Science.gov

Sample records for advanced microelectronic devices

  1. Electrochemical investigations of advanced materials for microelectronic and energy storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goonetilleke, Pubudu Chaminda

    A broad range of electrochemical techniques are employed in this work to study a selected set of advanced materials for applications in microelectronics and energy storage devices. The primary motivation of this study has been to explore the capabilities of certain modern electrochemical techniques in a number of emerging areas of material processing and characterization. The work includes both aqueous and non-aqueous systems, with applications in two rather general areas of technology, namely microelectronics and energy storage. The sub-systems selected for investigation are: (i) Electrochemical mechanical and chemical mechanical planarization (ECMP and CMP, respectively), (ii) Carbon nanotubes in combination with room temperature ionic liquids (ILs), and (iii) Cathode materials for high-performance Li ion batteries. The first group of systems represents an important building block in the fabrication of microelectronic devices. The second and third groups of systems are relevant for new energy storage technologies, and have generated immense interests in recent years. A common feature of these different systems is that they all are associated with complex surface reactions that dictate the performance of the devices based on them. Fundamental understanding of these reactions is crucial to further development and expansion of their associated technologies. It is the complex mechanistic details of these surface reactions that we address using a judicious combination of a number of state of the art electrochemical techniques. The main electrochemical techniques used in this work include: (i) Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and slow scan cyclic voltammetry (SSCV, a special case of CV); (ii) Galvanostatic (or current-controlled) measurements; (iii) Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), based on two different methodologies, namely, Fourier transform EIS (FT-EIS, capable of studying fast reaction kinetics in a time-resolved mode), and EIS using frequency response

  2. Corrosion in Non-Hermetic Microelectronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, J.W.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1999-03-16

    Many types of integrated and discrete microelectronic devices exist in the enduring stockpile. In the past, most of these devices have used conventional ceramic hermetic packaging (CHP) technology. Sometime in the future, plastic encapsulated microelectronic (PEM) devices will almost certainly enter the inventory. In the presence of moisture, several of the aluminum-containing metallization features common to both types of packaging become susceptible to atmospheric corrosion (Figure 1). A breach in hermeticity (e.g., due to a crack in the ceramic body or lid seal) could allow moisture and/or contamination to enter the interior of a CHP device. For PEM components, the epoxy encapsulant material is inherently permeable to moisture. A multi-year project is now underway at Sandia to develop the knowledge base and analytical tools needed to quantitatively predict the effect of corrosion on microelectronic performance and reliability. The issue of corrosion-induced failure surfaced twice during the past year because cracks were found in their ceramic bodies of two different CHP devices: the SA371 1/3712 MOSFET and the SA3935 ASIC (acronym for A Simple Integrated Circuit). Because of our inability to perform a model-based prediction at that time, the decision was made to determine the validity of the corrosion concern for these specific situations by characterizing the expected environment and assessing its relative degree of corrosivity. The results of this study are briefly described in this paper along with some of the advancements made with the predictive model development.

  3. Protection of microelectronic devices during packaging

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Conley, William R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of protecting a microelectronic device during device packaging, including the steps of applying a water-insoluble, protective coating to a sensitive area on the device; performing at least one packaging step; and then substantially removing the protective coating, preferably by dry plasma etching. The sensitive area can include a released MEMS element. The microelectronic device can be disposed on a wafer. The protective coating can be a vacuum vapor-deposited parylene polymer, silicon nitride, metal (e.g. aluminum or tungsten), a vapor deposited organic material, cynoacrylate, a carbon film, a self-assembled monolayered material, perfluoropolyether, hexamethyldisilazane, or perfluorodecanoic carboxylic acid, silicon dioxide, silicate glass, or combinations thereof. The present invention also relates to a method of packaging a microelectronic device, including: providing a microelectronic device having a sensitive area; applying a water-insoluble, protective coating to the sensitive area; providing a package; attaching the device to the package; electrically interconnecting the device to the package; and substantially removing the protective coating from the sensitive area.

  4. Microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for packaging of microelectronic devices, including an integral window. The microelectronic device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The package can include a cofired ceramic frame or body. The package can have an internal stepped structure made of one or more plates, with apertures, which are patterned with metallized conductive circuit traces. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded on the plate to these traces, and oriented so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. A cover lid can be attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, having an integral window that can be hermetically-sealed. The package body can be formed by low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayer processes with the window being simultaneously joined (e.g. cofired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. Multiple chips can be located within a single package. The cover lid can include a window. The apparatus is particularly suited for packaging of MEMS devices, since the number of handling steps is greatly reduced, thereby reducing the potential for contamination.

  5. Photopolymerizable liquid encapsulants for microelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikerikar, Kiran K.

    2000-10-01

    Plastic encapsulated microelectronic devices consist of a silicon chip that is physically attached to a leadframe, electrically interconnected to input-output leads, and molded in a plastic that is in direct contact with the chip, leadframe, and interconnects. The plastic is often referred to as the molding compound, and is used to protect the chip from adverse mechanical, thermal, chemical, and electrical environments. Encapsulation of microelectronic devices is typically accomplished using a transfer molding process in which the molding compound is cured by heat. Most transfer molding processes suffer from significant problems arising from the high operating temperatures and pressures required to fill the mold. These aspects of the current process can lead to thermal stresses, incomplete mold filling, and wire sweep. In this research, a new strategy for encapsulating microelectronic devices using photopolymerizable liquid encapsulants (PLEs) has been investigated. The PLEs consist of an epoxy novolac-based vinyl ester resin (˜25 wt.%), fused silica filler (70--74 wt.%), and a photoinitiator, thermal initiator, and silane coupling agent. For these encapsulants, the use of light, rather than heat, to initiate the polymerization allows precise control over when the reaction starts, and therefore completely decouples the mold filling and the cure. The low viscosity of the PLEs allows for low operating pressures and minimizes problems associated with wire sweep. In addition, the in-mold cure time for the PLEs is equivalent to the in-mold cure times of current transfer molding compounds. In this thesis, the thermal and mechanical properties, as well as the viscosity and adhesion of photopolymerizable liquid encapsulants, are reported in order to demonstrate that a UV-curable formulation can have the material properties necessary for microelectronic encapsulation. In addition, the effects of the illumination time, postcure time, fused silica loading, and the inclusion

  6. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A.; White, E. R.; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B. C.

    2015-02-05

    We report that modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit’s glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum’s bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with amore » statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz₋1/2, an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Lastly, many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers.« less

  7. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A.; White, E. R.; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B. C.

    2015-02-05

    We report that modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit’s glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum’s bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with a statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz₋1/2, an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Lastly, many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers.

  8. Bi-level microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2004-01-06

    A package with an integral window for housing a microelectronic device. The integral window is bonded directly to the package without having a separate layer of adhesive material disposed in-between the window and the package. The device can be a semiconductor chip, CCD chip, CMOS chip, VCSEL chip, laser diode, MEMS device, or IMEMS device. The multilayered package can be formed of a LTCC or HTCC cofired ceramic material, with the integral window being simultaneously joined to the package during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. The package has at least two levels of circuits for making electrical interconnections to a pair of microelectronic devices. The result is a compact, low-profile package having an integral window that is hermetically sealed to the package prior to mounting and interconnecting the microelectronic device(s).

  9. Single level microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-12-09

    A package with an integral window for housing a microelectronic device. The integral window is bonded directly to the package without having a separate layer of adhesive material disposed in-between the window and the package. The device can be a semiconductor chip, CCD chip, CMOS chip, VCSEL chip, laser diode, MEMS device, or IMEMS device. The package can be formed of a multilayered LTCC or HTCC cofired ceramic material, with the integral window being simultaneously joined to the package during cofiring. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip interconnected so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. A glob-top encapsulant or protective cover can be used to protect the microelectronic device and electrical interconnections. The result is a compact, low profile package having an integral window that is hermetically sealed to the package prior to mounting and interconnecting the microelectronic device.

  10. Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Microelectronic Device Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Lou, John; Norton, Charles

    1999-01-01

    Finite element and finite volume methods are used in a variety of design simulations when it is necessary to compute fields throughout regions that contain varying materials or geometry. Convergence of the simulation can be assessed by uniformly increasing the mesh density until an observable quantity stabilizes. Depending on the electrical size of the problem, uniform refinement of the mesh may be computationally infeasible due to memory limitations. Similarly, depending on the geometric complexity of the object being modeled, uniform refinement can be inefficient since regions that do not need refinement add to the computational expense. In either case, convergence to the correct (measured) solution is not guaranteed. Adaptive mesh refinement methods attempt to selectively refine the region of the mesh that is estimated to contain proportionally higher solution errors. The refinement may be obtained by decreasing the element size (h-refinement), by increasing the order of the element (p-refinement) or by a combination of the two (h-p refinement). A successful adaptive strategy refines the mesh to produce an accurate solution measured against the correct fields without undue computational expense. This is accomplished by the use of a) reliable a posteriori error estimates, b) hierarchal elements, and c) automatic adaptive mesh generation. Adaptive methods are also useful when problems with multi-scale field variations are encountered. These occur in active electronic devices that have thin doped layers and also when mixed physics is used in the calculation. The mesh needs to be fine at and near the thin layer to capture rapid field or charge variations, but can coarsen away from these layers where field variations smoothen and charge densities are uniform. This poster will present an adaptive mesh refinement package that runs on parallel computers and is applied to specific microelectronic device simulations. Passive sensors that operate in the infrared portion of

  11. Optimization of Microelectronic Devices for Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/JPL goal to reduce payload in future space missions while increasing mission capability demands miniaturization of active and passive sensors, analytical instruments and communication systems among others. Currently, typical system requirements include the detection of particular spectral lines, associated data processing, and communication of the acquired data to other systems. Advances in lithography and deposition methods result in more advanced devices for space application, while the sub-micron resolution currently available opens a vast design space. Though an experimental exploration of this widening design space-searching for optimized performance by repeated fabrication efforts-is unfeasible, it does motivate the development of reliable software design tools. These tools necessitate models based on fundamental physics and mathematics of the device to accurately model effects such as diffraction and scattering in opto-electronic devices, or bandstructure and scattering in heterostructure devices. The software tools must have convenient turn-around times and interfaces that allow effective usage. The first issue is addressed by the application of high-performance computers and the second by the development of graphical user interfaces driven by properly developed data structures. These tools can then be integrated into an optimization environment, and with the available memory capacity and computational speed of high performance parallel platforms, simulation of optimized components can proceed. In this paper, specific applications of the electromagnetic modeling of infrared filtering, as well as heterostructure device design will be presented using genetic algorithm global optimization methods.

  12. Advanced microelectronics technologies for future small satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkalai, Leon

    2000-03-01

    Future small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space exploration are greatly enabled by the technological advances in deep sub-micron microelectronics technologies. Whereas these technological advances are being fueled by the commercial (non-space) industries, more recently there has been an exciting new synergism evolving between the two otherwise disjoint markets. In other words, both the commercial and space industries are enabled by advances in low-power, highly integrated, miniaturized (low-volume), lightweight, and reliable real-time embedded systems. Recent announcements by commercial semiconductor manufacturers to introduce Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology into their commercial product lines is driven by the need for high-performance low-power integrated devices. Moreover, SOI has been the technology of choice for many space semiconductor manufacturers where radiation requirements are critical. This technology has inherent radiation latch-up immunity built into the process, which makes it very attractive to space applications. In this paper, we describe the advanced microelectronics and avionics technologies under development by NASA's Deep Space Systems Technology Program (also known as X2000). These technologies are of significant benefit to both the commercial satellite as well as the deep-space and Earth orbiting science missions. Such a synergistic technology roadmap may truly enable quick turn-around, low-cost, and highly capable small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space missions.

  13. Advanced Microelectronics Technologies for Future Small Satellite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalai, Leon

    1999-01-01

    Future small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space exploration are greatly enabled by the technological advances in deep sub-micron microelectronics technologies. Whereas these technological advances are being fueled by the commercial (non-space) industries, more recently there has been an exciting new synergism evolving between the two otherwise disjointed markets. In other words, both the commercial and space industries are enabled by advances in low-power, highly integrated, miniaturized (low-volume), lightweight, and reliable real-time embedded systems. Recent announcements by commercial semiconductor manufacturers to introduce Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology into their commercial product lines is driven by the need for high-performance low-power integrated devices. Moreover, SOI has been the technology of choice for many space semiconductor manufacturers where radiation requirements are critical. This technology has inherent radiation latch-up immunity built into the process, which makes it very attractive to space applications. In this paper, we describe the advanced microelectronics and avionics technologies under development by NASA's Deep Space Systems Technology Program (also known as X2000). These technologies are of significant benefit to both the commercial satellite as well as the deep-space and Earth orbiting science missions. Such a synergistic technology roadmap may truly enable quick turn-around, low-cost, and highly capable small satellite systems for both Earth observation as well as deep-space missions.

  14. Multilayered Microelectronic Device Package With An Integral Window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2004-10-26

    A microelectronic package with an integral window mounted in a recessed lip for housing a microelectronic device. The device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The package can be formed of a low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) or high temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayered material, with the integral window being simultaneously joined (e.g. co-fired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded and oriented so that a light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. The result is a compact, low profile package, having an integral window mounted in a recessed lip, that can be hermetically sealed.

  15. Temporary coatings for protection of microelectronic devices during packaging

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Conley, William R.

    2005-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method of protecting a microelectronic device during device packaging, including the steps of applying a water-insoluble, temporary protective coating to a sensitive area on the device; performing at least one packaging step; and then substantially removing the protective coating, preferably by dry plasma etching. The sensitive area can include a released MEMS element. The microelectronic device can be disposed on a wafer. The protective coating can be a vacuum vapor-deposited parylene polymer, silicon nitride, metal (e.g. aluminum or tungsten), a vapor deposited organic material, cynoacrylate, a carbon film, a self-assembled monolayered material, perfluoropolyether, hexamethyldisilazane, or perfluorodecanoic carboxylic acid, silicon dioxide, silicate glass, or combinations thereof. The present invention also relates to a method of packaging a microelectronic device, including: providing a microelectronic device having a sensitive area; applying a water-insoluble, protective coating to the sensitive area; providing a package; attaching the device to the package; electrically interconnecting the device to the package; and substantially removing the protective coating from the sensitive area.

  16. Plan for advanced microelectronics processing technology application

    SciTech Connect

    Goland, A.N.

    1990-10-01

    The ultimate objective of the tasks described in the research agreement was to identify resources primarily, but not exclusively, within New York State that are available for the development of a Center for Advanced Microelectronics Processing (CAMP). Identification of those resources would enable Brookhaven National Laboratory to prepare a program plan for the CAMP. In order to achieve the stated goal, the principal investigators undertook to meet the key personnel in relevant NYS industrial and academic organizations to discuss the potential for economic development that could accompany such a Center and to gauge the extent of participation that could be expected from each interested party. Integrated of these discussions was to be achieved through a workshop convened in the summer of 1990. The culmination of this workshop was to be a report (the final report) outlining a plan for implementing a Center in the state. As events unfolded, it became possible to identify the elements of a major center for x-ray lithography on Lone Island at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The principal investigators were than advised to substitute a working document based upon that concept in place of a report based upon the more general CAMP workshop originally envisioned. Following that suggestion from the New York State Science and Technology Foundation, the principals established a working group consisting of representatives of the Grumman Corporation, Columbia University, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Regular meetings and additional communications between these collaborators have produced a preproposal that constitutes the main body of the final report required by the contract. Other components of this final report include the interim report and a brief description of the activities which followed the establishment of the X-ray Lithography Center working group.

  17. Application and deterioration of thin films used for microelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Microelectronic technology makes use of the knowledge and characterization methods of thin films and of our understanding of interfaces between thin films or between films and substrates. (See in this context some of the other papers in this book). The present contribution deals accordingly with thin films utilized in microelectronic devices. It needs to be realized that computers and other related devices depend heavily on metallic or semiconducting layers that often have only the size of one-tenth of the thickness of a human hair. As the electronic devices shrink, these layers represent an ever-greater fraction of the total device volume. These very films actually determine the electrical characteristics and also the stability (reliability) of the devices.

  18. Sealed symmetric multilayered microelectronic device package with integral windows

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A sealed symmetric multilayered package with integral windows for housing one or more microelectronic devices. The devices can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The multilayered package can be formed of a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayer processes with the windows being simultaneously joined (e.g. cofired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic devices can be flip-chip bonded and oriented so that the light-sensitive sides are optically accessible through the windows. The result is a compact, low-profile, sealed symmetric package, having integral windows that can be hermetically-sealed.

  19. Life cycle assessment applied to the sector of microelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matarazzo, Agata; Ingrao, Carlo; Clasadonte, Maria Teresa

    2016-07-01

    This work is about the application of LCA to the ends of the environmental assessment of pure-silicon wafers production. The input-data quantification is realized studying two microelectronic devices and presenting schematically tables and graphs, to be easily interpreted. This will allow help the reader to individuate, clearly and immediately, the materials flows and the relationships among the different steps of the production process. The material flows, in terms of raw materials use and energy consumption, were studied using the data provided by a firm involved in the microelectronic device production field. The two devices environmental analysis was developed considering potential effects such as Acidification, Eutrophication, Ozone reduction, Global warming, Ozone photochemical formation, Human Toxicity.

  20. Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V. M.; Ivanko, A. A.; Lapii, V. Iu.

    The principles for the automated design of radioelectronic devices having integrated microcircuits with optimal and limiting characteristics are discussed. The designs, characteristics, and basic circuit diagrams of a broad class of radioelectronic devices incorporating these microcircuits are presented. Attention is also given to criteria for evaluating the efficiency of the comprehensive microminiaturization of radioelectronic devices.

  1. Multilayered microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for packaging of microelectronic devices is disclosed, wherein the package includes an integral window. The microelectronic device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The package can comprise, for example, a cofired ceramic frame or body. The package has an internal stepped structure made of a plurality of plates, with apertures, which are patterned with metallized conductive circuit traces. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded on the plate to these traces, and oriented so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. A cover lid can be attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, having an integral window that can be hermetically-sealed. The package body can be formed by low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayer processes with the window being simultaneously joined (e.g. cofired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. Multiple chips can be located within a single package, according to some embodiments. The cover lid can include a window. The apparatus is particularly suited for packaging of MEMS devices, since the number of handling steps is greatly reduced, thereby reducing the potential for contamination. The integral window can further include a lens for optically transforming light passing through the window. The package can include an array of binary optic lenslets made integral with the window. The package can include an electrically-switched optical modulator, such as a lithium niobate window attached to the package, for providing a very fast electrically-operated shutter.

  2. Gold-based electrical interconnections for microelectronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Garrett, Stephen E.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making an electrical interconnection from a microelectronic device to a package, comprising ball or wedge compression bonding a gold-based conductor directly to a silicon surface, such as a polysilicon bonding pad in a MEMS or IMEMS device, without using layers of aluminum or titanium disposed in-between the conductor and the silicon surface. After compression bonding, optional heating of the bond above 363 C. allows formation of a liquid gold-silicon eutectic phase containing approximately 3% (by weight) silicon, which significantly improves the bond strength by reforming and enhancing the initial compression bond. The same process can be used for improving the bond strength of Au--Ge bonds by forming a liquid Au-12Ge eutectic phase.

  3. An overview of research in advanced microelectronics for micro-autonomous platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabandi, Kamal; Pierce, Leland

    2009-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory established the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) Collaborative Technology Alliance (CTA) program in 2008 to leapfrog technological barriers toward achieving the autonomous operation of a collaborative ensemble of multifunctional, mobile microsystems. This goal will be realized through fundamental advancements by the MAST alliance, composed of four centers with focused research activities in Microsystems Mechanics, Processing for Autonomous Operation, Microelectronics, and Integration. A team of researchers assembled by the University of Michigan was chosen to lead the microelectronics center. This paper provides an overview of research activities in the MAST Microelectronics Center. Research activities in this center are organized around five major research thrusts: 1) sensing, 2) low power processing, 3) communications, 4) navigation, 5) efficient power generation. Such activities are envisioned to enable micro-autonomous sensor platforms by developing novel electronic sensors and devices having the following attributes: low power and power efficient characteristics, low mass and volume, enhanced functionality/sensitivity, survivability, durability, extended operation capability, low cost, and fault tolerance. Fundamental advances in microelectronics will be accomplished through implementation of bio-mimetic and bio-inspired techniques and technologies, utilization of Nano/micro fabrication processes, and incorporation of novel materials in fabrication of components and subsystems.

  4. Thermal measurement. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A; White, E R; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B C

    2015-02-01

    Modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit's glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope and electron energy loss spectroscopy, we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum's bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with a statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz(-1/2), an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers. PMID:25657242

  5. Evaluation of advanced microelectronics for inclusion in MIL-STD-975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. Richard

    1991-01-01

    The approach taken by NASA and JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) in the development of a MIL-STD-975 section which contains advanced technology such as Large Scale Integration and Very Large Scale Integration (LSI/VLSI) microelectronic devices is described. The parts listed in this section are recommended as satisfactory for NASA flight applications, in the absence of alternate qualified devices, based on satisfactory results of a vendor capability audit, the availability of sufficient characterization and reliability data from the manufacturers and users and negotiated detail procurement specifications. The criteria used in the selection and evaluation of the vendors and candidate parts, the preparation of procurement specifications, and the status of this activity are discussed.

  6. Plan for advanced microelectronics processing technology application. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goland, A.N.

    1990-10-01

    The ultimate objective of the tasks described in the research agreement was to identify resources primarily, but not exclusively, within New York State that are available for the development of a Center for Advanced Microelectronics Processing (CAMP). Identification of those resources would enable Brookhaven National Laboratory to prepare a program plan for the CAMP. In order to achieve the stated goal, the principal investigators undertook to meet the key personnel in relevant NYS industrial and academic organizations to discuss the potential for economic development that could accompany such a Center and to gauge the extent of participation that could be expected from each interested party. Integrated of these discussions was to be achieved through a workshop convened in the summer of 1990. The culmination of this workshop was to be a report (the final report) outlining a plan for implementing a Center in the state. As events unfolded, it became possible to identify the elements of a major center for x-ray lithography on Lone Island at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The principal investigators were than advised to substitute a working document based upon that concept in place of a report based upon the more general CAMP workshop originally envisioned. Following that suggestion from the New York State Science and Technology Foundation, the principals established a working group consisting of representatives of the Grumman Corporation, Columbia University, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Regular meetings and additional communications between these collaborators have produced a preproposal that constitutes the main body of the final report required by the contract. Other components of this final report include the interim report and a brief description of the activities which followed the establishment of the X-ray Lithography Center working group.

  7. Microelectronic superconducting device with multi-layer contact

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-26

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3] ; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps. The photolithographic process is used to separately pattern the high T[sub c] superconductor thin films. 14 figures.

  8. Microelectronic superconducting device with multi-layer contact

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, Frederick C.; Kingston, John J.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T.sub.c superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO.sub.3 ; and a third high T.sub.c superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An insitu method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps. The photolithographic process is used to separately pattern the high T.sub.c superconductor thin films.

  9. Bi-level multilayered microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A bi-level, multilayered package with an integral window for housing a microelectronic device. The device can be a semiconductor chip, a CCD chip, a CMOS chip, a VCSEL chip, a laser diode, a MEMS device, or a IMEMS device. The multilayered package can be formed of a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) multilayer processes with the window being simultaneously joined (e.g. cofired) to the package body during LTCC or HTCC processing. The microelectronic device can be flip-chip bonded and oriented so that the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. A second chip can be bonded to the backside of the first chip, with the second chip being wirebonded to the second level of the bi-level package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, having an integral window that can be hermetically-sealed.

  10. Lithium and lithium ion batteries for applications in microelectronic devices: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxing; Liu, Bo; Li, Qiuyan; Cartmell, Samuel; Ferrara, Seth; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Xiao, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Batteries employing lithium chemistry have been intensively investigated because of their high energy attributes which may be deployed for vehicle electrification and large-scale energy storage applications. Another important direction of battery research for micro-electronics, however, is relatively less discussed in the field but growing fast in recent years. This paper reviews chemistry and electrochemistry in different microbatteries along with their cell designs to meet the goals of their various applications. The state-of-the-art knowledge and recent progress of microbatteries for emerging micro-electronic devices may shed light on the future development of microbatteries towards high energy density and flexible design.

  11. Method of fabricating a microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    A method of fabricating a microelectronic device package with an integral window for providing optical access through an aperture in the package. The package is made of a multilayered insulating material, e.g., a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC). The window is inserted in-between personalized layers of ceramic green tape during stackup and registration. Then, during baking and firing, the integral window is simultaneously bonded to the sintered ceramic layers of the densified package. Next, the microelectronic device is flip-chip bonded to cofired thick-film metallized traces on the package, where the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. Finally, a cover lid is attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, flip-chip bonded, hermetically-sealed package having an integral window.

  12. Advanced modeling and simulation to design and manufacture high performance and reliable advanced microelectronics and microsystems.

    SciTech Connect

    Nettleship, Ian (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Hinklin, Thomas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Tandon, Rajan; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dempsey, James Franklin; Ewsuk, Kevin Gregory; Neilsen, Michael K.; Lanagan, Michael (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA)

    2007-07-01

    An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers having broad expertise in materials processing and properties, materials characterization, and computational mechanics was assembled to develop science-based modeling/simulation technology to design and reproducibly manufacture high performance and reliable, complex microelectronics and microsystems. The team's efforts focused on defining and developing a science-based infrastructure to enable predictive compaction, sintering, stress, and thermomechanical modeling in ''real systems'', including: (1) developing techniques to and determining materials properties and constitutive behavior required for modeling; (2) developing new, improved/updated models and modeling capabilities, (3) ensuring that models are representative of the physical phenomena being simulated; and (4) assessing existing modeling capabilities to identify advances necessary to facilitate the practical application of Sandia's predictive modeling technology.

  13. Comparison of single event upset rates for microelectronic memory devices during interplanetary solar particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckerracher, P. L.; Kinnison, J. D.; Maurer, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Variability in the methods and models used for single event upset calculations in microelectronic memory devices can lead to a range of possible upset rates. Using heavy ion and proton data for selected DRAM and SRAM memories, we have calculated an array of upset rates in order to compare the Adams worst case interplanetary solar flare model to a model proposed by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In addition, methods of upset rate calculation are compared: the Cosmic Ray Effects on Microelectronics CREME code and a Monte Carlo algorithm developed at the Applied Physics Laboratory. The results show that use of a more realistic, although still conservative, model of the space environment can have significant cost saving benefits.

  14. Geckoprinting: assembly of microelectronic devices on unconventional surfaces by transfer printing with isolated gecko setal arrays.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaeyoung; Kim, Juho; Song, Kwangsun; Autumn, Kellar; Lee, Jongho

    2014-10-01

    Developing electronics in unconventional forms provides opportunities to expand the use of electronics in diverse applications including bio-integrated or implanted electronics. One of the key challenges lies in integrating semiconductor microdevices onto unconventional substrates without glue, high pressure or temperature that may cause damage to microdevices, substrates or interfaces. This paper describes a solution based on natural gecko setal arrays that switch adhesion mechanically on and off, enabling pick and place manipulation of thin microscale semiconductor materials onto diverse surfaces including plants and insects whose surfaces are usually rough and irregular. A demonstration of functional 'geckoprinted' microelectronic devices provides a proof of concept of our results in practical applications. PMID:25056216

  15. Simulation of ion beam induced current in radiation detectors and microelectronic devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2009-10-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause Single Event Effects (SEE) in a variety of electronic devices. The mechanism that leads to these SEEs is current induced by the radiation in these devices. While this phenomenon is detrimental in ICs, this is the basic mechanism behind the operation of semiconductor radiation detectors. To be able to predict SEEs in ICs and detector responses we need to be able to simulate the radiation induced current as the function of time. There are analytical models, which work for very simple detector configurations, but fail for anything more complex. On the other end, TCAD programs can simulate this process in microelectronic devices, but these TCAD codes costs hundreds of thousands of dollars and they require huge computing resources. In addition, in certain cases they fail to predict the correct behavior. A simulation model based on the Gunn theorem was developed and used with the COMSOL Multiphysics framework.

  16. Simulation of ion beam induced current in radiation detectors and microelectronic devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2010-07-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause Single Event Effects (SEE) in a variety of electronic devices. The mechanism that leads to these SEEs is current induced by the radiation in these devices. While this phenomenon is detrimental in ICs, this is the basic mechanism behind the operation of semiconductor radiation detectors. To be able to predict SEEs in ICs and detector responses we need to be able to simulate the radiation induced current as the function of time. There are analytical models, which work for very simple detector configurations, but fail for anything more complex. On the other end, TCAD programs can simulate this process in microelectronic devices, but these TCAD codes costs hundreds of thousands of dollars and they require huge computing resources. In addition, in certain cases they fail to predict the correct behavior. A simulation model based on the Gunn theorem was developed and used with the COMSOL Multiphysics framework.

  17. Microelectronics technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovyy, M.

    1985-08-01

    To develop at a leading pace the production of high-speed control and computational systems, peripheral equipment and software for these, electronic devices for control and telemechanics applications, a nation must have a strong microelectronics industry. The world of microelectronics created by man is one of fantastic possibilities and its horizons broaden daily. It is undergoing a process of interlocking growth and of introduction into our daily lives as well as into many fields of human endeavor. Microelectronics is a catalyst for technical progress. It provides artificial intelligence for robots and systems of robots, for automated systems used in control, teaching, design and computing applications, spacecraft and production facilities. A country's economic might and defensive capability are defined by the scale at which it produces pure and ultrapure substances and materials, including semiconductor and metallic crystals.

  18. Center for space microelectronics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1992 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center during the past year. The report lists 187 publications, 253 presentations, and 111 new technology reports and patents in the areas of solid-state devices, photonics, advanced computing, and custom microcircuits.

  19. Geckoprinting: assembly of microelectronic devices on unconventional surfaces by transfer printing with isolated gecko setal arrays

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaeyoung; Kim, Juho; Song, Kwangsun; Autumn, Kellar; Lee, Jongho

    2014-01-01

    Developing electronics in unconventional forms provides opportunities to expand the use of electronics in diverse applications including bio-integrated or implanted electronics. One of the key challenges lies in integrating semiconductor microdevices onto unconventional substrates without glue, high pressure or temperature that may cause damage to microdevices, substrates or interfaces. This paper describes a solution based on natural gecko setal arrays that switch adhesion mechanically on and off, enabling pick and place manipulation of thin microscale semiconductor materials onto diverse surfaces including plants and insects whose surfaces are usually rough and irregular. A demonstration of functional ‘geckoprinted’ microelectronic devices provides a proof of concept of our results in practical applications. PMID:25056216

  20. Evaluation of advanced microelectronic fluxless solder-bump contacts for hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandal, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    Technology for interconnecting monolithic integrated circuit chips with other components is investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of the current flip-chip approach as compared to other interconnection methods are outlined. A fluxless solder-bump contact technology is evaluated. Multiple solder-bump contacts were formed on silicon integrated circuit chips. The solder-bumps, comprised of a rigid nickel under layer and a compliant solder overlayer, were electroformed onto gold device pads with the aid of thick dry film photomasks. Different solder alloys and the use of conductive epoxy for bonding were explored. Fluxless solder-bump bond quality and reliability were evaluated by measuring the effects of centrifuge, thermal cycling, and high temperature storage on bond visual characteristics, bond electrical continuity, and bond shear tests. The applicability and suitability of this technology for hybrid microelectronic packaging is discussed.

  1. Investigation of charge transport and electromagnetic effects in advanced microelectronics and optoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.; Booth, T.; Gray, M.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The next generation of electronic microchips will utilize components with sub-micron feature size and optoelectronic devices with picosecond response time. Fundamental understanding of the device performance can only be obtained through first principles physics modeling of charge transport and electromagnetic effects in realistic geometries with material interfaces and dispersive properties. We have developed a general model incorporating important physics such as charge transport processes in materials with multilevel band structures and electromagnetic effects to simulate device characteristics. Accurate treatment of material interfaces and boundaries is included. The Monte Carlo charge transport is coupled self-consistently to Maxwell`s equations to accurately model scattering processes in the presence of an externally biased potential. This detailed multidimensional simulation capability is compared with and verified by experimental data, and could become an industrial standard for benchmarking and improving the {open_quotes}reduced model{close_quotes} codes used for semiconductor design. Specific tasks are the extension of existing capabilities in particle-in-cell plasma simulation technique and Monte Carlo charge transport to study the physics of charged particle dynamics in realistic microelectronic devices, such as bipolar semiconductors, heterojunction transistors, and optoelectronic switches. Our approach has been based on the coupled particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo technique, which can simultaneously treat both electromagnetic wave propagation and charged-particle transport.

  2. Listening to Brain Microcircuits for Interfacing With External World—Progress in Wireless Implantable Microelectronic Neuroengineering Devices

    PubMed Central

    Nurmikko, Arto V.; Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Patterson, William R.; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Bull, Christopher W.; Borton, David A.; Laiwalla, Farah; Park, Sunmee; Ming, Yin; Aceros, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring neural signals at high spatial and temporal resolution directly from brain microcircuits and decoding their activity to interpret commands and/or prior planning activity, such as motion of an arm or a leg, is a prime goal of modern neurotechnology. Its practical aims include assistive devices for subjects whose normal neural information pathways are not functioning due to physical damage or disease. On the fundamental side, researchers are striving to decipher the code of multiple neural microcircuits which collectively make up nature’s amazing computing machine, the brain. By implanting biocompatible neural sensor probes directly into the brain, in the form of microelectrode arrays, it is now possible to extract information from interacting populations of neural cells with spatial and temporal resolution at the single cell level. With parallel advances in application of statistical and mathematical techniques tools for deciphering the neural code, extracted populations or correlated neurons, significant understanding has been achieved of those brain commands that control, e.g., the motion of an arm in a primate (monkey or a human subject). These developments are accelerating the work on neural prosthetics where brain derived signals may be employed to bypass, e.g., an injured spinal cord. One key element in achieving the goals for practical and versatile neural prostheses is the development of fully implantable wireless microelectronic “brain-interfaces” within the body, a point of special emphasis of this paper. PMID:21654935

  3. A novel monolithic piezoelectric actuated flexure-mechanism based wire clamp for microelectronic device packaging.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cunman; Wang, Fujun; Tian, Yanling; Zhao, Xingyu; Zhang, Hongjie; Cui, Liangyu; Zhang, Dawei; Ferreira, Placid

    2015-04-01

    A novel monolithic piezoelectric actuated wire clamp is presented in this paper to achieve fast, accurate, and robust microelectronic device packaging. The wire clamp has compact, flexure-based mechanical structure and light weight. To obtain large and robust jaw displacements and ensure parallel jaw grasping, a two-stage amplification composed of a homothetic bridge type mechanism and a parallelogram leverage mechanism was designed. Pseudo-rigid-body model and Lagrange approaches were employed to conduct the kinematic, static, and dynamic modeling of the wire clamp and optimization design was carried out. The displacement amplification ratio, maximum allowable stress, and natural frequency were calculated. Finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to evaluate the characteristics of the wire clamp and wire electro discharge machining technique was utilized to fabricate the monolithic structure. Experimental tests were carried out to investigate the performance and the experimental results match well with the theoretical calculation and FEA. The amplification ratio of the clamp is 20.96 and the working mode frequency is 895 Hz. Step response test shows that the wire clamp has fast response and high accuracy and the motion resolution is 0.2 μm. High speed precision grasping operations of gold and copper wires were realized using the wire clamper. PMID:25933896

  4. A novel monolithic piezoelectric actuated flexure-mechanism based wire clamp for microelectronic device packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cunman; Wang, Fujun; Tian, Yanling; Zhao, Xingyu; Zhang, Hongjie; Cui, Liangyu; Zhang, Dawei; Ferreira, Placid

    2015-04-01

    A novel monolithic piezoelectric actuated wire clamp is presented in this paper to achieve fast, accurate, and robust microelectronic device packaging. The wire clamp has compact, flexure-based mechanical structure and light weight. To obtain large and robust jaw displacements and ensure parallel jaw grasping, a two-stage amplification composed of a homothetic bridge type mechanism and a parallelogram leverage mechanism was designed. Pseudo-rigid-body model and Lagrange approaches were employed to conduct the kinematic, static, and dynamic modeling of the wire clamp and optimization design was carried out. The displacement amplification ratio, maximum allowable stress, and natural frequency were calculated. Finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to evaluate the characteristics of the wire clamp and wire electro discharge machining technique was utilized to fabricate the monolithic structure. Experimental tests were carried out to investigate the performance and the experimental results match well with the theoretical calculation and FEA. The amplification ratio of the clamp is 20.96 and the working mode frequency is 895 Hz. Step response test shows that the wire clamp has fast response and high accuracy and the motion resolution is 0.2 μm. High speed precision grasping operations of gold and copper wires were realized using the wire clamper.

  5. Assessing Advanced High School and Undergraduate Students' Thinking Skills: The Chemistry--From the Nanoscale to Microelectronics Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Dangur, Vered; Avargil, Shirly; Peskin, Uri

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry students in Israel have two options for studying chemistry: basic or honors (advanced placement). For instruction in high school honors chemistry courses, we developed a module focusing on abstract topics in quantum mechanics: Chemistry--From the Nanoscale to Microelectronics. The module adopts a visual-conceptual approach, which…

  6. 1/f noise measurements for faster evaluation of electromigration in advanced microelectronics interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyne, Sofie; Croes, Kristof; De Wolf, Ingrid; Tőkei, Zsolt

    2016-05-01

    The use of 1/f noise measurements is explored for the purpose of finding faster techniques for electromigration (EM) characterization in advanced microelectronic interconnects, which also enable a better understanding of its underlying physical mechanisms. Three different applications of 1/f noise for EM characterization are explored. First, whether 1/f noise measurements during EM stress can serve as an early indicator of EM damage. Second, whether the current dependence of the noise power spectral density (PSD) can be used for a qualitative comparison of the defect concentration of different interconnects and consequently also their EM lifetime t50. Third, whether the activation energies obtained from the temperature dependence of the 1/f noise PSD correspond to the activation energies found by means of classic EM tests. In this paper, the 1/f noise technique has been used to assess and compare the EM properties of various advanced integration schemes and different materials, as they are being explored by the industry to enable advanced interconnect scaling. More concrete, different types of copper interconnects and one type of tungsten interconnect are compared. The 1/f noise measurements confirm the excellent electromigration properties of tungsten and demonstrate a dependence of the EM failure mechanism on copper grain size and distribution, where grain boundary diffusion is found to be a dominant failure mechanism.

  7. Impact of junction temperature on microelectronic device reliability and considerations for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mark; Chen, Yuan; Cooper, Mark

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of an industry survey on junction temperature derating from key microelectronics suppliers, and offers recommendations to users for temperature derating for reliable operation over time. Background information on established derating factors, and reccommendations for safe operating junction temperatures for newer technologies are also presented.

  8. Diagnostics and Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, J.W.

    1993-03-01

    This report discusses activities of the Diagnostics and Microelectronics thrust area which conducts activities in semiconductor devices and semiconductor fabrication technology for programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our multidisciplinary engineering and scientific staff use modern computational tools and semi-conductor microfabrication equipment to develop high-performance devices. Our work concentrates on three broad technologies of semiconductor microdevices: (1) silicon on III-V semiconductor microeletronics, (2) lithium niobate-based and III-V semiconductor-based photonics, and (3) silicon-based micromaching for application to microstructures and microinstruments. In FY-92, we worked on projects in seven areas, described in this report: novel photonic detectors; a wideband phase modulator; an optoelectronic terahertz beam system; the fabrication of microelectrode electrochemical sensors; diamond heatsinks; advanced micromachining technologies; and electrophoresis using silicon microchannels.

  9. Noninvasive sensors for in-situ process monitoring and control in advanced microelectronics manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehi, Mehrdad M.

    1991-04-01

    The combination of noninvasive in-situ monitoring sensors single-wafer processing modules vacuum-integrated cluster tools and computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) can provide a suitable fabrication environment for flexible and high-yield advanced semiconductor device manufacturing. The use of in-situ sensors for monitoring of equipment process and wafer parameters results in increased equipment/process up-time reduced process and device parameter spread improved cluster tool reliability and functionality and reduced overall device manufacturing cycle time. This paper will present an overview of the main features and impact of noninvasive in-situ monitoring sensors for semiconductor device manufacturing applications. Specific examples will be presented for the use of critical sensors in conjunction with cluster tools for advanced CMOS device processing. A noninvasive temperature sensor will be presented which can monitor true wafer temperature via infrared (5. 35 jtm) pyrometery and laser-assisted real-time spectral wafer emissivity measurements. This sensor design eliminates any. temperature measurement errors caused by the heating lamp radiation and wafer emissivity variations. 1. SENSORS: MOTIVATIONS AND IMPACT Semiconductor chip manufacturing factories usually employ well-established statistical process control (SPC) techniques to minimize the process parameter deviations and to increase the device fabrication yield. The conventional fabrication environments rely on controlling a limited set of critical equipment and process parameters (e. g. process pressure gas flow rates substrate temperature RF power etc. ) however most of the significant wafer process and equipment parameters of interest are not monitored in real

  10. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  11. Nano-Nucleation Characteristic of Cu-Ag Alloy Directly Electrodeposited on W Diffusion Barrier for Microelectronic Device Interconnect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang O; Kim, Sunjung

    2016-05-01

    Cu-Ag alloy interconnect is promising for ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) microelectronic system of which device dimension keeps shrinking. In this study, seedless electrodeposition of Cu-Ag alloy directly on W diffusion barrier as interconnect technology is presented in respect of nano-nucleation control. Chemical equilibrium state of electrolyte was fundamentally investigated according to the pH of electrolyte because direct nano-nucleation of Cu-Ag alloy on W surface is challenging. Chelation behavior of Cu2+ and Ag+ ions with citrate (Cit) and ammonia ligands was dependent on the pH of electrolyte. The amount and kind of Cu- and Ag-based complexes determine the deposition rate, size, elemental composition, and surface morphology of Cu-Ag alloy nano-nuclei formed on W surface. PMID:27483895

  12. Advanced underwater lift device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible underwater lift devices ('lift bags') are used in underwater operations to provide buoyancy to submerged objects. Commercially available designs are heavy, bulky, and awkward to handle, and thus are limited in size and useful lifting capacity. An underwater lift device having less than 20 percent of the bulk and less than 10 percent of the weight of commercially available models was developed. The design features a dual membrane envelope, a nearly homogeneous envelope membrane stress distribution, and a minimum surface-to-volume ratio. A proof-of-concept model of 50 kg capacity was built and tested. Originally designed to provide buoyancy to mock-ups submerged in NASA's weightlessness simulators, the device may have application to water-landed spacecraft which must deploy flotation upon impact, and where launch weight and volume penalties are significant. The device may also be useful for the automated recovery of ocean floor probes or in marine salvage applications.

  13. Laser-assisted ultrathin bare die packaging: a route to a new class of microelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Val R.; Swenson, Orven; Atanasov, Yuriy; Schneck, Nathan

    2013-03-01

    Ultrathin flip-chip semiconductor die packaging on paper substrates is an enabling technology for a variety of extremely low-cost electronic devices with huge market potential such as RFID smart forms, smart labels, smart tickets, banknotes, security documents, etc. Highly flexible and imperceptible dice are possible only at a thickness of less than 50 μm, preferably down to 10-20 μm or less. Several cents per die cost is achievable only if the die size is <= 500 μm/side. Such ultrathin, ultra-small dice provide the flexibility and low cost required, but no conventional technology today can package such die onto a flexible substrate at low cost and high rate. The laser-enabled advanced packaging (LEAP) technology has been developed at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University in Fargo, North Dakota, to accomplish this objective. Presented are results using LEAP to assemble dice with various thicknesses, including 350 μm/side dice as thin as 20 μm and less. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of using a laser to package conventional silicon dice with such small size and thickness. LEAP-packaged RFID-enabled paper for financial and security applications is also demonstrated. The cost of packaging using LEAP is lower compared to the conventional pick-and-place methods while the rate of packaging is much higher and independent of the die size.

  14. Microelectronic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1969-01-01

    Bipolar transistor operated in a grounded base configuration is used as the inductor in a microelectronic oscillator. This configuration is employed using thin-film hybrid technology and is also applicable to monolithic technology.

  15. Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael S.; Maki, Paul A.; Kolodzey, James

    2007-06-01

    I. Wide band gap devices. Wide-Bandgap Semiconductor devices for automotive applications / M. Sugimoto ... [et al.]. A GaN on SiC HFET device technology for wireless infrastructure applications / B. Green ... [et al.]. Drift velocity limitation in GaN HEMT channels / A. Matulionis. Simulations of field-plated and recessed gate gallium nitride-based heterojunction field-effect transistors / V. O. Turin, M. S. Shur and D. B. Veksler. Low temperature electroluminescence of green and deep green GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / Y. Li ... [et al.]. Spatial spectral analysis in high brightness GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / T. Detchprohm ... [et al.]. Self-induced surface texturing of Al2O3 by means of inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching in Cl2 chemistry / P. Batoni ... [et al.]. Field and termionic field transport in aluminium gallium arsenide heterojunction barriers / D. V. Morgan and A. Porch. Electrical characteristics and carrier lifetime measurements in high voltage 4H-SiC PiN diodes / P. A. Losee ... [et al.]. Geometry and short channel effects on enhancement-mode n-Channel GaN MOSFETs on p and n- GaN/sapphire substrates / W. Huang, T. Khan and T. P. Chow. 4H-SiC Vertical RESURF Schottky Rectifiers and MOSFETs / Y. Wang, P. A. Losee and T. P. Chow. Present status and future Directions of SiGe HBT technology / M. H. Khater ... [et al.]Optical properties of GaInN/GaN multi-quantum Wells structure and light emitting diode grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy / J. Senawiratne ... [et al.]. Electrical comparison of Ta/Ti/Al/Mo/Au and Ti/Al/Mo/Au Ohmic contacts on undoped GaN HEMTs structure with AlN interlayer / Y. Sun and L. F. Eastman. Above 2 A/mm drain current density of GaN HEMTs grown on sapphire / F. Medjdoub ... [et al.]. Focused thermal beam direct patterning on InGaN during molecular beam epitaxy / X. Chen, W. J. Schaff and L. F. Eastman -- II. Terahertz and millimeter wave devices. Temperature-dependent microwave performance of

  16. Radiation Testing, Characterization and Qualification Challenges for Modern Microelectronics and Photonics Devices and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    At an earlier conference we discussed a selection of the challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices focusing on state-of-the-art CMOS technologies. In this presentation, we extend this discussion focusing on the following areas: (1) Device packaging, (2) Evolving physical single even upset mechanisms, (3) Device complexity, and (4) the goal of understanding the limitations and interpretation of radiation testing results.

  17. Radiation Testing, Characterization and Qualification Challenges for Modern Microelectronics and Photonics Devices and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    At GOMAC 2007, we discussed a selection of the challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices focusing on state-of-the-art memory technologies. This included FLASH non-volatile memories (NVMs) and synchronous dynamic random access memories (SDRAMs). In this presentation, we extend this discussion in device packaging and complexity as well as single event upset (SEU) mechanisms using several technology areas as examples including: system-on-a-chip (SOC) devices and photonic or fiber optic systems. The underlying goal is intended to provoke thought for understanding the limitations and interpretation of radiation testing results.

  18. Microelectronics in Scottish Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ian

    1982-01-01

    Describes the Scottish Microelectronics Development Programme (SMDP), which was undertaken to advance the use of microcomputers in instruction at all educational levels in Scotland. The development of the microprocessor and its effect on educational technology are briefly considered, as well as initial problems and prospects for the future of…

  19. Advanced Modeling of Micromirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalicek, M. Adrian; Sene, Darren E.; Bright, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    The flexure-beam micromirror device (FBMD) is a phase only piston style spatial light modulator demonstrating properties which can be used for phase adaptive corrective optics. This paper presents a complete study of a square FBMD, from advanced model development through final device testing and model verification. The model relates the electrical and mechanical properties of the device by equating the electrostatic force of a parallel-plate capacitor with the counter-acting spring force of the device's support flexures. The capacitor solution is derived via the Schwartz-Christoffel transformation such that the final solution accounts for non-ideal electric fields. The complete model describes the behavior of any piston-style device, given its design geometry and material properties. It includes operational parameters such as drive frequency and temperature, as well as fringing effects, mirror surface deformations, and cross-talk from neighboring devices. The steps taken to develop this model can be applied to other micromirrors, such as the cantilever and torsion-beam designs, to produce an advanced model for any given device. The micromirror devices studied in this paper were commercially fabricated in a surface micromachining process. A microscope-based laser interferometer is used to test the device in which a beam reflected from the device modulates a fixed reference beam. The mirror displacement is determined from the relative phase which generates a continuous set of data for each selected position on the mirror surface. Plots of this data describe the localized deflection as a function of drive voltage.

  20. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  1. Materials reliability issues in microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, J.R. ); Yost, F.G. ); Ho, P.S. )

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of a MRS symposium on materials reliability in microelectronics. Topics include: electromigration; stress effects on reliability; stress and packaging; metallization; device, oxide and dielectric reliability; new investigative techniques; and corrosion.

  2. Overview of Micro- and Nano-Technology Tools for Stem Cell Applications: Micropatterned and Microelectronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Cagnin, Stefano; Cimetta, Elisa; Guiducci, Carlotta; Martini, Paolo; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo

    2012-01-01

    In the past few decades the scientific community has been recognizing the paramount role of the cell microenvironment in determining cell behavior. In parallel, the study of human stem cells for their potential therapeutic applications has been progressing constantly. The use of advanced technologies, enabling one to mimic the in vivo stem cell microenviroment and to study stem cell physiology and physio-pathology, in settings that better predict human cell biology, is becoming the object of much research effort. In this review we will detail the most relevant and recent advances in the field of biosensors and micro- and nano-technologies in general, highlighting advantages and disadvantages. Particular attention will be devoted to those applications employing stem cells as a sensing element. PMID:23202240

  3. Photon assisted conducting polymer polymerization process for storage information and microelectronic device development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Azevedo, W. M.; de Barros, R. A.; da Silva, E. F., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    In this work, we use the photon polymerization process to prepare conducting polymer patterns and optical memory devices (CPROM). For the CPROM and image development, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is used as a solid support doped with the aniline monomer and transition metals, whereas for the patterns development, the ink, of a conventional DeskJet printer is substituted by a solution of transition metal ions that is used to print the desired pattern on substrates previously treated, in an aqueous solution of conducting polymer monomer. Both processes use photons and transition metals instead of conventional oxidants to promote polymerization of the aniline monomer inside the host medium, or on a flat surface, such as glossy paper. The SEM analysis of the CPROM shows that the metal particles grow in form of wire with diameter of 100 nm and lengths up to 4μm long. The conductivity of the printed conducting polymer patterns on glossy paper is about 2 × 10 -2 S/cm. These results strongly suggest that this new, fast and low cost technology can be used to produce conducting polymer structures for all polymer electronic devices applications.

  4. New Materials, Methods, and Molecules for Microelectronic and Molecular Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michael Stephen

    This dissertation reports a variety of new methods and materials for the fabrication of electronic devices. Particular emphasis is placed on low-cost, solution based methods for flexible electronic device fabrication, and new substrates and molecules for molecular electronic tunnel junctions. Chapter 2 reports a low-cost, solution based method for depositing patterned metal circuitry onto a variety of flexible polymer substrates. Microcontact printing an aluminum (III) porphyrin complex activates selected areas of an oxidized polymer substrate to electroless copper metallization. Chapter 3 reports a new transparent conductive electrode for use in optoelectronic devices. A highly conductive, transparent silver nanowire network is embedded at the surface of an optical adhesive, which can be applied to a variety of rigid and flexible polymer substrates. Chapter 4 describes a new approach to the self-assembly of mesoscale components into two-dimensional arrays. Unlike most previously reported self-assembly motifs, this method is completely dry; eliminating solvent makes this method compatible with the assembly of electronic components. Chapter 5 describes a new class of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold formed from dihexadecyldithiophosphinic acid ((C16) 2DTPA) adsorbate molecules. The binding and structure (C16) 2DTPA SAMs is dependent upon the roughness and morphology of the underlying gold substrate. Chapter 6 investigates the influence of chain length on the binding and structure of dialkyl-DTPA SAMs on smooth, template-stripped (TS) gold. Binding of the DTPA head group is independent of the length of the alkyl chain, while the structure of the organic layer has a counter-intuitive dependence: As the length of the alkyl chain increases, these SAMs become more disordered and liquid-like. Chapter 7 describes the fabrication of ultra smooth gold substrates using chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). These substrates are smooth, uniform, and prove to be ideal

  5. Spectroscopic ellipsometry analysis of nanoporous low dielectric constant films processed via supercritical carbon dioxide for next-generation microelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Maslina T.

    My research will address issues at the back-end-of-line in microelectronics fabrication, specifically the need for Low-k extendibility. The International Roadmap for Semiconductors (2005) suggested that interconnect insulation must be replaced with a material having an ultra-low dielectric constant (k) of < 2.0 and can withstand rigorous current process integration for the 65 nm technology. Creating porosity in the films produces k-values as low (1.0) air. In this research, supercritical CO2 (SCCO2) process is utilized to create pores, remove water, repair plasma-damaged sample and seal pores. These multi-step processing does not only produce low-k film but also create device reliability. Spectroscopy ellipsometric (SE) analysis is used to evaluate the performance of each process on porous film. In SE analysis, Cauchy, Bruggeman Effective Medium Approximation and graded models are used to model the processed samples. The depth profile SE analysis demonstrates the individual process performance based on its changes of refractive index (n) throughout the film thickness. SE also provide important film properties like thickness, porosity etc. In addition to SE, Fourier Transform Infra-red (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and electrical characterizations are used. Results show that SCCO2/co-solvents can extract porogens and remove water effectively at a significantly shorter time (≤1 hr) and at a low temperature (≤160°C) without thickness shrinkage in contrast with thermal annealing which uses 450°C and 5 hours without significantly shrinkage. SCCO2/TMCS removes water and terminates silanol group with methyl group, and hence preventing water re-adsorption which increases k. The dense layer on the sample surface that formed through the vapor treatment/HMDS helps to seal pores and prevent metal diffusion. This research also shows that patterning samples prior to porogen/water removal can minimize plasma damages on porous sample.

  6. Advanced Summer School on Microelectronics: Physics and Technology for VLSI, Espoo, Finland, June 8-12, 1987, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubb, Tor; Paananen, Riitta

    The conference presents papers on process integration for submicron CMOS, metallurgical topics in silicon device interconnections, and silicon oxidation. Consideration is also given to advanced photolithography for VSLI's and physics and modeling of submicron semiconductor devices. Other topics include the stability and electronic structure of ultrathin superlattices and alloys and time-dependent tunneling in heterostructures.

  7. A Methodology to Teach Advanced A/D Converters, Combining Digital Signal Processing and Microelectronics Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintans, C.; Colmenar, A.; Castro, M.; Moure, M. J.; Mandado, E.

    2010-01-01

    ADCs (analog-to-digital converters), especially Pipeline and Sigma-Delta converters, are designed using complex architectures in order to increase their sampling rate and/or resolution. Consequently, the learning of ADC devices also encompasses complex concepts such as multistage synchronization, latency, oversampling, modulation, noise shaping,…

  8. Microelectronic device data handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Handbook provides general guidance to the technology of integrated circuits for readers with little or no experience. It does not supply solutions to specific design problems, but is heavily footnoted to the original sources.

  9. A Review of Failure Analysis Methods for Advanced 3D Microelectronic Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Srinath, Purushotham Kaushik Muthur; Goyal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Advanced three dimensional (3D) packaging is a key enabler in driving form factor reduction, performance benefits, and package cost reduction, especially in the fast paced mobility and ultraportable consumer electronics segments. The high level of functional integration and the complex package architecture pose a significant challenge for conventional fault isolation (FI) and failure analysis (FA) methods. Innovative FI/FA tools and techniques are required to tackle the technical and throughput challenges. In this paper, the applications of FI and FA techniques such as Electro Optic Terahertz Pulse Reflectometry, 3D x-ray computed tomography, lock-in thermography, and novel physical sample preparation methods to 3D packages with package on package and stacked die with through silicon via configurations are reviewed, along with the key FI and FA challenges.

  10. Designing materials for advanced microelectronic patterning applications using controlled polymerization RAFT technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Michael T.; Farnham, William B.; Chambers, Charles R.; Tran, Hoang V.; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Brun, Yefim; Romberger, Matthew L.; Sounik, James R.

    2011-04-01

    Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization technology enables the production of polymers possessing low polydispersity (PD) in high yield for many applications. RAFT technology also enables control over polymer architecture. With synthetic control over these polymer characteristics, a variety of polymers can be designed and manufactured for use in advanced electronic applications. By matching the specific RAFT reagent and monomer combinations, we can accommodate monomer reactivity and optimize acrylate or methacrylate polymerizations (193 and 193i photoresist polymers) or optimize styrenic monomer systems (248 nm photoresist polymers) to yield polymers with PD as low as 1.05. For 193i lithography, we have used RAFT technology to produce block copolymers comprising of a random "resist" block with composition and size based on conventional dry photoresist materials and a "low surface energy" block The relative block lengths and compositions may be varied to tune solution migration behavior, surface energy, contact angles, and solubility in developer. Directed self assembly is proving to be an interesting and innovative method to make 2- and even 3-dimensional periodic, uniform patterns. Two keys to acceptable performance of directed self assembly from block copolymers are the uniformity and the purity of the materials will be discussed.

  11. Ultra sensitive magnetic sensors integrating the giant magnetoelectric effect with advanced microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhao

    This dissertation investigates approaches to enhance the performance, especially the sensitivity and signal to noise ratio of magnetoelectric sensors, which exploits the magnetoelectric coupling in magnetostrictive and piezoelectric laminate composites. A magnetic sensor is a system or device that can measure the magnitude of a magnetic field or each of its vector components. Usually the techniques encompass many aspects of physics and electronics. The common technologies used for magnetic field sensing include induction coil sensors, fluxgate, SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device), Hall effect, giant magnetoresistance, magnetostrictive/piezoelectric composites, and MEMS (microelectromechanical systems)-based magnetic sensors. Magnetic sensors have found a broad range of applications for many decades. For example, ultra sensitive magnetic sensors are able to detect tiny magnetic fields produced outside the brain by the neuronal currents which can be used for diagnostic application. Measuring the brain's magnetic field is extremely challenging because they are so weak, have strengths of 0.1--1 pT and thus requiring magnetic sensors with sub-picotesla sensitivity. In fact, to date, these measurements can only performed with the most sensitive magnetic sensors, i.e., SQUID. However, such detectors need expensive and cumbersome cryogenics to operate. Additionally, the thermal insulation of the sensors prevents them from being placed very closed to the tissues under study, thereby preventing high-resolution measurement capability. All of these severely limit their broad usage and proliferation for biomedical imaging, diagnosis, and research. A novel ultra-sensitive magnetic sensor capable of operating at room temperature is investigated in this thesis. Magnetoelectric effect is a material phenomenon featuring the interchange between the magnetic and electric energies or signals. The large ME effect observed in ME composites, especially the ME laminates

  12. Microelectronic Packaging Trends and the Role of Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Madhav

    The microelectronic packaging industry is undergoing major changes to keep pace with the ever-increasing demands imposed by high performing chips and by end-use system applications. Solutions using advanced materials for microprocessor interconnect scaling and chip package interconnects, novel concepts in heat management systems, and improvements in package substrates continue to drive major packaging efforts. Advances in electrochemical technologies have played an important role in the evolution of such solutions for miniaturization of microelectronic devices and packages. Indeed, since the development of through-mask plating for thin film heads in the1960s and 1970s, an enormous amount of industrial and academic R&D effort has positioned electrochemical processing among the most sophisticated processing technologies employed in the microelectronics industry today [1-4]. Electrochemical processing is perhaps better understood than some of the dry processing technologies used in the microelectronics industry. Compared to other competing dry processing technologies, it has emerged as a more environmentally-friendly and cost-effective fabrication method. Electrochemical processing has, thus, become an integral part of advanced wafer processing fabs and an enabling technology for nanofabrication [5]. As the electronics industry faces the challenges of extending Moore's law, electrochemical processing is expected to continue to enable further miniaturization of high-performance chip interconnects, packages, and printed circuit boards. Evolving novel approaches to electrochemical processing using nano-materials and nano-fabrication techniques have started to make tremendous impact on further miniaturization of high performance devices and packages. A detailed discussion of different facets of technology advances in electronic packaging is difficult to present in the limited space of this chapter. The current chapter, therefore, makes an effort to capture some of the key

  13. Microelectronics plastic molded packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Peterson, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    The use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectronics for nuclear weapon applications will soon be reality rather than hearsay. The use of COTS for new technologies for uniquely military applications is being driven by the so-called Perry Initiative that requires the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to accept and utilize commercial standards for procurement of military systems. Based on this philosophy, coupled with several practical considerations, new weapons systems as well as future upgrades will contain plastic encapsulated microelectronics. However, a conservative Department of Energy (DOE) approach requires lifetime predictive models. Thus, the focus of the current project is on accelerated testing to advance current aging models as well as on the development of the methodology to be used during WR qualification of plastic encapsulated microelectronics. An additional focal point involves achieving awareness of commercial capabilities, materials, and processes. One of the major outcomes of the project has been the definition of proper techniques for handling and evaluation of modern surface mount parts which might be used in future systems. This program is also raising the familiarity level of plastic within the weapons complex, allowing subsystem design rules accommodating COTS to evolve. A two year program plan is presented along with test results and commercial interactions during this first year.

  14. Nanoscale Copper and Copper Compounds for Advanced Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lih-Juann

    2016-04-01

    Copper has been in use for at least 10,000 years. Copper alloys, such as bronze and brass, have played important roles in advancing civilization in human history. Bronze artifacts date at least 6500 years. On the other hand, discovery of intriguing properties and new applications in contemporary technology for copper and its compounds, particularly on nanoscale, have continued. In this paper, examples for the applications of Cu and Cu alloys for advanced device applications will be given on Cu metallization in microelectronics devices, Cu nanobats as field emitters, Cu2S nanowire array as high-rate capability and high-capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries, Cu-Te nanostructures for field-effect transistor, Cu3Si nanowires as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers, single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high-efficiency solar cell, multilevel Cu2S resistive memory, superlattice Cu2S-Ag2S heterojunction diodes, and facet-dependent Cu2O diode.

  15. Properties of zirconium silicate and zirconium-silicon oxynitride high-k dielectric alloys for advanced microelectronic applications: Chemical and electrical characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Byongsun

    2005-11-01

    As the microelectronic devices are aggressively scaled down to the 1999 International Technology Roadmap, the advanced complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) is required to increase packing density of ultra-large scale integrated circuits (ULSI). High-k alternative dielectrics can provide the required levels of EOT for device scaling at larger physical thickness, thereby providing a materials pathway for reducing the tunneling current. Zr silicates and its end members (SiO2 and ZrO2) and Zr-Si oxynitride films, (ZrO2)x(Si3N 4)y(SiO2)z, have been deposited using a remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPECVD) system. After deposition of Zr silicate, the films were exposed to He/N2 plasma to incorporate nitrogen atoms into the surface of films. The amount of incorporated nitrogen atoms was measured by on-line Auger electron spectrometry (AES) as a function of silicate composition and showed its local minimum around the 30% silicate. The effect of nitrogen atoms on capacitance-voltage (C-V) and leakage-voltage (J-V) were also investigated by fabricating metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. Results suggested that incorporating nitrogen into silicate decreased the leakage current in SiO2-rich silicate, whereas the leakage increased in the middle range of silicate. Zr-Si oxynitride was a pseudo-ternary alloy and no phase separation was detected by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis up to 1100°C annealing. The leakage current of Zr-Si oxynitride films showed two different temperature dependent activation energies, 0.02 eV for low temperature and 0.3 eV for high temperature. Poole-Frenkel emission was the dominant leakage mechanism. Zr silicate alloys with no Si3N4 phase were chemically separated into the SiO2 and ZrO2 phase as annealed above 900°C. While chemical phase separation in Zr silicate films with Si 3N4 phase (Zr-Si oxynitride) were suppressed as increasing the amount of Si3N4 phase due to the narrow bonding network m Si3

  16. Thermoelectric Devices Advance Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) devices heat, cool, and generate electricity when a temperature differential is provided between the two module faces. In cooperation with NASA, Chico, California-based United States Thermoelectric Consortium Inc. (USTC) built a gas emissions analyzer (GEA) for combustion research. The GEA precipitated hydrocarbon particles, preventing contamination that would hinder precise rocket fuel analysis. The USTC research and design team uses patent-pending dimple, pin-fin, microchannel and microjet structures to develop and design heat dissipation devices on the mini-scale level, which not only guarantee high performance of products, but also scale device size from 1 centimeter to 10 centimeters. USTC continues to integrate the benefits of TE devices in its current line of thermal management solutions and has found the accessibility of NASA technical research to be a valuable, sustainable resource that has continued to positively influence its product design and manufacturing

  17. NDE applications in microelectronic industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyendorf, N.; Oppermann, M.; Krueger, P.; Roellig, M.; Wolter, K. J.

    2016-04-01

    New concepts in assembly technology boost our daily life in an unknown way. High end semiconductor industry today deals with functional structures down to a few nanometers. ITRS roadmap predicts an ongoing decrease of the "DRAM half pitch" over the next decade. Packaging of course is not intended to realize pitches at the nanometer scale, but has to face the challenges of integrating such semiconductor devices with smallest pitch and high pin counts into systems. Advanced techniques of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) with resolutions in volume better than 1 micrometer vixen size are urgently needed for the safety and reliability of electronic systems, especially those that are used in long living applications. The development speed of integrated circuits is still very high and is not expected to decrease in the next future. The integration density of microelectronic devices is increasing, the dimensions become smaller and the number of I/O's is getting higher. The development of new types of packages must be done with respect to reliability issues. Potential damage sources must be identified and finally avoided in the new packages. In power electronics production the condition monitoring receives a lot of interest to avoid electrical shortcuts, dead solder joints and interface cracking. It is also desired to detect and characterize very small defects like transportation phenomenon or Kirkendall voids. For this purpose, imaging technologies with resolutions in the sub-micron range are required.

  18. Improved Thermoelectric Devices: Advanced Semiconductor Materials for Thermoelectric Devices

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Phononic Devices is working to recapture waste heat and convert it into usable electric power. To do this, the company is using thermoelectric devices, which are made from advanced semiconductor materials that convert heat into electricity or actively remove heat for refrigeration and cooling purposes. Thermoelectric devices resemble computer chips, and they manage heat by manipulating the direction of electrons at the nanoscale. These devices aren’t new, but they are currently too inefficient and expensive for widespread use. Phononic Devices is using a high-performance, cost-effective thermoelectric design that will improve the device’s efficiency and enable electronics manufacturers to more easily integrate them into their products.

  19. Microelectronics and Music Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    1979-01-01

    This look at the impact of microelectronics on computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in music notes trends toward new applications and lower costs. Included are: a rationale for CAI in music, a list of sample programs, comparison of five microelectronic music systems, PLATO cost projections, and sources of further information. (SJL)

  20. Microelectronics in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orton, Richard J. J.

    2011-01-01

    The history and meaning of the term "microelectronics" is reviewed, followed by a discussion of the key inventions of the Intel microprocessor in 1971 and the Texas Instruments electronic pocket calculator in 1975. The six characteristic features of microelectronic components are then defined. The UK prime minister Jim Callaghan's address to the…

  1. Microelectronics bioinstrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Microelectronic bioinstrumentation systems to be employed in the Cardiovascular Deconditioning Program were developed. Implantable telemetry systems for long-term monitoring of animals on earth were designed to collect physiological data necessary for the understanding of the mechanisms of cardiovascular deconditioning. In-flight instrumentation systems, microelectronic instruments, and RF powering techniques for other life science experiments in the NASA program were studied.

  2. Space radiation environment prediction for VLSI microelectronics devices onboard a LEO satellite using OMERE-TRAD software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, Muhammad; Chechenin, N. G.; Torres, Frank Sill; Khan, E. U.; Agha, Shahrukh

    2015-07-01

    Space radiation environment at Low Earth Orbits (LEO) with perigee at 300 km, apogee at 600 km altitude having different orbital inclinations was modeled in the form of electrons and protons trapped in Van Allen Earth Radiation Belts (ERBs), heavy ions and protons in Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), and Energetic Solar Particles (ESP) Events during solar maximum period. The co-relation between various shielding thicknesses and particles transport flux was analyzed for this specific orbit. We observed that there is an optimum shield thickness above which the attenuation of the transmitted flux of incident particles is negligible. To estimate the orbit average differential and integral fluxes to be encountered by onboard devices an appropriate radiation environment models were chosen in OMERE-TRAD toolkit and the impact of various shielding thickness for different orbital inclinations on integral Linear-Energy-Transfer (LET) spectra were determined.

  3. Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Watterson, C.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Advanced Electro-Optic Surety Devices project was initiated in march 1991 to support design laboratory guidance on electro-optic device packaging and evaluation. Sandia National Laboratory requested AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), to prepare for future packaging efforts in electro-optic integrated circuits. Los Alamos National Laboratory requested the evaluation of electro-optic waveguide devices for nuclear surety applications. New packaging techniques involving multiple fiber optic alignment and attachment, binary lens array development, silicon V-groove etching, and flip chip bonding were requested. Hermetic sealing of the electro-optic hybrid and submicron alignment of optical components present new challenges to be resolved. A 10-channel electro-optic modulator and laser amplifier were evaluated for potential surety applications.

  4. From Microelectronics to Nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    We highlight key events in over 100 years of electronic amplifiers and their incorporation in computers and communication in order to appreciate the electron as man's most powerful token of information. We recognize that it has taken about 25 years or almost a generation for inventions to make it into new products, and that, within these periods, it still took major campaigns, like the Sputnik effect or what we shall call 10× programs, to achieve major technology steps. From Lilienfeld's invention 1926 of the solid-state field-effect triode to its realization 1959 in Kahng's MOS field-effect transistor, it took 33 years, and this pivotal year also saw the first planar integrated silicon circuit as patented by Noyce. This birth of the integrated microchip launched the unparalleled exponential growth of microelectronics with many great milestones. Among these, we point out the 3D integration of CMOS transistors by Gibbons in 1979 and the related Japanese program on Future Electron Devices (FED). The 3D domain has finally arrived as a broad development since 2005. Consecutively, we mark the neural networks on-chip of 1989 by Mead and others, now, 20 years later, a major project by DARPA. We highlight cooperatives like SRC and SEMATECH, their impact on progress and more recent nanoelectronic milestones until 2010.

  5. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  6. Microelectronic oscillator, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L.

    1969-01-01

    Microelectronic oscillator uses a bipolar transistor to circumvent the problem of developing suitable inductors for lower frequencies. The oscillator is fabricated by hybrid thin film techniques or by monolithic construction. Discrete microminiature components may also be employed.

  7. Advanced Devices for Cryogenic Thermal Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugby, D.; Stouffer, C.; Garzon, J.; Beres, M.; Gilchrist, A.

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes six advanced cryogenic thermal management devices/subsystems developed by Swales Aerospace for ground/space-based applications of interest to NASA, DoD, and the commercial sector. The devices/subsystems described herein include the following: (a) a differential thermal expansion cryogenic thermal switch (DTE-CTSW) constructed with high purity aluminum end-pieces and an Ultem support rod for the 6 K Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) (b) a quad-redundant DTE-CTSW assembly for the 35 K science instruments (NIRCam, NIRSpec, and FGS) mounted on the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) (c) a cryogenic diode heat pipe (CDHP) thermal switching system using methane as the working fluid for the 100 K CRISM hyperspectral mapping instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and (d) three additional devices/subsystems developed during the AFRL-sponsored CRYOTOOL program, which include a dual DTE-CTSW/dual cryocooler test bed, a miniaturized neon cryogenic loop heat pipe (mini-CLHP), and an across gimbal cryogenic thermal transport system (GCTTS). For the first three devices/subsystems mentioned above, this paper describes key aspects of the development efforts including concept definition, design, fabrication, and testing. For the latter three, this paper provides brief overview descriptions as key details are provided in a related paper.

  8. Microelectronics in the Curriculum--The Science Teacher's Contribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Science Education, Cambridge (England).

    Rapid advances in microelectronics over the past few years have generally been beneficial, but they have also created some problems, and questions must be asked about the philosophy for including aspects of the new technology in the school curriculum. This statement, prepared by the Microelectronics and Science Education Subcommittee of the…

  9. Image stabilization for SWIR advanced optoelectronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru; Granciu, Dana

    2015-02-01

    At long ranges and under low visibility conditions, Advanced Optoelectronic Device provides the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in the Short-wave Infra-red - SWIR (wavelengths between 1,1 ÷2,5 μm), significantly better than in the near wave infrared - NWIR and visible spectral bands [1,2]. The quality of image is nearly independent of the polarization in the incoming light, but it is influenced by the relative movement between the optical system and the observer (the operators' handshake), and the movement towards the support system (land and air vehicles). All these make it difficult to detect objectives observation in real time. This paper presents some systems enhance which the ability of observation and sighting through the optical systems without the use of the stands, tripods or other means. We have to eliminate the effect of "tremors of the hands" and the vibration in order to allow the use of optical devices by operators on the moving vehicles on land, on aircraft, or on boats, and to provide additional comfort for the user to track the moving object through the optical system, without losing the control in the process of detection and tracking. The practical applications of stabilization image process, in SWIR, are the most advanced part of the optical observation systems available worldwide [3,4,5]. This application has a didactic nature, because it ensures understanding by the students about image stabilization and their participation in research.

  10. Metal microstructures in advanced CMOS devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gignac, L.M.; Rodbell, K.P.

    1996-12-31

    As advanced semiconductor device features shrink, grain boundaries and interfaces become increasingly more important to the properties of thin metal film. With film thickness decreasing to the range of 10 nm and the corresponding features also decreasing to sub-micrometer sizes, interface and grain boundary properties become dominant. In this regime the details of the surface and grain boundaries dictate the interactions between film layers and the subsequent electrical properties. Therefore it is necessary to accurately characterize these materials on the proper length scale in order to first understand and then to improve the device effectiveness. In this talk we will examine the importance of microstructural characterization of thin metal films used in semiconductor devices and show how microstructure can influence the electrical performance. Specifically, we will review Co and Ti silicides for silicon contact and gate conductor applications, Ti/TiN liner films used for adhesion and diffusion barriers in chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten vertical wiring (vias) and Ti/AlCu/Ti-TiN films used as planar interconnect metal lines.

  11. Microelectronics for harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    McGarrity, J.M.; McLean, F.B. )

    1993-01-01

    Microelectronics is included on everybody's critical technology list for the future, and rightfully so. Each year, the role of microelectronics expands beyond its main market of consumer electronics and computers into areas such as home appliances, automobiles, aircraft, etc. The role of microelectronics in military equipment is similarly expanding. Some of these applications present highly stressing environments for the electronics, including high -temperatures and high radiation fields. Electronics that are robust - hardened to these environments - would offer great advantage in their capability to sense, control, and operate engines, machines, Power plants, and nuclear reactors with new levels of safety and reliability. Electronics under development to withstand these harsh environments include the following four semiconductor material technologies: silicon, GaAs, silicon carbide (SiC), and diamond.

  12. Analogy among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Shian; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-01

    We wish to illuminate the analogous link between microfluidic-based devices, and the already established pairing of micromechanics and microelectronics to create a triangular/three-way scientific relationship as a means of interlinking familial disciplines and accomplishing two primary goals: (1) to facilitate the modeling of multidisciplinary domains; and, (2) to enable us to co-simulate the entire system within a compact circuit simulator (e.g., Cadence or SPICE). A microfluidic channel-like structure embedded in a micro-electro-mechanical resonator via our proposed CMOS-MEMS technology is used to illustrate the connections among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics. PMID:23963526

  13. Sandia microelectronics development

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, H.T.

    1997-02-01

    An overview of the operations of Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Lab (MDL) is to develop radiation hardened IC, but techniques used for IC processing have been applied to a variety of related technologies such as micromechanics, smart sensors, and packaging.

  14. The Unilab Blue Chip Range for Introducing Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various topics in microelectronics to aid those teaching modern electronics for the first time, including, among others, the slang name "micro," attitudes of examining boards, rapid obsolescence of electronic devices, costs, analog systems, and digital systems. (SK)

  15. Trends in microelectronics development, applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestner, R.

    1985-12-01

    Scientific-technical development is characterized by elaboration and application of new technologies based on the principles of chemistry and physics. The microelectronic technology focuses on the highly efficient production of electronic circuits. Microelectronics makes possible the production of electronic circuits of heretofore unattainable complexity and reliability and at quite favorable costs. The reliability of the microelectronic application with the qualitative changes in the cost/performance ratio stimulates its applications to data processing and industry. Microelectronic products are characterized by a distant increase in functional value with a simultaneous decline in expense. Integrated circuit (IC) adaptation are manufactured and users are interested in the microelectronics.

  16. Micromachined sensor and actuator research at Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.

    1996-11-01

    An overview of the surface micromachining program at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of surface micromachined sensors and actuators for both defense and commercial applications. A technology that embeds micromechanical devices below the surface of the wafer prior to microelectronics fabrication has been developed for integrating microelectronics with surface-micromachined micromechanical devices. The application of chemical-mechanical polishing to increase the manufacturability of micromechanical devices is also presented.

  17. Hybrid microelectronic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, P.

    Various areas of hybrid microelectronic technology are discussed. The topics addressed include: basic thick film processing, thick film pastes and substrates, add-on components and attachment methods, thin film processing, and design of thick film hybrid circuits. Also considered are: packaging hybrid circuits, automating the production of hybrid circuits, application of hybrid techniques, customer's view of hybrid technology, and quality control and assurance in hybrid circuit production.

  18. Microelectronic bioinstrumentation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. H.; Yon, E. T.; Rodriguez, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The progess made from April 1973 to June 1974 on a microelectronics bioinstrumentation system is reported and includes data for the following three individual projects: (1) a radio frequency powered implant telemetry system; (2) an ingestible temperature telemeter; and (3) development of pO2 and pH sensors. Proposed activities for continuation of the research for the period September 1, 1974 to August 31, 1975 are also discussed.

  19. Using SDI-12 with ST microelectronics MCU's

    SciTech Connect

    Saari, Alexandra; Hinzey, Shawn Adrian; Frigo, Janette Rose; Proicou, Michael Chris; Borges, Louis

    2015-09-03

    ST Microelectronics microcontrollers and processors are readily available, capable and economical processors. Unfortunately they lack a broad user base like similar offerings from Texas Instrument, Atmel, or Microchip. All of these devices could be useful in economical devices for remote sensing applications used with environmental sensing. With the increased need for environmental studies, and limited budgets, flexibility in hardware is very important. To that end, and in an effort to increase open support of ST devices, I am sharing my teams' experience in interfacing a common environmental sensor communication protocol (SDI-12) with ST devices.

  20. Eye vision system using programmable micro-optics and micro-electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, Nabeel A.; Amin, M. Junaid; Riza, Mehdi N.

    2014-02-01

    Proposed is a novel eye vision system that combines the use of advanced micro-optic and microelectronic technologies that includes programmable micro-optic devices, pico-projectors, Radio Frequency (RF) and optical wireless communication and control links, energy harvesting and storage devices and remote wireless energy transfer capabilities. This portable light weight system can measure eye refractive powers, optimize light conditions for the eye under test, conduct color-blindness tests, and implement eye strain relief and eye muscle exercises via time sequenced imaging. Described is the basic design of the proposed system and its first stage system experimental results for vision spherical lens refractive error correction.

  1. Diversionary device history and revolutionary advancements.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles

    2005-04-01

    Diversionary devices also known as flash bangs or stun grenades were first employed about three decades ago. These devices produce a loud bang accompanied by a brilliant flash of light and are employed to temporarily distract or disorient an adversary by overwhelming their visual and auditory senses in order to gain a tactical advantage. Early devices that where employed had numerous shortcomings. Over time, many of these deficiencies were identified and corrected. This evolutionary process led to today's modern diversionary devices. These present-day conventional diversionary devices have undergone evolutionary changes but operate in the same manner as their predecessors. In order to produce the loud bang and brilliant flash of light, a flash powder mixture, usually a combination of potassium perchlorate and aluminum powder is ignited to produce an explosion. In essence these diversionary devices are small pyrotechnic bombs that produce a high point-source pressure in order to achieve the desired far-field effect. This high point-source pressure can make these devices a hazard to the operator, adversaries and hostages even though they are intended for 'less than lethal' roles. A revolutionary diversionary device has been developed that eliminates this high point-source pressure problem and eliminates the need for the hazardous pyrotechnic flash powder composition. This new diversionary device employs a fuel charge that is expelled and ignited in the atmosphere. This process is similar to a fuel air or thermobaric explosion, except that it is a deflagration, not a detonation, thereby reducing the overpressure hazard. This technology reduces the hazard associated with diversionary devices to all involved with their manufacture, transport and use. An overview of the history of diversionary device development and developments at Sandia National Laboratories will be presented.

  2. A microelectronics approach for the ROSETTA surface science package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandau, Rainer (Editor); Alkalaj, Leon

    1996-01-01

    In relation to the Rosetta surface science package, the benefits of the application of advanced microelectronics packaging technologies and other output from the Mars environmental survey (MESUR) integrated microelectronics study are reported on. The surface science package will be designed to operate for tens of hours. Its limited mass and power consumption make necessary a highly integrated design with all the instruments and subunits operated from a centralized control and information management subsystem.

  3. ARED (Advanced-Resistive Exercise Device) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes ARED which is a new hardware exercise device for use on the International Space Station. Astronaut physiological adaptations, muscle parameters, and cardiovascular parameters are also reviewed.

  4. An advanced space rotary power transfer device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, P. E.

    A new electrical signal and rotary power transfer device has recently evolved from ball-bearing and electrical-transfer technologies. This hybrid device, known as a roll ring, has been tested extensively since the late 1970s and has demonstrated important operational advantages in a wide variety of signal and power transfer configurations. A high power version has been developed and evaluated. This paper describes this latter roll ring configuration. The paper also summarizes test results.

  5. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research.

    PubMed

    Muthaiyan Shanmugam, Muniesh; Subhra Santra, Tuhin

    2016-01-01

    The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology. PMID:27490525

  6. Thin film microelectronics materials production in the vacuum of space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatiev, A.; Sterling, M.; Horton, C.; Freundlich, A.; Pei, S.; Hill, R.

    1997-01-01

    The international Space Station era will open up a new dimension in the use of one of the unique attributes of space, vacuum, for the production of advanced semiconductor materials and devices for microelectronics applications. Ultra-vacuum is required for the fabrication in thin film form of high quality semiconductors. This can be accomplished behind a free flying platform similar to the current Wake Shield Facility which is specifically designed to support in-space production. The platform will require apparatus for thin film growth, a robotics interface to allow for the change out of raw materials and the harvesting of finished product, and a servicing plant incorporating Space Station that will support long-term utilization of the platform.

  7. Advances in nonlinear optical materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The recent progress in the application of nonlinear techniques to extend the frequency of laser sources has come from the joint progress in laser sources and in nonlinear materials. A brief summary of the progress in diode pumped solid state lasers is followed by an overview of progress in nonlinear frequency extension by harmonic generation and parametric processes. Improved nonlinear materials including bulk crystals, quasiphasematched interactions, guided wave devices, and quantum well intersubband studies are discussed with the idea of identifying areas of future progress in nonlinear materials and devices.

  8. Advanced colour processing for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillich, Eugen; Dörksen, Helene; Lohweg, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones are going to play an important role in professionally image processing tasks. However, mobile systems were not designed for such applications, especially in terms of image processing requirements like stability and robustness. One major drawback is the automatic white balance, which comes with the devices. It is necessary for many applications, but of no use when applied to shiny surfaces. Such an issue appears when image acquisition takes place in differently coloured illuminations caused by different environments. This results in inhomogeneous appearances of the same subject. In our paper we show a new approach for handling the complex task of generating a low-noise and sharp image without spatial filtering. Our method is based on the fact that we analyze the spectral and saturation distribution of the channels. Furthermore, the RGB space is transformed into a more convenient space, a particular HSI space. We generate the greyscale image by a control procedure that takes into account the colour channels. This leads in an adaptive colour mixing model with reduced noise. The results of the optimized images are used to show how, e. g., image classification benefits from our colour adaptation approach.

  9. Advances in modeling and simulation of vacuum electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Mondelli, A.A.; Levush, B.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1999-05-01

    Recent advances in the modeling and simulation of vacuum electronic devices are reviewed. Design of these devices makes use of a variety of physical models and numerical code types. Progress in the development of these models and codes is outlined and illustrated with specific examples. The state of the art in device simulation is evolving to the point such that devices can be designed on the computer, thereby eliminating many trial and error fabrication and test steps. The role of numerical simulation in the design process can be expected to grow further in the future.

  10. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  11. Microelectronics packaging technique: A Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringer, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    Plug-in flat packs and flat conductor cable (FCC) can be used to make compact, lightweight, external monitoring system requiring minimum of hard wiring. Microelectronic monitoring panel includes replaceable integrated or hybrid circuit flat packs and FCC.

  12. Advanced devices and systems for radiation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.; Wehe, D.K.; He, Z.; Barrett, C.; Miyamoto, J.

    1996-06-01

    The authors` most recent work continues their long-standing efforts to develop semiconductor detectors based on the collection of only a single type of charge carrier. Their best results are an extension of the principle of coplanar electrodes first described by Paul Luke of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 18 months ago. This technique, described in past progress reports, has the effect of deriving an output signal from detectors that depends only on the motion of carriers close to one surface. Since nearly all of these carriers are of one type (electrons) that are attracted to that electrode, the net effect is to nearly eliminate the influence of hole motion on the properties of the output signal. The result is that the much better mobility of electrons in compound semiconductors materials such as CZT can now be exploited without the concurrent penalty of poor hole collection. They have also developed new techniques in conjunction with the coplanar electrode principle that extends the technique into a new dimension. By proper processing of signals from the opposite electrode (the cathode) from the coplanar surface, they are able to derive a signal that is a good indication of the depth of interaction at which the charge carriers were initially formed. They have been the first group to demonstrate this technique, and examples of separate pulse height spectra recorded at a variety of different depths of interaction are shown in several of the figures that follow. Obtaining depth information is one step in the direction of obtaining volumetric point-of-interaction information from the detector. If one could known the coordinates of each specific interaction, then corrections could be applied to account for the inhomogeneities that currently plague many room-temperature devices.

  13. Advanced Stress, Strain And Geometrical Analysis In Semiconductor Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Neels, Antonia; Dommann, Alex; Niedermann, Philippe; Farub, Claudiu; Kaenel, Hans von

    2010-11-24

    High stresses and defect densities increases the risk of semiconductor device failure. Reliability studies on potential failure sources have an impact on design and are essential to assure the long term functioning of the device. Related to the dramatically smaller volume of semiconductor devices and new bonding techniques on such devices, new methods in testing and qualification are needed. Reliability studies on potential failure sources have an impact on design and are essential to assure the long term functioning of the device. In this paper, the applications of advanced High Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXRD) methods in strain, defect and deformation analysis on semiconductor devices are discussed. HRXRD with Rocking Curves (RC's) and Reciprocal Space Maps (RSM's) is used as accurate, non-destructive experimental method to evaluate the crystalline quality, and more precisely for the given samples, the in-situ strain, defects and geometrical parameters such as tilt and bending of device. The combination with advanced FEM simulations gives the possibility to support efficiently semiconductor devices design.

  14. Future Opportunities for Advancing Glucose Test Device Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brian R; Young, Teresa L; Joyce, Margaret K; Kennedy, Spencer I; Atashbar, Massood Z

    2011-01-01

    Advancements in the field of printed electronics can be applied to the field of diabetes testing. A brief history and some new developments in printed electronics components applicable to personal test devices, including circuitry, batteries, transmission devices, displays, and sensors, are presented. Low-cost, thin, and lightweight materials containing printed circuits with energy storage or harvest capability and reactive/display centers, made using new printing/imaging technologies, are ideal for incorporation into personal-use medical devices such as glucose test meters. Semicontinuous rotogravure printing, which utilizes flexible substrates and polymeric, metallic, and/or nano “ink” composite materials to effect rapidly produced, lower-cost printed electronics, is showing promise. Continuing research advancing substrate, “ink,” and continuous processing development presents the opportunity for research collaboration with medical device designers. PMID:22027300

  15. Dopant materials used in the microelectronics industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in microelectronics have transformed the occupational environment of the electronics industry. Large quantities of potentially hazardous materials are now in routine use as integrated circuit manufacturing becomes more complex and specialized. While the acute hazards associated with these dopant materials are clear, the subacute and chronic effects are less evident. Many of these elements are trace elements in humans and may play roles in health and disease in minute concentrations. Early detection and prevention of adverse health effects requires both astute medical surveillance, industrial hygiene, and safety engineering efforts to eliminate the sources of exposure to workers. 24 references.

  16. Managing the Manpower Aspects of Applying Micro-Electronics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, P.; Routledge, C.

    1980-01-01

    Outlines major effects that the application of micro-electronics devices in products/processes and in office systems will have on future manpower and skill requirements in manufacturing organizations. Identifies the type of problems these changes will pose for manpower managers. Provides general guidelines for the successful management of these…

  17. Advances in device and formulation technologies for pulmonary drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chan, John Gar Yan; Wong, Jennifer; Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-08-01

    Inhaled pharmaceuticals are formulated and delivered differently according to the therapeutic indication. However, specific device-formulation coupling is often fickle, and new medications or indications also demand new strategies. The discontinuation of chlorofluorocarbon propellants has seen replacement of older metered dose inhalers with dry powder inhaler formulations. High-dose dry powder inhalers are increasingly seen as an alternative dosage form for nebulised medications. In other cases, new medications have completely bypassed conventional inhalers and been formulated for use with unique inhalers such as the Staccato® device. Among these different devices, integration of software and electronic assistance has become a shared trend. This review covers recent device and formulation advances that are forming the current landscape of inhaled therapeutics. PMID:24728868

  18. FOREWORD: Proceedings of the 39th International Microelectronics and Packaging IMAPS Poland Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiński, Piotr; Górecki, Krzysztof; Bogdanowicz, Robert

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings are a collection of the selected articles presented at the 39th International Microelectronics and Packaging IMAPS Poland Conference, held in Gdansk, Poland on September 20-23, 2015 (IMAPS Poland 2015). The conference has been held under the scientific patronage of the International Microelectronics and Packaging Society Poland Chapter and the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunication, Polish Academy of Science and jointly hosted by the Gdansk University of Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunication and Informatics (GUT) and the Gdynia Maritime University, Faculty of Electrical Engineering (GMU). The IMAPS Poland conference series aims to advance interdisciplinary scientific information exchange and the discussion of the science and technology of advanced electronics. The IMAPS Poland 2015 conference took place in the heart of Gdansk, two minutes walking distance from the beach. The surroundings and location of the venue guaranteed excellent working and leisure conditions. The three-day conference highlighted invited talks by outstanding scientists working in important areas of electronics and electronic material science. The eight sessions covered areas in the fields of electronics packaging, interconnects on PCB, Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC), MEMS devices, transducers, sensors and modelling of electronic devices. The conference was attended by 99 participants from 11 countries. The conference schedule included 18 invited presentations and 78 poster presentations.

  19. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Grimmer, J.; Xu, S.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Wiemerslage, G.

    1997-08-01

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured.

  20. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  1. Microelectronics: Their Implications for Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audiovisual Instruction, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This two-part article indicates some probable characteristics of the microelectronics in the future and assesses implications of the microelectronics revolution for the methods and systems currently used in teaching and training. (CMV)

  2. CRRES microelectronics package flight data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Brucker, G. J.; Stauffer, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed in-depth analysis was performed on the data from some of the CRRES MEP (Microelectronics Package) devices. These space flight measurements covered a period of about fourteen months of mission lifetime. Several types of invalid data were identified and corrections were made. Other problems were noted and adjustments applied, as necessary. Particularly important and surprising were observations of abnormal device behavior in many parts that could neither be explained nor correlated to causative events. Also, contrary to prevailing theory, proton effects appeared to be far more significant and numerous than cosmic ray effects. Another unexpected result was the realization that only nine out of thirty-two p-MOS dosimeters on the MEP indicated a valid operation. Comments, conclusions, and recommendations are given.

  3. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 193 publications, 211 presentations, and 125 new technology reports and patents.

  4. Fundamentals of microelectronic equipment design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenashev, A. P.; Koledov, L. A.

    Microelectronic equipment design is reviewed with reference to general design principles and criteria, role of standardization, design of microcircuit components, and assembly techniques. Particular attention is given to the design of hybrid integrated circuitry and discrete radioelectronic components. Design methods for providing adequate temperature conditions and protection from humidity and mechanical overloads as well as component layout criteria are also discussed.

  5. Fundamentals of Microelectronics Processing (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a 15-week course in the fundamentals of microelectronics processing in chemical engineering, which emphasizes the use of very large scale integration (VLSI). Provides a listing of the topics covered in the course outline, along with a sample of some of the final projects done by students. (TW)

  6. Microelectronics and Computers in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meindl, James D.

    1982-01-01

    The use of microelectronics and computers in medicine is reviewed, focusing on medical research; medical data collection, storage, retrieval, and manipulation; medical decision making; computed tomography; ultrasonic imaging; role in clinical laboratories; and use as adjuncts for diagnostic tests, monitors of critically-ill patients, and with the…

  7. Launching a Programme on Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fothergill, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the priorities and problems in the development by the United Kingdom Department of Education and Science of a program to introduce microelectronic technology to elementary and secondary level students. The basic needs for program implementation, information support required for the program, inservice teacher training, and curriculum…

  8. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 technical report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center during 1990. The report lists 130 publications, 226 presentations, and 87 new technology reports and patents.

  9. Microelectronics in Education--A Changing Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Describes major program activities of Microelectronics Education Programme (MEP) for England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, which is designed to help schools prepare children for society with microelectronics. The core elements and potential consequences of the Microelectronics Support Unit, a follow-up to MEP which will conclude activities in…

  10. Materials Advances for Next-Generation Ingestible Electronic Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Electronic medical implants have collectively transformed the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, but have many inherent limitations. Electronic implants require invasive surgeries, operate in challenging microenvironments, and are susceptible to bacterial infection and persistent inflammation. Novel materials and nonconventional device fabrication strategies may revolutionize the way electronic devices are integrated with the body. Ingestible electronic devices offer many advantages compared with implantable counterparts that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies ranging from gastrointestinal infections to diabetes. This review summarizes current technologies and highlights recent materials advances. Specific focus is dedicated to next-generation materials for packaging, circuit design, and on-board power supplies that are benign, nontoxic, and even biodegradable. Future challenges and opportunities are also highlighted. PMID:26403162

  11. Insertion devices for the Advanced Light Source at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Savoy, R.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will be the first of the new generation of dedicated synchrotron light sources to be put into operation. Specially designed insertion devices will be required to realize the high brightness photon beams made possible by the low emittance of the electron beam. The complement of insertion devices on the ALS will include undulators with periods as short as 3.9 cm and one or more high field wigglers. The first device to be designed is a 5 m long, 5 cm period, hybrid undulator. The goal of very high brightness and high harmonic output imposes unusually tight tolerances on the magnetic field quality and thus on the mechanical structure. The design process, using a generic structure for all undulators, is described. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Applications of laser direct-write for embedding microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Ray C. Y.; Mathews, Scott A.

    2007-03-01

    The use of direct-write techniques might revolutionize the way microelectronic devices such as interconnects, passives, IC's, antennas, sensors and power sources are designed and fabricated. The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a laser-based microfabrication process for direct-writing the materials and components required for the assembly and interconnection of the above devices. This laser direct-write (LDW) technique is capable of operating in subtractive, additive, and transfer mode. In subtractive mode, the system operates as a laser micromachining workstation capable of achieving precise depth and surface roughness control. In additive mode, the system utilizes a laser-forward transfer process for the deposition of metals, oxides, polymers and composites under ambient conditions onto virtually any type of surface, thus functioning as a laser printer for patterns of electronic materials. Furthermore, in transfer mode, the system is capable of transferring individual devices, such as semiconductor bare die or surface mount devices, inside a trench or recess in a substrate, thus performing the same function of the pick-and-place machines used in circuit board manufacture. The use of this technique is ideally suited for the rapid prototyping of embedded microelectronic components and systems while allowing the overall circuit design and layout to be easily modified or adapted to any specific application or form factor. This paper describes the laser direct-write process as applied to the forward transfer of microelectronic devices.

  13. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  14. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  15. The Advanced Space Plant Culture Device with Live Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weibo; Zhang, Tao; Tong, Guanghui

    The live imaging techniques, including the color and fluorescent imags, are very important and useful for space life science. The advanced space plant culture Device (ASPCD) with live imaging Technique, developed for Chinese Spacecraft, would be introduced in this paper. The ASPCD had two plant experimental chambers. Three cameras (two color cameras and one fluorescent camera) were installed in the two chambers. The fluorescent camera could observe flowering genes, which were labeled by GFP. The lighting, nutrient, temperature controling and water recycling were all independent in each chamber. The ASPCD would beed applied to investigate for the growth and development of the high plant under microgravity conditions on board the Chinese Spacecraft.

  16. PREFACE: The Second Conference on Microelectronics, Microsystems and Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiopoulou, Androula G.; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Tsamis, Christos

    2005-01-01

    The Second Conference on Microelectronics, Microsystems and Nanotechnology took place at the National Centre for Scientific Research `Demokritos', in Athens, Greece, between 14 and 17 November 2004. The conference was organized by the Institute of Microelectronics (IMEL) with the aim to bring together scientists and engineers working in the above exciting fields in an interactive forum. The conference included 45 oral presentations with 9 invited papers and was attended by 146 participants from 16 countries. The topics covered were nanotechnologies, quantum devices, sensors, micro- and nano-systems, semiconductor devices, C-MOS fabrication and characterization techniques, new materials, and IC design. Quantum devices and nanostructured materials attracted considerable attention. Both theoretical and experimental studies of metallic and semiconducting quantum systems were presented, with emphasis on their applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and nanocrystal memory devices. Another exciting topic was the recent developments in biocompatible lithographic processes for applications in biosensors. In particular novel processes for bio-friendly lithography, together with innovations in Si sensors for applications in medicine and food industry were presented. Recent developments and perspectives in CMOS technology towards the ultimate limit were also discussed. The conference covered issues and concepts of IC design with two invited talks on RF design and cryptography.The conference included presentations from several companies active in the field of microelectronics and systems in Greece.

  17. Recent advances in conjugated polymers for light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  18. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymers for Light Emitting Devices

    PubMed Central

    AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  19. Advanced Silicon Solar Cell Device Physics and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceglie, Michael Gardner

    A fundamental challenge in the development and deployment of solar photovoltaic technology is a reduction in cost enabling direct competition with fossil-fuel-based energy sources. A key driver in this cost reduction is optimized device efficiency, because increased energy output leverages all photovoltaic system costs, from raw materials and module manufacturing to installation and maintenance. To continue progress toward higher conversion efficiencies, solar cells are being fabricated with increasingly complex designs, including engineered nanostructures, heterojunctions, and novel contacting and passivation schemes. Such advanced designs require a comprehensive and unified understanding of the optical and electrical device physics at the microscopic scale. This thesis focuses on a microscopic understanding of solar cell optoelectronic performance and its impact on cell optimization. We consider this in three solar cell platforms: thin-film crystalline silicon, amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions, and thin-film cells with nanophotonic light trapping. The work described in this thesis represents a powerful design paradigm, based on a detailed physical understanding of the mechanisms governing solar cell performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of understanding not just the individual mechanisms, but also their interactions. Such an approach to device optimization is critical for the efficiency and competitiveness of future generations of solar cells.

  20. PREFACE: E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, Symposium M: More than Moore: Novel materials approaches for functionalized Silicon based Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Christian; Fompeyrine, Jean; Vallée, Christophe; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    More than Moore explores a new area of Silicon based microelectronics, which reaches beyond the boundaries of conventional semiconductor applications. Creating new functionality to semiconductor circuits, More than Moore focuses on motivating new technological possibilities. In the past decades, the main stream of microelectronics progresses was mainly powered by Moore's law, with two focused development arenas, namely, IC miniaturization down to nano scale, and SoC based system integration. While the microelectronics community continues to invent new solutions around the world to keep Moore's law alive, there is increasing momentum for the development of 'More than Moore' technologies which are based on silicon technologies but do not simply scale with Moore's law. Typical examples are RF, Power/HV, Passives, Sensor/Actuator/MEMS or Bio-chips. The More than Moore strategy is driven by the increasing social needs for high level heterogeneous system integration including non-digital functions, the necessity to speed up innovative product creation and to broaden the product portfolio of wafer fabs, and the limiting cost and time factors of advanced SoC development. It is believed that More than Moore will add value to society on top of and beyond advanced CMOS with fast increasing marketing potentials. Important key challenges for the realization of the 'More than Moore' strategy are: perspective materials for future THz devices materials systems for embedded sensors and actuators perspective materials for epitaxial approaches material systems for embedded innovative memory technologies development of new materials with customized characteristics The Hot topics covered by the symposium M (More than Moore: Novel materials approaches for functionalized Silicon based Microelectronics) at E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, 14-18 May 2012 have been: development of functional ceramics thin films New dielectric materials for advanced microelectronics bio- and CMOS compatible

  1. The quantum hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Carl L.

    1995-02-01

    Quantum semiconductor devices are playing an increasingly important role in advanced microelectronic applications, including multiple-state logic and memory devices. To model quantum devices, the classical hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices can be extended to include O(h(2)) quantum corrections. This proposal focused on theoretical and computational investigations of the flow of electrons in semiconductor devices based on the quantum hydrodynamic model. The development of efficient, robots numerical methods for the QHD model in one and two spatial dimensions we also emphasized.

  2. Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J.

    1994-03-01

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T[sub c] superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO[sub 3]; and a third high T[sub c] superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions. 13 figures.

  3. Microelectronic superconducting crossover and coil

    DOEpatents

    Wellstood, Frederick C.; Kingston, John J.; Clarke, John

    1994-01-01

    A microelectronic component comprising a crossover is provided comprising a substrate, a first high T.sub.c superconductor thin film, a second insulating thin film comprising SrTiO.sub.3 ; and a third high T.sub.c superconducting film which has strips which crossover one or more areas of the first superconductor film. An in situ method for depositing all three films on a substrate is provided which does not require annealing steps and which can be opened to the atmosphere between depositions.

  4. Electrochemical planarization for microelectronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Bernhardt, A.F.

    1993-03-25

    The need for flatter and smoother surfaces (planarization) in microelectronic circuits increases as the number of metal levels in ultra large scale integrated (ULSI) circuits increases. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the authors have developed an electrochemical planarization process that fills vias and trenches with metal (without voids) and subsequently planarizes the surface. Use is made of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of SiO[sub 2] for the dielectric layers and electroplated copper for the metalization. This report describes the advantages of this process over existing techniques, possibilities for collaboration, and previous technology transfer.

  5. Electrochemical planarization for microelectronic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contolini, R. J.; Mayer, S. T.; Bernhardt, A. F.

    1993-03-01

    The need for flatter and smoother surfaces (planarization) in microelectronic circuits increases as the number of metal levels in ultra large scale integrated (ULSI) circuits increases. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the authors have developed an electrochemical planarization process that fills vias and trenches with metal (without voids) and subsequently planarizes the surface. Use is made of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of SiO2 for the dielectric layers and electroplated copper for the metalization. This report describes the advantages of this process over existing techniques, possibilities for collaboration, and previous technology transfer.

  6. Consistent low-field mobility modeling for advanced MOS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojević, Zlatan; Baumgartner, Oskar; Filipović, Lidija; Kosina, Hans; Karner, Markus; Kernstock, Christian; Prause, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we develop several extensions to semi-classical modeling of low-field mobility, which are necessary to treat planar and non-planar channel geometries on equal footing. We advance the state-of-the-art by generalizing the Prange-Nee model for surface roughness scattering to non-planar geometries, providing a fully numerical treatment of Coulomb scattering, and formulating the Kubo-Greenwood mobility model in a consistent, dimension-independent manner. These extensions allow meaningful comparison of planar and non-planar structures alike, and open the door to evaluating emerging device concepts, such as the FinFET or the junction-less transistor, on physical grounds.

  7. Control system for insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Oleg A.; Den Hartog, Patric; Moog, Elizabeth R.; Smith, Martin L.

    1997-07-01

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like 'open all IDs' are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed.

  8. Control system for insertion devices at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, O.A.; Den Hartog, P.; Moog, E.R.; Smith, M.L.

    1997-09-01

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like ``open all IDs`` are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed.

  9. Control system for insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, O.A.; Den Hartog, P.; Moog, E.R.; Smith, M.L.

    1997-07-01

    Eighteen insertion devices (IDs) are installed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and three more are scheduled for installation by the end of this year. A distributed control system for insertion devices at the APS storage ring was created with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The basic components of this system are operator interfaces (OPIs), input output controllers (IOCs), and a local area network that allows the OPI and IOC to communicate. The IOC operates under the VxWorks OS with an EPICS database and a sequencer. The sequencer runs an ID control program written in State Notation Language. The OPI is built with the EPICS tool MEDM and provides display screens with input and output fields and buttons for gap control of the IDs. Global commands like {open_quotes}open all IDs{close_quotes} are C-shell scripts invoked from the display menu. The algorithms for control and protection of the ID and ID vacuum chamber and the accuracy of gap control are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Evaluation of Advanced COTS Passive Devices for Extreme Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dones, Keishla R.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic sensors and circuits are often exposed to extreme temperatures in many of NASA deep space and planetary surface exploration missions. Electronics capable of operation in harsh environments would be beneficial as they simplify overall system design, relax thermal management constraints, and meet operational requirements. For example, cryogenic operation of electronic parts will improve reliability, increase energy density, and extend the operational lifetimes of space-based electronic systems. Similarly, electronic parts that are able to withstand and operate efficiently in high temperature environments will negate the need for thermal control elements and their associated structures, thereby reducing system size and weight, enhancing its reliability, improving its efficiency, and reducing cost. Passive devices play a critical role in the design of almost all electronic circuitry. To address the needs of systems for extreme temperature operation, some of the advanced and most recently introduced commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) passive devices, which included resistors and capacitors, were examined for operation under a wide temperature regime. The types of resistors investigated included high temperature precision film, general purpose metal oxide, and wirewound.

  11. Towards manufacturing of advanced logic devices by double-patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Chiew-seng; Halle, Scott; Holmes, Steven; Petrillo, Karen; Colburn, Matthew; van Dommelen, Youri; Jiang, Aiqin; Crouse, Michael; Dunn, Shannon; Hetzer, David; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Cantone, Jason; Huli, Lior; Rodgers, Martin; Martinick, Brian

    2011-04-01

    As reported previously, the IBM Alliance has established a DETO (Double-Expose-Track-Optimized) baseline, in collaboration with ASML, TEL, and CNSE, to evaluate commercially available DETO photoresist system for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. Although EUV lithography is the baseline strategy for <2x nm logic nodes, alternative techniques are still being pursued. The DETO technique produces pitch-split patterns capable of supporting 16 nm and 11 nm node semiconductor devices. We present the long-term monitoring performances of CD uniformity (CDU), overlay, and defectivity of our DETO process. CDU and overlay performances for controlled experiments are also presented. Two alignment schemes in DETO are compared experimentally for their effects on inter-level & intralevel overlays, and space CDU. We also experimented with methods for improving CDU, in which the CD-OptimizerTMand DoseMapperTM were evaluated separately and in tandem. Overlay improvements using the Correction Per Exposure (CPE) and the intra-field High-Order Process Correction (i-HOPC) were compared against the usual linear correction method. The effects of the exposure field size are also compared between a small field and the full field. Included in all the above, we also compare the performances derived from stack-integrated wafers and bare-Si wafers.

  12. Shielding considerations for satellite microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.C.; Drumm, C.R.; Roeske, S.B.; Scrivner, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Shielding for space microelectronics needs to provide an acceptable dose rate with minimum shield mass. The analysis presented here shows that the best approach is, in general, to use a graded-Z shield, with a high-Z layer sandwiched between two low-Z materials. A graded-Z shield is shown to reduce the electron dose rate by more than sixty percent over a single-material shield of the same areal density. For protons, the optimal shield would consist of a single, low-Z material layer. However, it is shown that a graded-Z shield is nearly as effective as a single-material shield, as long as a low-Z layer is located adjacent to the microelectronics. A specific shield design depends upon the details of the radiation environment, system model, design margins/levels, compatibility of shield materials, etc. Therefore, the authors present here general principles for designing effective shields and describe how the computer codes are used for this application.

  13. Semiconductor materials and microelectronic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesar, Edward S.

    Microminiaturization developments in IC systems have dramatically increased the reliability and performance of electronic components while reducing their physical size and power requirements; these advancements have pervasively affected weapons systems design efforts. Built-in self-test circuitry has greatly reduced maintenance problems and improved overall systems reliability. Increasing circuit complexity has also led to a major expansion of key military operational capabilities for reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition. It is expected that Si-based ICs will continue to dominate high power solid-state switches in hypervelocity projectiles and beam weapons, while GaAs will remain the most commonly employed material in microwave and mm-wave devices for EW, radars, smart weapons, and communications.

  14. Educational Implications of Microelectronics and Microprocessors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, N. D. C., Ed.

    This conference report explores microelectronic technology, its effect on educational methods and objectives, and its implications for educator responsibilities. Two main areas were considered: the significance of the likely impact of the large scale introduction of microprocessors and microelectronics on commercial and industrial processes, the…

  15. Development of the Microelectronic Education Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fothergill, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development of the Microelectronics Education Programme for England, Northern Ireland and Wales, including funding, aims, and relationships of the national program with local organizations. The program focuses on incorporating uses/effects of microelectronic technology into the total school curriculum and ways of using this…

  16. The Legacy of the Microelectronics Education Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Microelectronics Education Programme (MEP), a plan developed to help British secondary school students learn about microcomputers and the role of technology in society, and its successor, the Microelectronics Support Unit (MESU). Highlights include curriculum development, teacher training, computer assisted instruction and the…

  17. Relevance of microelectronic education to industrial needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, J. L.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The relevance of microelectronic education to industrial needs was evaluated, and four categories were surveyed: (1) facts and rules; (2) skills; (3) personality; and (4) deductive-inductive reasoning. Examples of specific items in each category are given to illustrate their meaning and it was indicated as to which items in each category are strongly impacted by microelectronics courses and laboratories.

  18. Advanced materials and concepts for energy storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Shiang Jen

    Over the last decade, technological progress and advances in the miniaturization of electronic devices have increased demands for light-weight, high-efficiency, and carbon-free energy storage devices. These energy storage devices are expected to play important roles in automobiles, the military, power plants, and consumer electronics. Two main types of electrical energy storage systems studied in this research are Li ion batteries and supercapacitors. Several promising solid state electrolytes and supercapacitor electrode materials are investigated in this research. The first section of this dissertation is focused on the novel results on pulsed laser annealing of Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO). LLZO powders with a tetragonal structure were prepared by a sol-gel technique, then a pulsed laser annealing process was employed to convert the tetragonal powders to cubic LLZO without any loss of lithium. The second section of the dissertation reports on how Li5La 3Nb2O12 (LLNO) was successfully synthesized via a novel molten salt synthesis (MSS) method at the relatively low temperature of 900°C. The low sintering temperature prevented the loss of lithium that commonly occurs during synthesis using conventional solid state or wet chemical reactions. The second type of energy storage device studied is supercapacitors. Currently, research on supercapacitors is focused on increasing their energy densities and lowering their overall production costs by finding suitable electrode materials. The third section of this dissertation details how carbonized woods electrodes were used as supercapacitor electrode materials. A high energy density of 45.6 Wh/kg and a high power density of 2000 W/kg were obtained from the supercapacitor made from carbonized wood electrodes. The high performance of the supercapacitor was discovered to originate from the hierarchical porous structures of the carbonized wood. Finally, the fourth section of this dissertation is on the electrochemical effects of

  19. 76 FR 48169 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... following public meeting: ``Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical... multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application and public...

  20. Lithography for enabling advances in integrated circuits and devices.

    PubMed

    Garner, C Michael

    2012-08-28

    Because the transistor was fabricated in volume, lithography has enabled the increase in density of devices and integrated circuits. With the invention of the integrated circuit, lithography enabled the integration of higher densities of field-effect transistors through evolutionary applications of optical lithography. In 1994, the semiconductor industry determined that continuing the increase in density transistors was increasingly difficult and required coordinated development of lithography and process capabilities. It established the US National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors and this was expanded in 1999 to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors to align multiple industries to provide the complex capabilities to continue increasing the density of integrated circuits to nanometre scales. Since the 1960s, lithography has become increasingly complex with the evolution from contact printers, to steppers, pattern reduction technology at i-line, 248 nm and 193 nm wavelengths, which required dramatic improvements of mask-making technology, photolithography printing and alignment capabilities and photoresist capabilities. At the same time, pattern transfer has evolved from wet etching of features, to plasma etch and more complex etching capabilities to fabricate features that are currently 32 nm in high-volume production. To continue increasing the density of devices and interconnects, new pattern transfer technologies will be needed with options for the future including extreme ultraviolet lithography, imprint technology and directed self-assembly. While complementary metal oxide semiconductors will continue to be extended for many years, these advanced pattern transfer technologies may enable development of novel memory and logic technologies based on different physical phenomena in the future to enhance and extend information processing. PMID:22802500

  1. Design of advanced ultrasonic transducers for welding devices.

    PubMed

    Parrini, L

    2001-11-01

    A new high frequency ultrasonic transducer has been conceived, designed, prototyped, and tested. In the design phase, an advanced approach was used and established. The method is based on an initial design estimate obtained with finite element method (FEM) simulations. The simulated ultrasonic transducers and resonators are then built and characterized experimentally through laser interferometry and electrical resonance spectra. The comparison of simulation results with experimental data allows the parameters of FEM models to be adjusted and optimized. The achieved FEM simulations exhibit a remarkably high predictive potential and allow full control of the vibration behavior of the transducer. The new transducer is mounted on a wire bonder with a flange whose special geometry was calculated by means of FEM simulations. This flange allows the transducer to be attached on the wire bonder, not only in longitudinal nodes, but also in radial nodes of the ultrasonic field excited in the horn. This leads to a total decoupling of the transducer to the wire bonder, which has not been achieved so far. The new approach to mount ultrasonic transducers on a welding device is of major importance, not only for wire bonding, but also for all high power ultrasound applications and has been patented. PMID:11800125

  2. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhiche, Mike; Dufera, Hiz; Montagna, Deb

    2012-10-29

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE‐EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven‐stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling‐up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke‐ unlimited Power Take‐Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  3. Carbon-ionogel supercapacitors for integrated microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Greg; Smith, Leland; Lau, Jonathan; Dunn, Bruce; Chui, Chi On

    2016-01-01

    To exceed the performance limits of dielectric capacitors in microelectronic circuit applications, we design and demonstrate on-chip coplanar electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), or supercapacitors, employing carbon-coated gold electrodes with ionogel electrolyte. The formation of carbon-coated microelectrodes is accomplished by solution processing and results in a ten-fold increase in EDLC capacitance compared to bare gold electrodes without carbon. At frequencies up to 10 Hz, an areal capacitance of 2.1 pF μm-2 is achieved for coplanar carbon-ionogel EDLCs with 10 μm electrode gaps and 0.14 mm2 electrode area. Our smallest devices, comprised of 5 μm electrode gaps and 80 μm2 of active electrode area, reach areal capacitance values of ˜0.3 pF μm-2 at frequencies up to 1 kHz, even without carbon. To our knowledge, these are the highest reported values to date for on-chip EDLCs with sub-mm2 areas. A physical EDLC model is developed through the use of computer-aided simulations for design exploration and optimization of coplanar EDLCs. Through modeling and comparison with experimental data, we highlight the importance of reducing the electrode gap and electrolyte resistance to achieve maximum performance from on-chip EDLCs.

  4. Micromechanical structures and microelectronics for acceleration sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Montague, S.; Smith, J.H.; Lemkin, M.

    1997-08-01

    MEMS is an enabling technology that may provide low-cost devices capable of sensing motion in a reliable and accurate manner. This paper describes work in MEMS accelerometer development at Sandia National Laboratories. This work leverages a process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronis circuitry of a MEMS accelerometer on the same chip. The design and test results of an integrated MEMS high-g accelerometer will be detailed. Additionally a design for a high-g fuse component (low-G or {approx} 25 G accelerometer) will be discussed in the paper (where 1 G {approx} 9.81 m/s). In particular, a design team at Sandia was assembled to develop a new micromachined silicon accelerometer which would be capable of surviving and measuring high-g shocks. Such a sensor is designed to be cheaper and more reliable than currently available sensors. A promising design for a suspended plate mass sensor was developed and the details of that design along with test data will be documented in the paper. Future development in this area at Sandia will focus on implementing accelerometers capable of measuring 200 kilo-g accelerations. Accelerometer development at Sandia will also focus on multi-axis acceleration measurement with integrated microelectronics.

  5. Carbon-ionogel supercapacitors for integrated microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Leung, Greg; Smith, Leland; Lau, Jonathan; Dunn, Bruce; Chui, Chi On

    2016-01-22

    To exceed the performance limits of dielectric capacitors in microelectronic circuit applications, we design and demonstrate on-chip coplanar electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs), or supercapacitors, employing carbon-coated gold electrodes with ionogel electrolyte. The formation of carbon-coated microelectrodes is accomplished by solution processing and results in a ten-fold increase in EDLC capacitance compared to bare gold electrodes without carbon. At frequencies up to 10 Hz, an areal capacitance of 2.1 pF μm(-2) is achieved for coplanar carbon-ionogel EDLCs with 10 μm electrode gaps and 0.14 mm(2) electrode area. Our smallest devices, comprised of 5 μm electrode gaps and 80 μm(2) of active electrode area, reach areal capacitance values of ∼0.3 pF μm(-2) at frequencies up to 1 kHz, even without carbon. To our knowledge, these are the highest reported values to date for on-chip EDLCs with sub-mm(2) areas. A physical EDLC model is developed through the use of computer-aided simulations for design exploration and optimization of coplanar EDLCs. Through modeling and comparison with experimental data, we highlight the importance of reducing the electrode gap and electrolyte resistance to achieve maximum performance from on-chip EDLCs. PMID:26650708

  6. Implications of Pb-free microelectronics assembly in aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, A. A.; Bonner, J. K.; Ogunseitan, D.; Saphores, J. D.; Schoenung, J.

    2003-01-01

    The commercial microelectronics industry is rapidly moving to completely Pb-free assembly strategies within the next decade. This trend is being driven by existing and proposed legislation in Europe and in Japan. The microelectronics industry has become truly global, as indicated by major U .S. firms who already adopted Pb-free implementation programs. Among these forward-looking firms are AT&T, IBM, Motorola, HP and Intel to name a few.Following Moore's law, advances in microelectronics are happening very rapidly. In many cases, commercial industry is ahead of the aerospace sector in technology. Progress by commercial industry, along with cost, drives the use of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) parts for military and space applications. We can thus anticipate that the aerospace industry will, at some point, be forced to use Pb-free components and subsystems as part of their standard business practices. In this paper we attempt to provide a snapshot of the commercial industry trends and how they may impact electronics in the aerospace environment. In addition, we also look at different strategies for implementation. Finally we present data collected on a recent NASA project to focus on finding suitable alternatives to eutectic tin-lead solders and solder pastes. The world is moving toward implementation of environmentally friendly manufacturing techniques. The aerospace industry will be forced to deal with issues related with Pb free assembly, either by availability or legislation. This paper provides some insight into some of the tradeoffs that should be considered.

  7. Sandia programs relevant to microelectronics fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, S.T.; Vook, F.L.; Gregory, B.L.

    1987-04-01

    This report was prepared for the Semiconductor Industry and the National Laboratories Workshop held at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, February 24, 1987. It details the current Sandia program activities relevant to microelectronics fabrication.

  8. Physical Limitations in Lithography for Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes techniques being used in the production of microelectronics kits which have replaced traditional optical lithography, including contact and optical projection printing, and X-ray and electron beam lithography. Also includes limitations of each technique described. (SK)

  9. Point-of-care (POC) devices by means of advanced MEMS.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Stanislav L; Tarhan, Mehmet C; Kudo, Lili C; Collard, Dominique; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have become an invaluable technology to advance the development of point-of-care (POC) devices for diagnostics and sample analyses. MEMS can transform sophisticated methods into compact and cost-effective microdevices that offer numerous advantages at many levels. Such devices include microchannels, microsensors, etc., that have been applied to various miniaturized POC products. Here we discuss some of the recent advances made in the use of MEMS devices for POC applications. PMID:26459443

  10. Using federal technology policy to strength the US microelectronics industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gover, J. E.; Gwyn, C. W.

    1994-07-01

    A review of US and Japanese experiences with using microelectronics consortia as a tool for strengthening their respective industries reveals major differences. Japan has established catch-up consortia with focused goals. These consortia have a finite life targeted from the beginning, and emphasis is on work that supports or leads to product and process-improvement-driven commercialization. Japan's government has played a key role in facilitating the development of consortia and has used consortia promote domestic competition. US consortia, on the other hand, have often emphasized long-range research with considerably less focus than those in Japan. The US consortia have searched for and often made revolutionary technology advancements. However, technology transfer to their members has been difficult. Only SEMATECH has assisted its members with continuous improvements, compressing product cycles, establishing relationships, and strengthening core competencies. The US government has not been a catalyst nor provided leadership in consortia creation and operation. We propose that in order to regain world leadership in areas where US companies lag foreign competition, the US should create industry-wide, horizontal-vertical, catch-up consortia or continue existing consortia in the six areas where the US lags behind Japan -- optoelectronics, displays, memories, materials, packaging, and manufacturing equipment. In addition, we recommend that consortia be established for special government microelectronics and microelectronics research integration and application. We advocate that these consortia be managed by an industry-led Microelectronics Alliance, whose establishment would be coordinated by the Department of Commerce. We further recommend that the Semiconductor Research Corporation, the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers, and relevant elements of other federal programs be integrated into this consortia complex.

  11. Using federal technology policy to strength the US microelectronics industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, J.E.; Gwyn, C.W.

    1994-07-01

    A review of US and Japanese experiences with using microelectronics consortia as a tool for strengthening their respective industries reveals major differences. Japan has established catch-up consortia with focused goals. These consortia have a finite life targeted from the beginning, and emphasis is on work that supports or leads to product and process-improvement-driven commercialization. Japan`s government has played a key role in facilitating the development of consortia and has used consortia promote domestic competition. US consortia, on the other hand, have often emphasized long-range research with considerably less focus than those in Japan. The US consortia have searched for and often made revolutionary technology advancements. However, technology transfer to their members has been difficult. Only SEMATECH has assisted its members with continuous improvements, compressing product cycles, establishing relationships, and strengthening core competencies. The US government has not been a catalyst nor provided leadership in consortia creation and operation. We propose that in order to regain world leadership in areas where US companies lag foreign competition, the US should create industry-wide, horizontal-vertical, catch-up consortia or continue existing consortia in the six areas where the US lags behind Japan -- optoelectronics, displays, memories, materials, packaging, and manufacturing equipment. In addition, we recommend that consortia be established for special government microelectronics and microelectronics research integration and application. We advocate that these consortia be managed by an industry-led Microelectronics Alliance, whose establishment would be coordinated by the Department of Commerce. We further recommend that the Semiconductor Research Corporation, the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Centers, and relevant elements of other federal programs be integrated into this consortia complex.

  12. Monitoring vibrations in microelectronics facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, John J.

    1992-02-01

    A PC based vibration monitoring system can be an effective tool for the prevention and diagnosis of vibration related problems in microelectronics facilities. The computing and storage power of present day PC''s, coupled with the availability of high speed data acquisition plug-in boards, allows for the creation of a powerful but low cost system. The low frequency content motion typical of buildings that support sensitive tools can be exploited by multiplexing multiple signals into a single A/D converter. By doing that, many channels of data can be monitored by a single PC without a proportional rise in system cost. Programmable A/D boards and multiplexers can be controlled by a user through the PC to provide flexibility in obtaining data samples. Once available to the PC, there is great flexibility to examine, modify, display and save data. The functions to control the system and handle the data can be integrated into a single program accessible to facility engineers. By separating the various monitoring functions into library of high level commands, a customized monitoring regimen can be assembled for each application. Commercially available software for managing and displaying data can greatly decrease development costs in the creation of such a system.

  13. Integrated microelectronics for smart textiles.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Christl; Glaser, Rupert; Savio, Domnic; Schnell, Markus; Weber, Werner

    2005-01-01

    The combination of textile fabrics with microelectronics will lead to completely new applications, thus achieving elements of ambient intelligence. The integration of sensor or actuator networks, using fabrics with conductive fibres as a textile motherboard enable the fabrication of large active areas. In this paper we describe an integration technology for the fabrication of a "smart textile" based on a wired peer-to-peer network of microcontrollers with integrated sensors or actuators. A self-organizing and fault-tolerant architecture is accomplished which detects the physical shape of the network. Routing paths are formed for data transmission, automatically circumventing defective or missing areas. The network architecture allows the smart textiles to be produced by reel-to-reel processes, cut into arbitrary shapes subsequently and implemented in systems at low installation costs. The possible applications are manifold, ranging from alarm systems to intelligent guidance systems, passenger recognition in car seats, air conditioning control in interior lining and smart wallpaper with software-defined light switches. PMID:16282655

  14. Development of a micropump for microelectronic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Adkins, D.R.; Chu, Dahwey

    1996-10-01

    To demonstrate a system integration process for Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), we are building an active cooling MEMS unit for microelectronics applications. This integrated unit will incorporate a micropump, temperature sensors, microchannels, and heat exchange devices into a single unit. The first phase of this research project is to develop and test a micropump capable of moving the working fluid within the integrated device. This paper will discuss the design, development, testing, and evaluation of a micropump concept. The micropump which was developed is an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) injection pump. Fabrication of the pump was accomplished using laser micromachining technology, and two initial designs were examined for full fabrication. The first design has two silicon parts stacked vertically on top of each other. Gold is deposited on one side of each stacked plate to serve as electrodes for the electrohydrodynamic pump. A Nd:YAG laser is used to drill an array of circular holes in the {open_quotes}well{close_quotes} region of both silicon parts, leaving an open pathway for fluid movement. Next the silicon parts are aligned and bonded together, thus becoming a EHD pump. Fluid flow has been observed when an electric voltage is applied across the electrodes. The second design has the silicon parts which contain the flow grid oriented {open_quotes}back-to-back{close_quotes} and bonded together. This {open_quotes}back-to-back{close_quotes} design has a shorter grid distance between the anode and cathode plates so that a smaller voltage is required for pumping. Preliminary results from laboratory experiments have demonstrated that this EHD micropump design can achieve a pressure head of about 287 Pa with an applied voltage of 120 V.

  15. Optical packaging activities at Institute of Microelectronics (IME), Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Keng-Hwa; Sudharsanam, Krishnamachari; Pamidighantam, Ramana V.; Yeo, Yongkee; Iyer, Mahadevan K.

    2002-08-01

    The development of optoelectronic components for gigabit Ethernet communications is converging towards access networks where the cost of device makes a significant impact on the market acceptance. Device fabrication and packaging cost have to be brought down with novel assembly and packaging methods. Singapore has established a reputation in semiconductor device development and fabrication with excellent process and packaging facilities. Institute of Microelectronics (IME) was founded in 1991 to add value to the Singapore electronics industry. IME is involved in the development of active and passive photonics components using Silicon and polymer materials. We present a brief report on the development activities taking place in the field of optical component packaging at IME in recent years. We present a review of our competence and some of the optical device packaging activities that are being undertaken.

  16. Advanced methods for controlling untethered magnetic devices using rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Arthur W., Jr.

    This dissertation presents results documenting advancements on the control of untethered magnetic devices, such as magnetic "microrobots" and magnetically actuated capsule endoscopes, motivated by problems in minimally invasive medicine. This dissertation focuses on applying rotating magnetic fields for magnetic manipulation. The contributions include advancements in the way that helical microswimmers (devices that mimic the propulsion of bacterial flagella) are controlled in the presence of gravitational forces, advancements in ways that groups of untethered magnetic devices can be differentiated and semi-independently controlled, advancements in the way that untethered magnetic device can be controlled with a single rotating permanent magnet, and an improved understanding in the nature of the magnetic force applied to an untethered device by a rotating magnet.

  17. Microelectronic components and metallic oxide studies and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The project involved work in two basic areas: (1) Evaluation of commercial screen printable thick film conductors, resistors, thermistors and dielectrics as well as alumina substrates used in hybird microelectronics industries. Results of tests made on materials produced by seven companies are presented. (2) Experimental studies on metallic oxides of copper and vanadium, in an effort to determine their electrochemical properties in crystalline, powder mixtures and as screen printable thick films constituted the second phase of the research effort. Oxide investigations were aimed at finding possible applications of these materials as switching devices memory elements and sensors.

  18. The Microelectronics Education Programme--Dissemination and Diffusion of Microelectronics Technology in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, J. A.; Anderson, J. S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the Microelectronics Education Programme, a development program which embodies the building of a springboard for the dissemination of microelectronic innovations that will benefit education. Springboard activities discussed in detail include information dissemination through regional information centers, inservice teacher training, and…

  19. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Philip R.

    2011-09-27

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics device design projects to scale up the current Ocean Power Technology PowerBuoy from 150kW to 500kW.

  20. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  1. HeartWare left ventricular assist device for the treatment of advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Jasmin S; Rojas, Sebastian V; Avsar, Murat; Bara, Christoph; Ismail, Issam; Haverich, Axel; Schmitto, Jan D

    2016-01-01

    The importance of mechanical circulatory support in the therapy of advanced heart failure is steadily growing. The rapid developments in the field of mechanical support are characterized by continuous miniaturization and enhanced performance of the assist devices, providing increased pump durability and prolonged patient survival. The HeartWare left ventricular assist device system (HeartWare Inc., Framingham, MA, USA) is a mechanical ventricular assist device with over 8000 implantations worldwide. Compared with other available assist devices it is smaller in size and used in a broad range of patients. The possibility of minimally invasive procedures is one of the major benefits of the device - allowing implants and explants, as well as exchanges of the device with reduced surgical impact. We present here a review of the existing literature on the treatment of advanced heart failure using the HeartWare left ventricular assist device system. PMID:26597386

  2. Micromachined sensor and actuator research at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S.; Rodriguez, J.L.; Smith, B.K.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    An overview of the major sensor and actuator projects using the micromachining capabilities of the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of micromechanical devices and control electronics for those devices. Surface micromachining is the predominant technology under development. Pressure sensors based on silicon nitride diaphragms have been developed. Hot polysilicon filaments for calorimetric gas sensing have been developed. Accelerometers based upon high-aspect ratio surface micromachining are under development. Actuation mechanisms employing either electrostatic or steam power are being combined with a three-level active (plus an additional passive level) polysilicon surface micromachining process to couple these actuators to external devices. Results of efforts toward integration of micromechanics with the driving electronics for actuators or the amplification/signal processing electronics for sensors is also described. This effort includes a tungsten metallization process to allow the CMOS electronics to withstand high-temperature micromechanical processing.

  3. Devices in the management of advanced, chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, William T.; Smith, Sakima A.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a global phenomenon, and the overall incidence and prevalence of the condition are steadily increasing. Medical therapies have proven efficacious, but only a small number of pharmacological options are in development. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy, cardiac resynchronization therapy has been shown to improve symptoms, reduce hospitalizations, promote reverse remodelling, and decrease mortality. However, challenges remain in identifying the ideal recipients for this therapy. The field of mechanical circulatory support has seen immense growth since the early 2000s, and left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have transitioned over the past decade from large, pulsatile devices to smaller, more-compact, continuous-flow devices. Infections and haematological issues are still important areas that need to be addressed. Whereas LVADs were once approved only for ‘bridge to transplantation’, these devices are now used as destination therapy for critically ill patients with HF, allowing these individuals to return to the community. A host of novel strategies, including cardiac contractility modulation, implantable haemodynamic-monitoring devices, and phrenic and vagus nerve stimulation, are under investigation and might have an impact on the future care of patients with chronic HF. PMID:23229137

  4. MovAid- a novel device for advanced rehabilitation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prashant; Verma, Piyush; Gupta, Rakesh; Verma, Bhawna

    2015-08-01

    The present article introduces a new device "MovAid" which helps to measure and monitor rehabilitation. It has two main components- "MovAid device" and the "MovAid Smart Phone Application". The device connects wirelessly to the MovAid smart phone application via Bluetooth. It has electronic sensors to measure three important parameters of the patient- Angle of Joint Bent, Lift from the ground and Orientation of the limb. A mono-axis flex sensor to measure the degree of joint bent and a 3-axis accelerometer and gyroscope to measure the orientation of the limb and lift from the ground have been used. MovAid system bridges the gap between caretakers and patients, empowering both in ways never thought of before, by providing detailed and accurate data on every move. PMID:26737332

  5. Advances in dental local anesthesia techniques and devices: An update

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Payal; Gupta, Saurabh K.; Newaskar, Vilas; Chandra, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Although local anesthesia remains the backbone of pain control in dentistry, researches are going to seek new and better means of managing the pain. Most of the researches are focused on improvement in the area of anesthetic agents, delivery devices and technique involved. Newer technologies have been developed that can assist the dentist in providing enhanced pain relief with reduced injection pain and fewer adverse effects. This overview will enlighten the practicing dentists regarding newer devices and methods of rendering pain control comparing these with the earlier used ones on the basis of research and clinical studies available. PMID:24163548

  6. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Toth, Gabor G; Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  7. Novel device-based interventional strategies for advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    While heart failure is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity, our tools to provide ultimate treatment solutions are still limited. Recent developments in new devices are designed to fill this therapeutic gap. The scope of this review is to focus on two particular targets, namely (1) left ventricular geometric restoration and (2) atrial depressurization. (1) Reduction of the wall stress by shrinking the ventricular cavity has been traditionally attempted surgically. Recently, the Parachute device (CardioKinetix Inc., Menlo Park, CA, USA) has been introduced to restore ventricular geometry and cardiac mechanics. The intervention aims to partition distal dysfunctional segments that are non-contributory to the ventricular mechanics and forward cardiac output. (2) Diastolic heart failure is characterized by abnormal relaxation and chamber stiffness. The main therapeutic goal achieved should be the reduction of afterload and diastolic pressure load. Recently, new catheter-based approaches were proposed to reduce left atrial pressure and ventricular decompression: the InterAtrial Shunt Device (IASD™) (Corvia Medical Inc., Tewksbury, MA, USA) and the V-Wave Shunt (V-Wave Ltd, Or Akiva, Israel). Both are designed to create a controlled atrial septal defect in symptomatic patients with heart failure. While the assist devices are aimed at end-stage heart failure, emerging device-based percutaneous or minimal invasive techniques comprise a wide spectrum of innovative concepts that target ventricular remodeling, cardiac contractility or neuro-humoral modulation. The clinical adoption is in the early stages of the initial feasibility and safety studies, and clinical evidence needs to be gathered in appropriately designed clinical trials. PMID:26966444

  8. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  9. BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

    2010-11-01

    This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

  10. Advanced investigation of two-phase charge-coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosonocky, W. F.; Carnes, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of experimental two phase, charge-coupled shift registers constructed using polysilicon gates overlapped by aluminum gates was studied. Shift registers with 64, 128, and 500 stages were built and operated. Devices were operated at the maximum clock frequency of 20 MHz. Loss per transfer of less than .0001 was demonstrated for fat zero operation. The effect upon transfer efficiency of various structural and materials parameters was investigated including substrate orientation, resistivity, and conductivity type; channel width and channel length; and method of channel confinement. Operation of the devices with and without fat zero was studied as well as operation in the complete charge transfer mode and the bias charge, or bucket brigade mode.

  11. Breakthrough: micro-electronic photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin

    2014-06-23

    Sandia developed tiny glitter-sized photovoltaic (PV) cells that could revolutionize solar energy collection. The crystalline silicon micro-PV cells will be cheaper and have greater efficiencies than current PV collectors. Micro-PV cells require relatively little material to form well-controlled, highly efficient devices. Cell fabrication uses common microelectric and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques.

  12. Breakthrough: micro-electronic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin

    2012-04-23

    Sandia developed tiny glitter-sized photovoltaic (PV) cells that could revolutionize solar energy collection. The crystalline silicon micro-PV cells will be cheaper and have greater efficiencies than current PV collectors. Micro-PV cells require relatively little material to form well-controlled, highly efficient devices. Cell fabrication uses common microelectric and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques.

  13. Active microelectronic neurosensor arrays for implantable brain communication interfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, Y-K; Borton, D A; Park, S; Patterson, W R; Bull, C W; Laiwalla, F; Mislow, J; Simeral, J D; Donoghue, J P; Nurmikko, A V

    2009-08-01

    We have built a wireless implantable microelectronic device for transmitting cortical signals transcutaneously. The device is aimed at interfacing a cortical microelectrode array to an external computer for neural control applications. Our implantable microsystem enables 16-channel broadband neural recording in a nonhuman primate brain by converting these signals to a digital stream of infrared light pulses for transmission through the skin. The implantable unit employs a flexible polymer substrate onto which we have integrated ultra-low power amplification with analog multiplexing, an analog-to-digital converter, a low power digital controller chip, and infrared telemetry. The scalable 16-channel microsystem can employ any of several modalities of power supply, including radio frequency by induction, or infrared light via photovoltaic conversion. As of the time of this report, the implant has been tested as a subchronic unit in nonhuman primates ( approximately 1 month), yielding robust spike and broadband neural data on all available channels. PMID:19502132

  14. Active Microelectronic Neurosensor Arrays for Implantable Brain Communication Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Y.-K.; Borton, D. A.; Park, S.; Patterson, W. R.; Bull, C. W.; Laiwalla, F.; Mislow, J.; Simeral, J. D.; Donoghue, J. P.; Nurmikko, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    We have built a wireless implantable microelectronic device for transmitting cortical signals transcutaneously. The device is aimed at interfacing a microelectrode array cortical to an external computer for neural control applications. Our implantable microsystem enables presently 16-channel broadband neural recording in a non-human primate brain by converting these signals to a digital stream of infrared light pulses for transmission through the skin. The implantable unit employs a flexible polymer substrate onto which we have integrated ultra-low power amplification with analog multiplexing, an analog-to-digital converter, a low power digital controller chip, and infrared telemetry. The scalable 16-channel microsystem can employ any of several modalities of power supply, including via radio frequency by induction, or infrared light via a photovoltaic converter. As of today, the implant has been tested as a sub-chronic unit in non-human primates (~ 1 month), yielding robust spike and broadband neural data on all available channels. PMID:19502132

  15. Recent advances in spintronics for emerging memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seung H.

    2008-09-01

    The emerging field of spintronics has the potential to bring game-changing opportunities to nanoelectronic technologies far beyond its traditional contribution to mass storage applications such as hard disk drives. The value proposition is timely since the dominant semiconductor industry is in pursuit of “More-than-Moore” to extend the technology roadmap or to create functional diversifications through enhanced system platforms. This article overviews a promising spintronic device in conjunction with recent breakthroughs in tunnel magnetoresistance and spin-transfer-torque magnetization switching.

  16. Uses of ceramics in microelectronics: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratschun, W. R.; Mountvala, A. J.; Pincus, A. G.

    1971-01-01

    The properties and behavior of ceramic materials used in components for electronic circuitry are examined to appraise the present and future directions for microelectronics, and to suggest further product development, and how innovations may be useful in other technologies. Ceramic and glass insulators, resistors, capacitors, and the use of ceramics and glasses in microcircuitry are discussed along with technology transfer to nonaerospace uses.

  17. About the Scottish Microelectronics Development Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scottish Microelectronics Development Programme, Glasgow.

    Activities of the Scottish Microelectronics Development Programme (SMDP) related to the introduction and coordination of educational microcomputing in Scotland from 1980 to February 1984 are described. The background of the program is outlined, and it is noted that SMDP has become a division of the Scottish Council for Educational Technology…

  18. Teaching and Learning in a Microelectronic Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shane, Harold G.

    General background information on microtechnologies with implications for educators provides an introduction to this review of past and current developments in microelectronics and specific ways in which the microchip is permeating society, creating problems and opportunities both in the workplace and the home. Topics discussed in the first of two…

  19. Education, Computers and Micro-Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, R.

    1981-01-01

    Traces general educational changes over the last 20 years, summarizes past and present uses of computers in education, and identifies the impact microelectronics will have on present and future education. Discusses vocational training, availability of inexpensive educational resources, teaching methods, and teacher education. (DC)

  20. Microelectronics used for Semiconductor Imaging Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Heijne, Erik H. M.

    2010-01-05

    Semiconductor crystal technology, microelectronics developments and nuclear particle detection have been in a relation of symbiosis, all the way from the beginning. The increase of complexity in electronics chips can now be applied to obtain much more information on the incident nuclear radiation. Some basic technologies are described, in order to acquire insight in possibilities and limitations for the most recent detectors.

  1. Problems in CEMA microelectronic cooperation noted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, J.; Kusinski, J.

    1983-10-01

    The development and market trends of products, which use large scale integrated circuits are discussed. Products such as pocket calculators, electronic wrist watches, telephones, and automobiles are used to illustrate the economic results of market saturation with specialized integrated circuits. The status of microelectronics in socialist countries in Europe is addressed.

  2. CEMA cooperation in microelectronics research, production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-03-01

    The assignments resulting from an agreement concerning multilateral specialization and cooperation among European socialist countries in the development and production of microelectronic components for computer technology are enumerated. Several areas which impact directly on the manufacture of large scale and very large scale integrated components are identified.

  3. River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials (River DREAM)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Daniel P.

    2013-07-03

    The purpose of this project is to develop a generator called a Galloping Hydroelectric Energy Extraction Device (GHEED). It uses a galloping prism to convert water flow into linear motion. This motion is converted into electricity via a dielectric elastomer generator (DEG). The galloping mechanism and the DEG are combined to create a system to effectively generate electricity. This project has three research objectives: 1. Oscillator development and design a. Characterize galloping behavior, evaluate control surface shape change on oscillator performance and demonstrate shape change with water flow change. 2. Dielectric Energy Generator (DEG) characterization and modeling a. Characterize and model the performance of the DEG based on oscillator design 3. Galloping Hydroelectric Energy Extraction Device (GHEED) system modeling and integration a. Create numerical models for construction of a system performance model and define operating capabilities for this approach Accomplishing these three objectives will result in the creation of a model that can be used to fully define the operating parameters and performance capabilities of a generator based on the GHEED design. This information will be used in the next phase of product development, the creation of an integrated laboratory scale generator to confirm model predictions.

  4. Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard; Mahorter, Robert G.; Siergiej, Richard; Link, Samuel D.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Belanger, Sean J.; Fourspring, Patrick; Murray, Susan; Newman, Fred; Taylor, Dan; Rahmlow, Tom

    2005-02-06

    Advanced thermophotovoltaic (TPV) modules capable of producing > 0.3 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 22% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1228 K and 325 K, respectively, have been made. These advanced TPV modules are projected to produce > 0.9 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 24% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1373 K and 325 K, respectively. Radioisotope and nuclear (fission) powered space systems utilizing these advanced TPV modules have been evaluated. For a 100 We radioisotope TPV system, systems utilizing as low as 2 general purpose heat source (GPHS) units are feasible, where the specific power for the 2 and 3 GPHS unit systems operating in a 200 K environment is as large as {approx} 16 We/kg and {approx} 14 We/kg, respectively. For a 100 kWe nuclear powered (as was entertained for the thermoelectric SP-100 program) TPV system, the minimum system radiator area and mass is {approx} 640 m2 and {approx} 1150 kg, respectively, for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 435 K and 200 K, respectively. Also, for a converter radiator temperature of 1373 K, the converter volume and mass remains less than 0.36 m3 and 640 kg, respectively. Thus, the minimum system radiator + converter (reactor and shield not included) specific mass is {approx} 16 kg/kWe for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 425 K and 200 K, respectively. Under this operating condition, the reactor thermal rating is {approx} 1110 kWt. Due to the large radiator area, the added complexity and mission risk needs to be weighed against reducing the reactor thermal rating to determine the feasibility of using TPV for space nuclear (fission) power systems.

  5. Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsman, Bernard; Mahorter, Robert G.; Siergiej, Richard; Link, Samuel D.; Wehrer, Rebecca J.; Belanger, Sean J.; Fourspring, Patrick; Murray, Susan; Newman, Fred; Taylor, Dan; Rahmlow, Tom

    2005-02-01

    Advanced thermophotovoltaic (TPV) modules capable of producing > 0.3 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 22% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1228 K and 325 K, respectively, have been made. These advanced TPV modules are projected to produce > 0.9 W/cm2 at an efficiency > 24% while operating at a converter radiator and module temperature of 1373 K and 325 K, respectively. Radioisotope and nuclear (fission) powered space systems utilizing these advanced TPV modules have been evaluated. For a 100 We radioisotope TPV system, systems utilizing as low as 2 general purpose heat source (GPHS) units are feasible, where the specific power for the 2 and 3 GPHS unit systems operating in a 200 K environment is as large as ˜ 16 We/kg and ˜ 14 We/kg, respectively. For a 100 kWe nuclear powered (as was entertained for the thermoelectric SP-100 program) TPV system, the minimum system radiator area and mass is ˜ 640 m2 and ˜ 1150 kg, respectively, for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 435 K and 200 K, respectively. Also, for a converter radiator temperature of 1373 K, the converter volume and mass remains less than 0.36 m3 and 640 kg, respectively. Thus, the minimum system radiator + converter (reactor and shield not included) specific mass is ˜ 16 kg/kWe for a converter radiator, system radiator and environment temperature of 1373 K, 425 K and 200 K, respectively. Under this operating condition, the reactor thermal rating is ˜ 1110 kWt. Due to the large radiator area, the added complexity and mission risk needs to be weighed against reducing the reactor thermal rating to determine the feasibility of using TPV for space nuclear (fission) power systems.

  6. Genetically Engineered Microelectronic Infrared Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Klimeck, Gerhard

    1998-01-01

    A genetic algorithm is used for design of infrared filters and in the understanding of the material structure of a resonant tunneling diode. These two components are examples of microdevices and nanodevices that can be numerically simulated using fundamental mathematical and physical models. Because the number of parameters that can be used in the design of one of these devices is large, and because experimental exploration of the design space is unfeasible, reliable software models integrated with global optimization methods are examined The genetic algorithm and engineering design codes have been implemented on massively parallel computers to exploit their high performance. Design results are presented for the infrared filter showing new and optimized device design. Results for nanodevices are presented in a companion paper at this workshop.

  7. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  8. Advanced Silicon Photonic Device Architectures for Optical Communications: Proposals and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacher, Wesley David

    Photonic integrated circuits implemented on silicon (Si) hold the potential for densely integrated electro-optic and passive devices manufactured by the high-volume fabrication and sophisticated assembly processes used for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) electronics. However, high index contrast Si photonics has a number of functional limitations. In this thesis, several devices are proposed, designed, and experimentally demonstrated to overcome challenges in the areas of resonant modulation, waveguide loss, fiber-to-chip coupling, and polarization control. The devices were fabricated using foundry services at IBM and A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics (IME). First, we describe coupling modulated microrings, in which the coupler between a microring and the bus waveguide is modulated. The device circumvents the modulation bandwidth vs. resonator linewidth trade-off of conventional intracavity modulated microrings. We demonstrate a Si coupling modulated microring with a small-signal modulation response free of the parasitic resonator linewidth limitations at frequencies up to about 6x the linewidth. Comparisons of eye diagrams show that coupling modulation achieved data rates > 2x the rate attainable with intracavity modulation. Second, we demonstrate a silicon nitride (Si3N4)-on-Si photonic platform with independent Si3N4 and Si waveguides and taper transitions to couple light between the layers. The platform combines the excellent passive waveguide properties of Si3N4 and the compatibility of Si waveguides with electro-optic devices. Within the platform, we propose and demonstrate dual-level, Si3N 4-on-Si, fiber-to-chip grating couplers that simultaneously have wide bandwidths and high coupling efficiencies. Conventional Si and Si3N 4 grating couplers suffer from a trade-off between bandwidth and coupling efficiency. The dual-level grating coupler achieved a peak coupling efficiency of -1.3 dB and a 1-dB bandwidth of 80 nm, a record for the

  9. Advanced materials development for multi-junction monolithic photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, L.R.; Reno, J.L.

    1996-07-01

    We report results in three areas of research relevant to the fabrication of monolithic multi-junction photovoltaic devices. (1) The use of compliant intervening layers grown between highly mismatched materials, GaAs and GaP (same lattice constant as Si), is shown to increase the structural quality of the GaAs overgrowth. (2) The use of digital alloys applied to the MBE growth of GaAs{sub x}Sb{sub l-x} (a candidate material for a two junction solar cell) provides increased control of the alloy composition without degrading the optical properties. (3) A nitrogen plasma discharge is shown to be an excellent p-type doping source for CdTe and ZnTe, both of which are candidate materials for a two junction solar cell.

  10. Detecting corrosion in plastic encapsulated micro-electronics packages

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, N.R.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

    1998-08-01

    In the past, most defense microelectronics components were packaged in ceramic, hermetic enclosures. PEMs are not hermetic because the plastic molding compounds are permeable to moisture. This lack of hermeticity creates an unknown liability, especially with respect to corrosion of the metallization features. This potential liability must be addressed to ensure long-term reliability of these systems is maintained under conditions of long-term dormant storage. However, the corrosion process is difficult to monitor because it occurs under the encapsulating plastic and is therefore not visible. The authors have developed techniques that allow them to study corrosion of Al bondpads and traces under relevant atmospheric corrosion conditions. The cornerstone of this capability is the ATC 2.6, a microelectronic test device designed at Sandia National Laboratories. Corrosion tests were performed by exposing test chips to aggressive environments. The electrical response of the ATC indicated an increase in bondpad resistance with exposure time. Note that the change in resistance is not uniform from one bondpad to another. This illustrates the stochastic nature of the corrosion process. The change in resistance correlated with visual observation of corrosion of the bondpads on the unencapsulated test chips.

  11. Leveraging Microelectronics Research to Enable A Smarter Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Timothy J.

    2009-10-01

    Over the course of the last fifty years, the microelectronics industry has made tremendous strides in the development and manufacturing of ever more complex integrated circuits (IC). These circuits have typically been applied to the information technology (IT) industry and have driven improvements in the computational power per dollar of many orders of magnitude. Part of the ``toolbox'' of skills acquired to produce integrated circuits is the ability to form desired patterns at ever decreasing sizes. The minimum controllable feature size has been reduced by six orders of magnitude (from millimeters to nanometers) during the last fifty years. With feature sizes rapidly approaching 10nm, the conventional silicon IC industry is nearing a threshold with the end of conventional silicon scaling approaching. Research today focuses on new device structure to replace the CMOS FET as the engine of the IT industry. A very exciting research area today is the concept of taking the skill-set acquired from IC research, development, and manufacturing, and applying those skills into new domains where they can enable a ``smarter planet''. These new domains include areas such as energy, water, and health care / life sciences. All of these are outside of the traditional IT focus for microelectronics research, yet, the new ``smarter planet'' domains may form the basis for future industries. This presentation will look at the evolution of IBM's research model and focus, shifting from one solely focused on IT, to one that compliments IT research with Smarter Planet domains.

  12. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited; exceptions. 381.131 Section... Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance approval prohibited... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label...

  13. Advanced numerical methods and software approaches for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    CAREY,GRAHAM F.; PARDHANANI,A.L.; BOVA,STEVEN W.

    2000-03-23

    In this article the authors concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to drift-dominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the drift-diffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of upwind and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter-Gummel approach, Petrov-Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), entropy variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of the methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. They have included numerical examples from the recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and they emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, they briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.

  14. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  15. Micro-Electronic Nose System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zee, Frank C.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to "smell" various gas vapors and complex odors is important for many applications such as environmental monitoring for detecting toxic gases as well as quality control in the processing of food, cosmetics, and other chemical products for commercial industries. Mimicking the architecture of the biological nose, a miniature electronic nose system was designed and developed consisting of an array of sensor devices, signal-processing circuits, and software pattern-recognition algorithms. The array of sensors used polymer/carbon-black composite thin-films, which would swell or expand reversibly and reproducibly and cause a resistance change upon exposure to a wide variety of gases. Two types of sensor devices were fabricated using silicon micromachining techniques to form "wells" that confined the polymer/carbon-black to a small and specific area. The first type of sensor device formed the "well" by etching into the silicon substrate using bulk micromachining. The second type built a high-aspect-ratio "well" on the surface of a silicon wafer using SU-8 photoresist. Two sizes of "wells" were fabricated: 500 x 600 mum² and 250 x 250 mum². Custom signal-processing circuits were implemented on a printed circuit board and as an application-specific integrated-circuit (ASIC) chip. The circuits were not only able to measure and amplify the small resistance changes, which corresponded to small ppm (parts-per-million) changes in gas concentrations, but were also adaptable to accommodate the various characteristics of the different thin-films. Since the thin-films were not specific to any one particular gas vapor, an array of sensors each containing a different thin-film was used to produce a distributed response pattern when exposed to a gas vapor. Pattern recognition, including a clustering algorithm and two artificial neural network algorithms, was used to classify the response pattern and identify the gas vapor or odor. Two gas experiments were performed, one

  16. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  17. Current state-of-the-art of device therapy for advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lawrence S.; Shekar, Prem S.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The advent of mechanical circulatory support devices has allowed significant improvements in patient survival and quality of life for those with advanced or end-stage heart failure. We provide a general overview of past and current mechanical circulatory support devices encompassing options for both short- and long-term ventricular support. PMID:25559828

  18. Verification, Validation and Credibility Assessment of a Computational Model of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, C. R.; Humphreys, B. T.; Mulugeta, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the resistive exercise device used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to mitigate bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to microgravity (micro g). The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a multi-body dynamics model of biomechanics models for use in spaceflight exercise physiology research and operations. In an effort to advance model maturity and credibility of the ARED model, the DAP performed verification, validation and credibility (VV and C) assessment of the analyses of the model in accordance to NASA-STD-7009 'Standards for Models and Simulations'.

  19. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. PMID:22464092

  20. Thermal and Electrical Characterization of Alumina Substrate for Microelectronic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, S.; Ibrahim, A.; Alias, R.; Shapee, S. M.; Ambak, Z.; Zakaria, S. Z.; Yahya, M. R.; Mat, A. F. A.

    2010-03-11

    This paper reports the effect of sintering temperature on thermal and electrical properties of alumina material as substrate for microelectronic devices. Alumina materials in the form of green sheet with 1 mm thickness were sintered at 1100 deg. C, 1300 deg. C and 1500 deg. C for about 20 hours using heating and cooling rates of 2 deg. C/min. The densities were measured using densitometer and the microstructures of the samples were analyzed using SEM micrographs. Meanwhile thermal and electrical properties of the samples were measured using flash method and impedance analyzer respectively. It was found that thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the substrate increases as sintering temperature increases. It was found also that the dielectric constant of alumina substrate increases as the sintering temperature increases.

  1. Evaluation of advanced cooling therapy's esophageal cooling device for core temperature control.

    PubMed

    Naiman, Melissa; Shanley, Patrick; Garrett, Frank; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Managing core temperature is critical to patient outcomes in a wide range of clinical scenarios. Previous devices designed to perform temperature management required a trade-off between invasiveness and temperature modulation efficiency. The Esophageal Cooling Device, made by Advanced Cooling Therapy (Chicago, IL), was developed to optimize warming and cooling efficiency through an easy and low risk procedure that leverages heat transfer through convection and conduction. Clinical data from cardiac arrest, fever, and critical burn patients indicate that the Esophageal Cooling Device performs very well both in terms of temperature modulation (cooling rates of approximately 1.3°C/hour, warming of up to 0.5°C/hour) and maintaining temperature stability (variation around goal temperature ± 0.3°C). Physicians have reported that device performance is comparable to the performance of intravascular temperature management techniques and superior to the performance of surface devices, while avoiding the downsides associated with both. PMID:27043177

  2. Advanced photovoltaic system simulator to demonstrate the performance of advanced photovoltaic cells and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.; DeBlasio, R.; O'Sullivan, G.A.; Tomko, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    This paper describes a photovoltaic system simulator for characterizing and evaluating the performance of advanced photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays as well as for simulating the operation of advanced conceptual photovoltaic systems. The system simulator is capable of extrapolating the performance from a single laboratory cell, or of a module to power levels up to 10 kW. The major subsystems comprising the system simulator are (1) Solar Array Simulator, (2) Power Conditioning Unit, (3) Load Controller and Resistive Load Unit, (4) Data Acquisition and Control Unit, and (5) Cell Test Bed.

  3. Aircrew Training Devices: Utility and Utilization of Advanced Instructional Features (Phase IV--Summary Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polzella, Donald J.; And Others

    Modern aircrew training devices (ATDs) are equipped with sophisticated hardware and software capabilities, known as advanced instructional features (AIFs), that permit a simulator instructor to prepare briefings, manage training, vary task difficulty/fidelity, monitor performance, and provide feedback for flight simulation training missions. The…

  4. SETA support for the DARPA microelectronics technology insertion program of the Microelectronics Technology Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Daniel H., Jr.

    1992-08-01

    Booz-Allen and Hamilton provides DARPA's Microelectronics Technology Office with a broad range of SETA support under contract MDA972-92-C-0029. This report describes activities during the first quarter of this contract. The main programs supported were: the Digital Gallium Arsenide Insertion Program, the Transition of Optical Processors to Systems (TOPS), the Microelectronics Manufacturing Strategy (MMST) Program, the Flexible, Intelligent Microelectronics Manufacturing Program (FIMM), and the Artificial Neural Networks Technology Program (ANNT). This report is organized by subtask areas in the statement of work, indicating for each subtask the Task Objectives, General Methodology, Technical Results, and Important Findings and Conclusions. The final section of this report presents a summary and conclusions, and appendices present deliverables from Booz-Allen and special consultants providing MTO Support via this contract.

  5. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures. PMID:26856789

  6. An advanced photovoltaic system simulator to demonstrate the performance of advanced photovoltaic cells and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mrig, L.; DeBlasio, R.; O'Sullivan, G.A.; Tomko, R.P.

    1982-09-01

    This paper describes a photovoltaic system simulator for characterizing and evaluating the performance of advanced photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays as well as for simulating the operation of advanced conceptual photovoltaic systems. The system simulator is capable of extrapolating the performance from a single laboratory cell, or of a module to power levels up to 10 kw. The major subsystems comprising the system simulator are Solar Array Simulator, Power Conditioning Unit, Load Controller and Resistive Load Unit, Data Acquisition and Control Unit, and Cell Test Bed. The system was designed and fabricated by Abacus Controls, Inc., Somerville, NJ, under subcontract to SERI, and has recently been installed (except the cell test bed) at SERI, where initial operation is taking place.

  7. Technique for rapid inspection of hermetic seals of microelectronic packages using shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Y. (Michael) Y.; Shi, Dahuan

    1998-05-01

    One possible failure of microelectronic devices is due to leakage resulting from an imperfect hermetical seal in microelectronic packages such as microchips. This malfunction is often experienced in automobiles in which the electronic devices are exposed to hostile environments. Traditional leak-testing methods are very time consuming. A shearographic technique for rapid evaluation of hermetic seals is presented. The package under test is stressed by an external pressure change. With the pressure change maintained, the lid of a perfectly sealed package will remain deformed while a leaky package will not hold the deformation, which can be monitored by shearography. This leak testing is fast and practical and can be extended to testing pharmaceutical packages, food packages, etc.

  8. AN ADVANCED CALIBRATION PROCEDURE FOR COMPLEX IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENTS OF ADVANCED ENERGY STORAGE DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Morrison; Jon P. Christophersen; Patrick Bald; John L. Morrison

    2012-06-01

    With the increasing demand for electric and hybrid electric vehicles and the explosion in popularity of mobile and portable electronic devices such as laptops, cell phones, e-readers, tablet computers and the like, reliance on portable energy storage devices such as batteries has likewise increased. The concern for the availability of critical systems in turn drives the availability of battery systems and thus the need for accurate battery health monitoring has become paramount. Over the past decade the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Montana Tech of the University of Montana (Tech), and Qualtech Systems, Inc. (QSI) have been developing the Smart Battery Status Monitor (SBSM), an integrated battery management system designed to monitor battery health, performance and degradation and use this knowledge for effective battery management and increased battery life. Key to the success of the SBSM is an in-situ impedance measurement system called the Impedance Measurement Box (IMB). One of the challenges encountered has been development of an accurate, simple, robust calibration process. This paper discusses the successful realization of this process.

  9. Recent advances in medical device triage technologies for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events.

    PubMed

    Lansdowne, Krystal; Scully, Christopher G; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marcozzi, David; Strauss, David G

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, the US Food and Drug Administration (Silver Spring, Maryland USA) created the Medical Countermeasures Initiative with the mission of development and promoting medical countermeasures that would be needed to protect the nation from identified, high-priority chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) threats and emerging infectious diseases. The aim of this review was to promote regulatory science research of medical devices and to analyze how the devices can be employed in different CBRN scenarios. Triage in CBRN scenarios presents unique challenges for first responders because the effects of CBRN agents and the clinical presentations of casualties at each triage stage can vary. The uniqueness of a CBRN event can render standard patient monitoring medical device and conventional triage algorithms ineffective. Despite the challenges, there have been recent advances in CBRN triage technology that include: novel technologies; mobile medical applications ("medical apps") for CBRN disasters; electronic triage tags, such as eTriage; diagnostic field devices, such as the Joint Biological Agent Identification System; and decision support systems, such as the Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management Intelligent Syndromes Tool (CHEMM-IST). Further research and medical device validation can help to advance prehospital triage technology for CBRN events. PMID:25868677

  10. Sub-Shot Noise Power Source for Microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan; Mansour, Kamjou

    2011-01-01

    Low-current, high-impedance microelectronic devices can be affected by electric current shot noise more than they are affected by Nyquist noise, even at room temperature. An approach to implementing a sub-shot noise current source for powering such devices is based on direct conversion of amplitude-squeezed light to photocurrent. The phenomenon of optical squeezing allows for the optical measurements below the fundamental shot noise limit, which would be impossible in the domain of classical optics. This becomes possible by affecting the statistical properties of photons in an optical mode, which can be considered as a case of information encoding. Once encoded, the information describing the photon (or any other elementary excitations) statistics can be also transmitted. In fact, it is such information transduction from optics to an electronics circuit, via photoelectric effect, that has allowed the observation of the optical squeezing. It is very difficult, if not technically impossible, to directly measure the statistical distribution of optical photons except at extremely low light level. The photoelectric current, on the other hand, can be easily analyzed using RF spectrum analyzers. Once it was observed that the photocurrent noise generated by a tested light source in question is below the shot noise limit (e.g. produced by a coherent light beam), it was concluded that the light source in question possess the property of amplitude squeezing. The main novelty of this technology is to turn this well-known information transduction approach around. Instead of studying the statistical property of an optical mode by measuring the photoelectron statistics, an amplitude-squeezed light source and a high-efficiency linear photodiode are used to generate photocurrent with sub-Poissonian electron statistics. By powering microelectronic devices with this current source, their performance can be improved, especially their noise parameters. Therefore, a room-temperature sub

  11. Radiation Effects and Hardening Techniques for Spacecraft Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambles, J. W.; Maki, G. K.

    2002-01-01

    The natural radiation from the Van Allen belts, solar flares, and cosmic rays found outside of the protection of the earth's atmosphere can produce deleterious effects on microelectronics used in space systems. Historically civil space agencies and the commercial satellite industry have been able to utilize components produced in special radiation hardened fabrication process foundries that were developed during the 1970s and 1980s under sponsorship of the Departments of Defense (DoD) and Energy (DoE). In the post--cold war world the DoD and DoE push to advance the rad--hard processes has waned. Today the available rad--hard components lag two-plus technology node generations behind state- of-the-art commercial technologies. As a result space craft designers face a large performance gap when trying to utilize available rad--hard components. Compounding the performance gap problems, rad--hard components are becoming increasingly harder to get. Faced with the economic pitfalls associated with low demand versus the ever increasing investment required for integrated circuit manufacturing equipment most sources of rad--hard parts have simply exited this market in recent years, leaving only two domestic US suppliers of digital rad--hard components. This paper summarizes the radiation induced mechanisms that can cause digital microelectronics to fail in space, techniques that can be applied to mitigate these failure mechanisms, and ground based testing used to validate radiation hardness/tolerance. The radiation hardening techniques can be broken down into two classes, Hardness By Process (HBP) and Hardness By Design (HBD). Fortunately many HBD techniques can be applied to commercial fabrication processes providing space craft designer with radiation tolerant Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) that can bridge the performance gap between the special HBP foundries and the commercial state-of-the-art performance.

  12. Selected area chemical vapor deposition of thin films for conductometric microelectronic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majoo, Sanjeev

    Recent advances in microelectronics and silicon processing have been exploited to fabricate miniaturized chemical sensors. Although the capability of chemical sensing technology has grown steadily, it has been outpaced by the increasing demands for more reliable, inexpensive, and selective sensors. The diversity of applications requires the deployment of different sensing materials that have rich interfacial chemistry. However, several promising sensor materials are often incompatible with silicon micromachining and their deposition requires complicated masking steps. The new approach described here is to first micromachine a generic, instrumented, conductometric, microelectronic sensor platform that is fully functional except for the front-end sensing element. This generic platform contains a thin dielectric membrane, an integrated boron-doped silicon heater, and conductance electrodes. The membrane has low thermal mass and excellent thermal isolation. A proprietary selected-area chemical vapor deposition (SACVD) process in a cold-wall reactor at low pressures was then used to achieve maskless, self-lithographic deposition of thin films. The temperature-programmable integrated microheater initiates localized thermal decomposition/reaction of suitable CVD precursors confined to a small heated area (500 mum in diameter), and this creates the active sensing element. Platinum and titania (TiOsb2) films were deposited from pyrolysis of organometallic precursors, tetrakistrifluorophosphine platinum Pt(PFsb3)sb4 and titanium tetraisopropoxide Ti(OCH(CHsb3)sb2rbrack sb4, respectively. Deposition of gold metal films from chlorotriethylphosphine gold (Csb2Hsb5)sb3PAuCl precursor was also attempted but without success. The conductance electrodes permit in situ monitoring of film growth. The as-deposited films were characterized in situ by conductance measurements and optical microscopy and ex situ by electron microscopy and spectroscopy methods. Devices equipped with

  13. Recent Advances in Flexible and Stretchable Bio-Electronic Devices Integrated with Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Suji; Lee, Hyunjae; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and stretchable electronics and optoelectronics configured in soft, water resistant formats uniquely address seminal challenges in biomedicine. Over the past decade, there has been enormous progress in the materials, designs, and manufacturing processes for flexible/stretchable system subcomponents, including transistors, amplifiers, bio-sensors, actuators, light emitting diodes, photodetector arrays, photovoltaics, energy storage elements, and bare die integrated circuits. Nanomaterials prepared using top-down processing approaches and synthesis-based bottom-up methods have helped resolve the intrinsic mechanical mismatch between rigid/planar devices and soft/curvilinear biological structures, thereby enabling a broad range of non-invasive, minimally invasive, and implantable systems to address challenges in biomedicine. Integration of therapeutic functional nanomaterials with soft bioelectronics demonstrates therapeutics in combination with unconventional diagnostics capabilities. Recent advances in soft materials, devices, and integrated systems are reviewes, with representative examples that highlight the utility of soft bioelectronics for advanced medical diagnostics and therapies. PMID:26779680

  14. Porous Diblock Copolymer Thin Films in High-Performance Semiconductor Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Black, C.T.

    2011-02-01

    The engine fueling more than 40 years of performance improvements in semiconductor integrated circuits (ICs) has been industry's ability to pattern circuit elements at ever-higher resolution and with ever-greater precision. Steady advances in photolithography - the process wherein ultraviolet light chemically changes a photosensitive polymer resist material in order to create a latent image - have resulted in scaling of minimum printed feature sizes from tens of microns during the 1980s to sub-50 nanometer transistor gate lengths in today's state-of-the-art ICs. The history of semiconductor technology scaling as well as future technology requirements is documented in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). The progression of the semiconductor industry to the realm of nanometer-scale sizes has brought enormous challenges to device and circuit fabrication, rendering performance improvements by conventional scaling alone increasingly difficult. Most often this discussion is couched in terms of field effect transistor (FET) feature sizes such as the gate length or gate oxide thickness, however these challenges extend to many other aspects of the IC, including interconnect dimensions and pitch, device packing density, power consumption, and heat dissipation. The ITRS Technology Roadmap forecasts a difficult set of scientific and engineering challenges with no presently-known solutions. The primary focus of this chapter is the research performed at IBM on diblock copolymer films composed of polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA) (PS-b-PMMA) with total molecular weights M{sub n} in the range of {approx}60K (g/mol) and polydispersities (PD) of {approx}1.1. These materials self assemble to form patterns having feature sizes in the range of 15-20nm. PS-b-PMMA was selected as a self-assembling patterning material due to its compatibility with the semiconductor microelectronics manufacturing infrastructure, as well as the significant body

  15. A Retinal Prosthesis Technology Based on CMOS Microelectronics and Microwire Glass Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Scribner, D; Johnson, L; Skeath, P; Klein, R; Ilg, D; Wasserman, L; Fernandez, N; Freeman, W; Peele, J; Perkins, F K; Friebele, E J; Bassett, W E; Howard, J G; Krebs, W

    2007-03-01

    A very large format neural stimulator device, to be used in future retinal prosthesis experiments, has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The device was designed to be positioned against a human retina for short periods in an operating room environment. Demonstrating a very large format, parallel interface between a 2-D microelectronic stimulator array and neural tissue would be an important step in proving the feasibility of high resolution retinal prosthesis for the blind. The architecture of the test device combines several novel components, including microwire glass, a microelectronic multiplexer, and a microcable connector. The array format is 80 times 40 array pixels with approximately 20 microwire electrodes per pixel. The custom assembly techniques involve indium bump bonding, ribbon bonding, and encapsulation. The design, fabrication, and testing of the device has resolved several important issues regarding the feasibility of high-resolution retinal prosthesis, namely, that the combination of conventional CMOS electronics and microwire glass provides a viable approach for a high resolution retinal prosthesis device. Temperature change from power dissipation within the device and maximum electrical output current levels suggest that the device is acceptable for acute human tests. PMID:23851523

  16. Moving Education and Its Administration into the Microelectronic Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Jack A.

    Education is in transition between the ascendent microelectronic and descendent industrial revolutions, with purposes ambiguously linked to both. These purposes must be clarified before educational leaders can establish priorities for adapting education to the needs of a society transformed by microelectronic technology. Accordingly, the features…

  17. Microelectronics and Special Education. CET/MEP Information Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Educational Technology, London (England).

    Used as an additional aid by the teacher, microelectronics can assist mentally and physically handicapped children to meet educational objectives that have been specifically agreed upon for the individual child. Microelectronics can help deaf children develop speech production, communication skills, and grammar and sentence construction;…

  18. Acoustic, fiber optic, and silicon microelectronic microsensors research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Wiczer, J.J.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, an 8500+ person, multiprogram research and development facility operated for the US Department of Energy, has over 400 research, development and applications scientists and engineers working on sensor technologies. Sandia`s 20 person Microsensors Research and Development Department has invented, developed and fielded sensor systems based on acoustic, fiber optic, and silicon microelectronic technologies. These sensors have been used for diverse applications inducting the monitoring of cleaning chemical concentrations in industrial process effluent streams, detection of explosive gas concentrations in aging industrial equipment, real-time measurements of fluid viscosity in equipment lubricants, and monitoring of contaminant concentration levels in ultrapure process gases. Representative sensor technologies available for technology transfer will be described including bulk acoustic wave resonators, surface acoustic wave devices, fiber optic micromirror sensors, and silicon microelectronic sensors.

  19. Reliability of Strength Testing using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Kirk L.; Loehr, James A.; Laughlin, Mitzi A.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) was developed for use on the International Space Station as a countermeasure against muscle atrophy and decreased strength. This investigation examined the reliability of one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength testing using ARED and traditional free weight (FW) exercise. Methods: Six males (180.8 +/- 4.3 cm, 83.6 +/- 6.4 kg, 36 +/- 8 y, mean +/- SD) who had not engaged in resistive exercise for at least six months volunteered to participate in this project. Subjects completed four 1RM testing sessions each for FW and ARED (eight total sessions) using a balanced, randomized, crossover design. All testing using one device was completed before progressing to the other. During each session, 1RM was measured for the squat, heel raise, and deadlift exercises. Generalizability (G) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for each exercise on each device and were used to predict the number of sessions needed to obtain a reliable 1RM measurement (G . 0.90). Interclass reliability coefficients and Pearson's correlation coefficients (R) also were calculated for the highest 1RM value (1RM9sub peak)) obtained for each exercise on each device to quantify 1RM relationships between devices.

  20. Devices and systems-on-chip for photonic communication links in a microprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Mark T.

    For the first time, high-performance photonic devices and electronic-photonic systems-on-chip are monolithically integrated in an advanced CMOS microelectronics fabrication process. This includes a silicon optical resonator termed the "spoked-ring" cavity that meets the constraints of thin-SOI microelectronics CMOS processes and enables energy efficient modulators and thermally tunable filters. For low-loss fiber-to-chip optical coupling, a phased-array antenna concept is demonstrated, and the 45 nm CMOS microelectronics process is shown to support a near ideal implementation of the device using the crystalline silicon and polysilicon material layers that comprise the active region and gate, respectively, of the native MOSFET transistors. The active devices and vertical grating couplers are implemented in large-scale electronic-photonic systems-on-chip to demonstrate a wavelength stabilized, microring-based chip-to-chip communications link and an 11-channel wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) transmitter. The link is shown to be robust against thermal environmental variations which is critical for operation in realistic systems. The chip-to-chip link is then used to demonstrate a CPU-to-memory communication link, the first demonstration of its kind. The first microprocessor with photonic I/O is demonstrated as part of this work, with substantial implications for computer architecture. Advanced photonic device technology demonstrations, including photonic crystals, a quantum-correlated photon-pair source, an active photonic device platform in a 32 nm SOI node, and a 180 nm bulk silicon process, are presented to show the wide range of applications that monolithic integration could support in the future of photonics. These results taken together show that monolithic integration directly into CMOS microelectronics processes does allow high performance photonics, and is a viable approach to build large-scale electronic-photonic systems with a realistic path to

  1. In vitro retention of a new thermoplastic titratable mandibular advancement device

    PubMed Central

    Braem, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Oral appliance (OA) therapy with a mandibular advancement device (OAm) is a non-invasive, alternative approach to maintaining upper airway patency. The main requirement for an OAm to be effective is the adequate retention on the teeth while the patient is asleep. We evaluated the retentive forces of a new low-cost, customizable, titratable, thermoplastic OAm (BluePro ®; BlueSom, France). Dental impressions and casts were made for one patient with complete upper and lower dental arches including the third molars and class II bite proportions. A setup based on Frasaco ANA-4 models was also used. Two protrusive positions of the mandible were investigated: 3 mm and 8 mm, representing respectively 25% and 65% of the maximal protrusion. The forces required to remove the BluePro ® device from the carriers were recorded continuously over 730 cycles (=365 days, twice a day) to simulate 1 year of clinical use. At 8 mm protrusion the BluePro ® device showed retentive forces of ~27N. There was a slight but non-significant decrease in retentive forces in the tests on the epoxified carriers which was not found on the ANA-4 carriers. There were no significant differences between the carriers as a function of protrusion. The BluePro ® device tested in the present study possesses sufficient retention forces to resist initial jaw opening forces and full mouth opening forces estimated to be ~20N. It could therefore broaden the indications for use of thermoplastic OAms. It could provide a temporary OAm while a custom-made OAm is being manufactured or repaired. Patients could be provided with a low-cost try-out device capable of reliable titration, providing an indication of effectiveness and of patient acceptance of an OAm, although the effect of device shape and size on therapeutic outcome is not yet known. Finally it could provide an affordable OAm solution in resource-restricted healthcare settings. PMID:25901281

  2. Further measurements of bremsstrahlung from the insertion device beamlines of the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Job, P. K.

    1998-09-16

    Bremsstrahlung is produced in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring when the positron beam interacts with the storage-ring components or with the residual gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum. The interaction of the positrons with the gas molecules occurs continually during storage ring operation. Bremsstrahlung is important at the insertion device straight sections because the contribution from each interaction adds up to produce a narrow mono-directional beam that travel down the beamlines. At the APS, with long storage ring beam straight paths (15.38 meters), gas bremsstrahlung in the insertion device beamlines can be significant. The preliminary results of the bremsstrahlung measurements in the insertion device beamlines of the APS was presented at SATIF3. This paper presents the results of further measurements at the two insertion device (ID) beamlines with higher statistics in the data collection. The beam current and the vacuum normalized bremsstrahlung power is fairly constant in a beamline for a given storage ring fill pattern, but may vary from beamline to beamline. The average bremsstrahlung power is measured as 118 {+-} 9 GeV/s/nT/mA at beamline 11 ID and as 36 {+-} 2 GeV/s/nT/mA at beamline 6 ID. These results, along with the results from the four previous independent bremsstrahlung measurements, enabled us to conclude upon the various reasons causing this variation.

  3. Advanced simulation technology for etching process design for CMOS device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    Plasma etching is a critical process for the realization of high performance in the next generation of CMOS devices. To predict and control fluctuations in the etching properties accurately during mass production, it is essential that etching process simulation technology considers fluctuations in the plasma chamber wall conditions, the effects of by-products on the critical dimensions, the Si recess dependence on the wafer open area ratio and local pattern structure, and the time-dependent plasma-induced damage distribution associated with the three-dimensional feature scale profile at the 100 nm level. This consideration can overcome the issues with conventional simulations performed under the assumed ideal conditions, which are not accurate enough for practical process design. In this article, these advanced process simulation technologies are reviewed, and, from the results of suitable process simulations, a new etching system that automatically controls the etching properties is proposed to enable stable CMOS device fabrication with high yields.

  4. Left ventricular assist device driveline infections: recent advances and future goals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have revolutionized the treatment of advanced heart failure, but infection remains a substantial risk. LVAD driveline infections (DLIs) are the most common type of LVAD-associated infection (LVADI). In the past several years we have expanded our understanding of DLI epidemiology, standardized the definition of LVADIs, improved infection rates through changes in implantation techniques, and investigated potential new modalities for DLI diagnosis. However, significant challenges remain for optimizing DLI prevention and treatment. These challenges include standardizing and improving both empiric and targeted antimicrobial therapy, expanding our understanding of effective driveline exit site dressings and topical therapies, and defining the patient population that benefits from device exchange and transplant. Additionally, in an era of expanding antibiotic resistance we need to continue investigating novel, non-antibiotic therapies for prevention and treatment of DLIs. PMID:26793335

  5. Development of the Vibration Isolation System for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebuhr, Jason H.; Hagen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Vibration Isolation System for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device from conceptual design to lessons learned. Maintaining a micro-g environment on the International Space Station requires that experiment racks and major vibration sources be isolated. The challenge in characterizing exercise loads and testing the system in the presence of gravity led to a decision to qualify the system by analysis. Available data suggests that the system is successful in attenuating loads, yet there has been a major component failure and several procedural issues during its 3 years of operational use.

  6. Computational Models of Exercise on the Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nate; Caldwell, Erin; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Peters,Brian; Fincke, Renita; DeWitt, John; Poutz-Snyder, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Muscle and bone loss remain a concern for crew returning from space flight. The advanced resistance exercise device (ARED) is used for on-orbit resistance exercise to help mitigate these losses. However, characterization of how the ARED loads the body in microgravity has yet to be determined. Computational models allow us to analyze ARED exercise in both 1G and 0G environments. To this end, biomechanical models of the squat, single-leg squat, and deadlift exercise on the ARED have been developed to further investigate bone and muscle forces resulting from the exercises.

  7. [Objective surgery -- advanced robotic devices and simulators used for surgical skill assessment].

    PubMed

    Suhánszki, Norbert; Haidegger, Tamás

    2014-12-01

    Robotic assistance became a leading trend in minimally invasive surgery, which is based on the global success of laparoscopic surgery. Manual laparoscopy requires advanced skills and capabilities, which is acquired through tedious learning procedure, while da Vinci type surgical systems offer intuitive control and advanced ergonomics. Nevertheless, in either case, the key issue is to be able to assess objectively the surgeons' skills and capabilities. Robotic devices offer radically new way to collect data during surgical procedures, opening the space for new ways of skill parameterization. This may be revolutionary in MIS training, given the new and objective surgical curriculum and examination methods. The article reviews currently developed skill assessment techniques for robotic surgery and simulators, thoroughly inspecting their validation procedure and utility. In the coming years, these methods will become the mainstream of Western surgical education. PMID:25500641

  8. Organic transistors in optical displays and microelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Gelinck, Gerwin; Heremans, Paul; Nomoto, Kazumasa; Anthopoulos, Thomas D

    2010-09-01

    Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) offer unprecedented opportunities for implementation in a broad range of technological applications spanning from large-volume microelectronics and optical displays to chemical and biological sensors. In this Progress Report, we review the application of organic transistors in the fields of flexible optical displays and microelectronics. The advantages associated with the use of OTFT technology are discussed with primary emphasis on the latest developments in the area of active-matrix electrophoretic and organic light-emitting diode displays based on OTFT backplanes and on the application of organic transistors in microelectronics including digital and analog circuits. PMID:20533415

  9. Cold-Cathodes for Sensors and Vacuum Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, M.P.; Sullivan, J.P.; Tallant, D.R.; Simpson, R.L.; DiNardo, N.J.; Mercer, T.W.; Martinez-Miranda, L.J.

    1998-05-01

    The aim of this laboratory-directed research and development project was to study amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films for eventual cold-cathode electron emitter applications. The development of robust, cold-cathode emitters are likely to have significant implications for modern technology and possibly launch a new industry: vacuum micro-electronics (VME). The potential impact of VME on Sandia`s National Security missions, such as defense against military threats and economic challenges, is profound. VME enables new microsensors and intrinsically radiation-hard electronics compatible with MOSFET and IMEM technologies. Furthermore, VME is expected to result in a breakthrough technology for the development of high-visibility, low-power flat-panel displays. This work covers four important research areas. First, the authors studied the nature of the C-C bonding structures within these a-C thin films. Second, they determined the changes in the film structures resulting from thermal annealing to simulate the effects of device processing on a-C properties. Third, they performed detailed electrical transport measurements as a function of annealing temperature to correlate changes in transport properties with structural changes and to propose a model for transport in these a-C materials with implications on the nature of electron emission. Finally, they used scanning atom probes to determine important aspects on the nature of emission in a-C.

  10. Evaluation of a prototype micro-electronic autoclave cycle integrator.

    PubMed

    Kirk, B; Hambleton, R

    1981-02-01

    Instability and non-uniformity of spore preparations and the non-conformity of chemical indicators to the temperature coefficients of spore inactivation are problems associated with current methods of autoclave cycle monitoring. A prototype micro-electronic instrument, which largely overcomes these problems, is described. It monitors autoclave cycles in terms of the integral F0 and Nabla functions. Its thermometric and integrating accuracy is demonstrated. A discussion of the problems associated with the use of sensitive electronic instruments in the autoclave room environment reveals the need for independent monitoring areas when such devices are used. Inactivation constants were determined for spores of the organism Bacillus stearothermophilus, NCTC 10 003 and were described using D115 (12.0 min) and Z (9.0 degrees C) values and the first order reaction Arrhenius constants A 10(41.2) min-1) and Ea (74.4 kcal mol-1, 311 kJ mol-1). These have been compared with recently published values. The standardization of F0 and Nabla is discussed with reference to the setting of minimum values related to product bioburden and maximum values related to an acceptable degree of product degradation. PMID:6111601

  11. Indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride vacuum microelectronic cold cathodes: Piezoelectric surface barrier lowering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Robert Douglas

    Vacuum microelectronic devices are electronic devices fabricated using microelectronic processing and using vacuum as a transport medium. The electron velocity in vacuum can be larger than in solid state, which allows higher frequency operation of vacuum devices compared to solid-state devices. The effectiveness of vacuum microelectronic devices relies on the realization of an efficient source of electrons supplied to the vacuum. Cold cathodes do not rely on thermal energy for the emission of electrons into vacuum. Cold cathodes based on field emission are the most common types of vacuum microelectronic cold cathode because they have a very high efficiency and high current density electron emission. Materials used to fabricate field emitters must have the properties of high electron concentration, low surface reactivity, resistance to sputtering by ions, high thermal conductivity, and a method of fabrication of uniform arrays of field emitters. The III--V nitride semiconductors possess these material properties and uniform arrays of GaN field emitter pyramids have been produced by selective area, self-limited metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The first GaN field emitter arrays were fabricated and measured. Emission currents as large as 82 muA at 1100 V from 245,000 pyramids have been realized using an external anode, separated by 0.25 mm, to apply voltage bias. The operation voltage was reduced by the development of an integrated anode structure. The anode-cathode separation achievable with the integrated anode was in the range of 0.5--2.4 m. The turn-on voltages of these devices were reduced to the range of 175--435 V. The operation voltage of field emitter cathodes is related to the surface energy barrier, which for n-type semiconductors is the electron affinity. A new method to reduce the effective electron affinity using a piezoelectric dipole in an InGaN/GaN heterostructure has been proposed and tested. The piezoelectric field produced in the strained In

  12. Monitoring Composite Material Pressure Vessels with a Fiber-Optic/Microelectronic Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimcak, C.; Jaduszliwer, B.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the concept of an integrated, fiber-optic/microelectronic distributed sensor system that can monitor composite material pressure vessels for Air Force space systems to provide assessments of the overall health and integrity of the vessel throughout its entire operating history from birth to end of life. The fiber optic component would include either a semiconductor light emitting diode or diode laser and a multiplexed fiber optic sensing network incorporating Bragg grating sensors capable of detecting internal temperature and strain. The microelectronic components include a power source, a pulsed laser driver, time domain data acquisition hardware, a microprocessor, a data storage device, and a communication interface. The sensing system would be incorporated within the composite during its manufacture. The microelectronic data acquisition and logging system would record the environmental conditions to which the vessel has been subjected to during its storage and transit, e.g., the history of thermal excursions, pressure loading data, the occurrence of mechanical impacts, the presence of changing internal strain due to aging, delamination, material decomposition, etc. Data would be maintained din non-volatile memory for subsequent readout through a microcomputer interface.

  13. Stress-induced Effects Caused by 3D IC TSV Packaging in Advanced Semiconductor Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sukharev, V.; Kteyan, A.; Choy, J.-H.; Hovsepyan, H.; Markosian, A.; Zschech, E.; Huebner, R.

    2011-11-10

    Potential challenges with managing mechanical stress and the consequent effects on device performance for advanced 3D through-silicon-via (TSV) based technologies are outlined. The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze a design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-die out-of-spec variations in device electrical characteristics caused by the layout and through-silicon-via (TSV)/package-induced mechanical stress. The limited characterization/measurement capabilities for 3D IC stacks and a strict ''good die'' requirement make this type of analysis critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation to assess the mechanical stress across the device layers in silicon chips stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology is proposed. A calibration technique based on fitting to measured stress components and electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices is presented. A strategy for generation of a simulation feeding data and respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to generate a database for multi-scale material parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. For model validation, high-resolution strain measurements in Si channels of the test-chip devices are needed. At the nanoscale, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is the only technique available for sub-10 nm strain measurements so far.

  14. Development of a Robust and Integrated Methodology for Predicting the Reliability of Microelectronic Packaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah-Adl, Ali

    Ball Grid Array (BGA) using lead-free or lead-rich solder materials are widely used as Second Level Interconnects (SLI) in mounting packaged components to the printed circuit board (PCB). The reliability of these solder joints is of significant importance to the performance of microelectronics components and systems. Product design/form-factor, solder material, manufacturing process, use condition, as well as, the inherent variabilities present in the system, greatly influence product reliability. Accurate reliability analysis requires an integrated approach to concurrently account for all these factors and their synergistic effects. Such an integrated and robust methodology can be used in design and development of new and advanced microelectronics systems and can provide significant improvement in cycle-time, cost, and reliability. IMPRPK approach is based on a probabilistic methodology, focusing on three major tasks of (1) Characterization of BGA solder joints to identify failure mechanisms and obtain statistical data, (2) Finite Element analysis (FEM) to predict system response needed for life prediction, and (3) development of a probabilistic methodology to predict the reliability, as well as, the sensitivity of the system to various parameters and the variabilities. These tasks and the predictive capabilities of IMPRPK in microelectronic reliability analysis are discussed.

  15. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology 1988-1989 technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Peggy

    1990-01-01

    The 1988 to 1989 Technical Report of the JPL Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center. Listed are 321 publications, 282 presentations, and 140 new technology reports and patents.

  16. The International Implications of the Development of Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieghart, Paul

    1981-01-01

    Synthesizes issues covered at a conference on microelectronics: production, productivity, and employment; social implications; market mechanisms v government intervention; the role of national governments; data protection laws; and cultural pollution. (SW)

  17. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology 1988-1989 technical report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Peggy

    1990-03-01

    The 1988 to 1989 Technical Report of the JPL Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center. Listed are 321 publications, 282 presentations, and 140 new technology reports and patents.

  18. Handbook of Thick- and Thin-Film Hybrid Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Tapan K.

    2003-05-01

    This is the first handbook on the fabrication and design of hybrid microelectronic circuits. * Deals with all aspects of the technology, design, layout and processing of materials. * Fills the need for a comprehensive survey of a widely-used technology.

  19. Enabling laser applications in microelectronics manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Brune, Jan; Fechner, Burkhard; Senczuk, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    In this experimental study, we report on high-pulse-energy excimer laser drilling into high-performance build-up films which are pivotal in microelectronics manufacturing. Build-up materials ABF-GX13 from Ajinomoto as well as ZS-100 from Zeon Corporation are evaluated with respect to their viability for economic excimer laser-based micro-via formation. Excimer laser mask imaging projection at laser wavelengths of 193, 248 and 308 nm is employed to generate matrices of smaller micro-vias with different diameters and via pitches. High drilling quality is achievable for all excimer laser wavelengths with the fastest ablation rates measured in the case of 248 and 308 nm wavelengths. The presence of glass fillers in build-up films as in the ABF-GX13 material poses some limitations to the minimum achievable via diameter. However, surprisingly good drilling results are obtainable as long as the filler dimensions are well below the diameter of the micro-vias. Sidewall angles of vias are controllable by adjusting the laser energy density and pulse number. In this work, the structuring capabilities of excimer lasers in build-up films as to taper angle variations, attainable via diameters, edge-stop behavior and ablation rates will be elucidated.

  20. Health hazards in the microelectronics industry.

    PubMed

    Geiser, K

    1986-01-01

    The microelectronics industry is explored as a source of occupational health hazards resulting from the extensive use of toxic chemicals in the production of semiconductor chips and the assembly of electronic components. Information is provided on the range of chemicals used in the industry and their particular health implications. Case materials are drawn from Massachusetts' "Route 128" region and California's "Silicon Valley." Problems with worker exposure in the plants are compared with the risks experienced by residents of local neighborhoods from the leakage of industrial chemicals from underground storage tanks into the local groundwater used for drinking water. The recent development of the industry, its highly innovative character, the absence of unions and organizations for worker protection, and the persistence of a public perception that the industry is relatively safe and clean, are all identified as determinants of the extent of health hazards posed by chemical exposure. The paper concludes with recommendations for further studies, worker organization, and increased attention to the reduction of the volume and toxicity of chemicals in industrial production. PMID:3957508

  1. IP validation in remote microelectronics testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osseiran, Adam; Eshraghian, Kamran; Lachowicz, Stefan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Jeffery, Roger; Robins, Michael

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents the test and validation of FPGA based IP using the concept of remote testing. It demonstrates how a virtual tester environment based on a powerful, networked Integrated Circuit testing facility, aimed to complement the emerging Australian microelectronics based research and development, can be employed to perform the tasks beyond the standard IC test. IC testing in production consists in verifying the tested products and eliminating defective parts. Defects could have a number of different causes, including process defects, process migration and IP design and implementation errors. One of the challenges in semiconductor testing is that while current fault models are used to represent likely faults (stuck-at, delay, etc.) in a global context, they do not account for all possible defects. Research in this field keeps growing but the high cost of ATE is preventing a large community from accessing test and verification equipment to validate innovative IP designs. For these reasons a world class networked IC teletest facility has been established in Australia under the support of the Commonwealth government. The facility is based on a state-of-the-art semiconductor tester operating as a virtual centre spanning Australia and accessible internationally. Through a novel approach the teletest network provides virtual access to the tester on which the DUT has previously been placed. The tester software is then accessible as if the designer is sitting next to the tester. This paper presents the approach used to test and validate FPGA based IPs using this remote test approach.

  2. Recent advances in computational methodology for simulation of mechanical circulatory assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Alison L.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Long, Christopher C.; Behr, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to offload the work of one or both ventricles during heart failure. They are used in the clinical setting as destination therapy, as bridge to transplant, or more recently as bridge to recovery to allow for myocardial remodeling. Recent developments in computational simulation allow for detailed assessment of VAD hemodynamics for device design and optimization for both children and adults. Here, we provide a focused review of the recent literature on finite element methods and optimization for VAD simulations. As VAD designs typically fall into two categories, pulsatile and continuous flow devices, we separately address computational challenges of both types of designs, and the interaction with the circulatory system with three representative case studies. In particular, we focus on recent advancements in finite element methodology that has increased the fidelity of VAD simulations. We outline key challenges, which extend to the incorporation of biological response such as thrombosis and hemolysis, as well as shape optimization methods and challenges in computational methodology. PMID:24449607

  3. Advanced Multi-Junction Photovoltaic Device Optimization For High Temperature Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Almost all solar cells available today for space or terrestrial applications are optimized for low temperature or "room temperature" operations, where cell performances demonstrate favourable efficiency figures. The fact is in many space applications, as well as when using solar concentrators, operating cell temperature are typically highly elevated, where cells outputs are severely depreciated. In this paper, a novel approach for the optimization of multi-junction photovoltaic devices at such high expected operating temperature is presented. The device optimization is carried out on the novel cell physical model previously developed at the Naval Postgraduate School using the SILVACO software tools [1]. Taking into account the high cost of research and experimentation involved with the development of advanced cells, this successful modelling technique was introduced and detailed results were previously presented by the author [2]. The flexibility of the proposed methodology is demonstrated and example results are shown throughout the whole process. The research demonstrated the capability of developing a realistic model of any type of solar cell, as well as thermo-photovoltaic devices. Details of an example model of an InGaP/GaAs/Ge multi-junction cell was prepared and fully simulated. The major stages of the process are explained and the simulation results are compared to published experimental data. An example of cell parameters optimization for high operating temperature is also presented. Individual junction layer optimization was accomplished through the use of a genetic search algorithm implemented in Matlab.

  4. Mechanism Development, Testing, and Lessons Learned for the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamoreaux, Christopher D.; Landeck, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) has been developed at NASA Johnson Space Center, for the International Space Station (ISS) program. ARED is a multi-exercise, high-load resistive exercise device, designed for long duration, human space missions. ARED will enable astronauts to effectively maintain their muscle strength and bone mass in the micro-gravity environment more effectively than any other existing devices. ARED's resistance is provided via two, 20.3 cm (8 in) diameter vacuum cylinders, which provide a nearly constant resistance source. ARED also has a means to simulate the inertia that is felt during a 1-G exercise routine via the flywheel subassembly, which is directly tied to the motion of the ARED cylinders. ARED is scheduled to fly on flight ULF 2 to the ISS and will be located in Node 1. Presently, ARED is in the middle of its qualification and acceptance test program. An extensive testing program and engineering evaluation has increased the reliability of ARED by bringing potential design issues to light before flight production. Some of those design issues, resolutions, and design details will be discussed in this paper.

  5. Application of complex macromolecular architectures for advanced microelectronic materials.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, James L; Magbitang, Teddie; Connor, Eric F; Glauser, Thierry; Volksen, Willi; Hawker, Craig J; Lee, Victor Y; Miller, Robert D

    2002-08-01

    The distinctive features of well-defined, three-dimensional macromolecules with topologies designed to enhance solubility and amplify end-group functionality facilitated nanophase morphologies in mixtures with organosilicates and ultimately nanoporous organosilicate networks. Novel macromolecular architectures including dendritic and star-shaped polymers and organic nanoparticles were prepared by a modular approach from several libraries of building blocks including various generations of dendritic initiators and dendrons, selectively placed to amplify functionality and/or arm number, coupled with living polymerization techniques. Mixtures of an organosilicate and the macromolecular template were deposited, cured, and the phase separation of the organic component, organized the vitrifying organosilicate into nanostructures. Removal of the sacrificial macromolecular template, also denoted as porogen, by thermolysis, yielded the desired nanoporous organosilicate, and the size scale of phase separation was strongly dependent on the chain topology. These materials were designed for use as interlayer, ultra-low dielectric insulators for on-chip applications with dielectric constant values as low as 1.5. The porogen design, chemistry and role of polymer architecture on hybrid and pore morphology will be emphasized. PMID:12203311

  6. Thermal interface materials: advancements for "beating the heat" in microelectronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Jeffrey A.; Rae, David F.; Rightley, Michael J.; Emerson, John Allen

    2005-05-01

    As electronic assemblies become more compact and with increased processing bandwidth, the escalating thermal energy has become more difficult to manage. The major limitation has been nonmetallic joining using poor thermal interface materials.

  7. Advanced microelectronics research for space applications, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaertner, W. W.

    1971-01-01

    Negative-resistance circuits with possible space flight applications are discussed. The basic design approach is to use impedance rotation, i.e., the conversion from capacitance to negative resistance, and from resistance to inductance by the phase shift of the transistor current gain at high frequencies. The subjects discussed in detail are the following: hybrid fabrication of VHF and UHF negative-resistance stages with lumped passive elements; formulation of measurement techniques to characterize transistors and to extend the frequency of negative-resistance transistor amplifiers to higher microwave frequencies; and derivation of transistor characteristics required to increase the frequency range of negative-resistance transistor stages.

  8. Using advanced microelectronic test chips to qualify ASIC's for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.; Lin, Y-S.

    1990-01-01

    Qualification procedures for complex integrated circuits are being developed under a U.S. government program known as Qualified Manufacturing Lines (QML). This effort is focused on circuits designed by IC manufacturers and has not addressed application specific IC's (ASIC's) designed at system houses. The qualification procedures described here are intended to be responsive to the needs of system houses who design their own ASIC's and have them fabricated at Silicon foundries. A particular focus of this presentation will be the use of the TID (total Ionizing Dose) Chip to evaluate CMOS foundry processes and to provide parameters for circuit simulators. This chip is under development as a standard chip for qualifying the total dose aspects of ASIC's. The benefits of standardization are that the results will be well understood and easy to interpret. Data is presented and compared for 1.6 micron and 3.0 micron CMOS. The data shows that 1.6 micron CMOS is significantly harder than 3.0 micron CMOS. Two failure modes are explored: (1) the radiation-induced degradation of timing delays; and (2) radiation-induced leakage currents.

  9. Development of a High Fidelity Dynamic Module of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Using Adams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, B. T.; Thompson, W. K.; Lewandowski, B. E.; Cadwell, E. E.; Newby, N. J.; Fincke, R. S.; Sheehan, C.; Mulugeta, L.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) implements well-vetted computational models to predict and assess spaceflight health and performance risks, and enhance countermeasure development. DAP provides expertise and computation tools to its research customers for model development, integration, or analysis. DAP is currently supporting the NASA Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures (ExPC) project by integrating their biomechanical models of specific exercise movements with dynamic models of the devices on which the exercises were performed. This presentation focuses on the development of a high fidelity dynamic module of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on board the ISS. The ARED module, illustrated in the figure below, was developed using the Adams (MSC Santa Ana, California) simulation package. The Adams package provides the capabilities to perform multi rigid body, flexible body, and mixed dynamic analyses of complex mechanisms. These capabilities were applied to accurately simulate: Inertial and mass properties of the device such as the vibration isolation system (VIS) effects and other ARED components, Non-linear joint friction effects, The gas law dynamics of the vacuum cylinders and VIS components using custom written differential state equations, The ARED flywheel dynamics, including torque limiting clutch. Design data from the JSC ARED Engineering team was utilized in developing the model. This included solid modeling geometry files, component/system specifications, engineering reports and available data sets. The Adams ARED module is importable into LifeMOD (Life Modeler, Inc., San Clemente, CA) for biomechanical analyses of different resistive exercises such as squat and dead-lift. Using motion capture data from ground test subjects, the ExPC developed biomechanical exercise models in LifeMOD. The Adams ARED device module was then integrated with the exercise subject model into one integrated dynamic model. This presentation will describe the

  10. Composite metal-oxide device has voltage sensitive capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattauch, R. J.; Viola, T. J., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Device with step function variation of the capacitance is useful for voltage-controlled oscillator circuits and as a voltage-sensitive switch. Simplicity of construction makes the device suitable for large-scale integration, microelectronic circuits.

  11. High density packing and interconnections for hybrid microelectronics: new trends in materials development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubowska, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    Electronic devices, components, circuits and microsystems continue to become smaller, lighter, faster and less expensive. The progress in hybrid microelectronics, especially in high density packaging and interconnections, is very much dependent on the achievements in developing new electronic materials. The paper presents the state of art of thick film materials as well as the new developments carried in Hybrid Mirocircuits and Microsystems Laboratory, which was established in 2006 by Warsaw University of Technology, Department of Electronics and Information Technology and Institute of Electronic Materials Technology.

  12. The effects of insertion devices on beam dynamics in the ALS (Advanced Light Source)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.; Forest, E.; Nishimura, H.; Zisman, M.S.

    1989-03-01

    Third generation synchrotron radiation sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), are specifically designed to operate with long undulators that produce very high brightness beams of synchrotron radiation. Including such devices in the storage ring magnet lattice introduced extra linear and nonlinear fields that are intrinsic to the undulator. These fields break the symmetry of the lattice and provide driving forces for nonlinear resonances, thereby perturbing the dynamics of the electron motion, particularly at large amplitudes. The main impact of these perturbations is on the beam lifetime, arising out of a reduction of both the transverse acceptance and the momentum acceptance. In this paper, we present the results of an ongoing study of these effects as they relate to the performance of the ALS. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. New chicane magnet design for insertion device straights at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Steve; Schlueter, Ross; Anderson, David; Gath, William; Jung, Jin-Young; Robin, David; Steier, Christoph; Stevens, Troy

    2001-12-10

    A chicane magnet incorporating counter-rotating permanent magnet pairs together with trim coils has been designed for use in the Advanced Light Source (ALS) straights in conjunction with two insertion devices. In particular, this design is being developed for use in the existing beam line (BL) 4 elliptically polarizing undulator (EPU) straight and in the BL11 EPU straight, currently under design and construction. The purpose of the chicane is to provide a fixed angular separation between two successive EPU photon fans, and to correct steering perturbations resulting from EPU polarization state changes. Polarization changes occur on the time scale of one second; associated steering corrections must be accomplished in less than a second. Hysteresis associated with conventional iron core electromagnets prevents fast steering correction to the required precision. This consideration motivated the iron-free design presented here.

  14. Advanced Monitoring of Trace Metals Applied to Contamination Reduction of Silicon Device Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillot, P.; Martin, C.; Planchais, A.

    2011-11-01

    The detrimental effects of metallic on certain key electrical parameters of silicon devices mandates the use of state-of-the-art characterization and metrology tools as well as appropriate control plans. Historically, this has been commonly achieved in-line on monitor wafers through a combination of Total Reflectance X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) and post anneal Surface Photo Voltage (SPV). On the other hand, VPD (Vapor Phase Decomposition) combined with ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry) or TXRF is known to provide both identification and quantification of surface trace metals at lower detection limits. Based on these considerations the description of an advanced monitoring scheme using SPV, TXRF and automated VPD ICP-MS is described.

  15. Analysis of insertion device magnet measurements for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.M.; Schlueter, R.; Wang, C.

    1993-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), which is currently being commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a third generation light source designed to produce XUV radiation of unprecedented brightness. To meet the high brightness goal the storage ring has been designed for very small electron beam emittance and the undulators installed in the ALS are built to a high degree of precision. The allowable magnetic field errors are driven by electron beam and radiation requirements. Detailed magnetic measurements and adjustments are performed on each undulator to qualify it for installation in the ALS. The first two ALS undulators, IDA and IDB, have been installed. This paper describes the program of measurements, data analysis, and adjustments carried out for these two devices. Calculations of the radiation spectrum, based upon magnetic measurements, are included. Final field integral distributions are also shown. Good field integral uniformity has been achieved using a novel correction scheme, which is also described.

  16. Proceedings of the Goddard Space Flight Center Workshop on Robotics for Commercial Microelectronic Processes in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Potential applications of robots for cost effective commercial microelectronic processes in space were studied and the associated robotic requirements were defined. Potential space application areas include advanced materials processing, bulk crystal growth, and epitaxial thin film growth and related processes. All possible automation of these processes was considered, along with energy and environmental requirements. Aspects of robot capabilities considered include system intelligence, ROM requirements, kinematic and dynamic specifications, sensor design and configuration, flexibility and maintainability. Support elements discussed included facilities, logistics, ground support, launch and recovery, and management systems.

  17. Spectral characteristics of insertion device sources at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Viccaro, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) synchrotron facility at Argonne National Laboratory will be a powerful source of hard x-rays with energies above 1 keV. In addition to the availability of bending magnet radiation, the storage ring will have 35 straight sections for insertion device (ID) x-ray sources. The unique spectral properties and flexibility of these devices open new possibilities for scientific research in essentially every area of science and technology. Existing and new techniques utilizing the full potential of these sources, such as the enhanced coherence, unique polarization properties, and high spectral brilliance, will permit experiments not possible with existing sources. In the following presentation, the spectral properties of ID sources are briefly reviewed. A summary of the specific properties of sources planned for the APS storage ring is then presented. Recent results for APS prototype ID sources are discussed, and finally some special x-ray sources under consideration for the APS facility are described. 9 refs.

  18. Silicon high speed modulator for advanced modulation: device structures and exemplary modulator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milivojevic, Biljana; Wiese, Stefan; Whiteaway, James; Raabe, Christian; Shastri, Anujit; Webster, Mark; Metz, Peter; Sunder, Sanjay; Chattin, Bill; Anderson, Sean P.; Dama, Bipin; Shastri, Kal

    2014-03-01

    Fiber optics is well established today due to the high capacity and speed, unrivaled flexibility and quality of service. However, state of the art optical elements and components are hardly scalable in terms of cost and size required to achieve competitive port density and cost per bit. Next-generation high-speed coherent optical communication systems targeting a data rate of 100-Gb/s and beyond goes along with innovations in component and subsystem areas. Consequently, by leveraging the advanced silicon micro and nano-fabrication technologies, significant progress in developing CMOS platform-based silicon photonic devices has been made all over the world. These achievements include the demonstration of high-speed IQ modulators, which are important building blocks in coherent optical communication systems. In this paper, we demonstrate silicon photonic QPSK modulator based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure, address different modulator configuration structures and report our progress and research associated with highspeed advanced optical modulation in silicon photonics

  19. Material and processing issues for the monolithic integration of microelectronics with surface-micromachined polysilicon sensors and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Montague, S.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1995-08-01

    The monolithic integration of micromechanical devices with their controlling electronics offers potential increases in performance as well as decreases in cost for these devices. Analog Devices has demonstrated the commercial viability of this integration by interleaving the micromechanical fabrication steps of an accelerometer with the microelectronic fabrication steps of its controlling electronics. Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Laboratory has integrated the micromechanical and microelectronic processing sequences in a segregated fashion. In this CMOS-first, micromechanics-last approach, conventional aluminum metallization is replaced by tungsten metallization to allow CMOS to withstand subsequent high-temperature processing during the micromechanical fabrication. This approach is a further development of an approach originally developed at UC Berkeley. Specifically, the issues of yield, repeatability, and uniformity of the tungsten/CMOS approach are addressed. Also, material issues related to the development of high-temperature diffusion barriers, adhesion layers, and low-stress films are discussed. Processing and material issues associated with alternative approaches to this integration such as micromechanics- first, CMOS-last or the interleaved process are also discussed.

  20. Experiences with integral microelectronics on smart structures for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, Ted; Casteel, Scott; Navarro, Sergio A.; Kraml, Bob

    1995-05-01

    One feature of a smart structure implies that some computational and signal processing capability can be performed at a local level, perhaps integral to the controlled structure. This requires electronics with a minimal mechanical influence regarding structural stiffening, heat dissipation, weight, and electrical interface connectivity. The Advanced Controls Technology Experiment II (ACTEX II) space-flight experiments implemented such a local control electronics scheme by utilizing composite smart members with integral processing electronics. These microelectronics, tested to MIL-STD-883B levels, were fabricated with conventional thick film on ceramic multichip module techniques. Kovar housings and aluminum-kapton multilayer insulation was used to protect against harsh space radiation and thermal environments. Development and acceptance testing showed the electronics design was extremely robust, operating in vacuum and at temperature range with minimal gain variations occurring just above room temperatures. Four electronics modules, used for the flight hardware configuration, were connected by a RS-485 2 Mbit per second serial data bus. The data bus was controlled by Actel field programmable gate arrays arranged in a single master, four slave configuration. An Intel 80C196KD microprocessor was chosen as the digital compensator in each controller. It was used to apply a series of selectable biquad filters, implemented via Delta Transforms. Instability in any compensator was expected to appear as large amplitude oscillations in the deployed structure. Thus, over-vibration detection circuitry with automatic output isolation was incorporated into the design. This was not used however, since during experiment integration and test, intentionally induced compensator instabilities resulted in benign mechanical oscillation symptoms. Not too surprisingly, it was determined that instabilities were most detectable by large temperature increases in the electronics, typically

  1. Molten-Metal Droplet Deposition on a Moving Substrate in Microgravity: Aiding the Development of Novel Technologies for Microelectronic Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megaridis, C. M.; Bayer, I. S.; Poulikakos, D.; Nayagam, V.

    2002-01-01

    Driven by advancements in microelectronics manufacturing, this research investigates the oblique (non-axisymmetric) impact of liquid-metal droplets on flat substrates. The problem of interest is relevant to the development of the novel technology of on-demand dispension (printing) of microscopic solder deposits for the surface mounting of microelectronic devices. The technology, known as solder jetting, features on-demand deposition of miniature solder droplets (30 to 120 microns in diameter) in very fine, very accurate patterns using techniques analogous to those developed for the ink-jet printing industry. Despite its promise, severe limitations exist currently with regards to the throughput rates of the technology; some of these limitations are largely due to the lack of the capability for reliable prediction of solder bump positioning and shapes, especially under ballistic deposition conditions where the droplet impact phenomena are inherently three-dimensional. The study consists of a theoretical and an experimental component. The theoretical work uses a finite element formulation to simulate numerically the non-axisymmetric (3-D) fluid mechanics and heat transfer phenomena of a liquid solder droplet impacting at an angle alpha on a flat substrate. The work focuses on the pre-solidification regime. The modeling of the most challenging fluid mechanics part of the process has been completed successfully. It is based upon the full laminar Navier-Stokes equations employing a Lagrangian frame of reference. Due to the large droplet deformation, the surface (skin) as well as the volumetric mesh have to be regenerated during the calculations in order to maintain the high accuracy of the numerical scheme. The pressure and velocity fields are then interpolated on the newly created mesh. The numerical predictions are being tested against experiments, for cases where wetting phenomena are not important. For the impact parameters used in the example shown (We = 2.38, Fr

  2. Nuclear fragmentation studies for microelectronic application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Duc M.; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.; Fogarty, Thomas N.

    1989-01-01

    A formalism for target fragment transport is presented with application to energy loss spectra in thin silicon devices. Predicted results are compared to experiments with the surface barrier detectors of McNulty et al. The intranuclear cascade nuclear reaction model does not predict the McNulty experimental data for the highest energy events. A semiempirical nuclear cross section gives an adequate explanation of McNulty's experiments. Application of the formalism to specific electronic devices is discussed.

  3. Kovar Micro Heat Pipe Substrates for Microelectronic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, David A.; Burchett, Steven N.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Robino, Charles V.; Schmidt, Carrie; Tigges, Chris P.

    1999-04-01

    We describe the development of a new technology for cooling microelectronics. This report documents the design, fabrication, and prototype testing of micro scale heat pipes embedded in a flat plate substrate or heat spreader. A thermal model tuned to the test results enables us to describe heat transfer in the prototype, as well as evaluate the use of this technology in other applications. The substrate walls are Kovar alloy, which has a coefficient of thermal expansion close to that of microelectronic die. The prototype designs integrating micro heat pipes with Kovar enhance thermal conductivity by more than a factor of two over that of Kovar alone, thus improving the cooling of micro-electronic die.

  4. Micromachined chemical sensor with integrated microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Sniegowski, J.; Koehler, D.; Ricco, T.; Martin, S.; McWhorter, P.

    With today's continued emphasis on environmental safety and health issues, a resurgence of interest has developed in the area of chemical sensors. These sensors would typically be used to monitor contamination hazards such as underground storage tanks or to assess previous contamination at waste disposal sites. Human exposure to chemical hazards can also be monitored. Additionally, these sensors can be used as part of a manufacturing process control loop. One type of sensor suitable for gas phase monitoring of chemicals is the quartz resonator or quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor. In this type of sensor, a thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonator is coated with a film that interacts with the chemical species of interest. Changes in the mass and elasticity of this film are reflected as changes in the resonant properties of the device. Therefore, the presence of the species of interest can be detected by monitoring the frequency of an oscillator based on the resonance of the quartz. These QCM sensors compete with surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices as a means for monitoring gas phase species. SAW devices are typically more sensitive to small amounts of a species, but the instrumentation associated with a SAW device is an order of magnitude more expensive than the instrumentation associated with a TSM wave resonator since the SAW devices operate in the 100's of MHz frequency regime while quartz resonators operate in the 5-25 MHz regime. We are working to improve the sensitivity of the QCM sensor by increasing the frequency of the device to 25 MHz (compared to the typical 5 MHz crystal) and by increasing the frequency stability of the system to an ultimate goal of 0.1 Hz. The 25 MHz QCM has already been achieved, and once the stability goal is achieved, the QCM will have the same sensitivity as a SAW device.

  5. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Lee, K D; Seo, D C; Nam, Y U; Choi, M C

    2010-10-01

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 °C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5×10(-8) Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations. PMID:21033972

  6. A microtomography beamline at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Kyungmin; Jin, Hua; Butler, Leslie G.; Kurtz, Richard L.

    2002-03-01

    A microtomography beamline has been recently assembled and is currently operating at the Louisiana State University's Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices synchrotron (CAMD). It has been installed on a bending magnet white-light beamline at port 7A. With the storage ring operating at 1.5 GeV, this beamline has a maximum usable x-ray energy of ˜15 keV. The instrumentation consists of computer-controlled positioning stages for alignment and rotation, a CsI(Tl) phosphor screen, a reflecting mirror, a microscope objective (1:1, 1:4), and Linux/LabVIEW-controlled charge coupled device. With the 1:4 objective, the maximum spatial resolution is 2.25 μm. The positioning and image acquisition computers communicate via transfer control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP). A small G4/Linux cluster has been installed for the purpose of on-site reconstruction. Instrument, alignment and reconstruction programs are written in MATLAB, IDL, and C. The applications to date are many and we present several examples. Several biological samples have been studied as part of an effort on biological visualization and computation. Future improvements to this microtomography station include the addition of a double-multilayer monochromator, allowing one to evaluate the three-dimensional elemental composition of materials. Plans also include eventual installation at the CAMD 7 T wiggler beamline, providing x rays in excess of 50 keV to provide better penetration of higher mass-density materials.

  7. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.; Lee, K. D.; Seo, D. C.; Nam, Y. U.; Choi, M. C.

    2010-10-15

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 deg. C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5x10{sup -8} Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  8. Design, processing and testing of LSI arrays, hybrid microelectronics task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.; Stuhlbarg, S. M.; Ravetti, R. G.; Zulueta, P. J.; Rothrock, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical cost models previously developed for hybrid microelectronic subsystems were refined and expanded. Rework terms related to substrate fabrication, nonrecurring developmental and manufacturing operations, and prototype production are included. Sample computer programs were written to demonstrate hybrid microelectric applications of these cost models. Computer programs were generated to calculate and analyze values for the total microelectronics costs. Large scale integrated (LST) chips utilizing tape chip carrier technology were studied. The feasibility of interconnecting arrays of LSU chips utilizing tape chip carrier and semiautomatic wire bonding technology was demonstrated.

  9. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology. 1993 Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The 1993 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 170 publications, 193 presentations, and 84 New Technology Reports and patents. The 1993 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 170 publications, 193 presentations, and 84 New Technology Reports and patents.

  10. Carbon nanotubes for thermal interface materials in microelectronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei

    As the integration scale of transistors/devices in a chip/system keeps increasing, effective cooling has become more and more important in microelectronics. To address the thermal dissipation issue, one important solution is to develop thermal interface materials with higher performance. Carbon nanotubes, given their high intrinsic thermal and mechanical properties, and their high thermal and chemical stabilities, have received extensive attention from both academia and industry as a candidate for high-performance thermal interface materials. The thesis is devoted to addressing some challenges related to the potential application of carbon nanotubes as thermal interface materials in microelectronics. These challenges include: 1) controlled synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates via chemical vapor deposition and the fundamental understanding involved; 2) development of a scalable annealing process to improve the intrinsic properties of synthesized carbon nanotubes; 3) development of a state-of-art assembling process to effectively implement high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes into a flip-chip assembly; 4) a reliable thermal measurement of intrinsic thermal transport property of vertically aligned carbon nanotube films; 5) improvement of interfacial thermal transport between carbon nanotubes and other materials. The major achievements are summarized. 1. Based on the fundamental understanding of catalytic chemical vapor deposition processes and the growth mechanism of carbon nanotube, fast synthesis of high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates (e.g., copper, quartz, silicon, aluminum oxide, etc.) has been successfully achieved. The synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on the bulk copper substrate by the thermal chemical vapor deposition process has set a world record. In order to functionalize the synthesized carbon nanotubes while maintaining their good vertical alignment

  11. Mandibular advancement devices: indications and predictors of treatment outcome. A review.

    PubMed

    Cuccia, A M; Caradonna, C

    2007-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a chronic sleep and respiratory disorder, which causes a partial or total obstruction of the air passage at the upper airway level. Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) have been used in the treatment of snoring, but may be a valid alternative to the continuous nasal positive airway pressure (CPAP) for certain OSAS cases. Therapy by means of MADs arises the interest of the scientific community and now there are many sleep-centres where dentists work as experts in sleep disorders. MADs are instruments of value because they are simple to use, reversible, portable and they generally have a low complication rate. They mechanically increase the oropharyngeal space by advancing the mandible and/or the tongue and reduce pharyngeal collapsibility. More than 60 different MADs are in use, with considerable variations in design. Several studies show that their systematic use produces an evident improvement in the global quality of life as well as in the symptoms of patients with OSAS, especially sleepiness. Even though significant progress has been made in proving the efficacy of MADs for OSAS, the ability to predict the treatment outcome and hence pre-select suitable candidates for this treatment still remains in its early stage. The first aim of this review is to supply to the clinician informations on the cephalometric and polysomnographic parameters that can be used to predict the efficacy of the outcome of MAD therapy in OSAS. Moreover, we examine the cases for which the use of a MAD is indicated. PMID:17938623

  12. Wireless Integrated Microelectronic Vacuum Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krug, Eric; Philpot, Brian; Trott, Aaron; Lawrence, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center's (SSC's) large rocket engine test facility requires the use of liquid propellants, including the use of cryogenic fluids like liquid hydrogen as fuel, and liquid oxygen as an oxidizer (gases which have been liquefied at very low temperatures). These fluids require special handling, storage, and transfer technology. The biggest problem associated with transferring cryogenic liquids is product loss due to heat transfer. Vacuum jacketed piping is specifically designed to maintain high thermal efficiency so that cryogenic liquids can be transferred with minimal heat transfer. A vacuum jacketed pipe is essentially two pipes in one. There is an inner carrier pipe, in which the cryogenic liquid is actually transferred, and an outer jacket pipe that supports and seals the vacuum insulation, forming the "vacuum jacket." The integrity of the vacuum jacketed transmission lines that transfer the cryogenic fluid from delivery barges to the test stand must be maintained prior to and during engine testing. To monitor the vacuum in these vacuum jacketed transmission lines, vacuum gauge readings are used. At SSC, vacuum gauge measurements are done on a manual rotation basis with two technicians, each using a handheld instrument. Manual collection of vacuum data is labor intensive and uses valuable personnel time. Additionally, there are times when personnel cannot collect the data in a timely fashion (i.e., when a leak is detected, measurements must be taken more often). Additionally, distribution of this data to all interested parties can be cumbersome. To simplify the vacuum-gauge data collection process, automate the data collection, and decrease the labor costs associated with acquiring these measurements, an automated system that monitors the existing gauges was developed by Invocon, Inc. For this project, Invocon developed a Wireless Integrated Microelectronic Vacuum Sensor System (WIMVSS) that provides the ability to gather vacuum

  13. Teaching Advanced Operation of an iPod-Based Speech-Generating Device to Two Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achmadi, Donna; Kagohara, Debora M.; van der Meer, Larah; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Sutherland, Dean; Lang, Russell; Marschik, Peter B.; Green, Vanessa A.; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a program for teaching two adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to perform more advanced operations on an iPod-based speech-generating device (SGD). The effects of the teaching program were evaluated in a multiprobe multiple baseline across participants design that included two intervention phases. The first intervention…

  14. Return on Investment and Technology-Based Training--An Introduction and a Case Study at Advanced Micro Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masumian, Bijan

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes findings from studies comparing classroom and technology-based approaches to training and the respective Return on Investment (ROI) data. Highlights several advantages of technology-based training. Offers information and initial ROI numbers on the use of technology-based training at Advanced Micro Devices, a global manufacturer of…

  15. Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Ancona, Mario G.; Yu, Zhi-Ping

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction to the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion or quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

  16. Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Ancona, Mario G.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Yu, Zhiping

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction ot the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

  17. A Cs2LiYCl6:Ce-based advanced radiation monitoring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, B. S.; Stonehill, L. C.; Dallmann, N.; Baginski, M. J.; Best, D. J.; Smith, M. B.; Graham, S. A.; Dathy, C.; Frank, J. M.; McClish, M.

    2015-06-01

    Cs2LiYCl6:Ce3+ (CLYC) scintillator has gained recent interest because of its ability to perform simultaneous gamma spectroscopy and thermal neutron detection. Discrimination between the two incident particle types owes to the fundamentally unique emission waveforms, a consequence of the interaction and subsequent scintillation mechanisms within the crystal. Due to this dual-mode detector capability, CLYC was selected for the development of an Advanced Radiation Monitoring Device (ARMD), a compact handheld instrument for radioisotope identification and localization. ARMD consists of four 1 in.-right cylindrical CLYC crystals, custom readout electronics including a suitable multi-window application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), battery pack, proprietary software, and Android-based tablet for high-level analysis and display. We herein describe the motivation of the work and engineering design of the unit, and we explain the software embedded in the core module and for radioisotope analysis. We report an operational range of tens of keV to 8.5 MeV with approximately 5.3% gamma energy resolution at 662 keV, thermal neutron detection efficiency of 10%, battery lifetime of up to 10 h, manageable rates of 20 kHz; further, we describe in greater detail time to identify specific gamma source setups.

  18. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing.

    PubMed

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices. PMID:26233395

  19. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Strittmatter, André; Rodt, Sven; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  20. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven Reitzenstein, Stephan; Strittmatter, André

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  1. Family-centred care during midface advancement with a rigid external device: what do families need?

    PubMed

    Bredero-Boelhouwer, H; Joosten, K F M; van Veen-van der Hoek, M; Mathijssen, I M J

    2013-08-01

    Midface advancement with distraction osteogenesis using the rigid external device (RED) is an effective but invasive treatment to correct the hypoplastic midface. This study draws up an inventory of the stressors, needs and coping strategies of families during this treatment, to determine the best conditions for family-centred care. Data were collected by reviewing the patients' files and administering semi-structured interviews. The data were analysed using the software program Atlas.ti and were re-analysed by an independent researcher. Parents and patients were interviewed separately. Fourteen families participated. Four patients had an absolute indication for surgery. All families were eager to have the patient's facial appearance improved. Nevertheless, despite psychological counselling, they experienced stress when confronted with the changed facial appearance. Another stressor was weight loss. Six patients were in a state of acute malnutrition and needed supplementary feeding. We conclude that the best conditions for family-centred care should be aligned to the different phases of treatment. Leading up to surgery it is important to screen families' expectations regarding aesthetic, functional and social outcomes and to assess their capacity to cope with the long treatment and effects of changed facial appearance. Peer contact and psychosocial training to increase self-esteem are tools to enhance co-operation and satisfaction. During the distraction and stabilisation phase, we advise the monitoring of nutritional intake and weight. During all phases of treatment easy accessibility to the team is recommended. PMID:23664572

  2. Advanced Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, Handling, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Englar

    2001-05-14

    Research is being conducted at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) to develop advanced aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability, handling and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles by using previously-developed and flight-tested pneumatic (blown) aircraft technology. Recent wind-tunnel investigations of a generic Heavy Vehicle model with blowing slots on both the leading and trailing edges of the trailer have been conducted under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These experimental results show overall aerodynamic drag reductions on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle of 50% using only 1 psig blowing pressure in the plenums, and over 80% drag reductions if additional blowing air were available. Additionally, an increase in drag force for braking was confirmed by blowing different slots. Lift coefficient was increased for rolling resistance reduction by blowing only the top slot, while downforce was produced for traction increase by blowing only the bottom. Also, side force and yawing moment were generated on either side of the vehicle, and directional stability was restored by blowing the appropriate side slot. These experimental results and the predicted full-scale payoffs are presented in this paper, as is a discussion of additional applications to conventional commercial autos, buses, motor homes, and Sport Utility Vehicles.

  3. Automatic visual inspection system for microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micka, E. Z. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A system for automatically inspecting an integrated circuit was developed. A device for shining a scanning narrow light beam at an integrated circuit to be inspected and another light beam at an accepted integrated circuit was included. A pair of photodetectors that receive light reflected from these integrated circuits, and a comparing system compares the outputs of the photodetectors.

  4. Local tetrahedron modeling of microelectronics using the finite-volume hybrid-grid technique

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.J.; Turner, C.D.

    1995-12-01

    The finite-volume hybrid-grid (FVHG) technique uses both structured and unstructured grid regions in obtaining a solution to the time-domain Maxwell`s equations. The method is based on explicit time differencing and utilizes rectilinear finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and nonorthogonal finite-volume time-domain (FVTD). The technique directly couples structured FDTD grids with unstructured FVTD grids without the need for spatial interpolation across grid interfaces. In this paper, the FVHG method is applied to simple planar microelectronic devices. Local tetrahedron grids are used to model portions of the device under study, with the remainder of the problem space being modeled with cubical hexahedral cells. The accuracy of propagating microstrip-guided waves from a low-density hexahedron region through a high-density tetrahedron grid is investigated.

  5. The Wales Region: Microelectronics Education to the Mid Eighties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lionel

    1982-01-01

    Discusses developments which should occur in the Wales region by the end of the Microelectronics Education Programme (1984). Indicates that a major curriculum project has been started to enable developments in information technology to be reflected in classrooms, focusing on the production of software and resource materials. (Author/JN)

  6. Microelectronic Technology and the Hearing Impaired: The Future. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorkildsen, Ron

    1985-01-01

    The potential of microelectronic technology for alleviating communication problems of hearing-impaired persons is discussed from a futuristic point of view. The need for computer literacy training is related to changing career opportunities. Computer literacy, artificial intelligence, and videodisc technology are described and related to training…

  7. Integrating Microcomputers and Microelectronics into the Physics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Douglas S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary microcomputer and microelectronics program offered jointly by the Physics and Computer Science Departments of East Texas State University. The program operates on both the graduate and undergraduate level. Content as well as structure of the program are discussed. (Author/DS)

  8. Speculations on the Social Effects of New Microelectronics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherns, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the implications of the reduced importance of employment for individuals, for enterprises (work conditions, management styles), trade unions (with a more political than industrial role), and the conservation of resources, concluding with a brief look at the possible benefits of microelectronics for the developing countries. (CT)

  9. Microelectronics in F. E.: Some Personal Perceptions. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, K. J.

    The recent microelectronics developments are having, and will continue to have, a sharp impact on various industries in Great Britain, and thus on the capacity of the Further Education System to produce qualified graduates. To maintain a high quality of education, instructors must learn of these new developments and teach them to their vocational…

  10. Reparable, high-density microelectronic module provides effective heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, K. J.; Maytone, F. F.

    1967-01-01

    Reparable modular system is used for packaging microelectronic flat packs and miniature discrete components. This three-dimensional compartmented structure incorporates etched phosphor bronze sheets and frames with etched wire conductors. It provides an effective heat sink for electric power dissipation in the absence of convective cooling means.

  11. Rainbows and ferrofilms - smart materials for hybrid microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Haertling, G.H.

    1996-12-31

    This review paper describes the materials, processing, properties and applications of the newly developed ultra-high displacement Rainbows and thick/thin ferroelectric Ferrofilms. Their applicability to hybrid and fully integrated microelectronics is discussed in regard to each of these areas of concern.

  12. Novel Rigid External Distraction Device Improves Stability and Controls the Vector During Midfacial Advancement.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Cory M; Rottgers, Stephen Alex; Langenfeld, Christopher C; Mulliken, John B; Padwa, Bonnie L

    2016-06-01

    The major limitation of the rigid external devices currently used for midfacial distraction after subcranial Le Fort III osteotomies is the ductile wire that connects the midface to the device, which makes it difficult to control the vector and force during distraction. The authors describe a novel external appliance that addresses this and other problems of contemporary devices, and application of a custom cranial template that facilitates precise placement of the device to achieve the planned vector of distraction. PMID:27213737

  13. Evidence for adverse reproductive outcomes among women microelectronic assembly workers.

    PubMed Central

    Huel, G; Mergler, D; Bowler, R

    1990-01-01

    Microelectronics assembly entails complex processes where several potentially fetotoxic chemical compounds are used extensively. This study was undertaken to assess the potential adverse reproductive outcomes among former women workers in a microelectronics assembly plant in New Mexico with respect to a comparable population from the same geographical region and to examine the relation between these outcomes and employment history in this plant. After matching a pool of 143 former microelectronic female workers and 105 referents, 90 former microelectronic female worker-referent pairs were constituted (representing 302 and 324 pregnancies in former workers and referents respectively). The odds ratio (for pair matching design) of spontaneous abortion among women workers, before beginning to assemble microelectronic components, was 0.9 (chi 2 = 0.04; NS). After the beginning of employment this odds ratio became 5.6 (chi 2 = 9.8; p less than 1%). This estimated odds ratio decreased to 4.0, taking into account the increased risk for spontaneous abortion in previous pregnancies before employment (chi 2 = 5.4; p less than 5%). It was not possible to determine if this effect was reversible owing to the small number of pairs available after employment. The findings of this study corroborate the results of former studies that suggest a potential association between electronic manufacturing activity and risk of spontaneous abortion. Although the organic solvents were suspected of being the potential risk factor, this study was inconclusive from this point of view. Nevertheless, these investigations may provide some insight into reproductive outcomes among female workers exposed to solvents. PMID:2378817

  14. Advanced copper/low-k IC devices: Packaging process development and materials integrtion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chungpaiboonpatana, Surasit

    Cu/low-k technology provides a number of key advantages including higher interconnect density, improved electrical performance, enhanced thermal performance, and reduced cost. Nevertheless, Cu/low-k IC technology poses many challenges to the packaging industry today. Specifically, low-k dielectric is much more fragile mechanically and copper surfaces are readily oxidized thereby weakening their adhesion to the ILD/metallization layers. The purpose of the study is to provide integrated and reliable materials and process solutions for the packaging of advanced Cu/low-k devices through fundamental materials science understanding. Novel solutions for advanced wirebond and flip-chip technologies are developed, along with resolutions for local and global material interaction issues. The zero-th packaging level study examines a novel direct gold wirebonding onto the Cu/low-k terminal pad structure. The first packaging level study attempts to eliminate the Cu/low-k wiresweeping issue through assembly material interactions with both bonding and transfer molding processes. The second packaging level study exams at the impact of Cu/low-k and processing material implementations on the copper trace cracking failures at the substrate level of a package. An integrated first and second level study on high performance flip chip technology using 8M Cu/low-k silicon chip is performed by the optimization of the underfill and substrate materials selections. Lastly, electromigration phenomena and corrosion mechanisms of copper metallization are developed for biased stressing assembly environment through the fundamental of electrochemistry. Throughout the experiment, the 90/130nm technology node of copper wafer fabrication using Black Diamond low-k dielectric is implemented in several large form-factor package assemblies. Functional test vehicles are assembled, reliability-stressed, and failure-analyzed according to the JEDEC standards for the validity of the integrated materials

  15. Automated hotspot analysis with aerial image CD metrology for advanced logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Trautzsch, Thomas; Kim, Min-ho; Seo, Jung-Uk; Yoon, Young-Keun; Han, Hak-Seung; Chung, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Meyers, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Continuously shrinking designs by further extension of 193nm technology lead to a much higher probability of hotspots especially for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. The CD of these potential hotspots needs to be precisely controlled and measured on the mask. On top of that, the feature complexity increases due to high OPC load in the logic mask design which is an additional challenge for CD metrology. Therefore the hotspot measurements have been performed on WLCD from ZEISS, which provides the benefit of reduced complexity by measuring the CD in the aerial image and qualifying the printing relevant CD. This is especially of advantage for complex 2D feature measurements. Additionally, the data preparation for CD measurement becomes more critical due to the larger amount of CD measurements and the increasing feature diversity. For the data preparation this means to identify these hotspots and mark them automatically with the correct marker required to make the feature specific CD measurement successful. Currently available methods can address generic pattern but cannot deal with the pattern diversity of the hotspots. The paper will explore a method how to overcome those limitations and to enhance the time-to-result in the marking process dramatically. For the marking process the Synopsys WLCD Output Module was utilized, which is an interface between the CATS mask data prep software and the WLCD metrology tool. It translates the CATS marking directly into an executable WLCD measurement job including CD analysis. The paper will describe the utilized method and flow for the hotspot measurement. Additionally, the achieved results on hotspot measurements utilizing this method will be presented.

  16. Fundamental studies of the mechanical behavior of microelectronic thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, William D.

    1987-03-01

    A fundamental program of research on the mechanical properties of microelectronic thin film material has been initiated at Stanford University. The work is being supported under AFOSR Grant No. 86-0051. In this interim Scientific Report, some of the progress made during the first year of the program is reviewed. We have made very rapid progress,expecially in the development of new experimental techniques for measuring mechanical properties. The work has already led to several publications and to an equal number of invited oral presentations, both of which are listed at the end of this report. The primary motivation of this work is to understand the mechanical properties of microelectronic this film materials. Although these materials are not structural materials as such, they are, nevertheless, expected to withstand very high stresses, both during manufacturing and in service. As a consequence, the mechanical properties of these materials are almost as important as their electronic properties for successful device applicaitions. because these materials often exist only as thin films bonded to substrates, it is necessary to study their mechanical properties in that state.

  17. ISS Squat and Deadlift Kinematics on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, N.; Caldwell, E.; Sibonga, J.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2014-01-01

    Visual assessment of exercise form on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) on orbit is difficult due to the motion of the entire device on its Vibration Isolation System (VIS). The VIS allows for two degrees of device translational motion, and one degree of rotational motion. In order to minimize the forces that the VIS must damp in these planes of motion, the floor of the ARED moves as well during exercise to reduce changes in the center of mass of the system. To help trainers and other exercise personnel better assess squat and deadlift form a tool was developed that removes the VIS motion and creates a stick figure video of the exerciser. Another goal of the study was to determine whether any useful kinematic information could be obtained from just a single camera. Finally, the use of these data may aid in the interpretation of QCT hip structure data in response to ARED exercises performed in-flight. After obtaining informed consent, four International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers participated in this investigation. Exercise was videotaped using a single camera positioned to view the side of the crewmember during exercise on the ARED. One crewmember wore reflective tape on the toe, heel, ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder joints. This technique was not available for the other three crewmembers, so joint locations were assessed and digitized frame-by-frame by lab personnel. A custom Matlab program was used to assign two-dimensional coordinates to the joint locations throughout exercise. A second custom Matlab program was used to scale the data, calculate joint angles, estimate the foot center of pressure (COP), approximate normal and shear loads, and to create the VIS motion-corrected stick figure videos. Kinematics for the squat and deadlift vary considerably for the four crewmembers in this investigation. Some have very shallow knee and hip angles, and others have quite large ranges of motion at these joints. Joint angle analysis showed that crewmembers

  18. Prospects of application of superconducting electrodynamic structures in electronic devices for their advancement to the terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraev, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Rak, A. O.; Sinitsyn, A. K.; Hramov, A. E.

    2015-04-01

    It is shown that the application of superconducting electrodynamic structures in microwave electronic devices not only improves their characteristics, but also creates premises for implementation of devices like the autophase traveling-wave tube (TWT) and peniotron operating in the millimeter range with their further advancement to the terahertz range, which is impossible for conventional electrodynamic structures with Ohmic losses. Superconducting corrugated waveguides make it possible to suspend limitations imposed on the output power of pulsed relativistic Cherenkov oscillators, which are associated with thermal degradation of the working surface of conventional waveguides with Ohmic losses.

  19. Synchrotron Radiation Microtomography for Large Area 3D Imaging of Multilevel Microelectronic Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, John W.; Li, Yan; Barth, Holly D.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; Pacheco, Mario; Goyal, Deepak

    2014-12-01

    3D x-ray computed tomography (CT), using conventional laboratory-based x-ray sources, has been used in the past to image multiple levels of interconnects in 3D microelectronic packages. These conventional x-ray sources can provide high resolution images with throughput times (TPT) of several hours. However, this can only be performed on localized areas of about 1-2 mm2, which gravely limits the application of 3D x-ray CT in the field of microelectronic packages with sizes usually in the range of 100-3600 mm2. An alternative to laboratory-based x-ray sources is synchrotron radiation, which can produce large area collimated beams for high flux x-ray imaging over a much larger field of view (FOV) than conventional sources. Synchrotrons can potentially image an entire 3D stacked chip package at high resolutions in less than an hour. Here, we present results using the micro-CT line at the advanced light source synchrotron to image an entire 16 × 16 mm system in a package in times as low as 3 min, demonstrating several orders of magnitude increase in the ratio of FOV to TPT as compared to laboratory-based x-ray methods.

  20. Technical Challenges in Reliable Microelectronics Packaging of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2000-01-01

    MEMS have shown a significant promise in the last decade for a variety of applications such as air-bag, pressure sensors, accelerometer, microgyro, chemical sensors, artificial nose, etc. Standard semiconductor microelectronics packaging needs the integrated circuits (IC) to be protected from the harsh environment, and provide electrical communication with the other parts of the circuit, facilitate thermal dissipation efficiently, and impart mechanical strength to the silicon die. Microelectronics packaging involves wafer dicing, bonding, lead attachment, encapsulation to protect from the environment, electrical integrity, and package leak tests to assure the reliable IC packaging technology. Active elements or microstructures in MEMS devices often interfaces with the hostile environment where packaging leak tests and testing of such devices using chemical and mechanical parameters will be very difficult and expensive. Packaging of MEMS is significantly complex as they serve to protect from the environment and microstructures interact with the same environment to measure or affect the desired physical or chemical parameters. The most of the silicon circuitry is sensitive to temperature, moisture, magnetic field, light, and electromagnetic interference. The package must then protect the on-board silicon circuitry while simultaneously exposing the microsensor to the effect it measures to assure the packaging technology of MEMS. MEMS technology has a major application in developing a microspacecraft for space systems provided reliability of MEMS packaging technology is sufficiently addressed. This MEMS technology would eventually miniaturize many of the components of the spacecraft to reach the NASA's goal by building faster, cheaper, better, smaller spacecraft to explore the space more effectively. This paper discusses the latest developments in the MEMS technology and challenging technical issues in the packaging of hermetically sealed and non-hermetically sealed

  1. Recent Advances in Photonic Devices for Optical Computing and the Role of Nonlinear Optics-Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis E.; Paley, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    The twentieth century has been the era of semiconductor materials and electronic technology while this millennium is expected to be the age of photonic materials and all-optical technology. Optical technology has led to countless optical devices that have become indispensable in our daily lives in storage area networks, parallel processing, optical switches, all-optical data networks, holographic storage devices, and biometric devices at airports. This chapters intends to bring some awareness to the state-of-the-art of optical technologies, which have potential for optical computing and demonstrate the role of nonlinear optics in many of these components. Our intent, in this Chapter, is to present an overview of the current status of optical computing, and a brief evaluation of the recent advances and performance of the following key components necessary to build an optical computing system: all-optical logic gates, adders, optical processors, optical storage, holographic storage, optical interconnects, spatial light modulators and optical materials.

  2. Lessons learned from early microelectronics production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, H.T.

    1998-02-01

    During the 1980s Sandia designed, developed, fabricated, tested, and delivered hundreds of thousands of radiation hardened Integrated Circuits (IC) for use in weapons and satellites. Initially, Sandia carried out all phases, design through delivery, so that development of next generation ICs and production of current generation circuits were carried out simultaneously. All this changed in the mid-eighties when an outside contractor was brought in to produce ICs that Sandia developed, in effect creating a crisp separation between development and production. This partnership had a severe impact on operations, but its more damaging effect was the degradation of Sandia`s microelectronics capabilities. This report outlines microelectronics development and production in the early eighties and summarizes the impact of changing to a separate contractor for production. This record suggests that low volume production be best accomplished within the development organization.

  3. The spatial and logical organization of devices in an advanced industrial robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the geometrical and device organization of a robot system which is based in part upon transformations of Cartesian frames and exchangeable device tree structures. It discusses coordinate frame transformations, geometrical device representation and solution degeneracy along with the data structures which support the exchangeable logical-physical device assignments. The system, which has been implemented in a minicomputer, supports vision, force, and other sensors. It allows tasks to be instantiated with logically equivalent devices and it allows tasks to be defined relative to appropriate frames. Since these frames are, in turn, defined relative other frames this organization provides a significant simplification in task specification and a high degree of system modularity.

  4. High reliability plastic packaging for microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, J.N.; Peterson, D.W.; Hsia, A.H.; Tuck, M.

    1997-07-01

    Goal was Assembly Test Chips (ATCs) which could be used for evaluating plastic encapsulation technologies. Circuits were demonstrated for measuring Au-Al wirebond and Al metal corrosion failure rates during accelerated temperature and humidity testing. The test circuits on the ATC02.5 chip were very sensitive to extrinsic or processing induced failure rates. Accelerated aging experiments were conducted with unpassivated triple track Al structures on the ATC02.6 chip; the unpassivated tracks were found to be very sensitive to particulate contamination. Some modifications to existing circuitry were suggested. The piezoresistive stress sensing circuitry designed for the ATC04 test chip was found suitable for determining the change in the state of mechanical stress at the die when both initial and final measurements were made near room temperature (RT). Attempt to measure thermal stress between RT and a typical polymer glass transition temperature failed because of excessive die resistor- substrate leakage currents at the high temperature end; suitable circuitry changes were developed to overcome this problem. One temperature and humidity experiment was conducted with Sandia developed static radom access memory parts to examine non-corrosion CMOS failures; this objective was not achieved, but corrosion failure at the metal to Si contacts on the die surface could be detected. This 2-year effort resulted in new designs for test circuits which could be used on an advanced ATC for reliability assessment in Defense Programs electronics development projects.

  5. Area Reports. Advanced materials and devices research area. Silicon materials research task, and advanced silicon sheet task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Silicon Materials Task and the Advanced Silicon Sheet Task are to identify the critical technical barriers to low-cost silicon purification and sheet growth that must be overcome to produce a PV cell substrate material at a price consistent with Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project objectives and to overcome these barriers by performing and supporting appropriate R&D. Progress reports are given on silicon refinement using silane, a chemical vapor transport process for purifying metallurgical grade silicon, silicon particle growth research, and modeling of silane pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors.

  6. Roughness evaluation from ultrapure fluid transfer surface materials for microelectronics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulieru, Dumitru G.

    1998-10-01

    The microelectronics fab need the manufacturing in ultraclean environments. The actual and future requirements of new generation of semiconductor devices become more stringent that which demand the reduction of tolerances to particles in cleanroom air and in processing liquids, gases and vacuum. The purity of process chemicals, water and gases is one area under scruting the systems for distribution. These fluids must also be examined so that their contamination charge to be minimal. For examining functional surfaces of fluid distribution systems by using more surface analysis tools such as electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), auger electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (AES), scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM), brush analyzer or 3D laser scanner provide specification of a material identity, a measure of its surface contaminant, and a measurement record of surface roughness. In our paper we will analyze two case studies of investigation results of surface roughness measurement for electropolished 316L stainless steel and molded polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF).

  7. High and low threshold P-channel metal oxide semiconductor process and description of microelectronics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouldin, D. L.; Feltner, W. R.; Hollis, B. R.; Routh, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    The fabrication techniques and detail procedures for creating P-channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (P-MOS) integrated circuits at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are described. Examples of P-MOS integrated circuits fabricated at MSFC together with functional descriptions of each are given. Typical electrical characteristics of high and low threshold P-MOS discrete devices under given conditions are provided. A general description of MSFC design, mask making, packaging, and testing procedures is included. The capabilities described in this report are being utilized in: (1) research and development of new technology, (2) education of individuals in the various disciplines and technologies of the field of microelectronics, and (3) fabrication of many types of specially designed integrated circuits which are not commercially feasible in small quantities for in-house research and development programs.

  8. Porous electrode apparatus for electrodeposition of detailed metal structures or microelectronic interconnections

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Hruby, Jill M.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and procedure for performing microfabrication of detailed metal structures by electroforming metal deposits within small cavities. Two primary areas of application are: the LIGA process which manufactures complex three-dimensional metal parts and the damascene process used for electroplating line and via interconnections of microelectronic devices. A porous electrode held in contact or in close proximity with a plating substrate or mold top to ensure one-dimensional and uniform current flow into all mold cavities is used. Electrolyte is pumped over the exposed surface of the porous electrode to ensure uniform ion concentrations at this external surface. The porous electrode prevents electrolyte circulation within individual mold cavities, avoiding preferential enhancement of ion transport in cavities having favorable geometries. Both current flow and ion transport are one-dimensional and identical in all mold cavities, so all metal deposits grow at the same rate eliminating nonuniformities of the prior art.

  9. Thermal control for space microelectronic equipment via pyroelectric material: Design, characterisation and experimental campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Riccardo; Gasbarri, Paolo; Lecci, Umberto

    2012-12-01

    In the last decades the development of new satellite platforms from a smaller to a bigger size goes in parallel with the development of the microelectronics equipment boarded on. Avionics, control systems and payloads equipment exploit the microelectronics in order to reduce the overall dimensions and masses and to increase the performances of each unit for the improvement of goals in each mission. A larger use of electronic elements with the relevant components increases the importance of a carefully equipment designed under different points of view. One of them is the thermal management. It is well known that the Joule Effect causes the heat overstocking which in turn reduces the efficiency of the electronic devices and increases the difficulties to manage the thermal power budget on board. A new design philosophy sees a possibility for a simpler and a more efficient thermal control on the use of the pyroelectric materials. Pyroelectrics are a "special" class of materials that demonstrates a spontaneous capacity to convert thermal fluxes in electrical charge and if applied on a "passive" structure they can "actively" reduce the heat overstocking. The electrical charge could be eventually stored for different purposes such as for instance the auto-feeding, or better the energy harvesting. With the reduction of the temperature of each component, and consequently with the reduction of the heat flux that flows through microelectronics, better efficiency and better performances are ensured. In this way the reliability is increased and the goals of the mission could be achieved easier and easier. In this paper the design of a thermal rig made up of pyroelectric devices and dummy electronics components in order to verify the thermo-electric conversion is presented. Furthermore an experimental campaign has been performed to validate the technology here introduced and the relevant results presented. In particular the characterisation of a typical aerospace pyroelectric

  10. Detecting Nano-Scale Vibrations in Rotating Devices by Using Advanced Computational Methods

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Raúl M.; Haber, Rodolfo E.; Schmittdiel, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a computational method for detecting vibrations related to eccentricity in ultra precision rotation devices used for nano-scale manufacturing. The vibration is indirectly measured via a frequency domain analysis of the signal from a piezoelectric sensor attached to the stationary component of the rotating device. The algorithm searches for particular harmonic sequences associated with the eccentricity of the device rotation axis. The detected sequence is quantified and serves as input to a regression model that estimates the eccentricity. A case study presents the application of the computational algorithm during precision manufacturing processes. PMID:22399918

  11. Detecting nano-scale vibrations in rotating devices by using advanced computational methods.

    PubMed

    del Toro, Raúl M; Haber, Rodolfo E; Schmittdiel, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a computational method for detecting vibrations related to eccentricity in ultra precision rotation devices used for nano-scale manufacturing. The vibration is indirectly measured via a frequency domain analysis of the signal from a piezoelectric sensor attached to the stationary component of the rotating device. The algorithm searches for particular harmonic sequences associated with the eccentricity of the device rotation axis. The detected sequence is quantified and serves as input to a regression model that estimates the eccentricity. A case study presents the application of the computational algorithm during precision manufacturing processes. PMID:22399918

  12. Measurement of local stress for microelectronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dawei

    For quality control and reliability analysis in semiconductor manufacturing, it is crucial to access the localized stress in devices due to process integration in thin film deposition, etching, passivation and thermal treatment. Presented in this dissertation is the exploration of a new methodology to access localized stress in patterned microstructures. It is called the "micro-bending-beam method". In order to evaluate the residual stress distribution in a thin film pattern residing on a silicon wafer, the Si underlying the pattern was thinned down uniformly so that its deflection, caused by the residual stress, could be measured. If the etched-back surface remains optically flat and reflective, then the bending of the diaphragm would be equivalent to its surface profile, which could be readily measured by a Twyman-Green laser interferometer. A procedure called "numerical etching" was implemented to simulate the Si etching process, which linked the stress state of the microstructure on a bulk wafer to that on a Si diaphragm. An initial stress field in the pattern was assumed, its effect on the bending of the Si diaphragm beneath was calculated and compared to the measured value. The discrepancy between them was used to modify the initially assumed stress field and repeated until satisfactory matches were achieved at each diaphragm thickness. The applicability of the micro-bending-beam method was demonstrated by resolving the residual stress in an electroless Ni bump. It was found that for a relatively thick diaphragm, the "plate" effect dominated; for a relatively thin diaphragm, the "membrane" effect dominated; at intermediate thickness, both effects existed. A general algorithm to solve non-linear equations where both bending stiffness and residual stress in a diaphragm must be considered was invented, and named "non-linear sequential analysis". It was found that for a pre-stressed pattern sitting on a stress-free Si diaphragm starting at to and thinned down to

  13. Advanced biosensing methodologies developed for evaluating performance quality and safety of emerging biophotonics technologies and medical devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilev, Ilko K.; Walker, Bennett; Calhoun, William; Hassan, Moinuddin

    2016-03-01

    Biophotonics is an emerging field in modern biomedical technology that has opened up new horizons for transfer of state-of-the-art techniques from the areas of lasers, fiber optics and biomedical optics to the life sciences and medicine. This field continues to vastly expand with advanced developments across the entire spectrum of biomedical applications ranging from fundamental "bench" laboratory studies to clinical patient "bedside" diagnostics and therapeutics. However, in order to translate these technologies to clinical device applications, the scientific and industrial community, and FDA are facing the requirement for a thorough evaluation and review of laser radiation safety and efficacy concerns. In many cases, however, the review process is complicated due the lack of effective means and standard test methods to precisely analyze safety and effectiveness of some of the newly developed biophotonics techniques and devices. There is, therefore, an immediate public health need for new test protocols, guidance documents and standard test methods to precisely evaluate fundamental characteristics, performance quality and safety of these technologies and devices. Here, we will overview our recent developments of novel test methodologies for safety and efficacy evaluation of some emerging biophotonics technologies and medical devices. These methodologies are based on integrating the advanced features of state-of-the-art optical sensor technologies and approaches such as high-resolution fiber-optic sensing, confocal and optical coherence tomography imaging, and infrared spectroscopy. The presentation will also illustrate some methodologies developed and implemented for testing intraocular lens implants, biochemical contaminations of medical devices, ultrahigh-resolution nanoscopy, and femtosecond laser therapeutics.

  14. Preliminary investigation of polystyrene/MoS2-Oleylamine polymer composite for potential application as low-dielectric material in microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Giovanni; Altavilla, Claudia; Ciambelli, Paolo; Neitzert, Heinrich C.; Iannace, Salvatore; Sorrentino, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Insulating materials play a vital role in the design and performance of electrical systems for both steady and transient state conditions. Among the other properties, also in this field, polymer nanocomposites promise to offer exciting improvements. Many studies in the last decade has witnessed significant developments in the area of nano-dielectric materials and significant effects of nano-scale fillers on electric, thermal and mechanical properties of polymeric materials have been observed. However, the developments of new and advanced materials to be used the miniaturization of electronic devices fabrication require extensive studies on electrical insulation characteristics of these materials before they can be used in commercial systems. In this work, Polystyrene (PS) composites were prepared by the blend solution method using MoS2@Oleylamine nanosheets as filler. The dielectric properties of the resulting comoposite have been investigated at 300K and in the frequency range between 1000 Hz and 1 MHz. The addition of the MoS2@Oleylamine nanosheets leads to a decreasing of the relative dielectric constant and of the electrical conductivity measured in the voltage range between ±500V. Thanks to a possibility to tune the electrical permittivity with the control of MoS2 concentration, these materials could be used as a low-dielectric material in the microelectronics applications.

  15. Preliminary investigation of polystyrene/MoS{sub 2}-Oleylamine polymer composite for potential application as low-dielectric material in microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, Giovanni; Altavilla, Claudia; Iannace, Salvatore; Sorrentino, Andrea; Ciambelli, Paolo; Neitzert, Heinrich C.

    2015-12-17

    Insulating materials play a vital role in the design and performance of electrical systems for both steady and transient state conditions. Among the other properties, also in this field, polymer nanocomposites promise to offer exciting improvements. Many studies in the last decade has witnessed significant developments in the area of nano-dielectric materials and significant effects of nano-scale fillers on electric, thermal and mechanical properties of polymeric materials have been observed. However, the developments of new and advanced materials to be used the miniaturization of electronic devices fabrication require extensive studies on electrical insulation characteristics of these materials before they can be used in commercial systems. In this work, Polystyrene (PS) composites were prepared by the blend solution method using MoS{sub 2}@Oleylamine nanosheets as filler. The dielectric properties of the resulting comoposite have been investigated at 300K and in the frequency range between 1000 Hz and 1 MHz. The addition of the MoS{sub 2}@Oleylamine nanosheets leads to a decreasing of the relative dielectric constant and of the electrical conductivity measured in the voltage range between ±500V. Thanks to a possibility to tune the electrical permittivity with the control of MoS{sub 2} concentration, these materials could be used as a low-dielectric material in the microelectronics applications.

  16. The Spin Torque Lego - from spin torque nano-devices to advanced computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grollier, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Spin transfer torque (STT), predicted in 1996, and first observed around 2000, brought spintronic devices to the realm of active elements. A whole class of new devices, based on the combined effects of STT for writing and Giant Magneto-Resistance or Tunnel Magneto-Resistance for reading has emerged. The second generation of MRAMs, based on spin torque writing : the STT-RAM, is under industrial development and should be out on the market in three years. But spin torque devices are not limited to binary memories. We will rapidly present how the spin torque effect also allows to implement non-linear nano-oscillators, spin-wave emitters, controlled stochastic devices and microwave nano-detectors. What is extremely interesting is that all these functionalities can be obtained using the same materials, the exact same stack, simply by changing the device geometry and its bias conditions. So these different devices can be seen as Lego bricks, each brick with its own functionality. During this talk, I will show how spin torque can be engineered to build new bricks, such as the Spintronic Memristor, an artificial magnetic nano-synapse. I will then give hints on how to assemble these bricks in order to build novel types of computing architectures, with a special focus on neuromorphic circuits. Financial support by the European Research Council Starting Grant NanoBrain (ERC 2010 Stg 259068) is acknowledged.

  17. Encapsulation methods for organic electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Blum, Yigal D.; Chu, William Siu-Keung; MacQueen, David Brent; Shi, Yijian

    2013-06-18

    The disclosure provides methods and materials suitable for use as encapsulation barriers in electronic devices. In one embodiment, for example, there is provided an electroluminescent device or other electronic device encapsulated by alternating layers of a silicon-containing bonding material and a ceramic material. The encapsulation methods provide, for example, electronic devices with increased stability and shelf-life. The invention is useful, for example, in the field of microelectronic devices.

  18. The work function engineering and thermal stability of novel metal gate electrodes for advanced CMOS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Penghui

    depleted silicon on insulator (FDSOI) NMOS or PMOS with thermal stability up to 1000°C. Compared to MoXSi YNZ (X=46% Y=12%, Z=42%) gates on HfO2, the gates on FlfSiO provides better thermal stability up to 1000°C with no degradation of work function (˜4.4 eV), EOT, fixed charge density, or gate leakage current. These results suggest that MoSiN films with optimized compositions could be promising metal gate candidates for advanced CMOS devices. The thermal stability of FUSI NiSi metal gate electrodes on both SiON and Hf-based high-kappadielectrics after typical back-end of line (BEOL) thermal annealing has been also investigated. It has been found that the thermal stability of FUSI NiSi metal gates is strongly dependent on the dopants and annealing ambient. The dependence of nickel diffusion on the dielectric thickness and dopants into the silicon channel is discussed in detail. It was found that 5 nm gate dielectric layers are sufficient to inhibit any detectable nickel diffusion from the FUSI NiSi metal gates into the silicon channel.

  19. Micromachined sensor and actuator research at Sandia`s Microelectronics Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.

    1995-08-01

    An overview of the major sensor and actuator projects using the micromachining capabilities of the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of micromechanical devices and control electronics for those devices. Our efforts are concentrated in the area of surface micromachining. Pressure sensors based on silicon nitride diaphragms and hot polysilicon filaments for calorimetric gas sensing have been developed. Accelerometers based upon high-aspect ratio surface micromachining are being developed. Actuation mechanisms employing either electrostatic or steam power are being combined with a three-level active (plus an additional passive level) polysilicon surface micromachining process to couple these actuators to external devices. The results of efforts toward integration of micromechanics with the driving electronics for actuators or the amplification/signal processing electronics for sensors is also described. This effort includes a CMOS-first, tungsten metallization process to allow the CMOS electronics to withstand high-temperature micromechanical processing. Also, a unique micromechanics-first approach is being pursued in which the micromechanical devices are embedded below the surface of the starting material for the CMOS.

  20. Ultrathin (<4 nm) SiO2 and Si-O-N gate dielectric layers for silicon microelectronics: Understanding the processing, structure, and physical and electrical limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. L.; Gusev, E. P.; Degraeve, R.; Garfunkel, E. L.

    2001-09-01

    The outstanding properties of SiO2, which include high resistivity, excellent dielectric strength, a large band gap, a high melting point, and a native, low defect density interface with Si, are in large part responsible for enabling the microelectronics revolution. The Si/SiO2 interface, which forms the heart of the modern metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor, the building block of the integrated circuit, is arguably the worlds most economically and technologically important materials interface. This article summarizes recent progress and current scientific understanding of ultrathin (<4 nm) SiO2 and Si-O-N (silicon oxynitride) gate dielectrics on Si based devices. We will emphasize an understanding of the limits of these gate dielectrics, i.e., how their continuously shrinking thickness, dictated by integrated circuit device scaling, results in physical and electrical property changes that impose limits on their usefulness. We observe, in conclusion, that although Si microelectronic devices will be manufactured with SiO2 and Si-O-N for the foreseeable future, continued scaling of integrated circuit devices, essentially the continued adherence to Moore's law, will necessitate the introduction of an alternate gate dielectric once the SiO2 gate dielectric thickness approaches ˜1.2 nm. It is hoped that this article will prove useful to members of the silicon microelectronics community, newcomers to the gate dielectrics field, practitioners in allied fields, and graduate students. Parts of this article have been adapted from earlier articles by the authors [L. Feldman, E. P. Gusev, and E. Garfunkel, in Fundamental Aspects of Ultrathin Dielectrics on Si-based Devices, edited by E. Garfunkel, E. P. Gusev, and A. Y. Vul' (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1998), p. 1 [Ref. 1]; E. P. Gusev, H. C. Lu, E. Garfunkel, T. Gustafsson, and M. Green, IBM J. Res. Dev. 43, 265 (1999) [Ref. 2]; R. Degraeve, B. Kaczer, and G. Groeseneken, Microelectron. Reliab. 39, 1445 (1999) [Ref. 3].

  1. Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high-capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Water Loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for the ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System. The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of crewed spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System hardware.

  2. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2013-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  3. Design and Evaluation of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2011-01-01

    A dual-bed device to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been designed and is undergoing testing. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the development of a water recirculation maintenance device is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The bed design further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a clear demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  4. Performance of a Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Device and Process for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2012-01-01

    A water loop maintenance device and process to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop has been undergoing a performance evaluation. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the water recirculation maintenance device and process is to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons-learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a Hamilton Sundstrand military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provides a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance process further leverages a sorbent developed for ISS that introduces a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware. This

  5. Device therapy in advanced heart failure: what to put in and what to turn off: remote telemonitoring and implantable hemodynamic devices for advanced heart failure monitoring in the ambulatory setting and the evolving role of cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sakima A; Abraham, William T

    2011-01-01

    Despite evidence based medical and pharmacologic advances the management of heart failure remains challenging, especially in the ambulatory setting. There is an urgent need to develop strategies to reduce hospitalizations and re-admission rates for heart failure in general. This focused review illustrates the potential role for remote telemonitoring and implantable hemodynamic devices to address this significant issue. We also explore the growth of cardiac resynchronization therapy and how it has evolved into another tool in our armamentarium for hemodynamic monitoring. PMID:21906246

  6. Nanotechnology in Microsystems: Towards the Integration of Nanoscale Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evoy, Stephane

    2002-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems have transformed the microelectronics industry by providing a new range of integrative functionalities to several applications. However, successful applications have been limited by materials and processing issues inherent to traditional microfabrication processes. Nanometer scale science and technology continues to revolutionize materials manufacturing, opening avenues for novel device design and integration approaches. Such advances will greatly enhance the list of functionalities accessible to integrative systems. Functions may include highly sensitive force- and mass sensors, photodetectors, biosystems, and signal processors. Our discussion will open with a quick overview of the current state of the art in integrative systems. We will then present prospective applications of nanotechnology in these areas. Topics will include the development and deployment of nanoeletromechanical systems as sensors and signal processors, as well as the development and assembly of multifunctional and hybrid nanosensors. Both "top-down" and "bottom-up" philosophies will be discussed, in terms of their application to materials development, device design, and process integration.

  7. Moore's law and the impact on trusted and radiation-hardened microelectronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Kwok Kee

    2011-12-01

    In 1965 Gordon Moore wrote an article claiming that integrated circuit density would scale exponentially. His prediction has remained valid for more than four decades. Integrated circuits have changed all aspects of everyday life. They are also the 'heart and soul' of modern systems for defense, national infrastructure, and intelligence applications. The United States government needs an assured and trusted microelectronics supply for military systems. However, migration of microelectronics design and manufacturing from the United States to other countries in recent years has placed the supply of trusted microelectronics in jeopardy. Prevailing wisdom dictates that it is necessary to use microelectronics fabricated in a state-of-the-art technology for highest performance and military system superiority. Close examination of silicon microelectronics technology evolution and Moore's Law reveals that this prevailing wisdom is not necessarily true. This presents the US government the possibility of a totally new approach to acquire trusted microelectronics.

  8. Insertion device and beam line plans for the Advanced Photon Source: A report and recommendations by the Insertion Device and Beam Line Planning Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    In the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR), fifteen complete experimental beam lines were specified in order to establish a representative technical and cost base for the components involved. In order to optimize the composition of the insertion devices and the beam line, these funds are considered a ''Trust Fund.'' The present report evaluates the optimization for the distribution of these funds so that the short- and long-term research programs will be most productive, making the facility more attractive from the user's point of view. It is recommended that part of the ''Trust Fund'' be used for the construction of the insertion devices, the front-end components, and the first-optics, minimizing the cost to potential users of completing a beam line. In addition, the possibility of cost savings resulting from replication and standardization of high multiplicity components (such as IDs, front ends, and first-optics instrumentation) is addressed. 2 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. Recent Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Novel Devices and Potential Shortcomings

    PubMed Central

    Blumenstein, J.; Liebetrau, C.; Linden, A. Van; Moellmann, H.; Walther, T.; Kempfert, J.

    2013-01-01

    During the past years transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved to a standard technique for the treatment of high risk patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. Worldwide the number of TAVI procedures is increasing exponentially. In this context both the transapical antegrade (TA) and the transfemoral retrograde (TF) approach are predominantly used and can be considered as safe and reproducible access sites for TAVI interventions. As a new technology TAVI is in a constant progress regarding the development of new devices. While in the first years only the Edwards SAPIEN™ and the Medtronic CoreValve™ prostheses were commercial available, recently additional devices obtained CE-mark approval and others have entered initial clinical trials. In addition to enhance the treatment options in general, the main driving factor to further develop new device iterations is to solve the drawbacks of the current TAVI systems: paravalvular leaks, occurrence of AV-blocks and the lack of full repositionability. PMID:24313644

  10. Fully integrated biochip platforms for advanced healthcare.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  11. Fully Integrated Biochip Platforms for Advanced Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Carrara, Sandro; Ghoreishizadeh, Sara; Olivo, Jacopo; Taurino, Irene; Baj-Rossi, Camilla; Cavallini, Andrea; de Beeck, Maaike Op; Dehollain, Catherine; Burleson, Wayne; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and biosensors are enabling developments of innovative biochips for advanced healthcare by providing fully integrated platforms for continuous monitoring of a large set of human disease biomarkers. Continuous monitoring of several human metabolites can be addressed by using fully integrated and minimally invasive devices located in the sub-cutis, typically in the peritoneal region. This extends the techniques of continuous monitoring of glucose currently being pursued with diabetic patients. However, several issues have to be considered in order to succeed in developing fully integrated and minimally invasive implantable devices. These innovative devices require a high-degree of integration, minimal invasive surgery, long-term biocompatibility, security and privacy in data transmission, high reliability, high reproducibility, high specificity, low detection limit and high sensitivity. Recent advances in the field have already proposed possible solutions for several of these issues. The aim of the present paper is to present a broad spectrum of recent results and to propose future directions of development in order to obtain fully implantable systems for the continuous monitoring of the human metabolism in advanced healthcare applications. PMID:23112644

  12. Characterization of Amorphous Silicon Advanced Materials and PV Devices: Final Technical Report, 15 December 2001--31 January 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P. C.

    2005-11-01

    The major objectives of this subcontract have been: (1) understand the microscopic properties of the defects that contribute to the Staebler-Wronski effect to eliminate this effect, (2) perform correlated studies on films and devices made by novel techniques, especially those with promise to improve stability or deposition rates, (3) understand the structural, electronic, and optical properties of films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) made on the boundary between the amorphous and microcrystalline phases, (4) search for more stable intrinsic layers of a-Si:H, (5) characterize the important defects, impurities, and metastabilities in the bulk and at surfaces and interfaces in a-Si:H films and devices and in important alloy systems, and (6) make state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) devices out of new, advanced materials, when appropriate. All of these goals are highly relevant to improving photovoltaic devices based on a-Si:H and related alloys. With regard to the first objective, we have identified a paired hydrogen site that may be the defect that stabilizes the silicon dangling bonds formed in the Staebler-Wronski effect.

  13. Advanced digital subtraction angiography and MR fusion imaging protocol applied to accurate placement of flow diverter device.

    PubMed

    Faragò, Giuseppe; Caldiera, Valentina; Tempra, Giovanni; Ciceri, Elisa

    2016-02-01

    In recent years there has been a progressive increase in interventional neuroradiology procedures, partially due to improvements in devices, but also to the simultaneous development of technologies and radiological images. Cone beam CT (Dyna-CT; Siemens) is a method recently used to obtain pseudo CT images from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with a flat panel detector. Using dedicated software, it is then possible to merge Dyna-CT images with images from a different source. We report here the usefulness of advanced DSA techniques (Syngo-Dyna CT, three-dimensional DSA iPilot) for the treatment of an intracranial aneurysm with a flow diverter device. Merging MR and Dyna-CT images at the end of the procedure proved to be a simple and rapid additional method of verifying the success of the intervention. PMID:25589548

  14. Advances in Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensor Technology Using GaN and ZnO-Based Devices

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Travis; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen; Kang, Byoung Sam; Wang, Hung-Ta; Chang, Chih-Yang; Lin, Jenshan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we review our recent results in developing gas sensors for hydrogen using various device structures, including ZnO nanowires and GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). ZnO nanowires are particularly interesting because they have a large surface area to volume ratio, which will improve sensitivity, and because they operate at low current levels, will have low power requirements in a sensor module. GaN-based devices offer the advantage of the HEMT structure, high temperature operation, and simple integration with existing fabrication technology and sensing systems. Improvements in sensitivity, recoverability, and reliability are presented. Also reported are demonstrations of detection of other gases, including CO2 and C2H4 using functionalized GaN HEMTs. This is critical for the development of lab-on-a-chip type systems and can provide a significant advance towards a market-ready sensor application. PMID:22408548

  15. Efficacy of mandibular advancement device in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: A randomized controlled crossover clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Crovetto-Martínez, Rafael; Alkhraisat, Mohammad-Hamdan; Crovetto, Miguel; Municio, Antonio; Kutz, Ramón; Aizpuru, Felipe; Miranda, Erika; Anitua, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) (KlearwayTM) in the treatment of mild-to-moderate obstructive sleep apnea and chronic roncopathy. Material and Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled, double blinded, and crossover clinical trial was conducted. Placebo device (PD) defined as a splint in the centric occlusion that did not induce a mandibular advancement served as a control. The mandible was advanced to the maximum tolerable distance or to a minimum of 65% of the maximum protrusion. After each sequence of treatment, patients were assessed by questionnaires, conventional polysomnography, and objective measurement of snoring at the patient’s own home. Results Forty two patients participated in the study and 38 completed the study. Patients mean age was 46 ±9 years and the 79% were males. The mean mandibular advancement was 8.6 ±2.8 mm. Patients used the MAD and the PD for 6.4 +2.4 hours and 6.2 +2.0 hours, respectively. Secondary effects (mostly mild) occurred in the 85.7% and the 86.8% of the users of MAD and PD, respectively. The MAD induced a decrease in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) from 15.3 +10.2 to 11.9 +15.5. The 50% reduction in the AHI was achieved in the 46.2% and the 18.4% of the patients treated with MAD and PD, respectively. The use of the MAD induced a reduction in the AHI by 3.4 +15.9 while the PD induced an increase by 10.6 +26.1. The subjective evaluation of the roncopathy indicated an improvement by the MAD and an increase in the perceptive quality of sleep. However, the objective evaluation of the roncopathy did not show significant improvements. Conclusions The use of MAD is efficient to reduce the AHI and improve subjectively the roncopathy. MAD could be considered in the treatment of mild-to-moderate OSA and chronic roncopathy. Key words:Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), mandibular advance device, treatment, efficacy, clinical assay. PMID:26241460

  16. Advanced laser-based tracking device for motor vehicle lane position monitoring and steering assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachalo, William D.; Inenaga, Andrew; Schuler, Carlos A.

    1995-12-01

    Aerometrics is developing an innovative laser-diode based device that provides a warning signal when a motor-vehicle deviates from the center of the lane. The device is based on a sensor that scans the roadway on either side of the vehicle and determines the lateral position relative to the existing painted lines marking the lane. No additional markings are required. A warning is used to alert the driver of excessive weaving or unanticipated departure from the center of the lane. The laser beams are at invisible wavelengths to that operation of the device does not pose a distraction to the driver or other motorists: When appropriate markers are not present on the road, the device is capable of detecting this condition and warn the driver. The sensor system is expected to work well irrespective of ambient light levels, fog and rain. This sensor has enormous commercial potential. It could be marketed as an instrument to warn drivers that they are weaving, used as a research tool to monitor driving patterns, be required equipment for those previously convicted of driving under the influence, or used as a backup sensor for vehicle lateral position control. It can also be used in storage plants to guide robotic delivery vehicles. In this paper, the principles of operation of the sensor, and the results of Aerometrics ongoing testing will be presented.

  17. 76 FR 71982 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... the Federal Register of August 8, 2011 (76 FR 48169). In the notice, FDA requested public comments.... 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Raquel Peat, Center for Devices and..., ] MD 20993-0002, (301) 796-6218, email: raquel.peat@fda.hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  18. SAW-grade SiO2 for advanced microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Andreas; Menzel, Siegfried; Schmidt, Hagen

    2009-05-01

    Acoustoelectronic devices based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology are primarily used in radio frequency filters, delay lines, duplexers, amplifiers and RFID tags. Thereby, SAW's are excited at the surface of piezoelectric materials (e.g. Quartz, LiTaO3, LiNbO3) by an RF signal applied via interdigital transducers (IDTs)1. Novel SAW applications that emerged recently in the field of microfluidics such as the handling of minimum quantities of fluids or gases2,3 require a fluid compatible design approach, high power durability and long lifetime of the devices. However, conventional SAW devices with finger electrodes arranged on top of the chip surface experience acoustomigration damage4,5 at high power input and/or higher operating temperature leading to failure of the device. Additionally, inappropriate material systems or chip surface topography can limit their performance in microfluidic application. To overcome these limitations the electrodes can be buried in an acoustically suited ("SAW-grade") functional layer which moreover should be adjustable to the specific biotechnological task. Depending on the properties of this layer, it can suppress the acoustomigration impact6 and improve the power durability of the device. Also, a reduction of the thermally-induced frequency shift is possible7. The present paper describes a novel SAW based chip technology approach using a modular concept. Here, the electrodes are buried in surface polished SAW-grade SiO2 fabricated by means of reactive RF magnetron sputtering from a SiO2- target. This approach will be demonstrated for two different metallization systems based on Al or Cu thin films on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates. We also show the application of the SiO2-layer with respect to compensation of thermallyinduced frequency shift and bio /chemical surface modification. Investigations were carried out using atomic force microscopy, laser-pulse acoustic measurement, glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy

  19. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) update: focus on device and procedure advances.

    PubMed

    Choy, D S

    1993-08-01

    This discussion is an update on the U.S. advances in percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). This report summarizes the knowledge that has been gained about the procedure, advances in technique, and increased information about the three lasers currently in use for PLDD: KTP, Nd:YAG, and holmium. A new surgical approach to the L5-S1 disc is described. It is concluded that PLDD has become an established procedure that will be more widely used because it is simple, effective, and reasonably safe. PMID:10146384

  20. Modeling micro-electronics drill bit behavior with ABAQUS Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.; Ricketson, E.

    1997-06-01

    Modeling of drill bit behavior under applied forces as well as modeling of the drilling process itself can aid in the understanding of the relative importance of the various drill bit process parameters and can eventually lead to improved drill bit designs. In this paper the authors illustrate the application of ABAQUS Standard to the stress and deformation analysis of micro-electronics drill bits that are used in manufacturing printed circuit boards. Effects of varying point geometry, web taper and flute length on the stress and deformation in a drill bit are illustrated.

  1. 78 FR 3319 - Amendments to Existing Validated End User Authorizations: Advanced Micro Devices China, Inc., Lam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Suzhou, China 78 FR [INSERT FR 3C002 and 3C004 215021. PAGE NUMBER] 1/16/ and Advanced Micro 13... on June 19, 2007 (72 FR 33646) to create Authorization VEU. ] Amendment to Existing Validated End... (Mexico) and Reports,'' published July 2, 2012 (77 FR 39354). Former List of Eligible Items for SK...

  2. Non-Intrusive Device for Real-Time Circulatory System Assessment with Advanced Signal Processing Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, E.; Postolache, O.; Girão, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a device that uses three cardiography signals to characterize several important parameters of a subject's circulatory system. Using electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmogram, and ballistocardiogram, three heart rate estimates are acquired from beat-to-beat time interval extraction. Furthermore, pre-ejection period, pulse transit time (PTT), and pulse arrival time (PAT) are computed, and their long-term evolution is analyzed. The system estimates heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) from the heart rate and PAT time series, to infer the activity of the cardiac autonomic system. The software component of the device evaluates the frequency content of HRV and BPV, and also their fractal dimension and entropy, thus providing a detailed analysis of the time series' regularity and complexity evolution, to allow personalized subject evaluation.

  3. Advanced InSb monolithic Charge Coupled Infrared Imaging Devices (CCIRID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, T. L.; Thom, R. D.; Parrish, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    The continued development of monolithic InSb charge coupled infrared imaging devices (CCIRIDs) is discussed. The processing sequence and structural design of 20-element linear arrays are discussed. Also, results obtained from radiometric testing of the 20-element arrays using a clamped sample-and-hold output circuit are reported. The design and layout of a next-generation CCIRID chip are discussed. The major devices on this chip are a 20 by 16 time-delay-and-integration (TDI) area array and a 100-element linear imaging array. The development of a process for incorporating an ion implanted S(+) planar channel stop into the CCIRID structure and the development of a thin film transparent photogate are also addressed. The transparent photogates will increase quantum efficiency to greater than 70% across the 2.5 to 5.4 micrometer spectral region in future front-side illuminated CCIRIDs.

  4. An advanced tracker design for pointing and control of space vehicles using the charge injection device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C.; Kollodge, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of charge transfer devices (CTD) in pointing and control of space vehicles is examined, with emphasis on the use of charge injection devices (CID). The selection of CTD type and CID operation, including CID signal and noise analysis and signal improvement, are discussed. Star tracking operational advantages of the CTD are pointed out, and the tracking optical concept is discussed and graphically depicted. The position interpolation procedure and the effects of rate of stellar motion on position interpolation are considered, and error analysis is examined. Finally, the breadboard and test program are discussed in detail, coarse and fine acquisition, test for star, track pattern, test procedure and results. An overall accuracy performance of approximately 0.02 pixels or approximately 0.8 arcsec for the test equipment and tracker was obtained.

  5. Automatic detection of selective arterial devices for advanced visualization during abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Simon; Kauffmann, Claude; Pfister, Marcus; Cloutier, Guy; Thérasse, Éric; de Guise, Jacques A; Soulez, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Here we address the automatic segmentation of endovascular devices used in the endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) that deform vascular tissues. Using this approach, the vascular structure is automatically reshaped solving the issue of misregistration observed on 2D/3D image fusion for EVAR guidance. The endovascular devices we considered are the graduated pigtail catheter (PC) used for contrast injection and the stent-graft delivery device (DD). The segmentation of the DD was enhanced using an asymmetric Frangi filter. The segmented geometries were then analysed using their specific features to remove artefacts. The radiopaque markers of the PC were enhanced using a fusion of Hessian and newly introduced gradient norm shift filters. Extensive experiments were performed using a database of images taken during 28 AAA-EVAR interventions. This dataset was divided into two parts: the first half was used to optimize parameters and the second to compile performances using optimal values obtained. The radiopaque markers of the PC were detected with a sensitivity of 88.3% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 96%. The PC can therefore be positioned with a majority of its markers localized while the artefacts were all located inside the vessel lumen. The major parts of the DD, the dilatator tip and the pusher surfaces, were detected accurately with a sensitivity of 85.9% and a PPV of 88.7%. The less visible part of the DD, the stent enclosed within the sheath, was segmented with a sensitivity of 63.4% because the radiopacity of this region is low and uneven. The centreline of the DD in this stent region was alternatively traced within a 0.74 mm mean error. The automatic segmentation of endovascular devices during EVAR is feasible and accurate; it could be useful to perform elastic registration of the vascular lumen during endovascular repair. PMID:26362721

  6. Low-Cost Photolithographic Fabrication of Nanowires and Microfilters for Advanced Bioassay Devices

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Nhi M.; Qiang, Liangliang; Li, Zhe; Vaddiraju, Santhisagar; Bishop, Gregory W.; Rusling, James F.; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2015-01-01

    Integrated microfluidic devices with nanosized array electrodes and microfiltration capabilities can greatly increase sensitivity and enhance automation in immunoassay devices. In this contribution, we utilize the edge-patterning method of thin aluminum (Al) films in order to form nano- to micron-sized gaps. Evaporation of high work-function metals (i.e., Au, Ag, etc.) on these gaps, followed by Al lift-off, enables the formation of electrical uniform nanowires from low-cost, plastic-based, photomasks. By replacing Al with chromium (Cr), the formation of high resolution, custom-made photomasks that are ideal for low-cost fabrication of a plurality of array devices were realized. To demonstrate the feasibility of such Cr photomasks, SU-8 micro-pillar masters were formed and replicated into PDMS to produce micron-sized filters with 3–4 µm gaps and an aspect ratio of 3. These microfilters were capable of retaining 6 µm beads within a localized site, while allowing solvent flow. The combination of nanowire arrays and micro-pillar filtration opens new perspectives for rapid R&D screening of various microfluidic-based immunoassay geometries, where analyte pre-concentration and highly sensitive, electrochemical detection can be readily co-localized. PMID:25774709

  7. Low-cost photolithographic fabrication of nanowires and microfilters for advanced bioassay devices.

    PubMed

    Doan, Nhi M; Qiang, Liangliang; Li, Zhe; Vaddiraju, Santhisagar; Bishop, Gregory W; Rusling, James F; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios

    2015-01-01

    Integrated microfluidic devices with nanosized array electrodes and microfiltration capabilities can greatly increase sensitivity and enhance automation in immunoassay devices. In this contribution, we utilize the edge-patterning method of thin aluminum (Al) films in order to form nano- to micron-sized gaps. Evaporation of high work-function metals (i.e., Au, Ag, etc.) on these gaps, followed by Al lift-off, enables the formation of electrical uniform nanowires from low-cost, plastic-based, photomasks. By replacing Al with chromium (Cr), the formation of high resolution, custom-made photomasks that are ideal for low-cost fabrication of a plurality of array devices were realized. To demonstrate the feasibility of such Cr photomasks, SU-8 micro-pillar masters were formed and replicated into PDMS to produce micron-sized filters with 3-4 µm gaps and an aspect ratio of 3. These microfilters were capable of retaining 6 µm beads within a localized site, while allowing solvent flow. The combination of nanowire arrays and micro-pillar filtration opens new perspectives for rapid R&D screening of various microfluidic-based immunoassay geometries, where analyte pre-concentration and highly sensitive, electrochemical detection can be readily co-localized. PMID:25774709

  8. Using Synchrotron Radiation Microtomography to Investigate Multi-scale Three-dimensional Microelectronic Packages.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Holly D; Elmer, John W; Li, Yan; Pacheco, Mario; Goyal, Deepak; Parkinson, Dilworth Y; MacDowell, Alastair A

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation micro-tomography (SRµT) is a non-destructive three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique that offers high flux for fast data acquisition times with high spatial resolution. In the electronics industry there is serious interest in performing failure analysis on 3D microelectronic packages, many which contain multiple levels of high-density interconnections. Often in tomography there is a trade-off between image resolution and the volume of a sample that can be imaged. This inverse relationship limits the usefulness of conventional computed tomography (CT) systems since a microelectronic package is often large in cross sectional area 100-3,600 mm(2), but has important features on the micron scale. The micro-tomography beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), in Berkeley, CA USA, has a setup which is adaptable and can be tailored to a sample's properties, i.e., density, thickness, etc., with a maximum allowable cross-section of 36 x 36 mm. This setup also has the option of being either monochromatic in the energy range ~7-43 keV or operating with maximum flux in white light mode using a polychromatic beam. Presented here are details of the experimental steps taken to image an entire 16 x 16 mm system within a package, in order to obtain 3D images of the system with a spatial resolution of 8.7 µm all within a scan time of less than 3 min. Also shown are results from packages scanned in different orientations and a sectioned package for higher resolution imaging. In contrast a conventional CT system would take hours to record data with potentially poorer resolution. Indeed, the ratio of field-of-view to throughput time is much higher when using the synchrotron radiation tomography setup. The description below of the experimental setup can be implemented and adapted for use with many other multi-materials. PMID:27167469

  9. Review on recent and advanced applications of monoliths and related porous polymer gels in micro-fluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Mercedes; Paull, Brett

    2010-06-01

    This review critically summarises recent novel and advanced achievements in the application of monolithic materials and related porous polymer gels in micro-fluidic devices appearing within the literature over the period of the last 5 years (2005-2010). The range of monolithic materials has developed rapidly over the past decade, with a diverse and highly versatile class of materials now available, with each exhibiting distinct porosities, pore sizes, and a wide variety of surface functionalities. A major advantage of these materials is their ease of preparation in micro-fluidic channels by in situ polymerisation, leading to monolithic materials being increasingly utilised for a larger variety of purposes in micro-fluidic platforms. Applications of porous polymer monoliths, silica-based monoliths and related homogeneous porous polymer gels in the preparation of separation columns, ion-permeable membranes, preconcentrators, extractors, electrospray emitters, micro-valves, electrokinetic pumps, micro-reactors and micro-mixers in micro-fluidic devices are discussed herein. Procedures used in the preparation of monolithic materials in micro-channels, as well as some practical aspects of the micro-fluidic chip fabrication are addressed. Recent analytical/bioanalytical and catalytic applications of the final micro-fluidic devices incorporating monolithic materials are also reviewed. PMID:20493286

  10. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  11. Device structures and carrier transport properties of advanced CMOS using high mobility channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, S.; Tezuka, T.; Irisawa, T.; Nakaharai, S.; Numata, T.; Usuda, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Shichijo, M.; Nakane, R.; Sugahara, S.

    2007-04-01

    Mobility enhancement technologies have currently been recognized as mandatory for future scaled MOSFETs. In this paper, the recent mobility enhancement technologies including application of strain and new channel materials such as SiGe, Ge and III-V materials are reviewed. These carrier transport enhancement technologies can be classified into three categories; global enhancement techniques, local enhancement techniques and global/local-merged techniques. We present our recent results on MOSFETs using these three types of the technologies with an emphasis on the global strained-Si/SiGe/Ge substrates and the combination with the local techniques. Finally, issues on device structures merged with III-V materials are briefly described.

  12. Magnetic field calculations of a permanent magnet insertion device for the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.

    1988-03-01

    The magnetic fields of a hybrid undulator for the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) have been calculated. The 2-D geometries of regular poles and end pole are chosen using PANDIRA and PE2D codes. The field distribution in 3-D geometry are calculated using the TOSCA code. It is shown that the undulator dimensions should be chosen according to the requirements of the final use. TOSCA calculations in the 2-D limit agreed remarkably well with the results of PANDIRA and PE2D.

  13. Particle LET spectra from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, J. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    1988-12-01

    Cumulative fractions for LET spectra were measured for particles ejected from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation. The measurements for the neutron irradiation compare well with Monte Carlo theoretical calculations. The spectra can be used to access microelectronics vulnerabilities in strategic-nuclear- weapon, space-trapped, and neutral-beam directed-energy particle environments.

  14. Microelectronics at Work: Productivity and Jobs in the World Economy. Worldwatch Paper 39.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Colin

    A combination of revitalized employment policies, greater industrial democracy, and new ways of distributing both the hours of work and the fruits of technological change are essential if the benefits of the microelectronic revolution are to be equitably shared. Microelectronic technology promises an array of benefits, and the electronic age is…

  15. Advanced devices for photoacoustic imaging to improve cancer and cerebrovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla Marien, Leonardo Gabriel

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information for breast cancer staging. Despite these promising studies, PAI remains an unfeasible option for clinics due to the cost to implement, the required large modification in user conduct and the inflexibility of the hardware to accommodate other applications for the incremental enhancement in diagnostic information. The research described in this dissertation addresses these issues by designing attachments to clinical ultrasound probes and incorporating custom detectors into commercial ultrasound scanners. The ultimate benefit of these handheld devices is to expand the capability of current ultrasound systems and facilitate the translation of PAI to enhance cancer diagnostics and neurosurgical outcomes. Photoacoustic enabling devices (PEDs) were designed as attachments to two clinical ultrasound probes optimized for breast cancer diagnostics. PAI uses pulsed laser excitation to create transient heating (<1°C) and thermoelastic expansion that is detected as an ultrasonic emission. These ultrasonic emissions are remotely sensed to construct noninvasive images with optical contrast at depths much greater than other optical modalities. The PEDs are feasible in terms of cost, user familiarity and flexibility for various applications. Another possible application for PAI is in assisting neurosurgeons treating aneurysms. Aneurysms are often treated by placing a clip to prevent blood flow into the aneurysm. However, this procedure has risks associated with damaging nearby vessels. One of the developed PEDs demonstrated the feasibility to three-dimensionally image tiny microvasculature (<0.3mm) beyond large blood occlusions (>2.4mm) in a phantom model. The capability to use this during surgery would suggest decreasing the risks associated with these treatments. However, clinical ultrasound arrays are not clinically feasible for microsurgical applications due to

  16. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawabata, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS

  17. Moving graphene devices from lab to market: advanced graphene-coated nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Hui, Fei; Vajha, Pujashree; Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Duan, Huiling; Padovani, Andrea; Larcher, Luca; Li, Xiao Rong; Xu, Jing Juan; Lanza, Mario

    2016-04-28

    After more than a decade working with graphene there is still a preoccupying lack of commercial devices based on this wonder material. Here we report the use of high-quality solution-processed graphene sheets to fabricate ultra-sharp probes with superior performance. Nanoprobes are versatile tools used in many fields of science, but they can wear fast after some experiments, reducing the quality and increasing the cost of the research. As the market of nanoprobes is huge, providing a solution for this problem should be a priority for the nanotechnology industry. Our graphene-coated nanoprobes not only show enhanced lifetime, but also additional unique properties of graphene, such as hydrophobicity. Moreover, we have functionalized the surface of graphene to provide piezoelectric capability, and have fabricated a nano relay. The simplicity and low cost of this method, which can be used to coat any kind of sharp tip, make it suitable for the industry, allowing production on demand. PMID:26593053

  18. Development and characterization of 3D, nano-confined multicellular constructs for advanced biohybrid devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaehr, Bryan James

    2011-09-01

    This is the final report for the President Harry S. Truman Fellowship in National Security Science and Engineering (LDRD project 130813) awarded to Dr. Bryan Kaehr from 2008-2011. Biological chemistries, cells, and integrated systems (e.g., organisms, ecologies, etc.) offer important lessons for the design of synthetic strategies and materials. The desire to both understand and ultimately improve upon biological processes has been a driving force for considerable scientific efforts worldwide. However, to impart the useful properties of biological systems into modern devices and materials requires new ideas and technologies. The research herein addresses aspects of these issues through the development of (1) a rapid-prototyping methodology to build 3D bio-interfaces and catalytic architectures, (2) a quantitative method to measure cell/material mechanical interactions in situ and at the microscale, and (3) a breakthrough approach to generate functional biocomposites from bacteria and cultured cells.

  19. Advances in CO2 laser fabrication for high power fibre laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Keiron; Rees, Simon; Simakov, Nikita; Daniel, Jae M. O.; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. A.; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser processing facilitates contamination free, rapid, precise and reproducible fabrication of devices for high power fibre laser applications. We present recent progress in fibre end-face preparation and cladding surface modification techniques. We demonstrate a fine feature CO2 laser process that yields topography significantly smaller than that achieved with typical mechanical cleaving processes. We also investigate the side processing of optical fibres for the fabrication of all-glass cladding light strippers and demonstrate extremely efficient cladding mode removal. We apply both techniques to fibres with complex designs containing multiple layers of doped and un-doped silica as well as shaped and circularly symmetric structures. Finally, we discuss the challenges and approaches to working with various fibre and glass-types.

  20. Advances in phosphors based on organic materials for light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kashma; Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Vinod; Swart, Hendrik C.

    2016-01-01

    A brief overview is presented in the light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on purely organic materials. Organic LEDs are of great interest to the research community because of their outstanding properties and flexibility. Comparison between devices made using different organic materials and their derivatives with respect to synthetic protocols, characterizations, quantum efficiencies, sensitivity, specificity and their applications in various fields have been discussed. This review also discusses the essential requirement and scientific issues that arise in synthesizing cost-effective and environmental friendly organic LEDs diodes based on purely organic materials. This mini review aims to capture and convey some of the key current developments in phosphors formed by purely organic materials and highlights some possible future applications. Hence, this study comes up with a widespread discussion on the various contents in a single platform. Also, it offers avenues for new researchers for futuristic development in the area.

  1. Advanced techniques for latent fingerprint detection and validation using a CWL device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrushin, Andrey; Hildebrandt, Mario; Fischer, Robert; Kiertscher, Tobias; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2012-06-01

    The technology-aided support of forensic experts while investigating crime scenes and collecting traces becomes a more and more important part in the domains of image acquisition and signal processing. The manual lifting of latent fingerprints using conventional methods like the use of carbon black powder is time-consuming and very limited in its scope of application. New technologies for a contact-less and non-invasive acquisition and automatic processing of latent fingerprints, promise the possibilities to inspect much more and larger surface areas and can significantly simplify and speed up the workflow. Furthermore, it allows multiple investigations of the same trace, subsequent chemical analysis of the residue left behind and the acquisition of latent fingerprints on sensitive surfaces without destroying the surface itself. In this work, a FRT MicroProf200 surface measurement device equipped with a chromatic white-light sensor CWL600 is used. The device provides a gray-scale intensity image and 3D-topography data simultaneously. While large area scans are time-consuming, the detection and localization of finger traces are done based on low-resolution scans. The localized areas are scanned again with higher resolution. Due to the broad variety of different surface characteristics the fingerprint pattern is often overlaid by the surface structure or texture. Thus, image processing and classification techniques are proposed for validation and visualization of ridge lines in high-resolution scans. Positively validated regions containing complete or sufficient partial fingerprints are passed on to forensic experts. The experiments are provided on a set of three surfaces with different reflection and texture characteristics, and fingerprints from ten different persons.

  2. MEMS probes for on-wafer RF microwave characterization of future microelectronics: design, fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzouk, Jaouad; Arscott, Steve; El Fellahi, Abdelhatif; Haddadi, Kamel; Lasri, Tuami; Boyaval, Christophe; Dambrine, Gilles

    2015-07-01

    This article presents microelectromechanical system (MEMS) ground-signal-ground (GSG) probes based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology for on-wafer microwave characterization of radio-frequency (RF) microelectronics. The probe is designed using optimized coplanar waveguide structures with the aim of ensuring a low-contact resistance between the probe and the pads of the device under test (DUT). The probes are batch fabricated using SOI substrates and employ a simple silicon micromachining process. The probes have a pitch of 4.5 µm with miniaturized dimensions for a DUT pad area with a similar size. Electrical (dc) measurements show that the fabricated probe has a low-contact resistance (~0.02 Ω) on gold pads. Excellent extracted RF performances of the probe are observed up to 30 GHz, showing an insertion loss better than 2.2 dB and return loss better than 20 dB over the frequency range. An ageing study shows the probes are capable of forming this dc contact for over 6000 contact cycles. The preliminary result of the repeatability of on-wafer one-port measurements with the miniaturized probe shows a consistent RF performance maintained through several contacts. The data indicates that the proposed MEMS probe is suitable for the high-frequency characterization of integrated nanoscale devices having reduced pad dimensions.

  3. Improvement of process control using wafer geometry for enhanced manufacturability of advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Lee, Jongsu; Kim, Sang Min; Lee, Changhwan; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kwon, Wontaik; Park, Sung-Ki; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Awasthi, Amartya; Kim, J. H.; Veeraraghavan, Sathish; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Dighe, Prasanna; Lee, Cheouljung; Byeon, Jungho; Dey, Soham; Sinha, Jaydeep

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive advancements in semiconductor technology have resulted in integrated chip (IC) manufacturing capability at sub-20nm half-pitch nodes. With this, lithography overlay error budgets are becoming increasingly stringent. The delay in EUV lithography readiness for high volume manufacturing (HVM) and the need for multiple-patterning lithography with 193i technology has further amplified the overlay issue. Thus there exists a need for technologies that can improve overlay errors in HVM. The traditional method for reducing overlay errors predominantly focused on improving lithography scanner printability performance. However, processes outside of the lithography sector known as processinduced overlay errors can contribute significantly to the total overlay at the current requirements. Monitoring and characterizing process-induced overlay has become critical for advanced node patterning. Recently a relatively new technique for overlay control that uses high-resolution wafer geometry measurements has gained significance. In this work we present the implementation of this technique in an IC fabrication environment to monitor wafer geometry changes induced across several points in the process flow, of multiple product layers with critical overlay performance requirement. Several production wafer lots were measured and analyzed on a patterned wafer geometry tool. Changes induced in wafer geometry as a result of wafer processing were related to down-stream overlay error contribution using the analytical in-plane distortion (IPD) calculation model. Through this segmentation, process steps that are major contributors to down-stream overlay were identified. Subsequent process optimization was then isolated to those process steps where maximum benefit might be realized. Root-cause for the within-wafer, wafer-to-wafer, tool-to-tool, and station-to-station variations observed were further investigated using local shape curvature changes - which is directly related to

  4. Advances in three-dimensional rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices for biological applications

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, P. F.; Ben Azouz, A.; Vázquez, M.; Liu, J.; Marczak, S.; Slouka, Z.; Chang, H. C.; Diamond, D.; Brabazon, D.

    2014-01-01

    The capability of 3D printing technologies for direct production of complex 3D structures in a single step has recently attracted an ever increasing interest within the field of microfluidics. Recently, ultrafast lasers have also allowed developing new methods for production of internal microfluidic channels within the bulk of glass and polymer materials by direct internal 3D laser writing. This review critically summarizes the latest advances in the production of microfluidic 3D structures by using 3D printing technologies and direct internal 3D laser writing fabrication methods. Current applications of these rapid prototyped microfluidic platforms in biology will be also discussed. These include imaging of cells and living organisms, electrochemical detection of viruses and neurotransmitters, and studies in drug transport and induced-release of adenosine triphosphate from erythrocytes. PMID:25538804

  5. Advanced Biasing Experiments on the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Matthew; Korepanov, Sergey; Garate, Eusebio; Yang, Xiaokang; Gota, Hiroshi; Douglass, Jon; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Uchizono, Nolan; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    The C-2 experiment seeks to study the evolution, heating and sustainment effects of neutral beam injection on field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. Recently, substantial improvements in plasma performance were achieved through the application of edge biasing with coaxial plasma guns located in the divertors. Edge biasing provides rotation control that reduces instabilities and E × B shear that improves confinement. Typically, the plasma gun arcs are run at ~ 10 MW for the entire shot duration (~ 5 ms), which will become unsustainable as the plasma duration increases. We have conducted several advanced biasing experiments with reduced-average-power plasma gun operating modes and alternative biasing cathodes in an effort to develop an effective biasing scenario applicable to steady state FRC plasmas. Early results show that several techniques can potentially provide effective, long-duration edge biasing.

  6. Advances in three-dimensional rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices for biological applications.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P F; Ben Azouz, A; Vázquez, M; Liu, J; Marczak, S; Slouka, Z; Chang, H C; Diamond, D; Brabazon, D

    2014-09-01

    The capability of 3D printing technologies for direct production of complex 3D structures in a single step has recently attracted an ever increasing interest within the field of microfluidics. Recently, ultrafast lasers have also allowed developing new methods for production of internal microfluidic channels within the bulk of glass and polymer materials by direct internal 3D laser writing. This review critically summarizes the latest advances in the production of microfluidic 3D structures by using 3D printing technologies and direct internal 3D laser writing fabrication methods. Current applications of these rapid prototyped microfluidic platforms in biology will be also discussed. These include imaging of cells and living organisms, electrochemical detection of viruses and neurotransmitters, and studies in drug transport and induced-release of adenosine triphosphate from erythrocytes. PMID:25538804

  7. Advances in the development of an imaging device for plaque measurement in the area of the carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Ličev, Lačezar; Krumnikl, Michal; Škuta, Jaromír; Babiuch, Marek; Farana, Radim

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the advances in the development and subsequent testing of an imaging device for three-dimensional ultrasound measurement of atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid artery. The embolization from the atherosclerotic carotid plaque is one of the most common causes of ischemic stroke and, therefore, we consider the measurement of the plaque as extremely important. The paper describes the proposed hardware for enhancing the standard ultrasonic probe to provide a possibility of accurate probe positioning and synchronization with the cardiac activity, allowing the precise plaque measurements that were impossible with the standard equipment. The synchronization signal is derived from the output signal of the patient monitor (electrocardiogram (ECG)), processed by a microcontroller-based system, generating the control commands for the linear motion moving the probe. The controlling algorithm synchronizes the movement with the ECG waveform to obtain clear images not disturbed by the heart activity. PMID:26740760

  8. Moving graphene devices from lab to market: advanced graphene-coated nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Fei; Vajha, Pujashree; Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Duan, Huiling; Padovani, Andrea; Larcher, Luca; Li, Xiao Rong; Xu, Jing Juan; Lanza, Mario

    2016-04-01

    After more than a decade working with graphene there is still a preoccupying lack of commercial devices based on this wonder material. Here we report the use of high-quality solution-processed graphene sheets to fabricate ultra-sharp probes with superior performance. Nanoprobes are versatile tools used in many fields of science, but they can wear fast after some experiments, reducing the quality and increasing the cost of the research. As the market of nanoprobes is huge, providing a solution for this problem should be a priority for the nanotechnology industry. Our graphene-coated nanoprobes not only show enhanced lifetime, but also additional unique properties of graphene, such as hydrophobicity. Moreover, we have functionalized the surface of graphene to provide piezoelectric capability, and have fabricated a nano relay. The simplicity and low cost of this method, which can be used to coat any kind of sharp tip, make it suitable for the industry, allowing production on demand.After more than a decade working with graphene there is still a preoccupying lack of commercial devices based on this wonder material. Here we report the use of high-quality solution-processed graphene sheets to fabricate ultra-sharp probes with superior performance. Nanoprobes are versatile tools used in many fields of science, but they can wear fast after some experiments, reducing the quality and increasing the cost of the research. As the market of nanoprobes is huge, providing a solution for this problem should be a priority for the nanotechnology industry. Our graphene-coated nanoprobes not only show enhanced lifetime, but also additional unique properties of graphene, such as hydrophobicity. Moreover, we have functionalized the surface of graphene to provide piezoelectric capability, and have fabricated a nano relay. The simplicity and low cost of this method, which can be used to coat any kind of sharp tip, make it suitable for the industry, allowing production on demand. Electronic

  9. Advances in molecular electronics: Synthesis and testing of potential molecular electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, David Wilson, Jr.

    New potential molecular electronics devices have been synthesized based on our knowledge of previous systems that have come out of our group. Previous studies and current studies have shown that simple molecular systems demonstrate negative differential resistance (NDR) and memory characteristics. The new systems rely primarily on the redox properties of the compounds to improve upon the solid state properties already observed. Most of these new organic compounds use thiol-based "alligator clips" for attachment to metal surfaces. Some of the compounds, however, contain different "alligator clips," primarily isonitriles, for attachment to metal substrates. It is our hope that these new "alligator clips" will offer lower conductivity barriers (higher current density). Electrochemical tests have been performed in order to evaluate those redox properties and in the hope of using those electrochemical results as a predictive tool to evaluate the usefulness of those compounds. Also, organic structures with polymerizable functionalities have been synthesized in order to cross-link the molecules once they are a part of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). This has been shown to enable the electrochemical growth of polypyrrole from a SAM in a controllable manner.

  10. New regulations for medical devices: Rationale, advances and impact on research and patient care

    PubMed Central

    Labek, Gerold; Schöffl, Harald; Stoica, Christian Ioan

    2016-01-01

    A series of events relating to inferior medical devices has brought about changes in the legal requirements regarding quality control on the part of regulators. Apart from clinical studies, register and routine data will play an essential role in this context. To ensure adequate use of these data, adapted methodologies are required as register data in fact represent a new scientific entity. For the interpretation of register and routine data several limitations of published data should be taken into account. In many cases essential parameters of study cohorts - such as age, comorbidities, the patients’ risk profiles or the hospital profile - are not presented. Required data and evaluation procedures differ significantly, for example, between hip and spine implants. A “one fits for all” methodology is quite unlikely to exist and vigorous efforts will be required to develop suitable standards in the next future. The new legislation will affect all high-risk products, besides joint implants also contact lenses, cardiac pacemakers or stents, for example, the new regulations can markedly enhance product quality monitoring. Register data and clinical studies should not be considered as competitors, they complement each other when used responsibly. In the future follow-up studies should increasingly focus on specific questions, while global follow-up investigations regarding product complication rates and surgical methods will increasingly be covered by registers. PMID:27004163

  11. Charge-Transfer Mobility Parameters in Photoelectronic Devices: The Advanced Miller-Abrahams Computation.

    PubMed

    Basilevsky, M V; Odinokov, A V; Komarova, K G

    2015-06-18

    The local hopping step of the electron transfer (ET) reaction is investigated for a real organic material composed of molecules M (N,N'-di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine). This material is implemented in light-emitting photoelectronic devices. The conductivity effect is simulated and calculated at a molecular level. We have studied the ET mechanism alternative to that suggested by the usually employed Marcus-like polaron model. The ion-molecular binary complex M(+)M (for hole transfer) is considered as a reaction center. The reaction dynamics is carried through the low-frequency intermolecular vibration coordinate connecting its fragments (the promotion mode). Its coupling to the acoustic phonon bath serves for a dissipation of the reaction energy misfit. The high-frequency intramolecular vibrations (the reorganization modes) modulate the reaction kinetics via Franck-Condon factors induced by their polarization. The ET rate constants are evaluated in terms of the computational algorithm described earlier (Basilevsky, M. V.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2013 139, 234102). Standard quantum-chemical and molecular dynamical techniques are used for a calculation of all necessary parameters of this model. The macroscopic charge-carrier mobility of the material is estimated by properly averaging the rate constants over the total simulation cell. PMID:25636079

  12. The Design and Optimization of Advanced Thermophotovoltaic Devices for Deep Space Applications Using a New Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Sherif; Canfield, L. T. Burt

    2007-02-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells hold great promise for lightweight, reliable energy conversion for deep space missions. A new method for developing a realistic model of any type of solar cell, with application to Thermophotovoltaic devices, is presented in this paper. Taking into account the high cost of research and experimentation involved with the development of advanced cells, we present here this novel methodology. An example model of an InGaP/GaAs/Ge multi-junction cell is prepared and is fully simulated. The major stages of the process are explained and the simulation results are compared to published experimental data. An example of cell parameters optimization is also presented. The flexibility of the proposed methodology is demonstrated and example results are shown throughout the whole process. One of the big problems for use of TPV devices in any space mission is heat removal. Currently, many TPV designs assume a low temperature radiator, which equates to large areas and masses. As an application to demonstrate the advantage of this approach. The Silvaco Virtual Wafer Fabrication Software is used as a tool to examine TPV optimization and performance at high temperatures in an attempt to reduce the mass cost associated with large radiators. Results are shown for InGaAs cells optimized to a 1300K black body at 350 K, 400 K, 450 K, and, 500 K.

  13. Assessment and Assurance of Microelectronics Packaging Technology of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2000-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have shown a significant promise in the last decade for a variety of applications such as air-bag, pressure sensors, accelerometer, microgyro, etc. Standard semiconductor microelectronics packaging needs the integrated circuits to be protected from the harsh environment, and provide electrical communication with the other parts of the circuit, facilitate thermal dissipation efficiently, and impart mechanical strength to the silicon die. Microelectronics packaging involves wafer dicing, bonding, lead attachment, encapsulation to protect from the environment, electrical integrity, and package leak tests to assure the packaging technology. In the case of MEMS the microstructures (active elements) often interfaces with the hostile environment where packaging leak tests and testing of such devices using chemical and mechanical parameters will be very difficult and expensive. Packaging of MEMS is significantly complex as they serve to protect from the environment and microstructures interact with the same environment to measure or affect the desired physical or chemical parameters. The most of the silicon circuitry is sensitive to temperature, moisture, magnetic field, light, and electromagnetic interference. The package must then protect the on-board silicon circuitry while simultaneously exposing the microsensor to the effect it 'measures to assure the MEMS technology by lowering the risk to zero. MEMS technology has a major application in developing a microspacecraft for space systems provided assurance of MEMS technology is sufficiently addressed nondestructively. This technology would eventually miniaturize many of the components of the spacecraft to reach the NASA's safety and mission assurance goal by building faster, cheaper, better, smaller spacecraft to explore the space more effectively by teaming-up with the other NASA centers using the limited resources available. This paper discusses the latest developments in the MEMS

  14. 4D Ultrasound - Medical Devices for Recent Advances on the Etiology of Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tomasovic, Sanja; Predojevic, Maja

    2011-01-01

    Children cerebral palsy (CCP) encompasses a group of nonprogessive and noninfectious conditions, which cause light, moderate, and severe deviations in neurological development. Diagnosis of CCP is set mostly by the age of 3 years. The fact that a large number of cerebral damage occurs prenatally and the fact that early intervention in cases of neurological damage is successful, prompted some researchers to explore the possibility of detecting neurologically damaged fetus in the uterus. This research was made possible thanks to the development of two-dimensional ultrasound technology in a real time, which enabled the display of the mobility of the fetus. Advancement of the ultrasound technology has enabled the development of 4D ultrasound where a spontaneous fetal movement can be observed almost in a real time. Estimate of the number and quality of spontaneous fetal movements and stitches on the head, the neurology thumb and a high palate were included in the prenatal neurological screening of the fetus. This raises the question, as to does the fetal behavior reflect, (which was revealed in 2D or 4D ultrasound), fetal neurological development in a manner that will allow the detection of the brain damage. PMID:23407920

  15. Cell Phone-Based and Adherence Device Technologies for HIV Care and Treatment in Resource-Limited Settings: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jeffrey I; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cell phone-based and adherence monitoring technologies have been developed to address barriers to effective HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Because most people living with HIV and AIDS reside in resource-limited settings (RLS), it is important to understand the development and use of these technologies in RLS. Recent research on cell phone-based technologies has focused on HIV education, linkage to and retention in care, disease tracking, and antiretroviral therapy adherence reminders. Advances in adherence devices have focused on real-time adherence monitors, which have been used for both antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis. Real-time monitoring has recently been combined with cell phone-based technologies to create real-time adherence interventions using short message service (SMS). New developments in adherence technologies are exploring ingestion monitoring and metabolite detection to confirm adherence. This article provides an overview of recent advances in these two families of technologies and includes research on their acceptability and cost-effectiveness when available. It additionally outlines key challenges and needed research as use of these technologies continues to expand and evolve. PMID:26439917

  16. Measurement of gas bremsstrahlung from the insertion device beamlines of the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Pisharody, M.; Job, P.K.; Magill, S.

    1997-03-01

    High energy electron storage rings generate energetic bremsstrahlung photons through radiative interaction of the electrons (or positrons) with the residual gas molecules inside the storage ring. The resulting radiation exits at an average emittance angle of (m{sub 0}c{sub 2}/E) radian with respect to the electron beam path, where m{sub 0}c{sup 2} is the rest mass of E the electron and E its kinetic energy. Thus, at straight sections of the storage rings, moving electrons will produce a narrow and intense monodirectional photon beam. At synchrotron radiation facilities, where beamlines are channeled out of the storage ring, a continuous gas bremsstrahlung spectrum, with a maximum energy of the electron beam, will be present. There are a number of compelling reasons that a measurement of the bremsstrahlung characteristics be conducted at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Although the number of residual gas molecules present in the storage ring at typical nTorr vacuum is low, because of the long straight paths of the electrons in the storage ring at APS, significant production of bremsstrahlung will be produced. This may pose a radiation hazard. It is then imperative that personnel be shielded from dose rates due to this radiation. There are not many measurements available for gas bremsstrahlung, especially for higher electron beam energies. The quantitative estimates of gas bremsstrahlung from storage rings as evaluated by Monte Carlo codes also have several uncertainties. They are in general calculated for air at atmospheric pressure, the results of which are then extrapolated to typical storage ring vacuum values (of the order of 10{sup -9} Torr). Realistically, the actual pressure profile can vary inside the narrow vacuum chamber. Also, the actual chemical composition of the residual gas inside the storage ring is generally different from that of air.

  17. Highly effective and accurate weak point monitoring method for advanced design rule (1x nm) devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeongho; Seong, ShiJin; Yoon, Minjung; Park, Il-Suk; Kim, HyungSeop; Ihm, Dongchul; Chin, Soobok; Sivaraman, Gangadharan; Li, Mingwei; Babulnath, Raghav; Lee, Chang Ho; Kurada, Satya; Brown, Christine; Galani, Rajiv; Kim, JaeHyun

    2014-04-01

    Historically when we used to manufacture semiconductor devices for 45 nm or above design rules, IC manufacturing yield was mainly determined by global random variations and therefore the chip manufacturers / manufacturing team were mainly responsible for yield improvement. With the introduction of sub-45 nm semiconductor technologies, yield started to be dominated by systematic variations, primarily centered on resolution problems, copper/low-k interconnects and CMP. These local systematic variations, which have become decisively greater than global random variations, are design-dependent [1, 2] and therefore designers now share the responsibility of increasing yield with manufacturers / manufacturing teams. A widening manufacturing gap has led to a dramatic increase in design rules that are either too restrictive or do not guarantee a litho/etch hotspot-free design. The semiconductor industry is currently limited to 193 nm scanners and no relief is expected from the equipment side to prevent / eliminate these systematic hotspots. Hence we have seen a lot of design houses coming up with innovative design products to check hotspots based on model based lithography checks to validate design manufacturability, which will also account for complex two-dimensional effects that stem from aggressive scaling of 193 nm lithography. Most of these hotspots (a.k.a., weak points) are especially seen on Back End of the Line (BEOL) process levels like Mx ADI, Mx Etch and Mx CMP. Inspecting some of these BEOL levels can be extremely challenging as there are lots of wafer noises or nuisances that can hinder an inspector's ability to detect and monitor the defects or weak points of interest. In this work we have attempted to accurately inspect the weak points using a novel broadband plasma optical inspection approach that enhances defect signal from patterns of interest (POI) and precisely suppresses surrounding wafer noises. This new approach is a paradigm shift in wafer inspection

  18. Generic microelectronic smart sensor platform for detection of toxic, hazardous, and flammable gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J.; Corbett, W.; Montague, S.; Knoll, M.; McWhorter, P.

    Extensive work has been performed in the past which demonstrates that various metal alloys can be used to detect different toxic, hazardous, and flammable gases. Work has been performed using Pd, Pt, Ir, PdNi, PdAg and Pt/Pd for detecting things such as Hydrogen, Hydrazine, Hydrogen Sulfide, Deuterium, Tritium, Ethanol and Hexane. Perhaps the most familiar is the use of Pd and PdNi for the detection of Hydrogen. These devices work by examining the effect of the gases on the material properties of the metal alloys. Two of the most common material properties examined in these sensors are the resistance of thin film resistors, and the flatband or threshold voltage shifts of MOS structures fabricated with a particular alloy as the gate material. While research into these sensing techniques has shown much promise, few manufacturable, fieldable devices have resulted. These sensing techniques are prone to drift problems due to temperature variations, and typically have large sample to sample variations in performance due to process control issues. Typically, these sensors require significant external instrumentation for measurement and control, making the systems large and expensive. Sandia National Laboratories has designed, fabricated and demonstrated complete functionality of a generic microelectronic based smart sensor platform intended to effectively exploit the research mentioned above into high performance, manufacturable, fieldable devices. This smart sensor platform technology fabricates 2 (mu)m CMOS digital and analog control electronics, sensing elements, and temperature control elements on the same silicon integrated circuit. Our initial demonstration of this technology incorporates PdNi as the sensing alloy for the detection of hydrogen.

  19. Encapsulation methods and dielectric layers for organic electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Blum, Yigal D; Chu, William Siu-Keung; MacQueen, David Brent; Shi, Yijan

    2013-07-02

    The disclosure provides methods and materials suitable for use as encapsulation barriers and dielectric layers in electronic devices. In one embodiment, for example, there is provided an electroluminescent device or other electronic device with a dielectric layer comprising alternating layers of a silicon-containing bonding material and a ceramic material. The methods provide, for example, electronic devices with increased stability and shelf-life. The invention is useful, for example, in the field of microelectronic devices.

  20. Electrodeposition of platinum-iridium alloy nanowires for hermetic packaging of microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Petrossians, Artin; Whalen, John J; Weiland, James D; Mansfeld, Florian

    2012-01-01

    An electrodeposition technique was applied for fabrication of dense platinum-iridium alloy nanowires as interconnect structures in hermetic microelectronic packaging to be used in implantable devices. Vertically aligned arrays of platinum-iridium alloy nanowires with controllable length and a diameter of about 200 nm were fabricated using a cyclic potential technique from a novel electrodeposition bath in nanoporous aluminum oxide templates. Ti/Au thin films were sputter deposited on one side of the alumina membranes to form a base material for electrodeposition. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to characterize the morphology and the chemical composition of the nanowires, respectively. SEM micrographs revealed that the electrodeposited nanowires have dense and compact structures. EDS analysis showed a 60:40% platinum-iridium nanowire composition. Deposition rates were estimated by determining nanowire length as a function of deposition time. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) images revealed that the nanowires have a nanocrystalline structure with grain sizes ranging from 3 nm to 5 nm. Helium leak tests performed using a helium leak detector showed leak rates as low as 1 × 10(-11) mbar L s(-1) indicating that dense nanowires were electrodeposited inside the nanoporous membranes. Comparison of electrical measurements on platinum and platinum-iridium nanowires revealed that platinum-iridium nanowires have improved electrical conductivity. PMID:23365995

  1. Synchrotron radiation-based characterization of interconnections in microelectronics: recent 3D results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuet, P.; Audoit, G.; Bertheau, J.; Charbonnier, J.; Cloetens, P.; Djomeni Weleguela, M. L.; Ferreira Sanchez, D.; Hodaj, F.; Gergaud, P.; Lorut, F.; Micha, J.-S.; Thuaire, A.; Ulrich, O.

    2014-09-01

    In microelectronics, more and more attention is paid to the physical characterization of interconnections, to get a better understanding of reliability issues like voiding, cracking and performance degradation. Those interconnections have a 3D architecture with features in the deep sub-micrometer range, requiring a probe with high spatial resolution and high penetration depth. Third generation synchrotron sources are the ideal candidate for that, and we show hereafter the potential of synchrotron-based hard x-ray nanotomography to investigate the morphology of through silicon vias (TSVs) and copper pillars, using projection (holotomography) and scanning (fluorescence) 3D imaging, based on a series of experiments performed at the ESRF. In particular, we highlight the benefits of the method to characterize voids, but also the distribution of intermetallics in copper pillars, which play a critical role for the device reliability. Beyond morphological imaging, an original acquisition scheme based on scanning Laue tomography is introduced. It consists in performing a raster scan (z,θ) of a sample illuminated by a synchrotron polychromatic beam while recording diffraction data. After processing and image reconstruction, it allows for 3D reconstruction of grain orientation, strain and stress in copper TSV and also in the surrounding Si matrix.

  2. Development of a Ground-Based Analog to the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nathaniel J.; Scott-Pandorf, M. M.; Caldwell, E.; DeWitt, J.K.; Fincke, R.; Peters, B.T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA and Wyle engineers constructed a Horizontal Exercise Fixture (HEF) that was patented in 2006. Recently modifications were made to HEF with the goal of creating a device that mimics squat exercise on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and can be used by bed rest subjects who must remain supine during exercise. This project posed several engineering challenges, such as how best to reproduce the hip motions (we used a sled that allowed hip motion in the sagittal plane), how to counterweight the pelvis against gravity (we used a pulley and free-weight mechanism), and how to apply large loads (body weight plus squat load) to the shoulders while simultaneously supporting the back against gravity (we tested a standard and a safety bar that allowed movement in the subject s z-axis, both of which used a retractable plate for back support). METHODS An evaluation of the HEF was conducted with human subjects (3F, 3M), who performed sets of squat exercises of increasing load from 10-repetition maximum (RM) up to 1-RM. Three pelvic counterweight loads were tested along with each of the two back-support squat bars. Data collection included 3-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF), muscle activation (EMG), body motion (video-based motion capture), and subjective comments. These data were compared with previous ground-based ARED study data. RESULTS All subjects in the evaluation were able to perform low- to high-loading squats on the HEF. Four of the 6 subjects preferred a pelvic counterweight equivalent to 60 percent of their body weight. Four subjects preferred the standard squat bar, whereas 2 female subjects preferred the safety bar. EMG data showed muscle activation in the legs and low back typical of squat motion. GRF trajectories and eccentric-concentric loading ratios were similar to ARED. CONCLUSION: Squat exercise performed on HEF approximated squat exercise on ARED.

  3. Final LDRD report : design and fabrication of advanced device structures for ultra high efficiency solid state lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Shul, Randy John; Wendt, Joel Robert; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this one year LDRD was to improve the overall efficiency of InGaN LEDs by improving the extraction of light from the semiconductor chip. InGaN LEDs are currently the most promising technology for producing high efficiency blue and green semiconductor light emitters. Improving the efficiency of InGaN LEDs will enable a more rapid adoption of semiconductor based lighting. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop photonic structures to improve light extraction from nitride-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). While many advanced device geometries were considered for this work, we focused on the use of a photonic crystal for improved light extraction. Although resonant cavity LEDs and other advanced structures certainly have the potential to improve light extraction, the photonic crystal approach showed the most promise in the early stages of this short program. The photonic crystal (PX)-LED developed here incorporates a two dimensional photonic crystal, or photonic lattice, into a nitride-based LED. The dimensions of the photonic crystal are selected such that there are very few or no optical modes in the plane of the LED ('lateral' modes). This will reduce or eliminate any radiation in the lateral direction so that the majority of the LED radiation will be in vertical modes that escape the semiconductor, which will improve the light-extraction efficiency. PX-LEDs were fabricated using a range of hole diameters and lattice constants and compared to control LEDs without a photonic crystal. The far field patterns from the PX-LEDs were dramatically modified by the presence of the photonic crystal. An increase in LED brightness of 1.75X was observed for light measured into a 40 degree emission cone with a total increase in power of 1.5X for an unencapsulated LED.

  4. Spatially Resolved Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy in Microelectronics Processing Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.A.

    1998-10-14

    Plasma processing of microelectronic materials is strongly dependent on the generation and control of neutral radial and ion species generated in a plasma. For example, process uniformity across a #er is drken by a combination of plasma charged particle and neutral uniformity. Due to extensive rexarch and engineering the current generation of commercial plasma reactors can generate very radially uniform ion distributions, usually better than ~ 2 perwnt as determined by ion saturation measurements. Due in part to the difficulty associated with determining the neutral radial distributions, control of the neutral radical uniformity is less well developed. This abstract will review our recent measurements of the spatial distribution of severaI important atomic and molecukw species in inductively coupled plasmas through C12 / BCIJ / Ar containing gas mixtures. Measured species include the ground state Cl and BC1 densities as well as the metastable argon density. The fbeus of this review will be on the experimental techniques and results. In addition to assisting in the development of a fbndarnental understanding of the important pkunna physics, these measurements have been used to benchmark multi dimensional plasma discharge codes.

  5. Piezoelectric-nanowire-enabled power source for driving wireless microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng; Hansen, Benjamin J; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-01-01

    Harvesting energy from irregular/random mechanical actions in variable and uncontrollable environments is an effective approach for powering wireless mobile electronics to meet a wide range of applications in our daily life. Piezoelectric nanowires are robust and can be stimulated by tiny physical motions/disturbances over a range of frequencies. Here, we demonstrate the first chemical epitaxial growth of PbZr(x)Ti(1-x)O(3) (PZT) nanowire arrays at 230 °C and their application as high-output energy converters. The nanogenerators fabricated using a single array of PZT nanowires produce a peak output voltage of ~0.7 V, current density of 4 μA cm(-2) and an average power density of 2.8 mW cm(-3). The alternating current output of the nanogenerator is rectified, and the harvested energy is stored and later used to light up a commercial laser diode. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using nanogenerators for powering mobile and even personal microelectronics. PMID:20981021

  6. Precise selective deposition of microparticles on electrodes of microelectronic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, Alexander; König, Kai; Felgenhauer, Thomas; Lindenstruth, Volker; Trunk, Ulrich; Fernandez, Simon; Hausmann, Michael; Ralf Bischoff, F.; Breitling, Frank; Stadler, Volker

    2008-03-01

    We examined the high precision deposition of toner and polymer microparticles with a typical size of ˜10μm on electrode arrays with electrodes of 100μm and below using custom-made microelectronic chips. Selective desorption of redundant particles was employed to obtain a given particle pattern from preadsorbed particle layers. Microparticle desorption was regulated by dielectrophoretic attracting forces generated by individual pixel electrodes, tangential detaching forces of an air flow, and adhesion forces on the microchip surface. A theoretical consideration of the acting forces showed that without pixel voltage, the tangential force applied for particle detachment exceeded the particle adhesion force. When the pixel voltage was switched on, however, the sum of attracting forces was larger than the tangential detaching force, which was crucial for desorption efficiency. In our experiments, appropriately large dielectrophoretic forces were achieved by applying high voltages of up to 100V on the pixel electrodes. In addition, electrode geometries on the chip's surface as well as particle size influenced the desorption quality. We further demonstrated the compatibility of this procedure to complementary metal oxide semiconductor chip technology, which should allow for an easy technical implementation with respect to high-resolution microparticle deposition.

  7. Retrospective Cohort Study of a Microelectronics and Business Machine Facility

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Sharon R.; Pinkerton, Lynne E.; Fleming, Donald A.; Jones, James H.; Allee, Steven; Luo, Lian; Bertke, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined health outcomes among 34,494 workers employed at a microelectronics and business machine facility 1969–2001. Methods Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and standardized incidence ratios were used to evaluate health outcomes in the cohort and Cox regression modeling to evaluate relations between scores for occupational exposures and outcomes of a priori interest. Results Just over 17% of the cohort (5,966 people) had died through 2009. All cause, all cancer, and many cause-specific SMRs showed statistically significant deficits. In hourly males, SMRs were significantly elevated for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and rectal cancer. Salaried males had excess testicular cancer incidence. Pleural cancer and mesothelioma excesses were observed in workers hired before 1969, but no available records substantiate use of asbestos in manufacturing processes. A positive, statistically significant relation was observed between exposure scores for tetrachloroethylene and nervous system diseases. Conclusions Few significant exposure–outcome relations were observed, but risks from occupational exposures cannot be ruled out due to data limitations and the relative youth of the cohort. PMID:24375784

  8. Antimicrobial Resistance and Bacterial Identification Utilizing a Microelectronic Chip Array

    PubMed Central

    Westin, Lorelei; Miller, Carolyn; Vollmer, Dana; Canter, David; Radtkey, Ray; Nerenberg, Michael; O'Connell, James P.

    2001-01-01

    Species-specific bacterial identification of clinical specimens is often limited to a few species due to the difficulty of performing multiplex reactions. In addition, discrimination of amplicons is time-consuming and laborious, consisting of gel electrophoresis, probe hybridization, or sequencing technology. In order to simplify the process of bacterial identification, we combined anchored in situ amplification on a microelectronic chip array with discrimination and detection on the same platform. Here, we describe the simultaneous amplification and discrimination of six gene sequences which are representative of different bacterial identification assays: Escherichia coli gyrA, Salmonella gyrA, Campylobacter gyrA, E. coli parC, Staphylococcus mecA, and Chlamydia cryptic plasmid. The assay can detect both plasmid and transposon genes and can also discriminate strains carrying antibiotic resistance single-nucleotide polymorphism mutations. Finally, the assay is similarly capable of discriminating between bacterial species through reporter-specific discrimination and allele-specific amplification. Anchored strand displacement amplification allows multiplex amplification and complex genotype discrimination on the same platform. This assay simplifies the bacterial identification process greatly, allowing molecular biology techniques to be performed with minimal processing of samples and practical experience. PMID:11230433

  9. The NASA Microelectronics Space Radiation Effects Program (MSREP) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Coss, J.; Nichols, D.; Shaw, D.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of the Microelectronics Space Radiation Effects Program (MSREP) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is to assist NASA in the selection of radiation hardened microelectronic parts for insertion in NASA space systems through radiation testing and research. Prior to presenting examples of the research and testing on Single Event Effects (SEE) and Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects, the space radiation environment and radiation requirements for the CRAFT/Cassini program, a typical JPL space project, are discussed.

  10. A graphene superficial layer for the advanced electroforming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Hokyun; Park, Mina; Lee, Seungmin; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Tae-Wook; Ha, Jun-Seok; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Advances in electroplating technology facilitate the progress of modern electronic devices, including computers, microprocessors and other microelectronic devices. Metal layers with high electrical and thermal conductivities are essential for high speed and high power devices. In this paper, we report an effective route to fabricate free-standing metal films using graphene as a superficial layer in the electroforming process. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on a Cu foil was used as a template, which provides high electrical conductivity and low adhesive force with the template, thus enabling an effective electroforming process. The required force for delamination of the electroplated Cu layer from graphene is more than one order smaller than the force required for removing graphene from the Cu foil. We also demonstrated that the electroformed free-standing Cu thin films could be utilized for patterning microstructures and incorporated onto a flexible substrate for LEDs. This innovative process could be beneficial for the advancement of flexible electronics and optoelectronics, which require a wide range of mechanical and physical properties.Advances in electroplating technology facilitate the progress of modern electronic devices, including computers, microprocessors and other microelectronic devices. Metal layers with high electrical and thermal conductivities are essential for high speed and high power devices. In this paper, we report an effective route to fabricate free-standing metal films using graphene as a superficial layer in the electroforming process. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on a Cu foil was used as a template, which provides high electrical conductivity and low adhesive force with the template, thus enabling an effective electroforming process. The required force for delamination of the electroplated Cu layer from graphene is more than one order smaller than the force required for removing graphene from the Cu foil

  11. Devices Materials and Processes for Nanoelectronics: Characterization with Advanced X-Ray Techniques Using Lab-Based and Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    SciTech Connect

    E Zschech; C Wyon; C Murray; G Schneider

    2011-12-31

    Future nanoelectronics manufacturing at extraordinary length scales, new device structures, and advanced materials will provide challenges to process development and engineering but also to process control and physical failure analysis. Advanced X-ray techniques, using lab systems and synchrotron radiation sources, will play a key role for the characterization of thin films, nanostructures, surfaces, and interfaces. The development of advanced X-ray techniques and tools will reduce risk and time for the introduction of new technologies. Eventually, time-to-market for new products will be reduced by the timely implementation of the best techniques for process development and process control. The development and use of advanced methods at synchrotron radiation sources will be increasingly important, particularly for research and development in the field of advanced processes and new materials but also for the development of new X-ray components and procedures. The application of advanced X-ray techniques, in-line, in out-of-fab analytical labs and at synchrotron radiation sources, for research, development, and manufacturing in the nanoelectronics industry is reviewed. The focus of this paper is on the study of nanoscale device and on-chip interconnect materials, and materials for 3D IC integration as well.

  12. Multi-scale radiographic applications in microelectronic industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluch, J.; Löffler, M.; Meyendorf, N.; Oppermann, M.; Röllig, M.; Sättler, P.; Wolter, K. J.; Zschech, E.

    2016-02-01

    New concepts in assembly technology boost our daily life in an unknown way. High end semiconductor industry today deals with functional structures down to a few nanometers. ITRS roadmap predicts an ongoing decrease of the "DRAM half pitch" over the next decade. Packaging of course is not intended to realize pitches at the nanometer scale, but has to face the challenges of integrating such semiconductor devices with smallest pitch and high pin counts into systems. System integration (SiP, SoP, Hetero System Integration etc.) into the third dimension is the only way to reduce the gap between semiconductor level and packaging level interconnection. The described development is mainly driven by communication technology but also other branches like power electronics benefit from the vast progress in integration and assembly technology. The challenge of advanced packaging requires new nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for technology development and production control. In power electronics production the condition monitoring receives a lot of interest to avoid electrical shortcuts, dead solder joints and interface cracking. It is also desired to detect and characterize very small defects like transportation phenomenon or Kirkendall voids. For this purpose imaging technologies with resolutions in the sub-micron range are required. Our presentation discusses the potentials and the limits of X-ray NDE techniques, illustrated by crack observation in solder joints, evaluation of micro vias in PCBs and interposers and the investigation of solder material composition and other aftermaths of electro migration in solder joints. Applied radiographic methods are X-ray through transmission, multi-energy techniques, laminography, CT and nano-CT.

  13. Muscle Volume Increases Following 16 Weeks of Resistive Exercise Training with the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and Free Weights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, R. E.; Loehr, J. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Evans, H.; Smith, S. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    Space flight-induced muscle atrophy, particularly in the postural and locomotorymuscles, may impair task performance during long-duration space missions and planetary exploration. High intensity free weight (FW) resistive exercise training has been shown to prevent atrophy during bed rest, a space flight analog. NASA developed the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) to simulate the characteristics of FW exercise (i.e. constant mass, inertial force) and to be used as a countermeasure during International Space Station (ISS) missions. PURPOSE: To compare the efficacy of ARED and FW training to induce hypertrophy in specific muscle groups in ambulatory subjects prior to deploying ARED on the ISS. METHODS: Twenty untrained subjects were assigned to either the ARED (8 males, 3 females) or FW (6 males, 3 females) group and participated in a periodizedtraining protocol consisting of squat (SQ), heel raise (HR), and deadlift(DL) exercises 3 d wk-1 for 16 wks. SQ, HR, and DL muscle strength (1RM) was measured before, after 8 wks, and after 16 wks of training to prescribe exercise and measure strength changes. Muscle volume of the vastigroup (V), hamstring group (H), hip adductor group (ADD), medial gastrocnemius(MG), lateral gastrocnemius(LG), and deep posterior muscles including soleus(DP) was measured using MRI pre-and post-training. Consecutive cross-sectional images (8 mm slices with a 2 mm gap) were analyzed and summed. Anatomical references insured that the same muscle sections were analyzed pre-and post-training. Two-way repeated measures ANOVAs (p<0.05) were used to test for differences in muscle strength and volume between training devices. RESULTS: SQ, HR, and DL 1RM increased in both FW (SQ: 49+/-6%, HR: 12+/-2%, DL: 23+/-4%) and ARED (SQ: 31+/-4%, HR: 18+/-2%, DL: 23+/-3%) groups. Both groups increased muscle volume in the V (FW: 13+/-2%, ARED: 10+/-2%), H (FW: 3+/-1%, ARED: 3+/-1 %), ADD (FW: 15=/-2%, ARED: 10+/-1%), LG (FW: 7+/-2%, ARED: 4+/-1%), MG (FW

  14. Thermo-mechanical analysis of fixed mask 1 for the Advanced Photon Source insertion device front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Nian, H.L.T.; Shu, D.; Sheng, I.C.A.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-10-01

    The first fixed mask (FM1) is one of the critical elements on the insertion device front ends of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The heat flux from the APS undulators is enormous. For example, FM1 placed at a distance of 16 m from the Undulator A source will be subjected to 519 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence with a total power of 3.8 kW. Due to a high localized thermal gradient on this component, inclined geometry (1.5{degree}) is used in the design to spread the footprint of the x-ray beam. A box-cone-shape geometry was designed due to the limited space available in the front end. The box shape is a highly constrained geometry, which induces larger stress levels than would occur in a plate or a tube. In order to handle the expected higher stress and the stress concentration at the corners, a single Glidcop block (rather than copper) was used in the construction. The FM1 uses an enhanced heat transfer mechanism developed at Argonne National Laboratory, which increases the convective heat transfer coefficient to about 3 W/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}C with single-phase water as the coolant. The authors simulated the location of the x-ray beam in several places to cover the worst possible case. The maximum temperature (about 180{degree}C) occurs when the beam hits the center of horizontal surface. The maximum effective stress (about 313 MPa) occurs when the x-ray beam hits about the corners.

  15. Novel low-permittivity dielectrics for Si-based microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project was to develop and assess novel low-permittivity dielectric materials for applications as interlevel dielectrics (ILDs) in Si-based microelectronics. There were three classes of materials investigated: (1) novel covalently-bonded ceramics containing carbon, boron, and/or nitrogen, (2) fluorinated SiO{sub 2} (SiOF), and (3) plasma polymerized fluorocarbon (PPFC). The specific advantages and disadvantages for each potential low k ILD material were evaluated. It was discovered that highly energetic deposition processes are required for the formation of thermally and environmentally stable carbon or boron nitride ceramics, and the resulting films may have many potentially valuable applications, such as diffusion barriers, tribological coatings, micro-sensor materials, etc. The films are not suitable as low k ILDs, however, because the highly energetic deposition process leads to films with high atomic density, and this leads to high dielectric constants. SiOF shows a promise as low k ILD material for near-term applications, but special passivation or encapsulation strategies may be required in order to reduce two instability problems that the authors have discovered: moisture absorption and thermal instability of the SiOF/Al interface. PPFC films offer promise for even lower dielectric constant ILDs than SiOF, but it will be necessary to develop new strategies to passivate the free radicals in the films generated during deposition. These free radicals lead to increase in dielectric loss over time when the films are exposed to room ambient conditions.

  16. Smallest Nanoelectronic with Atomic Devices with Precise Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    2000-01-01

    Since its invention in 1948, the transistor has revolutionized our everyday life - transistor radios and TV's appeared in the early 1960s, personal computers came into widespread use in the mid-1980s, and cellular phones, laptops, and palm-sized organizers dominated the 1990s. The electronics revolution is based upon transistor miniaturization; smaller transistors are faster, and denser circuitry has more functionality. Transistors in current generation chips are 0.25 micron or 250 nanometers in size, and the electronics industry has completed development of 0.18 micron transistors which will enter production within the next few years. Industry researchers are now working to reduce transistor size down to 0.13 micron - a thousandth of the width of a human hair. However, studies indicate that the miniaturization of silicon transistors will soon reach its limit. For further progress in microelectronics, scientists have turned to nanotechnology to advance the science. Rather than continuing to miniaturize transistors to a point where they become unreliable, nanotechnology offers the new approach of building devices on the atomic scale [see sidebar]. One vision for the next generation of miniature electronics is atomic chain electronics, where devices are composed of atoms aligned on top of a substrate surface in a regular pattern. The Atomic Chain Electronics Project (ACEP) - part of the Semiconductor Device Modeling and Nanotechnology group, Integrated Product Team at the NAS Facility has been developing the theory of understanding atomic chain devices, and the author's patent for atomic chain electronics is now pending.

  17. Microwave and millimeter-wave resonant-tunneling devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollner, T. C. L. Gerhard; Le, Han Quang; Brown, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    Resonant-tunneling devices in microelectronic component form, whose structure is the electron analog of a Fabry-Perot resonator, encompass oscillators, self-oscillating mixers, and harmonic multipliers. The negative differential resistance characteristic of these devices has been obtained at room temperature, and resonant-tunneling transistors capable of operation in the THz-frequency range appear to be feasible. Three-terminal resonant-tunneling device development is in its infancy, as is that of devices for digital applications.

  18. Reproductive Hazards Still Persist in the Microelectronics Industry: Increased Risk of Spontaneous Abortion and Menstrual Aberration among Female Workers in the Microelectronics Industry in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Inah; Kim, Myoung-Hee; Lim, Sinye

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Despite the global expansion of supply chains and changes to the production process, few studies since the mid-1990s and 2000s have examined reproductive risks of the microelectronics industry; we examined the reproductive risks among female microelectronics workers in South Korea. Methods Based on claim data from the National Health Insurance (2008–2012), we estimated age-specific rates of spontaneous abortion (SAB) and menstrual aberration (MA) among women aged 20 to 39 years. We compared data between microelectronics workers and three different control groups: economically inactive women, the working population as a whole, and workers employed in the bank industry. For an effect measure, age-stratified relative risks (RRs) were estimated. Results Female workers in the microelectronics industry showed significantly higher risk for SAB and MA compared to control groups. The RRs for SAB with reference to economically inactive women, working population, and bank workers in their twenties were 1.57, 1.40, and 1.37, respectively, and the RRs for MA among females in their twenties were 1.54, 1.38, and 1.48, respectively. For women in their thirties, RRs for SAB were 1.58, 1.67, and 1.13, and those for MA were 1.25, 1.35, and 1.23 compared to the three control populations, respectively. All RRs were statistically significant at a level of 0.05, except for the SAB case comparison with bank workers in their thirties. Conclusions Despite technical innovations and health and safety measures, female workers in microelectronics industry in South Korea have high rates of SAB and MA, suggesting continued exposure to reproductive hazards. Further etiologic studies based on primary data collection and careful surveillance are required to confirm these results. PMID:25938673

  19. Accelerating tomorrow's opto-electronic technologies: a comprehensive introduction to advanced optoelectronic materials and devices in the National Hi-Tech R&D Plan (863-Plan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan; Chen, Haoming; Ren, Xiaomin; Wang, Zhigong; Qian, Longsheng; Zhang, Rong; Feng, Songlin; Yang, Hui; Xu, Ningsheng

    2004-05-01

    The National Hi-Tech R&D Program (the 863-Program) is to enhance China's international competitiveness and improve China's overall capability of R&D in high technology and to bridge the gap between the laboratory and the marketplace. Advanced Optoelectronic Materials and Devices are one of the technology areas strategically important to China's information industry. It has been one of the major priority research fields funded by the 863 Program even since 1987 when the plan was first initiated. From the viewpoint of Priority Expert Group (PEG), this paper will give a comprehensive introduction to advanced optoelectronic materials and devices in the national 863-Program during the current five years period (up to 2005) which includes the main aims and goals and especially the main content of each subject.

  20. Experimental investigation of the performance of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetectors from the Industrial Microelectronics Center, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anjali; Anderson, Steven E.; Ramos, Rodolfo A.; Purvis, Raymond K.; Cardimona, David A.; Gieson, N.; Thompson, D.; Goring, D. T.; Andersson, Jan Y.; Lundqvist, Lennart

    1994-10-01

    In this paper we present an experimental investigation of the performance of GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well photodetectors. The purpose of this exercise was to independently evaluate and verify the responsivity of the GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetectors developed at the Industrial Microelectronics Center in Sweden. These devices use 2D gratings to couple radiation into the detectors and a cladding layer to enhance the coupling of radiation. The devices were of two types: those optimized for high detectivity, and those optimized for high quantum efficiency. The tests performed on these devices included measurement of optical responsivity vs. bias, spectral response, Detectivity (D(superscript *)), and measurement of cross-talk between pixels. Several interesting observations were made during the investigation and will be reported in the paper.

  1. Development of a Nuclear Reaction Database on Silicon for Simulation of Neutron-Induced Single-Event Upsets in Microelectronics and its Application

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Kodama, Akihiro; Tukamoto, Yasuyuki; Nakashima, Hideki

    2005-05-24

    We have developed a cross-section database for neutron-induced reactions on 28Si in the energy range between 2 MeV and 3 GeV in order to analyze single-event upsets (SEUs) phenomena induced by cosmic-ray neutrons in microelectronic devices. A simplified spherical device model is proposed for simulation of the initial processes of SEUs. The model is applied to SEU cross-section calculations for semiconductor memory devices. The calculated results are compared with measured SEU cross sections and the other simulation result. The dependence of SEU cross sections on incident neutron energy and secondary ions having the most important effects on SEUs are discussed.

  2. Design, processing and testing of LSI arrays hybrid microelectronics task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.; Stuhlbarg, S. M.; Salmassy, S.

    1978-01-01

    Those factors affecting the cost of electronic subsystems utilizing LSI microcircuits were determined and the most efficient methods for low cost packaging of LSI devices as a function of density and reliability were developed.

  3. Gas sensing with acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C.; Spates, J.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    A survey is made of acoustic devices that are suitable as gas and vapor sensors. This survey focuses on attributes such as operating frequency, mass sensitivity, quality factor (Q), and their ability to be fabricated on a semiconductor substrate to allow integration with electronic circuitry. The treatment of the device surface with chemically-sensitive films to detect species of interest is discussed. Strategies for improving discrimination are described, including sensor arrays and species concentration and separation schemes. The advantages and disadvantages of integrating sensors with microelectronics are considered, along with the effect on sensitivity of scaling acoustic gas sensors to smaller size.

  4. Simulating total-dose and dose-rate effects on digital microelectronics timing delays using VHDL

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, C.P. Jr.; Pugh, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes a fast timing simulator based on Very High Speed Integrated Circuit (VHSIC) Hardware Description Language (VHDL) for simulating the timing of digital microelectronics in pre-irradiation, total dose, and dose-rate radiation environments. The goal of this research is the rapid and accurate timing simulation of radiation-hardened microelectronic circuits before, during, and after exposure to ionizing radiation. The results of this research effort were the development of VHDL compatible models capable of rapid and accurate simulation of the effect of radiation on the timing performance of microelectronic circuits. The effects of radiation for total dose at 1 Mrad(Si) and dose rates up to 2 {times} 10{sup 12} rads(Si) per second were modeled for a variety of Separation by IMplantion of OXygen (SIMOX) circuits. In all cases tested, the VHDL simulations ran at least 600 times faster than SPICE while maintaining a timing accuracy to within 15% of SPICE values.

  5. Application of analytical redundancy management to Shuttle crafts. [computerized simulation of microelectronic implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.; Tabak, D.

    1979-01-01

    The study involves the bank of filters approach to analytical redundancy management since this is amenable to microelectronic implementation. Attention is given to a study of the UD factorized filter to determine if it gives more accurate estimates than the standard Kalman filter when data processing word size is reduced. It is reported that, as the word size is reduced, the effect of modeling error dominates the filter performance of the two filters. However, the UD filter is shown to maintain a slight advantage in tracking performance. It is concluded that because of the UD filter's stability in the serial processing mode, it remains the leading candidate for microelectronic implementation.

  6. Micro-nondestructive evaluation of microelectronics using three-dimensional acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang-Ming; Harvey, David M.; Burton, David R.

    2011-02-01

    Holographic-like three-dimensional (3D) acoustic imaging is developed for micro-nondestructive evaluation of microelectronics. It is implemented by stacking all the interface slices together to locate and identify hidden defects. Matching pursuit based acoustic time-frequency domain imaging is proposed to overcome the wavelength limit of axial resolution so that ultra-thin slices are generated. Experiments are performed on 3D acoustic data collected from microelectronic packages. Results show that the proposed technique resolves closely spaced features that are unavailable by conventional acoustic imaging, revealing more image details of defects.

  7. Advances in superconducting quantum electronic microcircuit fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschman, R. K.; Notarys, H. A.; Mercereau, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Standard microelectronic fabrication techniques have been utilized to produce batch quantities of superconducting quantum electronic devices and circuits. The overall goal is a fabrication technology yielding circuits that are rugged and stable and capable of being fabricated controllably and reproducibly in sizeable quantities. Our progress toward this goal is presented, with primary emphasis on the most recent work, which includes the use of electron-beam lithography and techniques of hybrid microelectronics. Several prototype microcircuits have been successfully fabricated. These microcircuits are formed in a thin-film parent material consisting of layers of superconducting and normal metals, and use proximity-effect structures as the active circuit elements.

  8. A graphene superficial layer for the advanced electroforming process.

    PubMed

    Rho, Hokyun; Park, Mina; Lee, Seungmin; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Tae-Wook; Ha, Jun-Seok; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Advances in electroplating technology facilitate the progress of modern electronic devices, including computers, microprocessors and other microelectronic devices. Metal layers with high electrical and thermal conductivities are essential for high speed and high power devices. In this paper, we report an effective route to fabricate free-standing metal films using graphene as a superficial layer in the electroforming process. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene grown on a Cu foil was used as a template, which provides high electrical conductivity and low adhesive force with the template, thus enabling an effective electroforming process. The required force for delamination of the electroplated Cu layer from graphene is more than one order smaller than the force required for removing graphene from the Cu foil. We also demonstrated that the electroformed free-standing Cu thin films could be utilized for patterning microstructures and incorporated onto a flexible substrate for LEDs. This innovative process could be beneficial for the advancement of flexible electronics and optoelectronics, which require a wide range of mechanical and physical properties. PMID:26949072

  9. Growth and characterization of silicon-based optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filios, Adam A.

    Photonics, a blending of optics and electronics, has emerged as one of the world's most rapidly developing fields. Along with microelectronics, they constitute the core technologies of the information industry, and their advances are complementing each other in the tasks of the acquisition, transmission, storage, and processing of increasing amounts of information. Microelectronic device integration has progressed to the point that complete "systems-on-the-chip" have been realized. Photonic materials need to be integrated with standard electronic circuits for the implementation of the next generation optoelectronic "super-chip" where both electrons and photons participate in the transmission and processing of information. Silicon is the cornerstone material in conventional VLSI systems. However, having a relatively small and indirect fundamental energy band-gap, silicon is an inefficient lightemitter. On the other hand, direct integration of III-V photonic materials on a silicon chip is still very problematic. Squeezing light out of silicon itself appears to be an attractive alternative. Light emission from silicon is an important fundamental issue with enormous technological implications. In this work we explore several strategies towards developing silicon based optoelectronic devices. Porous silicon, a material produced by electrochemically etching silicon in aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions, generated great interest in the early 1990s when it was shown to exhibit relatively bright, room temperature, visible photoluminescence. However, having a poor surface morphology, the material is fragile and chemically unstable leading to degradation of light emission and preventing integration with silicon processing technology. With the development of the epitaxially grown crystalline-Si/O superlattice, we attempt to overcome the morphological problems of porous silicon, retaining its light emission characteristics. Our multilayer c-Si/O device consists of thin silicon

  10. Advanced in-line optical metrology of sub-10nm structures for gate all around devices (GAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthinti, Raja; Loubet, Nicolas; Chao, Robin; Ott, John; Guillorn, Michael; Felix, Nelson; Gaudiello, John; Lund, Parker; Cepler, Aron; Sendelbach, Matthew; Cohen, Oded; Wolfling, Shay; Bozdog, Cornel; Klare, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Gate-all-around (GAA) nanowire (NW) devices have long been acknowledged as the ultimate device from an electrostatic scaling point of view. The GAA architecture offers improved short channel effect (SCE) immunity compared to single and double gate planar, FinFET, and trigate structures. One attractive proposal for making GAA devices involves the use of a multilayer fin-like structure consisting of layers of Si and SiGe. However, such structures pose various metrology challenges, both geometrical and material. Optical Scatterometry, also called optical critical dimension (OCD) is a fast, accurate and non-destructive in-line metrology technique well suited for GAA integration challenges. In this work, OCD is used as an enabler for the process development of nanowire devices, extending its abilities to learn new material and process aspects specific to this novel device integration. The specific metrology challenges from multiple key steps in the process flow are detailed, along with the corresponding OCD solutions and results. In addition, Low Energy X-Ray Fluorescence (LE-XRF) is applied to process steps before and after the removal of the SiGe layers in order to quantify the amount of Ge present at each step. These results are correlated to OCD measurements of the Ge content, demonstrating that both OCD and LE-XRF are sensitive to Ge content for these applications.

  11. A progress report on the LDRD project entitled {open_quotes}Microelectronic silicon-based chemical sensors: Ultradetection of high value molecules{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.

    1996-09-01

    This work addresses a new kind of silicon based chemical sensor that combines the reliability and stability of silicon microelectronic field effect devices with the highly selective and sensitive immunoassay. The sensor works on the principle that thin SiN layers on lightly doped Si can detect pH changes rapidly and reversibly. The pH changes affect the surface potential, and that can be quickly determined by pulsed photovoltage measurements. To detect other species, chemically sensitive films were deposited on the SiN where the presence of the chosen analyte results in pH changes through chemical reactions. A invention of a cell sorting device based on these principles is also described. A new method of immobilizing enzymes using Sandia`s sol-gel glasses is documented and biosensors based on the silicon wafer and an amperometric technique are detailed.

  12. A New Microelectronics Curriculum Created by Synopsys, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Rich; Bartleson, Karen; Wood, Troy; Melikyan, Vazgen; Wang, Zhi-hua; Chen, Lan

    2009-01-01

    Rapid changes in integrated circuits (IC) technology and constantly shrinking process geometries demand a new curriculum that meets the contemporary requirements for IC design. This is especially important for 90nm and below technologies and the use of state-of-the-art EDA design tools and advanced IC design techniques. The creation of new…

  13. The large scale microelectronics Computer-Aided Design and Test (CADAT) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The CADAT system consists of a number of computer programs written in FORTRAN that provide the capability to simulate, lay out, analyze, and create the artwork for large scale microelectronics. The function of each software component of the system is described with references to specific documentation for each software component.

  14. Principles And Conception Of LCVD Reactors For Photolytic And Pyrolytic Applications In Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappe, J.; Nicodeme, O.

    1989-01-01

    Laser induced chemistry appears to be an important and relatively novel field of research with potential applications, for instance in microelectronics. In this area, the most developed laser processing techniques are laser lithography and laser induced pyrolytic deposition of micron scale features. This paper will focus on the laser direct writing technique where the laser is used to induce chemical vapour deposition.

  15. Microelectronic Information Processing Systems: Computing Systems. Summary of Awards Fiscal Year 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA. Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering.

    The purpose of this summary of awards is to provide the scientific and engineering communities with a summary of the grants awarded in 1994 by the National Science Foundation's Division of Microelectronic Information Processing Systems. Similar areas of research are grouped together. Grantee institutions and principal investigators are identified…

  16. Labour-Saving versus Work-Amplifying Effects of Micro-Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Susumu

    1986-01-01

    This article argues that the labor-displacement effect of microelectronic machinery, especially numerically controlled machine tools and robots, has been exaggerated and that people tend to confuse the impact of intensified international competition with that of the new technology. (Author/CT)

  17. Laser processing of photonic and microelectronic components using multiple visible and UV wavelength source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illy, Elizabeth K.; Rutterford, Graham; Knowles, Martyn R. H.

    2003-07-01

    Laser processing using a multiple visible and UV wavelength copper laser source is presented with particular emphasis on photonic and microelectronic applications. Visible micromachining of ceramics and diamond are discussed in addition to UV micromachining/microfabrication of germanium doped silica, sapphire and kapton.

  18. Monolithic silicon photonics in a sub-100nm SOI CMOS microprocessor foundry: progress from devices to systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Miloš A.; Wade, Mark T.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Sun, Chen; Georgas, Michael; Moss, Benjamin; Kumar, Rajesh; Alloatti, Luca; Pavanello, Fabio; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Nammari, Kareem; Notaros, Jelena; Atabaki, Amir; Leu, Jonathan; Stojanović, Vladimir; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2015-02-01

    We review recent progress of an effort led by the Stojanović (UC Berkeley), Ram (MIT) and Popović (CU Boulder) research groups to enable the design of photonic devices, and complete on-chip electro-optic systems and interfaces, directly in standard microelectronics CMOS processes in a microprocessor foundry, with no in-foundry process modifications. This approach allows tight and large-scale monolithic integration of silicon photonics with state-of-the-art (sub-100nm-node) microelectronics, here a 45nm SOI CMOS process. It enables natural scale-up to manufacturing, and rapid advances in device design due to process repeatability. The initial driver application was addressing the processor-to-memory communication energy bottleneck. Device results include 5Gbps modulators based on an interleaved junction that take advantage of the high resolution of the sub-100nm CMOS process. We demonstrate operation at 5fJ/bit with 1.5dB insertion loss and 8dB extinction ratio. We also demonstrate the first infrared detectors in a zero-change CMOS process, using absorption in transistor source/drain SiGe stressors. Subsystems described include the first monolithically integrated electronic-photonic transmitter on chip (modulator+driver) with 20-70fJ/bit wall plug energy/bit (2-3.5Gbps), to our knowledge the lowest transmitter energy demonstrated to date. We also demonstrate native-process infrared receivers at 220fJ/bit (5Gbps). These are encouraging signs for the prospects of monolithic electronics-photonics integration. Beyond processor-to-memory interconnects, our approach to photonics as a "More-than- Moore" technology inside advanced CMOS promises to enable VLSI electronic-photonic chip platforms tailored to a vast array of emerging applications, from optical and acoustic sensing, high-speed signal processing, RF and optical metrology and clocks, through to analog computation and quantum technology.

  19. A Brief Discussion of Radiation Hardening of CMOS Microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1998-12-18

    Commercial microchips work well in their intended environments. However, generic microchips will not fimction correctly if exposed to sufficient amounts of ionizing radiation, the kind that satellites encounter in outer space. Modern CMOS circuits must overcome three specific concerns from ionizing radiation: total-dose, single-event, and dose-rate effects. Minority-carrier devices such as bipolar transistors, optical receivers, and solar cells must also deal with recombination-generation centers caused by displacement damage, which are not major concerns for majority-carrier CMOS devices. There are ways to make the chips themselves more resistant to radiation. This extra protection, called radiation hardening, has been called both a science and an art. Radiation hardening requires both changing the designs of the chips and altering the ways that the chips are manufactured.

  20. Design, processing and testing of LSI arrays: Hybrid microelectronics task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.; Stuhlbarg, S. M.; Ravetti, R. G.; Zulueta, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical cost factors were generated for both hybrid microcircuit and printed wiring board packaging methods. A mathematical cost model was created for analysis of microcircuit fabrication costs. The costing factors were refined and reduced to formulae for computerization. Efficient methods were investigated for low cost packaging of LSI devices as a function of density and reliability. Technical problem areas such as wafer bumping, inner/outer leading bonding, testing on tape, and tape processing, were investigated.

  1. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label bearing any such mark or simulation, without the written authority therefor of the Administrator. However... legend shown in Figure 5 of § 381.102 or any simulation of that legend. (1) The certificate is a...

  2. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label bearing any such mark or simulation, without the written authority therefor of the Administrator. However... legend shown in Figure 5 of § 381.102 or any simulation of that legend. (1) The certificate is a...

  3. Incessant tachycardia in a patient with advanced heart failure and left ventricular assist device: What is the mechanism?

    PubMed

    Noheria, Amit; Mulpuru, Siva K; Noseworthy, Peter A; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of incessant wide-complex tachycardia in a patient with left-ventricular assist device, and discuss the differential diagnosis with an in-depth analysis of the intracardiac tracings during the invasive electrophysiologic study, including interpretation of the relative timing of the fascicular signals during tachycardia and in sinus rhythm, and interpretation of pacing and entrainment maneuvers. PMID:27485564

  4. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label bearing any such mark or simulation, without the written authority therefor of the Administrator. However... legend shown in Figure 5 of § 381.102 or any simulation of that legend. (1) The certificate is a...

  5. 9 CFR 381.131 - Preparation of labeling or other devices bearing official inspection marks without advance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... otherwise make any marking device containing any official mark or simulation thereof, or any label bearing any such mark or simulation, without the written authority therefor of the Administrator. However... legend shown in Figure 5 of § 381.102 or any simulation of that legend. (1) The certificate is a...

  6. Materials study for interfacial adhesion and reliability of microelectronics packaging structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiang

    Multilayers and interfaces are ubiquitous in microelectronics devices, interconnect and packaging structures. Because of the differential thermal expansion of the dissimilar materials, thermal excursions from manufacturing processes and component operations cause thermal stresses which often drive delamination at various interfaces. As the interface integrity becomes the major concern of performance, yield, and reliability, the need to evaluate the fracture and delamination behavior of various interfaces increases. The present work focuses on a typical flip-chip-on-board (FCOB) packaging structure. The FCOB package utilizes a particulate filled liquid epoxy (underfill) to adhere the chip to the board for improved reliability of solder interconnections. However, underfill delamination from chip and/or board is most commonly observed in premature failure of flip-chip-on-board packages. The objectives of this work are to develop experimental and analysis techniques for quantifying the underfill interface fracture resistance, to identify interface adhesion and toughening mechanisms, and to develop a methodology for the reliability assessment of the interface integrity. Series of experiments and analyses are conducted to investigate the adhesion and fracture behaviors of the underfill/silicon and underfill/board interfaces. The experimental techniques for the interface fracture experiments are developed to produce the double-cantilever-beam (DCB) sandwich specimens and to establish a reproducible testing protocol. To extract the interfacial fracture energies, a closed-form solution is developed based on a beam-on-elastic-foundation model for DCB underfill/silicon specimens. A corrected beam theory model is adopted for DCB underfill/board specimens. A two-dimensional elastoplastic finite element analysis (FEA) model is also implemented to examine effects of mode-mixity, thermal/residual stresses, and underfill plasticity. The fracture energies of underfill/silicon and

  7. Less invasive methods of advanced hemodynamic monitoring: principles, devices, and their role in the perioperative hemodynamic optimization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of the cardiac output (CO) and other hemodynamic parameters, traditionally performed with the thermodilution method via a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC), is now increasingly done with the aid of less invasive and much easier to use devices. When used within the context of a hemodynamic optimization protocol, they can positively influence the outcome in both surgical and non-surgical patient populations. While these monitoring tools have simplified the hemodynamic calculations, they are subject to limitations and can lead to erroneous results if not used properly. In this article we will review the commercially available minimally invasive CO monitoring devices, explore their technical characteristics and describe the limitations that should be taken into consideration when clinical decisions are made. PMID:24472443

  8. Diagnostic study of steady state advanced fuel (deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium) fusion in an IEC device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Krupakar Murali

    The ionized fusion fuels (D-D & D-3He) have been accelerated to fusion velocities using two concentric grids maintained at a high potential difference in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device. Though the gridded IEC device currently has a low efficiency (Q ≡ fusion power/input power ˜10-5), the energetic protons and neutrons generated within this device can be used for many near-term applications, such as medical isotope production, landmine detection, neutron activation analysis, etc. The present work is centered upon understanding the operation of the device and finding new ways to increase the overall efficiency. The steady state fusion of D-3He fuel in an IEC device was successfully studied. At a pressure of ˜2 mtorr the source of such reactions was identified to be principally beam-target reactions and was theoretically explained using the Monte Carlo - Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code. The first simultaneous measurement of DD and D-3He protons was accomplished during the present thesis work that confirmed that D- 3He fusion reactions indeed occur in an IEC device. A new pressure independent diagnostic was invented to measure the average ion energy. That diagnostic uses the D-D proton energy spectra from a single loop cathode grid and the SRIM code predictions. A second diagnostic called the eclipse disc was co-invented to characterize the various fusion regimes in an IEC device. This diagnostic verified that a converged core fusion source exists for the DD reactions but the D-3He reactions that are principally embedded source reactions. A third diagnostic called the chordwire was invented to study the effects of various sources of electrons---thermionic, photo and field emission electrons, that decrease the efficiency of the device. This diagnostic also helped map the ion flux into the cathode in 2D, besides helping identify the high performance grid materials (W-25%Re and pure Re). Understanding the electron current

  9. Advanced packaging for Integrated Micro-Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyke, James L.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between packaging, microelectronics, and micro-electrical-mechanical systems (MEMS) is an important one, particularly when the edges of performance boundaries are pressed, as in the case of miniaturized systems. Packaging is a sort of physical backbone that enables the maximum performance of these systems to be realized, and the penalties imposed by conventional packing approaches is particularly limiting for MEMS devices. As such, advanced packaging approaches, such as multi-chip modules (MCM's) have been touted as a true means of electronic 'enablement' for a variety of application domains. Realizing an optimum system of packaging, however, in not as simple as replacing a set of single chip packages with a substrate of interconnections. Research at Phillips Laboratory has turned up a number of integrating options in the two- and three-dimensional rending of miniature systems with physical interconnection structures with intrinsically high performance. Not only do these structures motivate the redesign of integrated circuits (IC's) for lower power, but they possess interesting features that provide a framework for the direct integration of MEMS devices. Cost remains a barrier to the application of MEMS devices, even in space systems. Several innovations are suggested that will result in lower cost and more rapid cycle time. First, the novelty of a 'constant floor plan' MCM which encapsulates a variety of commonly used components into a stockable, easily customized assembly is discussed. Next, the use of low-cost substrates is examined. The anticipated advent of ultra-high density interconnect (UHDI) is suggested as the limit argument of advanced packaging. Finally, the concept of a heterogeneous 3-D MCM system is outlined that allows for the combination of different compatible packaging approaches into a uniformly dense structure that could also include MEMS-based sensors.

  10. Conformal Coating of Three-Dimensional Nanostructures via Atomic Layer Deposition for Development of Advanced Energy Storage Devices and Plasmonic Transparent Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Gary A.

    Due to the prodigious amount of electrical energy consumed throughout the world, there exists a great demand for new and improved methods of generating electrical energy in a clean and renewable manner as well as finding more effective ways to store it. This enormous task is of great interest to scientists and engineers, and much headway is being made by utilizing three-dimensional (3D) nanostructured materials. This work explores the application of two types of 3D nanostructured materials toward fabrication of advanced electrical energy storage and conversion devices. The first nanostructured material consists of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers. This three-dimensional structure is opaque, electrically conducting, and contains active sites along the outside of each fiber that are conducive to chemical reactions. Therefore, they make the perfect 3D conducting nanostructured substrate for advanced energy storage devices. In this work, the details for transforming vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays into core-shell structures via atomic layer deposition as well as into a mesoporous manganese oxide coated supercapacitor electrode are given. Another unique type of three-dimensional nanostructured substrate is nanotextured glass, which is transparent but non-conducting. Therefore, it can be converted to a 3D transparent conductor for possible application in photovoltaics if it can be conformally coated with a conducting material. This work details that transformation as well as the addition of plasmonic gold nanoparticles to complete the transition to a 3D plasmonic transparent conductor.

  11. Use of an individual mandibular advancement device for an?obstructive sleep apnoea patient with facial paralysis: a short-term follow-up case report.

    PubMed

    Pişkin, B; Sipahi, C; Köse, M; Karakoç, Ö; Şevketbeyoğlu, H; Ataç, G K

    2012-06-01

    This case report aimed to describe the fabrication procedure and treatment efficacy of an individual, one-piece, non-adjustable mandibular advancement device (MAD) for a moderate obstructive sleep apnoea patient with facial paralysis (FP). Mandibular advancement device was fabricated with autopolymerising acrylic resin. The intermaxillary relations were recorded such as to fix the mandible at a protruded position with increased vertical dimension. Initial evaluation of the MAD was made with axial magnetic resonance imaging and polysomnography on the first day of usage. Following evaluations were made on the third and sixth month. After a follow-up period of 6 months, Apnoea/Hypopnea Index (AHI) significantly decreased from 26·7 to 3·0. However, the average oxygen saturation did not improve as expected initially. The MAD therapy decreased the AHI scores of a patient with FP. At the end of a follow-up period of 6 months, the patient did not report any serious complaint except temporary tooth pains. PMID:22329406

  12. The role of nanotechnology and nano and micro-electronics in monitoring and control of cardiovascular diseases and neurological disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.

    2007-04-01

    Nanotechnology has been broadly defined as the one for not only the creation of functional materials and devices as well as systems through control of matter at the scale of 1-100 nm, but also the exploitation of novel properties and phenomena at the same scale. Growing needs in the point-of-care (POC) that is an increasing market for improving patient's quality of life, are driving the development of nanotechnologies for diagnosis and treatment of various life threatening diseases. This paper addresses the recent development of nanodiagnostic sensors and nanotherapeutic devices with functionalized carbon nanotube and/or nanowire on a flexible organic thin film electronics to monitor and control of the three leading diseases namely 1) neurodegenerative diseases, 2) cardiovascular diseases, and 3) diabetes and metabolic diseases. The sensors developed include implantable and biocompatible devices, light weight wearable devices in wrist-watches, hats, shoes and clothes. The nanotherapeutics devices include nanobased drug delivery system. Many of these sensors are integrated with the wireless systems for the remote physiological monitoring. The author's research team has also developed a wireless neural probe using nanowires and nanotubes for monitoring and control of Parkinson's disease. Light weight and compact EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system in a hat developed is capable of monitoring real time epileptic patients and patients with neurological and movement disorders using the Internet and cellular network. Physicians could be able to monitor these signals in realtime using portable computers or cell phones and will give early warning signal if these signals cross a pre-determined threshold level. In addition the potential impact of nanotechnology for applications in medicine is that, the devices can be designed to interact with cells and tissues at the molecular level, which allows high degree of functionality. Devices engineered at nanometer scale imply a

  13. Recent Advances in Low-Bandgap, InP-Based GaInAs/InAsP Materials and Devices for Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ahrenkiel, S. P.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Carapella, J. J.; Wehrer, R. J.; Wernsman, B.

    2004-11-01

    Salient advances in the development of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy converters based on low-bandgap, InP-based, GaInAs/InAsP heterostructures are presented and discussed. InP-based materials are well-suited and advantageous for TPV converter applications. Substantial improvements in the quality of lattice-mismatched (LMM) heterostructures have been realized through an enhanced understanding of the relaxation behavior, and associated microstructure, of InAsP compositionally graded layers and GaInAs/InAsP interfaces. Double-heterostructure, GaInAs/InAsP test structures with bandgaps as low as 0.5 eV (1.6% lattice mismatch) have been demonstrated with exceptional low-injection, minority-carrier lifetimes (several μs) and large estimated diffusion lengths — comparable to those for lattice-matched materials. The advances in material quality have contributed to a number of notable TPV device achievements. A record in-cavity efficiency of 23.6% was reported for a 0.6-eV, GaInAs/InAsP monolithic interconnected module. Additionally, 0.52-eV GaInAs/InAsP TPV converters were demonstrated with near-unity internal quantum efficiencies and reverse-saturation current densities nearly equaling the best reported for lattice-matched, 0.52-eV GaInAsSb/GaSb devices. Furthermore, InP-based, 0.74/0.63-eV, monolithic, series-connected, tandem TPV converters are also under development and show promising performance; an in-cavity efficiency of 11% has been reported for preliminary devices.

  14. Accuracy of analyses of microelectronics nanostructures in atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vurpillot, F.; Rolland, N.; Estivill, R.; Duguay, S.; Blavette, D.

    2016-07-01

    The routine use of atom probe tomography (APT) as a nano-analysis microscope in the semiconductor industry requires the precise evaluation of the metrological parameters of this instrument (spatial accuracy, spatial precision, composition accuracy or composition precision). The spatial accuracy of this microscope is evaluated in this paper in the analysis of planar structures such as high-k metal gate stacks. It is shown both experimentally and theoretically that the in-depth accuracy of reconstructed APT images is perturbed when analyzing this structure composed of an oxide layer of high electrical permittivity (higher-k dielectric constant) that separates the metal gate and the semiconductor channel of a field emitter transistor. Large differences in the evaporation field between these layers (resulting from large differences in material properties) are the main sources of image distortions. An analytic model is used to interpret inaccuracy in the depth reconstruction of these devices in APT.

  15. Polyimide nanofoams for microelectronic applications: Nanofoams derived from 6FXDA/6FDAM-co-polypropylene oxide copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, K.R.; Labadie, J.W.; DiPietro, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    As part of our research efforts to obtain thin film dielectric layers with very low dielectric constants for use in microelectronic devices, we have explored polyimide foams created using a block copolymer approach. In these systems the pore sizes are in the manometer range thus the term {open_quotes}nanofoam{close_quotes}. The polyimide foams are prepared from block copolymers consisting of thermally stabile and thermally labile blocks, the latter being the dispersed phase. Foam formation is effected by thermolysis of the thermally labile block leaving pores the size and shape corresponding to the initial copolymer morphology. Nanofoams of 6FXDA/6FDAm polyimide were investigated. These highly fluorinated polyimide foams showed a drop in refractive index, indicative of a significant lowering of the dielectric constant. The foams were characterized by a variety of techniques including, TEM, SAXS, WAXD, DMTA, density measurements mid refractive index measurement. Thin film, high modulus foams with good mechanical properties can be synthesized using the copolymer/nanofoam approach.

  16. Interest and preferences for using advanced physical activity tracking devices: results of a national cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Stephanie; Schoeppe, Stephanie; Guertler, Diana; Jennings, Cally; Vandelanotte, Corneel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pedometers are an effective self-monitoring tool to increase users' physical activity. However, a range of advanced trackers that measure physical activity 24 hours per day have emerged (eg, Fitbit). The current study aims to determine people's current use, interest and preferences for advanced trackers. Design and participants A cross-sectional national telephone survey was conducted in Australia with 1349 respondents. Outcome measures Regression analyses were used to determine whether tracker interest and use, and use of advanced trackers over pedometers is a function of demographics. Preferences for tracker features and reasons for not wanting to wear a tracker are also presented. Results Over one-third of participants (35%) had used a tracker, and 16% are interested in using one. Multinomial regression (n=1257) revealed that the use of trackers was lower in males (OR=0.48, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.65), non-working participants (OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.61), participants with lower education (OR=0.52, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.72) and inactive participants (OR=0.52, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.70). Interest in using a tracker was higher in younger participants (OR=1.73, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.58). The most frequently used tracker was a pedometer (59%). Logistic regression (n=445) revealed that use of advanced trackers compared with pedometers was higher in males (OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.79) and younger participants (OR=2.96, 95% CI 1.71 to 5.13), and lower in inactive participants (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.63). Over half of current or interested tracker users (53%) prefer to wear it on their wrist, 31% considered counting steps the most important function and 30% regarded accuracy as the most important characteristic. The main reasons for not wanting to use a tracker were, ‘I don't think it would help me’ (39%), and ‘I don't want to increase my activity’ (47%). Conclusions Activity trackers are a promising tool to engage people in self-monitoring a physical activity

  17. Application of fiber optic sensors in waste water management from microelectronics fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulieru, Dumitru G.

    1999-09-01

    The concept of waste water treatment from microelectronics fab processes is referring to waste water discharged from ultrapure water plant which can't be treated on recovery waste water section. These wastes concentrated contains organic and inorganic acids, alkalis, metals, cyanide, chromium and fluoride effluent from fab processes. They will be canalized on qualities for treatment sections which permit the discharge of treated waste water as neutral with solids removal as compacted sludge. For management of waste water treatment plant we are using the fiber optic sensors as follows: level and flow control, signalization automatic pumps control and protection, solid control, leak detection a.s.o. The neutral quality of treated water has 'null' impact against of environmental system recommended for all semiconductors and microelectronics fab processes.

  18. Application of fiber optic sensors to wastewater management using microelectronics fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulieru, Dumitru G.

    1999-12-01

    The concept of waste water treatment from microelectronics fab. Processes is referring to waste water discharged from ultrapure water plant which can't be treated on recovery waste water section. These wastes concentrated contains organic and inorganic acids, alkalis, metals, cyanide, chromium and fluoride effluent from fab. processes. They will be canalized on qualities for treatment sections which permit the discharge of treated waste water as neutral with solids removal as compacted sludge. For management of waste water treatment plant we are using the fiber optic sensors as follows: level and flow control, signalization automatic pumps control and protection, solid control, leak detection a.s.o. The neutral quality of treated water has 'null' impact against of environmental system recommended for all semiconductors and microelectronics fab. processes.

  19. Application of fiber optic sensors to wastewater management using microelectronics fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulieru, Dumitru G.

    1997-05-01

    The concept of waste water treatment from microelectronics fab processes is referring to waste water discharged from ultrapure water plant which can't be treated on recovery waste water section. These wastes concentrated contain organic and inorganic acids, alkalis, metals, cyanide, chromium and fluoride effluent from fab processes. They will be canalized on qualities for treatment sections which permit the discharge of treated waste water as neutral with solids removal as compacted sludge. For management of the waste water treatment plant we are using the fiber optic sensors as follows: level and flow control, signalization automatic pumps control and protection, solid control, leak detection a.s.o. The neutral quality of treated water has 'null' impact against the environmental system recommended for all semiconductors and microelectronics fab processes.

  20. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A four-channel microelectronic system for neural signal regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shushan, Xie; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaoying, Lü; Wenyuan, Li; Haixian, Pan

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a microelectronic system which is capable of making a signal record and functional electric stimulation of an injured spinal cord. As a requirement of implantable engineering for the regeneration microelectronic system, the system is of low noise, low power, small size and high performance. A front-end circuit and two high performance OPAs (operational amplifiers) have been designed for the system with different functions, and the two OPAs are a low-noise low-power two-stage OPA and a constant-gm RTR input and output OPA. The system has been realized in CSMC 0.5-μm CMOS technology. The test results show that the system satisfies the demands of neuron signal regeneration.

  1. Architectures for Improved Organic Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jonathan H.

    Advancements in the microelectronics industry have brought increasing performance and decreasing prices to a wide range of users. Conventional silicon-based electronics have followed Moore's law to provide an ever-increasing integrated circuit transistor density, which drives processing power, solid-state memory density, and sensor technologies. As shrinking conventional integrated circuits became more challenging, researchers began exploring electronics with the potential to penetrate new applications with a low price of entry: "Electronics everywhere." The new generation of electronics is thin, light, flexible, and inexpensive. Organic electronics are part of the new generation of thin-film electronics, relying on the synthetic flexibility of carbon molecules to create organic semiconductors, absorbers, and emitters which perform useful tasks. Organic electronics can be fabricated with low energy input on a variety of novel substrates, including inexpensive plastic sheets. The potential ease of synthesis and fabrication of organic-based devices means that organic electronics can be made at very low cost. Successfully demonstrated organic semiconductor devices include photovoltaics, photodetectors, transistors, and light emitting diodes. Several challenges that face organic semiconductor devices are low performance relative to conventional devices, long-term device stability, and development of new organic-compatible processes and materials. While the absorption and emission performance of organic materials in photovoltaics and light emitting diodes is extraordinarily high for thin films, the charge conduction mobilities are generally low. Building highly efficient devices with low-mobility materials is one challenge. Many organic semiconductor films are unstable during fabrication, storage, and operation due to reactions with water, oxygen and hydroxide. A final challenge facing organic electronics is the need for new processes and materials for electrodes

  2. Laser forward transfer of solder paste for microelectronics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Ray C.; Kim, Heungsoo; Piqué, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The progressive miniaturization of electronic devices requires an ever-increasing density of interconnects attached via solder joints. As a consequence, the overall size and spacing (or pitch) of these solder joint interconnects keeps shrinking. When the pitch between interconnects decreases below 200 μm, current technologies, such as stencil printing, find themselves reaching their resolution limit. Laser direct-write (LDW) techniques based on laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offer unique advantages and capabilities for the printing of solder pastes. At NRL, we have demonstrated the successful transfer, patterning, and subsequent reflow of commercial Pb-free solder pastes using LIFT. Transfers were achieved both with the donor substrate in contact with the receiving substrate and across a 25 μm gap, such that the donor substrate does not make contact with the receiving substrate. We demonstrate the transfer of solder paste features down to 25 μm in diameter and as large as a few hundred microns, although neither represents the ultimate limit of the LIFT process in terms of spatial dimensions. Solder paste was transferred onto circular copper pads as small as 30 μm and subsequently reflowed, in order to demonstrate that the solder and flux were not adversely affected by the LIFT process.

  3. Asymmetric polarization-based frequency shifting interferometer for microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Min Young

    2014-05-01

    Frequency Scanning Interferometry(FSI) generally results in superior optical performance comparing with other 3-dimensional measuring methods as its hardware structure is fixed in operation and only the light frequency is scanned in a specific spectral band without vertical scanning of the target surface or the objective lens. However, it still suffers from optical noise due to polarization characteristic of target surfaces and relatively long processing time due to the number of images acquired in frequency scanning phase. First, a Polarization-based Frequency Scanning Interferometry(PFSI) is proposed for optical noise robustness. It consists of tunable laser for light source, λ/4 plate in front of reference mirror, λ /4 plate in front of target object, polarizing beam splitter, polarizer in front of image sensor, polarizer in front of the fiber coupled light source, λ/2 plate between PBS and polarizer of the light source. Using the proposed system, we can solve the problem of fringe image with low contrast by using polarization technique. Also, we can control light distribution of object beam and reference beam. Second the signal processing acceleration method is proposed for PFSI, based on parallel processing architecture, which consists of parallel processing hardware and software such as Graphic Processing Unit(GPU) and Compute Unified Device Architecture(CUDA). Finally, the proposed system is evaluated in terms of accuracy and processing speed through a series of experiment and the obtained results show the effectiveness of the proposed system and method.

  4. Advanced processing of gallium nitride and gallium nitride-based devices: Ultra-high temperature annealing and implantation incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haijiang

    into AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor processing has been first demonstrated. An ultra-high temperature (1500°C) rapid thermal annealing technique was developed for the activation of Si dopants implanted in the source and drain. In comparison to control devices processed by conventional fabrication, the implanted device with nonalloyed ohmic contact showed comparable device performance with a contact resistance of 0.4 Omm Imax 730 mA/mm ft/f max; 26/62 GHz and power 3.4 W/mm on sapphire. These early results demonstrate the feasibility of implantation incorporation into GaN based device processing as well as the potential to increase yield, reproducibility and reliability in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs.

  5. Two dimension (2-D) graphene-based nanomaterials as signal amplification elements in electrochemical microfluidic immune-devices: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is a 2-D carbon nanomaterial with many distinctive properties that are electrochemically beneficial, such as large surface-to-volume ratio, lowered power usage, high conductivity and electron mobility. Graphene-based electrochemical immune-devices have recently gained much importance for detecting antigens and biomarkers responsible for cancer diagnosis. This review describes fabrication and chemical modification of the surfaces of graphene for immunesensing applications. We also present a comprehensive overview of current developments and key issues in the determination of some biological molecules with particular emphasis on evaluating the models. This review focuses mostly on new developments in the last 5years in development of chip architecture and integration, different sensing modes that can be used in conjunction with microfluidics, and new applications that have emerged or have been demonstrated; it also aims to point out where future research can be directed to in these areas. PMID:27524045

  6. Changes in a basic course of electrical measurement caused by development in microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haasz, V.

    2015-02-01

    Changes in electrical measurement and instrumentation caused by a development in microelectronics should be reflected also in education. This trend runs more than 50 years. At present it relates especially to substitution of analogue signal processing by digital processing of sampled signal in a number of measuring instruments. The actual essential changes in the basic course of electrical measurement at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of the Czech Technical University (CTU) in Prague corresponding to this progress in last years are presented.

  7. From neural-based object recognition toward microelectronic eyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheu, Bing J.; Bang, Sa Hyun

    1994-01-01

    Engineering neural network systems are best known for their abilities to adapt to the changing characteristics of the surrounding environment by adjusting system parameter values during the learning process. Rapid advances in analog current-mode design techniques have made possible the implementation of major neural network functions in custom VLSI chips. An electrically programmable analog synapse cell with large dynamic range can be realized in a compact silicon area. New designs of the synapse cells, neurons, and analog processor are presented. A synapse cell based on Gilbert multiplier structure can perform the linear multiplication for back-propagation networks. A double differential-pair synapse cell can perform the Gaussian function for radial-basis network. The synapse cells can be biased in the strong inversion region for high-speed operation or biased in the subthreshold region for low-power operation. The voltage gain of the sigmoid-function neurons is externally adjustable which greatly facilitates the search of optimal solutions in certain networks. Various building blocks can be intelligently connected to form useful industrial applications. Efficient data communication is a key system-level design issue for large-scale networks. We also present analog neural processors based on perceptron architecture and Hopfield network for communication applications. Biologically inspired neural networks have played an important role towards the creation of powerful intelligent machines. Accuracy, limitations, and prospects of analog current-mode design of the biologically inspired vision processing chips and cellular neural network chips are key design issues.

  8. Synthesis of the System Modeling and Signal Detecting Circuit of a Novel Vacuum Microelectronic Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongling; Wen, Zhiyu; Wen, Zhongquan; He, Xuefeng; Yang, Yinchuan; Shang, Zhengguo

    2009-01-01

    A novel high-precision vacuum microelectronic accelerometer has been successfully fabricated and tested in our laboratory. This accelerometer has unique advantages of high sensitivity, fast response, and anti-radiation stability. It is a prototype intended for navigation applications and is required to feature micro-g resolution. This paper briefly describes the structure and working principle of our vacuum microelectronic accelerometer, and the mathematical model is also established. The performances of the accelerometer system are discussed after Matlab modeling. The results show that, the dynamic response of the accelerometer system is significantly improved by choosing appropriate parameters of signal detecting circuit, and the signal detecting circuit is designed. In order to attain good linearity and performance, the closed-loop control mode is adopted. Weak current detection technology is studied, and integral T-style feedback network is used in I/V conversion, which will eliminate high-frequency noise at the front of the circuit. According to the modeling parameters, the low-pass filter is designed. This circuit is simple, reliable, and has high precision. Experiments are done and the results show that the vacuum microelectronic accelerometer exhibits good linearity over -1 g to +1 g, an output sensitivity of 543 mV/g, and a nonlinearity of 0.94 %. PMID:22408515

  9. The optical assembly of a micro-electron column and its application.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Wonkweon; Park, Jongseon; Park, Sungsoon; Kim, Hoseob; Choi, Kwangho

    2007-04-01

    Micro-electron column has been intensively studied due to its high potential for application to multi-electron beam system. Its full length is less than 15mm, very short comparing that (1˜2m) of conventional electron column. Research is focused on how it can be assembled in shrunk size and work at the same or better level. The resolution and performance of a micro-electron column is determined by factors of spherical, chromatic aberration, astigmatism, coma, etc., and these factors critically depend on size, roundness of the lens aperture and precise alignment To date, many precise equipments have been used, such as aligner, piezoelectric transducer (PZT), and scanning tunneling microscope (STM). However, those methods were difficult to use and complicated. In this paper, we used the laser diffraction pattern method for optical alignment of micro-electron lenses, and laser bonding was employed for exact fabrication of micro-lenses within 4% error. After assembled it was fully functioned in nano-scale reading with current image. Application to LCD tester and comb wire imaging in micro-, nano-scale were successfully demonstrated.

  10. Assessment of microelectronics packaging for high temperature, high reliability applications

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, F.

    1997-04-01

    This report details characterization and development activities in electronic packaging for high temperature applications. This project was conducted through a Department of Energy sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors. Even though the target application of this collaborative effort is an automotive electronic throttle control system which would be located in the engine compartment, results of this work are directly applicable to Sandia`s national security mission. The component count associated with the throttle control dictates the use of high density packaging not offered by conventional surface mount. An enabling packaging technology was selected and thermal models defined which characterized the thermal and mechanical response of the throttle control module. These models were used to optimize thick film multichip module design, characterize the thermal signatures of the electronic components inside the module, and to determine the temperature field and resulting thermal stresses under conditions that may be encountered during the operational life of the throttle control module. Because the need to use unpackaged devices limits the level of testing that can be performed either at the wafer level or as individual dice, an approach to assure a high level of reliability of the unpackaged components was formulated. Component assembly and interconnect technologies were also evaluated and characterized for high temperature applications. Electrical, mechanical and chemical characterizations of enabling die and component attach technologies were performed. Additionally, studies were conducted to assess the performance and reliability of gold and aluminum wire bonding to thick film conductor inks. Kinetic models were developed and validated to estimate wire bond reliability.

  11. Advanced processing methods to introduce and preserve dipole orientation in organic electro-optic materials for next generation photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su

    ) (PVP) and TOPAS as well as ferroelectric polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE), 65/35 copolymer), which differ largely from the others in dielectric constant, conductivity and surface properties. The only common feature of them is that they all lowered the charge injection and leakage current for 1-2 orders during poling. On every buffer layer we tried, similar trend of stability enhancement is found. These results suggest that the observed temporal stability enhancement is indeed an effect from the abovementioned mechanism. Chapter 4 focuses on the development of an innovative new poling method, which utilizes pyroelectric effect instead of external power sources to overcome the limitations of conventional contact poling and corona poling. With careful theory assisted design, we developed a reliable protocol to efficiently introduce dipole orientation in organic E-O materials by heating and cooling them with detachable pyroelectric crystals. This new method can potentially improve the process adaptability of organic E-O materials in a variety of photonic devices. Large Pockels coefficients (up to 81 pm/V at 1.3 micron) have been successfully achieved in thin films poled using this method. The effective fields in these experiments are estimated to be around 0.5 to 0.9 MV/cm, which agree well with the electrostatics analysis using an idealized model. The same method is directly applied to surface modified hybrid polymer silicon slot waveguide ring-resonator modulators devices. A 25 pm/V tunability of resonance peak wavelength shift has been realized, which was higher than any reported results in similar devices. Chapter 5 discusses about the possible application of the pyroelectric poling in a multi-stack waveguide device architecture. A long-existing challenge to pole E-O polymer based photonic devices is how to effectively drop the poling voltage to the core layer, which is usually sandwiched between two dielectric claddings. In the past

  12. Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Flight Software (FSW): A Unique Approach to Exercise in Long Duration Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangieri, Mark

    2005-01-01

    ARED flight instrumentation software is associated with an overall custom designed resistive exercise system that will be deployed on the International Space Station (ISS). This innovative software application fuses together many diverse and new technologies into a robust and usable package. The software takes advantage of touchscreen user interface technology by providing a graphical user interface on a Windows based tablet PC, meeting a design constraint of keyboard-less interaction with flight crewmembers. The software interacts with modified commercial data acquisition (DAQ) hardware to acquire multiple channels of sensor measurment from the ARED device. This information is recorded on the tablet PC and made available, via International Space Station (ISS) Wireless LAN (WLAN) and telemetry subsystems, to ground based mission medics and trainers for analysis. The software includes a feature to accept electronically encoded prescriptions of exercises that guide crewmembers through a customized regimen of resistive weight training, based on personal analysis. These electronically encoded prescriptions are provided to the crew via ISS WLAN and telemetry subsystems. All personal data is securely associated with an individual crew member, based on a PIN ID mechanism.

  13. Advances in the application of high T_c superconductors to microwave devices for analog signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mage, J. C.; Marcilhac, B.; Mercandalli, M.; Lemaître, Y.; Barrau, S.; Dessertenne, B.; Mansart, D.; Castera, J. P.; Hartemann, P.

    1994-07-01

    During the last five years, the surface resistance R_s (10 GHs, 77 K) of YBCO thin films has decreased from a value of about 10 to 20 milliohms — i.e. the same as cooled pure copper or as bulk YBCO — down to values lower than 200 micro-ohms, close to the theoretical value of 100 micro-ohms obtained by a straightforward calculation from BCS theory. This improvement of R_s is due to a better quality of the material from random grain ceramics to quasi epitaxial films. These highly textured films can be obtained by many deposition methods : sputtering, laser ablation, co-evaporation, molecular beam epitaxy, MOCVD, using heating sample holders in order to obtain in situ crystal oriented layers. The value of the surface resistance is about one hundred times lower than that of usual metallizations, which can be used either to improve the specifications of some components by two order of magnitude such as high Q 3D resonators (Q > 10^6 for low phase noise oscillators) and high Q inductances (Q > 10^4 for circuit matching of antennae in the MHz range) or to reduce the size of voluminous devices such as filter banks for multiplexing or spectral analysis.

  14. A method for wafer level hermetic packaging of SOI-MEMS devices with embedded vertical feedthroughs using advanced MEMS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert Torunbalci, Mustafa; Emre Alper, Said; Akin, Tayfun

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a novel, inherently simple, and low-cost fabrication and hermetic packaging method developed for SOI-MEMS devices, where a single SOI wafer is used for the fabrication of MEMS structures as well as vertical feedthroughs, while a single glass cap wafer is used for hermetic encapsulation and routing metallization. Hermetic encapsulation can be achieved either with the silicon-glass anodic or Au-Si eutectic bonding techniques. The dies sealed with anodic and Au-Si eutectic bonding provide a low vertical feedthrough resistance around 50 Ω. Glass-to-silicon anodically and Au-Si eutectic bonded seals yield a very stable cavity pressure below 10 mTorr with thin-film getters, which are measured to be stable even after 311 d. The package pressure can be adjusted from 5 mTorr to 20 Torr by using different outgassing, cavity depth, and gettering options. The packaging yield is observed to be around 64% and 84% for the anodic and Au-Si eutectic packages, respectively. The average shear strength of the anodic and eutectic packages is measured to be higher than 17 MPa and 42 MPa, respectively. Temperature cycling, high temperature storage, and ultra-high temperature shock tests result in no degradation in the hermeticity of the packaged chips, proving perfect thermal reliability.

  15. Illumination-tolerant face verification of low-bit-rate JPEG2000 wavelet images with advanced correlation filters for handheld devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaya, Surya Li; Savvides, Marios; Vijaya Kumar, B. V. K.

    2005-02-01

    Face recognition on mobile devices, such as personal digital assistants and cell phones, is a big challenge owing to the limited computational resources available to run verifications on the devices themselves. One approach is to transmit the captured face images by use of the cell-phone connection and to run the verification on a remote station. However, owing to limitations in communication bandwidth, it may be necessary to transmit a compressed version of the image. We propose using the image compression standard JPEG2000, which is a wavelet-based compression engine used to compress the face images to low bit rates suitable for transmission over low-bandwidth communication channels. At the receiver end, the face images are reconstructed with a JPEG2000 decoder and are fed into the verification engine. We explore how advanced correlation filters, such as the minimum average correlation energy filter [Appl. Opt. 26, 3633 (1987)] and its variants, perform by using face images captured under different illumination conditions and encoded with different bit rates under the JPEG2000 wavelet-encoding standard. We evaluate the performance of these filters by using illumination variations from the Carnegie Mellon University's Pose, Illumination, and Expression (PIE) face database. We also demonstrate the tolerance of these filters to noisy versions of images with illumination variations.

  16. Pilot Study of a New Adjustable Thermoplastic Mandibular Advancement Device for the Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea-Hypopnoea Syndrome: A Brief Research Letter

    PubMed Central

    El Ibrahimi, Mohammed; Laabouri, Mounir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prefabricated adjustable thermoplastic mandibular advancement devices (PAT-MADs) are a practical short-term treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) in patients who have failed or refused continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of a new professionally-fitted PAT-MAD in patients with OSAHS in Morocco. Method: Twenty-four adults with mild, moderate or severe OSAHS were fitted with the PAT-MAD (BluePro®; BlueSom, France). Respiratory parameters (apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI)) and daytime sleepiness using the Epworth Sleepiness scale (ESS) were assessed before and after treatment. Adverse events were recorded. Results: Mean treatment duration was 106.3 ± 73.4 days. Mean AHI score decreased from 21.4 ± 7.4 to 9.3 ± 4.1 after treatment (p<0.0001) (mean reduction of 57.0 ± 12.3%). Mean ESS and ODI also decreased at EOS (from 10.4 ± 2.8 to 7.3 ± 2.3, mean reduction 30.3 ± 12.2%, p=0.0001; and 7.0 ± 6.9 to 4.7 ± 4.0, mean reduction 30.5 ± 25.0%, p=0.2, respectively). Treatment was considered to have been successful in 22 patients (91.7%) who had mild OSAHS or an AHI score of ≤5 at the end of the study. The device was well-tolerated. Conclusion: This new PAT-MAD appears to be effective at reducing respiratory parameters and improving daytime alertness in patients with OSAHS. Long term studies in a larger number of patients are warranted to assess the long-term efficacy, retention and side-effects of this device. PMID:27499821

  17. An external portable device for adaptive deep brain stimulation (aDBS) clinical research in advanced Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Arlotti, Mattia; Rossi, Lorenzo; Rosa, Manuela; Marceglia, Sara; Priori, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Compared to conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) for patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), the newer approach of adaptive DBS (aDBS), regulating stimulation on the basis of the patient's clinical state, promises to achieve better clinical outcomes, avoid adverse-effects and save time for tuning parameters. A remaining challenge before aDBS comes into practical use is to prove its feasibility and its effectiveness in larger groups of patients and in more ecological conditions. We developed an external portable aDBS system prototype designed for clinical testing in freely-moving PD patients with externalized DBS electrodes. From a single-channel bipolar artifact-free recording, it analyses local field potentials (LFPs), during ongoing DBS for tuning stimulation parameters, independent from the specific feedback algorithm implemented. We validated the aDBS system in vitro, by testing both its sensing and closed-loop stimulation capabilities, and then tested it in vivo, focusing on the sensing capabilities. By applying the aDBS system prototype in a patient with PD, we provided evidence that it can track levodopa and DBS-induced LFP spectral power changes among different patient's clinical states. Our system, intended for testing LFP-based feedback strategies for aDBS, should help understanding how and whether aDBS therapy works in PD and indicating future technical and clinical advances. PMID:27029510

  18. Designing and simulation smart multifunctional continuous logic device as a basic cell of advanced high-performance sensor systems with MIMO-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolskyy, Aleksandr I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed a design and simulation of hardware realizations of smart multifunctional continuous logic devices (SMCLD) as advanced basic cells of the sensor systems with MIMO- structure for images processing and interconnection. The SMCLD realize function of two-valued, multi-valued and continuous logics with current inputs and current outputs. Such advanced basic cells realize function nonlinear time-pulse transformation, analog-to-digital converters and neural logic. We showed advantages of such elements. It's have a number of advantages: high speed and reliability, simplicity, small power consumption, high integration level. The conception of construction of SMCLD consists in the use of a current mirrors realized on 1.5μm technology CMOS transistors. Presence of 50÷70 transistors, 1 PD and 1 LED makes the offered circuits quite compact. The simulation results of NOT, MIN, MAX, equivalence (EQ), normalize summation, averaging and other functions, that implemented SMCLD, showed that the level of logical variables can change from 0.1μA to 10μA for low-power consumption variants. The SMCLD have low power consumption <1mW and processing time about 1÷11μS at supply voltage 2.4÷3.3V.

  19. Solar Variability and the Near-Earth Environment: Mining Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity Data From the Microelectronics and Photonics Test Bed Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turflinger, T.; Schmeichel, W.; Krieg, J.; Titus, J.; Campbell, A.; Reeves, M.; Marshall (P.); Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This effort is a detailed analysis of existing microelectronics and photonics test bed satellite data from one experiment, the bipolar test board, looking to improve our understanding of the enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS) phenomenon. Over the past several years, extensive total dose irradiations of bipolar devices have demonstrated that many of these devices exhibited ELDRS. In sensitive bipolar transistors, ELDRS produced enhanced degradation of base current, resulting in enhanced gain degradation at dose rates <0.1 rd(Si)/s compared to similar transistors irradiated at dose rates >1 rd(Si)/s. This Technical Publication provides updated information about the test devices, the in-flight experiment, and both flight-and ground-based observations. Flight data are presented for the past 5 yr of the mission. These data are compared to ground-based data taken on devices from the same date code lots. Information about temperature fluctuations, power shutdowns, and other variables encountered during the space flight are documented.

  20. Experimental Studies of Selected Aqueous Electrochemical Systems Relevant for Materials Processing in the Fabrications of Microelectronic Components and Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xingzhao

    A broad range of electrochemical techniques are employed in this dissertation to investigate a selected set of aqueous electrochemical systems that are relevant for materials processing in the fabrication of microelectronic devices and direct alcohol fuel cells. In terms of technical applications, this work covers three main experimental systems: (i) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), (ii) electro-less nickel deposition, and (iii) direct alkaline glycerol fuel cells. The first two areas are related to electronic device fabrications and the third topic is related to cost-effective energy conversion. The common electrochemical aspect of these different systems is that, in all these cases the active material characteristics are governed by complex (often multi-step) reactions occurring at metal-liquid (aqueous) interfaces. Electro-analytical techniques are ideally suited for studying the detailed mechanisms of such reactions, and the present investigation is largely focused on developing adequate analytical strategies for probing these reaction mechanisms. In the fabrication of integrated circuits, certain steps of materials processing involve CMP of Al deposited on thin layers of diffusion barrier materials like Ta/TaN, Co, or Ti/TiN. A specific example of this situation is found in the processing of replacement metal gates used for high-k/metal-gate transistors. Since the commonly used barrier materials are nobler than Al, the Al interface in contact with the barrier can become prone to galvanic corrosion in the wet CMP environment. Using model systems of coupon electrodes and two specific barrier metals, Ta and Co, the electrochemical factors responsible for these corrosion effects are investigated here in a moderately acidic (pH = 4.0) abrasive-free solution. The techniques of cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy are combined with strategic measurements of galvanic currents and open circuit potentials (OCPs). L-ascorbic acid (AA) is employed as a

  1. Analytical Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    In the mid 60s under contract with NASA, Dr. Benjamin W. Grunbaum was responsible for the development of an automated electrophoresis device that would work in the weightless environment of space. The device was never used in space but was revived during the mid 70s as a technology utilization project aimed at an automated system for use on Earth. The advanced system became known as the Grunbaum System for electrophoresis. It is a versatile, economical assembly for rapid separation of specific blood proteins in very small quantities, permitting their subsequent identification and quantification.

  2. InGaAsN: A Novel Material for High-Efficiency Solar Cells and Advanced Photonic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Allerman, Andrew A.; Follstaedt, David M.; Gee, James M.; Jones, Eric D.; Kurtz, Steven R.; Modine, Norman A.

    1999-07-01

    This report represents the completion of a 6 month Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program that focused on research and development of novel compound semiconductor, InGaAsN. This project seeks to rapidly assess the potential of InGaAsN for improved high-efficiency photovoltaic. Due to the short time scale, the project focused on quickly investigating the range of attainable compositions and bandgaps while identifying possible material limitations for photovoltaic devices. InGaAsN is a new semiconductor alloy system with the remarkable property that the inclusion of only 2% nitrogen reduces the bandgap by more than 30%. In order to help understand the physical origin of this extreme deviation from the typically observed nearly linear dependence of alloy properties on concentration, we have investigated the pressure dependence of the excited state energies using both experimental and theoretical methods. We report measurements of the low temperature photoluminescence energy of the material for pressures between ambient and 110 kbar. We describe a simple, density-functional-theory-based approach to calculating the pressure dependence of low lying excitation energies for low concentration alloys. The theoretically predicted pressure dependence of the bandgap is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Based on the results of our calculations, we suggest an explanation for the strongly non-linear pressure dependence of the bandgap that, surprisingly, does not involve a nitrogen impurity band. Additionally, conduction-band mass measurements, measured by three different techniques, will be described and finally, the magnetoluminescence determined pressure coefficient for the conduction-band mass is measured. The design, growth by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, and processing of an In{sub 0.07}Ga{sub 0.93}As{sub 0.98}N{sub 0.02} solar cell, with 1.0 eV bandgap, lattice matched to GaAs is described. The hole diffusion length in

  3. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaoye

    Continuous downscaling in microelectronics has pushed conventional CMOS technology to its physical limits, while Moore's Law has correctly predicted the trend for decades, each step forward is accompanied with unprecedented technological difficulties and near-exponential increase in cost. At the same time, however, demands for low-power, low-cost and high-speed devices have never diminished, instead, even more stringent requirements have been imposed on device performances. It is therefore crucial to explore alternative materials and device architectures in order to alleviate the pressure caused by downscaling. To this end, we investigated two different approaches: (1) InSb nanowire based field effect transistors (NWFETs) and (2) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) -- peptide nucleic acid (PNA) --SWCNT conjugate. Two types of InSb nanowires were synthesized by template-assisted electrochemistry and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) respectively. In both cases, NWFETs were fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL) and crystallinity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns. For electrochemistry nanowire, ambipolar conduction was observed with strong p-type conduction, the effect of thermal annealing on the conductivity was analyzed, a NWFET model that took into consideration the underlapped region in top-gated NWFET was proposed. Hole mobility in the channel was calculated to be 292.84 cm2V-1s -1 with a density of 1.5x1017/cm3. For CVD nanowire, the diameter was below 40nm with an average of 20nm. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process was speculated to be the mechanism responsible for nanowire growth. The efficient gate control was manifested by high ION/I OFF ratio which was on the order of 106 and a small inverse subthreshold slope (<200 mV/decade). Scale analysis was used to successfully account for disparities observed among a number of sample devices. N-type conduction was found in all NWFETs with

  4. Advances in pulsed-laser-deposited AIN thin films for high-temperature capping, device passivation, and piezoelectric-based RF MEMS/NEMS resonator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hullavarad, S. S.; Vispute, R. D.; Nagaraj, B.; Kulkarni, V. N.; Dhar, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Jones, K. A.; Derenge, M.; Zheleva, T.; Ervin, M. H.; Lelis, A.; Scozzie, C. J.; Habersat, D.; Wickenden, A. E.; Currano, L. J.; Dubey, M.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper we report recent advances in pulsed-laser-deposited AIN thin films for high-temperature capping of SiC, passivation of SiC-based devices, and fabrication of a piezoelectric MEMS/NEMS resonator on Pt-metallized SiO2/Si. The AlN films grown using the reactive laser ablation technique were found to be highly stoichiometric, dense with an optical band gap of 6.2 eV, and with a surface smoothness of less than 1 nm. A low-temperature buffer-layer approach was used to reduce the lattice and thermal mismatch strains. The dependence of the quality of AlN thin films and its characteristics as a function of processing parameters are discussed. Due to high crystallinity, near-perfect stoichiometry, and high packing density, pulsed-laser-deposited AlN thin films show a tendency to withstand high temperatures up to 1600°C, and which enables it to be used as an anneal capping layer for SiC wafers for removing ion-implantation damage and dopant activation. The laser-deposited AlN thin films show conformal coverage on SiC-based devices and exhibit an electrical break-down strength of 1.66 MV/cm up to 350°C when used as an insulator in Ni/AlN/SiC metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) AlN films grown on Pt/SiO2/Si (100) substrates for radio-frequency microelectrical and mechanical systems and nanoelectrical and mechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) demonstrated resonators having high Q values ranging from 8,000 to 17,000 in the frequency range of 2.5-0.45 MHz. AlN thin films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (in normal and oxygen resonance mode), atomic force microscopy, ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Applications exploiting characteristics of high bandgap, high bond strength, excellent piezoelectric characteristics, extremely high chemical inertness, high electrical resistivity, high breakdown strength, and high thermal stability of the pulsed

  5. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness results from the randomised controlled Trial of Oral Mandibular Advancement Devices for Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (TOMADO) and long-term economic analysis of oral devices and continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, Linda; Glover, Matthew; Clutterbuck-James, Abigail; Bennett, Maxine; Jordan, Jake; Chadwick, Rebecca; Pittman, Marcus; East, Clare; Cameron, Malcolm; Davies, Mike; Oscroft, Nick; Smith, Ian; Morrell, Mary; Fox-Rushby, Julia; Quinnell, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (OSAH) causes excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), impairs quality of life (QoL) and increases cardiovascular disease and road traffic accident risks. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment is clinically effective but undermined by intolerance, and its cost-effectiveness is borderline in milder cases. Mandibular advancement devices (MADs) are another option, but evidence is lacking regarding their clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in milder disease. OBJECTIVES (1) Conduct a randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MADs against no treatment in mild to moderate OSAH. (2) Update systematic reviews and an existing health economic decision model with data from the Trial of Oral Mandibular Advancement Devices for Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (TOMADO) and newly published results to better inform long-term clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MADs and CPAP in mild to moderate OSAH. TOMADO A crossover RCT comparing clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three MADs: self-moulded [SleepPro 1™ (SP1); Meditas Ltd, Winchester, UK]; semibespoke [SleepPro 2™ (SP2); Meditas Ltd, Winchester, UK]; and fully bespoke [bespoke MAD (bMAD); NHS Oral-Maxillofacial Laboratory, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK] against no treatment, in 90 adults with mild to moderate OSAH. All devices improved primary outcome [apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI)] compared with no treatment: relative risk 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62 to 0.89] for SP1; relative risk 0.67 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.76) for SP2; and relative risk 0.64 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.76) for bMAD (p < 0.001). Differences between MADs were not significant. Sleepiness [as measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)] was scored 1.51 [95% CI 0.73 to 2.29 (SP1)] to 2.37 [95% CI 1.53 to 3.22 (bMAD)] lower than no treatment (p < 0.001), with SP2 and bMAD significantly better than SP1

  6. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  7. Process variation monitoring (PVM) by wafer inspection tool as a complementary method to CD-SEM for mapping field CDU on advanced production devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Jong; Yoo, Hyung Won; Kim, Chul Hong; Lee, Hak Kwon; Kim, Sung Su; Bae, Koon Ho; Spielberg, Hedvi; Lee, Yun Ho; Levi, Shimon; Bustan, Yariv; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    As design rules shrink, Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) and Line Edge Roughness (LER) have a dramatic effect on printed final lines and hence the need to control these parameters increases. Sources of CDU and LER variations include scanner auto-focus accuracy and stability, layer stack thickness, composition variations, and exposure variations. Process variations, in advanced VLSI production designs, specifically in memory devices, attributed to CDU and LER affect cell-to-cell parametric variations. These variations significantly impact device performance and die yield. Traditionally, measurements of LER are performed by CD-SEM or OCD metrology tools. Typically, these measurements require a relatively long time to set and cover only selected points of wafer area. In this paper we present the results of a collaborative work of the Process Diagnostic & Control Business Unit of Applied Materials and Hynix Semiconductor Inc. on the implementation of a complementary method to the CDSEM and OCD tools, to monitor defect density and post litho develop CDU and LER on production wafers. The method, referred to as Process Variation Monitoring (PVM) is based on measuring variations in the scattered light from periodic structures. The application is demonstrated using Applied Materials DUV bright field (BF) wafer inspection tool under optimized illumination and collection conditions. The UVisionTM has already passed a successful feasibility study on DRAM products with 66nm and 54nm design rules. The tool has shown high sensitivity to variations across an FEM wafer in both exposure and focus axes. In this article we show how PVM can help detection of Field to Field variations on DRAM wafers with 44nm design rule during normal production run. The complex die layout and the shrink in cell dimensions require high sensitivity to local variations within Dies or Fields. During normal scan of production wafers local Process variations are translated into GL (Grey Level) values

  8. Configurations of high-frequency ultrasonics complex vibration systems for packaging in microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Harada, Yoshiki; Ihara, Shigeru; Kasahara, Kohei; Shimizu, Masanori; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2004-04-01

    Ultrasonic high-frequency complex vibrations are effective for various ultrasonic high-power applications. Three types of ultrasonic complex vibration system with a welding tip vibrating elliptical to circular locus for packaging in microelectronics were studied. The complex vibration sources are using (1) a longitudinal-torsional vibration converter with diagonal slits that is driven only by a longitudinal vibration source, (2) a complex transverse vibration rod with several stepped parts that is driven by two longitudinal vibration source crossed at a right angle and (3) a longitudinal vibration circular disk and three longitudinal transducers that are installed at the circumference of the disk. PMID:15047273

  9. Nano-interconnection for microelectronics and polymers with benzo-triazole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon; Choi, Sang H.; Noh, Hyunpil; Kuk, Young

    2006-01-01

    Benzo-Triazole (BTA) is considered as an important bridging material that can connect an organic polymer to the metal electrode on silicon wafers as a part of the microelectronics fabrication technology. We report a detailed process of surface induced 3-D polymerization of BTA on the Cu electrode material which was measured with the Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS), X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS), and Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). The electric utilization of shield and chain polymerization of BTA on Cu surface is contemplated in this study.

  10. Automatic differentiation for gradient-based optimization of radiatively heated microelectronics manufacturing equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Moen, C.D.; Spence, P.A.; Meza, J.C.; Plantenga, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    Automatic differentiation is applied to the optimal design of microelectronic manufacturing equipment. The performance of nonlinear, least-squares optimization methods is compared between numerical and analytical gradient approaches. The optimization calculations are performed by running large finite-element codes in an object-oriented optimization environment. The Adifor automatic differentiation tool is used to generate analytic derivatives for the finite-element codes. The performance results support previous observations that automatic differentiation becomes beneficial as the number of optimization parameters increases. The increase in speed, relative to numerical differences, has a limited value and results are reported for two different analysis codes.

  11. Silicon photonic device for wavelength sensing and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Lopez, German R.

    Over the last decade advances and innovations from Silicon Photonics technology were observed in the telecommunications and computing industries. This technology which employs Silicon as an optical medium, relies on current CMOS micro-electronics fabrication processes to enable medium scale integration of many nano-photonic devices to produce photonic integrated circuitry. However, other fields of research such as optical sensor processing can benefit from silicon photonics technology, specially in sensors where the physical measurement is wavelength encoded. In this research work, we present a design and application of a thermally tuned silicon photonic device as an optical sensor interrogator. The main device is a micro-ring resonator filter of 10 mum of diameter. A photonic design toolkit was developed based on open source software from the research community. With those tools it was possible to estimate the resonance and spectral characteristics of the filter. From the obtained design parameters, a 7.8 x 3.8 mm optical chip was fabricated using standard micro-photonics techniques. In order to tune a ring resonance, Nichrome micro-heaters were fabricated on top of the device. Some fabricated devices were systematically characterized and their tuning response were determined. From measurements, a ring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 18.4 nm and with a bandwidth of 0.14 nm was obtained. Using just 5 mA it was possible to tune the device resonance up to 3 nm. In order to apply our device as a sensor interrogator in this research, a model of wavelength estimation using time interval between peaks measurement technique was developed and simulations were carried out to assess its performance. To test the technique, an experiment using a Fiber Bragg grating optical sensor was set, and estimations of the wavelength shift of this sensor due to axial strains yield an error within 22 pm compared to measurements from spectrum analyzer. Results from this study

  12. Aircrew Training Devices: Utility and Utilization of Advanced Instructional Features (Phase II-Air Training Command, Military Airlift Command, and Strategic Air Command [and] Phase III-Electronic Warfare Trainers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polzella, Donald J.; Hubbard, David C.

    This document consists of an interim report and a final report which describe the second and third phases of a project designed to determine the utility and utilization of sophisticated hardware and software capabilities known as advanced instructional features (AIFs). Used with an aircrew training device (ATD), AIFs permit a simulator instructor…

  13. Handheld ultrasound array imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Juin-Jet; Quistgaard, Jens

    1999-06-01

    A handheld ultrasound imaging device, one that weighs less than five pounds, has been developed for diagnosing trauma in the combat battlefield as well as a variety of commercial mobile diagnostic applications. This handheld device consists of four component ASICs, each is designed using the state of the art microelectronics technologies. These ASICs are integrated with a convex array transducer to allow high quality imaging of soft tissues and blood flow in real time. The device is designed to be battery driven or ac powered with built-in image storage and cineloop playback capability. Design methodologies of a handheld device are fundamentally different to those of a cart-based system. As system architecture, signal and image processing algorithm as well as image control circuit and software in this device is deigned suitably for large-scale integration, the image performance of this device is designed to be adequate to the intent applications. To elongate the battery life, low power design rules and power management circuits are incorporated in the design of each component ASIC. The performance of the prototype device is currently being evaluated for various applications such as a primary image screening tool, fetal imaging in Obstetrics, foreign object detection and wound assessment for emergency care, etc.

  14. Public-health assessment for Advanced Micro Devices No. 915, Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAT080034234. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-29

    Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. building 915 (AMD 915) served as an active semiconductor and microprocessor manufacturing facility from 1974 until 1990. AMD 915 is located in Sunnyvale, California in Santa Clara County, approximately four miles south of San Francisco Bay. AMD 915 was included on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in September, 1990. Waste solvents and acid-neutralization liquids contained in two underground storage tanks leaked, causing contamination of subsurface soils and groundwater. The contamination originating from the AMD 915 facility has not migrated off-site and the contaminated groundwater has not impacted any private or municipal drinking water supplies. The underground storage tanks suspected of leaking and some subsurface soils have been removed. A system of groundwater extraction and air stripping/liquid phase carbon adsorption treatment is currently operating at the site to restore groundwater to acceptable drinking water standards. Based on information reviewed, the United States Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and the California Department of Health Services (CDHS) conclude that no apparent health hazard exists at the AMD 915 site.

  15. Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of oral mandibular advancement devices and continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Linda D; Clutterbuck-James, Abigail L; Glover, Matthew J; Bennett, Maxine S; Chadwick, Rebecca; Pittman, Marcus A; Quinnell, Timothy G

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (OSAH) causes excessive daytime sleepiness, impairs quality-of-life, and increases cardiovascular disease and road traffic accident risks. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and mandibular advancement devices (MAD) have been shown to be effective in individual trials but their effectiveness particularly relative to disease severity is unclear. A MEDLINE, Embase and Science Citation Index search updating two systematic reviews to August 2013 identified 77 RCTs in adult OSAH patients comparing: MAD with conservative management (CM); MAD with CPAP; or CPAP with CM. Overall MAD and CPAP significantly improved apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) (MAD -9.3/hr (p < 0.001), CPAP -25.4 (p < 0.001)). In direct comparisons mean AHI and Epworth sleepiness scale score were lower (7.0/hr (p < 0.001) and 0.67 (p = 0.093) respectively) for CPAP. There were no CPAP vs. MAD trials in mild OSAH but in comparisons with CM, MAD and CPAP reduced ESS similarly (MAD 2.01 (p < 0.001); CPAP 1.23 (p = 0.012). Both MAD and CPAP are clinically effective in the treatment of OSAH. Although CPAP has a greater treatment effect, MAD is an appropriate treatment for patients who are intolerant of CPAP and may be comparable to CPAP in mild disease. PMID:26163056

  16. Impact of CPAP interface and mandibular advancement device on upper airway mechanical properties assessed with phrenic nerve stimulation in sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Borel, Jean-Christian; Gakwaya, Simon; Masse, Jean-François; Melo-Silva, Cesar Augusto; Sériès, Frédéric

    2012-08-15

    Oronasal mask (ONM) can be used when mouth leaks impair nasal-CPAP effectiveness. However, ONM's constraint on the chin and straps' traction may alter upper airway (UA) mechanical properties. In contrast, mandibular advancement device associated with nasal-CPAP (NM+MAD) may reduce UA resistance. The aim of this exploratory study was to compare the effects of ONM, NM, and NM+MAD on UA mechanical properties. The three interface modalities were assessed in 11 OSAS patients at 6, 8, 10 cmH(2)O CPAP using a phrenic nerve magnetic stimulation (PNMS) protocol. PNMS-twitches' related flow, pharyngeal pressures (nasopharynx, velopharynx, oropharynx) and UA resistances were determined. Regardless of CPAP level, twitch-induced maximum flow was higher with NM+MAD than with ONM. Velopharyngeal resistance was higher with ONM than with NM+MAD. Oropharyngeal resistance was higher with ONM than with NM. In conclusion, NM+MAD reduced velopharyngeal resistance compared to those measured with ONM and NM alone. We hypothesize that this strategy may help reducing the effective pressure level and thus further limit the risk for mouth leaks. PMID:22772315

  17. High frequency limit of vacuum microelectronic grating free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, M.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The dependencies that limit high frequency operation of a vacuum microelectronic grating free-electron laser are examined. The important parameters are identified as the electron beam energy, emittance, and generalized perveance. The scaling of power with emittance and frequency is studied in the far-infrared spectral range using a modified scanning electron microscope (SEM) and submillimeter diffraction gratings. The SEM is suited to the task of generating and positioning a low emittance (10{sup -2}{pi}-mm-mrad), low current (100 {mu}A), but high current density (50-500 A cm{sup -2}) electron beam. It has been used to demonstrate the spontaneous emission process known as the Smith-Purcell effect. A vacuum microelectronic grating free-electron laser has the potential of generating radiation throughout the entire far-infrared spectral range which extends from approximately 10 to 10{sup 3}{mu}m. An introduction to the theory, initial results, and details of the experiment are reported.

  18. Microelectronic neural bridge for signal regeneration and function rebuilding over two separate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyan, Shen; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaoying, Lü; Shushan, Xie; Zonghao, Huang

    2011-06-01

    According to the feature of neural signals, a micro-electronic neural bridge (MENB) has been designed. It consists of two electrode arrays for neural signal detection and functional electrical stimulation (FES), and a microelectronic circuit for signal amplifying, processing, and FES driving. The core of the system is realized in 0.5-μm CMOS technology and used in animal experiments. A special experimental strategy has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the system. With the help of the MENB, the withdrawal reflex function of the left/right leg of one spinal toad has been rebuilt in the corresponding leg of another spinal toad. According to the coherence analysis between the source and regenerated neural signals, the controlled spinal toad's sciatic nerve signal is delayed by 0.72 ms in relation to the sciatic nerve signal of the source spinal toad and the cross-correlation function reaches a value of 0.73. This shows that the regenerated signal is correlated with the source sciatic signal significantly and the neural activities involved in reflex function have been regenerated. The experiment demonstrates that the MENB is useful in rebuilding the neural function between nerves of different bodies.

  19. Results of external review Sandia microelectronics and microsystems program (September 2004).

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, Paul S. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madision, WI); Myers, David R.

    2005-08-01

    The US Department of Energy requires a periodic assessment of the Microsystems Program at Sandia National Laboratories. An external review of this program is held approximately every 18 months to 24 months. The report from the External Review Panel serves as the basis for Sandia's ''self assessment'' and is a specific deliverable of the governance contract between Lockheed Martin and the Department of Energy. The External Review of Microelectronics and Microsystems for Fiscal Year 2004 was held September 27-29, 2004 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM. The external review panel consisted of experts in the fields of microelectronics, photonics and microsystems from universities, industry and other Government agencies. A complete list of the panel members is included as Appendix A of the attached report. The review assessed four areas: relevance to national needs and agency mission; quality of science, technology and engineering; performance in the operation of a major facility; and program performance management and planning. Relevance to national needs and agency mission was rated as ''outstanding''. The quality of science, technology, and engineering was rated as ''outstanding''. Operation of a major facility was rated as ''outstanding'', and the category of program performance, management, and planning was rated as ''outstanding''. Sandia's Microsystems Program thus received an overall rating of ''outstanding'' [the highest possible rating].

  20. Statistical process control in the hybrid microelectronics manufacturing industry: A Navy view point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azu, Charles C., Jr.

    1993-04-01

    The U.S. Navy is concerned with receiving high quality hybrid microelectronic circuits. The Navy recognizes that in order to obtain high quality circuits a manufacturer must have an effective statistical process control (SPC) program implemented. The implementation of effective SPC programs is an objective of the military hybrid microelectronics industry. Often the smaller sized manufacturers in the industry have little SPC implementation, while the larger manufacturers have practices originally developed for the control of other product lines outside the hybrid technology area. The industry recognizes that SPC programs will result in high quality hybrid microcircuits which the U.S. Navy requires. In the past, the goal of the industry had not been to put in effective process control methods, but to merely meet the government military standards on the quality of the hybrids they produce. This practice, at best, resulted in a 'hit or miss' situation when it comes to hybrid microcircuit assemblies meeting military standards. The U.S. Navy through its MicroCIM program has been challenging and working with the industry in the area of SPC practice methods. The major limitations so far have been a lack of available sensors for the real-time collection of effective SPC data on the factory floor. This paper will discuss the Navy's efforts in bringing about effective SPC programs in the military hybrid manufacturing industry.