolecular probes

    PubMed Central

    Alapan, Yunus; Icoz, Kutay; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biomolecules, proteins and cells interact with their surroundings and other biological entities has become the fundamental design criterion for most biomedical micro- and nanodevices. Advances in biology, medicine, and nanofabrication technologies complement each other and allow us to engineer new tools based on biomolecules utilized as probes. Engineered micro/nanosystems and biomolecules in nature have remarkably robust compatibility in terms of function, size, and physical properties. This article presents the state of the art in micro- and nanoscale devices designed and fabricated with biomolecular probes as their vital constituents. General design and fabrication concepts are presented and three major platform technologies are highlighted: microcantilevers, micro/nanopillars, and microfluidics. Overview of each technology, typical fabrication details, and application areas are presented by emphasizing significant achievements, current challenges, and future opportunities. PMID:26363089

  13. Micro-Scale Avionics Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    Trends in the thermal management of avionics and commercial ground-based microelectronics are converging, and facing the same dilemma: a shortfall in technology to meet near-term maximum junction temperature and package power projections. Micro-scale devices hold the key to significant advances in thermal management, particularly micro-refrigerators/coolers that can drive cooling temperatures below ambient. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) Stirling cooler is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this challenge with predicted efficiencies that are an order of magnitude better than current and future thermoelectric coolers.

  14. Point of care with micro fluidic paper based device integrated with nano zeolite-graphene oxide nanoflakes for electrochemical sensing of ketamine.

    PubMed

    Narang, Jagriti; Malhotra, Nitesh; Singhal, Chaitali; Mathur, Ashish; Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Anil, Anusree; Ingle, Aviraj; Pundir, Chandra S

    2017-02-15

    The present study was aimed to develop an ultrasensitive technique for electroanalysis of ketamine; a date rape drug. It involved the fabrication of nano-hybrid based electrochemical micro fluidic paper-based analytical device (EμPADs) for electrochemical sensing of ketamine. A paper chip was developed using zeolites nanoflakes and graphene-oxide nanocrystals (Zeo-GO). EμPAD offers many advantages such as facile approach, economical and potential for commercialization. Nanocrystal modified EμPAD showed wide linear range 0.001-5nM/mL and a very low detection limit of 0.001nM/mL. The developed sensor was tested in real time samples like alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks and found good correlation (99%). The hyphenation of EμPAD integrated with nanocrystalline Zeo-GO for detection of ketamine has immense prospective for field-testing platforms. An extensive development could be made for industrial translation of this fabricated device.

  15. A novel approach combining the Calgary Biofilm Device and Phenotype MicroArray for the characterization of the chemical sensitivity of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Santopolo, L; Marchi, E; Frediani, L; Decorosi, F; Viti, C; Giovannetti, L

    2012-01-01

    A rapid method for screening the metabolic susceptibility of biofilms to toxic compounds was developed by combining the Calgary Biofilm Device (MBEC device) and Phenotype MicroArray (PM) technology. The method was developed using Pseudomonas alcaliphila 34, a Cr(VI)-hyper-resistant bacterium, as the test organism. P. alcaliphila produced a robust biofilm after incubation for 16 h, reaching the maximum value after incubation for 24 h (9.4 × 10(6) ± 3.3 × 10(6) CFU peg(-1)). In order to detect the metabolic activity of cells in the biofilm, dye E (5×) and menadione sodium bisulphate (100 μM) were selected for redox detection chemistry, because they produced a high colorimetric yield in response to bacterial metabolism (340.4 ± 6.9 Omnilog Arbitrary Units). This combined approach, which avoids the limitations of traditional plate counts, was validated by testing the susceptibility of P. alcaliphila biofilm to 22 toxic compounds. For each compound the concentration level that significantly lowered the metabolic activity of the biofilm was identified. Chemical sensitivity analysis of the planktonic culture was also performed, allowing comparison of the metabolic susceptibility patterns of biofilm and planktonic cultures.

  16. Development of a Ground-Based Analog to the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nathaniel J.; Scott-Pandorf, M. M.; Caldwell, E.; DeWitt, J.K.; Fincke, R.; Peters, B.T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA and Wyle engineers constructed a Horizontal Exercise Fixture (HEF) that was patented in 2006. Recently modifications were made to HEF with the goal of creating a device that mimics squat exercise on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and can be used by bed rest subjects who must remain supine during exercise. This project posed several engineering challenges, such as how best to reproduce the hip motions (we used a sled that allowed hip motion in the sagittal plane), how to counterweight the pelvis against gravity (we used a pulley and free-weight mechanism), and how to apply large loads (body weight plus squat load) to the shoulders while simultaneously supporting the back against gravity (we tested a standard and a safety bar that allowed movement in the subject s z-axis, both of which used a retractable plate for back support). METHODS An evaluation of the HEF was conducted with human subjects (3F, 3M), who performed sets of squat exercises of increasing load from 10-repetition maximum (RM) up to 1-RM. Three pelvic counterweight loads were tested along with each of the two back-support squat bars. Data collection included 3-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF), muscle activation (EMG), body motion (video-based motion capture), and subjective comments. These data were compared with previous ground-based ARED study data. RESULTS All subjects in the evaluation were able to perform low- to high-loading squats on the HEF. Four of the 6 subjects preferred a pelvic counterweight equivalent to 60 percent of their body weight. Four subjects preferred the standard squat bar, whereas 2 female subjects preferred the safety bar. EMG data showed muscle activation in the legs and low back typical of squat motion. GRF trajectories and eccentric-concentric loading ratios were similar to ARED. CONCLUSION: Squat exercise performed on HEF approximated squat exercise on ARED.

  17. MicroED data collection and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; Cruz, M. Jason de la; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-07-01

    The collection and processing of MicroED data are presented. MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges.

  18. Final LDRD report : design and fabrication of advanced device structures for ultra high efficiency solid state lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Shul, Randy John; Wendt, Joel Robert; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this one year LDRD was to improve the overall efficiency of InGaN LEDs by improving the extraction of light from the semiconductor chip. InGaN LEDs are currently the most promising technology for producing high efficiency blue and green semiconductor light emitters. Improving the efficiency of InGaN LEDs will enable a more rapid adoption of semiconductor based lighting. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop photonic structures to improve light extraction from nitride-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). While many advanced device geometries were considered for this work, we focused on the use of a photonic crystal for improved light extraction. Although resonant cavity LEDs and other advanced structures certainly have the potential to improve light extraction, the photonic crystal approach showed the most promise in the early stages of this short program. The photonic crystal (PX)-LED developed here incorporates a two dimensional photonic crystal, or photonic lattice, into a nitride-based LED. The dimensions of the photonic crystal are selected such that there are very few or no optical modes in the plane of the LED ('lateral' modes). This will reduce or eliminate any radiation in the lateral direction so that the majority of the LED radiation will be in vertical modes that escape the semiconductor, which will improve the light-extraction efficiency. PX-LEDs were fabricated using a range of hole diameters and lattice constants and compared to control LEDs without a photonic crystal. The far field patterns from the PX-LEDs were dramatically modified by the presence of the photonic crystal. An increase in LED brightness of 1.75X was observed for light measured into a 40 degree emission cone with a total increase in power of 1.5X for an unencapsulated LED.

  19. Ventricular Assist Device Implantation Corrects Myocardial Lipotoxicity, Reverses Insulin Resistance and Normalizes Cardiac Metabolism in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Aalap; Drosatos, Konstantinos; Cheema, Faisal H.; Ji, Ruiping; Khawaja, Tuba; Yu, Shuiqing; Kato, Tomoko; Khan, Raffay; Takayama, Hiroo; Knöll, Ralph; Milting, Hendrik; Chung, Christine S.; Jorde, Ulrich; Naka, Yoshifumi; Mancini, Donna M.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background Heart failure is associated with impaired myocardial metabolism with a shift from fatty acids to glucose utilization for ATP generation. We hypothesized that cardiac accumulation of toxic lipid intermediates inhibits insulin signaling in advanced heart failure and that mechanical unloading of the failing myocardium corrects impaired cardiac metabolism. Methods and Results We analyzed myocardium and serum of 61 patients with heart failure (BMI 26.5±5.1 kg/m2, age 51±12 years) obtained during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation and at explantation (mean duration 185±156 days) and from 9 controls. Systemic insulin resistance in heart failure was accompanied by decreased myocardial triglyceride and overall fatty acid content but increased toxic lipid intermediates, diacylglycerol and ceramide. Increased membrane localization of protein kinase C isoforms, inhibitors of insulin signaling, and decreased activity of insulin signaling molecules Akt and FOXO, were detectable in heart failure compared to controls. LVAD implantation improved whole body insulin resistance (HOMA-IR: 4.5±0.6 to 3.2±0.5; p<0.05) and decreased myocardial levels of diacylglycerol and ceramide while triglyceride and fatty acid content remained unchanged. Improved activation of the insulin/PI3kinase/Akt signaling cascade after LVAD implantation was confirmed by increased phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO, which was accompanied by decreased membrane localization of protein kinase C isoforms after LVAD implantation. Conclusions Mechanical unloading after LVAD implantation corrects systemic and local metabolic derangements in advanced heart failure leading to reduced myocardial levels of toxic lipid intermediates and improved cardiac insulin signaling. PMID:22586279

  20. The calibration of a model for simulating the thermal and electrical performance of a 2.8 kW AC solid-oxide fuel cell micro-cogeneration device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beausoleil-Morrison, Ian; Lombardi, Kathleen

    The concurrent production of heat and electricity within residential buildings using solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) micro-cogeneration devices has the potential to reduce primary energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and air pollutants. A realistic assessment of this emerging technology requires the accurate simulation of the thermal and electrical production of SOFC micro-cogeneration devices concurrent with the simulation of the building, its occupants, and coupled plant components. The calibration of such a model using empirical data gathered from experiments conducted with a 2.8 kW AC SOFC micro-cogeneration device is demonstrated. The experimental configuration, types of instrumentation employed, and the operating scenarios examined are treated. The propagation of measurement uncertainty into the derived quantities that are necessary for model calibration are demonstrated by focusing upon the SOFC micro-cogeneration system's gas-to-water heat exchanger. The calibration coefficients necessary to accurately simulate the thermal and electrical performance of this prototype device are presented and the types of analyses enabled to study the potential of the technology are demonstrated.

  1. Advances in Astrocyte-targeted Approaches for Stroke Therapy: An Emerging Role for Mitochondria and microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Stary, Creed M.; Giffard, Rona G.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are critical regulators of neuronal function and an effective target for stroke therapy in animal models. Identifying individual targets with the potential for simultaneous activation of multiple downstream pathways that regulate astrocyte homeostasis may be a necessary element for successful clinical translation. Mitochondria and microRNAs each represent individual targets with multi-modal therapeutic potential. Mitochondria regulate metabolism and apoptosis, while microRNAs have the capacity to bind and inhibit numerous mRNAs. By combining strategies targeted at maintaining astrocyte function during and following cerebral ischemia, a synergistic therapeutic effect may be achieved. PMID:24993363

  2. In Vivo and in Vitro Evaluations of Repeatability and Accuracy of VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 Dental Shade-Matching Device

    PubMed Central

    Illeš, Iva Ž.; Alajbeg, Maja; Žagar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the intra-device repeatability and accuracy of dental shade-matching device (VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0) using both in vitro and in vivo models. Materials and methods For the repeatability assessment, the in vivo model utilized shade-matching device to measure the central region of the labial surface of right maxillary central incisors of 10 people twice. The following tooth colors were measured: B1, A1, A2, A3, C1 and C3. The in vitro model included the same six Vitapan Classical tabs. Two measurements were made of the central region of each shade tab. For the accuracy assessment, each shade tab from 3 Vitapan Classical shade guides was measured once. CIE L*a*b* values were determined. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to analyze the in vitro and in vivo intra-device repeatability of the shade-matching device. The difference between in vitro and in vivo models was analyzed. Accuracy of the device tested was calculated. Results The mean color differences for in vivo and in vitro models were 3.51 and 1.25 E units, respectively. The device repeatability ICCs for in vivo measurements ranged from 0.858 to 0.971 and for in vitro from 0.992 to 0.994. Accuracy of the device tested was 93.75%. Conclusion Within the limitations of the experiment, VITA Easyshade®Advance 4.0 dental shade-matching device enabled reliable and accurate measurement. It can be a valuable tool for the determination of tooth colours. PMID:27688393

  3. Three-dimensional registration of synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography images with advanced laboratory micro-computed tomography data from murine kidney casts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, Peter; Hieber, Simone E.; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Khimchenko, Anna; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Olgac, Ufuk; Marmaras, Anastasios; Kuo, Willy; Meyer, Eric P.; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia; Ehrbar, Stefanie; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Malfunction of oxygen regulation in kidney and liver may lead to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In kidney, it is hypothesized that renal gas shunting from arteries to veins eliminates excess oxygen. Such shunting is highly dependent on the structure of the renal vascular network. The vascular tree has so far not been quantified under maintenance of its connectivity as three-dimensional imaging of the vessel tree down to the smallest capillaries, which in mouse model are smaller than 5 μm in diameter, is a challenging task. An established protocol uses corrosion casts and applies synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography (SRμCT), which provides the desired spatial resolution with the necessary contrast. However, SRμCT is expensive and beamtime access is limited. We show here that measurements with a phoenix nanotomrm (General Electric, Wunstorf, Germany) can provide comparable results to those obtained with SRμCT, except for regions with small vessel structures, where the signal-to-noise level was significantly reduced. For this purpose the nanotom®m measurement was compared with its corresponding measurement acquired at the beamline P05 at PETRA III at DESY, Hamburg, Germany.

  4. Micro 3D cell culture systems for cellular behavior studies: Culture matrices, devices, substrates, and in-situ sensing methods.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Eun Kyu; Choo, Jaebum; Yuh, Junhan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-09-01

    Microfabricated systems equipped with 3D cell culture devices and in-situ cellular biosensing tools can be a powerful bionanotechnology platform to investigate a variety of biomedical applications. Various construction substrates such as plastics, glass, and paper are used for microstructures. When selecting a construction substrate, a key consideration is a porous microenvironment that allows for spheroid growth and mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cell aggregates. Various bio-functionalized hydrogels are ideal candidates that mimic the natural ECM for 3D cell culture. When selecting an optimal and appropriate microfabrication method, both the intended use of the system and the characteristics and restrictions of the target cells should be carefully considered. For highly sensitive and near-cell surface detection of excreted cellular compounds, SERS-based microsystems capable of dual modal imaging have the potential to be powerful tools; however, the development of optical reporters and nanoprobes remains a key challenge. We expect that the microsystems capable of both 3D cell culture and cellular response monitoring would serve as excellent tools to provide fundamental cellular behavior information for various biomedical applications such as metastasis, wound healing, high throughput screening, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery and development.

  5. Devices Materials and Processes for Nanoelectronics: Characterization with Advanced X-Ray Techniques Using Lab-Based and Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    SciTech Connect

    E Zschech; C Wyon; C Murray; G Schneider

    2011-12-31

    Future nanoelectronics manufacturing at extraordinary length scales, new device structures, and advanced materials will provide challenges to process development and engineering but also to process control and physical failure analysis. Advanced X-ray techniques, using lab systems and synchrotron radiation sources, will play a key role for the characterization of thin films, nanostructures, surfaces, and interfaces. The development of advanced X-ray techniques and tools will reduce risk and time for the introduction of new technologies. Eventually, time-to-market for new products will be reduced by the timely implementation of the best techniques for process development and process control. The development and use of advanced methods at synchrotron radiation sources will be increasingly important, particularly for research and development in the field of advanced processes and new materials but also for the development of new X-ray components and procedures. The application of advanced X-ray techniques, in-line, in out-of-fab analytical labs and at synchrotron radiation sources, for research, development, and manufacturing in the nanoelectronics industry is reviewed. The focus of this paper is on the study of nanoscale device and on-chip interconnect materials, and materials for 3D IC integration as well.

  6. Muscle Volume Increases Following 16 Weeks of Resistive Exercise Training with the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, R. E.; Loehr, J. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Evans, H.; Smith, S. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    Space flight-induced muscle atrophy, particularly in the postural and locomotorymuscles, may impair task performance during long-duration space missions and planetary exploration. High intensity free weight (FW) resistive exercise training has been shown to prevent atrophy during bed rest, a space flight analog. NASA developed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to simulate the characteristics of FW exercise (i.e. constant mass, inertial force) and to be used as a countermeasure during International Space Station (ISS) missions. PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of ARED and FW training to induce hypertrophy in specific muscle groups in ambulatory subjects prior to deploying ARED on the ISS. METHODS: Twenty untrained subjects were assigned to either the ARED (8 males, 3 females) or FW (6 males, 3 females) group and participated in a periodizedtraining protocol consisting of squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and deadlift(DL) exercises 3 d wk-1 for 16 wks. SQ, HR, and DL muscle strength (1RM) was measured before, after 8 wks, and after 16 wks of training to prescribe exercise and measure strength changes. Muscle volume of the vastigroup (V), hamstring group (H), hip adductor group (ADD), medial gastrocnemius(MG), lateral gastrocnemius(LG), and deep posterior muscles including soleus(DP) was measured using MRI pre-and post-training. Consecutive cross-sectional images (8 mm slices with a 2 mm gap) were analyzed and summed. Anatomical references insured that the same muscle sections were analyzed pre-and post-training. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs (p<0.05) were used to test for differences in muscle strength and volume between training devices. RESULTS: SQ, HR, and DL 1RM increased in both FW (SQ: 49+/-6%, HR: 12+/-2%, DL: 23+/-4%) and ARED (SQ: 31+/-4%, HR: 18+/-2%, DL: 23+/-3%) groups. Both groups increased muscle volume in the V (FW: 13+/-2%, ARED: 10+/-2%), H (FW: 3+/-1%, ARED: 3+/-1 %), ADD (FW: 15=/-2%, ARED: 10+/-1%), LG (FW: 7+/-2%, ARED: 4+/-1%), MG (FW

  7. Intravesical treatment of advanced urothelial bladder cancers with oncolytic HSV-1 co-regulated by differentially expressed microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K-X; Matsui, Y; Lee, C; Osamu, O; Skinner, L; Wang, J; So, A; Rennie, P S; Jia, W W

    2016-05-01

    Urothelial bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the urinary tract. Although most cases are initially diagnosed as non-muscle-invasive, more than 80% of patients will develop recurrent or metastatic tumors. No effective therapy exists currently for late-stage metastatic tumors. By intravesical application, local administration of oncolytic Herpes Simplex virus (oHSV-1) can provide a promising new therapy for this disease. However, its inherent neurotoxicity has been a perceived limitation for such application. In this study, we present a novel microRNA-regulatory approach to reduce HSV-1-induced neurotoxicity by suppressing viral replication in neurons while maintaining oncolytic selectivity toward urothelial tumors. Specifically, we designed a recombinant virus that utilizes differentially expressed endogenous microR143 (non-cancerous, ubiquitous) and microR124 (neural-specific) to regulate expression of ICP-4, a gene essential for HSV-1 replication. We found that expression of ICP-4 must be controlled by a combination of both miR143 and miR124 to achieve the most effective attenuation in HSV-1-induced toxicity while retaining maximal oncolytic capacity. These results suggest that interaction between miR143 and miR124 may be required to successfully regulate HSV-1 replication. Our resent study is the first proof-in-principle that miRNA combination can be exploited to fine-tune the replication of HSV-1 to treat human cancers.

  8. Thermo-mechanical analysis of fixed mask 1 for the Advanced Photon Source insertion device front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, H.L.T.; Shu, D.; Sheng, I.C.A.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-10-01

    The first fixed mask (FM1) is one of the critical elements on the insertion device front ends of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The heat flux from the APS undulators is enormous. For example, FM1 placed at a distance of 16 m from the Undulator A source will be subjected to 519 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence with a total power of 3.8 kW. Due to a high localized thermal gradient on this component, inclined geometry (1.5{degree}) is used in the design to spread the footprint of the x-ray beam. A box-cone-shape geometry was designed due to the limited space available in the front end. The box shape is a highly constrained geometry, which induces larger stress levels than would occur in a plate or a tube. In order to handle the expected higher stress and the stress concentration at the corners, a single Glidcop block (rather than copper) was used in the construction. The FM1 uses an enhanced heat transfer mechanism developed at Argonne National Laboratory, which increases the convective heat transfer coefficient to about 3 W/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}C with single-phase water as the coolant. The authors simulated the location of the x-ray beam in several places to cover the worst possible case. The maximum temperature (about 180{degree}C) occurs when the beam hits the center of horizontal surface. The maximum effective stress (about 313 MPa) occurs when the x-ray beam hits about the corners.

  9. Metal imaging on surface of micro- and nanoelectronic devices by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and possibility to measure at nanometer range.

    PubMed

    Zoriy, Myroslav V; Mayer, Dirk; Becker, J Sabine

    2009-05-01

    An analytical mass spectrometric method for the elemental analysis of nano-bioelectronic devices involved in bioengineering research was developed and applied for measurements of selected metals (Au, Ti, Pt, Cr, etc.) on interdigitated electrode array chips (IDA-chip). An imaging laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (LA-ICP-MS) procedure was used to map the elements of interest on the surface of the analyzed sample. The obtained images of metals were in a good agreement and corresponded to the micro- and nanofabricated metal electrode pattern. For the analysis at nanometer resolution scale a NF-LA-ICP-MS (NF-near-field) procedure was applied, which utilize thin Ag needle to enhance laser beam energy and improve spatial resolution of the method. The results show a approximately 100x enhancement of analyte signal, when the needle was positioned in the "near-field region" to the sample surface and the laser shot was performed. In addition, mass spectrometric studies of reproducibly for five separated NF-LA shots in different places of analyzed sample yielded an RSD of the measurement of 16%.

  10. An Approach To Fabricate PDMS Encapsulated All-Solid-State Advanced Asymmetric Supercapacitor Device with Vertically Aligned Hierarchical Zn-Fe-Co Ternary Oxide Nanowire and Nitrogen Doped Graphene Nanosheet for High Power Device Applications.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Anirban; Das, Amit Kumar; Bera, Ranadip; Karan, Sumanta Kumar; Paria, Sarbaranjan; Si, Suman Kumar; Khatua, Bhanu Bhusan

    2017-02-22

    We highlight the design and fabrication of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) encapsulated advanced all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) device consisting of hierarchical mesoporous zinc-iron-cobalt ternary oxide (ZICO) nanowire coated nickel (Ni) foam (ZICO@Ni foam) as a promising positive electrode and nitrogen doped graphene coated Ni foam (N-G@Ni foam) as negative electrode in the presence of PVA-KOH gel electrolyte. Owing to outstanding electrochemical behavior and ultrahigh specific capacitance of ZICO (≈ 2587.4 F/g at 1 A/g) and N-G (550 F/g at 1 A/g) along with their mutual synergistic outputs, the assembled all-solid-state ASC device exhibits an outstanding energy density of ≈40.5 Wh/kg accompanied by a remarkable long-term cycle stability with ≈95% specific capacitance retention even after 5000 charge-discharge cycles. The exclusive hierarchical ZICO nanowires were synthesized by a facile two-step process comprising of a hydrothermal protocol followed by an annealing treatment on a quartz substrate. While Zn(2+) gives the stability of the oxide system, Fe and Co ions provide better electronic conductivity and capacitive response under vigorous cyclic condition. The extraordinary performance of as-fabricated ASC device resembles its suitability for the construction of advanced energy storage devices in modern electronic industries.

  11. The accuracy of the SenseWear Pro3 and the activPAL3 Micro devices for measurement of energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Powell, Cormac; Carson, Brian P; Dowd, Kieran P; Donnelly, Alan E

    2016-09-21

    Activity monitors such as the SenseWear Pro3 (SWP3) and the activPAL3 Micro (aP(3)M) are regularly used by researchers and practitioners to provide estimates of the metabolic cost (METs) of activities in free-living settings. The purpose of this study is to examine the accuracy of the MET predictions from the SWP3 and the aP(3)M compared to the criterion standard MET values from indirect calorimetry. Fifty-six participants (mean age: 39.9 (±11.5), 25M/31F) performed eight activities (four daily living, three ambulatory and one cycling), while simultaneously wearing a SWP3, aP(3)M and the Cosmed K4B(2) (K4B(2)) mobile metabolic unit. Paired samples T-tests were used to examine differences between device predicted METs and criterion METs. Bland-Altman plots were constructed to examine the mean bias and limits of agreement for predicted METs compared to criterion METs. SWP3 predicted MET values were significantly different from the K4B(2) for each activity (p  ⩽  0.004), excluding sweeping (p  =  0.122). aP(3)M predicted MET values were significantly different (p  <  0.001) from the K4B(2) for each activity. When examining the activities collectively, both devices underestimated activity intensity (0.20 METs (SWP3), 0.95 METs (aP(3)M)). The greatest mean bias for the SWP3 was for cycling (-3.25 METs), with jogging (-5.16 METs) producing the greatest mean bias for the aP(3)M. All of the activities (excluding SWP3 sweeping) were significantly different from the criterion measure. Although the SWP3 predicted METs are more accurate than their aP(3)M equivalent, the predicted MET values from both devices are significantly different from the criterion measure for the majority of activities.

  12. Research and Development on Advanced Silicon Carbide Thin Film Growth Techniques and Fabrication of High Power and Microwave Frequency Silicon Carbide-Based Device Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    AD-A243 531IIII!IIHUHllAlll| DTIC Annual Letter Report EL Vr DECA S C Research and Development on Advanced Silicon Carbide Thin Film Growth...Techniques and Fabrication of High Power and Microwave Frequency Silicon Carbide -Based Device Structures Supported under Grant #N00014-88-K-0341/P00002 Office...Letter l/,1- 2 3 lj9 l 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Research and Develp~nt on Advanced S. FUNDING NUMBERS Silicon Carbide Thin Film .Growth Techniques and R&T

  13. Accelerating tomorrow's opto-electronic technologies: a comprehensive introduction to advanced optoelectronic materials and devices in the National Hi-Tech R&D Plan (863-Plan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan; Chen, Haoming; Ren, Xiaomin; Wang, Zhigong; Qian, Longsheng; Zhang, Rong; Feng, Songlin; Yang, Hui; Xu, Ningsheng

    2004-05-01

    The National Hi-Tech R&D Program (the 863-Program) is to enhance China's international competitiveness and improve China's overall capability of R&D in high technology and to bridge the gap between the laboratory and the marketplace. Advanced Optoelectronic Materials and Devices are one of the technology areas strategically important to China's information industry. It has been one of the major priority research fields funded by the 863 Program even since 1987 when the plan was first initiated. From the viewpoint of Priority Expert Group (PEG), this paper will give a comprehensive introduction to advanced optoelectronic materials and devices in the national 863-Program during the current five years period (up to 2005) which includes the main aims and goals and especially the main content of each subject.

  14. Pilot Investigation into the Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Detection Device (R.A.P.I.D.) for Dengue Detection in East Timor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    were modified for real - time PCR using a LightCycler. Two reporter fluorochromes, the double stranded DNA specific dye SYBR Green I, and 6-hydroxy...fluorescein conjugated to TaqMan DNA probes, were employed to detect positive reactions. Following optimisation of the assays for real - time PCR , portable... real - time PCR equipment, the Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Detection Device (R.A.P.I.D.(trademark)), was deployed to East Timor and a field trial was

  15. Methods and systems for positioning micro elements

    SciTech Connect

    Stalford, Harold L

    2015-04-28

    A micro device may comprise a substrate, a first micro structure coupled to the substrate, a second micro structure coupled to the substrate, and port configured to receive an input. The first micro structure is configured to move into engagement with the second micro structure in response to the input.

  16. Methods and systems for positioning micro elements

    DOEpatents

    Stalford,; Harold, L [Norman, OK

    2012-03-13

    A micro device may comprise a substrate, a first micro structure coupled to the substrate, a second micro structure coupled to the substrate, and port configured to receive an input. The first micro structure is configured to move into engagement with the second micro structure in response to the input.

  17. Measurement of internal movements of the Escherichia coli ribosome using Forster resonance energy transfer and microsecond, continuous-flow turbulent mixing in micro-fabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Zigurts Krishna

    We have studied internal movements of the Eschericia coli ribosome with Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using multiple donor-acceptor pairs labeled at specific ribosomal protein residues. We have developed a novel methodology that allows a more quantitative interpretation of distance data from FRET measurements, accounting for specific effects when using fluorescent probes, such as: non-stoichiometric labeling when biochemical separation is not possible, quantification of static and dynamic quenching, changes in extinction coefficients, effects of the orientation factor and the presence of random and systematic errors. From the obtained distance data, 13 donor-acceptor positions (from 18 independent FRET pairs) are used to model internal movements within the 30S subunit upon 70S association. These measurements are also applied to monitoring inter-subunit movements in functional states of the ribosome that are associated with the translocation cycle of the ribosome. This work reveals internal movements of the ribosome observed for the first time in solution, and presents in vitro evidence for large concerted inter-subunit motions associated with ribosome translocation. The second half of this thesis is independent of the above. We present the design, construction and implementation of micro-fabricated, continuous-flow, turbulent mixing devices that can mix two or three fluids to complete homogeneity on the molecular scale in the microsecond range. The prototypical designs are compact, portable, simple to fabricate and consume smaller sample volumes than current technology. We characterize the turbulent mixing process in microfluidic channels with fluorescence intensity and lifetime imaging and show that both the dependence of mixing times and pressure drop on the flow velocity and Reynolds number agree well with theoretical expectations for turbulent pipe flow. The novelties in this work are: the new methods of fabrication which enable production of three

  18. Recent advances in polymer solar cells: realization of high device performance by incorporating water/alcohol-soluble conjugated polymers as electrode buffer layer.

    PubMed

    He, Zhicai; Wu, Hongbin; Cao, Yong

    2014-02-01

    This Progress Report highlights recent advances in polymer solar cells with special attention focused on the recent rapid-growing progress in methods that use a thin layer of alcohol/water-soluble conjugated polymers as key component to obtain optimized device performance, but also discusses novel materials and device architectures made by major prestigious institutions in this field. We anticipate that due to drastic improvements in efficiency and easy utilization, this method opens up new opportunities for PSCs from various material systems to improve towards 10% efficiency, and many novel device structures will emerge as suitable architectures for developing the ideal roll-to-roll type processing of polymer-based solar cells.

  19. Lithographic measurement of EUV flare in the 0.3-NA Micro ExposureTool optic at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, Jason P.; Naulleau, Patrick; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-01-01

    The level of flare present in a 0.3-NA EUV optic (the MET optic) at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is measured using a lithographic method. Photoresist behavior at high exposure doses makes analysis difficult. Flare measurement analysis under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy is compared, and optical microscopy is found to be a more reliable technique. In addition, the measured results are compared with predictions based on surface roughness measurement of the MET optical elements. When the fields in the exposure matrix are spaced far enough apart to avoid influence from surrounding fields and the data is corrected for imperfect mask contrast and aerial image proximity effects, the results match predicted values quite well. The amount of flare present in this optic ranges from 4.7% for 2 {micro}m features to 6.8% for 500 nm features.

  20. In Vivo Evaluations of Inter-Observer Reliability Using VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 Dental Shade-Matching Device

    PubMed Central

    KNEZOVIĆ, Dubravka; ZLATARIĆ, Davor; Illeš, Iva Ž.; Alajbeg, Maja; Žagar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter-observer reliability of dental shade-matching device using an in vivo model. Materials and methods Four observers who were well trained in color assessment and handling of the dental shade-matching device determined teeth color and CIE-Lab values on maxillary right central incisors in 10 patients with completely healthy and intact dentitions. VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 shade-matching device was utilized to measure the central region of the labial surface of all investigated teeth, twice by each observer. The inter-observer reliability of the measurements was observed and deviations between Lab and ∆E values between the observers were calculated. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to analyze inter-observer reliability. Results One-way ANOVA showed no statistically significant differences in color measurement of four observers in all the measured values (p>0.05). Delta E values ranged from 3.018 to 5.234. Although some small differences existed, statistically significant differences between the observers were not found (p>0.05). Inter-observer ICCs were very high for all observers (from 0.651 to 0.992). Conclusion Inter-examiner reliability of measurements using VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 shade-matching device was acceptable. Apart from the digital equipment, a well trained observer seems to be crucial in order to achieve correct dental color measurement. PMID:27688424

  1. The interweaving of pharmaceutical and medical expectations as dynamics of micro-pharmaceuticalisation: advanced-stage cancer patients' hope in medicines alongside trust in professionals.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patrick; de Graaf, Sabine; Hillen, Marij; Smets, Ellen; van Laarhoven, Hanneke

    2015-04-01

    Existing pharmaceuticalisation research denotes the salience of expectations in novel medicines and in the medical contexts through which these may be accessed. Specific processes of expectation such as hope and trust, alongside their shaping of patients' lifeworlds around pharmaceutical use, remain neglected however. Considering data from in-depth interviews and observations involving thirteen patients with advanced-stage cancer diagnoses who were or had recently been involved in clinical trials, we develop an interpretative phenomenological analysis of the influence of hope and trust upon the accessing of novel medicines through trials, illuminating the depth and texture of pharmaceuticalisation at the micro-level. Trust in clinicians and hope in trial medicines, for self and future patients, were important in the reconfiguring of patients' horizon of possibilities when accessing new medicines. Interwoven processes of trust and hope, embedded within heightened vulnerability, sustained the bracketing out of doubts regarding medicines, trials and professionals. The need to maintain hopes, and trusting relations with professionals who facilitated these hopes, generated meaning and momentum of medicines use which inhibited disengagement from trials. Findings indicate the taken-for-granted, as well as more reflexive, pursuit of solutions through medicines, which in this case-study enabled the generation of evidence through trial involvement. Analyses of micro-level dynamics within both downstream-consumption and upstream-substantiation of pharmaceutical solutions assist more nuanced accounts of interests, agency and expectations within pharmaceuticalisation.

  2. Recent advances in the investigation of the bioactive conformation of peptides active at the micro-opioid receptor. conformational analysis of endomorphins.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, Luca; Tolomelli, Alessandra

    2004-01-01

    Despite of the recent advances in the structural investigation of complex molecules, the comprehension of the 3D features responsible for the interaction between opioid peptides and micro-opioid receptors still remains an elusive task. This has to be attributed to the intrinsic nature of opioid peptides, which can assume a number of different conformations of similar energy, and to the flexibility of the receptorial cavity, which can modify its inner shape to host different ligands. Due to this inherent mobility of the ligand-receptor system, massive efforts devoted to the definition of a rigid bioactive conformation to be used as a template for the design of new pharmacologically active compounds might be overstressed. The future goal might be the design of peptide or nonpeptide ligands capable of maximizing specific hydrophobic interactions. This review covers the recent opinions emerged on the nature of the ligand-receptor interaction, and the development of suitable models for the determination of the bioactive conformation of peptide ligands active towards micro-opioid receptors.

  3. 3D printing of nano- and micro-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing or 3D printing techniques are being vigorously investigated as a replacement to the traditional and conventional methods in fabrication to bring forth cost and time effective approaches. Introduction of 3D printing has led to printing micro and nanoscale structures including tissues and organelles, bioelectric sensors and devices, artificial bones and transplants, microfluidic devices, batteries and various other biomaterials. Various microfabrication processes have been developed to fabricate micro components and assemblies at lab scale. 3D Fabrication processes that can accommodate the functional and geometrical requirements to realize complicated structures are becoming feasible through advances in additive manufacturing. This advancement could lead to simpler development mechanisms of novel components and devices exhibiting complex features. For instance, development of microstructure electrodes that can penetrate the epidermis of the skin to collect the bio potential signal may prove very effective than the electrodes that measure signal from the skin's surface. The micro and nanostructures will have to possess extraordinary material and mechanical properties for its dexterity in the applications. A substantial amount of research being pursued on stretchable and flexible devices based on PDMA, textiles, and organic electronics. Despite the numerous advantages these substrates and techniques could solely offer, 3D printing enables a multi-dimensional approach towards finer and complex applications. This review emphasizes the use of 3D printing to fabricate micro and nanostructures for that can be applied for human healthcare.

  4. MicroED data collection and processing

    PubMed Central

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; de la Cruz, M. Jason; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges. PMID:26131894

  5. A MicroRNA Signature Associated with Recovery from Assist Device Support in Two Groups of Patients with Severe Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Ravi; Vela, Deborah; Segura, Ana; McNamara, Dennis; Lemster, Bonnie; Samarendra, Vishnupriya; Kormos, Robert; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Bermudez, Christian; Frazier, O.H.; Moravec, Christine S.; Gorcsan, John; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; McTiernan, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that cardiac microRNAs (miRs) profiling in severe heart failure patients at the time of ventricular assist device (VAD) placement would differentiate those who remained VAD-dependent from those with subsequent left ventricular (LV) recovery. Background The relationship of myocardial miR expression to ventricular recovery is unknown. Methods We studied 28 patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy requiring VAD support consisting of Test and Validation cohorts from two institutions; 14 with subsequent LV recovery and VAD removal and 14 clinically matched VAD-dependent patients. Apical core myocardium was studied for expression of 376 miRs by PCR-based array and RT-PCR methods. Samples from seven non-failing hearts were used in confirmatory studies. Results By PCR-array, ten miRs were differentially expressed between LV recovery and VAD-dependent patients in the Test cohort. RT-PCR confirmed lower expression in LV recovery patients for 4 miRs (-15b, -1.5 fold; -23a, -2.2 fold; -26a, -1.4 fold; and -195, -1.8 fold; all p<0.04 vs. VAD-dependent). The Validation cohort similarly showed lower miRs expression in LV recovery patients: -23a (-1.8 fold) and -195 (-1.5 fold) both p<0.03). Furthermore, miR-23a and -195 expression in non-failing hearts was similar to LV recovery patients (both p<0.04 vs. VAD dependent). LV recovery patients also had significantly smaller cardiomyocytes by quantitative histology in both cohorts. Conclusions Lower cardiac expression of miRs-23a and -195 and smaller cardiomyocyte size at the time of VAD placement were associated with subsequent LV functional recovery. Differential expression of miRs at VAD placement may provide markers to assess recovery potential. PMID:22093502

  6. Research on micro-sized acoustic bandgap structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, James Grant; McCormick, Frederick Bossert; Su, Mehmet F.; El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Olsson, Roy H., III; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2010-01-01

    Phononic crystals (or acoustic crystals) are the acoustic wave analogue of photonic crystals. Here a periodic array of scattering inclusions located in a homogeneous host material forbids certain ranges of acoustic frequencies from existence within the crystal, thus creating what are known as acoustic (or phononic) bandgaps. The vast majority of phononic crystal devices reported prior to this LDRD were constructed by hand assembling scattering inclusions in a lossy viscoelastic medium, predominantly air, water or epoxy, resulting in large structures limited to frequencies below 1 MHz. Under this LDRD, phononic crystals and devices were scaled to very (VHF: 30-300 MHz) and ultra (UHF: 300-3000 MHz) high frequencies utilizing finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling, microfabrication and micromachining technologies. This LDRD developed key breakthroughs in the areas of micro-phononic crystals including physical origins of phononic crystals, advanced FDTD modeling and design techniques, material considerations, microfabrication processes, characterization methods and device structures. Micro-phononic crystal devices realized in low-loss solid materials were emphasized in this work due to their potential applications in radio frequency communications and acoustic imaging for medical ultrasound and nondestructive testing. The results of the advanced modeling, fabrication and integrated transducer designs were that this LDRD produced the 1st measured phononic crystals and phononic crystal devices (waveguides) operating in the VHF (67 MHz) and UHF (937 MHz) frequency bands and established Sandia as a world leader in the area of micro-phononic crystals.

  7. MicroRNA Expression Profiling of Peripheral Blood Samples Predicts Resistance to First-line Sunitinib in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients12

    PubMed Central

    Gámez-Pozo, Angelo; Antón-Aparicio, Luis M; Bayona, Cristina; Borrega, Pablo; Gallegos Sancho, María I; García-Domínguez, Rocío; de Portugal, Teresa; Ramos-Vázquez, Manuel; Pérez-Carrión, Ramón; Bolós, María V; Madero, Rosario; Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Fresno Vara, Juan A; Arranz, Enrique Espinosa

    2012-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy benefits many patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), but there is still a need for predictive markers that help in selecting the best therapy for individual patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cancer cell behavior and may be attractive biomarkers for prognosis and prediction of response. Forty-four patients with RCC were recruited into this observational prospective study conducted in nine Spanish institutions. Peripheral blood samples were taken before initiation of therapy and 14 days later in patients receiving first-line therapy with sunitinib for advanced RCC. miRNA expression in peripheral blood was assessed using microarrays and L2 boosting was applied to filtered miRNA expression data. Several models predicting poor and prolonged response to sunitinib were constructed and evaluated by binary logistic regression. Blood samples from 38 patients and 287 miRNAs were evaluated. Twenty-eight miRNAs of the 287 were related to poor response and 23 of the 287 were related to prolonged response to sunitinib treatment. Predictive models identified populations with differences in the established end points. In the poor response group, median time to progression was 3.5 months and the overall survival was 8.5, whereas in the prolonged response group these values were 24 and 29.5 months, respectively. Ontology analyses pointed out to cancer-related pathways, such angiogenesis and apoptosis. miRNA expression signatures, measured in peripheral blood, may stratify patients with advanced RCC according to their response to first-line therapy with sunitinib, improving diagnostic accuracy. After proper validation, these signatures could be used to tailor therapy in this setting. PMID:23308047

  8. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy as a selection tool for mandibular advancement therapy by oral device in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    De Corso, E; Bastanza, G; Della Marca, G; Grippaudo, C; Rizzotto, G; Marchese, M R; Fiorita, A; Sergi, B; Meucci, D; Di Nardo, W; Paludetti, G; Scarano, E

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays oral appliance therapy is recognised as an effective therapy for many patients with primary snoring and mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), as well as those with more severe OSA who cannot tolerate positive airway pressure (PAP) therapies. For this reason, it is important to focus on objective criteria to indicate which subjects may benefit from treatment with a mandibular advancement device (MAD). Various anthropometric and polysomnographic predictors have been described in the literature, whereas there are still controversies about the role of drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) and advancement bimanual manoeuvre as predictor factors of treatment outcome by oral device. Herein, we report our experience in treatment of mild moderate OSA by oral appliance selected by DISE. We performed a single institution, longitudinal prospective evaluation of a consecutive group of mild moderate patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome who underwent DISE. During sleep endoscopy, gentle manoeuvre of mandibular advancement less than 5 mm was performed. In 30 of 65 patients (46.2%) we obtained an unsuccessful improvement of airway patency whereas in 35 of 65 patients (53.8%) the improvement was successful and patients were considered suitable for oral device application. Because 7 of 35 patients were excluded due to conditions interfering with oral appliance therapy, we finally treated 28 patients. After 3 months of treatment, we observed a significant improvement in the Epworth medium index [(7.35 ± 2.8 versus 4.1 ± 2.2 (p < 0.05)], in mean AHI [(21.4 ± 6 events per hour versus 8.85 ± 6.9 (p < 0.05)] and in mean ODI [(18.6 ± 8 events per hour to 7 ± 5.8 (p < 0.05)]. We observed that the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) improved by up to 50% from baseline in 71.4% of patients selected after DISE for MAD therapy. In the current study, mandibular advancement splint therapy was successfully prescribed on the basis not only of severity of disease, as

  9. Breakthrough: micro-electronic photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin

    2016-07-12

    Sandia developed tiny glitter-sized photovoltaic (PV) cells that could revolutionize solar energy collection. The crystalline silicon micro-PV cells will be cheaper and have greater efficiencies than current PV collectors. Micro-PV cells require relatively little material to form well-controlled, highly efficient devices. Cell fabrication uses common microelectric and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques.

  10. Developments in synchrotron x-ray micro-tomography for in-situ materials analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Harold S.; MacDowell, A. A.; Parkinson, D. Y.; Venkatakrishnan, S. V.; Panerai, F.; Mansour, N. N.

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third-generation synchrotron X-ray source that operates as a user facility with more than 40 beamlines hosting over 2000 users per year. Synchrotron sources like the ALS provide high quality X-ray beams, with flux that is several orders of magnitude higher than lab-based sources. This is particularly advantageous for dynamic applications because it allows for high-speed, high-resolution imaging and microscale tomography. The hard X-ray beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source enables imaging of samples at high temperatures and pressures, with mechanical loading and other realistic conditions using environmental test cells. These test cells enable experimental observation of samples undergoing dynamic microstructural changes in-situ. We present recent instrumentation developments that allow for continuous tomography with scan rates approaching 1 Hz per 3D image. In addition, our use of iterative reconstruction techniques allows for improved image quality despite fewer images and low exposure times used during fast tomography compared to traditional Fourier reconstruction methods.

  11. Bridging to Heart Transplantation from the Biventricular Pulsatile Berlin Heart EXCOR Assist Device Support in a Patient with Advanced End-Organ Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tuba Demirozu, Zumrut; Suha Kucukaksu, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Long-term mechanical circulatory support is a life-saving technology while briding to heart transplantation. It increases the quality of life and preserves end-organ function for patients with advanced heart failure. The number of patients with advanced heart failure scheduled for heart transplantation before comorbidities escalate is on the rise. However, the device function is complicated by the bleeding-thrombosis and infection paradigm, hence the interest in understanding device thrombosis and infection. We describe a 27-year-old man with idiopathic cardiomyopathy, advanced end-organ failure, and severe infection, who was bridged to heart transplantation after 8 months on the Berlin Heart EXCOR (Berlin Heart AG, Berlin, Germany) biventricular support. The patient was discharged from the hospital in the third postoperative week after the recovery of his end-organ functions. At 29 months’ post-transplantation follow-up, his last cardiac biopsy was grade 0, his ejection fraction was 60%, and he was enjoying a good quality of life. PMID:26985209

  12. Advanced in-line optical metrology of sub-10nm structures for gate all around devices (GAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthinti, Raja; Loubet, Nicolas; Chao, Robin; Ott, John; Guillorn, Michael; Felix, Nelson; Gaudiello, John; Lund, Parker; Cepler, Aron; Sendelbach, Matthew; Cohen, Oded; Wolfling, Shay; Bozdog, Cornel; Klare, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Gate-all-around (GAA) nanowire (NW) devices have long been acknowledged as the ultimate device from an electrostatic scaling point of view. The GAA architecture offers improved short channel effect (SCE) immunity compared to single and double gate planar, FinFET, and trigate structures. One attractive proposal for making GAA devices involves the use of a multilayer fin-like structure consisting of layers of Si and SiGe. However, such structures pose various metrology challenges, both geometrical and material. Optical Scatterometry, also called optical critical dimension (OCD) is a fast, accurate and non-destructive in-line metrology technique well suited for GAA integration challenges. In this work, OCD is used as an enabler for the process development of nanowire devices, extending its abilities to learn new material and process aspects specific to this novel device integration. The specific metrology challenges from multiple key steps in the process flow are detailed, along with the corresponding OCD solutions and results. In addition, Low Energy X-Ray Fluorescence (LE-XRF) is applied to process steps before and after the removal of the SiGe layers in order to quantify the amount of Ge present at each step. These results are correlated to OCD measurements of the Ge content, demonstrating that both OCD and LE-XRF are sensitive to Ge content for these applications.

  13. Recent advances in particle and droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices based on surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuochen; Zhe, Jiang

    2011-04-07

    Manipulation of microscale particles and fluid liquid droplets is an important task for lab-on-a-chip devices for numerous biological researches and applications, such as cell detection and tissue engineering. Particle manipulation techniques based on surface acoustic waves (SAWs) appear effective for lab-on-a-chip devices because they are non-invasive, compatible with soft lithography micromachining, have high energy density, and work for nearly any type of microscale particles. Here we review the most recent research and development of the past two years in SAW based particle and liquid droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices including particle focusing and separation, particle alignment and patterning, particle directing, and liquid droplet delivery.

  14. [Projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo].

    PubMed

    Niimi, Shingo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iseki, Hiroshi; Harada, Hiroshi Kasanuki Noboru; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Kitamori, Takehiko; Tei, Yuichi; Nakaoka, Ryusuke; Haishima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Division of Medical Devices has been conducting the projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo. The TWIns has been studying to aim at establishment of preclinical evaluation methods by "Engineering Based Medicine", and established Regulatory Science Institute for Medical Devices. School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo has been studying to aim at establishment of assessment methodology for innovative minimally invasive therapeutic devices, materials, and nanobio diagnostic devices. This report reviews the exchanges of personnel, the implement systems and the research progress of these projects.

  15. Micro-laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Richards, Roger K.

    2003-07-22

    A micro-laser is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide and at least one amplifying medium in the waveguide. PBG features are positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings and allow introduction of amplifying mediums into the highly resonant guided micro-laser microcavity. The micro-laser may be positioned on a die of a bulk substrate material with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a micro-laser is disclosed. A method for tuning the micro-laser is also disclosed. The micro-laser may be used as an optical regenerator, or a light source for data transfer or for optical computing.

  16. Microfabricated phononic crystal devices and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, R. H., III; El-Kady, I.

    2009-01-01

    Phononic crystals are the acoustic wave analogue of photonic crystals. Here a periodic array of scattering inclusions located in a homogeneous host material forbids certain ranges of acoustic frequencies from existence within the crystal, thus creating what are known as acoustic bandgaps. The majority of previously reported phononic crystal devices have been constructed by hand, assembling scattering inclusions in a viscoelastic medium, predominantly air, water or epoxy, resulting in large structures limited to frequencies below 1 MHz. Recently, phononic crystals and devices have been scaled to VHF (30-300 MHz) frequencies and beyond by utilizing microfabrication and micromachining technologies. This paper reviews recent developments in the area of micro-phononic crystals including design techniques, material considerations, microfabrication processes, characterization methods and reported device structures. Micro-phononic crystal devices realized in low-loss solid materials are emphasized along with their potential application in radio frequency communications and acoustic imaging for medical ultrasound and nondestructive testing. The reported advances in batch micro-phononic crystal fabrication and simplified testing promise not only the deployment of phononic crystals in a number of commercial applications but also greater experimentation on a wide variety of phononic crystal structures.

  17. X-ray micro-diffraction studies on biological samples at the BioCAT Beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Barrea, R A; Antipova, O; Gore, D; Heurich, R; Vukonich, M; Kujala, N G; Irving, T C; Orgel, J P R O

    2014-09-01

    The small source sizes of third-generation synchrotron sources are ideal for the production of microbeams for diffraction studies of crystalline and non-crystalline materials. While several such facilities have been available around the world for some time now, few have been optimized for the handling of delicate soft-tissue specimens under cryogenic conditions. Here the development of a new X-ray micro-diffraction instrument at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source, and its use with newly developed cryo-diffraction techniques for soft-tissue studies, are described. The combination of the small beam sizes delivered by this instrument, the high delivered flux and successful cryo-freezing of rat-tail tendon has enabled us to record data to better than 4 Å resolution. The ability to quickly raster scan samples in the beam allows selection of ordered regions in fibrous samples for markedly improved data quality. Examples of results of experiments obtainable using this instrument are presented.

  18. X-ray micro-diffraction studies on biological samples at the BioCAT Beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source

    PubMed Central

    Barrea, R. A.; Antipova, O.; Gore, D.; Heurich, R.; Vukonich, M.; Kujala, N. G.; Irving, T. C.; Orgel, J. P. R. O.

    2014-01-01

    The small source sizes of third-generation synchrotron sources are ideal for the production of microbeams for diffraction studies of crystalline and non-crystalline materials. While several such facilities have been available around the world for some time now, few have been optimized for the handling of delicate soft-tissue specimens under cryogenic conditions. Here the development of a new X-ray micro-diffraction instrument at the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source, and its use with newly developed cryo-diffraction techniques for soft-tissue studies, are described. The combination of the small beam sizes delivered by this instrument, the high delivered flux and successful cryo-freezing of rat-tail tendon has enabled us to record data to better than 4 Å resolution. The ability to quickly raster scan samples in the beam allows selection of ordered regions in fibrous samples for markedly improved data quality. Examples of results of experiments obtainable using this instrument are presented. PMID:25178013

  19. Use of an individual mandibular advancement device for an?obstructive sleep apnoea patient with facial paralysis: a short-term follow-up case report.

    PubMed

    Pişkin, B; Sipahi, C; Köse, M; Karakoç, Ö; Şevketbeyoğlu, H; Ataç, G K

    2012-06-01

    This case report aimed to describe the fabrication procedure and treatment efficacy of an individual, one-piece, non-adjustable mandibular advancement device (MAD) for a moderate obstructive sleep apnoea patient with facial paralysis (FP). Mandibular advancement device was fabricated with autopolymerising acrylic resin. The intermaxillary relations were recorded such as to fix the mandible at a protruded position with increased vertical dimension. Initial evaluation of the MAD was made with axial magnetic resonance imaging and polysomnography on the first day of usage. Following evaluations were made on the third and sixth month. After a follow-up period of 6 months, Apnoea/Hypopnea Index (AHI) significantly decreased from 26·7 to 3·0. However, the average oxygen saturation did not improve as expected initially. The MAD therapy decreased the AHI scores of a patient with FP. At the end of a follow-up period of 6 months, the patient did not report any serious complaint except temporary tooth pains.

  20. Smart x-ray beam position monitor system using artificial intelligence methods for the Advanced Photon Source insertion-device beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.; Ding, H.; Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T.M.; Haeffner, D.; Ramanathan, M.

    1997-09-01

    At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), each insertion device (ID) beamline front-end has two XBPMs to monitor the X-ray beam position for both that vertical and horizontal directions. Performance challenges for a conventional photoemission type X-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) during operations are contamination of the signal from the neighboring bending magnet sources and the sensitivity of the XBPM to the insertion device (ID) gap variations. Problems are exacerbated because users change the ID gap during their operations, and hence the percentage level of the contamination in the front end XBPM signals varies. A smart XBPM system with a high speed digital signal processor has been built at the Advanced Photon Source for the ID beamline front ends. The new version of the software, which uses an artificial intelligence method, provides a self learning and self-calibration capability to the smart XBPM system. The structure of and recent test results with the system are presented in this paper.