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Sample records for advanced mixed signal

  1. Inferring strength and deformation properties of hot mix asphalt layers from the GPR signal: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosti, Fabio; Benedetto, Andrea; Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Adabi, Saba; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    The great flexibility of ground-penetrating radar has led to consider worldwide this instrument as an effective and efficient geophysical tool in several fields of application. As far as pavement engineering is concerned, ground-penetrating radar is employed in a wide range of applications, including physical and geometrical evaluation of road pavements. Conversely, the mechanical characterization of pavements is generally inferred through traditional (e.g., plate bearing test method) or advanced non-destructive techniques (e.g., falling weight deflectometer). Nevertheless, measurements performed using these methods, inevitably turn out to be both much more time-consuming and low-significant whether compared with ground-penetrating radar's potentials. In such a framework, a mechanical evaluation directly coming from electromagnetic inspections could represent a real breakthrough in the field of road assets management. With this purpose, a ground-penetrating radar system with 600 MHz and 1600 MHz center frequencies of investigation and ground-coupled antennas was employed to survey a 4m×30m flexible pavement test site. The test area was marked by a regular grid mesh of 836 nodes, respectively spaced by a distance of 0.40 m alongside the horizontal and vertical axes. At each node, the elastic modulus was measured using a light falling weight deflectometer. Data processing has provided to reconstruct a 3-D matrix of amplitudes for the surveyed area, considering a depth of around 300 mm, in accord to the influence domain of the light falling weight deflectometer. On the other hand, deflectometric data were employed for both calibration and validation of a semi-empirical model by relating the amplitude of signal reflections through the media along fixed depths within the depth domain considered, and the Young's modulus of the pavement at the evaluated point. This statistically-based model is aimed at continuously taking into account alongside the depth of investigation

  2. Advanced signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, D. J.

    1985-12-01

    A collection of papers on advanced signal processing in radar, sonar, and communications is presented. The topics addressed include: transmitter aerials, high-power amplifier design for active sonar, radar transmitters, receiver array technology for sonar, new underwater acoustic detectors, diversity techniques in communications receivers, GaAs IC amplifiers for radar and communication receivers, integrated optical techniques for acoustooptic receivers, logarithmic receivers, CCD processors for sonar, acoustooptic correlators, designing in silicon, very high performance integrated circuits, and digital filters. Also discussed are: display types, scan converters in sonar, display ergonomics, simulators, high throughput sonar processors, optical fiber systems for signal processing, satellite communications, VLSI array processor for image and signal processing, ADA, future of cryogenic devices for signal processing applications, advanced image understanding, and VLSI architectures for real-time image processing.

  3. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Dimenna, R; Tamburello, D

    2011-02-14

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in

  4. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and

  5. VLSI mixed signal processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, A.; Premkumar, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    An economical and efficient VLSI implementation of a mixed signal processing system (MSP) is presented in this paper. The MSP concept is investigated and the functional blocks of the proposed MSP are described. The requirements of each of the blocks are discussed in detail. A sample application using active acoustic cancellation technique is described to demonstrate the power of the MSP approach.

  6. Commercially developed mixed-signal CMOS process features for application in advanced ROICs in 0.18μm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar-Roy, Arjun; Hurwitz, Paul; Mann, Richard; Qamar, Yasir; Chaudhry, Samir; Zwingman, Robert; Howard, David; Racanelli, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Increasingly complex specifications for next-generation focal plane arrays (FPAs) require smaller pixels, larger array sizes, reduced power consumption and lower cost. We have previously reported on the favorable features available in the commercially available TowerJazz CA18 0.18μm mixed-signal CMOS technology platform for advanced read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) applications. In his paper, new devices in development for commercial purposes and which may have applications in advanced ROICs are reported. First, results of buried-channel 3.3V field effect transistors (FETs) are detailed. The buried-channel pFETs show flicker (1/f) noise reductions of ~5X in comparison to surface-channel pFETs along with a significant reduction of the body constant parameter. The buried-channel nFETs show ~2X reduction of 1/f noise versus surface-channel nFETs. Additional reduced threshold voltage nFETs and pFETs are also described. Second, a high-density capacitor solution with a four-stacked linear (metal-insulator-metal) MIM capacitor having capacitance density of 8fF/μm2 is reported. Additional stacking with MOS capacitor in a 5V tolerant process results in >50fC/μm2 charge density. Finally, one-time programmable (OTP) and multi-time programmable (MTP) non-volatile memory options in the CA18 technology platform are outlined.

  7. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  8. Advanced detectors and signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greve, D. W.; Rasky, P. H. L.; Kryder, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Continued progress is reported toward development of a silicon on garnet technology which would allow fabrication of advanced detection and signal processing circuits on bubble memories. The first integrated detectors and propagation patterns have been designed and incorporated on a new mask set. In addition, annealing studies on spacer layers are performed. Based on those studies, a new double layer spacer is proposed which should reduce contamination of the silicon originating in the substrate. Finally, the magnetic sensitivity of uncontaminated detectors from the last lot of wafers is measured. The measured sensitivity is lower than anticipated but still higher than present magnetoresistive detectors.

  9. Advances in thermographic signal reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Steven M.; Frendberg Beemer, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Since its introduction in 2001, the Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) method has emerged as one of the most widely used methods for enhancement and analysis of thermographic sequences, with applications extending beyond industrial NDT into biomedical research, art restoration and botany. The basic TSR process, in which a noise reduced replica of each pixel time history is created, yields improvement over unprocessed image data that is sufficient for many applications. However, examination of the resulting logarithmic time derivatives of each TSR pixel replica provides significant insight into the physical mechanisms underlying the active thermography process. The deterministic and invariant properties of the derivatives have enabled the successful implementation of automated defect recognition and measurement systems. Unlike most approaches to analysis of thermography data, TSR does not depend on flawbackground contrast, so that it can also be applied to characterization and measurement of thermal properties of flaw-free samples. We present a summary of recent advances in TSR, a review of the underlying theory and examples of its implementation.

  10. Compressibility of Quantum Mixed-State Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2001-07-02

    We present a formula that determines the optimal number of qubits per message that allows asymptotically faithful compression of the quantum information carried by an ensemble of mixed states. The set of mixed states determines a decomposition of the Hilbert space into the redundant part and the irreducible part. After removing the redundancy, the optimal compression rate is shown to be given by the von Neumann entropy of the reduced ensemble.

  11. Advances in Targeting Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    McCubrey, James A.; Steelman, Linda S.; Chappell, William H.; Sun, Lin; Davis, Nicole M.; Abrams, Stephen L.; Franklin, Richard A.; Cocco, Lucio; Evangelisti, Camilla; Chiarini, Francesca; Martelli, Alberto M.; Libra, Massimo; Candido, Saverio; Ligresti, Giovanni; Malaponte, Grazia; Mazzarino, Maria C.; Fagone, Paolo; Donia, Marco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Polesel, Jerry; Talamini, Renato; Bäsecke, Jörg; Mijatovic, Sanja; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Milella, Michele; Tafuri, Agostino; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Laidler, Piotr; D'Assoro, Antonio B.; Drobot, Lyudmyla; Umezawa, Kazuo; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre; Demidenko, Zoya N.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, significant advances have occurred in both our understanding of the complexity of signal transduction pathways as well as the isolation of specific inhibitors which target key components in those pathways. Furthermore critical information is being accrued regarding how genetic mutations can affect the sensitivity of various types of patients to targeted therapy. Finally, genetic mechanisms responsible for the development of resistance after targeted therapy are being discovered which may allow the creation of alternative therapies to overcome resistance. This review will discuss some of the highlights over the past few years on the roles of key signaling pathways in various diseases, the targeting of signal transduction pathways and the genetic mechanisms governing sensitivity and resistance to targeted therapies. PMID:23455493

  12. Signal enhancement in collinear four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    McKinstrie, C.J.; Luther, G.G.; Batha, S. )

    1990-03-01

    The solitary-wave solutions of the four-wave equations are studied, and their relevance to four-wave mixing in finite media is discussed. In general, the transfer of action from the pump waves to the probe and signal waves is limited by nonlinear phase shifts that detune the interaction. However, by controlling the linear phase mismatch judiciously, it is often possible to effect a complete transfer of action from the pump waves to the probe and signal waves.

  13. Towards a Standard Mixed-Signal Parallel Processing Architecture for Miniature and Microrobotics

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Brian M; Hoyos, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The conventional analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) and digital signal processing (DSP) architecture has led to major advances in miniature and micro-systems technology over the past several decades. The outlook for these systems is significantly enhanced by advances in sensing, signal processing, communications and control, and the combination of these technologies enables autonomous robotics on the miniature to micro scales. In this article we look at trends in the combination of analog and digital (mixed-signal) processing, and consider a generalized sampling architecture. Employing a parallel analog basis expansion of the input signal, this scalable approach is adaptable and reconfigurable, and is suitable for a large variety of current and future applications in networking, perception, cognition, and control. PMID:26601042

  14. Towards a Standard Mixed-Signal Parallel Processing Architecture for Miniature and Microrobotics.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Brian M; Hoyos, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The conventional analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) and digital signal processing (DSP) architecture has led to major advances in miniature and micro-systems technology over the past several decades. The outlook for these systems is significantly enhanced by advances in sensing, signal processing, communications and control, and the combination of these technologies enables autonomous robotics on the miniature to micro scales. In this article we look at trends in the combination of analog and digital (mixed-signal) processing, and consider a generalized sampling architecture. Employing a parallel analog basis expansion of the input signal, this scalable approach is adaptable and reconfigurable, and is suitable for a large variety of current and future applications in networking, perception, cognition, and control. PMID:26601042

  15. Compressive sensing of sparse radio frequency signals using optical mixing.

    PubMed

    Valley, George C; Sefler, George A; Shaw, T Justin

    2012-11-15

    We demonstrate an optical mixing system for measuring properties of sparse radio frequency (RF) signals using compressive sensing (CS). Two types of sparse RF signals are investigated: (1) a signal that consists of a few 0.4 ns pulses in a 26.8 ns window and (2) a signal that consists of a few sinusoids at different frequencies. The RF is modulated onto the intensity of a repetitively pulsed, wavelength-chirped optical field, and time-wavelength-space mapping is used to map the optical field onto a 118-pixel, one-dimensional spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM pixels are programmed with a pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) to form one row of the CS measurement matrix, and the optical throughput is integrated with a photodiode to obtain one value of the CS measurement vector. Then the PRBS is changed to form the second row of the mixing matrix and a second value of the measurement vector is obtained. This process is performed 118 times so that we can vary the dimensions of the CS measurement matrix from 1×118 to 118×118 (square). We use the penalized ℓ(1) norm method with stopping parameter λ (also called basis pursuit denoising) to recover pulsed or sinusoidal RF signals as a function of the small dimension of the measurement matrix and stopping parameter. For a square matrix, we also find that penalized ℓ(1) norm recovery performs better than conventional recovery using matrix inversion. PMID:23164876

  16. Multiple signal classification for self-mixing flowmetry.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Milan; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Taimre, Thomas; Rakić, Aleksandar D

    2015-03-20

    For the first time to our knowledge, we apply the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm to signals obtained from a self-mixing flow sensor. We find that MUSIC accurately extracts the fluid velocity and exhibits a markedly better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than the commonly used fast Fourier transform (FFT) method. We compare the performance of the MUSIC and FFT methods for three decades of scatterer concentration and fluid velocities from 0.5 to 50 mm/s. MUSIC provided better linearity than the FFT and was able to accurately function over a wider range of algorithm parameters. MUSIC exhibited excellent linearity and SNR even at low scatterer concentration, at which the FFT's SNR decreased to impractical levels. This makes MUSIC a particularly attractive method for flow measurement systems with a low density of scatterers such as microfluidic and nanofluidic systems and blood flow in capillaries. PMID:25968500

  17. Mixed signal custom integrated circuit development for physics instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Bryan, W.L.; Emery, M.S.

    1998-10-01

    The Monolithic Systems Development Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been greatly involved in custom mixed-mode integrated circuit development for the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory and position-sensitive germanium spectrometer front-ends for the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). This paper will outline the work done for both PHENIX and the Naval Research Laboratory in the area of full-custom, mixed-signal CMOS integrated electronics. This paper presents the architectures chosen for the various PHENIX detectors which include position-sensitive silicon, capacitive pixel, and phototube detectors, and performance results for the subsystems as well as a system description of the NRL germanium strip system and its performance. The performance of the custom preamplifiers, discriminators, analog memories, analog-digital converters, and control circuitry for all systems will be presented.

  18. Recent advances in understanding neurotrophin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bothwell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The nerve growth factor family of growth factors, collectively known as neurotrophins, are evolutionarily ancient regulators with an enormous range of biological functions. Reflecting this long history and functional diversity, mechanisms for cellular responses to neurotrophins are exceptionally complex. Neurotrophins signal through p75 NTR, a member of the TNF receptor superfamily member, and through receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB, TrkC), often with opposite functional outcomes. The two classes of receptors are activated preferentially by proneurotrophins and mature processed neurotrophins, respectively. However, both receptor classes also possess neurotrophin-independent signaling functions. Signaling functions of p75 NTR and Trk receptors are each influenced by the other class of receptors. This review focuses on the mechanisms responsible for the functional interplay between the two neurotrophin receptor signaling systems. PMID:27540475

  19. A Step Response Based Mixed-Signal BIST Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Alvernon

    2001-01-01

    A new Mixed-Signal Built-in Self-test approach that is based upon the step response of a reconfigurable (or multifunction) analog block is presented in this paper. The technique requires the overlapping step response of the Circuit Under Test (CUT) for two circuit configurations. Each configuration can be realized by changing the topology of the CUT or by sampling two CUT nodes with differing step responses. The technique can effectively detect both soft and hard faults and does not require an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and/or digital-to-analog converter( DAC). It also does not require any precision voltage sources or comparators. The approach does not require any additional analog circuits to realize the test signal generator and a two input analog multiplexer for CUT test node sampling. The paper is concluded with the application of the proposed approach to a circuit found in the work of Epstein et a1 and two ITC 97 analog benchmark circuits.

  20. Advanced Integrated Optical Signal Processing Components.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastani, Kasra

    This research was aimed at the development of advanced integrated optical components suitable for devices capable of processing multi-dimensional inputs. In such processors, densely packed waveguide arrays with low crosstalk are needed to provide dissection of the information that has been partially processed. Waveguide arrays also expand the information in the plane of the processor while maintaining its coherence. Rib waveguide arrays with low loss, high mode confinement and highly uniform surface quality (660 elements, 8 μm wide, 1 μm high, and 1 cm long with 2 mu m separations) were fabricated on LiNbO _3 substrates through the ion beam milling technique. A novel feature of the multi-dimensional IO processor architecture proposed herein is the implementation of large area uniform outcoupling (with low to moderate outcoupling efficiencies) from rib waveguide arrays in order to access the third dimension of the processor structure. As a means of outcoupling, uniform surface gratings (2 μm and 4 μm grating periods, 0.05 μm high and 1 mm long) with low outcoupling efficiencies (of approximately 2-18%/mm) were fabricated on the nonuniform surface of the rib waveguide arrays. As a practical technique of modulating the low outcoupling efficiencies of the surface gratings, it was proposed to alter the period of the grating as a function of position along each waveguide. Large aperture (2.5 mm) integrated lenses with short positive focal lengths (1.2-2.5 cm) were developed through a modification of the titanium-indiffused proton exchanged (TIPE) technique. Such integrated lenses were fabricated by increasing the refractive index of the slab waveguides by the TIPE process while maintaining the refractive index of the lenses at the lower level of Ti:LiNbO _3 waveguide. By means of curvature reversal of the integrated lenses, positive focal length lenses have been fabricated while providing high mode confinement for the slab waveguide. The above elements performed as

  1. Center for Advanced Signal and Imaging Sciences Workshop 2004

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, J H; Carrano, C; Poyneer, L; Palmer, D; Baker, K; Chen, D; London, R; Weinert, G; Brase, J; Paglieroni, D; Lopez, A; Grant, C W; Wright, W; Burke, M; Miller, W O; DeTeresa, S; White, D; Toeppen, J; Haugen, P; Kamath, C; Nguyen, T; Manay, S; Newsam, S; Cantu-Paz, E; Pao, H; Chang, J; Chambers, D; Leach, R; Paulson, C; Romero, C E; Spiridon, A; Vigars, M; Welsh, P; Zumstein, J; Romero, K; Oppenheim, A; Harris, D B; Dowla, F; Brown, C G; Clark, G A; Ong, M M; Clance, T J; Kegelmeyer, l M; Benzuijen, M; Bliss, E; Burkhart, S; Conder, A; Daveler, S; Ferguson, W; Glenn, S; Liebman, J; Norton, M; Prasad, R; Salmon, T; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hafiz, O; Cheung, S; Fodor, I; Aufderheide, M B; Bary, A; Martz, Jr., H E; Burke, M W; Benson, S; Fisher, K A; Quarry, M J

    2004-11-15

    Welcome to the Eleventh Annual C.A.S.I.S. Workshop, a yearly event at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, presented by the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences, or CASIS, and sponsored by the LLNL Engineering Directorate. Every November for the last 10 years we have convened a diverse set of engineering and scientific talent to share their work in signal processing, imaging, communications, controls, along with associated fields of mathematics, statistics, and computing sciences. This year is no exception, with sessions in Adaptive Optics, Applied Imaging, Scientific Data Mining, Electromagnetic Image and Signal Processing, Applied Signal Processing, National Ignition Facility (NIF) Imaging, and Nondestructive Characterization.

  2. A configurable and low-power mixed signal SoC for portable ECG monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejung; Kim, Sunyoung; Van Helleputte, Nick; Artes, Antonio; Konijnenburg, Mario; Huisken, Jos; Van Hoof, Chris; Yazicioglu, Refet Firat

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes a mixed-signal ECG System-on-Chip (SoC) that is capable of implementing configurable functionality with low-power consumption for portable ECG monitoring applications. A low-voltage and high performance analog front-end extracts 3-channel ECG signals and single channel electrode-tissue-impedance (ETI) measurement with high signal quality. This can be used to evaluate the quality of the ECG measurement and to filter motion artifacts. A custom digital signal processor consisting of 4-way SIMD processor provides the configurability and advanced functionality like motion artifact removal and R peak detection. A built-in 12-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is capable of adaptive sampling achieving a compression ratio of up to 7, and loop buffer integration reduces the power consumption for on-chip memory access. The SoC is implemented in 0.18 μm CMOS process and consumes 32 μ W from a 1.2 V while heart beat detection application is running, and integrated in a wireless ECG monitoring system with Bluetooth protocol. Thanks to the ECG SoC, the overall system power consumption can be reduced significantly. PMID:24875285

  3. Industry-Oriented Laboratory Development for Mixed-Signal IC Test Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, J.; Haffner, M.; Yoder, S.; Scott, M.; Reehal, G.; Ismail, M.

    2010-01-01

    The semiconductor industry is lacking qualified integrated circuit (IC) test engineers to serve in the field of mixed-signal electronics. The absence of mixed-signal IC test education at the collegiate level is cited as one of the main sources for this problem. In response to this situation, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at…

  4. Develop Advanced Nonlinear Signal Analysis Topographical Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1997-01-01

    During the development of the SSME, a hierarchy of advanced signal analysis techniques for mechanical signature analysis has been developed by NASA and AI Signal Research Inc. (ASRI) to improve the safety and reliability for Space Shuttle operations. These techniques can process and identify intelligent information hidden in a measured signal which is often unidentifiable using conventional signal analysis methods. Currently, due to the highly interactive processing requirements and the volume of dynamic data involved, detailed diagnostic analysis is being performed manually which requires immense man-hours with extensive human interface. To overcome this manual process, NASA implemented this program to develop an Advanced nonlinear signal Analysis Topographical Mapping System (ATMS) to provide automatic/unsupervised engine diagnostic capabilities. The ATMS will utilize a rule-based Clips expert system to supervise a hierarchy of diagnostic signature analysis techniques in the Advanced Signal Analysis Library (ASAL). ASAL will perform automatic signal processing, archiving, and anomaly detection/identification tasks in order to provide an intelligent and fully automated engine diagnostic capability. The ATMS has been successfully developed under this contract. In summary, the program objectives to design, develop, test and conduct performance evaluation for an automated engine diagnostic system have been successfully achieved. Software implementation of the entire ATMS system on MSFC's OISPS computer has been completed. The significance of the ATMS developed under this program is attributed to the fully automated coherence analysis capability for anomaly detection and identification which can greatly enhance the power and reliability of engine diagnostic evaluation. The results have demonstrated that ATMS can significantly save time and man-hours in performing engine test/flight data analysis and performance evaluation of large volumes of dynamic test data.

  5. Subwavelength alignment mark signal analysis of advanced memory products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaoming; Wong, Alfred K. K.; Wheeler, Donald C.; Williams, Gary; Lehner, Eric A.; Zach, Franz X.; Kim, Byeong Y.; Fukuzaki, Yuzo; Lu, Zhijian G.; Credendino, Santo; Wiltshire, Timothy J.

    2000-06-01

    The impact of alignment mark structure, mark geometry, and stepper alignment optical system on mark signal contrast was investigated using computer simulation. Several sub-wavelength poly silicon recessed film stack alignment targets of advanced memory products were studied. Stimulated alignment mark signals for both dark-field and bright-field systems using the rigorous electromagnetic simulation program TEMPEST showed excellent agreement with experimental data. For a dark-field alignment system, the critical parameters affecting signal contrast were found to be mark size and mark recess depth below silicon surface. On the other hand, film stack thickness and mark recess depth below/above silicon surface are the important parameters for a bright-field alignment system. From observed simulation results optimal process parameters are determined. Based on the simulation results some signal enhancement techniques will be discussed.

  6. Advanced software design and standards for traffic signal control

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, D.; Hendrickson, C. )

    1992-05-01

    Improves traffic management and control systems are widely reported to be cost-effective investments. Simply retiming signals can provide significant benefits by reducing vehicle stops, travel times, and fuel consumption. The installation of advanced traffic management systems (ATMS) can provide even greater savings. However, many hardware and software obstacles have impeded the actual implementation of advanced traffic management systems. The general hardware and software limitations of current traffic signal control technology are reviewed in this paper. The impact of these deficiencies is discussed in the context of three example applications. Based on this discussion, the paper identifies several computing issues that should be addressed in order to reduce the effort involved with integrating existing traffic control devices. Adoption of standard industrial control computing platforms and development of new communication and software engineering models are recommendrecommended.

  7. Connecting Prognostic Ligand Receptor Signaling Loops in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin H.; Ruggeri, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding cancer cell signal transduction is a promising lead for uncovering therapeutic targets and building treatment-specific markers for epithelial ovarian cancer. To brodaly assay the many known transmembrane receptor systems, previous studies have employed gene expression data measured on high-throughput microarrays. Starting with the knowledge of validated ligand-receptor pairs (LRPs), these studies postulate that correlation of the two genes implies functional autocrine signaling. It is our goal to consider the additional weight of evidence that prognosis (progression-free survival) can bring to prioritize ovarian cancer specific signaling mechanism. We survey three large studies of epithelial ovarian cancers, with gene expression measurements and clinical information, by modeling survival times both categorically (long/short survival) and continuously. We use differential correlation and proportional hazards regression to identify sets of LRPs that are both prognostic and correlated. Of 475 candidate LRPs, 77 show reproducible evidence of correlation; 55 show differential correlation. Survival models identify 16 LRPs with reproduced, significant interactions. Only two pairs show both interactions and correlation (PDGFAPDGFRA and COL1A1CD44) suggesting that the majority of prognostically useful LRPs act without positive feedback. We further assess the connectivity of receptors using a Gaussian graphical model finding one large graph and a number of smaller disconnected networks. These LRPs can be organized into mutually exclusive signaling clusters suggesting different mechanisms apply to different patients. We conclude that a mix of autocrine and endocrine LRPs influence prognosis in ovarian cancer, there exists a heterogenous mix of signaling themes across patients, and we point to a number of novel applications of existing targeted therapies which may benefit ovarian cancer. PMID:25244152

  8. Advanced Signal Analysis for Forensic Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Koppenjan; Matthew Streeton; Hua Lee; Michael Lee; Sashi Ono

    2004-06-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems have traditionally been used to image subsurface objects. The main focus of this paper is to evaluate an advanced signal analysis technique. Instead of compiling spatial data for the analysis, this technique conducts object recognition procedures based on spectral statistics. The identification feature of an object type is formed from the training vectors by a singular-value decomposition procedure. To illustrate its capability, this procedure is applied to experimental data and compared to the performance of the neural-network approach.

  9. Synthetic mixed-signal computation in living cells.

    PubMed

    Rubens, Jacob R; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-01-01

    Living cells implement complex computations on the continuous environmental signals that they encounter. These computations involve both analogue- and digital-like processing of signals to give rise to complex developmental programs, context-dependent behaviours and homeostatic activities. In contrast to natural biological systems, synthetic biological systems have largely focused on either digital or analogue computation separately. Here we integrate analogue and digital computation to implement complex hybrid synthetic genetic programs in living cells. We present a framework for building comparator gene circuits to digitize analogue inputs based on different thresholds. We then demonstrate that comparators can be predictably composed together to build band-pass filters, ternary logic systems and multi-level analogue-to-digital converters. In addition, we interface these analogue-to-digital circuits with other digital gene circuits to enable concentration-dependent logic. We expect that this hybrid computational paradigm will enable new industrial, diagnostic and therapeutic applications with engineered cells. PMID:27255669

  10. Synthetic mixed-signal computation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Rubens, Jacob R.; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Living cells implement complex computations on the continuous environmental signals that they encounter. These computations involve both analogue- and digital-like processing of signals to give rise to complex developmental programs, context-dependent behaviours and homeostatic activities. In contrast to natural biological systems, synthetic biological systems have largely focused on either digital or analogue computation separately. Here we integrate analogue and digital computation to implement complex hybrid synthetic genetic programs in living cells. We present a framework for building comparator gene circuits to digitize analogue inputs based on different thresholds. We then demonstrate that comparators can be predictably composed together to build band-pass filters, ternary logic systems and multi-level analogue-to-digital converters. In addition, we interface these analogue-to-digital circuits with other digital gene circuits to enable concentration-dependent logic. We expect that this hybrid computational paradigm will enable new industrial, diagnostic and therapeutic applications with engineered cells. PMID:27255669

  11. Advances in mechanisms and signaling pathways of carbon nanotube toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Ma, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been developed into new materials with a variety of industrial and commercial applications. In contrast, the physicochemical properties of CNT at the nanoscale render them the potency to generate toxic effects. Indeed, the potential health impacts of CNT have drawn a great deal of attention in recent years, owing to their identified toxicological and pathological consequences including cytotoxicity, inflammation, fibrosis, genotoxicity, tumorigenesis, and immunotoxicity. Understanding the mechanisms by which CNT induce toxicity and pathology is thus urgently needed for accurate risk assessment of CNT exposure in humans, and for safe and responsible development and commercialization of nanotechnology. Here, we summarize and discuss recent advances in this area with a focus on the molecular interactions between CNT and mammalian systems, and the signaling pathways important for the development of CNT toxicity such as the NF-κB, NLRP3 inflammasome, TGF-β1, MAPK, and p53 signaling cascades. With the current mechanistic evidence summarized in this review, we expect to provide new insights into CNT toxicology at the molecular level and offer new clues to the prevention of health effects resulting from CNT exposure. Moreover, we disclose questions and issues that remain in this rapidly advancing field of nanotoxicology, which would facilitate ascertaining future research directions. PMID:25676622

  12. Advanced Signal Conditioners for Data-Acquisition Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucena, Angel; Perotti, Jose; Eckhoff, Anthony; Medelius, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    Signal conditioners embodying advanced concepts in analog and digital electronic circuitry and software have been developed for use in data-acquisition systems that are required to be compact and lightweight, to utilize electric energy efficiently, and to operate with high reliability, high accuracy, and high power efficiency, without intervention by human technicians. These signal conditioners were originally intended for use aboard spacecraft. There are also numerous potential terrestrial uses - especially in the fields of aeronautics and medicine, wherein it is necessary to monitor critical functions. Going beyond the usual analog and digital signal-processing functions of prior signal conditioners, the new signal conditioner performs the following additional functions: It continuously diagnoses its own electronic circuitry, so that it can detect failures and repair itself (as described below) within seconds. It continuously calibrates itself on the basis of a highly accurate and stable voltage reference, so that it can continue to generate accurate measurement data, even under extreme environmental conditions. It repairs itself in the sense that it contains a micro-controller that reroutes signals among redundant components as needed to maintain the ability to perform accurate and stable measurements. It detects deterioration of components, predicts future failures, and/or detects imminent failures by means of a real-time analysis in which, among other things, data on its present state are continuously compared with locally stored historical data. It minimizes unnecessary consumption of electric energy. The design architecture divides the signal conditioner into three main sections: an analog signal section, a digital module, and a power-management section. The design of the analog signal section does not follow the traditional approach of ensuring reliability through total redundancy of hardware: Instead, following an approach called spare parts tool box, the

  13. Nonzero θ13 signals nonmaximal atmospheric neutrino mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eby, David A.; Frampton, Paul H.

    2012-12-01

    From recent groundbreaking experiments, it is now known that the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing differs significantly from the tribimaximal model in which θ13=0 and θ23=π/4. Flavor symmetry can require that the departures from these two equations are linearly related. T' and A4, which successfully accommodated the pre-T2K Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix, predict that 38.07°≤θ23≤39.52° at 95% C.L. The best fit values, combining the model predictions with T2K, MINOS, Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and RENO data, are θ23=38.7° and θ13=8.9°.

  14. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy C. (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  15. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy Clay (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  16. A Library of Rad Hard Mixed-Voltage/Mixed-Signal Building Blocks for Integration of Avionics Systems for Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, M. M.; Blaes, B.; Kolawa, E. A.; Blalock, B. J.; Li, H. W.; Buck, K.; Houge, D.

    2001-01-01

    To build the sensor intensive system-on-a-chip for the next generation spacecrafts for deep space, Center for Integration of Space Microsystems at JPL (CISM) takes advantage of the lower power rating and inherent radiation resistance of Silicon on Insulator technology (SOI). We are developing a suite of mixed-voltage and mixed-signal building blocks in Honeywell's SOI process that can enable the rapid integration of the next generation avionics systems with lower power rating, higher reliability, longer life, and enhanced radiation tolerance for spacecrafts such as the Europa Orbiter and Europa Lander. The mixed-voltage building blocks are predominantly for design of adaptive power management systems. Their design centers around an LDMOS structure that is being developed by Honeywell, Boeing Corp, and the University of Idaho. The mixed-signal building blocks are designed to meet the low power, extreme radiation requirement of deep space applications. These building blocks are predominantly used to interface analog sensors to the digital CPU of the next generation avionics system on a chip. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-12

    The AMWTP Final EIS assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with alternatives related to the construction and operation of a proposed waste treatment facility at the INEEL. The alternatives analyzed were: the No Action Alternative, the Proposed Action, the Non-Thermal Treatment Alternative, and the Treatment and Storage Alternative. The Proposed Action is the Preferred Alternative. Under the Proposed Action/Preferred Alternative, the AMWTP facility would treat transuranic waste, alpha-contaminated low-level mixed waste, and low-level mixed waste in preparation for disposal. After treatment, transuranic waste would be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Low-level mixed waste would be disposed of at an approved disposal facility depending on decisions to be based on DOE's Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Evaluation of impacts on land use, socioeconomics, cultural resources, aesthetic and scenic resources, geology, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, noise, traffic and transportation, occupational and public health and safety, INEEL services, and environmental justice were included in the assessment.

  18. Mix it and fix it: functions of composite olfactory signals in ring-tailed lemurs

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Lydia K.; Grogan, Kathleen E.; Smyth, Kendra N.; Adams, Christine A.; Klager, Skylar A.; Drea, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Animals communicating via scent often deposit composite signals that incorporate odorants from multiple sources; however, the function of mixing chemical signals remains understudied. We tested both a ‘multiple-messages’ and a ‘fixative’ hypothesis of composite olfactory signalling, which, respectively, posit that mixing scents functions to increase information content or prolong signal longevity. Our subjects—adult, male ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta)—have a complex scent-marking repertoire, involving volatile antebrachial (A) secretions, deposited pure or after being mixed with a squalene-rich paste exuded from brachial (B) glands. Using behavioural bioassays, we examined recipient responses to odorants collected from conspecific strangers. We concurrently presented pure A, pure B and mixed A + B secretions, in fresh or decayed conditions. Lemurs preferentially responded to mixed over pure secretions, their interest increasing and shifting over time, from sniffing and countermarking fresh mixtures, to licking and countermarking decayed mixtures. Substituting synthetic squalene (S)—a well-known fixative—for B secretions did not replicate prior results: B secretions, which contain additional chemicals that probably encode salient information, were preferred over pure S. Whereas support for the ‘multiple-messages’ hypothesis underscores the unique contribution from each of an animal's various secretions, support for the ‘fixative’ hypothesis highlights the synergistic benefits of composite signals. PMID:27152222

  19. Mix it and fix it: functions of composite olfactory signals in ring-tailed lemurs.

    PubMed

    Greene, Lydia K; Grogan, Kathleen E; Smyth, Kendra N; Adams, Christine A; Klager, Skylar A; Drea, Christine M

    2016-04-01

    Animals communicating via scent often deposit composite signals that incorporate odorants from multiple sources; however, the function of mixing chemical signals remains understudied. We tested both a 'multiple-messages' and a 'fixative' hypothesis of composite olfactory signalling, which, respectively, posit that mixing scents functions to increase information content or prolong signal longevity. Our subjects-adult, male ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta)-have a complex scent-marking repertoire, involving volatile antebrachial (A) secretions, deposited pure or after being mixed with a squalene-rich paste exuded from brachial (B) glands. Using behavioural bioassays, we examined recipient responses to odorants collected from conspecific strangers. We concurrently presented pure A, pure B and mixed A + B secretions, in fresh or decayed conditions. Lemurs preferentially responded to mixed over pure secretions, their interest increasing and shifting over time, from sniffing and countermarking fresh mixtures, to licking and countermarking decayed mixtures. Substituting synthetic squalene (S)-a well-known fixative-for B secretions did not replicate prior results: B secretions, which contain additional chemicals that probably encode salient information, were preferred over pure S. Whereas support for the 'multiple-messages' hypothesis underscores the unique contribution from each of an animal's various secretions, support for the 'fixative' hypothesis highlights the synergistic benefits of composite signals. PMID:27152222

  20. Recent advances in hybrid/mixed finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    In formulations of Hybrid/Mixed finite element methods respectively by the Hellinger-Reissner principle and the Hu-Washizu principle, the stress equilibrium equations are brought in as conditions of constraint through the introduction of additional internal displacement parameters. These two approaches are more flexible and have better computing efficiencies. A procedure for the choice of assumed stress terms for 3-D solids is suggested. Example solutions are given for plates and shells using the present formulations and the idea of semiloof elements.

  1. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been undergoing extensive flight certification and developmental testing, which involves some 250 health monitoring measurements. Under the severe temperature, pressure, and dynamic environments sustained during operation, numerous major component failures have occurred, resulting in extensive engine hardware damage and scheduling losses. To enhance SSME safety and reliability, detailed analysis and evaluation of the measurements signal are mandatory to assess its dynamic characteristics and operational condition. Efficient and reliable signal detection techniques will reduce catastrophic system failure risks and expedite the evaluation of both flight and ground test data, and thereby reduce launch turn-around time. The basic objective of this contract are threefold: (1) develop and validate a hierarchy of innovative signal analysis techniques for nonlinear and nonstationary time-frequency analysis. Performance evaluation will be carried out through detailed analysis of extensive SSME static firing and flight data. These techniques will be incorporated into a fully automated system; (2) develop an advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system (ATMS) to generate a Compressed SSME TOPO Data Base (CSTDB). This ATMS system will convert tremendous amount of complex vibration signals from the entire SSME test history into a bank of succinct image-like patterns while retaining all respective phase information. High compression ratio can be achieved to allow minimal storage requirement, while providing fast signature retrieval, pattern comparison, and identification capabilities; and (3) integrate the nonlinear correlation techniques into the CSTDB data base with compatible TOPO input data format. Such integrated ATMS system will provide the large test archives necessary for quick signature comparison. This study will provide timely assessment of SSME component operational status, identify probable causes of

  2. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1993-01-01

    The SSME has been undergoing extensive flight certification and developmental testing, which involves some 250 health monitoring measurements. Under the severe temperature pressure, and dynamic environments sustained during operation, numerous major component failures have occurred, resulting in extensive engine hardware damage and scheduling losses. To enhance SSME safety and reliability, detailed analysis and evaluation of the measurements signal are mandatory to assess its dynamic characteristics and operational condition. Efficient and reliable signal detection techniques will reduce catastrophic system failure risks and expedite the evaluation of both flight and ground test data, and thereby reduce launch turn-around time. The basic objective of this contract are threefold: (1) Develop and validate a hierarchy of innovative signal analysis techniques for nonlinear and nonstationary time-frequency analysis. Performance evaluation will be carried out through detailed analysis of extensive SSME static firing and flight data. These techniques will be incorporated into a fully automated system. (2) Develop an advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system (ATMS) to generate a Compressed SSME TOPO Data Base (CSTDB). This ATMS system will convert tremendous amounts of complex vibration signals from the entire SSME test history into a bank of succinct image-like patterns while retaining all respective phase information. A high compression ratio can be achieved to allow the minimal storage requirement, while providing fast signature retrieval, pattern comparison, and identification capabilities. (3) Integrate the nonlinear correlation techniques into the CSTDB data base with compatible TOPO input data format. Such integrated ATMS system will provide the large test archives necessary for a quick signature comparison. This study will provide timely assessment of SSME component operational status, identify probable causes of malfunction, and indicate

  3. Interatomic potentials for mixed oxide and advanced nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Walle, Axel van de; Jeon, Byoungseon; Groenbech-Jensen, Niels

    2011-03-01

    We extend our recently developed interatomic potentials for UO{sub 2} to the fuel system (U,Pu,Np)O{sub 2}. We do so by fitting against an extensive database of ab initio results as well as to experimental measurements. The applicability of these interactions to a variety of mixed environments beyond the fitting domain is also assessed. The employed formalism makes these potentials applicable across all interatomic distances without the need for any ambiguous splining to the well-established short-range Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark universal pair potential. We therefore expect these to be reliable potentials for carrying out damage simulations (and molecular dynamics simulations in general) in nuclear fuels of varying compositions for all relevant atomic collision energies.

  4. Russian technology advancements for waste mixing and retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    GIBBONS, P.W.

    2002-01-21

    Engineers at the Mining and Chemical Combine nuclear facility, located in Zheleznogorsk, Russia, have developed a pulsating mixer/sluicer to mobilize a layer of consolidated, hardened sludge at the bottom of their 12-m-diameter by 30-m-high nuclear waste tanks. This waste has resisted mobilization by conventional sluicing jets. The new pulsating mixer/sluicer draws tank liquid into a pressure vessel, then expels it at elevated pressure either through a set of submerged mixing jets or a steerable through-air jet. Four versions (or generations) of this technology have been developed. Following testing of three other Russian mobilization and transfer systems at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a first generation of the new pulsating mixer/sluicer was identified for possible waste retrieval applications in U.S. high-level waste tanks (1). A second-generation pulsating mixer/sluicer was developed and successfully deployed in Tank TH-4 at the Oak Ridge Reservation, located in Tennessee, US (2). A thud-generation pulsating mixed/sluicer with a dual nozzle design was developed and is being tested for possible use by the Hanford Site's River Protection Project to retrieve waste from Tank 241-S-102, a single-shell tank containing radioactive saltcake and sludge. In cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy Tanks Focus Area, the Mining and Chemical Combine is conducting cold (that is, nonradioactive) tests and demonstrations of the third-generation system in 2001 and 2002. This work is being conducted through the Tank Retrieval and Closure Demonstration Center, which is sponsored by the National Nuclear Safety Administration's Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (NN-40). A fourth-generation dual-nozzle pulsating mixer/sluicer is undergoing cold testing for use at the Mining and Chemical Combine to retrieve radioactive sludge there in 2004.

  5. Exploring mixed microbial community functioning: recent advances in metaproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Siggins, Alma; Gunnigle, Eoin; Abram, Florence

    2012-01-01

    System approaches to elucidate ecosystem functioning constitute an emerging area of research within microbial ecology. Such approaches aim at investigating all levels of biological information (DNA, RNA, proteins and metabolites) to capture the functional interactions occurring in a given ecosystem and track down characteristics that could not be accessed by the study of isolated components. In this context, the study of the proteins collectively expressed by all the microorganisms present within an ecosystem (metaproteomics) is not only crucial but can also provide insights into microbial functionality. Overall, the success of metaproteomics is closely linked to metagenomics, and with the exponential increase in the availability of metagenome sequences, this field of research is starting to experience generation of an overwhelming amount of data, which requires systematic analysis. Metaproteomics has been employed in very diverse environments, and this review discusses the recent advances achieved in the context of human biology, soil, marine and freshwater environments as well as natural and bioengineered systems. PMID:22225547

  6. A mixed signal ECG processing platform with an adaptive sampling ADC for portable monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejung; Van Hoof, Chris; Yazicioglu, Refet Firat

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a mixed-signal ECG processing platform with an 12-bit ADC architecture that can adapt its sampling rate according to the input signals rate of change. This enables the sampling of ECG signals with significantly reduced data rate without loss of information. The presented adaptive sampling scheme reduces the ADC power consumption, enables the processing of ECG signals with lower power consumption, and reduces the power consumption of the radio while streaming the ECG signals. The test results show that running a CWT-based R peak detection algorithm using the adaptively sampled ECG signals consumes only 45.6 μW and it leads to 36% less overall system power consumption. PMID:22254775

  7. Mixed Signals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danforth, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    According to the Education Commission of the States, 14 states prohibit pagers and/or cell phones in schools, 8 states have repealed bans, and the rest have no statutes on the issue. Ten states, including some that have repealed bans, grant policymaking authority to local boards. Presents arguments pro and con on cell phones and school district…

  8. A reuse-based framework for the design of analog and mixed-signal ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Lopez, Rafael; Fernandez, Francisco V.; Rodriguez Vazquez, Angel

    2005-06-01

    Despite the spectacular breakthroughs of the semiconductor industry, the ability to design integrated circuits (ICs) under stringent time-to-market (TTM) requirements is lagging behind integration capacity, so far keeping pace with still valid Moore"s Law. The resulting gap is threatening with slowing down such a phenomenal growth. The design community believes that it is only by means of powerful CAD tools and design methodologies - and, possibly, a design paradigm shift - that this design gap can be bridged. In this sense, reuse-based design is seen as a promising solution, and concepts such as IP Block, Virtual Component, and Design Reuse have become commonplace thanks to the significant advances in the digital arena. Unfortunately, the very nature of analog and mixed-signal (AMS) design has hindered a similar level of consensus and development. This paper presents a framework for the reuse-based design of AMS circuits. The framework is founded on three key elements: (1) a CAD-supported hierarchical design flow that facilitates the incorporation of AMS reusable blocks, reduces the overall design time, and expedites the management of increasing AMS design complexity; (2) a complete, clear definition of the AMS reusable block, structured into three separate facets or views: the behavioral, structural, and layout facets, the two first for top-down electrical synthesis and bottom-up verification, the latter used during bottom-up physical synthesis; (3) the design for reusability set of tools, methods, and guidelines that, relying on intensive parameterization as well as on design knowledge capture and encapsulation, allows to produce fully reusable AMS blocks. A case study and a functional silicon prototype demonstrate the validity of the paper"s proposals.

  9. 27 CFR 31.233 - Mixing cocktails in advance of sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mixing cocktails in advance of sale. 31.233 Section 31.233 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Miscellaneous § 31.233...

  10. 27 CFR 31.233 - Mixing cocktails in advance of sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mixing cocktails in advance of sale. 31.233 Section 31.233 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Miscellaneous § 31.233...

  11. 27 CFR 31.233 - Mixing cocktails in advance of sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mixing cocktails in advance of sale. 31.233 Section 31.233 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Miscellaneous § 31.233...

  12. 27 CFR 31.233 - Mixing cocktails in advance of sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mixing cocktails in advance of sale. 31.233 Section 31.233 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Miscellaneous § 31.233...

  13. 27 CFR 31.233 - Mixing cocktails in advance of sale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mixing cocktails in advance of sale. 31.233 Section 31.233 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Miscellaneous § 31.233...

  14. A Mixed Methods Approach to Examining an Advanced Placement Program in One Connecticut Public School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docimo, Chelsey L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this eleventh grade Advanced Placement (AP) program study was to determine factors associated with AP placement and subsequent student performance. This research was considered to be a mixed methods case study with elements of arrested action research. One hundred and twenty-four students, four guidance counselors, three AP…

  15. Advances in white-light optical signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, F. T. S.

    1984-01-01

    A technique that permits signal processing operations which can be carried out by white light source is described. The method performs signal processing that obeys the concept of coherent light rather than incoherent optics. Since the white light source contains all the color wavelengths of the visible light, the technique is very suitable for color signal processing.

  16. Suppressing background signals in solid state NMR via the Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, Giulia; Ziarelli, Fabio; Tintaru, Aura; Thureau, Pierre; Viel, Stéphane

    2012-05-01

    A simple procedure to effectively suppress background signals arising from various probe head components (e.g. stator, rotors, inserts) in solid state NMR is presented. Similarly to the ERETIC™ method, which uses an electronic signal as an internal standard for quantification, the proposed scheme is based on an electronically generated time-dependent signal that is injected into the receiver coil of the NMR probe head during signal acquisition. More specifically, the line shape, width and frequency of this electronic signal are determined by deconvoluting the background signal in the frequency domain. This deconvoluted signal is then converted into a time-dependent function through inverse Fourier Transform, which is used to generate the shaped pulse that is fed into the receiver coil during the acquisition of the Free Induction Decay. The power of the shaped pulse is adjusted to match the intensity of the background signal, and its phase is shifted by 180° with respect to the receiver reference phase. This so-called Electronic Mixing-Mediated Annihilation (EMMA) methodology is demonstrated here with a 13C Single Pulse Magic Angle Spinning spectrum of an isotopically enriched 13C histidine solid sample recorded under quantitative conditions.

  17. High-efficiency infrared four-wave mixing signal in monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shasha; Liu, Shaopeng; Zhu, Zhonghu; Yang, Wen-Xing

    2016-03-01

    A scheme of enhanced four-wave mixing (FWM) signal is exploited in graphene under an external magnetic field via multiphoton quantum destructive interference. By solving the coupled Schrödinger-Maxwell formalism, a time-dependent analysis performs the integrated analytical expressions of the input probe pulse and generated FWM field. Taking into account the tunable optical transition frequency between the Landau levels (LLs) in graphene, it is found that the generated FWM signal in the infrared region can be significantly enhanced and its efficiency is nearly 60% . As a result, the proposed magnetised graphene system may provide a striking potential for generating long-wavelength radiation.

  18. Evaluation of COTS SiGe, SOI, and Mixed Signal Electronic Parts for Extreme Temperature Use in NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program sponsors a task at the NASA Glenn Research Center titled "Reliability of SiGe, SOI, and Advanced Mixed Signal Devices for Cryogenic Space Missions." In this task COTS parts and flight-like are evaluated by determining their performance under extreme temperatures and thermal cycling. The results from the evaluations are published on the NEPP website and at professional conferences in order to disseminate information to mission planners and system designers. This presentation discusses the task and the 2010 highlights and technical results. Topics include extreme temperature operation of SiGe and SOI devices, all-silicon oscillators, a floating gate voltage reference, a MEMS oscillator, extreme temperature resistors and capacitors, and a high temperature silicon operational amplifier.

  19. Advanced robotics technology applied to mixed waste characterization, sorting and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.; Hurd, R.; Grasz, E.

    1994-04-01

    There are over one million cubic meters of radioactively contaminated hazardous waste, known as mixed waste, stored at Department of Energy facilities. Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing methods to safely and efficiently treat this type of waste. LLNL has automated and demonstrated a means of segregating items in a mixed waste stream. This capability incorporates robotics and automation with advanced multi-sensor information for autonomous and teleoperational handling of mixed waste items with previously unknown characteristics. The first phase of remote waste stream handling was item singulation; the ability to remove individual items of heterogeneous waste directly from a drum, box, bin, or pile. Once objects were singulated, additional multi-sensory information was used for object classification and segregation. In addition, autonomous and teleoperational surface cleaning and decontamination of homogeneous metals has been demonstrated in processing mixed waste streams. The LLNL waste stream demonstration includes advanced technology such as object classification algorithms, identification of various metal types using active and passive gamma scans and RF signatures, and improved teleoperational and autonomous grasping of waste objects. The workcell control program used an off-line programming system as a server to perform both simulation control as well as actual hardware control of the workcell. This paper will discuss the motivation for remote mixed waste stream handling, the overall workcell layout, sensor specifications, workcell supervisory control, 3D vision based automated grasp planning and object classification algorithms.

  20. Recent Advances in Plant Early Signaling in Response to Herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Ozawa, Rika; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2011-01-01

    Plants are frequently attacked by herbivores and pathogens and therefore have acquired constitutive and induced defenses during the course of their evolution. Here we review recent progress in the study of the early signal transduction pathways in host plants in response to herbivory. The sophisticated signaling network for plant defense responses is elicited and driven by both herbivore-induced factors (e.g., elicitors, effectors, and wounding) and plant signaling (e.g., phytohormone and plant volatiles) in response to arthropod factors. We describe significant findings, illuminating the scenario by providing broad insights into plant signaling involved in several arthropod-host interactions. PMID:21747702

  1. Property-Based Monitoring of Analog and Mixed-Signal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlicek, John; Little, Scott; Maler, Oded; Nickovic, Dejan

    In the recent past, there has been a steady growth of the market for consumer embedded devices such as cell phones, GPS and portable multimedia systems. In embedded systems, digital, analog and software components are combined on a single chip, resulting in increasingly complex designs that introduce richer functionality on smaller devices. As a consequence, the potential insertion of errors into a design becomes higher, yielding an increasing need for automated analog and mixed-signal validation tools. In the purely digital setting, formal verification based on properties expressed in industrial specification languages such as PSL and SVA is nowadays successfully integrated in the design flow. On the other hand, the validation of analog and mixed-signal systems still largely depends on simulation-based, ad-hoc methods. In this tutorial, we consider some ingredients of the standard verification methodology that can be successfully exported from digital to analog and mixed-signal setting, in particular property-based monitoring techniques. Property-based monitoring is a lighter approach to the formal verification, where the system is seen as a "black-box" that generates sets of traces, whose correctness is checked against a property, that is its high-level specification. Although incomplete, monitoring is effectively used to catch faults in systems, without guaranteeing their full correctness.

  2. Process development for high speed superconductor microelectronics for digital and mixed signal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohannes, Daniel T.

    After half a century of enormous successes and complete dominance, semiconductor electronics based on silicon Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) is fast approaching its limits for high-end applications in telecommunications, computing and routing. Digital superconductor electronics (SCE) based on the Rapid Single Flux Quantum Logic (RSFQ) is considered a viable low risk alternative to Si CMOS circuits, due to its potential for ultra-high operating frequency and ultra-low power dissipation. The most developed and reliable superconductor electronics fabrication technology is based on the externally shunted Nb/Al/AlOx/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions (JJ). The technology level is characterized by the Nb/Al/AlOx/Nb trilayer critical current density, jc, and the minimum junction size, a. The maximum clock frequency of the RSFQ-based SCE circuits scales as square root of jc and inversely proportional to a. The main goals of the thesis work is: first, to research the physical limitations of the existing methods of making SCE and restrictions on the circuit complexity and speed; second, to develop a reliable and scalable SCE fabrication process that is capable of making high-speed complex circuits for digital and mixed signal applications; and third to implement the results at a commercial SCE foundry at HYPRES Inc. To this end, an advanced fabrication process with 4:5 kA/cm2 critical current density JJ has been developed. The process is based on an enhanced lithography and thin film processes and incorporates an additional anodization step for JJ protection. A simple approach for scaling of the existing circuit designs to newer higher jc processes has been proposed and implemented. A great number of complex digital circuits > 104 JJ operating at clock frequencies in excess of 30 GHz has been fabricated for the first time as well as less complex (about 500 JJs) circuits operating above 40 GHz and simple circuits with about 20 JJs operating to about

  3. Photon statistics of pulse-pumped four-wave mixing in fiber with weak signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan-Nan, Liu; Yu-Hong, Liu; Jia-Min, Li; Xiao-Ying, Li

    2016-07-01

    We study the photon statistics of pulse-pumped four-wave mixing in fibers with weak coherent signal injection by measuring the intensity correlation functions of individual signal and idler fields. The experimental results show that the intensity correlation function of individual signal (idler) field decreases with the intensity of signal injection. After applying narrow band filter in signal (idler) band, the value of decreases from 1.9 ± 0.02 (1.9 ± 0.02) to 1.03 ± 0.02 (1.05 ± 0.02) when the intensity of signal injection varies from 0 to 120 photons/pulse. The results indicate that the photon statistics changes from Bose–Einstein distribution to Poisson distribution. We calculate the intensity correlation functions by using the multi-mode theory of four-wave mixing in fibers. The theoretical curves well fit the experimental results. Our investigation will be useful for mitigating the crosstalk between quantum and classical channels in a dense wavelength division multiplexing network. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11527808), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2014CB340103), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120032110055), the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin, China (Grant No. 14JCQNJC02300), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, China, and the Program of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities, China (Grant No. B07014).

  4. The Promise of Mixed-Methods for Advancing Latino Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Apesoa-Varano, Ester Carolina; Hinton, Ladson

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-methods research in the social sciences has been conducted for quite some time. More recently, mixed-methods have become popular in health research, with the National Institutes of Health leading the impetus to fund studies that implement such an approach. The public health issues facing us today are great and they range from policy and other macro-level issues, to systems level problems to individuals' health behaviors. For Latinos, who are projected to become the largest minority group bearing a great deal of the burden of social inequality in the U.S., it is important to understand the deeply-rooted nature of these health disparities in order to close the gap in health outcomes. Mixed-methodology thus holds promise for advancing research on Latino heath by tackling health disparities from a variety of standpoints and approaches. The aim of this manuscript is to provide two examples of mixed methods research, each of which addresses a health topic of considerable importance to older Latinos and their families. These two examples will illustrate a) the complementary use of qualitative and quantitative methods to advance health of older Latinos in an area that is important from a public health perspective, and b) the “translation” of findings from observational studies (informed by social science and medicine) to the development and testing of interventions. PMID:23996325

  5. Numerical Evaluation of Fluid Mixing Phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor Using Advanced Interface Tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed with the subchannel analysis codes which incorporated the correlations based on empirical results including actual-size tests. Then, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. In this situation, development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason, we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, a detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. In this paper, firstly, we tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the existing 2-channel air-water mixing experimental results. Secondary, the TPFIT code was applied to simulation of steam-water two-phase flow in a model of two subchannels of a current BWRs and FLWRs rod bundle. The fluid mixing was observed at a gap between the subchannels. The existing two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing is evaluated using detailed numerical simulation data. This data indicates that pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing, and thus the effects of the time average pressure difference and fluctuations must be incorporated in the two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing. When inlet quality ratio of subchannels is relatively large, it is understood that evaluation precision of the existing two-phase flow correlations for fluid mixing are relatively low.

  6. Efficient calculation of time- and frequency-resolved four-wave-mixing signals.

    PubMed

    Gelin, Maxim F; Egorova, Dassia; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2009-09-15

    "Four-wave-mixing" is the generic name for a family of nonlinear electronic and vibrational spectroscopies. These techniques are widely used to explore dissipation, dephasing, solvation, and interstate coupling mechanisms in various material systems. Four-wave-mixing spectroscopy needs a firm theoretical support, because it delivers information on material systems indirectly, through certain transients, which are measured as functions of carrier frequencies, durations, and relative time delays of the laser pulses. The observed transients are uniquely determined by the three-pulse-induced third-order polarization. There exist two conceptually different approaches to the calculation of the nonlinear polarization. In the standard perturbative approach to nonlinear spectroscopy, the third-order polarization is expressed in terms of the nonlinear response functions. As the material systems become more complex, the evaluation of the response functions becomes cumbersome and the calculation of the signals necessitates a number of approximations. Herein, we review alternative methods for the calculation of four-wave-mixing signals, in which the relevant laser pulses are incorporated into the system Hamiltonian and the driven system dynamics is simulated numerically exactly. The emphasis is on the recently developed equation-of-motion phase-matching approach (EOM-PMA), which allows us to calculate the three-pulse-induced third-order polarization in any phase-matching direction by performing three (with the rotating wave approximation) or seven (without the rotating wave approximation) independent propagations of the density matrix. The EOM-PMA is limited to weak laser fields (its domain of validity is equivalent to the approach based on the third-order response functions) but allows for arbitrary pulse durations and automatically accounts for pulse-overlap effects. As an illustration, we apply the EOM-PMA to the calculation of optical three-pulse photon-echo two

  7. Analog Module Architecture for Space-Qualified Field-Programmable Mixed-Signal Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, R. Timothy; Strohbehn, Kim; Jaskulek, Steven E.; Katz, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Spacecraft require all manner of both digital and analog circuits. Onboard digital systems are constructed almost exclusively from field-programmable gate array (FPGA) circuits providing numerous advantages over discrete design including high integration density, high reliability, fast turn-around design cycle time, lower mass, volume, and power consumption, and lower parts acquisition and flight qualification costs. Analog and mixed-signal circuits perform tasks ranging from housekeeping to signal conditioning and processing. These circuits are painstakingly designed and built using discrete components due to a lack of options for field-programmability. FPAA (Field-Programmable Analog Array) and FPMA (Field-Programmable Mixed-signal Array) parts exist but not in radiation-tolerant technology and not necessarily in an architecture optimal for the design of analog circuits for spaceflight applications. This paper outlines an architecture proposed for an FPAA fabricated in an existing commercial digital CMOS process used to make radiation-tolerant antifuse-based FPGA devices. The primary concerns are the impact of the technology and the overall array architecture on the flexibility of programming, the bandwidth available for high-speed analog circuits, and the accuracy of the components for high-performance applications.

  8. Combined Self-Test of Analog Portion and ADCs in Integrated Mixed-Signal Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Geng; Wang, Hong; Yang, Shiyuan

    Testing is a critical stage in integrated circuits production in order to guarantee reliability. The complexity and high integration level of mixed-signal ICs has put forward new challenges to circuit testing. This paper describes an oscillation-based combined self-test strategy for the analog portion and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) in integrated mixed-signal circuits. In test mode, the analog portion under test is reconfigured into an oscillator, generating periodic signals as the test stimulus of ADC. By analyzing the A/D conversion results, a histogram test of ADC can be performed, and the oscillation frequency as well as amplitude can be checked, and in this way the oscillation test of the analog portion is realized simultaneously. For an analog benchmark circuit combined with an ADC, triangle oscillation and sinusoid oscillation schemes are both given to test their faults. Experimental results show that fault coverage of the analog portion is 92.2% and 94.3% in the two schemes respectively, and faults in the ADC can also be tested.

  9. Integral resistors and capacitors for mixed-signal packages using electroless plating and polymer-ceramic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahal, Premjeet

    In this work, new approaches to achieving integral resistors and capacitors on large area substrates at low temperatures in a high density wiring (HDW) environment using non-vacuum deposition techniques are introduced. This includes the use of polymer-ceramic nanocomposites for integral capacitors and electroless plating for integral resistors. From the literature review it is believed that resistors in the range of 5--50 ohm/square and capacitors in the range of 1--20 nF/cm2 can satisfy most of the mixed-signal application needs. The proposed materials can satisfy this need as demonstrated in this work. Several test vehicles were fabricated and measured to characterize the material properties, and demonstrate conventional and novel circuits for mixed-signal applications. To begin with, several polymer-ceramic combinations were analyzed under varying conditions to gain a fundamental understanding of the material system. Experimental advances have been made to achieve high dielectric constant values for both epoxy-ceramic and polyimide-ceramic systems. These material systems in general can satisfy specific capacitances in the range of 1--22 nF/cm2. These materials were found to be stable into the GHz range and have low loss-tangent. For electroless resistors, several plating baths were studied and a combination of Ni-P/Ni-W-P was found to produce the best results. Uniform plating was achieved through better nucleation of PdCl2 catalyst through the use of organosilane surface treatment. The Ni-P/Ni-W-P films produced sheet resistance in the range of 5--50 ohm/square and TCR below 50 ppm/°C. The material is stable into the GHz range. Upon optimizing the electrical properties and processing of capacitors and resistors, several test vehicles were fabricated to demonstrate some conventional and novel passive structures for RF and mixed-signal applications (e.g., filters, delay lines, etc.). Some of the structures were modeled using MDS and PSPICE and a good correlation

  10. A Step Response Based Mixed-Signal BIST Approach for Continuous-time Linear Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Alvernon; Lala, P. K.

    2001-01-01

    A new Mixed-Signal Built-in self-test approach that is based upon the step response of a reconfigurable (or multifunction) analog block is presented in this paper. The technique requires the overlapping step response of the Circuit Under Test (CUT) for two circuit configurations. Each configuration can be realized by changing the topology of the CUT or by sampling two CUT nodes with differing step responses. The technique can effectively detect both soft and hard faults and does not require an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and/or digital-to-analog converter(DAC). It also does not require any precision voltage sources or comparators. This approach does not require any additional analog circuits to realize the test signal generator and sample circuits. The paper is concluded with the application of the proposed approach to a circuit found in the work of Epstein et al and two ITC 97 analog benchmark circuits.

  11. Advances in the Exploration of Particle Dark Matter Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornengo, Nicolao

    2011-10-01

    The particle physics interpretation of the missing-mass, or dark-matter, problem of cosmological and astrophysical nature is going to be posed under deep scrutiny in the next years. From the particle physics side, accelerator physics will deeply test theoretical ideas of new physics beyond the Standard Model, where a particle physics candidate to dark matter is often naturally obtained. From the astrophysical side, many probes are already providing a great deal of independent information on the signals which can be produced by the galactic or extra-galactic dark matter. The ultimate hope is in fact to be able to disentangle a dark matter signal from the various sources of backgrounds and to extract a coherent picture of new physics from the accelerator physics, astrophysics and cosmology side. A very ambitious and far-reaching project, indeed!

  12. Develop advanced nonlinear signal analysis topographical mapping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jong, Jen-Yi

    1993-01-01

    As reported in the monthly technical progress report for July 1993, a new signal analysis technique called instantaneous frequency correlation (IFC) for time delay estimation was developed which will be incorporated into the ATMS system. In this report, a different technique for time delay estimation called phase difference time derivative estimator (FDTDE) will be discussed. The FDTDE technique does not replace the IFC method since their application conditions are different. The IFC technique can estimate the time delay between two spectral components of two measurement signals when the center frequency of the components is constant, while the FDTDE method can provide accurate time delay estimation when the frequency of the subject component changes linearly such as during engine startup or shut-down.

  13. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  14. Gamma-ray Signal from Dark Matter Annihilation Mediated by Mixing Slepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei

    2016-03-01

    In order to reconcile the tension between the collider SUSY particle search and the dark matter relic density constraint, we free ourselves from the simplest CMSSM model and find a large parameter space in which a sub-TeV bino dark matter may comply with all the current experimental constraints. In this so-called incredible bulk region, dark matter mainly annihilates through the t channel exchange of a mixing slepton into a leptonic final state. We have explored this proposal and studied the resultant spectrum feature. We are going to show that the line signal produced by the γγ and γZ final state will give some indications to the mixing angle and CP-violation phase of the slepton sector. On the other hand, internal bremsstrahlung (IB) feature will be easier to get observed by future experiments, with sensitivity around 10-29cm3 /s . Unlike some other models, our IB signal is dominated by the collinear limit of the final state radiation amplitude and shows a bump-like feature.

  15. A mixed-signal implementation of a polychronous spiking neural network with delay adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Runchun M.; Hamilton, Tara J.; Tapson, Jonathan C.; van Schaik, André

    2014-01-01

    We present a mixed-signal implementation of a re-configurable polychronous spiking neural network capable of storing and recalling spatio-temporal patterns. The proposed neural network contains one neuron array and one axon array. Spike Timing Dependent Delay Plasticity is used to fine-tune delays and add dynamics to the network. In our mixed-signal implementation, the neurons and axons have been implemented as both analog and digital circuits. The system thus consists of one FPGA, containing the digital neuron array and the digital axon array, and one analog IC containing the analog neuron array and the analog axon array. The system can be easily configured to use different combinations of each. We present and discuss the experimental results of all combinations of the analog and digital axon arrays and the analog and digital neuron arrays. The test results show that the proposed neural network is capable of successfully recalling more than 85% of stored patterns using both analog and digital circuits. PMID:24672422

  16. Fault Detection of Gearbox from Inverter Signals Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pislaru, C.; Lane, M.; Ball, A. D.; Gu, F.

    2012-05-01

    The gear faults are time-localized transient events so time-frequency analysis techniques (such as the Short-Time Fourier Transform, Wavelet Transform, motor current signature analysis) are widely used to deal with non-stationary and nonlinear signals. Newly developed signal processing techniques (such as empirical mode decomposition and Teager Kaiser Energy Operator) enabled the recognition of the vibration modes that coexist in the system, and to have a better understanding of the nature of the fault information contained in the vibration signal. However these methods require a lot of computational power so this paper presents a novel approach of gearbox fault detection using the inverter signals to monitor the load, rather than the motor current. The proposed technique could be used for continuous monitoring as well as on-line damage detection systems for gearbox maintenance.

  17. Wavelength conversion of 28 GBaud 16-QAM signals based on four-wave mixing in a silicon nanowire.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rhys; Spasojevic, Mina; Chagnon, Mathieu; Malekiha, Mahdi; Li, Jia; Plant, David V; Chen, Lawrence R

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate error-free wavelength conversion of 28 GBaud 16-QAM single polarization (112 Gb/s) signals based on four-wave mixing in a dispersion engineered silicon nanowire (SNW). Wavelength conversion covering the entire C-band is achieved using a single pump. We characterize the performance of the wavelength converter subsystem through the electrical signal to noise ratio penalty as well as the bit error rate of the converted signal as a function of input signal power. Moreover, we evaluate the degradation of the optical signal to noise ratio due to wavelength conversion in the SNW. PMID:24663730

  18. Mixed Signal Learning by Spike Correlation Propagation in Feedback Inhibitory Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Hiratani, Naoki; Fukai, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    The brain can learn and detect mixed input signals masked by various types of noise, and spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is the candidate synaptic level mechanism. Because sensory inputs typically have spike correlation, and local circuits have dense feedback connections, input spikes cause the propagation of spike correlation in lateral circuits; however, it is largely unknown how this secondary correlation generated by lateral circuits influences learning processes through STDP, or whether it is beneficial to achieve efficient spike-based learning from uncertain stimuli. To explore the answers to these questions, we construct models of feedforward networks with lateral inhibitory circuits and study how propagated correlation influences STDP learning, and what kind of learning algorithm such circuits achieve. We derive analytical conditions at which neurons detect minor signals with STDP, and show that depending on the origin of the noise, different correlation timescales are useful for learning. In particular, we show that non-precise spike correlation is beneficial for learning in the presence of cross-talk noise. We also show that by considering excitatory and inhibitory STDP at lateral connections, the circuit can acquire a lateral structure optimal for signal detection. In addition, we demonstrate that the model performs blind source separation in a manner similar to the sequential sampling approximation of the Bayesian independent component analysis algorithm. Our results provide a basic understanding of STDP learning in feedback circuits by integrating analyses from both dynamical systems and information theory. PMID:25910189

  19. A Mixed Methods Study: African American Students' Performance Trends and Perceptions Towards Advanced Placement Literature Courses and Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buford, Brandie J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to describe the perceptions of African American students pertaining to their engagement in Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition course and Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition examination. A purposive sampling design was employed to select 12 participants from one urban…

  20. Coherent Terahertz Wireless Signal Transmission Using Advanced Optical Fiber Communication Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kuri, Toshiaki; Morohashi, Isao; Hosako, Iwao; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Yuki; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2015-02-01

    Coherent terahertz signal transmission with multilevel modulation and demodulation is demonstrated using an optical sub-harmonic IQ mixer (SHIQM), which consists of optical components in advanced optical fiber communication technologies. An optical-frequency-comb-employed signal generator is capable of vector modulation as well as frequency tunability. Digital signal processing (DSP) adopted from the recently developed optical digital coherent communication can easily demodulate multi-level modulated terahertz signals by using electrical heterodyning for intermediate-frequency (IF) down conversion. This technique is applicable for mobile backhauling in the next-generation mobile communication technology directly connected to an optical fiber network as a high-speed wireless transmission link.

  1. Advanced study of video signal processing in low signal to noise environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, F.

    1973-01-01

    Conventional analytical techniques used to determine and optimize phase-lock loop (PLL) characteristics are most often based on a model which is valid only if the intermediate frequency (IF) filter bandwidth is large compared to the PLL bandwidth and the phase error is small. An improved model (called the quasi-linear model) is developed which takes into account small IF filter bandwidths and nonlinear effects associated with large phase errors. By comparison of theoretical and experimental results it is demonstrated that the quasi-linear model accurately predicts PLL characteristics. This is true even for small IF filter bandwidths and large phase errors where the conventional model is invalid. The theoretical and experimental results are used to draw conclusions concerning threshold, multiplier output variance, phase error variance, output signal-to-noise ratio, and signal distortion. The relationship between these characteristics and IF filter bandwidth, modulating signal spectrum, and rms deviation is also determined.

  2. Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-11-18

    Emerging standards such as OpenADR enable Demand Response (DR) Resources to interact directly with Utilities and Independent System Operators to allow their facility automation equipment to respond to a variety of DR signals ranging from day ahead to real time ancillary services. In addition, there are Aggregators in today’s markets who are capable of bringing together collections of aggregated DR assets and selling them to the grid as a single resource. However, in most cases these aggregated resources are not automated and when they are, they typically use proprietary technologies. There is a need for a framework for dealing with aggregated resources that supports the following requirements: • Allows demand-side resources to participate in multiple DR markets ranging from wholesale ancillary services to retail tariffs without being completely committed to a single entity like an Aggregator; • Allow aggregated groups of demand-side resources to be formed in an ad hoc fashion to address specific grid-side issues and support the optimization of the collective response of an aggregated group along a number of different dimensions. This is important in order to taylor the aggregated performance envelope to the needs to of the grid; • Allow aggregated groups to be formed in a hierarchical fashion so that each group can participate in variety of markets from wholesale ancillary services to distribution level retail tariffs. This paper explores the issues of aggregated groups of DR resources as described above especially within the context of emerging smart grid standards and the role they will play in both the management and interaction of various grid-side entities with those resources.

  3. Radiation hardness by design for mixed signal infrared readout circuit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaalema, Stephen; Gates, James; Dobyns, David; Pauls, Greg; Wall, Bruce

    2013-09-01

    Readout integrated circuits (ROICs) to support space-based infrared detection applications often have severe radiation tolerance requirements. Radiation hardness-by-design (RHBD) significantly enhances the radiation tolerance of commercially available CMOS and custom radiation hardened fabrication techniques are not required. The combination of application specific design techniques, enclosed gate architecture nFETs and intrinsic thin oxide radiation hardness of 180 nm process node commercial CMOS allows realization of high performance mixed signal circuits. Black Forest Engineering has used RHBD techniques to develop ROICs with integrated A/D conversion that operate over a wide range of temperatures (40K-300K) to support infrared detection. ROIC radiation tolerance capability for 256x256 LWIR area arrays and 1x128 thermopile linear arrays is presented. The use of 130 nm CMOS for future ROIC RHBD applications is discussed.

  4. Low zinc environment induces stress signaling, senescence and mixed cell death modalities in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Emil; Rudolf, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    Currently it is not clear what type of the final cellular response (i.e. cell death modality or senescence) is induced upon chronic intracellular zinc depletion in colon cancer cells. To address this question, isogenic colon cancer lines SW480 and SW620 exposed to low zinc environment were studied over the period of 6 weeks. Low zinc environment reduced total as well as free intracellular zinc content in both cell lines. Decreased intracellular zinc content resulted in changes in cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of stress signaling. In addition, colonocytes with low zinc content displayed increased levels of oxidative stress, changes in mitochondrial activity but in the absence of significant DNA damage. Towards the end of treatment (4th-6th week), exposed cells started to change morphologically, and typical markers of senescence as well as cell death appeared. Of two examined colon cancer cell lines, SW480 cells proved to activate predominantly senescent phenotype, with frequent form of demise being necrosis and mixed cell death modality but not apoptosis. Conversely, SW620 cells activated mostly cell death, with relatively equal distribution of apoptosis and mixed types, while senescent phenotypes and necrosis were present only in a small fraction of cell populations. Addition of zinc at the beginning of 4th week of treatment significantly suppressed cell death phenotypes in both cell lines but had no significant effect on senescence. In conclusion, presented results demonstrate variability of responses to chronic zinc depletion in colon cancer as modeled in vitro. PMID:26446979

  5. Fast and economic signal processing technique of laser diode self-mixing interferometry for nanoparticle size measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huarui; Shen, Jianqi

    2014-05-01

    The size of nanoparticles is measured by laser diode self-mixing interferometry, which employs a sensitive, compact, and simple optical setup. However, the signal processing of the interferometry is slow or expensive. In this article, a fast and economic signal processing technique is introduced, in which the self-mixing AC signal is transformed into DC signals with an analog circuit consisting of 16 channels. These DC signals are obtained as a spectrum from which the size of nanoparticles can be retrieved. The technique is examined by measuring the standard nanoparticles. Further experiments are performed to compare the skimmed milk and whole milk, and also the fresh skimmed milk and rotten skimmed milk.

  6. Advanced age decreases local calcium signaling in endothelium of mouse mesenteric arteries in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boerman, Erika M; Everhart, Jesse E; Segal, Steven S

    2016-05-01

    Aging is associated with vascular dysfunction that impairs tissue perfusion, physical activity, and the quality of life. Calcium signaling in endothelial cells (ECs) is integral to vasomotor control, exemplified by localized Ca(2+) signals within EC projections through holes in the internal elastic lamina (IEL). Within these microdomains, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization is integral to smooth muscle cell (SMC) relaxation via coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions. However, the effects of aging on local EC Ca(2+) signals (and thereby signaling between ECs and SMCs) remain unclear, and these events have not been investigated in vivo. Furthermore, it is unknown whether aging affects either the number or the size of IEL holes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that local EC Ca(2+) signaling is impaired with advanced age along with a reduction in IEL holes. In anesthetized mice expressing a Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent protein (GCaMP2) selectively in ECs, our findings illustrate that for mesenteric arteries controlling splanchnic blood flow the frequency of spontaneous local Ca(2+) signals in ECs was reduced by ∼85% in old (24-26 mo) vs. young (3-6 mo) animals. At the same time, the number (and total area) of holes per square millimeter of IEL was reduced by ∼40%. We suggest that diminished signaling between ECs and SMCs contributes to dysfunction of resistance arteries with advanced age.Listen to this article's corresponding podcast at http://ajpheart.podbean.com/e/aging-impairs-endothelial-ca2-signaling/. PMID:26945073

  7. Noninvasive blood flow measurement using speckle signals from a self-mixing laser diode: in vitro and in vivo experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Sahin K.; Shinohara, Shigennobu; Takamiya, Sotetsu; Yoshida, Hirofumi

    2000-09-01

    A semiconductor laser speckle velocimeter that uses the self-mixing effect is studied for noninvasive relative blood flow measurements. The random modulation of intensity and spectra of the laser diode caused by the backcoupling of the scattered light from the red blood cells into the laser cavity is detected as a speckle signal with a photodiode inside the laser package. The autocorrelation of this self- mixing speckle signals gives information on the flow velocity of the blood. The proposed method is elucidated with in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results of these measurements are given together with a discussion of dependence of speckle signals of a self-mixing laser diode on various parameters such as velocity, hematocrit level of blood, and background reflectance of blood suspension.

  8. Algorithm of lithography advanced process control system for high-mix low-volume products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Eiichi

    2007-03-01

    We have proposed a new algorithm of Lithography Advanced Process Control System for high-mix low-volume production. This algorithm works well for 1 st lot of a new device input into the production line, or 1st lot of an existing device to be exposed with a newly introduced exposure tool. The algorithm consists of 1) searching the most suitable trend of other similar devices referring to an attribute table and a look-up table for priority of searching order, and 2) correction of differences between the two devices for deciding optimum exposure conditions. The attribute table categorizes same layers across different devices and similar layers within a device. Look-up table describes the order of searching keys. To attain cost-effective process control system, information useful to compensate referred trend is compiled into the database.

  9. Cortical Signal Analysis and Advances in Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Signal: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Muhammad A.; Mannan, Malik M. Naeem; Jeong, Myung Yung

    2016-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive neuroimaging modality that measures the concentration changes of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO) and de-oxy hemoglobin (HbR) at the same time. It is an emerging cortical imaging modality with a good temporal resolution that is acceptable for brain-computer interface applications. Researchers have developed several methods in last two decades to extract the neuronal activation related waveform from the observed fNIRS time series. But still there is no standard method for analysis of fNIRS data. This article presents a brief review of existing methodologies to model and analyze the activation signal. The purpose of this review article is to give a general overview of variety of existing methodologies to extract useful information from measured fNIRS data including pre-processing steps, effects of differential path length factor (DPF), variations and attributes of hemodynamic response function (HRF), extraction of evoked response, removal of physiological noises, instrumentation, and environmental noises and resting/activation state functional connectivity. Finally, the challenges in the analysis of fNIRS signal are summarized. PMID:27375458

  10. Cortical Signal Analysis and Advances in Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Signal: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Muhammad A; Mannan, Malik M Naeem; Jeong, Myung Yung

    2016-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive neuroimaging modality that measures the concentration changes of oxy-hemoglobin (HbO) and de-oxy hemoglobin (HbR) at the same time. It is an emerging cortical imaging modality with a good temporal resolution that is acceptable for brain-computer interface applications. Researchers have developed several methods in last two decades to extract the neuronal activation related waveform from the observed fNIRS time series. But still there is no standard method for analysis of fNIRS data. This article presents a brief review of existing methodologies to model and analyze the activation signal. The purpose of this review article is to give a general overview of variety of existing methodologies to extract useful information from measured fNIRS data including pre-processing steps, effects of differential path length factor (DPF), variations and attributes of hemodynamic response function (HRF), extraction of evoked response, removal of physiological noises, instrumentation, and environmental noises and resting/activation state functional connectivity. Finally, the challenges in the analysis of fNIRS signal are summarized. PMID:27375458

  11. Diesel engine emissions and combustion predictions using advanced mixing models applicable to fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abani, Neerav; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2010-09-01

    An advanced mixing model was applied to study engine emissions and combustion with different injection strategies ranging from multiple injections, early injection and grouped-hole nozzle injection in light and heavy duty diesel engines. The model was implemented in the KIVA-CHEMKIN engine combustion code and simulations were conducted at different mesh resolutions. The model was compared with the standard KIVA spray model that uses the Lagrangian-Drop and Eulerian-Fluid (LDEF) approach, and a Gas Jet spray model that improves predictions of liquid sprays. A Vapor Particle Method (VPM) is introduced that accounts for sub-grid scale mixing of fuel vapor and more accurately and predicts the mixing of fuel-vapor over a range of mesh resolutions. The fuel vapor is transported as particles until a certain distance from nozzle is reached where the local jet half-width is adequately resolved by the local mesh scale. Within this distance the vapor particle is transported while releasing fuel vapor locally, as determined by a weighting factor. The VPM model more accurately predicts fuel-vapor penetrations for early cycle injections and flame lift-off lengths for late cycle injections. Engine combustion computations show that as compared to the standard KIVA and Gas Jet spray models, the VPM spray model improves predictions of in-cylinder pressure, heat released rate and engine emissions of NOx, CO and soot with coarse mesh resolutions. The VPM spray model is thus a good tool for efficiently investigating diesel engine combustion with practical mesh resolutions, thereby saving computer time.

  12. Advanced micro scanning in laryngology: implications of new advanced scanning in relation to HSDI acquired signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis, Morten; Pedersen, Mette; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2012-02-01

    The objective was to provide a comprehensive overview of the advanced microscopes (light and electron) and to implicate how laryngeal science can benefit. The Core Facility for Integrated Microscopy (CFIM) has a wide range of state-of the art light and electron microscopes for users of all levels of experience and from any discipline. To explore the increasing findings with the high-speed film, researchers need to know more about the underlying pathology (tissue changes at cellular level). The scientists need to have access to state-of-the-art light and electron microscopes ready for use in their research, as well as the necessary technical assistance and support.

  13. Wavelength conversion for polarization multiplexing signal using four-wave mixing in semiconductor optical amplifier with reduced polarization crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hui; Chen, Ming; Wan, Qiuzhen; Zheng, Zhiwei

    2016-06-01

    We investigated wavelength conversion for polarization multiplexing signal based on four-wave mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier. We found that the converted signals endured crosstalk among the pol-muxed channels. We also proposed and demonstrated a wavelength conversion scheme with polarization diversity technique. By utilizing the technique, the converted polarization multiplexing signal can be received without crosstalk. In addition, the performance of the proposed system is numerically analyzed with respect to the bit error rate of the converted signal, different frequency spacing between signal and pump and modulated data rate. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme may be a promising method to realize transparent wavelength conversion for polarization multiplexing signals.

  14. Mixed lactate and caffeine compound increases satellite cell activity and anabolic signals for muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yoshimi; Tsukamoto, Hayato; Yokokawa, Takumi; Hirotsu, Keisuke; Shimazu, Mariko; Uchida, Kenji; Tomi, Hironori; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2015-03-15

    We examined whether a mixed lactate and caffeine compound (LC) could effectively elicit proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells or activate anabolic signals in skeletal muscles. We cultured C2C12 cells with either lactate or LC for 6 h. We found that lactate significantly increased myogenin and follistatin protein levels and phosphorylation of P70S6K while decreasing the levels of myostatin relative to the control. LC significantly increased protein levels of Pax7, MyoD, and Ki67 in addition to myogenin, relative to control. LC also significantly increased follistatin expression relative to control and stimulated phosphorylation of mTOR and P70S6K. In an in vivo study, male F344/DuCrlCrlj rats were assigned to control (Sed, n = 10), exercise (Ex, n = 12), and LC supplementation (LCEx, n = 13) groups. LC was orally administered daily. The LCEx and Ex groups were exercised on a treadmill, running for 30 min at low intensity every other day for 4 wk. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in the mass of the gastrocnemius (GA) and tibialis anterior (TA) relative to both the Sed and Ex groups. Furthermore, the LCEx group showed a significant increase in the total DNA content of TA compared with the Sed group. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in myogenin and follistatin expression of GA relative to the Ex group. These results suggest that administration of LC can effectively increase muscle mass concomitant with elevated numbers of myonuclei, even with low-intensity exercise training, via activated satellite cells and anabolic signals. PMID:25571987

  15. A Preliminary Mixed-Method Investigation of Trust and Hidden Signals in Medical Consultations

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Silvia; Monti, Marco; Iannello, Paola; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Schulz, Peter J.; Antonietti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Background Several factors influence patients' trust, and trust influences the doctor-patient relationship. Recent literature has investigated the quality of the personal relationship and its dynamics by considering the role of communication and the elements that influence trust giving in the frame of general practitioner (GP) consultations. Objective We analysed certain aspects of the interaction between patients and GPs to understand trust formation and maintenance by focusing on communication channels. The impact of socio-demographic variables in trust relationships was also evaluated. Method A cross-sectional design using concurrent mixed qualitative and quantitative research methods was employed. One hundred adults were involved in a semi-structured interview composed of both qualitative and quantitative items for descriptive and exploratory purposes. The study was conducted in six community-based departments adjacent to primary care clinics in Trento, Italy. Results The findings revealed that patients trusted their GP to a high extent by relying on simple signals that were based on the quality of the one-to-one communication and on behavioural and relational patterns. Patients inferred the ability of their GP by adopting simple heuristics based mainly on the so-called social “honest signals” rather than on content-dependent features. Furthermore, socio-demographic variables affected trust: less literate and elderly people tended to trust more. Conclusions This study is unique in attempting to explore the role of simple signals in trust relationships within medical consultation: people shape trust and give meaning to their relationships through a powerful channel of communication that orbits not around words but around social relations. The findings have implications for both clinicians and researchers. For doctors, these results suggest a way of thinking about encounters with patients. For researchers, the findings underline the importance of analysing

  16. The Time-Frequency Signatures of Advanced Seismic Signals Generated by Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. R.; Huang, C. J.; Lin, C. R.; Wang, C. C.; Kuo, B. Y.; Yin, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic monitoring is expected to reveal the process of debris flow from the initial area to alluvial fan, because other field monitoring techniques, such as the video camera and the ultrasonic sensor, are limited by detection range. For this reason, seismic approaches have been used as the detection system of debris flows over the past few decades. The analysis of the signatures of the seismic signals in time and frequency domain can be used to identify the different phases of debris flow. This study dedicates to investigate the different stages of seismic signals due to debris flow, including the advanced signal, the main front, and the decaying tail. Moreover, the characteristics of the advanced signals forward to the approach of main front were discussed for the warning purpose. This study presents a permanent system, composed by two seismometers, deployed along the bank of Ai-Yu-Zi Creek in Nantou County, which is one of the active streams with debris flow in Taiwan. The three axes seismometer with frequency response of 7 sec - 200 Hz was developed by the Institute of Earth Sciences (IES), Academia Sinica for the purpose to detect debris flow. The original idea of replacing the geophone system with the seismometer technique was for catching the advanced signals propagating from the upper reach of the stream before debris flow arrival because of the high sensitivity. Besides, the low frequency seismic waves could be also early detected because of the low attenuation. However, for avoiding other unnecessary ambient vibrations, the sensitivity of seismometer should be lower than the general seismometer for detecting teleseism. Three debris flows with different mean velocities were detected in 2013 and 2014. The typical triangular shape was obviously demonstrated in time series data and the spectrograms of the seismic signals from three events. The frequency analysis showed that enormous debris flow bearing huge boulders would induce low frequency seismic

  17. Mixed-signal template-based reduction scheme for stimulus artifact removal in electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Kim Thoa; Musa, Silke; Eberle, Wolfgang; Bartic, Carmen; Gielen, Georges

    2013-04-01

    Simultaneous electrical stimulation and recording are used to gain insights into the function of neuronal circuitry. However, artifacts produced by the electrical stimulation pulses prevent the recording of neural responses during, and a short period after, the stimulation duration. In this work, we describe a mixed-signal recording topology with template subtraction for removing the artifact during the stimulation pulse. Emulated artifacts generated from a lumped electrical circuit model and experimental artifacts in cardiac cell cultures are used to evaluate the topology. The simulations show that delays between the emulated artifact and its estimated compensation template represent the largest error source of the analog template subtraction. The quantization error appears like random noise and determines the threshold level for the action potential detection. Simulations show that removal of the artifacts is possible, allowing the detection of action potentials during the stimulation pulsing period, even for high-amplitude saturating artifacts. Measurement results with artifacts elicited in cardiac cell cultures show feasible applications of this topology. The proposed topology therefore promisingly opens up a previously unavailable detection window for improving the analysis of the neuronal activity. PMID:23242784

  18. Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) Devices and Mixed-Signal Circuits for Extreme Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems in planetary exploration missions and in aerospace applications are expected to encounter extreme temperatures and wide thermal swings in their operational environments. Electronics designed for such applications must, therefore, be able to withstand exposure to extreme temperatures and to perform properly for the duration of the missions. Electronic parts based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology are known, based on device structure, to provide faster switching, consume less power, and offer better radiation-tolerance compared to their silicon counterparts. They also exhibit reduced current leakage and are often tailored for high temperature operation. However, little is known about their performance at low temperature. The performance of several SOI devices and mixed-signal circuits was determined under extreme temperatures, cold-restart, and thermal cycling. The investigations were carried out to establish a baseline on the functionality and to determine suitability of these devices for use in space exploration missions under extreme temperatures. The experimental results obtained on selected SOI devices are presented and discussed in this paper.

  19. Four-wave mixing signals from beta-carotene and its n = 15 homologue.

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Fujiwara, Masazumi; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Cogdell, Richard J; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The third-order nonlinear optical responses of beta-carotene and its homologue having a conjugation-double bond n = 15 have been investigated using sub-20 fs ultra-short optical pulses in order to clarify the dissipation processes of excess energy. Using the four-wave mixing spectroscopy, we observed a clear coherent oscillation with a period of a few tens of femtoseconds. The spectral density of these molecules was estimated that allowed the theoretical linear and nonlinear optical signals to be directly compared with the experimental data. Calculations based on the Brownian oscillator model were performed under the impulsive excitation limit. We show that the memory of the vibronic coherence generated upon the excitation into the S(2) state is lost via the relaxation process including the S(1) state. The vibronic decoherence lifetime of the system was estimated to be 1 ps, which is about 5 times larger than the life time of the S(2) state ( approximately 150 fs) determined in previous studies. The role of coherence and the efficient energy transfer in the light-harvesting antenna complexes are discussed. PMID:17929192

  20. A high-speed mixed-signal down-scaling circuit for DAB tuners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tang; Zhigong, Wang; Jiahui, Xuan; Yang, Yang; Jian, Xu; Yong, Xu

    2012-07-01

    A high-speed mixed-signal down-scaling circuit with low power consumption and low phase noise for use in digital audio broadcasting tuners has been realized and characterized. Some new circuit techniques are adopted to improve its performance. A dual-modulus prescaler (DMP) with low phase noise is realized with a kind of improved source-coupled logic (SCL) D-flip-flop (DFF) in the synchronous divider and a kind of improved complementary metal oxide semiconductor master-slave (CMOS MS)-DFF in the asynchronous divider. A new more accurate wire-load model is used to realize the pulse-swallow counter (PS counter). Fabricated in a 0.18-μm CMOS process, the total chip size is 0.6 × 0.2 mm2. The DMP in the proposed down-scaling circuit exhibits a low phase noise of -118.2 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz off the carrier frequency. At a supply voltage of 1.8 V, the power consumption of the down-scaling circuit's core part is only 2.7 mW.

  1. Cosmic non-TEM radiation and synthetic feed array sensor system in ASIC mixed signal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centureli, F.; Scotti, G.; Tommasino, P.; Trifiletti, A.; Romano, F.; Cimmino, R.; Saitto, A.

    2014-08-01

    The paper deals with the opportunity to introduce "Not strictly TEM waves" Synthetic detection Method (NTSM), consisting in a Three Axis Digital Beam Processing (3ADBP), to enhance the performances of radio telescope and sensor systems. Current Radio Telescopes generally use the classic 3D "TEM waves" approximation Detection Method, which consists in a linear tomography process (Single or Dual axis beam forming processing) neglecting the small z component. The Synthetic FEED ARRAY three axis Sensor SYSTEM is an innovative technique using a synthetic detection of the generic "NOT strictly TEM Waves radiation coming from the Cosmo, which processes longitudinal component of Angular Momentum too. Than the simultaneous extraction from radiation of both the linear and quadratic information component, may reduce the complexity to reconstruct the Early Universe in the different requested scales. This next order approximation detection of the observed cosmologic processes, may improve the efficacy of the statistical numerical model used to elaborate the same information acquired. The present work focuses on detection of such waves at carrier frequencies in the bands ranging from LF to MMW. The work shows in further detail the new generation of on line programmable and reconfigurable Mixed Signal ASIC technology that made possible the innovative Synthetic Sensor. Furthermore the paper shows the ability of such technique to increase the Radio Telescope Array Antenna performances.

  2. The Design and Construction of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Harrop, G.

    2003-02-27

    The Advanced Mixed Treatment Project (AMWTP) privatized contract was awarded to BNFL Inc. in December 1996 and construction of the main facility commenced in August 2000. The purpose of the advanced mixed waste treatment facility is to safely treat plutonium contaminated waste, currently stored in drums and boxes, for final disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The plant is being built at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Construction was completed in 28 months, to satisfy the Settlement Agreement milestone of December 2002. Commissioning of the related retrieval and characterization facilities is currently underway. The first shipment of pre-characterized waste is scheduled for March 2003, with AMWTP characterized and certified waste shipments from June 2003. To accommodate these challenging delivery targets BNFL adopted a systematic and focused construction program that included the use of a temporary structure to allow winter working, proven design and engineering principles and international procurement policies to help achieve quality and schedule. The technology involved in achieving the AMWTP functional requirements is primarily based upon a BNFL established pedigree of plant and equipment; applied in a manner that suits the process and waste. This technology includes the use of remotely controlled floor mounted and overhead power manipulators, a high power shredder and a 2000-ton force supercompactor with the attendant glove box suite, interconnections and automated material handling. The characterization equipment includes real-time radiography (RTR) units, drum and box assay measurement systems, drum head space gas sampling / analysis and drum venting, drum coring and sampling capabilities. The project adopted a particularly stringent and intensive pre-installation testing philosophy to ensure that equipment would work safely and reliably at the required throughput. This testing included the complete off site

  3. Amorphous mixed-metal hydroxide nanostructures for advanced water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y. Q.; Liu, X. Y.; Yang, G. W.

    2016-02-01

    The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec-1, while no deactivation is detected in the CV testing even up to 30 000 cycles, which suggests the promising application of these amorphous nanomaterials in electrochemical oxidation. Meanwhile, the distinct catalytic activities among these amorphous Ni-Fe hydroxide nanostructures prompts us to take notice of the composition of the alloy hydroxides/oxides when studying their catalytic properties, which opens an avenue for the rational design and controllable preparation of such amorphous nanomaterials as advanced OER electrocatalysts.The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec-1, while no deactivation is detected in the CV

  4. Characterization of transient noise in Advanced LIGO relevant to gravitational wave signal GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adamo, M.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterji, S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    On 14 September 2015, a gravitational wave signal from a coalescing black hole binary system was observed by the Advanced LIGO detectors. This paper describes the transient noise backgrounds used to determine the significance of the event (designated GW150914) and presents the results of investigations into potential correlated or uncorrelated sources of transient noise in the detectors around the time of the event. The detectors were operating nominally at the time of GW150914. We have ruled out environmental influences and non-Gaussian instrument noise at either LIGO detector as the cause of the observed gravitational wave signal.

  5. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project melter system preliminary design technical review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, T.L.; Raivo, B.D.; Soelberg, N.R.; Wiersholm, O.

    1995-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project sponsored a plasma are melter technical design review meeting to evaluate high-temperature melter system configurations for processing heterogeneous alpha-contaminated low-level radioactive waste (ALLW). Thermal processing experts representing Department of Energy contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency, and private sector companies participated in the review. The participants discussed issues and evaluated alternative configurations for three areas of the melter system design: plasma torch melters and graphite arc melters, offgas treatment options, and overall system configuration considerations. The Technical Advisory Committee for the review concluded that graphite arc melters are preferred over plasma torch melters for processing ALLW. Initiating involvement of stakeholders was considered essential at this stage of the design. For the offgas treatment system, the advisory committee raised the question whether to a use wet-dry or a dry-wet system. The committee recommended that the waste stream characterization, feed preparation, and the control system are essential design tasks for the high-temperature melter treatment system. The participants strongly recommended that a complete melter treatment system be assembled to conduct tests with nonradioactive surrogate waste material. A nonradioactive test bed would allow for inexpensive design and operational changes prior to assembling a system for radioactive waste treatment operations.

  6. Amorphous mixed-metal hydroxide nanostructures for advanced water oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y Q; Liu, X Y; Yang, G W

    2016-03-01

    The design of highly efficient, durable, and earth-abundant catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is crucial in order to promote energy conversion and storage processes. Here, we synthesize amorphous mixed-metal (Ni-Fe) hydroxide nanostructures with a homogeneous distribution of Ni/Fe as well as a tunable Ni/Fe ratio by a simple, facile, green and low-cost electrochemical technique, and we demonstrate that the synthesized amorphous nanomaterials possess ultrahigh activity and super long-term cycle stability in the OER process. The amorphous Ni0.71Fe0.29(OH)x nanostructure affords a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential of a mere 0.296 V and a small Tafel slope of 58 mV dec(-1), while no deactivation is detected in the CV testing even up to 30 000 cycles, which suggests the promising application of these amorphous nanomaterials in electrochemical oxidation. Meanwhile, the distinct catalytic activities among these amorphous Ni-Fe hydroxide nanostructures prompts us to take notice of the composition of the alloy hydroxides/oxides when studying their catalytic properties, which opens an avenue for the rational design and controllable preparation of such amorphous nanomaterials as advanced OER electrocatalysts. PMID:26864279

  7. Novel δ-doped partially insulated junctionless transistor for mixed signal integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ganesh C.; Bonge, Vijaysinh H.; Malode, Mayur M.; Jain, Rahul G.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, δ-doped partially insulated junctionless transistor (δ-Pi-OXJLT) has been proposed which shows that, employing highly doped δ-region below the channel not only reduces the off-state leakage current (IOFF) and short channel effects (SCEs) but also reduce the requirements of scaling channel thickness of junctionless transistor (JLT). The comparative analysis of digital and analog circuit performance of proposed δ-Pi-OXJLT, bulk planar (BP) JLT and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) JLT has also been carried out. The digital parameters analyzed in this work are, on-state drive current (ION), IOFF, ION/IOFF ratio, static power dissipation (PSTAT) whereas the analog parameters analyzed includes, transconductance (GM), transconductance generation factor (GM/IDS), intrinsic gain (GMRO) and cut-off frequency (fT) of the devices. In addition, scaling behavior of the devices is studied for various channel lengths by using the parameters such as drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and sub-threshold swing (SS). It has been found that, the proposed δ-Pi-OXJLT shows significant reduction in IOFF, DIBL and SS over BPJLT and SOIJLT devices. Further, ION and ION/IOFF ratio in the case of proposed δ-Pi-OXJLT also improves over the BPJLT device. Furthermore, the improvement in analog figures of merit, GM, GM/IDS, GMRO and fT in the case of proposed δ-Pi-OXJLT clearly shows that the proposed δ-Pi-OXJLT is the promising device for mixed signal integrated circuits.

  8. Self-Calibration Approach for Mixed Signal Circuits in Systems-on-Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, In-Seok

    MOSFET scaling has served industry very well for a few decades by proving improvements in transistor performance, power, and cost. However, they require high test complexity and cost due to several issues such as limited pin count and integration of analog and digital mixed circuits. Therefore, self-calibration is an excellent and promising method to improve yield and to reduce manufacturing cost by simplifying the test complexity, because it is possible to address the process variation effects by means of self-calibration technique. Since the prior published calibration techniques were developed for a specific targeted application, it is not easy to be utilized for other applications. In order to solve the aforementioned issues, in this dissertation, several novel self-calibration design techniques in mixed-signal mode circuits are proposed for an analog to digital converter (ADC) to reduce mismatch error and improve performance. These are essential components in SOCs and the proposed self-calibration approach also compensates the process variations. The proposed novel self-calibration approach targets the successive approximation (SA) ADC. First of all, the offset error of the comparator in the SA-ADC is reduced using the proposed approach by enabling the capacitor array in the input nodes for better matching. In addition, the auxiliary capacitors for each capacitor of DAC in the SA-ADC are controlled by using synthesized digital controller to minimize the mismatch error of the DAC. Since the proposed technique is applied during foreground operation, the power overhead in SA-ADC case is minimal because the calibration circuit is deactivated during normal operation time. Another benefit of the proposed technique is that the offset voltage of the comparator is continuously adjusted for every step to decide one-bit code, because not only the inherit offset voltage of the comparator but also the mismatch of DAC are compensated simultaneously. Synthesized digital

  9. An offset tone based gain stabilization technique for mixed-signal RF measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Gopal; Motiwala, Paresh D.; Randale, G. D.; Singh, Pitamber; Agarwal, Vivek; Kumar, Girish

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a gain stabilization technique for a RF signal measurement system. A sinusoidal signal of known amplitude, phase and close enough in frequency is added to the main, to be measured RF signal at the input of the analog section. The system stabilizes this offset tone in the digital domain, as it is sampled at the output of the analog section. This process generates a correction factor needed to stabilize the magnitude of the gain of the analog section for the main RF signal. With the help of a simple calibration procedure, the absolute amplitude of the main RF signal can be measured. The technique is especially suited for a system that processes signals around a single frequency, employs direct signal conversion into the digital domain, and processes subsequent steps in an FPGA. The inherent parallel signal processing in an FPGA-based implementation allows a real time stabilization of the gain. The effectiveness of the technique is derived from the fact, that the gain stabilization stamped to the main RF signal measurement branch requires only a few components in the system to be inherently stable. A test setup, along with experimental results is presented from the field of RF instrumentation for particle accelerators. Due to the availability of a phase synchronized RF reference signal in these systems, the measured phase difference between the main RF and the RF reference is also stabilized using this technique. A scheme of the signal processing is presented, where a moving average filter has been used to filter out not only the unwanted frequencies, but also to separate the main RF signal from the offset tone signal. This is achieved by a suitable choice of sampling and offset tone frequencies. The presented signal processing scheme is suitable to a variety of RF measurement applications.

  10. A VLSI field-programmable mixed-signal array to perform neural signal processing and neural modeling in a prosthetic system.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Simeon A; Hogri, Roni; Giovannucci, Andrea; Taub, Aryeh H; Herreros, Ivan; Verschure, Paul F M J; Mintz, Matti; Del Giudice, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    A very-large-scale integration field-programmable mixed-signal array specialized for neural signal processing and neural modeling has been designed. This has been fabricated as a core on a chip prototype intended for use in an implantable closed-loop prosthetic system aimed at rehabilitation of the learning of a discrete motor response. The chosen experimental context is cerebellar classical conditioning of the eye-blink response. The programmable system is based on the intimate mixing of switched capacitor analog techniques with low speed digital computation; power saving innovations within this framework are presented. The utility of the system is demonstrated by the implementation of a motor classical conditioning model applied to eye-blink conditioning in real time with associated neural signal processing. Paired conditioned and unconditioned stimuli were repeatedly presented to an anesthetized rat and recordings were taken simultaneously from two precerebellar nuclei. These paired stimuli were detected in real time from this multichannel data. This resulted in the acquisition of a trigger for a well-timed conditioned eye-blink response, and repetition of unpaired trials constructed from the same data led to the extinction of the conditioned response trigger, compatible with natural cerebellar learning in awake animals. PMID:22481832

  11. Localization of Mixed Completely and Partially Polarized Signals with Crossed-Dipole Sensor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; He, Jin; Shu, Ting; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of source localization and classification under the coexistence of both completely polarized (CP) and partially polarized (PP) electromagnetic (EM) signals, using a crossed-dipole sensor array. We propose a MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC)-based solution, which does not require multidimensional searches. Moreover, the proposed method need no estimation of the degree of polarization of signals. The efficacy of the proposed method is examined by comparing with existing methods. PMID:26694410

  12. Localization of Mixed Completely and Partially Polarized Signals with Crossed-Dipole Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; He, Jin; Shu, Ting; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of source localization and classification under the coexistence of both completely polarized (CP) and partially polarized (PP) electromagnetic (EM) signals, using a crossed-dipole sensor array. We propose a MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC)-based solution, which does not require multidimensional searches. Moreover, the proposed method need no estimation of the degree of polarization of signals. The efficacy of the proposed method is examined by comparing with existing methods. PMID:26694410

  13. Estimation of mixing parameters for cancellation of discretized eddy current signals using time and frequency domain techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, C.K.; Simaar, M.

    1985-03-01

    In this paper, we present two methods for estimating the mixing parameters used in scaling, rotating, and time shifting discrete time eddy current impedance plane trajectories in order to suppress unwanted support plate signals. One method operates directly on the time signals. The other method operates on the frequency domain representation of these signals and consequently is computationally more involved. Both methods require the minimization of a functional which measures the energy difference between the horizontal and vertical components of the high and low frequency data. Three illustrative examples are presented, and it is shown that the use of the frequency domain method is justified if the data are corrupted with random noise as well as with unknown multisample time shifts.

  14. Uncovering brain–heart information through advanced signal and image processing

    PubMed Central

    Toschi, Nicola; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Through their dynamical interplay, the brain and the heart ensure fundamental homeostasis and mediate a number of physiological functions as well as their disease-related aberrations. Although a vast number of ad hoc analytical and computational tools have been recently applied to the non-invasive characterization of brain and heart dynamic functioning, little attention has been devoted to combining information to unveil the interactions between these two physiological systems. This theme issue collects contributions from leading experts dealing with the development of advanced analytical and computational tools in the field of biomedical signal and image processing. It includes perspectives on recent advances in 7 T magnetic resonance imaging as well as electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram and cerebrovascular flow processing, with the specific aim of elucidating methods to uncover novel biological and physiological correlates of brain–heart physiology and physiopathology. PMID:27044995

  15. Uncovering brain-heart information through advanced signal and image processing.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Gaetano; Toschi, Nicola; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2016-05-13

    Through their dynamical interplay, the brain and the heart ensure fundamental homeostasis and mediate a number of physiological functions as well as their disease-related aberrations. Although a vast number of ad hoc analytical and computational tools have been recently applied to the non-invasive characterization of brain and heart dynamic functioning, little attention has been devoted to combining information to unveil the interactions between these two physiological systems. This theme issue collects contributions from leading experts dealing with the development of advanced analytical and computational tools in the field of biomedical signal and image processing. It includes perspectives on recent advances in 7 T magnetic resonance imaging as well as electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram and cerebrovascular flow processing, with the specific aim of elucidating methods to uncover novel biological and physiological correlates of brain-heart physiology and physiopathology. PMID:27044995

  16. Mixed-Income Schools and Housing: Advancing the Neoliberal Urban Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman, Pauline

    2008-01-01

    This article uses a social justice framework to problematize national and local policies in housing and education which propose to reduce poverty and improve educational performance of low-income students through mixed-income strategies. Drawing on research on Chicago, the article argues mixed-income strategies are part of the neoliberal…

  17. Advanced glycation end-products and insulin signaling in granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Papageorgiou, Efstathia; Koundouras, Dimitrios; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) may interfere with insulin intracellular signaling and glucose transport in human granulosa cells, potentially affecting ovarian function, follicular growth, linked with diminished fertility. The potential interaction of AGEs with insulin signaling pathways and glucose transport was investigated in human granulosa KGN cells. KGN cells were cultured with variable concentrations of human glycated albumin (HGA, 50-200 µg/mL) or insulin (100 ng/mL). Combined treatments of KGN cells with insulin (100 ng/mL) and HGA (200 µg/mL) were also performed. p-AKT levels and glucose transporter type 4 (Glut-4) translocation analysis were performed by Western blot. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-specific signaling was checked by using the PI3K-inhibitor, LY294002. p-AKT levels were significantly increased following insulin treatment compared to basal levels or HGA exposure. This insulin-mediated AKT-phosphorylation was PI3K-specific and it was inhibited after combined treatment of insulin and HGA. Furthermore, Glut-4 translocation from the cytoplasm to the membrane compartments of KGN cells was remarkably reduced after the combined treatment of insulin and HGA. The present findings support that AGEs interfere with insulin signaling in granulosa cells and prevent Glut-4 membrane translocation suggesting that intra ovarian AGEs accumulation, from endogenous or exogenous sources, may contribute to the pathophysiology of states characterized with anovulation and insulin resistance such as polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:25956684

  18. Novel Asymmetric Tunnel Source Transistors for Energy Efficient Circuits and Mixed Signal Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhaveri, Ritesh Atul

    Over the history of integrated circuits, a gargantuan increase in speed and performance has been achieved due to the trend of scaling. In recent years, however, many daunting challenges arise as we scale into sub-32nm regime. The building block of the MOSFET device, Silicon, is being pushed to its performance limitation. New materials and design methodologies are being investigated to extract better performance. In this study, we concentrate on two flavors of Novel Source Tunneling Transistors: the Schottky Tunnel Source FET and the Source Pocket band-to-band tunneling FET. Schottky barrier FETs have recently attracted attention as a viable alternative to conventional CMOS transistors for sub-32nm technology nodes. In this study, an asymmetric Schottky Tunnel Source SOI FET (STS-FET) has been proposed. The STS-FET has the source/drain regions replaced with metal/silicide as opposed to highly doped silicon in conventional devices. The main feature of this device is the injection of carriers through gate controlled Schottky barrier tunneling at the source. The optimized device structure shows improved performance as compared to conventional Schottky FETs. The analog performance of the STS-FET was studied and the device was found to be a superior alternative to conventional CMOS transistors. Various process modules were designed and developed. The STS-FET was then fabricated with NiSi technology and successfully demonstrated for 0.11mum gate lengths. The high immunity to short channel effects and the excellent analog performance of the device makes it an attractive candidate for continued scaling into sub 32nm node as well as mixed signal applications. Energy Efficiency is also an important concern for sub-32nm CMOS integrated circuits. Scaling of devices to below 32nm leads to an increase in active power dissipation (CVDD2.f) and off-state power (IOFF·VDD). Hence, new device innovations are being explored to address these problems. In this study, a novel source

  19. Advanced Off-Gas Control System Design For Radioactive And Mixed Waste Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg

    2005-09-01

    Treatment of radioactive and mixed wastes is often required to destroy or immobilize hazardous constituents, reduce waste volume, and convert the waste to a form suitable for final disposal. These kinds of treatments usually evolve off-gas. Air emission regulations have become increasingly stringent in recent years. Mixed waste thermal treatment in the United States is now generally regulated under the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These standards impose unprecedented requirements for operation, monitoring and control, and emissions control. Off-gas control technologies and system designs that were satisfactorily proven in mixed waste operation prior to the implementation of new regulatory standards are in some cases no longer suitable in new mixed waste treatment system designs. Some mixed waste treatment facilities have been shut down rather than have excessively restrictive feed rate limits or facility upgrades to comply with the new standards. New mixed waste treatment facilities in the U. S. are being designed to operate in compliance with the HWC MACT standards. Activities have been underway for the past 10 years at the INL and elsewhere to identify, develop, demonstrate, and design technologies for enabling HWC MACT compliance for mixed waste treatment facilities. Some specific off-gas control technologies and system designs have been identified and tested to show that even the stringent HWC MACT standards can be met, while minimizing treatment facility size and cost.

  20. Tumor Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase Signaling and Development of Metastatic Disease in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Anne Hansen; Kristensen, Annette Torgunrud; Saelen, Marie Grøn; de Wijn, Rik; Edvardsen, Hege; Jovanovic, Jovana; Abrahamsen, Torveig Weum; Dueland, Svein; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2012-01-01

    Background Recognizing EGFR as key orchestrator of the metastatic process in colorectal cancer, but also the substantial heterogeneity of responses to anti-EGFR therapy, we examined the pattern of composite tumor kinase activities governed by EGFR-mediated signaling that might be implicated in development of metastatic disease. Patients and Methods Point mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA and ERBB2 amplification were determined in primary tumors from 63 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer scheduled for radical treatment. Using peptide arrays with tyrosine kinase substrates, ex vivo phosphopeptide profiles were generated from the same baseline tumor samples and correlated to metastasis-free survival. Results Unsupervised clustering analysis of the resulting phosphorylation of 102 array substrates defined two tumor classes, both consisting of cases with and without KRAS/BRAF mutations. The smaller cluster group of patients, with tumors generating high ex vivo phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-related substrates, had a particularly aggressive disease course, with almost a half of patients developing metastatic disease within one year of follow-up. Conclusion High phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-mediated signaling activity of the primary tumor, rather than KRAS/BRAF mutation status, was identified as a hallmark of poor metastasis-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing radical treatment of the pelvic cavity. PMID:23226389

  1. A robust multi-frequency mixing algorithm for suppression of rivet signal in GMR inspection of riveted structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdernejad, Morteza S.; Karpenko, Oleksii; Ye, Chaofeng; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish

    2016-02-01

    The advent of Giant Magneto-Resistive (GMR) technology permits development of novel highly sensitive array probes for Eddy Current (EC) inspection of multi-layer riveted structures. Multi-frequency GMR measurements with different EC pene-tration depths show promise for detection of bottom layer notches at fastener sites. However, the distortion of the induced magnetic field due to flaws is dominated by the strong fastener signal, which makes defect detection and classification a challenging prob-lem. This issue is more pronounced for ferromagnetic fasteners that concentrate most of the magnetic flux. In the present work, a novel multi-frequency mixing algorithm is proposed to suppress rivet signal response and enhance defect detection capability of the GMR array probe. The algorithm is baseline-free and does not require any assumptions about the sample geometry being inspected. Fastener signal suppression is based upon the random sample consensus (RANSAC) method, which iteratively estimates parameters of a mathematical model from a set of observed data with outliers. Bottom layer defects at fastener site are simulated as EDM notches of different length. Performance of the proposed multi-frequency mixing approach is evaluated on finite element data and experimental GMR measurements obtained with unidirectional planar current excitation. Initial results are promising demonstrating the feasibility of the approach.

  2. Single event transient modeling and mitigation techniques for mixed-signal delay locked loop (DLL) and clock circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, Pierre

    The purpose of this PhD work has been to investigate, model, test, develop and provide hardening techniques and guidelines for the mitigation of single event transients (SETs) in analog mixed-signal (AMS) delay locked loops (DLLs) for radiation-hardened applications. Delay-locked-loops (DLLs) are circuit substructures that are present in complex ASIC and system-on-a-chip designs. These circuits are widely used in on-chip clock distribution systems to reduce clock skew, to reduce jitter noise, and to recover clock signals at regional points within a global clock distribution system. DLLs are critical to the performance of many clock distribution systems, and in turn, the overall performance of the associated integrated system; as such, complex systems often employ multiple DLLs for clock deskew and distribution tasks. In radiation environments such as on-orbit, these critical circuits represent at-risk points of malfunction for large sections of integrated circuits due to vulnerabilities to radiation-generated transients (i.e. single event transients) that fan out across the system. The analysis of single event effects in analog DLLs has shown that each DLL sub-circuit primitive is vulnerable to single event transients. However, we have identified the voltage controlled delay line (VCDL) sub-circuit as the most sensitive to radiation-induced single event effects generating missing clock pulses that increase with the operating frequency of the circuit. This vulnerability increases with multiple instantiation of DLLs as clock distribution nodes throughout an integrated system on a chip. To our knowledge, no complete work in the rad-hard community regarding the hardening of mixed-signal DLLs against single event effects (missing pulses) has been developed. Most of the work present in the literature applies the "brute force" and well-established digital technique of triple modular redundancy (TMR) to the digital subcomponents. We have developed two novel design

  3. Advanced Signal Processing for High Temperatures Health Monitoring of Condensed Water Height in Steam Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Takano, Nobuyuki; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2013-01-01

    An advanced signal processing methodology is being developed to monitor the height of condensed water thru the wall of a steel pipe while operating at temperatures as high as 250deg. Using existing techniques, previous study indicated that, when the water height is low or there is disturbance in the environment, the predicted water height may not be accurate. In recent years, the use of the autocorrelation and envelope techniques in the signal processing has been demonstrated to be a very useful tool for practical applications. In this paper, various signal processing techniques including the auto correlation, Hilbert transform, and the Shannon Energy Envelope methods were studied and implemented to determine the water height in the steam pipe. The results have shown that the developed method provides a good capability for monitoring the height in the regular conditions. An alternative solution for shallow water or no water conditions based on a developed hybrid method based on Hilbert transform (HT) with a high pass filter and using the optimized windowing technique is suggested. Further development of the reported methods would provide a powerful tool for the identification of the disturbances of water height inside the pipe.

  4. Cell signaling mechanisms of oro-gustatory detection of dietary fat: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Timothy A; Khan, Naim A

    2014-01-01

    CD36 and two G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), i.e., GPR120 and GPR40, have been implicated in the gustatory perception of dietary fats in rodents. These glycoproteins are coupled to increases in free intracellular Ca²⁺ concentrations, [Ca²⁺](i), during their activation by dietary long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). The transient receptor potential type M5 (TRPM5) channel, activated by [Ca²⁺](i), participates in downstream signaling in taste bud cells (TBC). The mice, knocked-out for expression of CD36, GPR120, GPR40 or TRPM5 have a reduced spontaneous preference for fat. The delayed rectifying K⁺ (DRK) channels believed to lie downstream of these receptors are also important players in fat taste transduction. The trigeminal neurons by triggering increases in [Ca²⁺](i) may influence the taste signal to afferent nerve fibers. Why are there so many taste receptor candidates for one taste modality? We discuss the recent advances on the role of CD36, GPR120, GPR40, TRPM5 and DRK channels, in signal transduction in TBC. We shed light on their cross-talk and delineate their roles in obesity as a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind their regulation could eventually lead to new strategies to fight against this condition. PMID:24269201

  5. Monitoring Fetal Heart Rate during Pregnancy: Contributions from Advanced Signal Processing and Wearable Technology

    PubMed Central

    Signorini, Maria G.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring procedures are the basis to evaluate the clinical state of patients and to assess changes in their conditions, thus providing necessary interventions in time. Both these two objectives can be achieved by integrating technological development with methodological tools, thus allowing accurate classification and extraction of useful diagnostic information. The paper is focused on monitoring procedures applied to fetal heart rate variability (FHRV) signals, collected during pregnancy, in order to assess fetal well-being. The use of linear time and frequency techniques as well as the computation of non linear indices can contribute to enhancing the diagnostic power and reliability of fetal monitoring. The paper shows how advanced signal processing approaches can contribute to developing new diagnostic and classification indices. Their usefulness is evaluated by comparing two selected populations: normal fetuses and intra uterine growth restricted (IUGR) fetuses. Results show that the computation of different indices on FHRV signals, either linear and nonlinear, gives helpful indications to describe pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular and neural system controlling the fetal heart. As a further contribution, the paper briefly describes how the introduction of wearable systems for fetal ECG recording could provide new technological solutions improving the quality and usability of prenatal monitoring. PMID:24639886

  6. Graphene-assisted nonlinear optical device for four-wave mixing based tunable wavelength conversion of QPSK signal.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, Mengqi; Wang, Andong; Zhu, Long; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    We fabricate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber pigtail cross-section coated with a single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using such graphene-assisted nonlinear optical device, we experimentally demonstrate tunable wavelength conversion of a 10 Gbaud quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) signal by exploiting degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) progress in graphene. We study the conversion efficiency as functions of the pump power and pump wavelength and evaluate the bit-error rate (BER) performance. The observed optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) penalties for tunable QPSK wavelength conversion are less than 2.2 dB at a BER of 1 × 10(-3). PMID:26480130

  7. On the physical interconnection of Seismic Electric Signals with seismicity: Recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlis, Nicholas; Skordas, Efthimios; Lazaridou, Mary; Varotsos, Panayiotis

    2013-04-01

    We review the recent advances on Seismic Electric Signals (SES) which are low frequency (˜ 1Hz) signals that precede earthquakes [1-3]. Since the 1980's Varotsos and Alexopoulos proposed [4] that SES are generated in the future focal area when the stress reaches a critical value, thus causing a cooperative orientation of the electric dipoles that anyhow exist in the focal area due to lattice imperfections in the ionic constituents of the rocks. A series of such signals within a short time are termed SES activity [5] and usually appear before major earthquakes. The combination of their physical properties enable the determination of the epicentral region and the magnitude well in advance. Natural time analysis introduced a decade ago [6, 7] may uncover novel dynamic features hidden behind time series in complex systems [8]. By employing this analysis, several advances have been made towards a better understanding of the SES properties. For example, it has been found [6, 8] that the natural time analysis of the seismicity subsequent to the initiation of a SES activity enables the determination of the occurrence time of an impending major mainshock within a time window of around one week. On this basis, predictions -including the magnitude, epicenter and time window of the expected event- have been documented well in advance for all five mainshocks with M_w×6.4 in Greece since 2001 [8, 9]. In addition, by applying natural time analysis to the time series of earthquakes, we recently found [10] that the order parameter of seismicity exhibits a unique change approximately at the date at which SES activities have been reported to initiate. This is the first time that before the occurrence of major earthquakes, anomalous changes are found to appear almost simultaneously in two different geophysical observables. 1. P. Varotsos and K. Alexopoulos, Tectonophysics 110, 73-98, 1984a. 2. P. Varotsos and K. Alexopoulos, Tectonophysics 110, 99-125, 1984b. 3. P.A. Varotsos, N

  8. Progress and Lessons Learned in Transuranic Waste Disposition at The Department of Energy's Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Mousseau; S.C. Raish; F.M. Russo

    2006-05-18

    This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and operated by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC(BBWI) It describes the results to date in meeting the 6,000-cubic-meter Idaho Settlement Agreement milestone that was due December 31, 2005. The paper further describes lessons that have been learned from the project in the area of transuranic (TRU) waste processing and waste certification. Information contained within this paper would be beneficial to others who manage TRU waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

  9. Overcoming the Pigou-Downs Paradox Using Advanced Traffic Signal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowdur, S. C.; Rughooputh, S. D. D. V.

    2013-06-01

    Expansion of a road network has often been observed to cause more congestion and has led researchers to the formulation of traffic paradoxes such as the Pigou-Downs and the Braess paradoxes. In this paper, we present an application of advanced traffic signal control (ATSC) to overcome the Pigou-Downs paradox. Port Louis, the capital city of Mauritius is used to investigate the effect of using a harbor bridge to by-pass the city center. Using traffic cellular automata (TCA) simulations it has been shown how, if traffic is only gradually deviated along the by-pass, an overall longer travel time and decreased flux would result. By making use of ATSC, which involves traffic lights that sense the number of vehicles accumulated in the queue, better travel times and fluxes are achieved.

  10. Recent Advances in Nicotinic Receptor Signaling in Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shafiqur; Engleman, Eric A; Bell, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is the most commonly abused legal substance and alcoholism is a serious public health problem. It is a leading cause of preventable death in the world. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of alcohol reward and addiction are still not well understood. Emerging evidence indicates that unlike other drugs of abuse, such as nicotine, cocaine, or opioids, alcohol targets numerous channel proteins, receptor molecules, and signaling pathways in the brain. Previously, research has identified brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), a heterogeneous family of pentameric ligand-gated cation channels expressed in the mammalian brain, as critical molecular targets for alcohol abuse and dependence. Genetic variations encoding nAChR subunits have been shown to increase the vulnerability to develop alcohol dependence. Here, we review recent insights into the rewarding effects of alcohol, as they pertain to different nAChR subtypes, associated signaling molecules, and pathways that contribute to the molecular mechanisms of alcoholism and/or comorbid brain disorders. Understanding these cellular changes and molecular underpinnings may be useful for the advancement of brain nicotinic-cholinergic mechanisms, and will lead to a better translational and therapeutic outcome for alcoholism and/or comorbid conditions. PMID:26810002

  11. Advanced engine study for mixed-mode orbit-transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Engine design, performance, weight and envelope data were established for three mixed-mode orbit-transfer vehicle engine candidates. Engine concepts evaluated are the tripropellant, dual-expander and plug cluster. Oxygen, RP-1 and hydrogen are the propellants considered for use in these engines. Theoretical performance and propellant properties were established for bipropellant and tripropellant mixes of these propellants. RP-1, hydrogen and oxygen were evaluated as coolants and the maximum attainable chamber pressures were determined for each engine concept within the constraints of the propellant properties and the low cycle thermal fatigue (300 cycles) requirement. The baseline engine design and component operating characteristics are determined at a thrust level of 88,964N (20,000 lbs) and a thrust split of 0.5. The parametric data is generated over ranges of thrust and thrust split of 66.7 to 400kN (15 to 90 klb) and 0.4 to 0.8, respectively.

  12. The Effects of Using Advance Organizers on Improving EFL Learners' Listening Comprehension: A Mixed Method Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jafari, Khadijeh; Hashim, Fatimah

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of using two types of written advance organizers, key sentences and key vocabulary, on the improvement of EFL learners' listening comprehension. 108 second year university students at the higher and lower listening proficiency levels were randomly assigned to one control group and two experimental groups. Prior…

  13. NASA 60 GHz intersatellite communication link definition study. Addendum A: Mixed baseband and IF signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    As part of a definition study for a 60 GHz intersatellite communications link system (ICLS), baseline design concepts for a channelized crosslink were identified. The crosslink would allow communications between geostationary satellites of the planned Tracking and Data Acquisition System (TDAS) and would accommodate a mixture of frequency translation coherent links (bent pipe links) and baseband-in/baseband-out links (mod/demod links). A 60 GHz communication system was developed for sizing and analyzing the crosslink. For the coherent links this system translates incoming signals directly up to the 60 GHz band; trunks the signals across from one satellite to a second satellite at 60 GHz then down converts to the proper frequency for re-transmission from the second satellite without converting to any intermediate frequencies. For the baseband-in/baseband-out links the baseband data is modulated on to the 60 GHz carrier at the transmitting satellite and demodulated at the receiving satellite. The frequency plan, equipment diagrams, and link calculations are presented along with results from sizing and reliability analyses.

  14. Integrated mixed signal control IC for 500-kHz switching frequency buck regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keng; Zhang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    The main purpose for this work is to study the challenges of designing a digital buck regulator using pipelined analog to digital converter (ADC). Although pipelined ADC can achieve high sampling speed, it will introduce additional phase lag to the buck circuit. Along with the latency brought by processing time of additional digital circuits, as well as the time delay associated with the switching frequency, the closed loop will be unstable; moreover, raw ADC outputs have low signal-to-noise ratio, which usually need back-end calibration. In order to compensate these phase lag and make control loop unconditional stable, as well as boost up signal-to-noise ratio of the ADC block with cost-efficient design, a finite impulse response filter followed by digital proportional-integral-derivative blocks were designed. All these digital function blocks were optimised with processing speed. In the system simulation, it can be found that this controller achieved output regulation within 10% of nominal 5 V output voltage under 1 A/µs load transient condition; moreover, with the soft-start method, there is no turn-on overshooting. The die size of this controller is controlled within 3 mm2 by using 180 nm CMOS technology.

  15. Alterations in Mouse Hypothalamic Adipokine Gene Expression and Leptin Signaling following Chronic Spinal Cord Injury and with Advanced Age

    PubMed Central

    Bigford, Gregory E.; Bracchi-Ricard, Valerie C.; Nash, Mark S.; Bethea, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) results in an accelerated trajectory of several cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and related aging characteristics, however the molecular mechanisms that are activated have not been explored. Adipokines and leptin signaling are known to play a critical role in neuro-endocrine regulation of energy metabolism, and are now implicated in central inflammatory processes associated with CVD. Here, we examine hypothalamic adipokine gene expression and leptin signaling in response to chronic spinal cord injury and with advanced age. We demonstrate significant changes in fasting-induced adipose factor (FIAF), resistin (Rstn), long-form leptin receptor (LepRb) and suppressor of cytokine-3 (SOCS3) gene expression following chronic SCI and with advanced age. LepRb and Jak2/stat3 signaling is significantly decreased and the leptin signaling inhibitor SOCS3 is significantly elevated with chronic SCI and advanced age. In addition, we investigate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the uncoupled protein response (UPR) as a biological hallmark of leptin resistance. We observe the activation of the ER stress/UPR proteins IRE1, PERK, and eIF2alpha, demonstrating leptin resistance in chronic SCI and with advanced age. These findings provide evidence for adipokine-mediated inflammatory responses and leptin resistance as contributing to neuro-endocrine dysfunction and CVD risk following SCI and with advanced age. Understanding the underlying mechanisms contributing to SCI and age related CVD may provide insight that will help direct specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:22815920

  16. Receptor for advanced glycation end products inhibits proliferation in osteoblast through suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guofeng; Xu, Jingren; Li, Zengchun

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression suppresses cell proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases ERK and PI3K signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes PI3K signaling restored by RAGE blockade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes ERK signaling restored by RAGE blockade. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a crucial role in bone metabolism. However, the role of RAGE in the control of osteoblast proliferation is not yet evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrate that RAGE overexpression inhibits osteoblast proliferation in vitro. The negative regulation of RAGE on cell proliferation results from suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, and is restored by RAGE neutralizing antibody. Prevention of Wnt signaling using Sfrp1 or DKK1 rescues RAGE-decreased PI3K and ERK signaling and cell proliferation, indicating that the altered cell growth in RAGE overexpressing cells is in part secondary to alterations in Wnt signaling. Consistently, RAGE overexpression inhibits the expression of Wnt targets cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is partially reversed by RAGE blockade. Overall, these results suggest that RAGE inhibits osteoblast proliferation via suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, which provides novel mechanisms by which RAGE regulates osteoblast growth.

  17. Advanced Glycation End Products Acutely Impair Ca2+ Signaling in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Nadim; Januszewski, Andrzej S.; Brown, Bronwyn E.; Jenkins, Alicia J.; Hill, Michael A.; Murphy, Timothy V.

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins in diabetes, including formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are believed to contribute to vascular dysfunction and disease. Impaired function of the endothelium is an early indicator of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and as many endothelial cell processes are dependent upon intracellular [Ca2+] and Ca2+ signaling, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of AGEs on Ca2+ signaling in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Ca2+ signaling was studied using the fluorescent indicator dye Fura-2-AM. AGEs were generated by incubating bovine serum albumin with 0–250 mM glucose or glucose-6-phosphate for 0–120 days at 37°C. Under all conditions, the main AGE species generated was carboxymethyl lysine (CML) as assayed using both gas-liquid chromatograph-mass spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography. In Ca2+-replete solution, exposure of BAEC to AGEs for 5 min caused an elevation in basal [Ca2+] and attenuated the increase in intracellular [Ca2+] caused by ATP (100 μM). In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, exposure of BAEC to AGEs for 5 min caused an elevation in basal [Ca2+] and attenuated subsequent intracellular Ca2+ release caused by ATP, thapsigargin (0.1 μM), and ionomycin (3 μM), but AGEs did not affect extracellular Ca2+ entry induced by the re-addition of Ca2+ to the bathing solution in the presence of any of these agents. The anti-oxidant α-lipoic acid (2 μM) and NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors apocynin (500 μM) and diphenyleneiodonium (1 μM) abolished these effects of AGEs on BAECs, as did the IP3 receptor antagonist xestospongin C (1 μM). In summary, AGEs caused an acute depletion of Ca2+ from the intracellular store in BAECs, such that the Ca2+ signal stimulated by the subsequent application other agents acting upon this store is reduced. The mechanism may involve generation of reactive oxygen species from NAD(P)H oxidase and possible

  18. Estrogen action on the prostate gland: a critical mix of endocrine and paracrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Risbridger, Gail P; Ellem, Stuart J; McPherson, Stephen J

    2007-09-01

    Although modern biotechnology has provided us with a greater understanding of the molecular events in endocrine-related diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer, these conditions continue to be a significant healthcare problem world-wide. As the number of men afflicted by these diseases will only continue to grow with the aging population, finding new strategies and new therapeutic options for the treatment of both of these diseases is crucial. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of hormone action is pivotal to making progress in the development of new hormone-based therapies. This is fundamental to increasing our understanding of the endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine signaling mechanisms in the prostate and in prostate disease, distinguishing the effects and role of each, and identifying where and how this communication goes wrong. PMID:17766643

  19. Revisiting advance decision making under the Mental Capacity Act 2005: a tale of mixed messages.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Whilst most of the existing literature relating to advance decisions has focused on philosophical questions, this article reflects on the significant legal developments that have occurred since the introduction of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. The article provides a critique of the controversial issues which have emerged within contemporary case law. The focus of the discussion centres on capacity, the interpretation of the safeguards, and the bias towards preservation of life. PMID:25016383

  20. Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) exhibits frequent mutations in DNMT3A and activated signaling genes.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Olive S; Wang, Linghua; Punia, Jyotinder N; Kornblau, Steven M; Andreeff, Michael; Wheeler, David A; Goodell, Margaret A; Rau, Rachel E

    2016-08-01

    Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a heterogeneous group of poor-prognosis leukemias with immunophenotypic features of at least two cell lineages. The full spectrum of genetic mutations in this rare disease has not been elucidated, limiting our understanding of disease pathogenesis and our ability to devise targeted therapeutic strategies. Here, we sought to define the mutational landscape of MPAL by performing whole-exome sequencing on samples from 23 adult and pediatric MPAL patients. We identified frequent mutations of epigenetic modifiers, most notably mutations of DNMT3A, in 33% of adult MPAL patients. Mutations of activated signaling pathways, tumor suppressors, and transcription factors were also frequent. Importantly, many of the identified mutations are potentially therapeutically targetable, with agents currently available or in various stages of clinical development. Therefore, the mutational spectrum that we have identified provides potential biological insights and is likely to have clinical relevance for patients with this poor-prognosis disease. PMID:27208809

  1. A 128-ch Δ-Σ ADC based mixed signal IC for full digital beamforming Wireless handheld Ultrasound imaging system.

    PubMed

    Chirala, Mohan K; Phuong Huynh; Jaeyoung Ryu; Young-Hwan Kim

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports a massively integrated Δ-Σ ADC based mixed signal chipset for a handheld Wireless Ultrasound imaging system. The IC has been fabricated in a standard 0.13 μm 1.5V 7M2F CMOS process with 128 parallel channels containing Delta-Sigma (Δ-Σ) ADCs, Anti-aliasing filter, Decimation filters, Serializers and LVDS drivers. The entire chip is SPI controlled and allows group-level power control through an FPGA. The IC measures 15 × 15 mm and dissipates around ~ 4.6 W of power, with 12-bit resolution at 20 Msps sample rate. The chip was packaged in a thermally stable BGA package and demonstrated in a handheld ultrasound battery operated system with complete digital beamforming. PMID:26736516

  2. Computation of wake/exhaust mixing downstream of advanced transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Teske, Milton E.; Bilanin, Alan J.

    1993-01-01

    The mixing of engine exhaust with the vortical wake of high speed aircraft operating in the stratosphere can play an important role in the formation of chemical products that deplete atmospheric ozone. An accurate analysis of this type of interaction is therefore necessary as a part of the assessment of the impact of proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) designs on atmospheric chemistry. This paper describes modifications to the parabolic Navier-Stokes flow field analysis in the UNIWAKE unified aircraft wake model to accommodate the computation of wake/exhaust mixing and the simulation of reacting flow. The present implementation uses a passive chemistry model in which the reacting species are convected and diffused by the fluid dynamic solution but in which the evolution of the species does not affect the flow field. The resulting analysis, UNIWAKE/PCHEM (Passive CHEMistry) has been applied to the analysis of wake/exhaust flows downstream of representative HSCT configurations. The major elements of the flow field model are described, as are the results of sample calculations illustrating the behavior of the thermal exhaust plume and the production of species important to the modeling of condensation in the wake. Appropriate steps for further development of the UNIWAKE/PCHEM model are also outlined.

  3. Digital processing of signals arising from organic liquid scintillators for applications in the mixed-field assessment of nuclear threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspinall, M. D.; Joyce, M. J.; Mackin, R. O.; Jarrah, Z.; Peyton, A. J.

    2008-10-01

    The nuclear aspect of the CBRN* threat is often divided amongst radiological substances posing no criticality risk, often referred to as 'dirty bomb' scenarios, and fissile threats. The latter have the theoretical potential for criticality excursion, resulting in elevated neutron fluxes in addition to the γ-ray component that is common to dirty bombs. Even in isolation of the highly-unlikely criticality scenario, fissile substances often exhibit radiation fields comprising a significant neutron component which can require considerably different counterterrorism measures and clean-up methodologies. The contrast between these threats can indicate important differences in the relative sophistication of the perpetrators and their organizations. Consequently, the detection and discrimination of nuclear perils in terms of mixed-field content is an important assay in combating terrorist threats. In this paper we report on the design and implementation of a fast digitizer and embedded-processor for onthe- fly signal processing of events from organic liquid scintillators. A digital technique, known as Pulse Gradient Analysis (PGA), has been developed at Lancaster University for the digital discrimination of neutrons and γ rays. PGA has been deployed on bespoke hardware and demonstrates remarkable improvement over analogue methods for the assay of mixed fields and the real-time discrimination of neutrons and γ rays. In this regard the technology constitutes an attractive and affordable means for the discrimination of the radiation fields arising from fissile threats and those from dirty bombs. Data are presented demonstrating this capability with sealed radioactive sources.

  4. Advances in peptidic and peptidomimetic-based approaches to inhibit STAT signaling in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Szelag, Malgorzata; Wesoly, Joanna; Bluyssen, Hans A R

    2016-01-01

    STATs promote fundamental cellular processes, marking them as convergence points of many oncogenic and inflammatory pathways. Therefore, aberrant activation of STAT signaling is implicated in a plethora of human diseases, like cancer, inflammation and auto-immunity. Identification of STAT-specific inhibitors is the topic of great practical importance, and various inhibitory strategies are being pursued. An interesting approach includes peptides and peptide-like biopolymers, because they allow the manipulation of STAT signaling without the transfer of genetic material. Phosphopeptides and peptidomimetics directly target STATs by inhibiting dimerization. Despite that a large number of efficient peptide- based STAT3-specific inhibitors have been reported to date, none of them was able to meet the pharmacological requirements to serve as a potent anti-cancer drug. The existing limitations, like metabolic instability and poor cell permeability during in vivo tests, excluded these macromolecules from further clinical development. To overcome these liabilities, in the last five years many advances have been made to develop next generation STAT-specific inhibitors. Here we discuss the pitfalls of current STAT inhibitory strategies and review the progress on the development of peptide-like prodrugs directly targeting STATs. Novel strategies involve screening of high-complexity libraries of random peptides, as specific STAT3 or STAT5 DNA-binding inhibitors, to construct cell permeable peptide aptamers and aptides for cancer therapy. Another new direction is synthesis of negative dominant α-helical mimetics of the STAT3 N-domain, preventing oligomerization on DNA. Moreover, construction of phosphopeptide conjugates with molecules mediating cellular uptake offers new therapeutic possibilities in treatment of cancer, asthma and allergy. PMID:26521960

  5. Surprisingly extensive mixed phylogenetic and ecological signals among bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units

    PubMed Central

    Koeppel, Alexander F.; Wu, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The lack of a consensus bacterial species concept greatly hampers our ability to understand and organize bacterial diversity. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs), which are clustered on the basis of DNA sequence identity alone, are the most commonly used microbial diversity unit. Although it is understood that OTUs can be phylogenetically incoherent, the degree and the extent of the phylogenetic inconsistency have not been explicitly studied. Here, we tested the phylogenetic signal of OTUs in a broad range of bacterial genera from various phyla. Strikingly, we found that very few OTUs were monophyletic, and many showed evidence of multiple independent origins. Using previously established bacterial habitats as benchmarks, we showed that OTUs frequently spanned multiple ecological habitats. We demonstrated that ecological heterogeneity within OTUs is caused by their phylogenetic inconsistency, and not merely due to ‘lumping’ of taxa resulting from using relaxed identity cut-offs. We argue that ecotypes, as described by the Stable Ecotype Model, are phylogenetically and ecologically more consistent than OTUs and therefore could serve as an alternative unit for bacterial diversity studies. In addition, we introduce QuickES, a new wrapper program for the Ecotype Simulation algorithm, which is capable of demarcating ecotypes in data sets with tens of thousands of sequences. PMID:23571758

  6. Characterization and compensation of network-level anomalies in mixed-signal neuromorphic modeling platforms.

    PubMed

    Petrovici, Mihai A; Vogginger, Bernhard; Müller, Paul; Breitwieser, Oliver; Lundqvist, Mikael; Muller, Lyle; Ehrlich, Matthias; Destexhe, Alain; Lansner, Anders; Schüffny, René; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2014-01-01

    Advancing the size and complexity of neural network models leads to an ever increasing demand for computational resources for their simulation. Neuromorphic devices offer a number of advantages over conventional computing architectures, such as high emulation speed or low power consumption, but this usually comes at the price of reduced configurability and precision. In this article, we investigate the consequences of several such factors that are common to neuromorphic devices, more specifically limited hardware resources, limited parameter configurability and parameter variations due to fixed-pattern noise and trial-to-trial variability. Our final aim is to provide an array of methods for coping with such inevitable distortion mechanisms. As a platform for testing our proposed strategies, we use an executable system specification (ESS) of the BrainScaleS neuromorphic system, which has been designed as a universal emulation back-end for neuroscientific modeling. We address the most essential limitations of this device in detail and study their effects on three prototypical benchmark network models within a well-defined, systematic workflow. For each network model, we start by defining quantifiable functionality measures by which we then assess the effects of typical hardware-specific distortion mechanisms, both in idealized software simulations and on the ESS. For those effects that cause unacceptable deviations from the original network dynamics, we suggest generic compensation mechanisms and demonstrate their effectiveness. Both the suggested workflow and the investigated compensation mechanisms are largely back-end independent and do not require additional hardware configurability beyond the one required to emulate the benchmark networks in the first place. We hereby provide a generic methodological environment for configurable neuromorphic devices that are targeted at emulating large-scale, functional neural networks. PMID:25303102

  7. Characterization and Compensation of Network-Level Anomalies in Mixed-Signal Neuromorphic Modeling Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Petrovici, Mihai A.; Vogginger, Bernhard; Müller, Paul; Breitwieser, Oliver; Lundqvist, Mikael; Muller, Lyle; Ehrlich, Matthias; Destexhe, Alain; Lansner, Anders; Schüffny, René; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2014-01-01

    Advancing the size and complexity of neural network models leads to an ever increasing demand for computational resources for their simulation. Neuromorphic devices offer a number of advantages over conventional computing architectures, such as high emulation speed or low power consumption, but this usually comes at the price of reduced configurability and precision. In this article, we investigate the consequences of several such factors that are common to neuromorphic devices, more specifically limited hardware resources, limited parameter configurability and parameter variations due to fixed-pattern noise and trial-to-trial variability. Our final aim is to provide an array of methods for coping with such inevitable distortion mechanisms. As a platform for testing our proposed strategies, we use an executable system specification (ESS) of the BrainScaleS neuromorphic system, which has been designed as a universal emulation back-end for neuroscientific modeling. We address the most essential limitations of this device in detail and study their effects on three prototypical benchmark network models within a well-defined, systematic workflow. For each network model, we start by defining quantifiable functionality measures by which we then assess the effects of typical hardware-specific distortion mechanisms, both in idealized software simulations and on the ESS. For those effects that cause unacceptable deviations from the original network dynamics, we suggest generic compensation mechanisms and demonstrate their effectiveness. Both the suggested workflow and the investigated compensation mechanisms are largely back-end independent and do not require additional hardware configurability beyond the one required to emulate the benchmark networks in the first place. We hereby provide a generic methodological environment for configurable neuromorphic devices that are targeted at emulating large-scale, functional neural networks. PMID:25303102

  8. Advanced high pressure engine study for mixed-mode vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luscher, W. P.; Mellish, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    High pressure liquid rocket engine design, performance, weight, envelope, and operational characteristics were evaluated for a variety of candidate engines for use in mixed-mode, single-stage-to-orbit applications. Propellant property and performance data were obtained for candidate Mode 1 fuels which included: RP-1, RJ-5, hydrazine, monomethyl-hydrazine, and methane. The common oxidizer was liquid oxygen. Oxygen, the candidate Mode 1 fuels, and hydrogen were evaluated as thrust chamber coolants. Oxygen, methane, and hydrogen were found to be the most viable cooling candidates. Water, lithium, and sodium-potassium were also evaluated as auxiliary coolant systems. Water proved to be the best of these, but the system was heavier than those systems which cooled with the engine propellants. Engine weight and envelope parametric data were established for candidate Mode 1, Mode 2, and dual-fuel engines. Delivered engine performance data were also calculated for all candidate Mode 1 and dual-fuel engines.

  9. Mixed oxide fuels testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Chang, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    An intense worldwide effort is now under way to find means of reducing the stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium. One of the most attractive solutions would be to use WGPu as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PUO{sub 2}) mixed with urania (UO{sub 2}). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification, (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania, (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition, (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight, (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu, (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu, (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure, (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity, (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products, (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies, and (11) Fuel performance code validation. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified.

  10. Problematic Internet Users Show Impaired Inhibitory Control and Risk Taking with Losses: Evidence from Stop Signal and Mixed Gambles Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Nan, Weizhi; Taxer, Jamie; Dai, Weine; Zheng, Ya; Liu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    According to the balance model of self-regulation, dysfunction of the inhibitory control and reward processing might be a behavioral marker for addiction and problematic behaviors. Although several studies have separately examined the inhibitory control or reward processing of individuals exhibiting problematic Internet use (PIU), no study has explored these two functions simultaneously to examine the potential imbalance of these functions. This study aimed to investigate whether the self-regulatory failure of PIU individuals results from deficits in both inhibitory control [indexed with the stop signal reaction time (SSRT) in a stop signal task] and risk taking with losses (measured as the acceptance rates of risky gables or the ratio of win/loss in a mixed gambles task). The results revealed that PIU individuals, compared with controls, showed decreased SSRT and increased error rates as well as reduced risk taking with losses. Correlational analyses revealed a significant positive relationship between the SSRT and risk taking with losses. These findings suggest that both the inhibitory control and reward functions are impaired in PIU individuals and reveal an association between these two systems. These results strengthen the balance model of self-regulation theory’s argument that deficits in inhibitory control and risk taking with losses may assist in identifying risk markers for early diagnosis, progression, and prediction of PIU. PMID:27014170

  11. Problematic Internet Users Show Impaired Inhibitory Control and Risk Taking with Losses: Evidence from Stop Signal and Mixed Gambles Tasks.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Nan, Weizhi; Taxer, Jamie; Dai, Weine; Zheng, Ya; Liu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    According to the balance model of self-regulation, dysfunction of the inhibitory control and reward processing might be a behavioral marker for addiction and problematic behaviors. Although several studies have separately examined the inhibitory control or reward processing of individuals exhibiting problematic Internet use (PIU), no study has explored these two functions simultaneously to examine the potential imbalance of these functions. This study aimed to investigate whether the self-regulatory failure of PIU individuals results from deficits in both inhibitory control [indexed with the stop signal reaction time (SSRT) in a stop signal task] and risk taking with losses (measured as the acceptance rates of risky gables or the ratio of win/loss in a mixed gambles task). The results revealed that PIU individuals, compared with controls, showed decreased SSRT and increased error rates as well as reduced risk taking with losses. Correlational analyses revealed a significant positive relationship between the SSRT and risk taking with losses. These findings suggest that both the inhibitory control and reward functions are impaired in PIU individuals and reveal an association between these two systems. These results strengthen the balance model of self-regulation theory's argument that deficits in inhibitory control and risk taking with losses may assist in identifying risk markers for early diagnosis, progression, and prediction of PIU. PMID:27014170

  12. Phase discrimination and simultaneous frequency conversion of the orthogonal components of an optical signal by four-wave mixing in an SOA.

    PubMed

    Webb, R P; Dailey, J M; Manning, R J; Ellis, A D

    2011-10-10

    Simultaneous conversion of the two orthogonal phase components of an optical input to different output frequencies has been demonstrated by simulation and experiment. A single stage of four-wave mixing between the input signal and four pumps derived from a frequency comb was employed. The nonlinear device was a semiconductor optical amplifier, which provided overall signal gain and sufficient contrast for phase sensitive signal processing. The decomposition of a quadrature phase-shift keyed signal into a pair of binary phase-shift keyed outputs at different frequencies was also demonstrated by simulation. PMID:21997012

  13. Feed array metrology and correction layer for large antenna systems in ASIC mixed signal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centureli, F.; Scotti, G.; Tommasino, P.; Trifiletti, A.; Romano, F.; Cimmino, R.; Saitto, A.

    2014-08-01

    The paper deals with a possible use of the feed array present in a large antenna system, as a layer for measuring the antenna performance with a self-test procedure and a possible way to correct residual errors of the Antenna geometry and of the antenna distortions. Focus has been concentrated on a few key critical elements of a possible feed array metrology program. In particular, a preliminary contribution to the design and development of the feed array from one side, and the subsystem dedicated to antenna distortion monitoring and control from the other, have been chosen as the first areas of investigation. Scalability and flexibility principles and synergic approach with other coexistent technologies have been assumed of paramount importance to ensure ease of integrated operation and therefore allowing in principle increased performance and efficiency. The concept is based on the use of an existing feed array grid to measure antenna distortion with respect to the nominal configuration. Measured data are then processed to develop a multilayer strategy to control the mechanical movable devices (when existing) and to adjust the residual fine errors through a software controlled phase adjustment of the existing phase shifter The signal from the feed array is converted passing through a FPGA/ASIC level to digital data channels. The kind of those typically used for the scientific experiments. One additional channel is used for monitoring the antenna distortion status. These data are processed to define the best correction strategy, based on a software managed control system capable of operating at three different levels of the antenna system: reflector rotation layer, sub reflector rotation and translation layer (assuming the possibility of controlling a Stewart machine), phase shifter of the phased array layer. The project is at present in the design phase, a few elements necessary for a sound software design of the control subsystem have been developed at a

  14. Processing of solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for advanced space nuclear power and propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Travis Warren

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and space nuclear power are two enabling technologies for the manned exploration of space and the development of research outposts in space and on other planets such as Mars. Advanced carbide nuclear fuels have been proposed for application in space nuclear power and propulsion systems. This study examined the processing technologies and optimal parameters necessary to fabricate samples of single phase, solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides. In particular, the pseudo-ternary carbide, UC-ZrC-NbC, system was examined with uranium metal mole fractions of 5% and 10% and corresponding uranium densities of 0.8 to 1.8 gU/cc. Efforts were directed to those methods that could produce simple geometry fuel elements or wafers such as those used to fabricate a Square Lattice Honeycomb (SLHC) fuel element and reactor core. Methods of cold uniaxial pressing, sintering by induction heating, and hot pressing by self-resistance heating were investigated. Solid solution, high density (low porosity) samples greater than 95% TD were processed by cold pressing at 150 MPa and sintering above 2600 K for times longer than 90 min. Some impurity oxide phases were noted in some samples attributed to residual gases in the furnace during processing. Also, some samples noted secondary phases of carbon and UC2 due to some hyperstoichiometric powder mixtures having carbon-to-metal ratios greater than one. In all, 33 mixed carbide samples were processed and analyzed with half bearing uranium as ternary carbides of UC-ZrC-NbC. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and density measurements were used to characterize samples. Samples were processed from powders of the refractory mono-carbides and UC/UC 2 or from powders of uranium hydride (UH3), graphite, and refractory metal carbides to produce hypostoichiometric mixed carbides. Samples processed from the constituent carbide powders and sintered at temperatures above the melting point of UC

  15. Sending Mixed Signals: The Expanding Role of Molecular Cascade Mutations in Malformations of Cortical Development and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Iffland, Philip H.; Crino, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in gene sequencing techniques have led to a dramatic increase in the number of signaling cascade and cytoskeletal assembly mutations associated with malformations of cortical development and epilepsy. At the forefront of this research are novel mutations found in regulators of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR cascade and tubulin-associated malformations of cortical development. However, there is limited understanding of the consequences of these newly discovered germline and somatic mutations on cellular function or how these changes in cell biology may lead to areas—large or small—of malformed cortex and recurrent spontaneous seizures. We summarize and discuss what is currently known in this field in an effort to shine light on vast gaps in our knowledge of relatively common causes of cortical malformations. PMID:27330441

  16. Vaporization and Zonal Mixing in Performance Modeling of Advanced LOX-Methane Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George J., Jr.; Stiegemeier, Benjamin R.

    2013-01-01

    Initial modeling of LOX-Methane reaction control (RCE) 100 lbf thrusters and larger, 5500 lbf thrusters with the TDK/VIPER code has shown good agreement with sea-level and altitude test data. However, the vaporization and zonal mixing upstream of the compressible flow stage of the models leveraged empirical trends to match the sea-level data. This was necessary in part because the codes are designed primarily to handle the compressible part of the flow (i.e. contraction through expansion) and in part because there was limited data on the thrusters themselves on which to base a rigorous model. A more rigorous model has been developed which includes detailed vaporization trends based on element type and geometry, radial variations in mixture ratio within each of the "zones" associated with elements and not just between zones of different element types, and, to the extent possible, updated kinetic rates. The Spray Combustion Analysis Program (SCAP) was leveraged to support assumptions in the vaporization trends. Data of both thrusters is revisited and the model maintains a good predictive capability while addressing some of the major limitations of the previous version.

  17. Recent Advances in Development and Applications of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Babikov, Dmitri; Semenov, Alexander

    2016-01-28

    A mixed quantum/classical approach to inelastic scattering (MQCT) is developed in which the relative motion of two collision partners is treated classically, and the rotational and vibrational motion of each molecule is treated quantum mechanically. The cases of molecule + atom and molecule + molecule are considered including diatomics, symmetric-top rotors, and asymmetric-top rotor molecules. Phase information is taken into consideration, permitting calculations of elastic and inelastic, total and differential cross sections for excitation and quenching. The method is numerically efficient and intrinsically parallel. The scaling law of MQCT is favorable, which enables calculations at high collision energies and for complicated molecules. Benchmark studies are carried out for several quite different molecular systems (N2 + Na, H2 + He, CO + He, CH3 + He, H2O + He, HCOOCH3 + He, and H2 + N2) in a broad range of collision energies, which demonstrates that MQCT is a viable approach to inelastic scattering. At higher collision energies it can confidently replace the computationally expensive full-quantum calculations. At low collision energies and for low-mass systems results of MQCT are less accurate but are still reasonable. A proposal is made for blending MQCT calculations at higher energies with full-quantum calculations at low energies. PMID:26618533

  18. Advances in Using Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing to Identify the Mixing of Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Rosenberry, D. O.; Harvey, J. W.; Lane, J. W., Jr.; Hare, D. K.; Boutt, D. F.; Voytek, E. B.; Buckley, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) provides thermal data through space and time along linear cables. When installed along a streambed, FO-DTS can capture the influence of upwelling groundwater (GW) as thermal anomalies. The planning of labor-intensive physical measurements can make use of FO-DTS data to target areas of focused GW discharge that can disproportionately affect surface-water (SW) quality and temperature. Typical longitudinal FO-DTS spatial resolution ranges 0.25 to1.0 m, and cannot resolve small-scale water-column mixing or sub-surface diurnal fluctuations. However, configurations where the cable is wrapped around rods can improve the effective vertical resolution to sub-centimeter scales, and the pipes can be actively heated to induce a thermal tracer. Longitudinal streambed and high-resolution vertical arrays were deployed at the upper Delaware River (PA, USA) and the Quashnet River (MA, USA) for aquatic habitat studies. The resultant datasets exemplify the varied uses of FO-DTS. Cold anomalies found along the Delaware River steambed coincide with zones of known mussel populations, and high-resolution vertical array data showed relatively stable in-channel thermal refugia. Cold anomalies at the Quashnet River identified in 2013 were found to persist in 2014, and seepage measurements and water samples at these locations showed high GW flux with distinctive chemistry. Cable location is paramount to seepage identification, particularly in faster flowing deep streams such as the Quashnet and Delaware Rivers where steambed FO-DTS identified many seepage zones with no surface expression. The temporal characterization of seepage dynamics are unique to FO-DTS. However, data from Tidmarsh Farms, a cranberry bog restoration site in MA, USA indicate that in slower flowing shallow steams GW inflow affects surface temperature; therefore infrared imaging can provide seepage location information similar to FO-DTS with substantially less effort.

  19. Statistically Optimal Approximations of Astronomical Signals: Implications to Classification and Advanced Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Chinarova, L. L.; Kudashkina, L. S.; Marsakova, V. I.; Tkachenko, M. G.

    2016-06-01

    We have elaborated a set of new algorithms and programs for advanced time series analysis of (generally) multi-component multi-channel observations with irregularly spaced times of observations, which is a common case for large photometric surveys. Previous self-review on these methods for periodogram, scalegram, wavelet, autocorrelation analysis as well as on "running" or "sub-interval" local approximations were self-reviewed in (2003ASPC..292..391A). For an approximation of the phase light curves of nearly-periodic pulsating stars, we use a Trigonometric Polynomial (TP) fit of the statistically optimal degree and initial period improvement using differential corrections (1994OAP.....7...49A). For the determination of parameters of "characteristic points" (minima, maxima, crossings of some constant value etc.) we use a set of methods self-reviewed in 2005ASPC..335...37A, Results of the analysis of the catalogs compiled using these programs are presented in 2014AASP....4....3A. For more complicated signals, we use "phenomenological approximations" with "special shapes" based on functions defined on sub-intervals rather on the complete interval. E. g. for the Algol-type stars we developed the NAV ("New Algol Variable") algorithm (2012Ap.....55..536A, 2012arXiv1212.6707A, 2015JASS...32..127A), which was compared to common methods of Trigonometric Polynomial Fit (TP) or local Algebraic Polynomial (A) fit of a fixed or (alternately) statistically optimal degree. The method allows determine the minimal set of parameters required for the "General Catalogue of Variable Stars", as well as an extended set of phenomenological and astrophysical parameters which may be used for the classification. Totally more that 1900 variable stars were studied in our group using these methods in a frame of the "Inter-Longitude Astronomy" campaign (2010OAP....23....8A) and the "Ukrainian Virtual Observatory" project (2012KPCB...28...85V).

  20. Advanced stratospheric data processing of radio occultation with a variational combination for multifrequency GNSS signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Tae-Kwon; Kuo, Ying-Hwa

    2014-10-01

    As the understanding of our Earth system grows, the importance of comprehending the structure and processes in the remote stratosphere is intensified and the interest in stratospheric observations mushrooms. Despite its great potential, radio occultation (RO) data have been underused in exploiting the stratosphere. A major reason for the underutilization is the imperfections in preexisting RO data processing methods. We propose an advanced stratospheric RO data processing, where the variational method provides a general framework in which multiple-frequency RO measurements of different quality are effectively combined with the aid of a priori. The variational combination (VAR) is designed to extract the most information from RO measurements, where a priori plays a role of enhancing the observation and attenuating measurement noise. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is found to be a universal quality indicator, which concisely describes the uncertainty of RO measurements in diverse conditions. The measured SNR is used to parameterize a dynamic observation error, which is essential for the VAR to use the observation optimally. Tests with real data show that VAR significantly improves the accuracy of the RO retrieval even in the upper stratosphere, where the RO data were once considered to possess little observational value. When compared with independent radiosonde observations, for instance, the VAR-produced data are more accurate than the analysis from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts for which the radiosonde data have been assimilated. The VAR-produced data are also precise enough to reveal the systematic error of the radiosonde data.

  1. Nature of Catalytic Active Sites Present on the Surface of Advanced Bulk Tantalum Mixed Oxide Photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Phivilay, Somphonh; Puretzky, Alexander A; Domen, Kazunari Domen; Wachs, Israel

    2013-01-01

    The most active photocatalyst system for water splitting under UV irradiation (270 nm) is the promoted 0.2%NiO/NaTaO3:2%La photocatalyst with optimized photonic efficiency (P.E.) of 56%, but fundamental issues about the nature of the surface catalytic active sites and their involvement in the photocatalytic process still need to be clarified. This is the first study to apply cutting edge surface spectroscopic analyses to determine the surface nature of tantalum mixed oxide photocatalysts. Surface analysis with HR-XPS (1-3nm) and HS-LEIS (0.3nm) spectroscopy indicates that the NiO and La2O3 promoters are concentrated in the surface region of the bulk NaTaO3 phase. The La2O3 is concentrated on the NaTaO3 outermost surface layers while NiO is distributed throughout the NaTaO3 surface region (1-3nm). Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy revealed that the bulk molecular and electronic structures, respectively, of NaTaO3 were not modified by the addition of the La2O3 and NiO promoters, with La2O3 resulting in a slightly more ordered structure. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy reveals that the addition of La2O3 and NiO produces a greater number of electron traps resulting in the suppression of the recombination of excited electrons/holes. In contrast to earlier reports, the La2O3 is only a textural promoter (increasing the BET surface area ~7x by stabilizing smaller NaTaO3 particles), but causes a ~3x decrease in the specific photocatalytic TORs ( mol H2/m2/h) rate because surface La2O3 blocks exposed catalytic active NaTaO3 sites. The NiO promoter was found to be a potent electronic promoter that enhances the NaTaO3 surface normalized TORs by a factor of ~10-50 and TOF by a factor of ~10. The level of NiO promotion is the same in the absence and presence of La2O3 demonstrating that there is no promotional synergistic interaction between the NiO and La2O3 promoters. This study demonstrates the important contributions of the photocatalyst surface properties to the fundamental

  2. Phase I study of a new cancer vaccine of ten mixed peptides for advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Satoru; Yamada, Yasuhide; Heike, Yuji; Shoji, Hirokazu; Honma, Yoshitaka; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Matsueda, Satoko; Yamada, Akira; Morita, Michi; Yamaguchi, Rin; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Shichijo, Shigeki; Sasada, Tetsuro; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-05-01

    A phase I study of a new cancer vaccine (KRM-10), consisting of a mixture of 10 different short peptides, was conducted for patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancers. Primary or secondary endpoints included the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), or safety and immune responses, respectively. Peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), together with soluble inflammatory factors, were measured before and after vaccination. Twenty-one patients were vaccinated with KRM-10 at dose levels of 10 (n = 6), 20 (n = 8) or 30 mg (n = 7) of peptides every week for 6 weeks. No DLT were observed in the dose range evaluated. Common treatment-related adverse events were a grade 1 injection site reaction in 15 patients, and fever in three patients (grade 1 in two patients and grade 2 in one patient). CTL activity to at least one peptide at the time of the third and sixth vaccination increased in 2 and 3 of 6 (10 mg), 2 of 8 and 4 of 6 (20 mg), or 2 and 1 of 6 (30 mg) patients, respectively. IgG levels, at the third and sixth vaccination, were also increased in 1 and 1 of 6 (10 mg), 2 of 8 and 4 of 6 (20 mg), or 1 and 3 of 6 (30 mg) patients, respectively. The KRM-10 vaccine consisting of 20 mg of peptides was determined as the optimal dose for a coming phase II trial because of its safety, and also for demonstrating the most potent activity for augmenting the immune response of the three doses tested. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000008820. PMID:26920496

  3. Opportunities for mixed oxide fuel testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, W.K.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification; (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania; (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition; (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight; (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu; (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu; (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure; (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity; (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products; (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies; and (11) Fuel performance code validation. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory possesses many advantages for performing tests to resolve most of the issues identified above. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified. The facilities at Argonne National Laboratory-West can meet all potential needs for pre- and post-irradiation examination that might arise in a MOX fuel qualification program.

  4. Single event effect characterization of the mixed-signal ASIC developed for CCD camera in space use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Mari; Mori, Hideki; Kan, Hiroaki; Ueda, Shutaro; Kosugi, Hiroko; Anabuki, Naohisa; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Doty, John P.; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Kitamura, Hisashi; Uchihori, Yukio

    2013-12-01

    We present the single event effect (SEE) tolerance of a mixed-signal application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) developed for a charge-coupled device camera onboard a future X-ray astronomical mission. We adopted proton and heavy ion beams at HIMAC/NIRS in Japan. The particles with high linear energy transfer (LET) of 57.9 MeV cm2/mg is used to measure the single event latch-up (SEL) tolerance, which results in a sufficiently low cross-section of σSEL<4.2×10-11 cm2/(Ion×ASIC). The single event upset (SEU) tolerance is estimated with various kinds of species with wide range of energy. Taking into account that a part of the protons creates recoiled heavy ions that have higher LET than that of the incident protons, we derived the probability of SEU event as a function of LET. Then the SEE event rate in a low-earth orbit is estimated considering a simulation result of LET spectrum. SEL rate is below once per 49 years, which satisfies the required latch-up tolerance. The upper limit of the SEU rate is derived to be 1.3×10-3 events/s. Although the SEU events cannot be distinguished from the signals of X-ray photons from astronomical objects, the derived SEU rate is below 1.3% of expected non-X-ray background rate of the detector and hence these events should not be a major component of the instrumental background.

  5. Therapeutic targeting of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway: novel targeted therapies and advances in the treatment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the USA, and more effective treatment of CRC is therefore needed. Advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this malignancy have led to the development of novel molecule-targeted therapies. Among the most recent classes of targeted therapies being developed are inhibitors targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. As one of the most frequently deregulated pathways in several human cancers, including CRC, aberrant PI3K signaling plays an important role in the growth, survival, motility and metabolism of cancer cells. Targeting this pathway therefore has considerable potential to lead to novel and more effective treatments for CRC. Preclinical and early clinical studies have revealed the potential efficacy of drugs that target PI3K signaling for the treatment of CRC. However, a major challenge that remains is to study these agents in phase III clinical trials to see whether these early successes translate into better patient outcomes. In this review we focus on providing an up-to-date assessment of our current understanding of PI3K signaling biology and its deregulation in the molecular pathogenesis of CRC. Advances in available agents and challenges in targeting the PI3K signaling pathway in CRC treatment will be discussed and placed in the context of the currently available therapies for CRC. PMID:22973417

  6. Four-Wave Mixing Crosstalk Suppression Based on the Pairing Combinations of Differently Linear-Polarized Optical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Abd, Haider; Din, Norashidah Md.; Al-Mansoori, M. H.; Abdullah, F.; Fadhil, H. A.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach to suppressing the four-wave mixing (FWM) crosstalk by using the pairing combinations of differently linear-polarized optical signals was investigated. The simulation was conducted using a four-channel system, and the total data rate was 40 Gb/s. A comparative study on the suppression of FWM for existing and suggested techniques was conducted by varying the input power from 2 dBm to 14 dBm. The robustness of the proposed technique was examined with two types of optical fiber, namely, single-mode fiber (SMF) and dispersion-shifted fiber (DSF). The FWM power drastically reduced to less than −68 and −25 dBm at an input power of 14 dBm, when the polarization technique was conducted for SMF and DSF, respectively. With the conventional method, the FWM powers were, respectively, −56 and −20 dBm. The system performance greatly improved with the proposed polarization approach, where the bit error rates (BERs) at the first channel were 2.57 × 10−40 and 3.47 × 10−29 at received powers of −4.90 and −13.84 dBm for SMF and DSF, respectively. PMID:24883364

  7. Collagen-GAG Scaffold Biophysical Properties Bias MSC Lineage Choice in the Presence of Mixed Soluble Signals

    PubMed Central

    Caliari, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterial strategies for regenerating multitissue structures require unique approaches. One strategy is to design scaffolds so that their local biophysical properties can enhance site-specific effects of an otherwise heterogeneous biomolecular environment. This investigation examined the role of biomaterial physical properties (relative density, mineral content) on the human mesenchymal stem cell phenotype in the presence of mixed soluble signals to drive osteogenesis or chondrogenesis. We tested a series of three-dimensional collagen–glycosaminoglycan scaffolds with properties inspired by extracellular matrix characteristics across the osteotendinous interface (tendon, cartilage, and bone). We found that selective scaffold mineralization induced a depressed chondrogenic response compared with nonmineralized groups as demonstrated by gene expression and histological analyses. Interestingly, the greatest chondrogenic response was found in a higher density, nonmineralized scaffold variant despite increased contraction and cellular condensation in lower density nonmineralized scaffolds. In fact, the lower density scaffolds demonstrated a significantly higher expression of osteogenic transcripts as well as ample mineralization after 21 days of culture. This effect may be due to local stiffening of the scaffold microenvironment as the scaffold contracts, leading to increased cell density, accelerated differentiation, and possible endochondral ossification as evidenced by a transition from a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-rich milieu to higher mineralization at later culture times. These findings will help shape the design rules for graded biomaterials to regenerate distinct fibrillar, fibrocartilagenous, and mineralized regions of orthopedic interfaces. PMID:24568607

  8. Scaling and application of commercial, feature-rich, modular mixed-signal technology platforms for large format ROICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar-Roy, Arjun; Racanelli, Marco; Howard, David; Miyagi, Glenn; Bowler, Mark; Jordan, Scott; Zhang, Tao; Krieger, William

    2010-04-01

    Today's modular, mixed-signal CMOS process platforms are excellent choices for manufacturing of highly integrated, large-format read out integrated circuits (ROICs). Platform features, that can be used for both cooled and un-cooled ROIC applications, can include (1) quality passives such as 4fFμm2 stacked MIM capacitors for linearity and higher density capacitance per pixel, 1kOhm high-value poly-silicon resistors, 2.8μm thick metals for efficient power distribution and reduced I-R drop; (2) analog active devices such as low noise single gate 3.3V, and 1.8V/3.3V or 1.8V/5V dual gate configurations, 40V LDMOS FETs, and NPN and PNP devices, deep n-well for substrate isolation for analog blocks and digital logic; (3) tools to assist the circuit designer such as models for cryogenic temperatures, CAD assistance for metal density uniformity determination, statistical, X-sigma and PCM-based models for corner validation and to simulate design sensitivity, and (4) sub-field stitching for large die. The TowerJazz platform of technology for 0.50μm, 0.25μm and 0.18μm CMOS nodes, with features as described above, is described in detail in this paper.

  9. Complete Characterization of Weak Ultrashort Coherent Four-Wave-Mixing Signals from Quantum Wells by Spectral Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walecki, Wojciech J.; Fittinghoff, David N.; Smirl, Arthur L.

    1997-03-01

    Four wave mixing (FWM) techniques using ultrashort pulses have proven to be extremely powerful tools for studying coherent processes and excitonic effects in semiconductors and multiple quantum wells (MQWs). Complete characterization of the emitted electromagnetic field requires the measurement of the phase, the polarization, and the amplitude. Failure to measure any one of these will result in a loss of essential information about the optical interactions. Present techniques for measuring the phase and the polarization state, however, are insensitive, and labor intensive. Here, we demonstrate that spectral interferometry can be used to completely characterize the FWM emission from MQWs. This method, involving only a linear measurement at a single fixed time delay, is simpler and more sensitive than previous techniques, which require measurements for various orientations of waveplates and for various time delays and which require a cross correlation with a reference pulse. We demonstrate the power of this technique by investigating the temporal dynamics of the FWM signal emitted from GaAs/AlGaAs MQWs as a function of the excitation fluence, time delay between the two incident pulses, and orientation of the input polarizations.

  10. The Challenges of Creating a Real-Time Data Management System for TRU-Mixed Waste at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Paff, S. W; Doody, S.

    2003-02-25

    This paper discusses the challenges associated with creating a data management system for waste tracking at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (AMWTP) at the Idaho National Engineering Lab (INEEL). The waste tracking system combines data from plant automation systems and decision points. The primary purpose of the system is to provide information to enable the plant operators and engineers to assess the risks associated with each container and determine the best method of treating it. It is also used to track the transuranic (TRU) waste containers as they move throughout the various processes at the plant. And finally, the goal of the system is to support paperless shipments of the waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This paper describes the approach, methodologies, the underlying design of the database, and the challenges of creating the Data Management System (DMS) prior to completion of design and construction of a major plant. The system was built utilizing an Oracle database platform, and Oracle Forms 6i in client-server mode. The underlying data architecture is container-centric, with separate tables and objects for each type of analysis used to characterize the waste, including real-time radiography (RTR), non-destructive assay (NDA), head-space gas sampling and analysis (HSGS), visual examination (VE) and coring. The use of separate tables facilitated the construction of automatic interfaces with the analysis instruments that enabled direct data capture. Movements are tracked using a location system describing each waste container's current location and a history table tracking the container's movement history. The movement system is designed to interface both with radio-frequency bar-code devices and the plant's integrated control system (ICS). Collections of containers or information, such as batches, were created across the various types of analyses, which enabled a single, cohesive approach to be developed for verification and

  11. Advanced Geospatial Hydrodynamic Signals Analysis for Tsunami Event Detection and Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab-Zavar, Banafshe; Sabeur, Zoheir

    2013-04-01

    Current early tsunami warning can be issued upon the detection of a seismic event which may occur at a given location offshore. This also provides an opportunity to predict the tsunami wave propagation and run-ups at potentially affected coastal zones by selecting the best matching seismic event from a database of pre-computed tsunami scenarios. Nevertheless, it remains difficult and challenging to obtain the rupture parameters of the tsunamigenic earthquakes in real time and simulate the tsunami propagation with high accuracy. In this study, we propose a supporting approach, in which the hydrodynamic signal is systematically analysed for traces of a tsunamigenic signal. The combination of relatively low amplitudes of a tsunami signal at deep waters and the frequent occurrence of background signals and noise contributes to a generally low signal to noise ratio for the tsunami signal; which in turn makes the detection of this signal difficult. In order to improve the accuracy and confidence of detection, a re-identification framework in which a tsunamigenic signal is detected via the scan of a network of hydrodynamic stations with water level sensing is performed. The aim is to attempt the re-identification of the same signatures as the tsunami wave spatially propagates through the hydrodynamic stations sensing network. The re-identification of the tsunamigenic signal is technically possible since the tsunami signal at the open ocean itself conserves its birthmarks relating it to the source event. As well as supporting the initial detection and improving the confidence of detection, a re-identified signal is indicative of the spatial range of the signal, and thereby it can be used to facilitate the identification of certain background signals such as wind waves which do not have as large a spatial reach as tsunamis. In this paper, the proposed methodology for the automatic detection of tsunamigenic signals has been achieved using open data from NOAA with a recorded

  12. The parallel-antiparallel signal difference in double-wave-vector diffusion-weighted MR at short mixing times: A phase evolution perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Experiments with two diffusion weightings applied in direct succession in a single acquisition, so-called double- or two-wave-vector diffusion-weighting (DWV) experiments at short mixing times, have been shown to be a promising tool to estimate cell or compartment sizes, e.g. in living tissue. The basic theory for such experiments predicts that the signal decays for parallel and antiparallel wave vector orientations differ by a factor of three for small wave vectors. This seems to be surprising because in standard, single-wave-vector experiments the polarity of the diffusion weighting has no influence on the signal attenuation. Thus, the question how this difference can be understood more pictorially is often raised. In this rather educational manuscript, the phase evolution during a DWV experiment for simple geometries, e.g. diffusion between parallel, impermeable planes oriented perpendicular to the wave vectors, is considered step-by-step and demonstrates how the signal difference develops. Considering the populations of the phase distributions obtained, the factor of three between the signal decays which is predicted by the theory can be reproduced. Furthermore, the intermediate signal decay for orthogonal wave vector orientations can be derived when investigating diffusion in a box. Thus, the presented “phase gymnastics” approach may help to understand the signal modulation observed in DWV experiments at short mixing times.

  13. Molecular Basis of Signaling Specificity of Insulin and IGF Receptors: Neglected Corners and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptors utilize common phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways to mediate a broad spectrum of “metabolic” and “mitogenic” responses. Specificity of insulin and IGF action in vivo must in part reflect expression of receptors and responsive pathways in different tissues but it is widely assumed that it is also determined by the ligand binding and signaling mechanisms of the receptors. This review focuses on receptor-proximal events in insulin/IGF signaling and examines their contribution to specificity of downstream responses. Insulin and IGF receptors may differ subtly in the efficiency with which they recruit their major substrates (IRS-1 and IRS-2 and Shc) and this could influence effectiveness of signaling to “metabolic” and “mitogenic” responses. Other substrates (Grb2-associated binder, downstream of kinases, SH2Bs, Crk), scaffolds (RACK1, β-arrestins, cytohesins), and pathways (non-receptor tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositide kinases, reactive oxygen species) have been less widely studied. Some of these components appear to be specifically involved in “metabolic” or “mitogenic” signaling but it has not been shown that this reflects receptor-preferential interaction. Very few receptor-specific interactions have been characterized, and their roles in signaling are unclear. Signaling specificity might also be imparted by differences in intracellular trafficking or feedback regulation of receptors, but few studies have directly addressed this possibility. Although published data are not wholly conclusive, no evidence has yet emerged for signaling mechanisms that are specifically engaged by insulin receptors but not IGF receptors or vice versa, and there is only limited evidence for differential activation of signaling mechanisms that are common to both receptors. Cellular context, rather than intrinsic receptor activity, therefore appears

  14. Novel electrochemical nickel metallization in silicon impedance engineering for mixed-signal system-on-chip crosstalk isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi

    One of the major challenges for single chip radio frequency integrated circuits (RFIC's) built on Si is the RE crosstalk through the Si substrate. Noise from switching transient in digital circuits can be transmitted through Si substrate and degrades the performance of analog circuit elements. A highly conductive moat or Faraday cage type structure of through-the-wafer thickness in the Si substrate was demonstrated to be effective in shielding electromagnetic interference thereby reducing RE cross-talk in high performance mixed signal integrated circuits. Such a structure incorporated into the p- Si substrate was realized by electroless Ni metallization over selected regions with ultra-high-aspect-ratio macropores that was etched electrochemically in p- Si substrates. The metallization process was conducted by immersing the macroporous Si sample in an alkaline aqueous solution containing Ni2+ without a reducing agent. It was found that working at slightly elevated temperature, Ni 2+ was rapidly reduced and deposited in the macropores. During the wet chemical process, conformal metallization on the pore wall was achieved. The entire porous Si skeleton was gradually replaced by Ni along the extended duration of immersion. In a p-/p+ epi Si substrate used for high performance digital CMOS, the suppression of crosstalk by the arrayed metallic Ni via structure fabricated from the front p side was significant that the crosstalk went down to the noise floor of the conventional measurement instruments. The process and mechanism of forming such a Ni structure over the original Si were studied. Theoretical computation relevant to the process was carried out to show a good consistency with the experiments.

  15. Performance of Thorium-Based Mixed Oxide Fuels for the Consumption of Plutonium in Current and Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Herring, James Stephen

    2003-07-01

    A renewed interest in thorium-based fuels has arisen lately based on the need for proliferation resistance, longer fuel cycles, higher burnup, and improved waste form characteristics. Recent studies have been directed toward homogeneously mixed, heterogeneously mixed, and seed-and-blanket thorium-uranium oxide fuel cycles that rely on "in situ" use of the bred-in 233U. However, due to the higher initial enrichment required to achieve acceptable burnups, these fuels are encountering economic constraints. Thorium can nevertheless play a large role in the nuclear fuel cycle, particularly in the reduction of plutonium inventories. While uranium-based mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel will decrease the amount of plutonium in discharged fuel, the reduction is limited due to the breeding of more plutonium (and higher actinides) from the 238U. Here, we present calculational results and a comparison of the potential burnup of a thorium-based and uranium-based mixed-oxide fuel in a light water reactor. Although the uranium-based fuels outperformed the thorium-based fuels in achievable burnup, a depletion comparison of the initially charged plutonium (both reactor and weapons grade) showed that the thorium-based fuels outperformed the uranium-based fuels by more that a factor of 2, where >70% of the total plutonium in the thorium-based fuel is consumed during the cycle. This is significant considering that the achievable burnups of the thorium-based fuels were 1.4 to 4.6 times less than the uranium-based fuels for similar plutonium enrichments. For equal specific burnups of ~60 MWd/kg (i.e., using variable plutonium weight percentages to give the desired burnup), the thorium-based fuels still outperform the uranium-based fuels by more than a factor of 2, where the total plutonium consumption in a three-batch, 18-month cycle was 60 to 70%. This is fairly significant considering that 10 to 15% (by weight) more plutonium is needed in the thorium-based fuels as compared to the uranium

  16. Skill-Mix and Policy Change in the Health Workforce: Nurses in Advanced Roles. OECD Health Working Papers, No. 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchan, James; Calman, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    An important potential contribution to the efficient use of the health workforce, is the possibility of "skill mix" changes. "Skill mix" is a relatively broad term which can refer to the mix of staff in the workforce or the demarcation of roles and activities among different categories of staff. Most of the policy attention on using skill-mix…

  17. A fault diagnosis methodology for rolling element bearings based on advanced signal pretreatment and autoregressive modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bugharbee, Hussein; Trendafilova, Irina

    2016-05-01

    This study proposes a methodology for rolling element bearings fault diagnosis which gives a complete and highly accurate identification of the faults present. It has two main stages: signals pretreatment, which is based on several signal analysis procedures, and diagnosis, which uses a pattern-recognition process. The first stage is principally based on linear time invariant autoregressive modelling. One of the main contributions of this investigation is the development of a pretreatment signal analysis procedure which subjects the signal to noise cleaning by singular spectrum analysis and then stationarisation by differencing. So the signal is transformed to bring it close to a stationary one, rather than complicating the model to bring it closer to the signal. This type of pretreatment allows the use of a linear time invariant autoregressive model and improves its performance when the original signals are non-stationary. This contribution is at the heart of the proposed method, and the high accuracy of the diagnosis is a result of this procedure. The methodology emphasises the importance of preliminary noise cleaning and stationarisation. And it demonstrates that the information needed for fault identification is contained in the stationary part of the measured signal. The methodology is further validated using three different experimental setups, demonstrating very high accuracy for all of the applications. It is able to correctly classify nearly 100 percent of the faults with regard to their type and size. This high accuracy is the other important contribution of this methodology. Thus, this research suggests a highly accurate methodology for rolling element bearing fault diagnosis which is based on relatively simple procedures. This is also an advantage, as the simplicity of the individual processes ensures easy application and the possibility for automation of the entire process.

  18. Advanced signal separation and recovery algorithms for digital x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Imbaby I.; El Tokhy, Mohamed S.

    2015-02-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is widely used for in-situ applications for samples analysis. Therefore, spectrum drawing and assessment of x-ray spectroscopy with high accuracy is the main scope of this paper. A Silicon Lithium Si(Li) detector that cooled with a nitrogen is used for signal extraction. The resolution of the ADC is 12 bits. Also, the sampling rate of ADC is 5 MHz. Hence, different algorithms are implemented. These algorithms were run on a personal computer with Intel core TM i5-3470 CPU and 3.20 GHz. These algorithms are signal preprocessing, signal separation and recovery algorithms, and spectrum drawing algorithm. Moreover, statistical measurements are used for evaluation of these algorithms. Signal preprocessing based on DC-offset correction and signal de-noising is performed. DC-offset correction was done by using minimum value of radiation signal. However, signal de-noising was implemented using fourth order finite impulse response (FIR) filter, linear phase least-square FIR filter, complex wavelet transforms (CWT) and Kalman filter methods. We noticed that Kalman filter achieves large peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) and lower error than other methods. However, CWT takes much longer execution time. Moreover, three different algorithms that allow correction of x-ray signal overlapping are presented. These algorithms are 1D non-derivative peak search algorithm, second derivative peak search algorithm and extrema algorithm. Additionally, the effect of signal separation and recovery algorithms on spectrum drawing is measured. Comparison between these algorithms is introduced. The obtained results confirm that second derivative peak search algorithm as well as extrema algorithm have very small error in comparison with 1D non-derivative peak search algorithm. However, the second derivative peak search algorithm takes much longer execution time. Therefore, extrema algorithm introduces better results over other algorithms. It has the advantage of recovering and

  19. CMOS mixed-signal MODEM for data transmission and control of electrical household appliances using the low-voltage power line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalera, Sara; Dominguez-Matas, Carlos M.; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose M.; Guerra, Oscar; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Angel

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents a CMOS mixed-signal MODEM ASIC for data transmission on the low-voltage power line. The circuit includes all the analog circuitry needed for input interfacing and modulation/demodulation (PLL-based frequency synthesis, slave filter banks with PLL master VCO for tuning, and decision circuitry) plus the logic circuitry needed for control purposes. To allow the communication between the electrical household appliances and a remote unit to control them as well as to reduce the cost, an unique mixed-signal ASIC, made of two parts, one operating at high frequencies and another operating at lower frequencies, has been designed. The High Frequencies Module must allow the connection with the external control systems and, to ensure reasonable robustness, has to be able to send and receive signals using at least two different channels (to avoid local and temporary degradations of the communication). The Low Frequencies Module is needed to manage the indoors communication. This module enables the transmission of signals within distances between 50 and 100 meters with a speed in the order of, but never less than, 100 bits/s. This link should be accomplished by using a frequency range in such a way that a maximum number of channels are disposable to allow the control of as many different in-house devices as possible. Again, to this end, two different tunable channels have to be simultaneously available: one to control the quality of the signal and the other to allow the effective communication.

  20. Hybrid optically interconnected microprocessor: an InP I-MSM integrated onto a mixed-signal CMOS analog optical receiver with a digital CMOS microprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jae J.; Jung, Sungyong; Vrazel, Michael; Jung, Keeshik; Lee, Myunghee; Brooke, Martin A.; Jokerst, Nan Marie; Wills, Scott

    2000-05-01

    This paper presents the results of simultaneously working fully-differential optoelectronic receiver fabricated in Si CMOS with digital SIMD microprocessor on the same die next to analog, optical interface circuitry, the receiver have been hybrid integrated with a thin film InP-based inverted (I)-MSM photodetector and optically tested using external light source modulated by digital input signal. The noise immunity to mixed-signal digital switching noise of the differential receiver has been shown to be good enough to generate 10-9 BER.

  1. Origin of picosecond-pulse-induced, degenerate four-wave-mixing signals in KTa sub 1 minus x Nb sub x O sub 3 crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Powell, R.C. ); Boatner, L.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Transient gratings have been produced in KTa{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}Nb{sub {ital x}}O{sub 3} by picosecond-pulse, two-photon excitation using degenerate four-wave-mixing techniques. The excitation process has been characterized through fluorescence studies, and the fluorescence is attributed to the transition between an excited state and the ground state of B{sup 4+} ions that are produced in ABO{sub 3} perovskite crystals. Strong electron-phonon coupling gives rise to the luminescence quenching. The observed degenerate four-wave-mixing signal is shown to be due predominantly to a phase grating caused by a change in the susceptibility associated with the formation of Nb{sup 4+} or Ta{sup 4+} ions in the peak region of the grating. The grating signal intensity was found to be dependent on the concentration of niobium ions and the crossing angle of the two laser write beams.

  2. Advanced signal processing method for ground penetrating radar feature detection and enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Venkatachalam, Anbu Selvam; Huston, Dryver; Xia, Tian

    2014-03-01

    This paper focuses on new signal processing algorithms customized for an air coupled Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) system targeting highway pavements and bridge deck inspections. The GPR hardware consists of a high-voltage pulse generator, a high speed 8 GSps real time data acquisition unit, and a customized field-programmable gate array (FPGA) control element. In comparison to most existing GPR system with low survey speeds, this system can survey at normal highway speed (60 mph) with a high horizontal resolution of up to 10 scans per centimeter. Due to the complexity and uncertainty of subsurface media, the GPR signal processing is important but challenging. In this GPR system, an adaptive GPR signal processing algorithm using Curvelet Transform, 2D high pass filtering and exponential scaling is proposed to alleviate noise and clutter while the subsurface features are preserved and enhanced. First, Curvelet Transform is used to remove the environmental and systematic noises while maintain the range resolution of the B-Scan image. Then, mathematical models for cylinder-shaped object and clutter are built. A two-dimension (2D) filter based on these models removes clutter and enhances the hyperbola feature in a B-Scan image. Finally, an exponential scaling method is applied to compensate the signal attenuation in subsurface materials and to improve the desired signal feature. For performance test and validation, rebar detection experiments and subsurface feature inspection in laboratory and field configurations are performed.

  3. Progress toward advanced understanding of metabotropic glutamate receptors: structure, signaling and therapeutic indications

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shen; Niswender, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are a group of Class C Seven Transmembrane Spanning/G Protein Coupled Receptors (7TMRs/GPCRs). These receptors are activated by glutamate, one of the standard amino acids and the major excitatory neurotransmitter. By activating G protein-dependent and non G protein-dependent signaling pathways, mGlus modulate glutamatergic transmission in both the periphery and throughout the central nervous system. Since the discovery of the first mGlu receptor, especially the last decade, a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the signaling, structure, pharmacological manipulation and therapeutic indications of the 8 mGlu members. PMID:24793301

  4. Application of advanced signal processing techniques to the rectification and registration of spaceborne imagery. [technology transfer, data transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caron, R. H.; Rifman, S. S.; Simon, K. W.

    1974-01-01

    The development of an ERTS/MSS image processing system responsive to the needs of the user community is discussed. An overview of the TRW ERTS/MSS processor is presented, followed by a more detailed discussion of image processing functions satisfied by the system. The particular functions chosen for discussion are evolved from advanced signal processing techniques rooted in the areas of communication and control. These examples show how classical aerospace technology can be transferred to solve the more contemporary problems confronting the users of spaceborne imagery.

  5. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Signaling Interferes with the Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Contractile Phenotype and Function.

    PubMed

    Simard, Elie; Söllradl, Thomas; Maltais, Jean-Sébastien; Boucher, Julie; D'Orléans-Juste, Pédro; Grandbois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Increased blood glucose concentrations promote reactions between glucose and proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGE). Circulating AGE in the blood plasma can activate the receptor for advanced end-products (RAGE), which is present on both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). RAGE exhibits a complex signaling that involves small G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), which lead to increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. While RAGE signaling has been previously addressed in endothelial cells, little is known regarding its impact on the function of VSMC. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAGE signaling leads to alterations in the mechanical and functional properties of VSMC, which could contribute to complications associated with diabetes. We demonstrated that RAGE is expressed and functional in the A7r5 VSMC model, and its activation by AGE significantly increased NF-κB activity, which is known to interfere with the contractile phenotype of VSMC. The protein levels of the contraction-related transcription factor myocardin were also decreased by RAGE activation with a concomitant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of transgelin (SM-22α), a regulator of VSMC contraction. Interestingly, we demonstrated that RAGE activation increased the overall cell rigidity, an effect that can be related to an increase in myosin activity. Finally, although RAGE stimulation amplified calcium signaling and slightly myosin activity in VSMC challenged with vasopressin, their contractile capacity was negatively affected. Overall, RAGE activation in VSMC could represent a keystone in the development of vascular diseases associated with diabetes by interfering with the contractile phenotype of VSMC through the modification of their mechanical and functional properties. PMID:26248341

  6. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Signaling Interferes with the Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Contractile Phenotype and Function

    PubMed Central

    Simard, Elie; Söllradl, Thomas; Maltais, Jean-Sébastien; Boucher, Julie; D’Orléans-Juste, Pédro; Grandbois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Increased blood glucose concentrations promote reactions between glucose and proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGE). Circulating AGE in the blood plasma can activate the receptor for advanced end-products (RAGE), which is present on both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). RAGE exhibits a complex signaling that involves small G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), which lead to increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. While RAGE signaling has been previously addressed in endothelial cells, little is known regarding its impact on the function of VSMC. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAGE signaling leads to alterations in the mechanical and functional properties of VSMC, which could contribute to complications associated with diabetes. We demonstrated that RAGE is expressed and functional in the A7r5 VSMC model, and its activation by AGE significantly increased NF-κB activity, which is known to interfere with the contractile phenotype of VSMC. The protein levels of the contraction-related transcription factor myocardin were also decreased by RAGE activation with a concomitant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of transgelin (SM-22α), a regulator of VSMC contraction. Interestingly, we demonstrated that RAGE activation increased the overall cell rigidity, an effect that can be related to an increase in myosin activity. Finally, although RAGE stimulation amplified calcium signaling and slightly myosin activity in VSMC challenged with vasopressin, their contractile capacity was negatively affected. Overall, RAGE activation in VSMC could represent a keystone in the development of vascular diseases associated with diabetes by interfering with the contractile phenotype of VSMC through the modification of their mechanical and functional properties. PMID:26248341

  7. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions.

  8. Implementation and verification of an advancement to the Galileo system search and rescue service signal simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mo; Wu, Qiongzhi; Liu, Shaobo

    2009-12-01

    Based on the Sino-European cooperation in the Galileo satellite navigation system Search And Rescue(SAR) service, a multi-channel distress beacon signal simulator is presented here. The mathematic model and spectrum analysis of current 406 MHz distress beacons signals is presented which includes Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRB) for Maritime, Personal Locator Beacons (PLB) for land (road and rail), and Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) for aeronautical applications. Based on Software Defined Radio (SDR) and digital IF techniques, the design of a SAR Signal Simulator (SAR-SS) is proposed, which can generate no less than 20 distress signals simultaneously. The Doppler shift and space propagation effect such as ionosphere delay, free space attenuation and etc, are simulated in SAR-SS, which provided a significant test and evaluation capability for SAR/Galileo project. The performance of SAR-SS is more accurate and stabile than the Cospas-Sarsat(C-S) requirement. SAR-SS will be a significant instrument for the Galileo system search and rescue project ground test.

  9. Advanced Signal Processing Techniques Applied to Terahertz Inspections on Aerospace Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Long Buu

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle's external fuel tank is thermally insulated by the closed cell foams. However, natural voids composed of air and trapped gas are found as by-products when the foams are cured. Detection of foam voids and foam de-bonding is a formidable task owing to the small index of refraction contrast between foam and air (1.04:1). In the presence of a denser binding matrix agent that bonds two different foam materials, time-differentiation of filtered terahertz signals can be employed to magnify information prior to the main substrate reflections. In the absence of a matrix binder, de-convolution of the filtered time differential terahertz signals is performed to reduce the masking effects of antenna ringing. The goal is simply to increase probability of void detection through image enhancement and to determine the depth of the void.

  10. Advanced signaling technologies for high-speed digital fiber-optic links.

    PubMed

    Stark, Andrew J; Isautier, Pierre; Pan, Jie; Pavan, Sriharsha Kota; Filer, Mark; Tibuleac, Sorin; Lingle, Robert; de Salvo, Richard; Ralph, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    We summarize the most recent research of the Georgia Tech Terabit Optical Networking Consortium and the state-of-the-art in fiber telecommunications. These results comprise high-capacity single-mode fiber systems with digital coherent receivers and shorter-reach multimode fiber links with vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. We strongly emphasize the capabilities that sophisticated digital signal processing and electronics add to these fiber-based data transport links. PMID:25321383

  11. Advanced signal processing based on support vector regression for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfusa, M.; Murari, A.; Malizia, A.; Lungaroni, M.; Peluso, E.; Parracino, S.; Talebzadeh, S.; Vega, J.; Gaudio, P.

    2015-10-01

    The LIDAR technique has recently found many applications in atmospheric physics and remote sensing. One of the main issues, in the deployment of systems based on LIDAR, is the filtering of the backscattered signal to alleviate the problems generated by noise. Improvement in the signal to noise ratio is typically achieved by averaging a quite large number (of the order of hundreds) of successive laser pulses. This approach can be effective but presents significant limitations. First of all, it implies a great stress on the laser source, particularly in the case of systems for automatic monitoring of large areas for long periods. Secondly, this solution can become difficult to implement in applications characterised by rapid variations of the atmosphere, for example in the case of pollutant emissions, or by abrupt changes in the noise. In this contribution, a new method for the software filtering and denoising of LIDAR signals is presented. The technique is based on support vector regression. The proposed new method is insensitive to the statistics of the noise and is therefore fully general and quite robust. The developed numerical tool has been systematically compared with the most powerful techniques available, using both synthetic and experimental data. Its performances have been tested for various statistical distributions of the noise and also for other disturbances of the acquired signal such as outliers. The competitive advantages of the proposed method are fully documented. The potential of the proposed approach to widen the capability of the LIDAR technique, particularly in the detection of widespread smoke, is discussed in detail.

  12. Advances of the interleukin-21 signaling pathway in immunity and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, MING-JIE; WANG, TAO

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21) and its receptor (IL-21R) are broadly expressed on human B cells, activated T cells and other myeloid cells. IL-21 cooperates with IL-6 and transforming growth factor-β to regulate T-cell differentiation. IL-21-mediated human B cell and dendritic cells differentiation requires signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and also induces B-cell apoptosis dependents on the Toll-like receptor signal. Recently, in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that IL-21/IL-21R regulate angiogenesis through STAT3. IL-21 signaling pathways are complex due to its cooperation with other transcriptional factors, such as interferon regulatory factor 4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The Janus kinase-STAT pathway has been the most extensively studied. With the increase in the understanding of IL-21 biology in the context of each specific disease or pathological condition, IL-21 could be a new therapeutic target for immune-related disease.

  13. Advances in dynamic modeling of colorectal cancer signaling-network regions, a path toward targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Ambrosi, Cristina De; Barla, Annalisa; Biganzoli, Elia M.; Nencioni, Alessio; Patrone, Franco; Ballestrero, Alberto; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Verri, Alessandro; Parodi, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The interconnected network of pathways downstream of the TGFβ, WNT and EGF-families of receptor ligands play an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. We studied and implemented dynamic simulations of multiple downstream pathways and described the section of the signaling network considered as a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM). Our simulations used Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), which involved 447 reactants and their interactions. Starting from an initial “physiologic condition”, the model can be adapted to simulate individual pathologic cancer conditions implementing alterations/mutations in relevant onco-proteins. We verified some salient model predictions using the mutated colorectal cancer lines HCT116 and HT29. We measured the amount of MYC and CCND1 mRNAs and AKT and ERK phosphorylated proteins, in response to individual or combination onco-protein inhibitor treatments. Experimental and simulation results were well correlated. Recent independently published results were also predicted by our model. Even in the presence of an approximate and incomplete signaling network information, a predictive dynamic modeling seems already possible. An important long term road seems to be open and can be pursued further, by incremental steps, toward even larger and better parameterized MIMs. Personalized treatment strategies with rational associations of signaling-proteins inhibitors, could become a realistic goal. PMID:25671297

  14. Oxidative stress, redox signaling pathways, and autophagy in cachectic muscles of male patients with advanced COPD and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Puig-Vilanova, Ester; Rodriguez, Diego A; Lloreta, Josep; Ausin, Pilar; Pascual-Guardia, Sergio; Broquetas, Joan; Roca, Josep; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-02-01

    Muscle dysfunction and wasting are predictors of mortality in advanced COPD and malignancies. Redox imbalance and enhanced protein catabolism are underlying mechanisms in COPD. We hypothesized that the expression profile of several biological markers share similarities in patients with cachexia associated with either COPD or lung cancer (LC). In vastus lateralis of cachectic patients with either LC (n=10) or advanced COPD (n=16) and healthy controls (n=10), markers of redox balance, inflammation, proteolysis, autophagy, signaling pathways, mitochondrial function, muscle structure, and sarcomere damage were measured using laboratory and light and electron microscopy techniques. Systemic redox balance and inflammation were also determined. All subjects were clinically evaluated. Compared to controls, in both cachectic groups of patients, a similar expression profile of different biological markers was observed in their muscles: increased levels of muscle protein oxidation and ubiquitination (p<0.05, both), which positively correlated (r=0.888), redox-sensitive signaling pathways (NF-κB and FoxO) were activated (p<0.05, all), fast-twitch fiber sizes were atrophied, muscle structural abnormalities and sarcomere disruptions were significantly greater (p<0.05, both). Structural and functional protein levels were lower in muscles of both cachectic patient groups than in controls (p<0.05, all). However, levels of autophagy markers including ultrastructural autophagosome counts were increased only in muscles of cachectic COPD patients (p<0.05). Systemic oxidative stress and inflammation levels were also increased in both patient groups compared to controls (p<0.005, both). Oxidative stress and redox-sensitive signaling pathways are likely to contribute to the etiology of muscle wasting and sarcomere disruption in patients with respiratory cachexia: LC and COPD. PMID:25464271

  15. Bearing defect signature analysis using advanced nonlinear signal analysis in a controlled environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T.; Earhart, E.; Fiorucci, T.

    1995-01-01

    Utilizing high-frequency data from a highly instrumented rotor assembly, seeded bearing defect signatures are characterized using both conventional linear approaches, such as power spectral density analysis, and recently developed nonlinear techniques such as bicoherence analysis. Traditional low-frequency (less than 20 kHz) analysis and high-frequency envelope analysis of both accelerometer and acoustic emission data are used to recover characteristic bearing distress information buried deeply in acquired data. The successful coupling of newly developed nonlinear signal analysis with recovered wideband envelope data from accelerometers and acoustic emission sensors is the innovative focus of this research.

  16. Mitigating Oscillator Pulling Due To Magnetic Coupling in Monolithic Mixed-Signal Radio-Frequency Integrated Circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Sobering, Ian David

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of frequency pulling in a varactor-tuned LC VCO under coupling from an on-chip PA is presented. The large-signal behavior of the VCO's inversion-mode MOS varactors is outlined, and the susceptibility of the VCO to frequency pulling from PA aggressor signals with various modulation schemes is discussed. We show that if the aggressor signal is aperiodic, band-limited, or amplitude-modulated, the varactor-tuned LC VCO will experience frequency pulling due to time-modulation of the varactor capacitance. However, if the aggressor signal has constant-envelope phase modulation, VCO pulling can be eliminated, even in the presence of coupling, through careful choice of VCO frequency and divider ratio. Additional mitigation strategies, including new inductor topologies and system-level architectural choices, are also examined.

  17. Non-Intrusive Device for Real-Time Circulatory System Assessment with Advanced Signal Processing Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, E.; Postolache, O.; Girão, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a device that uses three cardiography signals to characterize several important parameters of a subject's circulatory system. Using electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmogram, and ballistocardiogram, three heart rate estimates are acquired from beat-to-beat time interval extraction. Furthermore, pre-ejection period, pulse transit time (PTT), and pulse arrival time (PAT) are computed, and their long-term evolution is analyzed. The system estimates heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) from the heart rate and PAT time series, to infer the activity of the cardiac autonomic system. The software component of the device evaluates the frequency content of HRV and BPV, and also their fractal dimension and entropy, thus providing a detailed analysis of the time series' regularity and complexity evolution, to allow personalized subject evaluation.

  18. Systems biology and brain activity in neuronal pathways by smart device and advanced signal processing

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Gastone; Intrator, Nathan; Remondini, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary biomedicine is producing large amount of data, especially within the fields of “omic” sciences. Nevertheless, other fields, such as neuroscience, are producing similar amount of data by using non-invasive techniques such as imaging, functional magnetic resonance and electroencephalography. Nowadays a big challenge and a new research horizon for Systems Biology is to develop methods to integrate and model this data in an unifying framework capable to disentangle this amazing complexity. In this paper we show how methods from genomic data analysis can be applied to brain data. In particular the concept of pathways, networks and multiplex are discussed. These methods can lead to a clear distinction of various regimes of brain activity. Moreover, this method could be the basis for a Systems Biology analysis of brain data and for the integration of these data in a multivariate and multidimensional framework. The feasibility of this integration is strongly dependent from the feature extraction method used. In our case we used an “alphabet” derived from a multi-resolution analysis that is capable to capture the most relevant information from these complex signals. PMID:25206359

  19. Simultaneous multichannel wavelength multicasting and XOR logic gate multicasting for three DPSK signals based on four-wave mixing in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun; Lu, Guo-Wei; Sakamoto, Takahide; Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Wang, Danshi; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Hongxiang; Zhang, Min; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Ji, Yuefeng

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate simultaneous multichannel wavelength multicasting (MWM) and exclusive-OR logic gate multicasting (XOR-LGM) for three 10Gbps non-return-to-zero differential phase-shift-keying (NRZ-DPSK) signals in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA) by exploiting the four-wave mixing (FWM) process. No additional pump is needed in the scheme. Through the interaction of the input three 10Gbps DPSK signal lights in QD-SOA, each channel is successfully multicasted to three wavelengths (1-to-3 for each), totally 3-to-9 MWM, and at the same time, three-output XOR-LGM is obtained at three different wavelengths. All the new generated channels are with a power penalty less than 1.2dB at a BER of 10(-9). Degenerate and non-degenerate FWM components are fully used in the experiment for data and logic multicasting. PMID:25606876

  20. Four-wave mixing of a chirped signal with bandwidth-limited pump waves in a resonant medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kabanov, V V

    1998-07-31

    An investigation is reported of the characteristic features of four-wave interaction of a chirped signal with bandwidth-limited pump waves in a resonant medium modelled by a two-level scheme. Analytic estimates are obtained and a numerical analysis is made of the combined influence of various mechanisms (spatial phase matching, a finite nonlinear response time, and phase cross-modulation) on the spectral composition and on the temporal behaviour of the fourth pulse. Conditions are found for achieving, with practically undetectable distortions, phase conjugation of a chirped signal accompanied by shortening of the pulse envelope and narrowing of the spectrum of the phase-conjugate wave. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  1. Advanced glycation end products are mitogenic signals and trigger cell cycle reentry of neurons in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Angela; Ludwig, Sophie C; Kuhla, Björn; Münch, Gerald; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2015-02-01

    Neurons that reenter the cell cycle die rather than divide, a phenomenon that is associated with neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Reexpression of cell-cycle related genes in differentiated neurons in AD might be rooted in aberrant mitogenic signaling. Because microglia and astroglia proliferate in the vicinity of amyloid plaques, it is likely that plaque components or factors secreted from plaque-activated glia induce neuronal mitogenic signaling. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), protein-bound oxidation products of sugar, might be one of those mitogenic compounds. Cyclin D1 positive neurons are colocalized with AGEs or directly surrounded by extracellular AGE deposits in AD brain. However, a direct proof of DNA replication in these cells has been missing. Here, we report by using fluorescent in situ hybridization that consistent with the expression of cell cycle proteins, hyperploid neuronal cells are in colocalization with AGE staining in AD brains but not in nondemented controls. To complement human data, we used apolipoprotein E-deficient mice as model of neurodegeneration and showed that increased oxidative stress caused an intensified neuronal deposition of AGEs, being accompanied by an activation of the MAPK cascade via RAGE. This cascade, in turn, induced the expression of cyclin D1 and DNA replication. In addition, reduction of oxidative stress by application of α-lipoic acid decreased AGE accumulations, and this decrease was accompanied by a reduction in cell cycle reentry and a more euploid neuronal genome. PMID:25448604

  2. Advanced signal processing methods applied to guided waves for wire rope defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Peter W.; Rostami, Javad

    2016-02-01

    Steel wire ropes, which are usually composed of a polymer core and enclosed by twisted wires, are used to hoist heavy loads. These loads are different structures that can be clamshells, draglines, elevators, etc. Since the loading of these structures is dynamic, the ropes are working under fluctuating forces in a corrosive environment. This consequently leads to progressive loss of the metallic cross-section due to abrasion and corrosion. These defects can be seen in the forms of roughened and pitted surface of the ropes, reduction in diameter, and broken wires. Therefore, their deterioration must be monitored so that any unexpected damage or corrosion can be detected before it causes fatal accident. This is of vital importance in the case of passenger transportation, particularly in elevators in which any failure may cause a catastrophic disaster. At present, the widely used methods for thorough inspection of wire ropes include visual inspection and magnetic flux leakage (MFL). Reliability of the first method is questionable since it only depends on the operators' eyes that fails to determine the integrity of internal wires. The later method has the drawback of being a point by point and time-consuming inspection method. Ultrasonic guided wave (UGW) based inspection, which has proved its capability in inspecting plate like structures such as tubes and pipes, can monitor the cross-section of wire ropes in their entire length from a single point. However, UGW have drawn less attention for defect detection in wire ropes. This paper reports the condition monitoring of a steel wire rope from a hoisting elevator with broken wires as a result of corrosive environment and fatigue. Experiments were conducted to investigate the efficiency of using magnetostrictive based UGW for rope defect detection. The obtained signals were analyzed by two time-frequency representation (TFR) methods, namely the Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) and the Wavelet analysis. The location of

  3. Mixed Signals: Combining Linguistic and Affective Functions of Eyebrows in Questions in Sign Language of the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vos, Connie; van der Kooij, Els; Crasborn, Onno

    2009-01-01

    The eyebrows are used as conversational signals in face-to-face spoken interaction (Ekman, 1979). In Sign Language of the Netherlands (NGT), the eyebrows are typically furrowed in content questions, and raised in polar questions (Coerts, 1992). On the other hand, these eyebrow positions are also associated with anger and surprise, respectively, in…

  4. Advanced glycation endproducts induce apoptosis of endothelial progenitor cells by activating receptor RAGE and NADPH oxidase/JNK signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianfei; Jing, Jun; Yu, Shiyong; Song, Minbao; Tan, Hu; Cui, Bin; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis. Dysfunction of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which is essential for re-endothelialization and neovascularization, is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. However, it remains unclear whether and how AGEs acts on EPCs to promote pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, EPCs were exposed to different concentrations of AGEs. The expression of NADPH and Rac1 was measured to investigate the involvement of NADPH oxidase pathway. ROS was examined to indicate the level of oxidative stress in EPCs. Total JNK and p-JNK were determined by Western blotting. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by both TUNEL staining and flow cytometry. Cell proliferation was measured by 3H thymidine uptake. The results showed that treatment of EPCs with AGEs increased the levels of ROS in EPCs. Mechanistically, AGEs increased the activity of NADPH oxidase and the expression of Rac1, a major component of NADPH. Importantly, treatment of EPCs with AGEs activated the JNK signaling pathway, which was closely associated with cell apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. Our results suggest that the RAGE activation by AGEs in EPCs upregulates intracellular ROS levels, which contributes to increased activity of NADPH oxidase and expression of Rac1, thus promoting cellular apoptosis and inhibiting proliferation. Mechanistically, AGEs binding to the receptor RAGE in EPCs is associated with hyperactivity of JNK signaling pathway, which is downstream of ROS. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of the AGEs/RAGE axis in EPCs may promote atherosclerosis and identify the NADPH/ROS/JNK signaling axis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27347324

  5. Developing Smart Seismic Arrays: A Simulation Environment, Observational Database, and Advanced Signal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P E; Harris, D; Myers, S; Larsen, S; Wagoner, J; Trebes, J; Nelson, K

    2003-09-15

    tracking methods. A field experiment was conducted over a tunnel at the Nevada Site that quantified the tunnel reflection signal and, coupled with modeling, identified key needs and requirements in experimental layout of sensors. A large field experiment was conducted at the Lake Lynn Laboratory, a mine safety research facility in Pennsylvania, over a tunnel complex in realistic, difficult conditions. This experiment gathered the necessary data for a full 3D attempt to apply the methodology. The experiment also collected data to analyze the capabilities to detect and locate in-tunnel explosions for mine safety and other applications.

  6. Genome-Wide Scan for Visceral Leishmaniasis in Mixed-Breed Dogs Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in T Helper Cells and Macrophage Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Utsunomiya, Yuri T.; Ribeiro, Érica S.; Quintal, Amanda P. N.; Sangalli, Juliano R.; Gazola, Valquiria R.; Paula, Henrique B.; Trinconi, Cristiana M.; Lima, Valéria M. F.; Perri, Silvia H. V.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Garcia, José F.; Nunes, Cáris M.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs from a highly endemic area in Brazil using 149,648 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers genotyped in 20 cases and 28 controls. Using a mixed model approach, we found two candidate loci on canine autosomes 1 and 2. The positional association on chromosome 2 mapped to a predicted DNAse sensitive site in CD14+ monocytes that serve as a cis-regulatory element for the expression of interleukin alpha receptors 2 (IL2RA) and 15 (IL15RA). Both interleukins were previously found to lead to protective T helper 1 cell (Th1) response against Leishmania spp. in humans and mice. The associated marker on chromosome 1 was located between two predicted transcription factor binding sites regulating the expression of the transducin-like enhancer of split 1 gene (TLE1), an important player in Notch signaling. This pathway is critical for macrophage activity and CD4+ T cell differentiation into Th1 and T helper 2. Together, these findings suggest that the human and mouse model for protective response against Leishmania spp., which involves Th1 and macrophage modulation by interleukins 2, 15, gamma interferon and Notch signaling, may also hold for the canine model. PMID:26348501

  7. Parameter estimation using a complete signal and inspiral templates for low-mass binary black holes with Advanced LIGO sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hee-Suk

    2015-12-01

    We study the validity of inspiral templates in gravitational wave data analysis with Advanced LIGO sensitivity for low mass binary black holes with total masses of M≤slant 30{M}⊙ . We mainly focus on the nonspinning system. As our complete inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform model ({I}{M}{R} ), we assume the phenomenological model, ‘PhenomA’, and define our inspiral template model ({{I}}{{merg}}) by taking the inspiral part into account from {I}{M}{R} up to the merger frequency ({f}{{merg}}). We first calculate the true statistical uncertainties using {I}{M}{R} signals and {I}{M}{R} templates. Next, using {I}{M}{R} signals and {{I}}{{merg}} templates, we calculate fitting factors and systematic biases, and compare the biases with the true statistical uncertainties. We find that the valid criteria of the bank of {{I}}{{merg}} templates are obtained as {M}{{crit}}˜ 24{M}⊙ for detection (if M\\gt {M}{{crit}}, the fitting factor is smaller than 0.97), and {M}{{crit}}˜ 26{M}⊙ for parameter estimation (if M\\gt {M}{{crit}}, the systematic bias is larger than the true statistical uncertainty where the signal-to-noise ratio is 20), respectively. In order to see the dependence on the cutoff frequency of the inspiral waveforms, we define another inspiral model {{I}}{{isco}} which is terminated at the innermost-stable-circular-orbit frequency ({f}{{isco}}\\lt {f}{{merg}}). We find that the valid criteria of the bank of {{I}}{{isco}} templates are obtained as {M}{{crit}}˜ 15{M}⊙ and ˜ 17{M}⊙ for detection and parameter estimation, respectively. We investigate the statistical uncertainties for the inspiral template models considering various signal-to-noise ratios, and compare those to the true statistical uncertainties. We also consider the aligned-spinning system with fixed mass ratio ({m}1/{m}2=3) and spin (χ =0.5) by employing the recent phenomenological model, ‘PhenomC’. In this case, we find that the true statistical uncertainties can be much larger

  8. CFD Simulations of a Flow Mixing and Heat Transfer Enhancement in an Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    In, Wang-Kee; Chun, Tae-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Hwan; Oh, Dong-Seok

    2007-07-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to investigate a flow-mixing and heat-transfer enhancement caused by a mixing-vane spacer in a LWR fuel assembly which is a rod bundle. This paper presents the CFD simulations of a flow mixing and heat transfer in a fully heated 5x5 array of a rod bundle with a split-vane and hybrid-vane spacer. The CFD prediction at a low Reynolds number of 42,000 showed a reasonably good agreement of the initial heat transfer enhancement with the measured one for a partially heated experiment using a similar spacer structure. The CFD simulation also predicted the decay rate of a normalized Nusselt number downstream of the split-vane spacer which agrees fairly well with those of the experiment and the correlation. The CFD calculations for the split vane and hybrid vane at the LWR operating conditions(Re = 500,000) predicted hot fuel spots in a streaky structure downstream of the spacer, which occurs due to the secondary flow occurring in an opposite direction near the fuel rod. However, the split-vane and hybrid-vane spacers are predicted to significantly enhance the overall heat transfer of a LWR nuclear fuel assembly. (authors)

  9. Development of Design Technology on Thermal-Hydraulic Performance in Tight-Lattice Rod Bundles: III - Numerical Evaluation of Fluid Mixing Phenomena using Advanced Interface-Tracking Method -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Takase, Kazuyuki; Akimoto, Hajime

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed by correlations with empirical results of actual-size tests. However, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. Development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. We tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the 2-channel air-water and steam-water mixing experimental results. The predicted result agrees well the observed results and bubble dynamics through the gap and cross flow behavior could be effectively predicted by the TPFIT code, and pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing.

  10. Temporal filtering of reward signals in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex during a mixed-strategy game.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyojung; Lee, Daeyeol

    2007-08-01

    The process of decision making in humans and other animals is adaptive and can be tuned through experience so as to optimize the outcomes of their choices in a dynamic environment. Previous studies have demonstrated that the anterior cingulate cortex plays an important role in updating the animal's behavioral strategies when the action outcome contingencies change. Moreover, neurons in the anterior cingulate cortex often encode the signals related to expected or actual reward. We investigated whether reward-related activity in the anterior cingulate cortex is affected by the animal's previous reward history. This was tested in rhesus monkeys trained to make binary choices in a computer-simulated competitive zero-sum game. The animal's choice behavior was relatively close to the optimal strategy but also revealed small systematic biases that are consistent with the use of a reinforcement learning algorithm. In addition, the activity of neurons in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex that was related to the reward received by the animal in a given trial often was modulated by the rewards in the previous trials. Some of these neurons encoded the rate of rewards in previous trials, whereas others displayed activity modulations more closely related to the reward prediction errors. In contrast, signals related to the animal's choices were represented only weakly in this cortical area. These results suggest that neurons in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex might be involved in the subjective evaluation of choice outcomes based on the animal's reward history. PMID:17670983

  11. Remote Activation of Host Cell DNA Synthesis in Uninfected Cells Signaled by Infected Cells in Advance of Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Nora; Hennig, Thomas; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Marchetti, Magda

    2015-01-01

    effector. The field has had no conception that this process occurs, and the work changes our interpretation of virus-host interaction during advancing infection and has implications for understanding controls of host DNA synthesis. Our findings demonstrate the utility of chemical biology techniques in analysis of infection processes, reveal distinct processes when infection is examined in multiround transmission versus single-step growth curves, and reveal a hitherto-unknown process in virus infection, likely relevant for other viruses (and other infectious agents) and for remote signaling of other processes, including transcription and protein synthesis. PMID:26311877

  12. Time-delayed behaviors of transient four-wave mixing signal intensity in inverted semiconductor with carrier-injection pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Gao, Shen; Xiang, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    An analytical expression of transient four-wave mixing (TFWM) in inverted semiconductor with carrier-injection pumping was derived from both the density matrix equation and the complex stochastic stationary statistical method of incoherent light. Numerical analysis showed that the TFWM decayed decay is towards the limit of extreme homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings in atoms and the decaying time is inversely proportional to half the power of the net carrier densities for a low carrier-density injection and other high carrier-density injection, while it obeys an usual exponential decay with other decaying time that is inversely proportional to half the power of the net carrier density or it obeys an unusual exponential decay with the decaying time that is inversely proportional to a third power of the net carrier density for a moderate carrier-density injection. The results can be applied to studying ultrafast carrier dephasing in the inverted semiconductors such as semiconductor laser amplifier and semiconductor optical amplifier.

  13. Reconfigurable optical inter-channel interference mitigation for spectrally overlapped QPSK signals using nonlinear wave mixing in cascaded PPLN waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yinwen; Ziyadi, Morteza; Mohajerin-Ariaei, Amirhossein; Almaiman, Ahmed; Liao, Peicheng; Bao, Changjing; Alishahi, Fatemeh; Falahpour, Ahmad; Shamee, Bishara; Yang, Jeng-Yuan; Akasaka, Youichi; Sekiya, Motoyoshi; Tur, Moshe; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin; Touch, Joseph; Willner, Alan E

    2016-07-15

    A reconfigurable all-optical inter-channel interference (ICI) mitigation method is proposed for an overlapped channel system that avoids the need for multi-channel detection and channel spacing estimation. The system exhibits a 0.5-dB implementation penalty compared to a single-channel baseline system. Experiments using a dual-carrier QPSK overlapped system with both 20G-baud and 25G-baud under different channel spacing conditions evaluate the performance of the method. Improved signal constellation and receiver sensitivity demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. This results in over 4-dB OSNR of benefit when the system Q-factor reaches a forward error correction (FEC) threshold of 8.5 dB under less-than-baudrate channel spacing conditions. PMID:27420503

  14. [Advances in independent component analysis and its application].

    PubMed

    Chen, Huafu; Yao, Dezhong

    2003-06-01

    The independent component analysis (ICA) is a new technique in statistical signal processing, which decomposes mixed signals into statistical independent components. The reported applications in biomedical and radar signal have demonstrated its good prospect in various blind signal separation. In this paper, the progress of ICA in such as its principle, algorithm and application and advance direction of ICA in future is reviewed. The aim is to promote the research in theory and application in the future. PMID:12856621

  15. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector. PMID:25261762

  16. Reconfigurable all-optical logic gate using four-wave mixing (FWM) in HNLF for NRZ-PolSK signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lanlan; Wu, Jian; Qiu, Jifang; Wu, Bingbing; Xu, Kun; Hong, Xiaobin; Li, Yan; Lin, Jintong

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate a reconfigurable all-optical logic gate for NRZ-PolSK signal based on FWM in a highly nonlinear fiber at 10 Gb/s. Half subtracter, XOR, AB¯, Ā B or XNOR, AND, and NOR logic gates can be implemented simultaneously. The input power for the HNLF is optimized to be as low as about 15.2 dBm and the high Q factors above 8 dB for eye diagrams are achieved. Experimental results show Q factors of AB¯, Ā B, AND, and NOR were higher than those of XOR, and XNOR. Error-free operation is achieved experimentally for 10 Gb/s 2 7-1 pseudorandom bit sequence (PRBS) data. Power penalties for the logic gate are less than 3 dB. Simulation analysis about the wavelength characteristic for all logic gates is given and it predicts that the reconfigurable logic gate can realize error-free operation when the wavelength separation is less than 5 nm.

  17. On the spatial coherence in mixed sound fields and its application to signal-to-diffuse ratio estimation.

    PubMed

    Thiergart, Oliver; Del Galdo, Giovanni; Habets, Emanuël A P

    2012-10-01

    Many applications in spatial sound recording and processing model the sound scene as a sum of directional and diffuse sound components. The power ratio between both components, i.e., the signal-to-diffuse ratio (SDR), represents an important measure for algorithms which aim at performing robustly in reverberant environments. This contribution discusses the SDR estimation from the spatial coherence between two arbitrary first-order directional microphones. First, the spatial coherence is expressed as function of the SDR. For most microphone setups, the spatial coherence is a complex function where both the absolute value and phase contain relevant information on the SDR. Secondly, the SDR estimator is derived from the spatial coherence function. The estimator is discussed for different practical microphone setups including coincident setups of arbitrary first-order directional microphones and spaced setups of identical first-order directional microphones. An unbiased SDR estimation requires noiseless coherence estimates as well as information on the direction-of-arrival of the directional sound, which usually has to be estimated. Nevertheless, measurement results verify that the proposed estimator is applicable in practice and provides accurate results. PMID:23039430

  18. A mixed methods investigation of dropout among talented young dancers: findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training.

    PubMed

    Walker, Imogen J; Nordin-Bates, Sanna M; Redding, Emma

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand reasons for dropout from a dance-talent program in the UK, using a mixed methods design. In-depth interviews were conducted with ten dropout students to explore the influencing factors in their decision to leave the program. In order to triangulate these findings, reasons for dropout were then examined from descriptive records of 147 young dancers who had withdrawn from the talent program over a four-year period. Overall, the most frequently cited reasons for dropping out were conflicting demands, change in aspirations, course content, difficulty making friends, and lost passion. Injury, financial factors, low perceived competence, and teacher behavior emerged as minor reasons. Intervention strategies that focus on changes in course content may be the easiest to implement and most effective means to enhance student retention. PMID:22687720

  19. Technology of integrated self-aligned E/D-mode n++GaN/InAlN/AlN/GaN MOS HEMTs for mixed-signal electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaho, M.; Gregušová, D.; Haščík, Š.; Seifertová, A.; Ťapajna, M.; Šoltýs, J.; Šatka, A.; Nagy, L.; Chvála, A.; Marek, J.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Konstantinidis, G.; Kuzmík, J.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the technology and performance of integrated enhancement/depletion (E/D)-mode n++GaN/InAlN/AlN/GaN HEMTs with a self-aligned metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) gate structure. An identical starting epi-structure was used for both types of devices without the additional need for a contacts regrowth. The n++GaN cap layer was etched away in the gate trenches of the E-mode HEMT while it was left intact for the D-mode HEMT. The plasma etching process was shown to be highly selective between the cap and the InAlN barrier and also to polish the InAlN surface. However, different GaN etching initiation times inside and outside the mesa region were obtained. Gate contacts were isolated using a dielectric layer deposited at low temperature through an e-beam resist to retain the self-aligned approach. Feasibility of the approach for future fast GaN-based mixed-signal electronic circuits was shown by obtaining alternative HEMT threshold voltage values of +0.8 V and ‑2.6 V, invariant maximal output current of ∼0.35 A mm‑1 despite large source-to-drain distances and by demonstrating a functional logic invertor.

  20. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in an Average Power Position (I-24) in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    J. M . Ryskamp; R. C. Howard; R. C. Pedersen; S. T. Khericha

    1998-10-01

    The Fissile Material Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan details a series of test irradiations designed to investigate the use of weapons-grade plutonium in MOX fuel for light water reactors (LWR) (Cowell 1996a, Cowell 1997a, Thoms 1997a). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons-derived test fuel contains small amounts of gallium (about 2 parts per million). A concern exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel and into the clad, inducing embrittlement. For preliminary out-of-pile experiments, Wilson (1997) states that intermetallic compound formation is the principal interaction mechanism between zircaloy cladding and gallium. This interaction is very limited by the low mass of gallium, so problems are not expected with the zircaloy cladding, but an in-pile experiment is needed to confirm the out-of-pile experiments. Ryskamp (1998) provides an overview of this experiment and its documentation. The purpose of this Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP) is to demonstrate the safe irradiation and handling of the mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) Fuel Average Power Test (APT) experiment as required by Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) 3.9.1 (LMITCO 1998). This ESAP addresses the specific operation of the MOX Fuel APT experiment with respect to the operating envelope for irradiation established by the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO 1997a). Experiment handling activities are discussed herein.

  1. Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) High-Power Mixed-Oxide (MOX) Fuel Irradiation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wachs, G. W.

    1998-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The High-Power MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. The purpose of the high-power experiment, in conjunction with the currently ongoing average-power experiment at the ATR, is to contribute new information concerning the response of WG plutonium under more severe irradiation conditions typical of the peak power locations in commercial reactors. In addition, the high-power test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the database required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues. The distinction between "high-power" and "average-power" relates to the position within the nominal CLWR core. The high-power test project is subject to a number of requirements, as discussed in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation High-Power Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-125).

  2. A protocol for an exploratory phase I mixed-methods study of enhanced integrated care for care home residents with advanced dementia: the Compassion Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Margaret; Harrington, Jane; Moore, Kirsten; Davis, Sarah; Kupeli, Nuriye; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Gola, Anna; Candy, Bridget; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Jones, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the UK approximately 700 000 people are living with, and a third of people aged over 65 will die with, dementia. People with dementia may receive poor quality care towards the end of life. We applied a realist approach and used mixed methods to develop a complex intervention to improve care for people with advanced dementia and their family carers. Consensus on intervention content was achieved using the RAND UCLA appropriateness method and mapped to sociological theories of process and impact. Core components are: (1) facilitation of integrated care, (2) education, training and support, (3) investment from commissioners and care providers. We present the protocol for an exploratory phase I study to implement components 1 and 2 in order to understand how the intervention operates in practice and to assess feasibility and acceptability. Methods and analysis An ‘Interdisciplinary Care Leader (ICL)’ will work within two care homes, alongside staff and associated professionals to facilitate service integration, encourage structured needs assessment, develop the use of personal and advance care plans and support staff training. We will use qualitative and quantitative methods to collect data for a range of outcome and process measures to detect effects on individual residents, family carers, care home staff, the intervention team, the interdisciplinary team and wider systems. Analysis will include descriptive statistics summarising process and care home level data, individual demographic and clinical characteristics and data on symptom burden, clinical events and quality of care. Qualitative data will be explored using thematic analysis. Findings will inform a future phase II trial. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was granted (REC reference 14/LO/0370). We shall publish findings at conferences, in peer-reviewed journals, on the Marie Curie Cancer Care website and prepare reports for dissemination by organisations involved with end

  3. Advancing the experimental design for simultaneous acquisition of laser induced plasma and Raman signals using a single pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Jin; Choi, Jae-Jun; Yoh, Jack J.

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous acquisition was performed of combined signals that show highly resolved and identifiable peaks of both LIBS and Raman signals. A LIBS-Raman combination using a single light source is a daunting task, because the energy required for Raman shift is relatively low, compared to the energy required for laser ablation. Here, we utilize an expanded-focused beam that allows simultaneous detection of the signals of laser induced plasma and Raman shift. A beam expander obtains the Raman signal with minimized interference from the plasma, and a focusing lens of small diameter generates strong laser induced plasma for LIBS. The position of the focusing lens can be adjusted to control the area of Raman scattering to ensure a strong Raman signal. In the proposed design, the key to minimized interference is to generate the Raman scattering apart from the plasma, which allows for sufficiently long gate width and wide area for Raman detection. Furthermore, axial relocation of the end of the optical fiber can easily optimize the Raman, LIBS, or combined Raman-LIBS signal.

  4. Mixing-induced CP violation in B{yields}P{sub 1}P{sub 2}{gamma} in search of clean new physics signals

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, David; Gershon, Tim; Hazumi, Masashi; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-04-01

    We show that in a decay of the form B{sub d} or B{sub s}{yields}P{sub 1}P{sub 2}{gamma} (where P{sub 1} and P{sub 2} are pseudoscalar mesons), through a flavor changing dipole transition, time dependent oscillations can reveal the presence of physics beyond the standard model. If P{sub 1} and P{sub 2} are CP eigenstates (e.g. as in B{sub d}{yields}K{sub S}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}), then to leading order in the effective Hamiltonian, the oscillation is independent of the resonance structure. Thus data from resonances as well as from nonresonant decays can be included. This may significantly enhance the sensitivity to new physics of the method. If P{sub 1} is a charged particle, and P{sub 2} its antiparticle (e.g. as in B{sub d}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma}), one has the additional advantage that both the magnitude and the weak phase of any new physics contribution can be determined from a study of the angular distribution. These signals offer excellent ways to detect new physics because they are suppressed in the standard model. We also show that the potential contamination of these signals originating from the standard model annihilation diagram gives rise to photons with, to a very good approximation, the same helicity as the dominant penguin graph and thus causes no serious difficulty. The formalism which applies to the case where P{sub 1} and P{sub 2} are C eigenstates also further generalizes to the case of final states containing multiple C eigenstates and a photon. This suggests several additional channels to search for new physics, such as K{sub S}{eta}{sup '}({eta}){gamma}, {phi}K{sub S}{gamma} etc. We also emphasize that the contribution of nondipole interactions can be monitored by the dependence of the mixing-induced CP asymmetry of nonresonant modes on the Dalitz variables. Furthermore, using a number of different final states can also provide important information on the contribution from nondipole effects.

  5. Topics of LIGO physics: Template banks for the inspiral of precessing, compact binaries, and design of the signal-recycling cavity for advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi

    This thesis deals with the detection of gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of precessing, compact binaries using interferometric gravitational- wave detectors (e.g., LIGO), and the design of the signal-recycling cavity for Advanced LIGO (the second generation LIGO). The detection of complicated signals from the inspiral of precessing binaries using the standard matched filter technique requires a computational cost far exceeding what is available with current technology. Alessandra Buonanno, Yanbei Chen, and Michele Vallisneri (BCV) proposed the use of detection template families (DTFs)---phenomenological templates capable of mimicking inspiral waveforms while having simpler functional forms. In Chapter 2 (in collaboration with BCV, and Hideyuki Tagoshi), a BCV2 DTF suggested by BCV is studied. We show a good signal-matching performance of this DTF, propose a template-placement strategy, and estimate that the computational cost required by this DTF is feasible. We also propose a BCV2P DTF to estimate binary parameters. In Chapters 3 and 4 (in collaboration with BCV), I investigate a physical template family (PTF) suggested by BCV. This PTF uses the most accurate known waveforms for inspiraling, precessing binaries with one spinning component, formulated using a new precessing convention to reduce computational cost. PTF has the obvious advantages of a perfect signal snatching, a lower false-alarm rate, and direct estimates of binary parameters. We show how this PTF can be used to detect inspiral waveforms from general precessing binaries. The second part of this thesis concerns a potential problem in the current design of the signal-recycling cavity (SRC) for Advanced LIGO: The SRC is nearly degenerate. In Chapter 5, I show with a numerical simulation that if the current design is used, there will be a serious constraint on the magnitude of mirror deformations, in order to keep the reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio below a few percent. This

  6. Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) induces apoptosis in human retinal ARPE-19 cells via promoting mitochondrial dysfunction and activating the Fas-FasL signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Xing, Yiqiao; Chen, Changzheng; Chen, Zhen; Qian, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are extremely accumulated in the retinal vascular and epithelial cells of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, particularly with diabetic retinopathy (DR). To elucidate the pathogenesis of the AGE-induced toxicity to retinal epithelial cells, we investigated the role of Fas-Fas ligand (FasL) signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction in the AGE-induced apoptosis. Results demonstrated that the AGE-BSA- induced apoptosis of retinal ARPE-19 cells. And the AGE-BSA treatment caused mitochondrial dysfunction, via deregulating the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) signaling. Moreover, the Fas/FasL and its downstreamer Caspase 8 were promoted by the AGE-BSA treatment, and the exogenous α-Fas exacerbated the activation of Caspase 3/8. On the other side, the siRNA-mediated knockdown of Fas/FasL inhibited the AGE-BSA-induced apoptosis. Taken together, we confirmed the activation of Fas-FasL signaling and of mitochondrial dysfunction in the AGE-BSA-promoted apoptosis in retinal ARPE-19 cells, implying the important role of Fas-FasL signaling in the DR in DM. PMID:26479732

  7. Genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs identifies candidate genes involved in T helper cells and macrophage signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted a genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs from a highly endemic area in Brazil using 149,648 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers genotyped in 20 cases and 28 controls. Using a mixed model approach, we found two candidate loci on canine autosomes 1 and 2....

  8. CoMPASs: IOn programme (Care Of Memory Problems in Advanced Stages of dementia: Improving Our Knowledge): protocol for a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Louise; Harrington, Jane; Scott, Sharon; Davis, Sarah; Lord, Kathryn; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Round, Jeff; Candy, Bridget; Sampson, Elizabeth L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 700 000 people in the UK have dementia, rising to 1.2 million by 2050; one-third of people aged over 65 will die with dementia. Good end-of-life care is often neglected, and detailed UK-based research on symptom burden and needs is lacking. Our project examines these issues from multiple perspectives using a rigorous and innovative design, collecting data which will inform the development of pragmatic interventions to improve care. Methods and analysis To define in detail symptom burden, service provision and factors affecting care pathways we shall use mixed methods: prospective cohort studies of people with advanced dementia and their carers; workshops and interactive interviews with health professionals and carers, and a workshop with people with early stage dementia. Interim analyses of cohort data will inform new scenarios for workshops and interviews. Final analysis will include cohort demographics, the symptom burden and health service use over the follow-up period. We shall explore the level and nature of unmet needs, describing how comfort and quality of life change over time and differences between those living in care homes and those remaining in their own homes. Data from workshops and interviews will be analysed for thematic content assisted by textual grouping software. Findings will inform the development of a complex intervention in the next phase of the research programme. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was granted by National Health Service ethical committees for studies involving people with dementia and carers (REC refs. 12/EE/0003; 12/LO/0346), and by university ethics committee for work with healthcare professionals (REC ref. 3578/001). We shall present our findings at conferences, and in peer-reviewed journals, prepare detailed reports for organisations involved with end-of-life care and dementia, publicising results on the Marie Curie website. A summary of the research will be provided to participants

  9. Advanced glycation end products induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ down-regulation-related inflammatory signals in human chondrocytes via Toll-like receptor-4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying Ju; Sheu, Meei Ling; Tsai, Keh Sung; Yang, Rong Sen; Liu, Shing Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in joints is important in the development of cartilage destruction and damage in age-related osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in AGEs-induced inflammatory signalings in human OA chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were isolated and cultured. The productions of metalloproteinase-13 and interleukin-6 were quantified using the specific ELISA kits. The expressions of related signaling proteins were determined by Western blotting. Our results showed that AGEs enhanced the productions of interleukin-6 and metalloproteinase-13 and the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 and high-mobility group protein B1 and resulted in the reduction of collagen II expression in human OA chondrocytes. AGEs could also activate nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. Stimulation of human OA chondrocytes with AGEs significantly induced the up-regulation of TLR4 and RAGE expressions and the down-regulation of PPARγ expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Neutralizing antibodies of TLR4 and RAGE effectively reversed the AGEs-induced inflammatory signalings and PPARγ down-regulation. PPARγ agonist pioglitazone could also reverse the AGEs-increased inflammatory signalings. Specific inhibitors for p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and NF-κB suppressed AGEs-induced PPARγ down-regulation and reduction of collagen II expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that AGEs induce PPARγ down-regulation-mediated inflammatory signalings and reduction of collagen II expression in human OA chondrocytes via TLR4 and RAGE, which may play a crucial role in the development of osteoarthritis pathogenesis induced by AGEs accumulation. PMID:23776688

  10. Functional Proteomic Analysis of Advanced Serous Ovarian Cancer using Reverse Phase Protein Array: TGFβ Pathway Signaling Indicates Response to Primary Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Mark S.; Agarwal, Roshan; Gilks, Blake; Swenerton, Kenneth; Kalloger, Steve; Santos, Jennifer; Ju, Zhenlin; Lu, Yiling; Zhang, Fan; Coombes, Kevin; Miller, Dianne; Huntsman, David; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Using Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) we measured protein expression associated with response to primary chemotherapy in patients with advanced-stage high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Experimental Design: Tumor samples were obtained from forty-five patients with advanced high-grade serous cancers from the Gynecology Tumor Bank at the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Treatment consisted of platinum-based chemotherapy following debulking surgery. Protein lysates were prepared from fresh frozen tumor samples and 80 validated proteins from signaling pathways implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis were measured by RPPA. Normalization of Ca-125 by the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy was chosen as the primary outcome measure of chemotherapy response. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis to identify protein predictors of Ca-125 normalization, and Cox regression to test for the association between protein expression and PFS. A significance level of p ≤ 0.05 was used. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 56.8 years. EGFR, YKL-40 and several TGFβ pathway proteins (c-Jun N-terminal kinase JNK, JNK phosphorylated at residues 183 and 185, PAI-1, Smad3, TAZ) showed significant associations with Ca-125 normalization on univariate testing. On multivariate analysis, EGFR (p < 0.02), JNK (p < 0.01), and Smad3 (p < 0.04) were significantly associated with normalization of Ca-125. Contingency table analysis of pathway-classified proteins revealed that the selection of TGFβ pathway proteins was unlikely due to false discovery (p < 0.007, Bonferroni-adjusted). Conclusion: TGFβ pathway signaling likely plays an important role as a marker or mediator of chemoresistance in advanced serous ovarian cancer. On this basis, future studies to develop and validate a useful predictor of treatment failure are warranted. PMID:20460476

  11. An advanced 500-MHZ-bandwidth fiber-optic signal link for EMP and general laboratory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    Means have been found to control modal noise in a fiber-optic system using single-mode lasers. Laser coherence is reduced by dithering, and careful attention is given to fiber connections. These techniques, in combination with miniaturization, have produced a compact wideband analog fiber-optic link that is well suited to signal transmission where dielectric transmission is dictated by electrical noise, need for complete isolation, TEMPEST considerations, or a requirement for wide bandwidth. The optical transmitter has a volume of 550 cc, contains an optically remote-controlled 0- to 45-dB input attenuator and calibrator, and will operate for 2 hr on its internal batteries. Maximum input sensitivity is a few millivolts into 50 ohms, system risetime in 0.8 ns, and dynamic range is greater than 30 dB. Transmission distances up to kilometers are possible, although fiber dispersion will reduce bandwidth at long distances.

  12. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  13. ARG2 impairs endothelial autophagy through regulation of MTOR and PRKAA/AMPK signaling in advanced atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yuyan; Yepuri, Gautham; Forbiteh, Michael; Yu, Yi; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Yang, Zhihong; Ming, Xiu-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Impaired autophagy function and enhanced ARG2 (arginase 2)-MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) crosstalk are implicated in vascular aging and atherosclerosis. We are interested in the role of ARG2 and the potential underlying mechanism(s) in modulation of endothelial autophagy. Using human nonsenescent “young” and replicative senescent endothelial cells as well as Apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoe−/−Arg2+/+) and Arg2-deficient apoe−/− (apoe−/−arg2−/−) mice fed a high-fat diet for 10 wk as the atherosclerotic animal model, we show here that overexpression of ARG2 in the young cells suppresses endothelial autophagy with concomitant enhanced expression of RICTOR, the essential component of the MTORC2 complex, leading to activation of the AKT-MTORC1-RPS6KB1/S6K1 (ribosomal protein S6 kinase, 70kDa, polypeptide 1) cascade and inhibition of PRKAA/AMPK (protein kinase, AMP-activated, α catalytic subunit). Expression of an inactive ARG2 mutant (H160F) had the same effect. Moreover, silencing RPS6KB1 or expression of a constitutively active PRKAA prevented autophagy suppression by ARG2 or H160F. In senescent cells, enhanced ARG2-RICTOR-AKT-MTORC1-RPS6KB1 and decreased PRKAA signaling and autophagy were observed, which was reversed by silencing ARG2 but not by arginase inhibitors. In line with the above observations, genetic ablation of Arg2 in apoe−/− mice reduced RPS6KB1, enhanced PRKAA signaling and endothelial autophagy in aortas, which was associated with reduced atherosclerosis lesion formation. Taken together, the results demonstrate that ARG2 impairs endothelial autophagy independently of the L-arginine ureahydrolase activity through activation of RPS6KB1 and inhibition of PRKAA, which is implicated in atherogenesis. PMID:25484082

  14. Cardiomyocyte mitochondrial respiration is reduced by receptor for advanced glycation end-product signaling in a ceramide-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael B; Swensen, Adam C; Winden, Duane R; Bodine, Jared S; Bikman, Benjamin T; Reynolds, Paul R

    2015-07-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications. The role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is already well established in numerous comorbidities, including cardiomyopathy. Given the role of AGEs and their receptor, RAGE, in activating inflammatory pathways, we sought to determine whether ceramides could be a mediator of RAGE-induced altered heart mitochondrial function. Using an in vitro model, we treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes with the AGE carboxy-methyllysine before mitochondrial respiration assessment. We discovered that mitochondrial respiration was significantly impaired in AGE-treated cells, but not when cotreated with myriocin, an inhibitor of de novo ceramide biosynthesis. Moreover, we exposed wild-type and RAGE knockout mice to secondhand cigarette smoke and found reduced mitochondrial respiration in the left ventricular myocardium from wild-type mice, but RAGE knockout mice were protected from this effect. Finally, conditional overexpression of RAGE in the lungs of transgenic mice elicited a robust increase in left ventricular ceramides in the absence of smoke exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest a RAGE-ceramide axis as an important contributor to AGE-mediated disrupted cardiomyocyte mitochondrial function. PMID:25957215

  15. Advancing Collaboration between School- and Agency-Employed School-Based Social Workers: A Mixed-Methods Comparison of Competencies and Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronstein, Laura R.; Ball, Annahita; Mellin, Elizabeth A.; Wade-Mdivanian, Rebecca; Anderson-Butcher, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share results of a mixed-methods research study designed to shed light on similarities and differences between school-employed and agency-employed school-based social workers' preparation and practice as a precursor for collaboration in expanded school mental health. Online survey data from a national sample of…

  16. Mixed Quantum-Classical Simulations of Transient Absorption Pump-Probe Signals for a Photo-Induced Electron Transfer Reaction Coupled to an Inner-Sphere Vibrational Mode.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Franz; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-05-19

    In a previous study (Martinez, F.; Hanna, G. Chem. Phys. Lett. 2013, 573, 77-83), we demonstrated the ability of two approximate solutions of the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) for qualitatively capturing the electronic dynamics in the pump-probe transient absorption (TA) signal of a model of a condensed phase photoinduced electron transfer reaction whose ground and excited donor states have the same equilibrium geometry. However, the question remained as to the ability of these solutions to treat the more complex situation in which the electronic states are coupled to a low-frequency inner-sphere harmonic vibrational mode (representing an intramolecular mode of the donor-acceptor complex) that shifts their equilibrium geometries with respect to each other and thereby gives rise to signatures of vibrational dynamics in the TA signal. Thus, in this study, we investigated this situation by treating the vibrational mode both quantum mechanically and classically within the context of the approximate Poisson bracket mapping equation (PBME) and forward-backward trajectory solutions (FBTS) of the QCLE. Depending on the definition of the quantum subsystem, both PBME and FBTS are capable of qualitatively capturing several of the main features in the exact TA signal and quantitatively capturing the characteristic time scale of the vibrational dynamics, despite the moderately strong subsystem-bath coupling in this model. Particularly, we found that treating the vibrational mode quantum mechanically using either PBME or FBTS better captures the signatures of the vibrational dynamics, while treating it classically using FBTS better captures the decay in the signal. These findings underscore the utility of the PBME and FBTS approaches for efficiently modeling and interpreting TA signals. PMID:26766568

  17. 50-200 GHz Silicon-Germanium Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor BICMOS Technology and a Computer-Aided Design Environment for 2--50+ GHz Very Large-Scale Integration Mixed-Signal ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbanna, Seshadri; Freeman, Gregory; Rieh, Jae-Sung; Ahlgren, David; Stein, Kenneth; Dickey, Carl; Mecke, James; Bacon, Peter; Groves, Robert; Meghelli, Mounir; Soyuer, Mehmet; Jagannathan, Basanth; Schonenberg, Kathryn; Jeng, Shwu-Jen; Joseph, Alvin; Coolbaugh, Douglas; Volant, Richard; Greenberg, David; Chen, Huajie; Brelsford, Kevin; Harame, David; Dunn, James; Larson, Lawrence; Herman, Dean; Meyerson, Bernard

    2002-02-01

    Silicon-germanium (SiGe) heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) BICMOS technology is a stable, ultra-high performance, semiconductor technology capable of supporting mixed-signal, very large-scale integration (VLSI) circuit designs for a variety of emerging communication applications. This technology is supported by a computer-aided design (CAD) system that supports a variety of high-performance circuit designs, mixed-signal circuit block reuse, and the ability to accurately predict circuit performance at the highest frequencies. This paper summarizes the progress this technology has made in recent years in moving from the research laboratory to a production environment. We also specifically address performance, operating voltage, reliability and integration considerations for using 100--200 GHz SiGe HBTs in high-speed (10--40 Gb/s) network ICs, an application space previously only addressed by InP technology. All indications are that SiGe will be very successful at addressing this new application space, and all facets of the networking IC market.

  18. Rational chemical design of the next generation of molecular imaging probes based on physics and biology: mixing modalities, colors and signals

    PubMed Central

    Longmire, Michelle R.; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, numerous in vivo molecular imaging probes have been developed. As a consequence, much has been published on the design and synthesis of molecular imaging probes focusing on each modality, each type of material, or each target disease. More recently, second generation molecular imaging probes with unique, multi-functional, or multiplexed characteristics have been designed. This critical review focuses on (i) molecular imaging using combinations of modalities and signals that employ the full range of the electromagnetic spectra, (ii) optimized chemical design of molecular imaging probes for in vivo kinetics based on biology and physiology across a range of physical sizes, (iii) practical examples of second generation molecular imaging probes designed to extract complementary data from targets using multiple modalities, color, and comprehensive signals (277 references). PMID:21607237

  19. Barriers and Facilitators to Career Advancement by Top-Level, Entry-Level and Non-Administrative Women in Public School Districts: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Eman Ibrahim El-Desouki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the barriers and facilitators to career advancement among women administrators occupying top-level positions, those occupying entry-level positions and those in non-administrative positions in both rural and urban public school districts in central Pennsylvania. The need to increase the awareness of the…

  20. Receptor for advanced glycation end-products regulates lung fluid balance via protein kinase C-gp91(phox) signaling to epithelial sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Downs, Charles A; Kreiner, Lisa H; Johnson, Nicholle M; Brown, Lou Ann; Helms, My N

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), a multiligand member of the Ig family, may play a crucial role in the regulation of lung fluid balance. We quantified soluble RAGE (sRAGE), a decoy isoform, and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of smokers and nonsmokers, and tested the hypothesis that AGEs regulate lung fluid balance through protein kinase C (PKC)-gp91(phox) signaling to the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Human bronchoalveolar lavage samples from smokers showed increased AGEs (9.02 ± 3.03 μg versus 2.48 ± 0.53 μg), lower sRAGE (1,205 ± 292 pg/ml versus 1,910 ± 263 pg/ml), and lower volume(s) of epithelial lining fluid (97 ± 14 ml versus 133 ± 17 ml). sRAGE levels did not predict ELF volumes in nonsmokers; however, in smokers, higher volumes of ELF were predicted with higher levels of sRAGE. Single-channel patch clamp analysis of rat alveolar epithelial type 1 cells showed that AGEs increased ENaC activity measured as the product of the number of channels (N) and the open probability (Po) (NPo) from 0.19 ± 0.08 to 0.83 ± 0.22 (P = 0.017) and the subsequent addition of 4-hydroxy-2, 2, 6, 6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl decreased ENaC NPo to 0.15 ± 0.07 (P = 0.01). In type 2 cells, human AGEs increased ENaC NPo from 0.12 ± 0.05 to 0.53 ± 0.16 (P = 0.025) and the addition of 4-hydroxy-2, 2, 6, 6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl decreased ENaC NPo to 0.10 ± 0.03 (P = 0.013). Using molecular and biochemical techniques, we observed that inhibition of RAGE and PKC activity attenuated AGE-induced activation of ENaC. AGEs induced phosphorylation of p47(phox) and increased gp91(phox)-dependent reactive oxygen species production, a response that was abrogated with RAGE or PKC inhibition. Finally, tracheal instillation of AGEs promoted clearance of lung fluid, whereas concomitant inhibition of RAGE, PKC, and gp91(phox) abrogated the response. PMID:24978055

  1. Generation of phase difference between self-mixing signals in a-cut Nd:YVO₄ laser with a waveplate in the external cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Tan, Yidong; Zhang, Shulian

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel method using Nd:YVO4 laser with a waveplate in the external cavity to generate two orthogonally polarized signals with stable and adjustable phase difference. The phase difference is observed in the presence of external interference, and it is determined by the phase retardation of the waveplate. A model based on birefringent external-interference effect is proposed to theoretically explain the phase difference phenomenon, and the arithmetic solution of the relation between the phase difference and the phase retardation of waveplate is given. The simulated results accord with the experimental phenomena. This Letter provides the possibility for the measurement of phase retardation and also offers guidance to the design of interferometers based on fringe counting technique. PMID:26258371

  2. Performance of Thorium-Based Mixed Oxide Fuels for the Consumption of Plutonium and Minor Actinides in Current and Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Herring, James Stephen

    2002-06-01

    A renewed interest in thorium-based fuels has arisen lately based on the need for proliferation resistance, longer fuel cycles, higher burnup and improved wasteform characteristics. Recent studies have been directed toward homogeneously mixed, heterogeneously mixed, and seed-and-blanket thorium-uranium fuel cycles that rely on "in situ" use of the bred-in U-233. However, due to the higher initial enrichment required to achieve acceptable burnups, these fuels are encountering economic constraints. Thorium can nevertheless play a large role in the nuclear fuel cycle; particularly in the reduction of plutonium. While uranium-based mixedoxide (MOX) fuel will decrease the amount of plutonium, the reduction is limited due to the breeding of more plutonium (and higher actinides) from the U-238. Here we present calculational results and a comparison of the potential burnup of a thorium-based and uranium-based mixed oxide fuel in a light water reactor (LWR). Although the uranium-based fuels outperformed the thorium-based fuels in achievable burnup, a depletion comparison of the initially charged plutonium (both reactor and weapons grade) showed that the thorium-based fuels outperformed the uranium-based fuels by more that a factor of 2; where more than 70% of the total plutonium in the thorium-based fuel is consumed during the cycle. This is significant considering that the achievable burnup of the thorium-based fuels were 1.4 to 4.6 times less than the uranium-based fuels. Furthermore, use of a thorium-based fuel could also be used as a strategy for reducing the amount of long-lived nuclides (including the minor actinides), and thus the radiotoxicity in spent nuclear fuel. Although the breeding of U-233 is a concern, the presence of U-232 and its daughter products can aid in making this fuel self-protecting, and/or enough U-238 can be added to denature the fissile uranium. From these calculations, it appears that thorium-based fuel for plutonium incineration is superior as

  3. Advanced Glycation End Products Affect Osteoblast Proliferation and Function by Modulating Autophagy Via the Receptor of Advanced Glycation End Products/Raf Protein/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Kinase/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (RAGE/Raf/MEK/ERK) Pathway.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hong-Zheng; Zhang, Wei-Lin; Liu, Fei; Yang, Mao-Wei

    2015-11-20

    The interaction between advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and receptor of AGEs (RAGE) is associated with the development and progression of diabetes-associated osteoporosis, but the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. In this study, we found that AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) induced a biphasic effect on the viability of hFOB1.19 cells; cell proliferation was stimulated after exposure to low dose AGE-BSA, but cell apoptosis was stimulated after exposure to high dose AGE-BSA. The low dose AGE-BSA facilitates proliferation of hFOB1.19 cells by concomitantly promoting autophagy, RAGE production, and the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway activation. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of AGE-BSA on the function of hFOB1.19 cells. Interestingly, the results suggest that the short term effects of low dose AGE-BSA increase osteogenic function and decrease osteoclastogenic function, which are likely mediated by autophagy and the RAGE/Raf/MEK/ERK signal pathway. In contrast, with increased treatment time, the opposite effects were observed. Collectively, AGE-BSA had a biphasic effect on the viability of hFOB1.19 cells in vitro, which was determined by the concentration of AGE-BSA and treatment time. A low concentration of AGE-BSA activated the Raf/MEK/ERK signal pathway through the interaction with RAGE, induced autophagy, and regulated the proliferation and function of hFOB1.19 cells. PMID:26472922

  4. Design and characterization of a mixed-signal PCB for digital-to-analog conversion in a modular and scalable infrared scene projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, Jacob

    Infra-red (IR) sensors have proven instrumental in a wide variety of fields from military to industrial applications. The proliferation of IR sensors has spawned an intense push for technologies that can test and calibrate the multitudes of IR sensors. One such technology, IR scene projection (IRSP), provides an inexpensive and safe method for the testing of IR sensor devices. Previous efforts have been conducted to develop IRSPs based on super-lattice light emitting diodes (SLEDS). A single-color 512x512 SLEDs system has been developed, produced, and tested as documented in Corey Lange's Master's thesis, and a GOMAC paper by Rodney McGee [1][2]. Current efforts are being undergone to develop a two-color 512x512 SLEDs system designated (TCSA). The following thesis discusses the design and implementation of a custom printed circuit board (PCB), known as the FMC 4DAC, that contains both analog and digital signals. Utilizing two 16-bit digital-to-analog converters (DAC) the purpose of the board is to provide four analog current output channels for driving the TCSA system to a maximum frame rate of 1 kHz. In addition, the board supports a scalable TCSA system architecture. Several copies of the board can be run in parallel to achieve a range of analog channels between 4 and 32.

  5. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A(AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: METSAT A1 Signal Processor, (P/N 1331670-2, S /N F05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, D.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a description of the tests performed, and the test data, for the AI METSAT Signal Processor Assembly P/N 1331670-2, S/N F05. The assembly was tested in accordance with AE-26754, "METSAT Signal Processor Scan Drive and Integration Procedure." The objective is to demonstrate functionality of the signal processor prior to instrument integration.

  6. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  7. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from the first ... disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive assessments followed by ...

  8. Theoretical modeling of large molecular systems. Advances in the local self consistent field method for mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations.

    PubMed

    Monari, Antonio; Rivail, Jean-Louis; Assfeld, Xavier

    2013-02-19

    Molecular mechanics methods can efficiently compute the macroscopic properties of a large molecular system but cannot represent the electronic changes that occur during a chemical reaction or an electronic transition. Quantum mechanical methods can accurately simulate these processes, but they require considerably greater computational resources. Because electronic changes typically occur in a limited part of the system, such as the solute in a molecular solution or the substrate within the active site of enzymatic reactions, researchers can limit the quantum computation to this part of the system. Researchers take into account the influence of the surroundings by embedding this quantum computation into a calculation of the whole system described at the molecular mechanical level, a strategy known as the mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The accuracy of this embedding varies according to the types of interactions included, whether they are purely mechanical or classically electrostatic. This embedding can also introduce the induced polarization of the surroundings. The difficulty in QM/MM calculations comes from the splitting of the system into two parts, which requires severing the chemical bonds that link the quantum mechanical subsystem to the classical subsystem. Typically, researchers replace the quantoclassical atoms, those at the boundary between the subsystems, with a monovalent link atom. For example, researchers might add a hydrogen atom when a C-C bond is cut. This Account describes another approach, the Local Self Consistent Field (LSCF), which was developed in our laboratory. LSCF links the quantum mechanical portion of the molecule to the classical portion using a strictly localized bond orbital extracted from a small model molecule for each bond. In this scenario, the quantoclassical atom has an apparent nuclear charge of +1. To achieve correct bond lengths and force constants, we must take into account the inner shell of

  9. [Mixed states and schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fakra, E; Belzeaux, R; Pringuey, D; Cermolacce, M; Corréard, N; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Azorin, J-M

    2013-12-01

    Because of their compilation of contrasted symptoms and their variable clinical presentation, mixed episodes have been withdrawn from the DSM. However, mixed states question not only the bonds between depression and mania, but also the distinction between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Indeed, doubts about the dichotomy introduced by Kraepelin between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia is as old as the nosolgy itself, as attest the later works of this author revealing his hesitations on his own classification. But findings here reviewed issued from recent technical advances, particularly in the imaging and genetic fields, offer a better understanding of the boundaries between these two disorders. Yet, when confronted to an acute episode, clinicians may find it challenging to distinguish a mixed state from a schizophrenic relapse. Indeed, there is no pathognomonic manifestation allowing to retain a diagnosis with confidence. The physician will therefore have to identify a pattern of signs, which will orient his assessment with no certainty. Thus, negative rather than affective or psychotic symptomatology appears to be useful in discriminating schizophrenia (or schizoaffective) disorders from mixed mania. However, a conclusion during this acute stage appears in definitive a formal exercise, first because the final diagnosis will only be ascertained once the symptoms are amended, and second because, according to our classifications, a mood episode, including mania and mixed mania, can be observed without ruling out the diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:24359851

  10. Gibberellin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hartweck, Lynn M

    2008-12-01

    This review covers recent advances in gibberellin (GA) signaling. GA signaling is now understood to hinge on DELLA proteins. DELLAs negatively regulate GA response by activating the promoters of several genes including Xerico, which upregulates the abscisic acid pathway which is antagonistic to GA. DELLAs also promote transcription of the GA receptor, GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF 1 (GID1) and indirectly regulate GA biosynthesis genes enhancing GA responsiveness and feedback control. A structural analysis of GID1 provides a model for understanding GA signaling. GA binds within a pocket of GID1, changes GID1 conformation and increases the affinity of GID1 for DELLA proteins. GA/GID1/DELLA has increased affinity for an F-Box protein and DELLAs are subsequently degraded via the proteasome. Therefore, GA induces growth through degradation of the DELLAs. The binding of DELLA proteins to three of the PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF) proteins integrates light and GA signaling pathways. This binding prevents PIFs 3, 4, and 5 from functioning as positive transcriptional regulators of growth in the dark. Since PIFs are degraded in light, these PIFs can only function in the combined absence of light and presence of GA. New analyses suggest that GA signaling evolved at the same time or just after the plant vascular system and before plants acquired the capacity for seed reproduction. An analysis of sequences cloned from Physcomitrella suggests that GID1 and DELLAs were the first to evolve but did not initially interact. The more recently diverging spike moss Selaginella has all the genes required for GA biosynthesis and signaling, but the role of GA response in Selaginella physiology remains a mystery. PMID:18936962

  11. Advanced bone formation in mice with a dominant-negative mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor β gene due to activation of Wnt/β-catenin protein signaling.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Patrick J; Kim, Dong Wook; Logan, John G; Davis, Sean; Walker, Robert L; Meltzer, Paul S; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Williams, Graham R

    2012-05-18

    Thyroid hormone (T(3)) acts in chondrocytes and bone-forming osteoblasts to control bone development and maintenance, but the signaling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Thrb(PV/PV) mice have a severely impaired pituitary-thyroid axis and elevated thyroid hormone levels due to a dominant-negative mutant T(3) receptor (TRβ(PV)) that cannot bind T(3) and interferes with the actions of wild-type TR. Thrb(PV/PV) mice have accelerated skeletal development due to unknown mechanisms. We performed microarray studies in primary osteoblasts from wild-type mice and Thrb(PV/PV) mice. Activation of the canonical Wnt signaling in Thrb(PV/PV) mice was confirmed by in situ hybridization analysis of Wnt target gene expression in bone during postnatal growth. By contrast, T(3) treatment inhibited Wnt signaling in osteoblastic cells, suggesting that T(3) inhibits the Wnt pathway by facilitating proteasomal degradation of β-catenin and preventing its accumulation in the nucleus. Activation of the Wnt pathway in Thrb(PV/PV) mice, however, results from a gain of function for TRβ(PV) that stabilizes β-catenin despite the presence of increased thyroid hormone levels. These studies demonstrate novel interactions between T(3) and Wnt signaling pathways in the regulation of skeletal development and bone formation. PMID:22442145

  12. Measuring Young's modulus using a self-mixing laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ke; Yu, Yanguang; Xi, Jiangtao; Fan, Yuanlong; Li, Huijun

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for determining the Young's modulus by using a self-mixing laser diode (SMLD). An SMLD system consists of a laser diode (LD), a microlens and an external target. With a small portion of light backscatterd or reflected by the target re-entering the LD inside cavity, both the amplitude and frequency of the LD power are modulated. This modulated LD power is referred as a self-mixing signal (SMS) which is detected by the photodiode (PD) packaged in the rear of the LD. The external target is the tested sample which is in damping vibration excited by a singular elastic strike with an impulse tool. The vibration information from the tested sample is carried in the SMS. Advanced data processing in frequency-domain is applied on the SMS, from which the resonant frequency of the vibration can be retrieved, and hence Young's modulus is calculated. The proposed method has been verified by simulations.

  13. Polarisation filtering of magnetotelluric data - Using an advanced wavelet processing scheme to discriminate between contribution of signal and noise to the data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoldt, J.; Jones, A. G.; Garcia, X. A.

    2009-12-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method investigates the structure of the Earth by studying its vertical and lateral electric conductivity distribution. For that purpose natural electromagnetic (EM) fields are measured at Earth’s surface, and thus derive a spatially and frequency dependent impedance response function that can be modelled in terms of Earth structure. Long period natural EM fields (>1 s) are generated by the interaction of electrical charged particles radiated from the Sun with the Earth’s magnetosphere and ionosphere. In phases of low solar activity the source signal for MT is weak, especially at longer periods (>1,000 s) and the effects of noise can result in poor response function estimates. A significant contribution to noise can be cultural sources fixed in space, such as mining areas, electric fences and television transmitters. Electromagnetic waves generated by such sources exhibit a preferential polarisation ellipticity and direction that differs from the natural signals generated at the Earth’s outer magnetosphere and ionosphere. In MT, the ellipticity and direction of the polarisation can be determined because the magnetic component of the electromagnetic field is measured in orthogonal directions. In addition, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) analysis is an efficient way to localize segments of chosen polarisation in the recorded dataset in both time and frequency. We have developed an algorithm that selects data segments according to their polarisation properties allowing us to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of MT responses. After rejecting segments of certain polarisation direction and therefore low signal-to-noise ratio for the signals we wish to record, the remaining data can be used for subsequent conventional MT processing. Using synthetic data and a MT dataset collected during the PICASSO fieldwork campaign in Spain in 2007, we test our pre-processing algorithm. In this paper we present a comparative analysis and results

  14. Rapid mixing kinetic techniques.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephen R; Schilstra, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Almost all of the elementary steps in a biochemical reaction scheme are either unimolecular or bimolecular processes that frequently occur on sub-second, often sub-millisecond, time scales. The traditional approach in kinetic studies is to mix two or more reagents and monitor the changes in concentrations with time. Conventional spectrophotometers cannot generally be used to study reactions that are complete within less than about 20 s, as it takes that amount of time to manually mix the reagents and activate the instrument. Rapid mixing techniques, which generally achieve mixing in less than 2 ms, overcome this limitation. This chapter is concerned with the use of these techniques in the study of reactions which reach equilibrium; the application of these methods to the study of enzyme kinetics is described in several excellent texts (Cornish-Bowden, Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics. Portland Press, 1995; Gutfreund, Kinetics for the life sciences. Receptors, transmitters and catalysis. Cambridge University Press, 1995).There are various ways to monitor changes in concentration of reactants, intermediates and products after mixing, but the most common way is to use changes in optical signals (absorbance or fluorescence) which often accompany reactions. Although absorbance can sometimes be used, fluorescence is often preferred because of its greater sensitivity, particularly in monitoring conformational changes. Such methods are continuous with good time resolution but they seldom permit the direct determination of the concentrations of individual species. Alternatively, samples may be taken from the reaction volume, mixed with a chemical quenching agent to stop the reaction, and their contents assessed by techniques such as HPLC. These methods can directly determine the concentrations of different species, but are discontinuous and have a limited time resolution. PMID:23729251

  15. [Mixed marriages].

    PubMed

    Harmsen, C N

    1998-08-01

    The author examines the extent and characteristics of mixed marriages in the Netherlands. "Nine out of ten married persons born in Turkey or Morocco have a partner who was born in the same country. The majority of married Surinamese also have a partner originating from the same country. Those who spend (a part of) their youth in Indonesia (the former Dutch East Indies), on the other hand, are mostly married to someone born in the Netherlands." (EXCERPT) PMID:12294179

  16. Multichannel signal enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    A mixed adaptive filter is formulated for the signal processing problem where desired a priori signal information is not available. The formulation generates a least squares problem which enables the filter output to be calculated directly from an input data matrix. In one embodiment, a folded processor array enables bidirectional data flow to solve the recursive problem by back substitution without global communications. In another embodiment, a balanced processor array solves the recursive problem by forward elimination through the array. In a particular application to magnetoencephalography, the mixed adaptive filter enables an evoked response to an auditory stimulus to be identified from only a single trial.

  17. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  18. Mixed results with mixed disulfides.

    PubMed

    Brigelius-Flohé, Regina

    2016-04-01

    A period of research with Helmut Sies in the 1980s is recalled. Our experiments aimed at an in-depth understanding of metabolic changes due to oxidative challenges under near-physiological conditions, i.e. perfused organs. A major focus were alterations of the glutathione and the NADPH/NADP(+) system by different kinds of oxidants, in particular formation of glutathione mixed disulfides with proteins. To analyze mixed disulfides, a test was adapted which is widely used until today. The observations in perfused rat livers let us believe that glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), i.a. might be activated by glutathionylation. Although we did not succeed to verify this hypothesis for the special case of G6PDH, the regulation of enzyme/protein activities by glutathionylation today is an accepted posttranslational mechanism in redox biology in general. Our early experimental approaches are discussed in the context of present knowledge. PMID:27095221

  19. Hypothyroidism advances mammary involution in lactating rats through inhibition of PRL signaling and induction of LIF/STAT3 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Campo Verde Arboccó, Fiorella; Sasso, Corina V; Actis, Esteban A; Carón, Rubén W; Hapon, María Belén; Jahn, Graciela A

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid diseases have deleterious effects on lactation, litter growth and survival, and hinder the suckling-induced hormone release, leading in the case of hyperthyroidism, to premature mammary involution. To determine the effects of hypothyroidism (HypoT) on late lactation, we analyzed the effect of chronic 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU)-induced HypoT on mammary histology and the expression of members of the JAK/STAT/SOCS signaling pathway, milk proteins, prolactin (PRLR), estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR) and thyroid hormone (TR) receptors, markers of involution (such as stat3, lif, bcl2, BAX and PARP) on lactation (L) day 21. HypoT mothers showed increased histological markers of involution compared with control rats, such as adipose/epithelial ratio, inactive alveoli, picnotic nuclei and numerous detached apoptotic cells within the alveolar lumina. We also found decreased PRLR, β-casein and α-lactoalbumin mRNAs, but increased SOCS1, SOCS3, STAT3 and LIF mRNAs, suggesting a decrease in PRL signaling and induction of involution markers. Furthermore, Caspase-3 and 8 and PARP labeled cells and the expression of structural proteins such as β-Actin, α-Tubulin and Lamin B were increased, indicating the activation of apoptotic pathways and tissue remodelation. HypoT also increased PRA (mRNA and protein) and erβ and decreased erα mRNAs, and increased strongly TRα1, TRβ1, PRA and ERα protein levels. These results show that lactating HypoT rats have premature mammary involution, most probably induced by the inhibition of prolactin signaling along with the activation of the LIF-STAT3 pathway. PMID:26472537

  20. Mapping the Mixed Methods–Mixed Research Synthesis Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Leeman, Jennifer; Crandell, Jamie L.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed methods–mixed research synthesis is a form of systematic review in which the findings of qualitative and quantitative studies are integrated via qualitative and/or quantitative methods. Although methodological advances have been made, efforts to differentiate research synthesis methods have been too focused on methods and not focused enough on the defining logics of research synthesis—each of which may be operationalized in different ways—or on the research findings themselves that are targeted for synthesis. The conduct of mixed methods–mixed research synthesis studies may more usefully be understood in terms of the logics of aggregation and configuration. Neither logic is preferable to the other nor tied exclusively to any one method or to any one side of the qualitative/quantitative binary. PMID:23066379

  1. Guest Editorial Introduction to the Special Issue on 'Advanced Signal Processing Techniques and Telecommunications Network Infrastructures for Smart Grid Analysis, Monitoring, and Management'

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bracale, Antonio; Barros, Julio; Cacciapuoti, Angela Sara; Chang, Gary; Dall'Anese, Emiliano

    2015-06-10

    Electrical power systems are undergoing a radical change in structure, components, and operational paradigms, and are progressively approaching the new concept of smart grids (SGs). Future power distribution systems will be characterized by the simultaneous presence of various distributed resources, such as renewable energy systems (i.e., photovoltaic power plant and wind farms), storage systems, and controllable/non-controllable loads. Control and optimization architectures will enable network-wide coordination of these grid components in order to improve system efficiency and reliability and to limit greenhouse gas emissions. In this context, the energy flows will be bidirectional from large power plants to end users andmore » vice versa; producers and consumers will continuously interact at different voltage levels to determine in advance the requests of loads and to adapt the production and demand for electricity flexibly and efficiently also taking into account the presence of storage systems.« less

  2. Guest Editorial Introduction to the Special Issue on 'Advanced Signal Processing Techniques and Telecommunications Network Infrastructures for Smart Grid Analysis, Monitoring, and Management'

    SciTech Connect

    Bracale, Antonio; Barros, Julio; Cacciapuoti, Angela Sara; Chang, Gary; Dall'Anese, Emiliano

    2015-06-10

    Electrical power systems are undergoing a radical change in structure, components, and operational paradigms, and are progressively approaching the new concept of smart grids (SGs). Future power distribution systems will be characterized by the simultaneous presence of various distributed resources, such as renewable energy systems (i.e., photovoltaic power plant and wind farms), storage systems, and controllable/non-controllable loads. Control and optimization architectures will enable network-wide coordination of these grid components in order to improve system efficiency and reliability and to limit greenhouse gas emissions. In this context, the energy flows will be bidirectional from large power plants to end users and vice versa; producers and consumers will continuously interact at different voltage levels to determine in advance the requests of loads and to adapt the production and demand for electricity flexibly and efficiently also taking into account the presence of storage systems.

  3. Signal voter

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Roy L.

    1981-01-01

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals, each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  4. Recent advances in the Okamoto model: the CD38-cyclic ADP-ribose signal system and the regenerating gene protein (Reg)-Reg receptor system in beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Takasawa, Shin

    2002-12-01

    Twenty years ago, we first proposed our hypothesis on beta-cell damage and its prevention (the Okamoto model), according to which poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase/polymerase (PARP) activation is critically involved in the consumption of NAD(+), leading to energy depletion and cell death by necrosis. Recently, the model was reconfirmed by results using PARP knockout mice and has been recognized as providing the basis for necrotic death of various cells and tissues. Based on the model, we proposed two signal systems in beta-cells: one is the CD38-cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) signal system for insulin secretion, and the other is the regenerating gene protein (Reg)-Reg receptor system for beta-cell regeneration. The physiological and pathological significance of the two signal systems in a variety of cells and tissues as well as in pancreatic beta-cells has recently been recognized. Here, we describe the Okamoto model and its descendents, the CD38-cADPR signal system and the Reg-Reg receptor system, focusing on recent advances and how their significance came to light. Because PARP is involved in Reg gene transcription to induce beta-cell regeneration, and the PARP activation reduces the cellular NAD(+) to decrease the formation of cADPR (a second messenger for insulin secretion) and further to cause necrotic beta-cell death, PARP and its inhibitors have key roles in the induction of beta-cell regeneration, the maintenance of insulin secretion, and the prevention of beta-cell death. PMID:12475791

  5. Digital processing of bandpass signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. C.; Matthewson, P.

    Modern radar and radio systems rely on digital signal processing to enhance the quality of received signals. Prior to such processing, these signals must be converted to digital form. The historical development of signal digitization is briefly discussed in this paper and leads to a description of some current work on digital mixing. A method of directly sampling a band-limited intermediate frequency (i.f.) signal is presented, using a pair of digital mixer channels to produce complex low-pass samples of the signal envelope. The method is found to produce well matched channel outputs. Finally, the applicability of the method to radar is discussed.

  6. Advanced diagnostic system for piston slap faults in IC engines, based on the non-stationary characteristics of the vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Randall, Robert Bond; Peeters, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) have the potential to solve the problem of automated diagnostics of piston slap faults, but the critical issue for the successful application of ANN is the training of the network by a large amount of data in various engine conditions (different speed/load conditions in normal condition, and with different locations/levels of faults). On the other hand, the latest simulation technology provides a useful alternative in that the effect of clearance changes may readily be explored without recourse to cutting metal, in order to create enough training data for the ANNs. In this paper, based on some existing simplified models of piston slap, an advanced multi-body dynamic simulation software was used to simulate piston slap faults with different speeds/loads and clearance conditions. Meanwhile, the simulation models were validated and updated by a series of experiments. Three-stage network systems are proposed to diagnose piston faults: fault detection, fault localisation and fault severity identification. Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) networks were used in the detection stage and severity/prognosis stage and a Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) was used to identify which cylinder has faults. Finally, it was demonstrated that the networks trained purely on simulated data can efficiently detect piston slap faults in real tests and identify the location and severity of the faults as well.

  7. Implementation of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and advanced signal processing for elastic optical networking in accordance with networking and transmission constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stanley

    An increasing adoption of digital signal processing (DSP) in optical fiber telecommunication has brought to the fore several interesting DSP enabled modulation formats. One such format is orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), which has seen great success in wireless and wired RF applications, and is being actively investigated by several research groups for use in optical fiber telecom. In this dissertation, I present three implementations of OFDM for elastic optical networking and distributed network control. The first is a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based real-time implementation of a version of OFDM conventionally known as intensity modulation and direct detection (IMDD) OFDM. I experimentally demonstrate the ability of this transmission system to dynamically adjust bandwidth and modulation format to meet networking constraints in an automated manner. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first real-time software defined networking (SDN) based control of an OFDM system. In the second OFDM implementation, I experimentally demonstrate a novel OFDM transmission scheme that supports both direct detection and coherent detection receivers simultaneously using the same OFDM transmitter. This interchangeable receiver solution enables a trade-off between bit rate and equipment cost in network deployment and upgrades. I show that the proposed transmission scheme can provide a receiver sensitivity improvement of up to 1.73 dB as compared to IMDD OFDM. I also present two novel polarization analyzer based detection schemes, and study their performance using experiment and simulation. In the third implementation, I present an OFDM pilot-tone based scheme for distributed network control. The first instance of an SDN-based OFDM elastic optical network with pilot-tone assisted distributed control is demonstrated. An improvement in spectral efficiency and a fast reconfiguration time of 30 ms have been achieved in this experiment. Finally, I

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 protects cardiomyocytes from advanced oxidation protein product-induced apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt/Bad signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HUA; XIONG, ZHOUYI; WANG, JIAO; ZHANG, SHUANGSHUANG; LEI, LEI; YANG, LI; ZHANG, ZHEN

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is a major event in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Currently, no single effective treatment for diabetic cardiomyopathy exists. The present study investigated whether advanced oxidative protein products (AOPPs) have a detrimental role in the survival of cardiomyocytes and if glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts a cardioprotective effect under these circumstances. The present study also aimed to determine the underlying mechanisms. H9c2 cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of AOPPs in the presence or absence of GLP-1, and the viability and apoptotic rate were detected using a cell counting kit-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. In addition, a phosphatidylino-sitol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002, was employed to illustrate the mechanism of the antiapoptotic effect of GLP-1. The expression levels of the apoptotic-associated proteins, Akt, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2, Bcl-2-associated death promoter (Bad), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and caspase-3 were measured by western blotting. It was revealed that GLP-1 significantly attenuated AOPP-induced cell toxicity and apoptosis. AOPPs inactivated the phosphorylation of Akt, reduced the phosphorylation of Bad, decreased the expression of Bcl-2, increased the expression of Bax and the activation of caspase-3 in H9c2 cells. GLP-1 reversed the above changes induced by AOPPs and the protective effects of GLP-1 were abolished by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the present data suggested that GLP-1 protected cardiomyocytes against AOPP-induced apoptosis, predominantly via the PI3K/Akt/Bad pathway. These results provided a conceivable mechanism for the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy and rendered a novel application of GLP-1 exerting favorable cardiac effects for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26717963

  9. Comparison of advanced DSP techniques for spectrally efficient Nyquist-WDM signal generation using digital FIR filters at transmitters based on higher-order modulation formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yi; Wang, Junyi; Pan, Zhongqi

    2016-02-01

    To support the ever-increasing demand for high-speed optical communications, Nyquist spectral shaping serves as a promising technique to improve spectral efficiency (SE) by generating near-rectangular spectra with negligible crosstalk and inter-symbol interference in wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) systems. Compared with specially-designed optical methods, DSP-based electrical filters are more flexible as they can generate different filter shapes and modulation formats. However, such transmitter-side pre-filtering approach is sensitive to the limited taps of finite-impulse-response (FIR) filter, for the complexity of the required DSP and digital-to-analog converter (DAC) is limited by the cost and power consumption of optical transponder. In this paper, we investigate the performance and complexity of transmitter-side FIR-based DSP with polarization-division-multiplexing (PDM) high-order quadrature-amplitude-modulation (QAM) formats. Our results show that Nyquist 64-QAM, 16-QAM and QPSK WDM signals can be sufficiently generated by digital FIR filters with 57, 37, and 17 taps respectively. Then we explore the effects of the required spectral pre-emphasis, bandwidth and resolution on the performance of Nyquist-WDM systems. To obtain negligible OSNR penalty with a roll-off factor of 0.1, two-channel-interleaved DAC requires a Gaussian electrical filter with the bandwidth of 0.4-0.6 times of the symbol rate for PDM-64QAM, 0.35-0.65 times for PDM-16QAM, and 0.3-0.8 times for PDM-QPSK, with required DAC resolutions as 8, 7, 6 bits correspondingly. As a tradeoff, PDM-64QAM can be a promising candidate for SE improvement in next-generation optical metro networks.

  10. An advanced real-time digital signal processing system for linear systems emulation, with special emphasis on network and acoustic response characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaydecki, Patrick; Fernandes, Bosco

    2003-11-01

    A fast digital signal processing (DSP) system is described that can perform real-time emulation of a wide variety of linear audio-bandwidth systems and networks, such as reverberant spaces, musical instrument bodies and very high order filter networks. The hardware design is based upon a Motorola DSP56309 operating at 110 million multiplication-accumulations per second and a dual-channel 24 bit codec with a maximum sampling frequency of 192 kHz. High level software has been developed to express complex vector frequency responses as both infinite impulse response (IIR) and finite impulse response (FIR) coefficients, in a form suitable for real-time convolution by the firmware installed in the DSP system memory. An algorithm has also been devised to express IIR filters as equivalent FIR structures, thereby obviating the potential instabilities associated with recursive equations and negating the traditional deficiencies of FIR filters respecting equivalent analogue designs. The speed and dynamic range of the system is such that, when sampling at 48 kHz, the frequency response can be specified to a spectral precision of 22 Hz when sampling at 10 kHz, this resolution increases to 0.9 Hz. Moreover, it is also possible to control the phase of any frequency band with a theoretical precision of 10-5 degrees in all cases. The system has been applied in the study of analogue filter networks, real-time Hilbert transformation, phase-shift systems and musical instrument body emulation, where it is providing valuable new insights into the understanding of psychoacoustic mechanisms.

  11. Advances in heart rate variability signal analysis: joint position statement by the e-Cardiology ESC Working Group and the European Heart Rhythm Association co-endorsed by the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Roberto; Cerutti, Sergio; Lombardi, Federico; Malik, Marek; Huikuri, Heikki V; Peng, Chung-Kang; Schmidt, Georg; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-09-01

    Following the publication of the Task Force document on heart rate variability (HRV) in 1996, a number of articles have been published to describe new HRV methodologies and their application in different physiological and clinical studies. This document presents a critical review of the new methods. A particular attention has been paid to methodologies that have not been reported in the 1996 standardization document but have been more recently tested in sufficiently sized populations. The following methods were considered: Long-range correlation and fractal analysis; Short-term complexity; Entropy and regularity; and Nonlinear dynamical systems and chaotic behaviour. For each of these methods, technical aspects, clinical achievements, and suggestions for clinical application were reviewed. While the novel approaches have contributed in the technical understanding of the signal character of HRV, their success in developing new clinical tools, such as those for the identification of high-risk patients, has been rather limited. Available results obtained in selected populations of patients by specialized laboratories are nevertheless of interest but new prospective studies are needed. The investigation of new parameters, descriptive of the complex regulation mechanisms of heart rate, has to be encouraged because not all information in the HRV signal is captured by traditional methods. The new technologies thus could provide after proper validation, additional physiological, and clinical meaning. Multidisciplinary dialogue and specialized courses in the combination of clinical cardiology and complex signal processing methods seem warranted for further advances in studies of cardiac oscillations and in the understanding normal and abnormal cardiac control processes. PMID:26177817

  12. Archaeological applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: an example from the Coso Volcanic Field, California, using advanced statistical signal processing analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Remus, Jeremiah J.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Harmon, Russell S.; Draucker, Anne; Baron, Dirk; Yohe, Robert

    2010-05-01

    of the classifier setup considered in this study include the training/testing routine (a 27-fold leave-one-sample-out setup versus a simple split of the data into separate sets for training and evaluation), the number of latent variables used in the regression model, and whether PLSDA operating on the entire broadband LIBS spectrum is superior to that using only a selected subset of LIBS emission lines. The results point to the robustness of the PLSDA technique and suggest that LIBS analysis combined with the appropriate statistical signal processing has the potential to be a useful tool for chemical analysis of archaeological artifacts and geological specimens.

  13. MixSIAR: A Bayesian stable isotope mixing model for characterizing intrapopulation niche variation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods The science of stable isotope mixing models has tended towards the development of modeling products (e.g. IsoSource, MixSIR, SIAR), where methodological advances or syntheses of the current state of the art are published in parity with software packa...

  14. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  15. Wireless Hearing Aid System Simulations using Advanced Design System™: A Behavioral Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Singh Rana, Ram; Bin, Tang; Liang, Zhang; Hari Krishna, Garg; De Yun, Wang

    2005-01-01

    The stringent requirements on size and power consumption constrain the conventional hearing aid devices from providing the patients an economic and user friendly solution, specifically for better noise cancellation. With the advancements in technologies such as integrated circuits design, wireless communications and digital signal processing techniques, the wireless hearing aids having multi-microphones, analog, digital and mixed signals and radio frequency signals processing circuits, DSP and programmable units seem to be promising to provide enhanced performance. The focus of this paper is about the system simulation of a typical wireless hearing aid using Agilent Advanced Design System™. The behavioral modeling features are exploited to enable the whole system simulations including electro-acoustic transducers. A few system level simulation results are included. PMID:17282359

  16. Housing Mix, School Mix: Barriers to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camina, M. M.; Iannone, P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent UK policy has emphasised both the development of socially mixed communities and the creation of balanced school intakes. In this paper, we use a case study of an area of mixed tenure in eastern England to explore policy in practice and the extent to which mechanisms of segregation impact on both the creation of socially mixed neighbourhoods…

  17. Electronic spark advance-type ignition system

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, H.

    1986-12-09

    An electronic spark advance-type ignition system is described for an internal combustion engine comprising: an ignition coil; a magnetic pickup for generating a pair of pulse signals with a time interval therebetween substantially corresponding to a maximum advance angle in terms of crankshaft rotation degrees for each rotation of a crankshaft of the engine; signal generating means responsive to the pair of pulse signals for the pickup for generating a pair of comparison signals of different levels within each of the crankshaft rotation degrees of the maximum advance angle and the other crankshaft rotation degrees; and control means for comparing the signal levels of each of the pairs of comparison signals to generate an energization starting position signal and an ignition timing determining ignition position signal for the ignition coil, the signal generating means including means for controlling the waveform of one of the pair of comparison signals so that the ignition position signal is advanced in angle with respect to the energization starting position signal. The energization starting position signal is generated under all conditions prior to the timing of generation of the earlier one of the next pair of pulse signals generated from the pickup. The ignition position signal is generated within the maximum advance angle at a point in time following generation of the earlier one of the next pair of pulse signals by at least a predetermined amount.

  18. Advanced glycation end‑products affect the cytoskeletal structure of rat glomerular endothelial cells via the Ras‑related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lei; Han, Yongsheng; Ren, Wei; Jiang, Jielong; Wang, Peng; Hu, Zhao

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to determine the molecular mechanisms leading to the production of advanced glycation end‑products (AGEs) and their effect on the morphology and function of rat glomerular capillary endothelial cells (GECs). Primary rat GECs were treated with AGE‑modified human serum albumin (AGE‑HSA) and divided into groups according to AGE concentration and treatment time. The structure and distribution of cytoskeletal protein F‑actin and the cortical actin binding protein, cortactin, were analyzed using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. As the Ras‑related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) signaling pathway was previously identified to be involved in mediating the contraction of endothelial actin‑myosin activity, Rac1 was examined subsequent to treatment of the cells with the Rac1 agonist 2'‑O‑methyladenosine‑3',5'‑cyclic monophosphate (O‑Me‑cAMP) for 1 h using a pull‑down assay. Cell permeability was determined by the leakage rate of a fluorescein isothiocyanate fluorescent marker protein. AGE‑HSA treatment resulted in alterations in the structure and distribution of F‑actin and cortactin in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner, while no effect was observed with HSA alone. The effect of AGE on the cytoskeleton was inhibited by the addition of O‑Me‑cAMP. AGE‑HSA significantly reduced the level of Rac1 activity (P<0.05); however, no effect was observed on total protein levels. Furthermore, AGE‑HSA treatment led to a significant increase in the permeability of endothelial cells (P<0.01), which was inhibited by O‑Me‑cAMP (P<0.01). The Rac1 signaling pathway is thus suggested to serve an important function in mediating AGE‑induced alterations in GEC morphology and function. PMID:25672514

  19. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on advanced glycation endproduct-induced aortic endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: possible roles of Rho kinase- and AMP kinase-mediated nuclear factor κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tang, Song-Tao; Zhang, Qiu; Tang, Hai-Qin; Wang, Chang-Jiang; Su, Huan; Zhou, Qing; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Hua-Qing; Wang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) as well as downstream pathways leads to vascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been reported to attenuate endothelial dysfunction in the models of atherosclerosis. However, whether GLP-1 exerts protective effects on aortic endothelium in diabetic animal model and the underlying mechanisms are still not well defined. Experimental diabetes was induced through administration with combination of high-fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Rats were randomly divided into four groups, including controls, diabetes, diabetes + sitagliptin (30 mg/kg/day), diabetes + exenatide (3 μg/kg/12 h). Eventually, endothelial damage, markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, were measured. After 12 weeks administration, diabetic rats received sitagliptin and exenatide showed significant elevation of serum NO level and reduction of ET-1 as well as inflammatory cytokines levels. Moreover, sitagliptin and exenatide significantly inhibited aortic oxidative stress level and improved aortic endothelial function in diabetic rats. Importantly, these drugs inhibited the protein expression level in AGE/RAGE-induced RhoA/ROCK/NF-κB/IκBα signaling pathways and activated AMPK in diabetic aorta. Finally, the target proteins of p-eNOS, iNOS, and ET-1, which reflect endothelial function, were also changed by these drugs. Our present study indicates that sitagliptin and exenatide administrations can improve endothelial function in diabetic aorta. Of note, RAGE/RhoA/ROCK and AMPK mediated NF-κB signaling pathways may be the intervention targets of these drugs to protect aortic endothelium. PMID:26758998

  20. Mixing and Transport.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; Chapman, Tom; Siverts-Wong, Elena; Wei, Li; Mei, Ying

    2016-10-01

    This section covers research published during the calendar year 2015 on mixing and transport processes. The review covers mixing of anaerobic digesters, mixing of heat transfer, and environmental fate and transport. PMID:27620101

  1. Mixing in wicking structures and the use of enhanced mixing within wicks in microchannel devices

    DOEpatents

    Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.

    2009-06-02

    Advanced wicking structures and methods utilizing these structures are described. The use of advanced wicking structures can promote rapid mass transfer while maintaining high capillary pressure through the use of small pores. Particularly improved results in fluid contacting processes can be achieved by enhanced mixing within a wicking layer within a microchannel.

  2. Mixing in wicking structures and the use of enhanced mixing within wicks in microchannel devices

    DOEpatents

    Stenkamp, Victoria S [Richland, WA; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA

    2011-04-19

    Advanced wicking structures and methods utilizing these structures are described. The use of advanced wicking structures can promote rapid mass transfer while maintaining high capillary pressure through the use of small pores. Particularly improved results in fluid contacting processes can be achieved by enhanced mixing within a wicking layer within a microchannel.

  3. Advanced glycation end products upregulate lysyl oxidase and endothelin-1 in human aortic endothelial cells via parallel activation of ERK1/2-NF-κB and JNK-AP-1 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Adamopoulos, Christos; Piperi, Christina; Gargalionis, Antonios N; Dalagiorgou, Georgia; Spilioti, Eliana; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction involves deregulation of the key extracellular matrix (ECM) enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) and the vasoconstrictor protein, endothelin-1 (ET-1), whose gene expression can be modulated by the transcriptional activators nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) present an aggravating factor of endothelial dysfunction which upon engagement to their receptor RAGE induce upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), leading to NF-κB and AP-1 potentiation. We hypothesized that AGEs could induce NF-κΒ- and AP-1-dependent regulation of LOX and ET-1 expression via the AGE/RAGE/MAPK signaling axis. Western blot, real-time qRT-PCR, FACS analysis and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays were employed in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) following treatment with AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) to investigate the signaling pathway towards this hypothesis. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis of AGEs, RAGE, LOX and ET-1 expression was conducted in aortic endothelium of a rat experimental model exposed to high- or low-AGE content diet. HAECs exposed to AGE-BSA for various time points exhibited upregulation of LOX and ET-1 mRNA levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Exposure of HAECs to AGE-BSA also showed specific elevation of phospho(p)-ERK1/2 and p-JNK levels in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGE administration significantly increased NF-κΒ- and AP-1-binding activity to both LOX and ET-1 cognate promoter regions. Moreover, LOX and ET-1 overexpression in rat aortic endothelium upon high-AGE content diet confirmed the functional interrelation of these molecules. Our findings demonstrate that AGEs trigger NF-κΒ- and AP-1-mediated upregulation of LOX and ET-1 via the AGE/RAGE/MAPK signaling cascade in human endothelial cells, thus contributing to distorted endothelial homeostasis by impairing endothelial barrier function, altering ECM biomechanical properties

  4. Laser characterization with advanced digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piels, Molly; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Zibar, Darko

    2015-01-01

    The use of machine learning techniques to characterize lasers with low output power is reviewed. Optimized phase tracking algorithms that can produce accurate noise spectra are discussed, and a method for inferring the amplitude noise spectrum and rate equation model of the laser under test is presented.

  5. Recent advances in actinorhizal symbiosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Froussart, Emilie; Bonneau, Jocelyne; Franche, Claudine; Bogusz, Didier

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorus availability are frequent limiting factors in plant growth and development. Certain bacteria and fungi form root endosymbiotic relationships with plants enabling them to exploit atmospheric nitrogen and soil phosphorus. The relationships between bacteria and plants include nitrogen-fixing Gram-negative proteobacteria called rhizobia that are able to interact with most leguminous plants (Fabaceae) but also with the non-legume Parasponia (Cannabaceae), and actinobacteria Frankia, which are able to interact with about 260 species collectively called actinorhizal plants. Fungi involved in the relationship with plants include Glomeromycota that form an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) association intracellularly within the roots of more than 80% of land plants. Increasing numbers of reports suggest that the rhizobial association with legumes has recycled part of the ancestral program used by most plants to interact with AM fungi. This review focuses on the most recent progress made in plant genetic control of root nodulation that occurs in non-legume actinorhizal plant species. PMID:26873697

  6. Signal Words

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signal Words? Signal words are found on pesticide product labels, and they describe the acute (short-term) toxicity ... red letters on the front panel of the product label. 2,4 Acute Oral LD 50 Inhalation LC ...

  7. Optical phase conjugation by an As(2)S(3) glass planar waveguide for dispersion-free transmission of WDM-DPSK signals over fiber.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, M D; Luan, F; Choi, D-Y; Madden, S J; Bulla, D A P; Luther-Davies, B; Eggleton, B J

    2010-12-01

    We report the first demonstration of optical phase conjugation (OPC) transmission of phase encoded and wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) signals by the Kerr effect in a planar structured waveguide. The phase conjugated electric field of the signal is produced by four wave mixing pumped by a CW laser during co-propagating with the signal in a highly nonlinear waveguide fabricated in As(2)S(3) glass. Experiments demonstrate the capability of the device to perform dispersion-free transmission through up to 225 km of standard single mode fiber for a 3 × 40 Gb/s WDM signal, with its channels encoded as return-to-zero differential phase shift keying and spaced either 100 or 200 GHz apart. This work represents an important milestone towards demonstrating advanced signal processing of high-speed and broadband optical signals in compact planar waveguides, with the potential for monolithic optical integration. PMID:21165019

  8. Automated detection and location of indications in eddy current signals

    DOEpatents

    Brudnoy, David M.; Oppenlander, Jane E.; Levy, Arthur J.

    2000-01-01

    A computer implemented information extraction process that locates and identifies eddy current signal features in digital point-ordered signals, signals representing data from inspection of test materials, by enhancing the signal features relative to signal noise, detecting features of the signals, verifying the location of the signal features that can be known in advance, and outputting information about the identity and location of all detected signal features.

  9. Automated Detection and Location of Indications in Eddy Current Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Brudnoy, David M.; Oppenlander, Jane E.; Levy, Arthur J.

    1998-06-30

    A computer implemented information extraction process that locates and identifies eddy current signal features in digital point-ordered signals, said signals representing data from inspection of test materials, by enhancing the signal features relative to signal noise, detecting features of the signals, verifying the location of the signal features that can be known in advance, and outputting information about the identity and location of all detected signal features.

  10. Recent advances in 2D and 3D in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes, alternative hepatocyte sources and non-parenchymal liver cells and their use in investigating mechanisms of hepatotoxicity, cell signaling and ADME.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Patricio; Hewitt, Nicola J; Albrecht, Ute; Andersen, Melvin E; Ansari, Nariman; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Bode, Johannes Georg; Bolleyn, Jennifer; Borner, Christoph; Böttger, Jan; Braeuning, Albert; Budinsky, Robert A; Burkhardt, Britta; Cameron, Neil R; Camussi, Giovanni; Cho, Chong-Su; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Craig Rowlands, J; Dahmen, Uta; Damm, Georg; Dirsch, Olaf; Donato, María Teresa; Dong, Jian; Dooley, Steven; Drasdo, Dirk; Eakins, Rowena; Ferreira, Karine Sá; Fonsato, Valentina; Fraczek, Joanna; Gebhardt, Rolf; Gibson, Andrew; Glanemann, Matthias; Goldring, Chris E P; Gómez-Lechón, María José; Groothuis, Geny M M; Gustavsson, Lena; Guyot, Christelle; Hallifax, David; Hammad, Seddik; Hayward, Adam; Häussinger, Dieter; Hellerbrand, Claus; Hewitt, Philip; Hoehme, Stefan; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Houston, J Brian; Hrach, Jens; Ito, Kiyomi; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Keitel, Verena; Kelm, Jens M; Kevin Park, B; Kordes, Claus; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; LeCluyse, Edward L; Lu, Peng; Luebke-Wheeler, Jennifer; Lutz, Anna; Maltman, Daniel J; Matz-Soja, Madlen; McMullen, Patrick; Merfort, Irmgard; Messner, Simon; Meyer, Christoph; Mwinyi, Jessica; Naisbitt, Dean J; Nussler, Andreas K; Olinga, Peter; Pampaloni, Francesco; Pi, Jingbo; Pluta, Linda; Przyborski, Stefan A; Ramachandran, Anup; Rogiers, Vera; Rowe, Cliff; Schelcher, Celine; Schmich, Kathrin; Schwarz, Michael; Singh, Bijay; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Stieger, Bruno; Stöber, Regina; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Tetta, Ciro; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu; Weiss, Thomas S; Widera, Agata; Woods, Courtney G; Xu, Jinghai James; Yarborough, Kathy M; Hengstler, Jan G

    2013-08-01

    This review encompasses the most important advances in liver functions and hepatotoxicity and analyzes which mechanisms can be studied in vitro. In a complex architecture of nested, zonated lobules, the liver consists of approximately 80 % hepatocytes and 20 % non-parenchymal cells, the latter being involved in a secondary phase that may dramatically aggravate the initial damage. Hepatotoxicity, as well as hepatic metabolism, is controlled by a set of nuclear receptors (including PXR, CAR, HNF-4α, FXR, LXR, SHP, VDR and PPAR) and signaling pathways. When isolating liver cells, some pathways are activated, e.g., the RAS/MEK/ERK pathway, whereas others are silenced (e.g. HNF-4α), resulting in up- and downregulation of hundreds of genes. An understanding of these changes is crucial for a correct interpretation of in vitro data. The possibilities and limitations of the most useful liver in vitro systems are summarized, including three-dimensional culture techniques, co-cultures with non-parenchymal cells, hepatospheres, precision cut liver slices and the isolated perfused liver. Also discussed is how closely hepatoma, stem cell and iPS cell-derived hepatocyte-like-cells resemble real hepatocytes. Finally, a summary is given of the state of the art of liver in vitro and mathematical modeling systems that are currently used in the pharmaceutical industry with an emphasis on drug metabolism, prediction of clearance, drug interaction, transporter studies and hepatotoxicity. One key message is that despite our enthusiasm for in vitro systems, we must never lose sight of the in vivo situation. Although hepatocytes have been isolated for decades, the hunt for relevant alternative systems has only just begun. PMID:23974980

  11. Mixing enhancement in chemical lasers. II. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, R.J.

    1987-07-01

    A phenomenological model for reactant mixing in trip nozzle chemical lasers by means of a surface-stretching mechanism is used in conjunction with a two-level laser model to derive scaling laws for numerous features noted in the trip nozzle data. This mixing model is then employed with an aerokinetics code in order to obtain quantitative laser gain predictions. The results yielded by the code are in good agreement with small-signal data. It is determined that trip jet mixing will not increase laser efficiency at low cavity pressures, but will at high cavity pressures result in a doubling of laser power output. 12 references.

  12. Pediatric Mixed Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Berard, Roberta A; Laxer, Ronald M

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric-onset mixed connective tissue disease is among the rare disease entities in pediatric rheumatology and includes features of arthritis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Accurate recognition and diagnosis of the disease is paramount to prevent long-term morbidity. Advances in the genetic and immunologic understanding of the factors involved in the etiopathogenesis provide an opportunity for improvements in prognostication and targeted therapy. The development of a multinational cohort of patients with mixed connective tissue disease would be invaluable to provide more updated data regarding the clinical presentation, to develop a standardized treatment approach, disease activity and outcome tools, and to provide data on long-term outcomes and comorbidities. PMID:27032791

  13. EEG signal analysis: a survey.

    PubMed

    Subha, D Puthankattil; Joseph, Paul K; Acharya U, Rajendra; Lim, Choo Min

    2010-04-01

    The EEG (Electroencephalogram) signal indicates the electrical activity of the brain. They are highly random in nature and may contain useful information about the brain state. However, it is very difficult to get useful information from these signals directly in the time domain just by observing them. They are basically non-linear and nonstationary in nature. Hence, important features can be extracted for the diagnosis of different diseases using advanced signal processing techniques. In this paper the effect of different events on the EEG signal, and different signal processing methods used to extract the hidden information from the signal are discussed in detail. Linear, Frequency domain, time - frequency and non-linear techniques like correlation dimension (CD), largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), Hurst exponent (H), different entropies, fractal dimension(FD), Higher Order Spectra (HOS), phase space plots and recurrence plots are discussed in detail using a typical normal EEG signal. PMID:20433058

  14. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A). Engineering Test Report: METSAT A1 Signal Processor (P/N: 1331670-2, S/N: F04)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, D.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a description of the tests performed, and the test data, for the A1 METSAT Signal Processor Assembly PN: 1331679-2, S/N F04. The assembly was tested in accordance with AE-26754, "METSAT Signal Processor Scan Drive Test and Integration Procedure." The objective is to demonstrate functionality of the signal processor prior to instrument integration.

  15. Mixing in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  16. Mixing in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee

    2011-01-07

    Turbulent mixing plays a vital role in many fields in astronomy. Here I review a few of these sites, discuss the importance of this turbulent mixing and the techniques used by astrophysicists to solve these problems.

  17. Format transparent, wide range and independent dispersion monitoring method based on four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Sheng; He, Sheng; Sun, Simin; Ke, Changjian; Liu, Deming

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we propose an improved all optical chromatic dispersion (CD) monitoring method based on highly nonlinear power transfer function (PTF) provided by four-wave mixing (FWM) in highly nonlinear fibers (HNLFs). This method can be applied for various modulation formats, including on-off keying and advanced multi-level modulation formats, without necessitating any changes of the hardware or software. Furthermore, it can expand the CD monitoring range beyond the limitation of Talbot effects and is insensitive to optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) and polarization mode dispersion (PMD). These improvements are achieved by optimizing the profile of the PTF curve and utilizing a sweeping tunable dispersion compensator (TDC) in combination with an extremely simple digital signal processing (DSP) to find the zero residual dispersion point. Numerical simulations are then used to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method.

  18. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 52-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. T. Khericha; R. C. Pedersen

    2003-09-01

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) ESAP issued in June 2002). The purpose of this revision is to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to 52 GWd/MT burnup [as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code The last ESAP provided basis for irradiation, at a linear heat generation rate (LHGR) no greater than 9 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly to 50 GWd/MT. This ESAP extends the basis for irradiation, at a LHGR no greater than 5 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly from 50 to 52 GWd/MT.

  19. Pinocembrin protects against β-amyloid-induced toxicity in neurons through inhibiting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE)-independent signaling pathways and regulating mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is known that amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Interaction between Aβ and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been implicated in neuronal degeneration associated with this disease. Pinocembrin, a flavonoid abundant in propolis, has been reported to possess numerous biological activities beneficial to health. Our previous studies have demonstrated that pinocembrin has neuroprotective effects on ischemic and vascular dementia in animal models. It has been approved by the State Food and Drug Administration of China for clinical use in stroke patients. Against this background, we investigated the effects of pinocembrin on cognitive function and neuronal protection against Aβ-induced toxicity and explored its potential mechanism. Methods Mice received an intracerebroventricular fusion of Aβ25-35. Pinocembrin was administrated orally at 20 mg/kg/day and 40 mg/kg/day for 8 days. Behavioral performance, cerebral cortex neuropil ultrastructure, neuronal degeneration and RAGE expression were assessed. Further, a RAGE-overexpressing cell model and an AD cell model were used for investigating the mechanisms of pinocembrin. The mechanisms underlying the efficacy of pinocembrin were conducted on target action, mitochondrial function and potential signal transduction using fluorescence-based multiparametric technologies on a high-content analysis platform. Results Our results showed that oral administration of pinocembrin improved cognitive function, preserved the ultrastructural neuropil and decreased neurodegeneration of the cerebral cortex in Aβ25-35-treated mice. Pinocembrin did not have a significant effect on inhibiting Aβ1-42 production and scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, pinocembrin significantly inhibited the upregulation of RAGE transcripts and protein expression both in vivo and in vitro, and also markedly depressed the activation of

  20. Phosphoinositide signaling.

    PubMed

    Boss, Wendy F; Im, Yang Ju

    2012-01-01

    "All things flow and change…even in the stillest matter there is unseen flux and movement." Attributed to Heraclitus (530-470 BC), from The Story of Philosophy by Will Durant. Heraclitus, a Greek philosopher, was thinking on a much larger scale than molecular signaling; however, his visionary comments are an important reminder for those studying signaling today. Even in unstimulated cells, signaling pathways are in constant metabolic flux and provide basal signals that travel throughout the organism. In addition, negatively charged phospholipids, such as the polyphosphorylated inositol phospholipids, provide a circuit board of on/off switches for attracting or repelling proteins that define the membranes of the cell. This template of charged phospholipids is sensitive to discrete changes and metabolic fluxes-e.g., in pH and cations-which contribute to the oscillating signals in the cell. The inherent complexities of a constantly fluctuating system make understanding how plants integrate and process signals challenging. In this review we discuss one aspect of lipid signaling: the inositol family of negatively charged phospholipids and their functions as molecular sensors and regulators of metabolic flux in plants. PMID:22404474

  1. Foundations of chaotic mixing.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Stephen; Ottino, Julio M

    2004-05-15

    The simplest mixing problem corresponds to the mixing of a fluid with itself; this case provides a foundation on which the subject rests. The objective here is to study mixing independently of the mechanisms used to create the motion and review elements of theory focusing mostly on mathematical foundations and minimal models. The flows under consideration will be of two types: two-dimensional (2D) 'blinking flows', or three-dimensional (3D) duct flows. Given that mixing in continuous 3D duct flows depends critically on cross-sectional mixing, and that many microfluidic applications involve continuous flows, we focus on the essential aspects of mixing in 2D flows, as they provide a foundation from which to base our understanding of more complex cases. The baker's transformation is taken as the centrepiece for describing the dynamical systems framework. In particular, a hierarchy of characterizations of mixing exist, Bernoulli --> mixing --> ergodic, ordered according to the quality of mixing (the strongest first). Most importantly for the design process, we show how the so-called linked twist maps function as a minimal picture of mixing, provide a mathematical structure for understanding the type of 2D flows that arise in many micromixers already built, and give conditions guaranteeing the best quality mixing. Extensions of these concepts lead to first-principle-based designs without resorting to lengthy computations. PMID:15306478

  2. Hedgehog signalling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Zhao, Zhonghua; Ingham, Philip W

    2016-02-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway is one of the key regulators of metazoan development. Hh proteins have been shown to play roles in many developmental processes and have become paradigms for classical morphogens. Dysfunction of the Hh pathway underlies a number of human developmental abnormalities and diseases, making it an important therapeutic target. Interest in Hh signalling thus extends across many fields, from evo-devo to cancer research and regenerative medicine. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide an outline of the current understanding of Hh signalling mechanisms, highlighting the similarities and differences between species. PMID:26839340

  3. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  4. Hedgehog signaling in skin cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengxin; Chi, Sumin; Xie, Jingwu

    2011-01-01

    An increasing progress on the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling for carcinogenesis has been achieved since the link of Hh pathway to human cancer was firstly established. In particular, the critical role of Hh signaling in the development of Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been convincingly demonstrated by genetic mutation analyses, mouse models of BCCs, and successful clinical trials of BCCs using Hh signaling inhibitors. In addition, the Hh pathway activity is also reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), melanoma and Merkel Cell Carcinoma. These findings have significant new paradigm on Hh signaling transduction, its mechanisms in skin cancer and even therapeutic approaches for BCC. In this review, we will summarize the major advances in the understanding of Hh signaling transduction, the roles of Hh signaling in skin cancer development, and the current implications of “mechanism-based” therapeutic strategies. PMID:21397013

  5. Aerosol Mass Loading, Mixing State, Size and Number in Present Day (2000) and Future (2100): Study with the Advanced Particle Microphysics (APM) module in the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, G.; Yu, F.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols affect the global energy budget by scattering and absorbing sunlight (direct effects) and by changing the microphysical properties, lifetime, and coverage of clouds (indirect effects). One of the key challenges in quantifying the aerosol direct and indirect effects is to deep our understanding about the size distribution, size-resolved composition, and mixing state of aerosols. However, detailed information on size distribution and mixing state is often not available or incomplete in current climate models. Here, we incorporated APM into CESM. APM is a multi-type, multi-component (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, SOA, BC, OC, dust, and sea salt), size-resolved particle microphysics model. Online chemistry, up-to-date nucleation, oxidation aging of medium-volatile and semi-volatile organic gases, aerosol-cloud interaction with stratiform cloud, shallow convection cloud, and deep convection cloud are considered. The amounts of secondary species coated on primary particles, through condensation, coagulation, equilibrium uptake, and aqueous chemistry, are also tracked. Model results are compared with aerosol mass observed by IMPROVE/EMEP, vertical structure of global particle number from aircraft-based field campaigns, particle and cloud condensation nuclei number at ground-based stations, aerosol optical properties retrieved by several satellites. Model results can capture the major characteristics shown in these observations. With this model system, we find that global burdens of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, BC, OC from 2000 to 2100, under scenario RCP 4.5 where total radiative forcing is stabilized before 2100, are decreased by 44%, 50%, 43%, 40%, 40%, respectively. Dust and sea salt increase slightly. Global burdens of secondary species coated on BCOC, dust, and sea salt are deceased by 34%, 30% and 60%, respectively. Global averaged aerosol number in the lower troposphere (from surface to 3 km) is significantly decreased, especially for particles smaller than

  6. Mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ragnar; Hetlevik, Siri Opsahl; Lilleby, Vibke; Molberg, Øyvind

    2016-02-01

    The concept of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) as a separate connective tissue disease (CTD) has persisted for more than four decades. High titers of antibodies targeting the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U1 snRNP) in peripheral blood are a sine qua non for the diagnosis of MCTD, in addition to distinct clinical features including Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), "puffy hands," arthritis, myositis, pleuritis, pericarditis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Recently, population-based epidemiology data from Norway estimated the point prevalence of adult-onset MCTD to be 3.8 per 100,000 and the mean annual incidence to be 2.1 per million per year, supporting the notion that MCTD is the least common CTD. Little is known about the etiology of MCTD, but recent genetic studies have confirmed that MCTD is a strongly HLA (​human leukocyte antigen)-linked disease, as the HLA profiles of MCTD differ distinctly from the corresponding profiles of ethnically matched healthy controls and other CTDs. In the first section of this review, we provide an update on the clinical, immunological, and genetic features of MCTD and discuss the relationship between MCTD and the other CTDs. Then we proceed to discuss the recent advances in therapy and our current understanding of prognosis and prognostic factors, especially those that are associated with the more serious pulmonary and cardiovascular complications of the disease. In the final section, we discuss some of the key, unresolved questions related to anti-RNP-associated diseases and indicate how these questions may be approached in future studies. PMID:27421219

  7. Protein Regulation in Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Yaffe, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYCells must respond to a diverse, complex, and ever-changing mix of signals, using a fairly limited set of parts. Changes in protein level, protein localization, protein activity, and protein-protein interactions are critical aspects of signal transduction, allowing cells to respond highly specifically to a nearly limitless set of cues and also to vary the sensitivity, duration, and dynamics of the response. Signal-dependent changes in levels of gene expression and protein synthesis play an important role in regulation of protein levels, whereas posttranslational modifications of proteins regulate their degradation, localization, and functional interactions. Protein ubiquitylation, for example, can direct proteins to the proteasome for degradation or provide a signal that regulates their interactions and/or location within the cell. Similarly, protein phosphorylation by specific kinases is a key mechanism for augmenting protein activity and relaying signals to other proteins that possess domains that recognize the phosphorylated residues. PMID:27252361

  8. Polarization insensitive all-optical wavelength conversion of polarization multiplexed signals using co-polarized pumps.

    PubMed

    Anthur, Aravind P; Zhou, Rui; O'Duill, Sean; Walsh, Anthony J; Martin, Eamonn; Venkitesh, Deepa; Barry, Liam P

    2016-05-30

    We study and experimentally validate the vector theory of four-wave mixing (FWM) in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA). We use the vector theory of FWM to design a polarization insensitive all-optical wavelength converter, suitable for advanced modulation formats, using non-degenerate FWM in SOAs and parallelly polarized pumps. We demonstrate the wavelength conversion of polarization-multiplexed (PM)-QPSK, PM-16QAM and a Nyquist WDM super-channel modulated with PM-QPSK signals at a baud rate of 12.5 GBaud, with total data rates of 50 Gbps, 100 Gbps and 200 Gbps respectively. PMID:27410100

  9. Computer derivation of some dolphin echolocation signals.

    PubMed

    Altes, R A

    1971-09-01

    Recent advances in radar theory have given rise to a straightforward method of sonar signal design. The method involves computer maximization of a signal-to-interference ratio. The procedure has been used to derive sonar signals that can accurately measure target velocity. When two dolphins were placed in a situation conducive to the utilization of such signals, their waveforms were similar to those that had been theoretically derived. PMID:17751313

  10. Laboratory studies of ocean mixing by microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Ortiz, Monica; Dabiri, John O.

    2011-11-01

    Ocean mixing plays a major role in nutrient and energy transport and is an important input to climate models. Recent studies suggest that the contribution of fluid transport by swimming microorganisms to ocean mixing may be of the same order of magnitude as winds and tides. An experimental setup has been designed in order to study the mixing efficiency of vertical migration of plankton. To this end, a stratified water column is created to model the ocean's density gradient. The vertical migration of Artemia Salina (brine shrimp) within the water column is controlled via luminescent signals on the top and bottom of the column. By fluorescently labelling portions of the water column, the stirring of the density gradient by the animals is visualized and quantified. Preliminary results show that the vertical movement of these organisms produces enhanced mixing relative to control cases in which only buoyancy forces and diffusion are present.

  11. Integrated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A): Engineering Test Report, METSAT A2 Signal Processor (P/N 1331120-2, S/N F04) S/N 108

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a description of the tests performed, and the test data, for the A2 METSAT Signal Processor Assembly PN: 1331120-2, S/N F04. The assembly was tested in accordance with AE-26754, "METSAT Signal Processor Scan Drive Test and Integration Procedure."

  12. Control of Jet Noise Through Mixing Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark; Brown, Cliff

    2003-01-01

    The idea of using mixing enhancement to reduce jet noise is not new. Lobed mixers have been around since shortly after jet noise became a problem. However, these designs were often a post-design fix that rarely was worth its weight and thrust loss from a system perspective. Recent advances in CFD and some inspired concepts involving chevrons have shown how mixing enhancement can be successfully employed in noise reduction by subtle manipulation of the nozzle geometry. At NASA Glenn Research Center, this recent success has provided an opportunity to explore our paradigms of jet noise understanding, prediction, and reduction. Recent advances in turbulence measurement technology for hot jets have also greatly aided our ability to explore the cause and effect relationships of nozzle geometry, plume turbulence, and acoustic far field. By studying the flow and sound fields of jets with various degrees of mixing enhancement and subsequent noise manipulation, we are able to explore our intuition regarding how jets make noise, test our prediction codes, and pursue advanced noise reduction concepts. The paper will cover some of the existing paradigms of jet noise as they relate to mixing enhancement for jet noise reduction, and present experimental and analytical observations that support these paradigms.

  13. Simultaneous frequency conversion, regeneration and reshaping of optical signals.

    PubMed

    McKinstrie, C J; Cargill, D S

    2012-03-26

    Nondegenerate four-wave mixing in fibers enables the tunable and low-noise frequency conversion of optical signals. This paper shows that four-wave mixing driven by pulsed pumps can also regenerate and reshape optical signal pulses arbitrarily. PMID:22453365

  14. Radiochemical Mix Diagnostic in the Presence of Burn

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Anna C.

    2014-01-28

    There is a general interest in radiochemical probes of hydrodamicalmix in burning regions of NIF capsule. Here we provide estimates for the production of 13N from mixing of 10B ablator burning hotspot of a capsule. By comparing the 13N signal with x-ray measurements of the ablator mix into the hotspot it should be possible to estimate the chunkiness of this mix.

  15. Signalling crosstalk in plants: emerging issues.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jane E; McAinsh, Martin R

    2004-01-01

    The Oxford English Dictionary defines crosstalk as 'unwanted transfer of signals between communication channels'. How does this definition relate to the way in which we view the organization and function of signalling pathways? Recent advances in the field of plant signalling have challenged the traditional view of a signalling transduction cascade as isolated linear pathways. Instead the picture emerging of the mechanisms by which plants transduce environmental signals is of the interaction between transduction chains. The manner in which these interactions occur (and indeed whether the transfer of these signals is 'unwanted' or beneficial) is currently the topic of intense research. PMID:14673021

  16. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  17. The principle of conformational signaling.

    PubMed

    Tompa, Peter

    2016-07-25

    Signal transduction is the primary process by which cells respond to changes in their physical and chemical environments. Cellular response is initiated through a signaling protein (a receptor), which interacts with the "signal", most often a novel molecule outside or inside the cell. The mechanism of activation of the receptor is a conformational change and/or covalent modification, which then sets in motion a signaling pathway, i.e. a cascade of modification and binding events that relay and amplify the message to eventually alter the state of the cell. In reflection of this general perception, concepts such as the "second messenger" and the "phosphorylation cascade" dominate our views of signal transduction. The idea I advocate here is that the non-covalent change in protein conformation itself might serve as the initial or intermittent "signal" in the cascade, and it is often the primary event being recognized and interpreted by downstream receptor(s). This signaling principle is intertwined with many other cellular regulatory concepts, such as (pathway) allostery, conformational spread, induced folding/unfolding, conformational memory, the hierarchical assembly of complexes, and the action of regulatory chaperones and prions. By elaborating on many examples and also recent advances in experimental methodology, I show that conformational signaling, although thus far underappreciated, is a general and robust signaling principle that most of the time operates in close interplay with covalent signals in the cell. PMID:27242242

  18. Advance directives

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Rory; Mailo, Kevin; Angeles, Ricardo; Agarwal, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To establish the prevalence of patients with advance directives in a family practice, and to describe patients’ perspectives on a family doctor’s role in initiating discussions about advance directives. Design A self-administered patient questionnaire. Setting A busy urban family medicine teaching clinic in Hamilton, Ont. Participants A convenience sample of adult patients attending the clinic over the course of a typical business week. Main outcome measures The prevalence of advance directives in the patient population was determined, and the patients’ expectations regarding the role of their family doctors were elucidated. Results The survey population consisted of 800 participants (a response rate of 72.5%) well distributed across age groups; 19.7% had written advance directives and 43.8% had previously discussed the topic of advance directives, but only 4.3% of these discussions had occurred with family doctors. In 5.7% of cases, a family physician had raised the issue; 72.3% of respondents believed patients should initiate the discussion. Patients who considered advance directives extremely important were significantly more likely to want their family doctors to start the conversation (odds ratio 3.98; P < .05). Conclusion Advance directives were not routinely addressed in the family practice. Most patients preferred to initiate the discussion of advance directives. However, patients who considered the subject extremely important wanted their family doctors to initiate the discussion. PMID:25873704

  19. Signal conditioning, the next generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penharlow, David

    This paper describes recent advances in signal conditioning techiques used on flight test programs, which were achieved due to the availability to the electronic designer of new or improved analog and digital monolithic devices. These changes were driven by the design of new sensors, the architecture of the data acquisition systems, and by the vehicle type and design. The paper considers how each of these factors influenced the signal conditioning equipment and discusses new technology introduced, such as hybridized signal conditioners, amplifier-filter products, the self-balancing amplifier, and automatic gain ranging amplifiers.

  20. Digital Signals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truxal, John G.

    Technological advances during the past few decades have revolutionized many complex systems that influence human activity. As the rate of technological progress accelerates, these systems will become more complex, and new ones will evolve. Citizens in a technological society need to be able to make intelligent choices about how technology will…

  1. In-line mixing states monitoring of suspensions using ultrasonic reflection technique.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiaobin; Yang, Yili; Liang, Jian; Zou, Dajun; Zhang, Jiaqi; Feng, Luyi; Shi, Tielin; Li, Xiwen

    2016-02-01

    Based on the measurement of echo signal changes caused by different concentration distributions in the mixing process, a simple ultrasonic reflection technique is proposed for in-line monitoring of the mixing states of suspensions in an agitated tank in this study. The relation between the echo signals and the concentration of suspensions is studied, and the mixing process of suspensions is tracked by in-line measurement of ultrasonic echo signals using two ultrasonic sensors. Through the analysis of echo signals over time, the mixing states of suspensions are obtained, and the homogeneity of suspensions is quantified. With the proposed technique, the effects of impeller diameter and agitation speed on the mixing process are studied, and the optimal agitation speed and the minimum mixing time to achieve the maximum homogeneity are acquired under different operating conditions and design parameters. The proposed technique is stable and feasible and shows great potential for in-line monitoring of mixing states of suspensions. PMID:26548526

  2. Digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, G.

    The theory, realization techniques, and applications of digital filtering are surveyed, with an emphasis on the development of software, in a handbook for advanced students of electrical and electronic engineering and practicing development engineers. The foundations of the theory of discrete signals and systems are introduced. The design of one-dimensional linear systems is discussed, and the techniques are expanded to the treatment of two-dimensional discrete and multidimensional analog systems. Numerical systems, quantification and limitation, and the characteristics of particular signal-processing devices are considered in a section on design realization. An appendix contains definitions of the basic mathematical concepts, derivations and proofs, and tables of integration and differentiation formulas.

  3. Spatiotemporal signalling in plant development

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Erin; Wachsman, Guy; Benfey, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, need to respond to changing environments, and as a result they have evolved unique signalling mechanisms that allow rapid communication between different parts of the plant. The signalling mechanisms that direct plant development include long-range effectors, such as phytohormones, and molecules with a local intra-organ range, such as peptides, transcription factors and some small RNAs. In this Review, we highlight recent advances in understanding plant signalling mechanisms and discuss how different classes of signalling networks can integrate with gene regulatory networks and contribute to plant development. In some cases, we also address the evolutionary context of mechanisms and discuss possible links between the lifestyle of plants and selection for different signalling mechanisms. PMID:23949543

  4. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  5. Equivalent wavelength self-mixing interferometry for displacement measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; Li, Chengwei; Li, Songquan; Li, Dongyu

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve fringe precision of a self-mixing signal, a simple and effective method based on an equivalent wavelength self-mixing interferometer is presented. And a linearization fringe counting method is proposed for equivalent wavelength self-mixing interferometry to quickly reconstruct target displacement. The validity of the proposed method was demonstrated by means of simulated signals and confirmed by several experimental measurements for both harmonic and aleatory target displacement with a fringe resolution of ∼125  nm. PMID:27607290

  6. Effects of material mixing on planetary gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, Steven W.; Evans, Larry G.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of mixing of rocks and soil on the gamma-ray signal emitted by Martian surface was investigated with special consideration given to the effect of the geometry of mixing. It is shown that, under certain circumstances, this scale can have a significant effect on the gamma-ray spectrum observed. The techniques that can be used to address this problem are discussed, showing that, using these techniques, rock compositions can be inferred from the signal produced by a rock-soil mixtures of unknown rock concentration and mixing geometry.

  7. Theory for Neutrino Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations, for which Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald were awarded the 2015 Nobel prize in physics, tremendous progresses have been made in measuring the mixing angles which determine the oscillation pattern. A lot of theoretical efforts have been made to understand how neutrinos mix with each other. Present data show that in the standard parameterization of the mixing matrix, θ23 is close to π/4 and the CP violating phase is close to ‑ π/2. In this talk I report results obtained in arXiv:1505.01932 (Phys. Lett. B750(2015)620) and arXive:1404.01560 (Chin. J. Phys.53(2015)100101) and discuss some implications for theoretical model buildings for such mixing pattern. Specific examples for neutrino mixing based on A4 family symmetry are given.

  8. High-mix insulins

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Farooqi, Mohammad Hamed; El-Houni, Ali E.

    2015-01-01

    Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use. PMID:26425485

  9. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  10. Respiration signals from photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Lena M

    2013-10-01

    Pulse oximetry is based on the technique of photoplethysmography (PPG) wherein light transmitted through tissues is modulated by the pulse. In addition to variations in light modulation by the cardiac cycle, the PPG signal contains a respiratory modulation and variations associated with changing tissue blood volume of other origins. Cardiovascular, respiratory, and neural fluctuations in the PPG signal are of different frequencies and can all be characterized according to their sinusoidal components. PPG was described in 1937 to measure blood volume changes. The technique is today increasingly used, in part because of developments in semiconductor technology during recent decades that have resulted in considerable advances in PPG probe design. Artificial neural networks help to detect complex nonlinear relationships and are extensively used in electronic signal analysis, including PPG. Patient and/or probe-tissue movement artifacts are sources of signal interference. Physiologic variations such as vasoconstriction, a deep gasp, or yawn also affect the signal. Monitoring respiratory rates from PPG are often based on respiratory-induced intensity variations (RIIVs) contained in the baseline of the PPG signal. Qualitative RIIV signals may be used for monitoring purposes regardless of age, gender, anesthesia, and mode of ventilation. Detection of breaths in adult volunteers had a maximal error of 8%, and in infants the rates of overdetected and missed breaths using PPG were 1.5% and 2.7%, respectively. During central apnea, the rhythmic RIIV signals caused by variations in intrathoracic pressure disappear. PPG has been evaluated for detecting airway obstruction with a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 85%. The RIIV and the pulse synchronous PPG waveform are sensitive for detecting hypovolemia. The respiratory synchronous variation of the PPG pulse amplitude is an accurate predictor of fluid responsiveness. Pleth variability index is a continuous measure of the

  11. Turbidity Current Head Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, David; Sanchez, Miguel Angel; Medina, Pablo

    2010-05-01

    A laboratory experimental set - up for studying the behaviour of sediment in presence of a turbulent field with zero mean flow is compared with the behaviour of turbidity currents [1] . Particular interest is shown on the initiation of sediment motion and in the sediment lift - off. The behaviour of the turbidity current in a flat ground is compared with the zero mean flow oscilating grid generated turbulence as when wave flow lifts off suspended sediments [2,3]. Some examples of the results obtained with this set-up relating the height of the head of the turbidity current to the equilibrium level of stirred lutoclines are shown. A turbulent velocity u' lower than that estimated by the Shield diagram is required to start sediment motion. The minimum u' required to start sediment lift - off, is a function of sediment size, cohesivity and resting time. The lutocline height depends on u', and the vorticity at the lutocline seems constant for a fixed sediment size [1,3]. Combining grid stirring and turbidty current head shapes analyzed by means of advanced image analysis, sediment vertical fluxes and settling speeds can be measured [4,5]. [1] D. Hernandez Turbulent structure of turbidity currents and sediment transport Ms Thesis ETSECCPB, UPC. Barcelona 2009. [2] A. Sánchez-Arcilla; A. Rodríguez; J.C. Santás; J.M. Redondo; V. Gracia; R. K'Osyan; S. Kuznetsov; C. Mösso. Delta'96 Surf-zone and nearshore measurements at the Ebro Delta. A: International Conference on Coastal Research through large Scale Experiments (Coastal Dynamics '97). University of Plymouth, 1997, p. 186-187. [3] P. Medina, M. A. Sánchez and J. M. Redondo. Grid stirred turbulence: applications to the initiation of sediment motion and lift-off studies Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Part B: Hydrology, Oceans and Atmosphere. 26, Issue 4, 2001, Pages 299-304 [4] M.O. Bezerra, M. Diez, C. Medeiros, A. Rodriguez, E. Bahia., A. Sanchez-Arcilla and J.M. Redondo. Study on the influence of waves on

  12. Advanced border monitoring sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobler, Ronald A.; Winston, Mark A.

    2008-04-01

    McQ has developed an advanced sensor system tailored for border monitoring that has been delivered as part of the SBInet program for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Technology developments that enhance a broad range of features are presented in this paper, which address the overall goal of the system to improving unattended ground sensor system capabilities for border monitoring applications. Specifically, this paper addresses a system definition, communications architecture, advanced signal processing to classify targets, and distributed sensor fusion processing.

  13. Advanced satellite communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  14. Principle component analysis for radiotracer signal separation.

    PubMed

    Kasban, H; Arafa, H; Elaraby, S M S

    2016-06-01

    Radiotracers can be used in several industrial applications by injecting the radiotracer into the industrial system and monitoring the radiation using radiation detectors for obtaining signals. These signals are analyzed to obtain indications about what is happening within the system or to determine the problems that may be present in the system. For multi-phase system analysis, more than one radiotracer is used and the result is a mixture of radiotracers signals. The problem is in such cases is how to separate these signals from each other. The paper presents a proposed method based on Principle Component Analysis (PCA) for separating mixed two radiotracer signals from each other. Two different radiotracers (Technetium-99m (Tc(99m)) and Barium-137m (Ba(137m))) were injected into a physical model for simulation of chemical reactor (PMSCR-MK2) for obtaining the radiotracer signals using radiation detectors and Data Acquisition System (DAS). The radiotracer signals are mixed and signal processing steps are performed include background correction and signal de-noising, then applying the signal separation algorithms. Three separation algorithms have been carried out; time domain based separation algorithm, Independent Component Analysis (ICA) based separation algorithm, and Principal Components Analysis (PCA) based separation algorithm. The results proved the superiority of the PCA based separation algorithm to the other based separation algorithm, and PCA based separation algorithm and the signal processing steps gives a considerable improvement of the separation process. PMID:26974488

  15. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  16. Effect of Mixing Enhancement Devices on Turbulence in Separate Flow Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of several mixing enhancement devices on turbulence in jet nozzles. The topics include: 1) The Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Program; 2) Test Programs SFNT97 and SFNT2K; 3) Facility; 4) Mixing Enhancement Nozzles; 5) IR reductions; 6) Schlieren of Chevrons; and 7) Aeroacoustics of Enhanced Mixing-Paradigm. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  17. Event recognition using signal spectrograms in long pulse experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, J.; Ruiz, M.; Barrera, E.; Arcas, G.; Lopez, J. M.; Vega, J.

    2010-10-15

    As discharge duration increases, real-time complex analysis of the signal becomes more important. In this context, data acquisition and processing systems must provide models for designing experiments which use event oriented plasma control. One example of advanced data analysis is signal classification. The off-line statistical analysis of a large number of discharges provides information to develop algorithms for the determination of the plasma parameters from measurements of magnetohydrodinamic waves, for example, to detect density fluctuations induced by the Alfven cascades using morphological patterns. The need to apply different algorithms to the signals and to address different processing algorithms using the previous results necessitates the use of an event-based experiment. The Intelligent Test and Measurement System platform is an example of architecture designed to implement distributed data acquisition and real-time processing systems. The processing algorithm sequence is modeled using an event-based paradigm. The adaptive capacity of this model is based on the logic defined by the use of state machines in SCXML. The Intelligent Test and Measurement System platform mixes a local multiprocessing model with a distributed deployment of services based on Jini.

  18. Event recognition using signal spectrograms in long pulse experiments.

    PubMed

    González, J; Ruiz, M; Vega, J; Barrera, E; Arcas, G; López, J M

    2010-10-01

    As discharge duration increases, real-time complex analysis of the signal becomes more important. In this context, data acquisition and processing systems must provide models for designing experiments which use event oriented plasma control. One example of advanced data analysis is signal classification. The off-line statistical analysis of a large number of discharges provides information to develop algorithms for the determination of the plasma parameters from measurements of magnetohydrodinamic waves, for example, to detect density fluctuations induced by the Alfvén cascades using morphological patterns. The need to apply different algorithms to the signals and to address different processing algorithms using the previous results necessitates the use of an event-based experiment. The Intelligent Test and Measurement System platform is an example of architecture designed to implement distributed data acquisition and real-time processing systems. The processing algorithm sequence is modeled using an event-based paradigm. The adaptive capacity of this model is based on the logic defined by the use of state machines in SCXML. The Intelligent Test and Measurement System platform mixes a local multiprocessing model with a distributed deployment of services based on Jini. PMID:21033990

  19. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to a remotely controllable mixing system in which a plurality of mixing assemblies are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly employs a central chamber and two outer, upper and lower chambers. Valves are positioned between chambers, and these valves for a given mixing assembly are operated by upper and lower control rotors, which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors. Additionally, a hoop is compressed around upper control rotors and a hoop is compressed around lower control rotors to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors and drive rotors. The drive rollers are driven by a motor.

  20. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  1. Decoding Mixed Signals: Survival in the Demise of Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Heather

    Among personal memories for one minority instructor in literature is witnessing the civil rights movement, that defining period in which people of African descent broke out of the chrysalis of "Jim Crow" and transformed themselves from "colored" to "Black." In 1995, 1,000,000 Black men once again converged on the Capitol in a nonviolent movement…

  2. Three-dimensional image signals: processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2010-11-01

    Over the years extensive studies have been carried out to apply coherent optics methods in real-time processing, communications and transmission image. This is especially true when a large amount of information needs to be processed, e.g., in high-resolution imaging. The recent progress in data-processing networks and communication systems has considerably increased the capacity of information exchange. We describe the results of literature investigation research of processing methods for the signals of the three-dimensional images. All commercially available 3D technologies today are based on stereoscopic viewing. 3D technology was once the exclusive domain of skilled computer-graphics developers with high-end machines and software. The images capture from the advanced 3D digital camera can be displayed onto screen of the 3D digital viewer with/ without special glasses. For this is needed considerable processing power and memory to create and render the complex mix of colors, textures, and virtual lighting and perspective necessary to make figures appear three-dimensional. Also, using a standard digital camera and a technique called phase-shift interferometry we can capture "digital holograms." These are holograms that can be stored on computer and transmitted over conventional networks. We present some research methods to process "digital holograms" for the Internet transmission and results.

  3. Magnetoplasmonic RF mixing and nonlinear frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firby, C. J.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design of a magnetoplasmonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulator facilitating radio-frequency (RF) mixing and nonlinear frequency generation. This is achieved by forming the MZI arms from long-range dielectric-loaded plasmonic waveguides containing bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Bi:YIG). The magnetization of the Bi:YIG can be driven in the nonlinear regime by RF magnetic fields produced around adjacent transmission lines. Correspondingly, the nonlinear temporal dynamics of the transverse magnetization component are mapped onto the nonreciprocal phase shift in the MZI arms, and onto the output optical intensity signal. We show that this tunable mechanism can generate harmonics, frequency splitting, and frequency down-conversion with a single RF excitation, as well as RF mixing when driven by two RF signals. This magnetoplasmonic component can reduce the number of electrical sources required to generate distinct optical modulation frequencies and is anticipated to satisfy important applications in integrated optics.

  4. Asymmetric antiproton debuncher: No bad mixing, more good mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Visnjic, V.

    1994-07-01

    An asymmetric lattice for the Fermilab Antiproton Debuncher is designed. The lattice has zero mixing between the pickups and the kickers (bad mixing) while the mixing in the rest of the machine (good mixing) can be varied (even during the operation of the machine) in order to optimize the stochastic cooling. As an example, a lattice with zero bad mixing and twice the good mixing is presented. The betatron cooling rate in this lattice is twice its present value.

  5. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  6. Signal transduction mechanisms in plants: an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Thompson, G. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This article provides an overview on recent advances in some of the basic signalling mechanisms that participate in a wide variety of stimulus-response pathways. The mechanisms include calcium-based signalling, G-protein-mediated-signalling and signalling involving inositol phospholipids, with discussion on the role of protein kinases and phosphatases interspersed. As a further defining feature, the article highlights recent exciting findings on three extracellular components that have not been given coverage in previous reviews of signal transduction in plants, extracellular calmodulin, extracellular ATP, and integrin-like receptors, all of which affect plant growth and development.

  7. Retrograde signaling: Organelles go networking.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario

    2016-08-01

    The term retrograde signaling refers to the fact that chloroplasts and mitochondria utilize specific signaling molecules to convey information on their developmental and physiological states to the nucleus and modulate the expression of nuclear genes accordingly. Signals emanating from plastids have been associated with two main networks: 'Biogenic control' is active during early stages of chloroplast development, while 'operational' control functions in response to environmental fluctuations. Early work focused on the former and its major players, the GUN proteins. However, our view of retrograde signaling has since been extended and revised. Elements of several 'operational' signaling circuits have come to light, including metabolites, signaling cascades in the cytosol and transcription factors. Here, we review recent advances in the identification and characterization of retrograde signaling components. We place particular emphasis on the strategies employed to define signaling components, spanning the entire spectrum of genetic screens, metabolite profiling and bioinformatics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26997501

  8. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  9. SIGNALING NETWORKS IN PALATE DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jamie; Kaartinen, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    Palatogenesis, the formation of the palate, is a dynamic process that is regulated by a complex series of context-dependent morphogenetic signaling events. Many genes involved in palatogenesis have been discovered through the use of genetically-manipulated mouse models as well as from human genetic studies, but the roles of these genes and their products in signaling networks regulating palatogenesis are still poorly known. In this review, we give a brief overview on palatogenesis and introduce key signaling cascades leading to formation of the intact palate. Moreover, we review conceptual differences between pathway biology and network biology and discuss how some of the recent technological advances in conjunction with mouse genetic models have contributed to our understanding of signaling networks regulating palate growth and fusion. PMID:24644145

  10. Extracellular modulators of Wnt signalling.

    PubMed

    Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    Wnt morphogens are secreted signalling proteins that play leading roles in embryogenesis and tissue homeostasis throughout life. Wnt signalling is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including posttranslational modification of Wnts, antagonist binding (to Wnts or their receptors), and regulation of the availability of Wnt receptors. Recent crystallographic, structure-guided biophysical and cell-based studies have advanced our understanding of how Wnt signalling is regulated at the cell surface. Structures include Wnt in complex with the cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of Frizzled, extracellular fragments of Wnt co-receptor LRP6, LRP6-binding antagonists Dickkopf and Sclerostin, antagonists 5T4/WAIF1 and Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF-1), as well as Frizzled-ubiquitin ligases ZNRF3/RNF43 (in isolation and in complexes with Wnt signalling promoters R-spondins and LGR5). We review recent discoveries and remaining questions. PMID:25460271

  11. Advanced Virgo: AN Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fafone, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational wave detectors. Several km-scale interferometers have already operated at interesting sensitivity levels. In particular, the interferometric detector for gravitational waves Virgo completed its fourth science run in August 2011, when the upgrade toward the second-generation detector Advanced Virgo started. This major upgrade is planned to be completed by 2015. The expected final sensitivity of Advanced Virgo is about ten times better than the sensitivity reached by its predecessor. Many of the components of the detector will be changed to meet this goal, including new core optics, a more powerful laser, an improved vacuum system, the implementation of the signal-recycling technique. In this paper the description of the project and the expected schedule are presented.

  12. Entropy and Mixing : Titan's Humidity Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2003-05-01

    Determinations of the relative humidity of methane near Titan's surface range from 40-60 %. The rationale advanced by Lunine in the global ocean hypothesis was that a mixed ethane-methane ocean in thermodynamic equilibrium with the atmosphere would be unsaturated due to methane vapor pressure supression by involatile ethane (much as salt or sugar dissolved in water slows its evaporation). Here I explore a nonequilibrium explanation for the incomplete saturation - the reason why the terrestrial atmosphere is not saturated. Specifically, saturated near-surface air is mixed with downwelling dry air, a mixing driven by vertical convection. The more vigorous the mixing, the dryer the near-surface air should be. Flasar (1983) made a crude empirical evaluation of transport processes : here I adopt a more fundamental thermodynamic approach. In reality both the involatile solute and the mixing mechanisms probably play a part in regulating methane humidity, and the utility of global and annual averages must be compromised by latitudinal and seasonal dependences. Comparison with the Earth - where moist processes play a dominant role in the entropy budget - will be instructive.

  13. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 10 rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  14. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 19 equivalent rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  15. Advanced sensors and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, Raymond S.; Zimmerman, Joe E.; Douglas, Kevin R.; Morrison, Rusty

    1990-01-01

    NASA is currently investigating the readiness of Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation to meet the requirements of new initiatives in space. The following technical objectives and technologies are briefly discussed: smart and nonintrusive sensors; onboard signal and data processing; high capacity and rate adaptive data acquisition systems; onboard computing; high capacity and rate onboard storage; efficient onboard data distribution; high capacity telemetry; ground and flight test support instrumentation; power distribution; and workstations, video/lighting. The requirements for high fidelity data (accuracy, frequency, quantity, spatial resolution) in hostile environments will continue to push the technology developers and users to extend the performance of their products and to develop new generations.

  16. Observation of heterodyne and homodyne mixing in X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy during thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headrick, Randall; Ulbrandt, Jeffrey; Rainville, Meliha; Wagenbach, Christa; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec; Zhou, Hua; Ludwig, Karl

    The properties of artificially grown thin films are often strongly affected by the dynamic relationship between surface growth processes and subsurface structure. Coherent mixing of X-ray signals promises to provide an approach to better understand such processes. Continuously variable mixing of surface and bulk scattering signals during real-time studies of sputter deposition of a-Si and a-WiSi2 films has been observed by controlling the X-ray penetration and escape depths in coherent grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (Co-GISAXS). Under conditions where the X-ray signal comes from both the growth surface and the thin film bulk, oscillations in temporal correlations arise from coherent interference between scattering from stationary bulk features and from the advancing surface. The absence of oscillations at larger in-plane wavevector transfer is interpreted as evidence that elongated bulk features propagate upward at the same velocity as the surface. Additionally, a highly surface sensitive mode is demonstrated that can access the surface dynamics independently of the subsurface structure. Acknowledgements: USDOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences under DE-FG02-07ER46380 (RH and JU), and DE-FG02-03ER46037 (MR, CW, and KL).

  17. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  18. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  19. Mixed waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.B.; Kirner, N.P.

    1991-12-31

    Disposal fees for mixed waste at proposed commercial disposal sites have been estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubit foot. If such high disposal fees are imposed, generators may be willing to apply extraordinary treatment or regulatory approaches to properly dispose of their mixed waste. This paper explores the feasibility of several waste management scenarios and attempts to answer the question: Can mixed waste be managed out of existence? Existing data on commercially generated mixed waste streams are used to identify the realm of mixed waste known to be generated. Each waste stream is evaluated from both a regulatory and technical perspective in order to convert the waste into a strictly low-level radioactive or a hazardous waste. Alternative regulatory approaches evaluated in this paper include a delisting petition, no migration petition, and a treatability variance. For each waste stream, potentially available treatment options are identified that could lead to these variances. Waste minimization methodology and storage for decay are also considered. Economic feasibility of each option is discussed broadly.

  20. Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment: Program Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    baroclinic (depth varying) tide, all validated with near-Ridge data, will be applied, to reveal the mechanisms of tidal energy conversion along the Ridge, and allow spatial and temporal integration of the rate of conversion. Field experiments include a survey to identify "hot spots" of enhanced mixing and barotropic to baroclinic conversion, a Nearfield study identifying the dominant mechanisms responsible for topographic mixing, and a Farfield program which quantifies the barotropic energy flux convergence at the Ridge and the flux divergence associated with low mode baroclinic waves radiation. The difference is a measure of the tidal power available for mixing at the Ridge. Field work is planned from years 2000 through 2002, with analysis and modeling efforts extending through early 2006. If successful, HOME will yield an understanding of the dominant topographic mixing processes applicable throughout the global ocean. It will advance understanding of two central problems in ocean science, the maintenance of the abyssal stratification, and the dissipation of the tides. HOME data will be used to improve the parameterization of dissipation in models which presently assimilate TOPEX-POSEIDON observations. The improved understanding of the dynamics and spatial distribution of mixing processes will benefit future long-term programs such as CLIVAR.

  1. An advanced mixed user domestic satellite system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, H. G.; Holmes, W. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A domestic satellite system architecture that can efficiently and economically accommodate a wide variety of disparate user classes is described and a baseline system configuration identified. With such a technique, both the efficiency of TDMA operation and the operational terminal flexibility of FDMA can be simultaneously achieved.

  2. Systemic silencing signal(s).

    PubMed

    Fagard, M; Vaucheret, H

    2000-06-01

    Grafting experiments have revealed that transgenic plants that undergo co-suppression of homologous transgenes and endogenous genes or PTGS of exogenous transgenes produce a sequence-specific systemic silencing signal that is able to propagate from cell to cell and at long distance. Similarly, infection of transgenic plants by viruses that carry (part of) a transgene sequence results in global silencing (VIGS) of the integrated transgenes although viral infection is localized. Systemic PTGS and VIGS strongly resemble recovery from virus infection in non-transgenic plants, leading to protection against secondary infection in newly emerging leaves and PTGS of transiently expressed homologous transgenes. The sequence-specific PTGS signal is probably a transgene product (for example, aberrant RNA) or a secondary product (for example, RNA molecules produced by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase with transgene RNA as a matrix) that mimics the type of viral RNA that is targeted for degradation by cellular defence. Whether some particular cases of transgene TGS could also rely on the production of such a mobile molecule is discussed. PMID:10999411

  3. AutoDJ: the art of electronic music mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemma, Aweke N.

    2005-10-01

    As a result of advances in audio compression, availability of broadband Internet access at home and the popularity of electronic music distribution systems, today consumers acquire and store ever-increasing number of songs in their local databases. Moreover, consumer-devices with mass random-access storage and sophisticated rendering capabilities make the whole electronic music database available for instant playback. As opposed to traditional music playback where only a limited number of songs are manually selected, there is a strong need for intelligent play-list generation techniques that utilize the whole database while taking the user's interests into account. Moreover, it is desirable to present these songs in a seamlessly streaming manner with smooth transitions. In this paper, we propose a systematic expressive content retrieval system, called AutoDJ, that achieves both objectives. It automatically creates a play-list by sorting songs ac-cording to their low-level features and plays them in a smooth rhythmically consistent way after audio mixing. AutoDJ first builds a profile for each song using features such as tempo, beat and major. Afterwards, it uses a similarity metric to build up a play-list based on a "seed" song. Finally, it introduces smooth transition from one song (profile) to the other by equalizing the tempo and synchronizing the beat phase. We present the system design principles and the signal processing techniques used, as well as a simple AutoDJ demonstrator.

  4. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  5. Quantifying Mixing using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Emilio J.; McCarthy, Kathryn L.; Bacca, Lori A.; Hartt, William H.; McCarthy, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media 1, 2. The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile 1H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  6. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  7. Basic concepts in the processing of SARSAT signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T.; Carter, C. R.

    1987-03-01

    Search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (SARSAT) involves the use of satellites in low-polar orbits which relay the emergency signals of distressed vehicles to an earth station for signal analysis. In this paper, some basic concepts and a theoretical analysis of the spectra produced by coherent and noncoherent emergency locator transmitter signals are presented. It is shown that coherent signals can be easily processed using linear spectral analysis. Noncoherent signals, however, require more advanced methods.

  8. Atomization and mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Jaqua, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art in atomization and mixing for triplet, pentad, and coaxial injectors is described. Injectors that are applicable for LOX/hydrocarbon propellants and main chamber and fuel rich preburner/gas generator mixture ratios are of special interest. Various applicable correlating equations and parameters as well as test data found in the literature are presented. The validity, utility, and important aspects of these data and correlations are discussed and the measurement techniques used are evaluated. Propellant mixing tests performed are described and summarized, results are reported, and tentative conclusions are included.

  9. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  10. Mixed waste characterization strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.E.; Stakebake, J.; Peters, M.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive mixed wastes containing a radioactive component subject to the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and hazardous waste subject to resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are generated, treated, and stored at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and are subject to federal and state statutory and regulatory requirements. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) are the two primary regulatory agencies which enforce these requirements. This paper describes the mechanism by which RFP will characterize mixed wastes within the LDR provisions of RCRA and the LDR FFCA as well as for meeting the waste acceptance criteria for disposal.

  11. Mixed waste characterization strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.E.; Stakebake, J.; Peters, M.

    1992-08-01

    Radioactive mixed wastes containing a radioactive component subject to the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and hazardous waste subject to resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are generated, treated, and stored at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and are subject to federal and state statutory and regulatory requirements. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) are the two primary regulatory agencies which enforce these requirements. This paper describes the mechanism by which RFP will characterize mixed wastes within the LDR provisions of RCRA and the LDR FFCA as well as for meeting the waste acceptance criteria for disposal.

  12. MixDown

    2010-01-01

    MixDown is a meta-build tool that orchestrates and manages the building of multiple 3rd party libraries. It can manage the downloading, uncompressing, unpacking, patching, configuration, build, and installation of 3rd party libraries using a variety of configuration and build tools. As a meta-build tool, it relies on 3rd party tools such as GNU Autotools, make, Cmake, scons, etc. to actually confugure and build libraries. MixDown includes an extensive database of settings to be used formore » general machines and specific leadership class computing resources.« less

  13. Turbulence and Interfacial Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, James; Li, Xiaolin

    2005-03-15

    The authors study mix from analytical and numerical points of view. These investigations are linked. The analytical studies (in addition to laboratory experiments) provide bench marks for the direct simulation of mix. However, direct simulation is too detailed to be useful and to expensive to be practical. They also consider averaged equations. Here the major issue is the validation of the closure assumptions. They appeal to the direct simulation methods for this step. They have collaborated with several NNSA teams; moreover, Stony Brook alumni (former students, faculty and research collaborators) presently hold staff positions in NNSA laboratories.

  14. Four-wave mixing experiments with extreme ultraviolet transient gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencivenga, F.; Cucini, R.; Capotondi, F.; Battistoni, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Gessini, A.; Manfredda, M.; Nikolov, I. P.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Svetina, C.; Parisse, P.; Casolari, F.; Danailov, M. B.; Kiskinova, M.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-04-01

    Four-wave mixing (FWM) processes, based on third-order nonlinear light-matter interactions, can combine ultrafast time resolution with energy and wavevector selectivity, and enable the exploration of dynamics inaccessible by linear methods. The coherent and multi-wave nature of the FWM approach has been crucial in the development of advanced technologies, such as silicon photonics, subwavelength imaging and quantum communications. All these technologies operate at optical wavelengths, which limits the spatial resolution and does not allow the probing of excitations with energy in the electronvolt range. Extension to shorter wavelengths--that is, the extreme ultraviolet and soft-X-ray ranges--would allow the spatial resolution to be improved and the excitation energy range to be expanded, as well as enabling elemental selectivity to be achieved by exploiting core resonances. So far, FWM applications at such wavelengths have been prevented by the absence of coherent sources of sufficient brightness and of suitable experimental set-ups. Here we show how transient gratings, generated by the interference of coherent extreme-ultraviolet pulses delivered by the FERMI free-electron laser, can be used to stimulate FWM processes at suboptical wavelengths. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the possibility of observing the time evolution of the FWM signal, which shows the dynamics of coherent excitations as molecular vibrations. This result opens the way to FWM with nanometre spatial resolution and elemental selectivity, which, for example, would enable the investigation of charge-transfer dynamics. The theoretical possibility of realizing these applications has already stimulated ongoing developments of free-electron lasers: our results show that FWM at suboptical wavelengths is feasible, and we hope that they will enable advances in present and future photon sources.

  15. 2009: signaling breakthroughs of the year.

    PubMed

    Adler, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    Nominations for this year's signaling breakthroughs spanned physiology, therapeutics and drug development, neuroscience, and plant signaling. Among the most exciting advances in mammalian biology were therapeutic applications of research that are overturning the conventional boundaries of signaling pathways,unexpected mechanisms to prolong life and prevent aging, new insights into schizophrenia and memory, development of a transgenic primate model, and the discovery that the cells in the lungs can "taste" noxious substances. In plant signaling,the nominations converged on the identification of the elusive receptor for the plant stress hormone abscisic acid. Finally, methodological advances were also noted with new techniques in synthetic biology enabling the precise spatiotemporal control of signaling events and increasingly facile methods for creation and analysis of proteomic data yielding tremendous increases in raw data and insights into cellular regulation. PMID:20051590

  16. Enhanced Turbulent Mixing on Highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liggio, J.; Makar, P.; Brook, J.; Wentzell, J. J.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Traffic emissions have a substantial effect on air quality and turbulence affects how these emissions mix with the surrounding air. In July and August of 2010, measurements of turbulent fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy were made on highways in the Toronto area (Ontario, Canada) as part of the ALMITEE (Advancing Local-scale Modeling through Inclusion of Transportation Emission Experiments) subproject FEVER (Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways). The aim of this project was to study and parameterize the turbulent mixing of traffic emissions on highways as a function of traffic density, speed, and vehicle type. The mobile station CRUISER (Canadian Regional and Urban Investigation System for Environmental Research) was equipped with two sonic anemometers, an air flow probe (AIMMS-20), inertial motion sensing, GPS, video recording equipment, and various particle and gas measurement instrumentation. This allowed in-situ turbulence measurements while driving on the highway with traffic. These measurements differ from previous studies in that turbulence can be measured in realistic conditions, while traffic densities, vehicle types, and vehicle to measurement distances can be extracted from video recording by automated video processing software. Although the turbulent motion of air is often measured from aircraft and ship-based instrumentation, the analysis and interpretation of sonic anemometer measurements from a highway-speed vehicle, moving over uneven and often bumpy terrain presents a very different challenge. Various analytical approaches to process these measurements will be compared and the development of the video processing software to determine vehicle size and following distance will be discussed. Results will be presented which demonstrate a strong dependence of turbulent energy on vehicle type, speed, and following distance.

  17. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  18. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  19. Advanced Nanoemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryd, Michael M.; Mason, Thomas G.

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in the growing field of nanoemulsions are opening up new applications in many areas such as pharmaceuticals, foods, and cosmetics. Moreover, highly controlled nanoemulsions can also serve as excellent model systems for investigating basic scientific questions about soft matter. Here, we highlight some of the most recent developments in nanoemulsions, focusing on methods of formation, surface modification, material properties, and characterization. These developments provide insight into the substantial advantages that nanoemulsions can offer over their microscale emulsion counterparts.

  20. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  1. Epigenetic signaling in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ibi, Daisuke; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression are complex and heterogeneous diseases with multiple and independent factors that may contribute to their pathophysiology, making challenging to find a link between specific elements and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the disorder and its treatment. Growing evidences suggest that epigenetic modifications in certain brain regions and neural circuits represent a key mechanism through which environmental factors interact with individual's genetic constitution to affect risk of psychiatric conditions throughout life. This review focuses on recent advances that directly implicate epigenetic modifications in schizophrenia and antipsychotic drug action. PMID:26120009

  2. Sylgard® Mixing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Mollie; Welch, Cynthia F.; Goodwin, Lynne Alese; Keller, Jennie

    2014-08-22

    Sylgard® 184 and Sylgard® 186 silicone elastomers form Dow Corning® are used as potting agents across the Nuclear Weapons Complex. A standardized mixing procedure is required for filled versions of these products. The present study is a follow-up to a mixing study performed by MST-7 which established the best mixing procedure to use when adding filler to either 184 or 186 base resins. The most effective and consistent method of mixing resin and curing agent for three modified silicone elastomer recipes is outlined in this report. For each recipe, sample size, mixing type, and mixing time was varied over 10 separate runs. The results show that the THINKY™ Mixer gives reliable mixing over varying batch sizes and mixing times. Hand Mixing can give improved mixing, as indicated by reduced initial viscosity; however, this method is not consistent.

  3. True Anonymity Without Mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Jimenez, C.; Marshall, L.

    2002-04-01

    Anonymizers based on mix computers interposed between the sender and the receiver of an e-mail message have been used in the Internet for several years by senders of e-mail messages who do not wish to disclose their identity. Unfortunately, the degree of anonymity provided by this paradigm is limited and fragile. First, the messages sent are not truly anonymous but pseudo-anonymous since one of the mixes, at least, always knows the sender's identity. Secondly, the strength of the system to protect the sender's identity depends on the ability and the willingness of the mixes to keep the secret. If the mixes fail, the sender/'s anonymity is reduced to pieces. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for sending truly anonymous messages over the Internet where the anonymous message is sent from a PDA which uses dynamically assigned temporary, non-personal, random IP and MAC addresses. Anonymous E-cash is used to pay for the service.

  4. Josephson junction mixing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, E. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theory is presented which, though too simple to explain quantitative details in the Josephson junction mixing response, is sufficient for explaining qualitatively the results observed. Crucial to the theory presented, and that which differentiates it from earlier ones, is the inclusion of harmonic voltages across the ideal Josephson element.

  5. Mixed valent metals.

    PubMed

    Riseborough, P S; Lawrence, J M

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger's theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach's diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc. PMID:27376888

  6. Stabilizer for mixed fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, M.; Igarashi, T.; Ukigai, T.

    1984-03-13

    A stabilizer for mixed fuels containing a reaction product obtained by reacting (1) a polyol having at least 3 hydroxyl groups in the molecule and a molecular weight of 400-10,000 with (2) an epihalohydrin, as the principal component.

  7. Progress in mix modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.K.

    1997-03-14

    We have identified the Cranfill multifluid turbulence model (Cranfill, 1992) as a starting point for development of subgrid models of instability, turbulent and mixing processes. We have differenced the closed system of equations in conservation form, and coded them in the object-oriented hydrodynamics code FLAG, which is to be used as a testbed for such models.

  8. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  9. Mixed valent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riseborough, P. S.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger’s theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer–Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach’s diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc.

  10. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, Clark W.; Landrum, D. Brian; Turner, Matthew; Wagner, David K.; Lambert, James

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane. Initial cold flow testing of the model is underway to determine both, the behavior of the ingested air in the duct and to validate the mixing diagnostics. During the tests, each of the two rocket nozzles ejected up to two pounds mass per second into the 13.6 square inch duct. The tests showed that the mass flow of the rockets was great enough to cause the entrained air to go sonic at the strut, which is the location of the rocket nozzles. More tests are necessary to determine whether the entrained air chokes due to the reduction in the area of the duct at the strut (a physical choke), or because of the addition of mass inside the duct at the nozzle exit (a Fabri choke). The initial tests of the mixing diagnostics are showing promise.

  11. Mixed Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    Markov random fields can encode complex probabilistic relationships involving multiple variables and admit efficient procedures for probabilistic inference. However, from a knowledge engineering point of view, these models suffer from a serious limitation. The graph of a Markov field must connect all pairs of variables that are conditionally dependent even for a single choice of values of the other variables. This makes it hard to encode interactions that occur only in a certain context and are absent in all others. Furthermore, the requirement that two variables be connected unless always conditionally independent may lead to excessively dense graphs, obscuring the independencies present among the variables and leading to computationally prohibitive inference algorithms. Mumford [Mumford, D. (1996) in ICIAM 95, eds. Kirchgassner, K., Marenholtz, O. & Mennicken, R. (Akademie Verlag, Berlin), pp. 233–256] proposed an alternative modeling framework where the graph need not be rigid and completely determined a priori. Mixed Markov models contain node-valued random variables that, when instantiated, augment the graph by a set of transient edges. A single joint probability distribution relates the values of regular and node-valued variables. In this article, we study the analytical and computational properties of mixed Markov models. In particular, we show that positive mixed models have a local Markov property that is equivalent to their global factorization. We also describe a computationally efficient procedure for answering probabilistic queries in mixed Markov models. PMID:12829802

  12. Color mixing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Steven J.

    1992-05-01

    In black-and-white printing the page image can be represented within a computer as an array of binary values indicating whether or not pixels should be inked. The Boolean operators of AND, OR, and EXCLUSIVE-OR are often used when adding new objects to the image array. For color printing the page may be represented as an array of continuous tone color values, and the generalization of these logic functions to gray-scale or full-color images is, in general, not defined or understood. When incrementally composing a page image new colors can replace old in an image buffer, or new colors and old can be combined according to some mixing function to form a composite color which is stored. This paper examines the properties of the Boolean operations and suggests full-color mixing functions which preserve the desired properties. These functions can be used to combine colored images, giving various transparency effects. The relationships between the mixing functions and physical models of color mixing are also discussed.

  13. Mixing and Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditmars, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of longitudinal dispersion, mixing and transport in streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, and oceans. This review covers also: (1) fluid-solid mixtures and (2) oil spill behavior. A list of 189 references published in 1976 and 1977 is presented. (HM)

  14. Room for advancement

    SciTech Connect

    Carrio, L.A. ); Sharpe, R. ); Bizzarri, R.E. ); Wilson, T.E. )

    1993-12-01

    The advanced biological nutrient removal (ABNR) process is a viable nutrient removal choice for wastewater treatment plants where site limitations and energy costs are a concern. Specifically, ABNR plants: can remove more than 60% of total nitrogen; achieve a high degree of phosphorus removal - primarily by chemical additions; use step aeration (step feed) to save tank volume and site space and to eliminate mixed liquor recirculation requirements; use less energy; use a supplemental source of carbon (typically, methanol) in small quantities to achieve higher levels of nitrogen removal; take advantage of the highest denitrification rates of raw wastewater; allow nitrification of low alkalinity wastewater with no chemical supplement; can be created from existing step aeration plants with only minor modifications; and can retain all the flexibility and wet-weather flow stability of conventional step aeration systems. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Evolution of density compensated fronts in simulated ocean mixed layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helber, R. W.; Hebert, D. A.; Koch, A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations within the ocean surface mixed layer indicate a tendency for temperature gradients to form that are compensated for their effect on density by salinity gradients. These density compensated fronts tend to occur in the absence of strong surface forcing and thus weak vertical mixing. Observations show that density compensated fronts are quickly erased by surface cooling events. The presence of density compensated gradients in the surface mixed layer, however, are not well represented in regional and global ocean circulation model predictions. In these models, subgrid-scale processes are parameterized with minimal ability to represent double diffusion. Recent advances in parameterizations have been developed to model the re-stratification of the mixed layer by sub-mesoscale eddies. These ageostrophic dynamics can lead to long filaments that are governed by process on length scales from 100 m to 10 km and time scales near a day. The impact of these processes in model physics on density compensated fronts is unclear. To improve our understanding of compensated front evolution in the ocean, three different mixing schemes are tested to evaluate the creation of horizontally density compensated gradients in model simulations. One scheme extracts potential energy of ocean fronts for mixing dependent on horizontal and vertical buoyancy gradients, mixed layer depth, and inertial period. The other two schemes mix temperature and salinity horizontally dependent on the buoyancy gradient. All schemes provide a three dimensional approach to mixing that differentiates the horizontal eddy diffusion of temperature and salinity.

  16. Receptor signaling clusters in the immune synapse

    PubMed Central

    Dustin, Michael L.; Groves, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    Signaling processes between various immune cells involve large scale spatial reorganization of receptors and signaling molecules within the cell-cell junction. These structures, now collectively referred to as immune synapses, interleave physical and mechanical processes with the cascades of chemical reactions that constitute signal transduction systems. Molecular level clustering, spatial exclusion, and long range directed transport are all emerging as key regulatory mechanisms. The study of these processes is drawing researchers from physical sciences to join the effort and represents a rapidly growing branch of biophysical chemistry. Recent advances in the physical and quantitative analysis of signaling within the immune synapses will be reviewed here. PMID:22404679

  17. Linear signal noise summer accurately determines and controls S/N ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundry, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Linear signal noise summer precisely controls the relative power levels of signal and noise, and mixes them linearly in accurately known ratios. The S/N ratio accuracy and stability are greatly improved by this technique and are attained simultaneously.

  18. Acquisition signal transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Morton L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An encoded information transmitter which transmits a radio frequency carrier that is amplitude modulated by a constant frequency waveform and thereafter amplitude modulated by a predetermined encoded waveform, the constant frequency waveform modulated carrier constituting an acquisition signal and the encoded waveform modulated carrier constituting an information bearing signal, the acquisition signal providing enhanced signal acquisition and interference rejection favoring the information bearing signal. One specific application for this transmitter is as a distress transmitter where a conventional, legislated audio tone modulated signal is transmitted followed first by the acquisition signal and then the information bearing signal, the information bearing signal being encoded with, among other things, vehicle identification data. The acquistion signal enables a receiver to acquire the information bearing signal where the received signal is low and/or where the received signal has a low signal-to-noise ratio in an environment where there are multiple signals in the same frequency band as the information bearing signal.

  19. Predicting Epileptic Seizures in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Negin; Corne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6–0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG) data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling), is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity) of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance. PMID:24911316

  20. Signal Conditioning Amplifier and Recorder (SCAmpR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Signal Conditioning Amplifier and Recorder (SCAmpR) system is presented. The topics include: 1) System Description; 2) Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA); 3) Advanced Data Acquisition System (ADAS); and 4) Signal Conditioning Amplifier and Recorder (SCAmpR). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  1. Mixing and scaling of accelerated interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzon, A.; Rozanov, V.; Redondo, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs when a layer of dense fluid is placed on top of a less dense layer in a gravitational field or are accelerated. The instability forms a turbulent front between the two layers, but some patterns seem to have a persistent memory of the initial conditions as turbulence develops. The advance of this front is described in Linden & Redondo (1991), and may be shown to follow a quadratic law in time. The width of the growing region of instability is proportional to the Atwood number but the distribution of fractal interfaces between the miscible fluids allow to distinguish the dominant mixing regions located at the sides of the RT blobs, where accelerated shear is greatest. A Large Eddy Simulation numerical model is used to predict some of the features of the experiments, different models on the interaction of the bubble generated buoyancy flux and on the boundary conditions are compared with the experiments. The aspect ratios of the bubble induced convective cells and some mixing descriptors are also seen to depend on the boundary conditions applied to the enclosure. The influence of the initial conditions on the structure of the flow and its mixing ability are investigated by means of image analysis, PIV and scaling analysis to determine the regions of the front which contribute most to molecular mixing.

  2. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Verlinde, J.; Harrington, Jerry Y.; McFarquhar, Greg; Yannuzzi, V. T.; Avramov, Alexander; Greenburg, S.; Johnson, N.; Zhang, G.; Poellot, Michael; Mather, Jim H.; Turner, David D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Zak, Bernard D.; Prenni, Anthony J.; Daniel, J. S.; Kok, G. L.; Tobin, D. C.; Holz, R. E.; Sassen, Kenneth; Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, Patrick; Tooman, Tim P.; Ivey, Mark D.; Richardson, S. J.; Bahrmann, C. P.; Shupe, Matthew D.; DeMott, Paul J.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Schofield, R.

    2007-02-01

    In order to help bridge the gaps in our understanding of mixed-phase Arctic clouds, the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (DOE-ARM) funded an integrated, systematic observational study. The major objective of the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted September 27–October 22, 2004 during the autumnal transition season, was to collect a focused set of observations needed to advance our understanding of the cloud microphysics, cloud dynamics, thermodynamics, radiative properties, and evolution of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. These data would then be used to improve to both detailed models of Arctic clouds and large-scale climate models. M-PACE successfully documented the microphysical structure of arctic mixed-phase clouds, with multiple in situ profiles in both single-layer and multi-layer clouds, over the two ground-based remote sensing sites at Barrow and Oliktok Point. Liquid was found in clouds with temperatures down to -30C, the coldest cloud top temperature below -40C sampled by the aircraft. The remote sensing instruments suggest that ice was present in low concentrations, mostly concentrated in precipitation shafts, although there are indications of light ice precipitation present below the optically thick single-layer clouds. Flights into arctic cirrus clouds revealed microphysics properties very similar to their mid-latitude in situ formed cousins, with dominant ice crystal habit bullet rosettes.

  3. Mix and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molitoris, John D.; Batteux, Jan D.; Garza, Raul G.; Tringe, Joseph W.; Souers, P. Clark; Energetic Materials Center Team

    2011-06-01

    We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced turbulent mix resulting from pre-emplaced interface features in a cylindrical geometry. In this research a solid cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave that is driven through a cylindrical interface. Pre-emplaced surface features in plastic and aluminum were studied. Time sequence radiographic imaging was utilized to observe the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to onset of mix and turbulence. Different types of pre-emplaced structures at the interface resulted in a range of mix and instability conditions, with some much more effective at creating a well-mixed region. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Radiographic image data will be compared with numerical simulations of the experiments. Partial support for this research was obtained from the Advanced Energetics Program, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. This work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. TGFβ signaling and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Pardali, Evangelia; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) family members are involved in a wide range of diverse functions and play key roles in embryogenesis, development and tissue homeostasis. Perturbation of TGFβ signaling may lead to vascular and other diseases. In vitro studies have provided evidence that TGFβ family members have a wide range of diverse effects on vascular cells, which are highly dependent on cellular context. Consistent with these observations genetic studies in mice and humans showed that TGFβ family members have ambiguous effects on the function of the cardiovascular system. In this review we discuss the recent advances on TGFβ signaling in (cardio)vascular diseases, and describe the value of TGFβ signaling as both a disease marker and therapeutic target for (cardio)vascular diseases. PMID:22253564

  5. Signaling lansdscape of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Aslam, A; Attar, R; Yaylim, I; Qureshi, M Z; Hasnain, S; Qadir, M I; Farooqi, A A

    2016-01-01

    Research over the decades has gradually and sequentially shown that both intratumor heterogeneity and multifocality make prostate cancer difficult to target. Different challenges associated with generation of risk-stratification tools that correlate genomic landscape with clinical outcomes severely influence clinical efficacy of therapeutic strategies. Androgen receptor mediated signaling has gained great appreciation and rewiring of AR induced signaling cascade in absence of androgen, structural variants of AR have provided near complete resolution of genomic landscape and underlying mechanisms of prostate cancer. In this review we have attempted to provide an overview of most recent advancements in our knowledge related to different signaling cascades including TGF, SHH, Notch, JAK-STAT in prostate cancer progression and development. PMID:26828986

  6. The Yeast Sphingolipid Signaling Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Matmati, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are recognized as signaling mediators in a growing number of pathways, and represent potential targets to address many diseases. The study of sphingolipid signaling in yeast has created a number of breakthroughs in the field, and has the potential to lead future advances. The aim of this article is to provide an inclusive view of two major frontiers in yeast sphingolipid signaling. In the first section, several key studies in the field of sphingolipidomics are consolidated to create a yeast sphingolipidome that ranks nearly all known sphingolipid species by their level in a resting yeast cell. The second section presents an overview of most known phenotypes identified for sphingolipid gene mutants, presented with the intention of illuminating not yet discovered connections outside and inside of the field. PMID:24220500

  7. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Serotonin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Terrell; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-07-15

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Serotonin is a monoamine that regulates numerous physiological responses including those in the central nervous system. The cardinal signal transduction mechanisms via serotonin and its receptors are well established, but fundamental questions regarding complex interactions between the serotonin system and heritable epigenetic modifications that exert control on gene function remain a topic of intense research and debate. This review focuses on recent advances and contributions to our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms of serotonin receptor-dependent signaling, with focus on psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. PMID:25734378

  8. Unitarity constraints on trimaximal mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2010-07-01

    When the neutrino mass eigenstate {nu}{sub 2} is trimaximally mixed, the mixing matrix is called trimaximal. The middle column of the trimaximal mixing matrix is identical to tribimaximal mixing and the other two columns are subject to unitarity constraints. This corresponds to a mixing matrix with four independent parameters in the most general case. Apart from the two Majorana phases, the mixing matrix has only one free parameter in the CP conserving limit. Trimaximality results in interesting interplay between mixing angles and CP violation. A notion of maximal CP violation naturally emerges here: CP violation is maximal for maximal 2-3 mixing. Similarly, there is a natural constraint on the deviation from maximal 2-3 mixing which takes its maximal value in the CP conserving limit.

  9. Analysis of lithology: Vegetation mixes in multispectral images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. B.; Smith, M.; Adams, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discrimination and identification of lithologies from multispectral images is discussed. Rock/soil identification can be facilitated by removing the component of the signal in the images that is contributed by the vegetation. Mixing models were developed to predict the spectra of combinations of pure end members, and those models were refined using laboratory measurements of real mixtures. Models in use include a simple linear (checkerboard) mix, granular mixing, semi-transparent coatings, and combinations of the above. The use of interactive computer techniques that allow quick comparison of the spectrum of a pixel stack (in a multiband set) with laboratory spectra is discussed.

  10. Turbine pyrometry for advanced engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Strange, R. R.

    1987-06-01

    The turbine pyrometry requirements for advanced engine designs are examined. The practical use of current optical pyrometer systems is limited to situations where the reflected radiation comprises not more than 50 percent of the total signal. Alternative approaches, including techniques known as 'Advanced Dual Spectral Area Pyrometer', 'Active Pyrometry', passive synchronous detection pyrometry, and techniques that use thermographic phosphors, are discussed. It is suggested that the methods that use thermographic phosphors at low temperatures can be extended to high temperatures and gas turbine engine environment and can be adapted to the vane scanning pyrometer application.

  11. [Mixed leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Torsten

    2011-03-01

    Coexisting peripheral arterial disease is not uncommon (15 - 21 %) in patients with ulcera cruris primarily based on a venous etiology. Patient's history, clinical examination and detection of ABI as well as duplex scan will establish diagnosis of mixed arterial-venous ulcera. Clinical significance of coexisting arterial disease is often difficult to define and should be evaluated by a vascular specialist. The concept of treatment of mixed ulcers should always include the arterial component. Frequently peripheral arterial perfusion and healing can be improved by minimal invasive, endovascular revascularization. Compression therapy is the corner stone in treatment of venous disease and should be complemented by contemporary two piece graduated compression systems if ulcera are present. According to circumstances ablation of varicose veins must be considered. PMID:21360460

  12. Nozzle mixing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mensink, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a nozzle device for causing two fluids to mix together. In particular, a spray nozzle comprise two hollow, concentric housings, an inner housing and an outer housing. The inner housing has a channel formed therethrough for a first fluid. Its outer surface cooperates with the interior surface of the outer housing to define the second channel for a second fluid. The outer surface of the inner housing and the inner surface of the outer housing each carry a plurality of vanes that interleave but do not touch, each vane of one housing being between two vanes of the other housing. The vanes are curved and the inner surface of the outer housing and the outer surface of the inner housing converge to narrow the second channel. The shape of second channel results in a swirling, accelerating second fluid that will impact the first fluid just past the end of the nozzle where mixing will take place.

  13. Experiments in mixed reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krum, David M.; Sadek, Ramy; Kohli, Luv; Olson, Logan; Bolas, Mark

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Institute for Creative Technologies and the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California, the Mixed Reality lab develops technologies and techniques for presenting realistic immersive training experiences. Such experiences typically place users within a complex ecology of social actors, physical objects, and collections of intents, motivations, relationships, and other psychological constructs. Currently, it remains infeasible to completely synthesize the interactivity and sensory signatures of such ecologies. For this reason, the lab advocates mixed reality methods for training and conducts experiments exploring such methods. Currently, the lab focuses on understanding and exploiting the elasticity of human perception with respect to representational differences between real and virtual environments. This paper presents an overview of three projects: techniques for redirected walking, displays for the representation of virtual humans, and audio processing to increase stress.

  14. Mixing by individual swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkin, Dmitri; Shum, Henry; Yeomans, Julia

    2012-11-01

    Despite their evolutionary and technological importance, different biomixing mechanisms, their effectiveness and universality remain poorly understood. In this talk we focus on the Lagrangian transport of the surrounding fluid by swimmers. Low Re passive tracers advected by swimmers move in loops that are, in general, almost closed. We analyze the reasons for this behavior and, as non-closedness of the loops is a natural requirement for an efficient mixing, propose a classification of possible mechanisms for biogenic mixing. Next, we discuss the universal (common to all swimmers) and the swimmer-dependent features of the resulting tracer displacements and analyze the Darwin drift, the total fluid volume displaced by a swimmer passing from and to infinity. We show that the Darwin drift is finite for force-free swimmers and can be decomposed into a universal and a swimmer-dependent part. We illustrate our consideration with examples for model swimmers and biological data.

  15. Turbulent mixing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Abarzhi, S I; Sreenivasan, K R

    2010-04-13

    Turbulence is a supermixer. Turbulent mixing has immense consequences for physical phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales under both high- and low-energy-density conditions. It influences thermonuclear fusion in inertial and magnetic confinement systems; governs dynamics of supernovae, accretion disks and explosions; dominates stellar convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics; affects premixed and non-premixed combustion; controls standard turbulent flows (wall-bounded and free-subsonic, supersonic as well as hypersonic); as well as atmospheric and oceanic phenomena (which themselves have important effects on climate). In most of these circumstances, the mixing phenomena are driven by non-equilibrium dynamics. While each article in this collection dwells on a specific problem, the purpose here is to seek a few unified themes amongst diverse phenomena. PMID:20211872

  16. EVALUATING CONCENTRATION PROFILES DURING UNSTEADY MIXING

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Lawler, Bruce D.; Sundaram, S. K.; Baer, Ellen BK; Hatchell, Brian K.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Sande, Susan; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zuljevic, Nino

    2010-01-01

    Pulse jet mixing tests to suspend noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid were conducted at three geometric scales. To understand the solids suspension process an ultrasonic concentration probe was used to measure the concentration of solids in the cloud during a pulse at various elevations and radial positions. The data are being analyzed to provide a model for predicting concentration as a function of elevation. This paper presents a simple single frequency ultrasonic measurement application that demonstrates the ability of ultrasonic sensors to measure slurry concentration based on signal attenuation. Sensor calibration data show that ultrasonic signal attenuation is proportional to the applied frequency and to the slurry volume fraction. Real-time measurements of ultrasonic signal attenuation were used to track the process of slurry mixing using single sensors and sensor arrays. Comparison of means of the ultrasonic measurements with means obtained from discrete extractive measurements show that the distributions overlap and cannot be statistically distinguished. The real-time ultrasonic sensor can be used as a primary measurement method or to reduce reliance upon extractive methods to measure slurry density.

  17. Recent advancements in photonic converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayduk, Michael J.; Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Getbehead, Mark A.; Louthain, James A.

    2000-09-01

    Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are an essential component of digital receiver systems. Progress at advancing the electronic ADC modules has been very slow due in large part to the difficulties in fabricating the electronic circuitry required for very high resolution and high sampling rate converters. This slow progress has resulted in a bottleneck between the received analog signal and the digital signal processing system. Single or multiple analog signal down conversion stages are required in digital receivers to down convert the received analog signal to an intermediate frequency (IF) that can be processed by the electronic ADC. There has been much recent interest in the use of photonics for direct digitization of the analog signal at the received RF frequency thus eliminating the need for analog down conversion. This paper reviews some of the recent research advancements in photonic ADCs. We will especially focus on the development of a novel photonic ADC module that uses semiconductor saturable absorbers to perform the data quantization. We will also present recent results in the development of a mode-locked fiber laser used as the sampling source in this photonic ADC architecture.

  18. Generating Ka-Band Signals Using an X-Band Vector Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott; Mysoor, Narayan; Lux, James; Cook, Brian; Shah, Biren

    2009-01-01

    A breadboard version of a transmitter for radio communication at a carrier frequency of 32 GHz (which is in the Ka band) utilizes a vector modulator operating at a carrier frequency of 8 GHz (the low end of the X band) to generate any of a number of advanced modulations that could include amplitude and/or phase modulation components. The 8-GHz modulated signal is mixed with a 24-GHz signal generated by an upconverter to obtain the desired 32-GHz modulated output. The transmitter is being developed as a prototype of downlink transmitters for transmission of data from spacecraft to Earth at high rates (>100 Mb/s). The transmitter design could also be adapted to terrestrial and Earth/satellite communication links. The advanced modulations (which can include M-ary phase-shift keying (M-PSK), offset phase-shift keying (OPSK), and M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM). These modulations are needed because for a given amount of signal bandwidth, they enable transmission of data at rates greater than those of older, simpler modulation schemes. The transmitter architecture (see figure) was chosen not only to enable generation of the required modulations at 32 GHz but also to reduce the number of components needed to implement the transmitter. Instead of incorporating an 8-GHz signal source, the transmitter utilizes an 8-GHz signal generated by a voltage-controlled oscillator that is part of an X-band transponder with which the fully developed version of this transmitter would be used in the original intended spacecraft application. The oscillator power is divided onto two paths, one of which goes through the vector modulator, the other through amplifiers and a 3 frequency multiplier. Band-pass filters are included downstream of the frequency multiplier to suppress unwanted harmonics.

  19. Low-power-penalty wavelength multicasting for 36  Gbit/s 16-QAM coherent optical signals in a silicon waveguide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Lingchen; Gao, Shiming

    2014-12-15

    All-optical wavelength multicasting has been experimentally demonstrated for 36 Gbit/s 16-quadrature amplitude modulation signals based on four-wave mixing processes in a silicon waveguide with multiple pumps. In our experiment, dual pumps are injected together with the signal into the waveguide and nine idlers are generated, involving five wavelength multicasting channels. Coherent detection and advanced digital signal processing are employed, and the recovered constellation diagrams of the multicasting idlers show a root-mean-square error vector magnitude degradation as small as 2.74%. The bit error rate (BER) results are measured for these multicasting idlers, and the power penalties are all lower than 0.96 dB at the BER of 3.8×10(-3) (corresponding to the forward error correction threshold). PMID:25503027

  20. Recent Advances in Geostatistical Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanidis, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    Inverse problems are common in hydrologic applications, such as in subsurface imaging which is the identification of parameters characterizing geologic formations from hydrologic and geophysical observations. In such problems, the data do not suffice to constrain the solution to be unique. The geostatistical approach utilizes probability theory and statistical inference to assimilate data and information about structure and to explore the range of possible solutions in a systematic way. This is a progress report on recent advances in terms of formulation and computational methods. The standard implementation of the geostatistical approach to the inverse method is computationally very expensive when there are millions of unknowns and hundreds of thousands of observations, as is the case in fusing data from many sources in hydrogeology. However, depending on the specific problem, alternative formulations and numerical methods can reduce the computational problem quite dramatically. One approach can utilize formulations that involve matrices with a very high degree of sparsity combined with indirect methods of solution and strategies that minimize the number of required forward runs. The potential for this method is illustrated with an application to transient hydraulic tomography. Another approach speeds up matrix-vector multiplications by utilizing hierarchical sparsity in commonly encountered matrices, particularly prior covariance matrices. A couple of examples show how the computational cost scales with the size of the problem (number of observations and unknowns) in conventional and newer methods. Yet another fruitful approach is to rely on a large number of realizations to represent ensembles of solutions and we illustrate this approach in fusing data from two different geophysical methods. In all of these approaches, utilizing parallel processors and mixed CPU/GPU programming can significantly reduce the computational cost and make it possible to solve very

  1. Scalar mixing in the supersonic shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, N. T.; Mungal, M. G.; Hanson, R. K.; Paul, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a two-stream planar mixing layer facility at convective Mach numbers of 0.28 and 0.62. Mie scattering from condensed alcohol droplets and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide were used for flow visualization in both the side and plan views. The PLIF signals were approximately proportional to mixture fraction and were used to generate statistical quantities. Visualizations using both the Mie scattering and PLIF indicate the structure is essentially two-dimensional at Mc = 0.28 and three-dimensional at Mc = 0.62. Perspective renderings of side view images show the structures are streamwise ramped at Mc = 0.28 and cross-stream ramped at Mc = 0.62. This difference appears to be associated with decreasing streamwise structure spacings at the higher Mc condition. The statistical analysis suggests that with increasing compressibility, the scalar fluctuations are smaller, and the fraction of mixed fluid is higher.

  2. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating conical broadcast signals

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-08-18

    A method of interrogating a formation includes generating a conical acoustic signal, at a first frequency--a second conical acoustic signal at a second frequency each in the between approximately 500 Hz and 500 kHz such that the signals intersect in a desired intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving, a difference signal returning to the borehole resulting from a non-linear mixing of the signals in a mixing zone within the intersection volume.

  3. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  4. A mixed transform approach for efficient compression of medical images.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, A; Mikhael, W B

    1996-01-01

    A novel technique is presented to compress medical data employing two or more mutually nonorthogonal transforms. Both lossy and lossless compression implementations are considered. The signal is first resolved into subsignals such that each subsignal is compactly represented in a particular transform domain. An efficient lossy representation of the signal is achieved by superimposing the dominant coefficients corresponding to each subsignal. The residual error, which is the difference between the original signal and the reconstructed signal is properly formulated. Adaptive algorithms in conjunction with an optimization strategy are developed to minimize this error. Both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) approaches for the technique are developed. It is shown that for a given number of retained coefficients, the discrete cosine transform (DCT)-Walsh mixed transform representation yields a more compact representation than using DCT or Walsh alone. This lossy technique is further extended for the lossless case. The coefficients are quantized and the signal is reconstructed. The resulting reconstructed signal samples are rounded to the nearest integer and the modified residual error is computed. This error is transmitted employing a lossless technique such as the Huffman coding. It is shown that for a given number of retained coefficients, the mixed transforms again produces the smaller rms-modified residual error. The first-order entropy of the error is also smaller for the mixed-transforms technique than for the DCT, thus resulting in smaller length Huffman codes. PMID:18215915

  5. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    presentations were published in the Book of Abstracts, International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', August 18-26, 2007, Copyright 2007 Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy, ISBN 92-95003-36-5. This Topical Issue consists of nearly 60 articles accepted for publication in the Conference Proceedings and reflects a substantial part of the Conference contributions. The articles cover a broad variety of TMB-2007 themes and are sorted alphabetically by the last name of the first author within each of the following topics: Canonical Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing (invariant, scaling, spectral properties, scalar transports) Wall-bounded Flows (structure and fundamentals, unsteady boundary layers, super-sonic flows, shock - boundary layer interaction) Interfacial Dynamics (Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities) Unsteady Turbulent Processes (turbulence and turbulent mixing in unsteady, multiphase and anisotropic flows) High Energy Density Physics (laser-material interaction, Z-pinches, laser-driven, heavy-ion and magnetic fusion) Astrophysics (supernovae, interstellar medium, star formation, stellar interiors, early Universe, cosmic micro-wave background) Magneto-hydrodynamics (magneto-convection, magneto-rotational instability, accretion disks, dynamo) Plasmas in Ionosphere (coupled plasmas, anomalous resistance, ionosphere) Physics of Atmosphere (environmental fluid dynamics, forecasting, data analysis, error estimate) Geophysics (turbulent convection in stratified, rotating and active flows) Combustion (dynamics of flames, fires, blast waves and explosions) Mathematical Aspects of Multi-Scale Dynamics (vortex dynamics, singularities, discontinuities, asymptotic dynamics, weak solutions, well- and ill-posedness) Statistical Approaches, Stochastic Processes and Probabilistic Description (uncertainty quantification, anomalous diffusion, long-tail distributions, wavelets) Advanced Numerical Simulations

  6. Haotic, Fractal, and Nonlinear Signal Processing. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, R.A.

    1996-10-01

    These proceedings include papers presented at the Third Technical Conference on Nonlinear Dynamics and Full{minus}Spectrum Processing held in Mystic, Connecticut. The Conference focus was on the latest advances in chaotic, fractal and nonlinear signal processing methods. Topics of discussion covered in the Conference include: mathematical frontiers; predictability and control of chaos, detection and classification with applications in acoustics; advanced applied signal processing methods(linear and nonlinear); stochastic resonance; machinery diagnostics; turbulence; geophysics; medicine; and recent novel approaches to modeling nonlinear systems. There were 58 papers in the conference and all have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database. (AIP)

  7. Recent advances in lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Doolen, G.D.; He, X.; Nie, X.; Zhang, R.

    1998-12-31

    In this paper, the authors briefly present the basic principles of lattice Boltzmann method and summarize recent advances of the method, including the application of the lattice Boltzmann method for fluid flows in MEMS and simulation of the multiphase mixing and turbulence.

  8. CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2011-02-23

    The main function of the CO instrument is to provide continuous accurate measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratio at the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF) 60-meter tower (36.607 °N, 97.489 °W, 314 meters above sea level). The essential feature of the control and data acquisition system is to record signals from a Thermo Electron 48C and periodically calibrate out zero and span drifts in the instrument using the combination of a CO scrubber and two concentrations of span gas (100 and 300 ppb CO in air). The system was deployed on May 25, 2005.

  9. MLK3 Signaling in Cancer Invasion.

    PubMed

    Rattanasinchai, Chotirat; Gallo, Kathleen A

    2016-01-01

    Mixed-lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) was first cloned in 1994; however, only in the past decade has MLK3 become recognized as a player in oncogenic signaling. MLK3 is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that mediates signals from several cell surface receptors including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), chemokine receptors, and cytokine receptors. Once activated, MLK3 transduces signals to multiple downstream pathways, primarily to c-Jun terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK, as well as to extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK, P38 MAPK, and NF-κB, resulting in both transcriptional and post-translational regulation of multiple effector proteins. In several types of cancer, MLK3 signaling is implicated in promoting cell proliferation, as well as driving cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27213454

  10. MLK3 Signaling in Cancer Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rattanasinchai, Chotirat; Gallo, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed-lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) was first cloned in 1994; however, only in the past decade has MLK3 become recognized as a player in oncogenic signaling. MLK3 is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that mediates signals from several cell surface receptors including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), chemokine receptors, and cytokine receptors. Once activated, MLK3 transduces signals to multiple downstream pathways, primarily to c-Jun terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK, as well as to extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK, P38 MAPK, and NF-κB, resulting in both transcriptional and post-translational regulation of multiple effector proteins. In several types of cancer, MLK3 signaling is implicated in promoting cell proliferation, as well as driving cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27213454

  11. Recent Experiences and Advances in Contrast-Enhanced Subharmonic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbrey, John R.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging schemes strive to suppress tissue signals in order to better visualize nonlinear signals from blood-pooling ultrasound contrast agents. Because tissue does not generate a subharmonic response (i.e., signal at half the transmit frequency), subharmonic imaging has been proposed as a method for isolating ultrasound microbubble signals while suppressing surrounding tissue signals. In this paper, we summarize recent advances in the use of subharmonic imaging in vivo. These advances include the implementation of subharmonic imaging on linear and curvilinear arrays, intravascular probes, and three-dimensional probes for breast, renal, liver, plaque, and tumor imaging. PMID:26090430

  12. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  13. Mix/Cast Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallentine, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presented is a training handbook for Mix/Cast Contamination Control; a part of a series of training courses to qualify access to Mix/Cast facilities. Contents: List Contamination Control Requirements; Identify foreign objects debris (FOD), Control Areas and their guidelines; Describe environmental monitoring; List Contamination Control Initiatives; Describe concern for Controlled Materials; Identify FOD Controlled Areas in Mix/Cast.

  14. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2015-09-22

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  15. Remote sensing, imaging, and signal engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    This report discusses the Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering (RISE) trust area which has been very active in working to define new directions. Signal and image processing have always been important support for existing programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but now these technologies are becoming central to the formation of new programs. Exciting new applications such as high-resolution telescopes, radar remote sensing, and advanced medical imaging are allowing us to participate in the development of new programs.

  16. DREADD: A Chemogenetic GPCR Signaling Platform

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we created a family of engineered G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) called DREADD (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs) which can precisely control three major GPCR signaling pathways (Gq, Gi, and Gs). DREADD technology has been successfully applied in a variety of in vivo studies to control GPCR signaling, and here we describe recent advances of DREADD technology and discuss its potential application in drug discovery, gene therapy, and tissue engineering. PMID:25522378

  17. A new unsteady mixing model to predict NO(x) production during rapid mixing in a dual-stage combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1992-01-01

    An advanced gas turbine engine to power supersonic transport aircraft is currently under study. In addition to high combustion efficiency requirements, environmental concerns have placed stringent restrictions on the pollutant emissions from these engines. A combustor design with the potential for minimizing pollutants such as NO(x) emissions is undergoing experimental evaluation. A major technical issue in the design of this combustor is how to rapidly mix the hot, fuel-rich primary zone product with the secondary diluent air to obtain a fuel-lean mixture for combustion in the second stage. Numerical predictions using steady-state methods cannot account for the unsteady phenomena in the mixing region. Therefore, to evaluate the effect of unsteady mixing and combustion processes, a novel unsteady mixing model is demonstrated here. This model has been used to study multispecies mixing as well as propane-air and hydrogen-air jet nonpremixed flames, and has been used to predict NO(x) production in the mixing region. Comparison with available experimental data show good agreement, thereby providing validation of the mixing model. With this demonstration, this mixing model is ready to be implemented in conjunction with steady-state prediction methods and provide an improved engineering design analysis tool.

  18. Signaling involved in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Shihori

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation is regulated by multiple signaling events. Recent technical advances have revealed that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells. The signals involved in stem cell programming are of major interest in stem cell research. The signaling mechanisms involved in regulating stem cell reprogramming and differentiation are the subject of intense study in the field of life sciences. In this review, the molecular interactions and signaling pathways related to stem cell differentiation are discussed. PMID:26328015

  19. Advanced glycation end products

    PubMed Central

    Gkogkolou, Paraskevi; Böhm, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the progressive accumulation of damage to an organism over time leading to disease and death. Aging research has been very intensive in the last years aiming at characterizing the pathophysiology of aging and finding possibilities to fight age-related diseases. Various theories of aging have been proposed. In the last years advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have received particular attention in this context. AGEs are formed in high amounts in diabetes but also in the physiological organism during aging. They have been etiologically implicated in numerous diabetes- and age-related diseases. Strategies inhibiting AGE accumulation and signaling seem to possess a therapeutic potential in these pathologies. However, still little is known on the precise role of AGEs during skin aging. In this review the existing literature on AGEs and skin aging will be reviewed. In addition, existing and potential anti-AGE strategies that may be beneficial on skin aging will be discussed. PMID:23467327

  20. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr/sup +3/:LaF/sub 3/ verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the /sup 3/H/sub 4/, /sup 3/H/sub 6/, and /sup 3/P/sub 0/ levels of the praseodymium ions.

  1. Transition mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, C.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model capable of analyzing the flow field in the transition liner of small gas turbine engines is developed. A FORTRAN code has been assembled from existing codes and physical submodels and used to predict the flow in several test geometries which contain characteristics similar to transition liners, and for which experimental data was available. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements indicate that the code produces qualitative results but that the turbulence models, both K-E and algebraic Reynolds Stress, underestimate the cross-stream diffusion. The code has also been used to perform a numerical experiment to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the mixing process in transition liners. Comparisons illustrate that geometries with significant curvature show a drift of the jet trajectory toward the convex wall and weaker wake region vortices and decreased penetration for jets located on the convex wall of the liner, when compared to jets located on concave walls. Also shown were the approximate equivalency of angled slots and round holes and a technique by which jet mixing correlations developed for rectangular channels can be used for can geometries.

  2. Seismic signal processing on heterogeneous supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhberg, Alexey; Ermert, Laura; Fichtner, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The processing of seismic signals - including the correlation of massive ambient noise data sets - represents an important part of a wide range of seismological applications. It is characterized by large data volumes as well as high computational input/output intensity. Development of efficient approaches towards seismic signal processing on emerging high performance computing systems is therefore essential. Heterogeneous supercomputing systems introduced in the recent years provide numerous computing nodes interconnected via high throughput networks, every node containing a mix of processing elements of different architectures, like several sequential processor cores and one or a few graphical processing units (GPU) serving as accelerators. A typical representative of such computing systems is "Piz Daint", a supercomputer of the Cray XC 30 family operated by the Swiss National Supercomputing Center (CSCS), which we used in this research. Heterogeneous supercomputers provide an opportunity for manifold application performance increase and are more energy-efficient, however they have much higher hardware complexity and are therefore much more difficult to program. The programming effort may be substantially reduced by the introduction of modular libraries of software components that can be reused for a wide class of seismology applications. The ultimate goal of this research is design of a prototype for such library suitable for implementing various seismic signal processing applications on heterogeneous systems. As a representative use case we have chosen an ambient noise correlation application. Ambient noise interferometry has developed into one of the most powerful tools to image and monitor the Earth's interior. Future applications will require the extraction of increasingly small details from noise recordings. To meet this demand, more advanced correlation techniques combined with very large data volumes are needed. This poses new computational problems that

  3. Advanced capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. D.; Buritz, R. S.; Taylor, A. R.; Bullwinkel, E. P.

    1982-11-01

    An experimental development program was conducted to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. High rep rate and low rate capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, and high frequency ac capacitors for series resonant inverters were considered. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film. Initially, low breakdown strength was thought to be related to inclusions of conductive particles. The effect of filtration of the casting solution was investigated. These experiments showed that more filtration was not the entire solution to low breakdown. The film samples were found to contain dissolved ionic impurities that move through the dielectric when voltage is applied and cause enhancement of the electric field. These contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and can be partially removed. However, these treatments did not significantly improve the breakdown characteristics. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films. this is the first step toward a replacement for kraft paper.

  4. Advanced capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, J. B.; Buritz, R. S.

    1984-10-01

    This report describes an experimental program to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. Five classes of capacitors were considered: high rep rate and low rep rate pulse capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, high frequency AC capacitors for series resonant inverters, and AC filter capacitors. To meet these requirements, existing dielectric materials were modified, and new materials were developed. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film with fewer imperfections that could operate at significantly higher electrical stresses. It was shown that contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and that they can be partially removed. As far as developed, however, these treatments did not significantly improved the breakdown characteristics. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films -- the first step toward a replacement for Kraft paper. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. This material was selected for further study in model capacitor designs.

  5. Future advances.

    PubMed

    Celesia, Gastone G; Hickok, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Future advances in the auditory systems are difficult to predict, and only educated guesses are possible. It is expected that innovative technologies in the field of neuroscience will be applied to the auditory system. Optogenetics, Brainbow, and CLARITY will improve our knowledge of the working of neural auditory networks and the relationship between sound and language, providing a dynamic picture of the brain in action. CLARITY makes brain tissue transparent and offers a three-dimensional view of neural networks, which, combined with genetically labeling neurons with multiple, distinct colors (Optogenetics), will provide detailed information of the complex brain system. Molecular functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will allow the study of neurotransmitters detectable by MRI and their function in the auditory pathways. The Human Connectome project will study the patterns of distributed brain activity that underlie virtually all aspects of cognition and behavior and determine if abnormalities in the distributed patterns of activity may result in hearing and behavior disorders. Similarly, the programs of Big Brain and ENIGMA will improve our understanding of auditory disorders. New stem-cell therapy and gene therapies therapy may bring about a partial restoration of hearing for impaired patients by inducing regeneration of cochlear hair cells. PMID:25726297

  6. Plans for Advanced LIGO Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Carol

    2005-04-01

    The proposed Advanced LIGO detector will have an increase in sensitivity over initial LIGO by a factor of ten, with an increased bandwidth in the region of highest sensitivity and the ability to tune for specific astrophysical sources. Advanced LIGO will achieve the equivalent of the one-year integrated observation time of initial LIGO in just several hours, allowing observation of astrophysical gravitational waves on a regular basis. The Advanced LIGO detector will replace the existing detector at the LIGO Observatories while retaining the existing building and vacuum system infrastructure. The new instruments build on the initial LIGO Fabry-Perot Michelson Interferometer layout and take advantage of significant advances in technology since the design of initial LIGO in the 1990's. Signal strength/sensitivity will be improved by increasing the laser power, lowering optical absorption, and adding signal recycling to the Fabry-Perot arm cavities. Stray forces on the test masses will be controlled by reducing thermal noise sources in the suspensions and optics and using a multi-staged seismic isolation system with inertial sensing and feedback control. The LIGO laboratory, the LIGO Science Collaboration, and international partners have undertaken a structured program of research and development, including testing of full-scale prototypes in context. Significant progress has been made on several of the detector subsystems. The Advanced LIGO project has been through National Science Foundation peer review and the National Science Board has recommended it for funding. Based on a proposed funding start in 2007, detector installation will begin in 2010, with observations at an advanced level of commissioning in 2013.

  7. Evolutional Trend of Mixed Analog and Digital RF Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi

    This paper describes recent technology trend of mixed analog digital RF circuits. With the progress of CMOS technology, large-scale digital signal process and control function can be integrated in an RF integrated circuit and some analog signal process blocks can be translated to digital signal processing units. At the same time, the design of remaining analog functional blocks becomes very hard. In this paper, those integration techniques for receiver and transmitter in these 20 years are reviewed. As a typical example of digital assisted systems, synthesizer based transmitters are discussed in detail.

  8. Inference of Mix from Experimental Data and Theoretical Mix Models

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Haynes, D. A.; Cooley, J. H.; Mancini, R. C.; Haan, S. W.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2007-08-02

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosion cores is a topic of great interest. Mixing due to hydrodynamic instabilities can affect implosion dynamics and could also go so far as to prevent ignition. We have demonstrated that it is possible to extract information on mixing directly from experimental data using spectroscopic arguments. In order to compare this data-driven analysis to a theoretical framework, two independent mix models, Youngs' phenomenological model and the Haan saturation model, have been implemented in conjunction with a series of clean hydrodynamic simulations that model the experiments. The first tests of these methods were carried out based on a set of indirect drive implosions at the OMEGA laser. We now focus on direct drive experiments, and endeavor to approach the problem from another perspective. In the current work, we use Youngs' and Haan's mix models in conjunction with hydrodynamic simulations in order to design experimental platforms that exhibit measurably different levels of mix. Once the experiments are completed based on these designs, the results of a data-driven mix analysis will be compared to the levels of mix predicted by the simulations. In this way, we aim to increase our confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from the experimental data, as well as to study sensitivities and the range of validity of the mix models.

  9. A "Mix of Attributes" Approach to the Study of Media Effects and New Communication Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eveland, William P., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the media effects approach broadly, to point out limitations the traditional approach imposes on the field, and discusses a "mix of attributes" approach with a focus on the study of "new" technologies for the dissemination of news. Argues that the mix of attributes approach would better serve to advance both theory and empirical research…

  10. Mixed-mode chromatography in pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kelly; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography (MMC) is a fast growing area in recent years, thanks to the new generation of mixed-mode stationary phases and better understanding of multimode interactions. MMC has superior applications in the separation of compounds that are not retained or not well resolved by typical reversed-phase LC methods, especially for polar and charged molecules. Due to the multiple retention modes that a single MMC column can offer, often MMC provides additional dimension to a separation method by adjusting the mobile phase conditions. Mixed-mode media is also an effective way to clean up complex sample matrices for purification purposes or for sensitive detection of trace amounts of analytes. In this article, we discuss mixed-mode stationary phases and separation mechanisms and review recent advances in pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical applications including the analysis and/or purification of counterions, small molecule drugs, impurities, formulation excipients, peptides and proteins. PMID:27236100

  11. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-08-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  12. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  13. Plasticity of Dendritic Spines: Subcompartmentalization of Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Lesley A.; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce and study neuronal plasticity in single dendritic spines has greatly advanced our understanding of the signaling mechanisms that mediate long-term potentiation. It is now clear that in addition to compartmentalization by the individual spine, subcompartmentalization of biochemical signals occurs at specialized microdomains within the spine. The spatiotemporal coordination of these complex cascades allows for the concomitant remodeling of the postsynaptic density actin spinoskeleton and for the regulation of membrane traffic to express functional and structural plasticity. Here, we highlight recent findings in the signaling cascades at spine microdomains as well as the challenges and approaches to studying plasticity at the spine level. PMID:24215443

  14. Plasticity of dendritic spines: subcompartmentalization of signaling.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Lesley A; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce and study neuronal plasticity in single dendritic spines has greatly advanced our understanding of the signaling mechanisms that mediate long-term potentiation. It is now clear that in addition to compartmentalization by the individual spine, subcompartmentalization of biochemical signals occurs at specialized microdomains within the spine. The spatiotemporal coordination of these complex cascades allows for the concomitant remodeling of the postsynaptic density and actin spinoskeleton and for the regulation of membrane traffic to express functional and structural plasticity. Here, we highlight recent findings in the signaling cascades at spine microdomains as well as the challenges and approaches to studying plasticity at the spine level. PMID:24215443

  15. Recent developments in arbuscular mycorrhizal signaling.

    PubMed

    Gobbato, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Plants can establish root endosymbioses with both arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobial bacteria to improve their nutrition. Our understanding of the molecular events underlying the establishment of these symbioses has significantly advanced in the last few years. Here I highlight major recent findings in the field of endosymbiosis signaling. Despite the identification of new signaling components and the definition, or in some cases better re-definition of the molecular functions of previously known players, major questions still remain that need to be addressed. Most notably the mechanisms defining signaling specificities within either symbiosis remain unclear. PMID:26043435

  16. Systems Biology Analysis of Heterocellular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Tissues comprise multiple heterotypic cell types (e.g., epithelial, mesenchymal, and immune cells). Communication between heterotypic cell types is essential for biological cohesion and is frequently dysregulated in disease. Despite the importance of heterocellular communication, most systems biology techniques do not report cell-specific signaling data from mixtures of cells. As a result, our existing perspective of cellular behavior under-represents the influence of heterocellular signaling. Recent technical advances now permit the resolution of systems-level cell-specific signaling data. This review discusses how new physical, spatial, and isotopic resolving methods are facilitating unique systems biology studies of heterocellular communication. PMID:27087613

  17. Wavelet-based detection of transients in biological signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mzaik, Tahsin; Jagadeesh, Jogikal M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents two multiresolution algorithms for detection and separation of mixed signals using the wavelet transform. The first algorithm allows one to design a mother wavelet and its associated wavelet grid that guarantees the separation of signal components if information about the expected minimum signal time and frequency separation of the individual components is known. The second algorithm expands this idea to design two mother wavelets which are then combined to achieve the required separation otherwise impossible with a single wavelet. Potential applications include many biological signals such as ECG, EKG, and retinal signals.

  18. Correlating lepton mixing angles and mixing maxtrix with Wolfenstein parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyi; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2012-11-01

    Inspired by a new relation θ13PMNS=θC/2 observed from the relatively large θ13PMNS, we find that the combination of this relation with the quark-lepton complementarity and the self-complementarity results in correlations of the lepton mixing angles with the quark mixing angles. We find that the three mixing angles in the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrix are all related to the Wolfenstein parameter λ in the quark mixing, so they are also correlated. Consequently, the PMNS matrix can be parameterized by λ, A, and a Dirac CP-violating phase δ. Such parametrizations for the PMNS matrix have the same explicitly hierarchical structure as the Wolfenstein parametrization for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix in the quark mixing, and the bimaximal mixing pattern is deduced at the leading order. We also discuss implications of these phenomenological relations in parametrizations.

  19. Nation's water picture mixed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The nation's water picture for April showed mixed trends: More than half of the index gaging stations reported normal streamflow conditions during the month, while the spring snowmelt boosted streamflow in the Northeast and Northwest to well above normal levels. Parts of the Southeast, however, from West Virginia south to the Carolinas, reported well-below normal streamflow conditions, according to a month-end check on water resources conditions by the U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior.After nearly 2 years of drought conditions the three major reservoirs supplying New York City reached full storage capacity and were spilling during April. Combined contents of the three reservoirs on May 1, 1982, was 272 billion gallons, 101% of their full usable capacity. The full reservoirs and the generally good surface and groundwater conditions throughout the Delaware River basin allowed the Delaware River Basin Commission to lift its drought emergency warning on April 27.

  20. Holographic mixing quantified

    SciTech Connect

    Batell, Brian; Gherghetta, Tony

    2007-08-15

    We compute the precise elementary/composite field content of mass eigenstates in holographic duals of warped models in a slice of AdS{sub 5}. This is accomplished by decomposing the bulk fields not in the usual Kaluza-Klein basis, but rather into a holographic basis of 4D fields, corresponding to purely elementary source or conformal field theory (CFT) composite fields. Generically, this decomposition yields kinetic and mass mixing between the elementary and composite sectors of the holographic theory. Depending on where the bulk zero mode is localized, the elementary/composite content may differ radically, which we show explicitly for several examples including the bulk Randall-Sundrum graviton, bulk gauge boson, and Higgs boson.

  1. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  2. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  3. Synthetic-wavelength self-mixing interferometry for displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junbao; Zhu, Hongbin; Xia, Wei; Guo, Dongmei; Hao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-06-01

    A simple synthetic-wavelength self-mixing interferometer is proposed for precision displacement measurement. Choosing the frequency difference of the orthogonally polarized dual frequency He-Ne laser appropriately, we introduce synthetic wavelength theory into self-mixing interference principle and demonstrate a feasible optical configuration by simply adjusting the optical design of self-mixing interferometer. The phase difference between the two orthogonally polarized feedback fringes is observed, and the tiny displacement of the object can be measured through the phase change of the synthetic signal. Since the virtual synthetic wavelength is 106 times larger than the operating wavelength, sub-nanometer displacement of the object can be obtained in millimeter criterion measurement without modulation, demodulation and complicated electrical circuits. Experimental results verifies the synthetic wavelength self-mixing interferometer's ability of measuring nanoscale displacement, which provides a potential approach for contactless precision displacement measurement in a number of scientific and industrial applications.

  4. CFD analysis of jet mixing in low NOx flametube combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talpallikar, M. V.; Smith, C. E.; Lai, M. C.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor was identified as a potential gas turbine combustor concept to reduce NO(x) emissions in High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. To demonstrate reduced NO(x) levels, cylindrical flametube versions of RQL combustors are being tested at NASA Lewis Research Center. A critical technology needed for the RQL combustor is a method of quickly mixing by-pass combustion air with rich-burn gases. Jet mixing in a cylindrical quick-mix section was numerically analyzed. The quick-mix configuration was five inches in diameter and employed twelve radial-inflow slots. The numerical analyses were performed with an advanced, validated 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code named REFLEQS. Parametric variation of jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratio (J) and slot aspect ratio was investigated. Both non-reacting and reacting analyses were performed. Results showed mixing and NO(x) emissions to be highly sensitive to J and slot aspect ratio. Lowest NO(x) emissions occurred when the dilution jet penetrated to approximately mid-radius. The viability of using 3-D CFD analyses for optimizing jet mixing was demonstrated.

  5. Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D.

    1995-05-01

    In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

  6. Four wave mixing experiments with extreme ultraviolet transient gratings

    PubMed Central

    Bencivenga, F.; Cucini, R.; Capotondi, F.; Battistoni, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Gessini, A.; Manfredda, M.; Nikolov, I. P.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Svetina, C.; Parisse, P.; Casolari, F.; Danailov, M. B.; Kiskinova, M.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-01-01

    Four wave mixing (FWM) processes, based on third-order non-linear light-matter interactions, can combine ultrafast time resolution with energy and wavevector selectivity, and enables to explore dynamics inaccessible by linear methods.1-7 The coherent and multi-wave nature of FWM approach has been crucial in the development of cutting edge technologies, such as silicon photonics,8 sub-wavelength imaging9 and quantum communications.10 All these technologies operate with optical wavelengths, which limit the spatial resolution and do not allow probing excitations with energy in the eV range. The extension to shorter wavelengths, that is the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft-x-ray (SXR) range, will allow to improve the spatial resolution and to expand the excitation energy range, as well as to achieve elemental selectivity by exploiting core resonances.5-7,11-14 So far FWM applications at these wavelengths have been prevented by the absence of coherent sources of sufficient brightness and suitable experimental setups. Our results show how transient gratings, generated by the interference of coherent EUV pulses delivered by the FERMI free electron laser (FEL),15 can be used to stimulate FWM processes at sub-optical wavelengths. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the possibility to read the time evolution of the FWM signal, which embodies the dynamics of coherent excitations as molecular vibrations. This result opens the perspective for FWM with nanometer spatial resolution and elemental selectivity, which, for example, would enable the investigation of charge-transfer dynamics.5-7 The theoretical possibility to realize these applications have already stimulated dedicated and ongoing FEL developments;16-20 today our results show that FWM at sub-optical wavelengths is feasible and would be the spark to the further advancements of the present and new sources. PMID:25855456

  7. CDPKs in immune and stress signaling

    PubMed Central

    Boudsocq, Marie; Sheen, Jen

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+ has long been recognized as a conserved second messenger and principal mediator in plant immune and stress responses. How Ca2+ signals are sensed and relayed into diverse primary and global signaling events is still largely unknown. Comprehensive analyses of the plant-specific multigene family of Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are unraveling the molecular, cellular and genetic mechanisms of Ca2+ signaling. CDPKs, which exhibit overlapping and distinct expression patterns, sub-cellular localizations, substrate specificities and Ca2+ sensitivities, play versatile roles in the activation and repression of enzymes, channels and transcription factors. Here, we review the recent advances on the multifaceted functions of CDPKs in the complex immune and stress signaling networks, including oxidative burst, stomatal movements, hormonal signaling and gene regulation. PMID:22974587

  8. Neurotrophin signalling pathways regulating neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, F D; Kaplan, D R

    2001-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring neuronal death in mammals is regulated by the interplay between receptor-mediated prosurvival and proapoptotic signals. The neurotrophins, a family of growth factors best known for their positive effects on neuronal biology, have now been shown to mediate both positive and negative survival signals, by signalling through the Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptors, respectively. The mechanisms whereby these two neurotrophin receptors interact to determine neuronal survival have been difficult to decipher, largely because both can signal independently or coincidentally, depending upon the cell or developmental context. Nonetheless, the past several years have seen significant advances in our understanding of this receptor signalling system. In this review, we focus on the proapoptotic actions of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), and on the interplay between Trk and p75NTR that determines neuronal survival. PMID:11529497

  9. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  10. Mycobacterial signaling through toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Joyoti; Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2012-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have helped to decipher molecular networks dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, in mycobacteria-infected macrophages. Stimulation of TLRs by mycobacteria and their antigenic components rapidly induces intracellular signaling cascades involved in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play important roles in orchestrating proinflammatory responses and innate defense through generation of a variety of antimicrobial effector molecules. Recent studies have provided evidence that mycobacterial TLR-signaling cross talks with other intracellular antimicrobial innate pathways, the autophagy process and functional vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling. In this article we describe recent advances in the recognition, responses, and regulation of mycobacterial signaling through TLRs. PMID:23189273

  11. Reactive oxygen species in abiotic stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Pinja; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2010-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to accumulate during abiotic stresses, and different cellular compartments respond to them by distinctive profiles of ROS formation. In contrast to earlier views, it is becoming increasingly evident that even during stress, ROS production is not necessarily a symptom of cellular dysfunction but might represent a necessary signal in adjusting the cellular machinery to the altered conditions. ROS can modulate many signal transduction pathways, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, and ultimately influence the activity of transcription factors. However, the picture of ROS-mediated signaling is still fragmentary and the issues of ROS perception as well as the signaling specificity remain open. Here, we review some of the recent advances in plant abiotic stress signaling with emphasis on processes known to be affected heavily by ROS. PMID:20028478

  12. Complexity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Volinsky, Natalia; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of molecular mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling advances with ever-increasing pace. Yet our understanding of how the spatiotemporal dynamics of RTK signaling control specific cellular outcomes has lagged behind. Systems-centered experimental and computational approaches can help reveal how overlapping networks of signal transducers downstream of RTKs orchestrate specific cell-fate decisions. We discuss how RTK network regulatory structures, which involve the immediate posttranslational and delayed transcriptional controls by multiple feed forward and feedback loops together with pathway cross talk, adapt cells to the combinatorial variety of external cues and conditions. This intricate network circuitry endows cells with emerging capabilities for RTK signal processing and decoding. We illustrate how mathematical modeling facilitates our understanding of RTK network behaviors by unraveling specific systems properties, including bistability, oscillations, excitable responses, and generation of intricate landscapes of signaling activities. PMID:23906711

  13. Hedgehog Signaling in Pancreatic Fibrosis and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yongyu; Bai, Yongheng; Dong, Jiaojiao; Li, Qiang; Jin, Yuepeng; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway was first discovered in the 1980s. It is a stem cell-related pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and organogenesis. Aberrant activation of hedgehog signaling leads to pathological consequences, including a variety of human tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that blockade of this pathway with several small-molecule inhibitors can inhibit the development of pancreatic neoplasm. In addition, activated hedgehog signaling has been reported to be involved in fibrogenesis in many tissues, including the pancreas. Therefore, new therapeutic targets based on hedgehog signaling have attracted a great deal of attention to alleviate pancreatic diseases. In this review, we briefly discuss the recent advances in hedgehog signaling in pancreatic fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis and highlight new insights on their potential relationship with respect to the development of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26962810

  14. Signal processor for processing ultrasonic receiver signals

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1980-01-01

    A signal processor is provided which uses an analog integrating circuit in conjunction with a set of digital counters controlled by a precision clock for sampling timing to provide an improved presentation of an ultrasonic transmitter/receiver signal. The signal is sampled relative to the transmitter trigger signal timing at precise times, the selected number of samples are integrated and the integrated samples are transferred and held for recording on a strip chart recorder or converted to digital form for storage. By integrating multiple samples taken at precisely the same time with respect to the trigger for the ultrasonic transmitter, random noise, which is contained in the ultrasonic receiver signal, is reduced relative to the desired useful signal.

  15. Mixing entropy in Dean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Petru; Vyhnalek, Brian; Kaufman, Miron

    2013-03-01

    We investigate mixing in Dean flows by solving numerically the Navier-Stokes equation for a circular channel. Tracers of two chemical species are carried by the fluid. The centrifugal forces, experienced as the fluid travels along a curved trajectory, coupled with the fluid incompressibility induce cross-sectional rotating flows (Dean vortices). These transversal flows promote the mixing of the chemical species. We generate images for different cross sections along the trajectory. The mixing efficiency is evaluated using the Shannon entropy. Previously we have found, P. S. Fodor and M. Kaufman, Modern Physics Letters B 25, 1111 (2011), this measure to be useful in understanding mixing in the staggered herringbone mixer. The mixing entropy is determined as function of the Reynolds number, the angle of the cross section and the observation scale (number of bins). Quantitative comparison of the mixing in the Dean micromixer and in the staggered herringbone mixer is attempted.

  16. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling.

    PubMed

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D; Schaefer, H Martin

    2013-11-22

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer-resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism. PMID:24068354

  17. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer–resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism. PMID:24068354

  18. Retroactive Signaling in Short Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sepulchre, Jacques-Alexandre; Merajver, Sofía D.; Ventura, Alejandra C.

    2012-01-01

    In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles. PMID:22848403

  19. Estimating beta-mixing coefficients

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Daniel J.; Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla; Schervish, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The literature on statistical learning for time series assumes the asymptotic independence or “mixing” of the data-generating process. These mixing assumptions are never tested, and there are no methods for estimating mixing rates from data. We give an estimator for the beta-mixing rate based on a single stationary sample path and show it is L1-risk consistent. PMID:26279742

  20. Telemetry Tests Of The Advanced Receiver II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, Sami M.; Bevan, Roland P.; Marina, Miguel

    1993-01-01

    Report describes telemetry tests of Advanced Receiver II (ARX-II): digital radio receiving subsystem operating on intermediate-frequency output of another receiving subsystem called "multimission receiver" (MMR), detecting carrier, subcarrier, and data-symbol signals transmitted by spacecraft, and extracts Doppler information from signals. Analysis of data shows performance of MMR/ARX-II system comparable and sometimes superior to performances of Blk-III/BPA and Blk-III/SDA/SSA systems.

  1. Multiplexing oscillatory biochemical signals.

    PubMed

    de Ronde, Wiet; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2014-04-01

    In recent years it has been increasingly recognized that biochemical signals are not necessarily constant in time and that the temporal dynamics of a signal can be the information carrier. Moreover, it is now well established that the protein signaling network of living cells has a bow-tie structure and that components are often shared between different signaling pathways. Here we show by mathematical modeling that living cells can multiplex a constant and an oscillatory signal: they can transmit these two signals simultaneously through a common signaling pathway, and yet respond to them specifically and reliably. We find that information transmission is reduced not only by noise arising from the intrinsic stochasticity of biochemical reactions, but also by crosstalk between the different channels. Yet, under biologically relevant conditions more than 2 bits of information can be transmitted per channel, even when the two signals are transmitted simultaneously. These observations suggest that oscillatory signals are ideal for multiplexing signals. PMID:24685537

  2. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2002-11-10

    The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

  3. Overview of Neutrino Mixing Models and Their Mixing Angle Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Carl H.

    2009-11-01

    An overview of neutrino-mixing models is presented with emphasis on the types of horizontal flavor and vertical family symmetries that have been invoked. Distributions for the mixing angles of many models are displayed. Ways to differentiate among the models and to narrow the list of viable models are discussed.

  4. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  5. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    acceleration. Their scaling, spectral and invariant properties differ substantially from those of classical Kolmogorov turbulence. At atomistic and meso-scales, the non-equilibrium dynamics depart dramatically from a standard scenario given by the Gibbs statistic ensemble average and quasi-static Boltzmann equation. The singular aspect and the similarity of the non-equilibrium dynamics at macroscopic scales are interplayed with the fundamental properties of the Euler and compressible Navier-Stokes equations and with the problem sensitivity to the boundary conditions at discontinuities. The state-of-the-art numerical simulations of multi-phase flows suggest new methods for predictive modeling of the multi-scale non-equilibrium dynamics in fluids and plasmas, up to peta-scale level, for error estimate and uncertainty quantification, as well as for novel data assimilation techniques. The Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, was held on 27 July-7 August 2009 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. This was a highly informative and exciting meeting, and it strengthened and reaffirmed the success of TMB-2007. TMB-2009 brought together over 180 participants from five continents, ranging from students to members of National Academies of Sciences and Engineering and including researchers at experienced and early stages of their carriers from leading scientific institutions in academia, national laboratories, corporations and industry, from developed and developing countries. The success of TMB-2009 came from the successful work of all the participants, who were responsible professionals caring for the quality of their research and sharing their scientific vision. The level of presentations was high; about 170 presentations included over 60 invited lectures and 15 tutorials (4500 minutes of talks in total), about 40 posters and two Round Tables. TMB-2009 covered 17 different topics

  6. A Case Study on Advanced Technology: Understanding the Impact of Advanced Technology on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jill Sellars

    2010-01-01

    While research has focused on the effect of technology on student performance, it is not yet known how advanced technology, such as Promethean boards influence student achievement. The purpose of this mixed-method study was to examine how Promethean boards impact academic performance of elementary school students in third and fifth grade…

  7. Nonlinear Mixing in Optical Multicarrier Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Mahmood Abdul

    Although optical fiber has a vast spectral bandwidth, efficient use of this bandwidth is still important in order to meet the ever increased capacity demand of optical networks. In addition to wavelength division multiplexing, it is possible to partition multiple low-rate subcarriers into each high speed wavelength channel. Multicarrier systems not only ensure efficient use of optical and electrical components, but also tolerate transmission impairments. The purpose of this research is to understand the impact of mixing among subcarriers in Radio-Over-Fiber (RoF) and high speed optical transmission systems, and experimentally demonstrate techniques to minimize this impact. We also analyze impact of clipping and quantization on multicarrier signals and compare bandwidth efficiency of two popular multiplexing techniques, namely, orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and Nyquist modulation. For an OFDM-RoF system, we present a novel technique that minimizes the RF domain signal-signal beat interference (SSBI), relaxes the phase noise limit on the RF carrier, realizes the full potential of optical heterodyne-based RF carrier generation, and increases the performance-to-cost ratio of RoF systems. We demonstrate a RoF network that shares the same RF carrier for both downlink and uplink, avoiding the need of an additional RF oscillator in the customer unit. For multi-carrier optical transmission, we first experimentally compare performance degradations of coherent optical OFDM and single-carrier Nyquist pulse modulated systems in a nonlinear environment. We then experimentally evaluate SSBI compensation techniques in the presence of semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) induced nonlinearities for a multicarrier optical system with direct detection. We show that SSBI contamination can be significantly reduced from the data signal when the carrier-to-signal power ratio is sufficiently low.

  8. Mixed additive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Francisco; Covas, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We consider mixed models y =∑i =0 w Xiβi with V (y )=∑i =1 w θiMi Where Mi=XiXi⊤ , i = 1, . . ., w, and µ = X0β0. For these we will estimate the variance components θ1, . . ., θw, aswell estimable vectors through the decomposition of the initial model into sub-models y(h), h ∈ Γ, with V (y (h ))=γ (h )Ig (h )h ∈Γ . Moreover we will consider L extensions of these models, i.e., y˚=Ly+ɛ, where L=D (1n1, . . ., 1nw) and ɛ, independent of y, has null mean vector and variance covariance matrix θw+1Iw, where w =∑i =1 n wi .

  9. Mixed waste analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.J.; Turner, C.A.

    1993-12-31

    Improved superpower relations followed by the Soviet Union`s collapse acted as catalysts for changing the mission at Rocky Flats. Now, environmental concerns command as much attention as production capability. As a result, laboratory instruments once dedicated to plutonium production have a new purpose - the analysis of mixed wastes. Waste drums destined for WIPP require headspace analysis by GS/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC and SVOC). Flame AA analysis provides information on inorganic constituents. EPA guidelines for waste analysis (SW-846) overlook the obstacles of glove box manipulations. Sometimes, SW-846 guidelines conflict with the Rocky Flats waste minimization effort. However, the EPA encourages SW-846 adaptations if experimental data confirms the results. For water and soil samples, AA analysis of laboratory control samples show method capability inside a glove box. Non-radioactive drum headspace samples use a revised version of USEPA compendium method TO-14. Radioactive drum headspace samples require new instrumentation and change to SW-846 methods.

  10. Mixed voltage VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Rennels, David; Alkalaj, Leon

    1993-01-01

    A technique for minimizing the power dissipated in a Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) chip by lowering the operating voltage without any significant penalty in the chip throughput even though low voltage operation results in slower circuits. Since the overall throughput of a VLSI chip depends on the speed of the critical path(s) in the chip, it may be possible to sustain the throughput rates attained at higher voltages by operating the circuits in the critical path(s) with a high voltage while operating the other circuits with a lower voltage to minimize the power dissipation. The interface between the gates which operate at different voltages is crucial for low power dissipation since the interface may possibly have high static current dissipation thus negating the gains of the low voltage operation. The design of a voltage level translator which does the interface between the low voltage and high voltage circuits without any significant static dissipation is presented. Then, the results of the mixed voltage design using a greedy algorithm on three chips for various operating voltages are presented.

  11. Maximum mixing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorth, Jens

    The unique feature of MEM is that C(-1)(z) = exp(z) amplifies all scales equally. Narayan & Nityananda (1986) have shown that this leads to Gaussian deconvolved peaks. In MMM different scales are treated differently, depending on the choice of C. This gives different peak shapes, but also allows one to experiment with the degree of peak sharpening as a function of peak height. In fact, despite its strong information-theoretic background, MEM is known to redistribute flux incorrectly during deconvolution, thus making the method problematic if the goal is to get correct intensities out. MMM could remedy this problem by using an alternative to the entropy. In conclusion, some ideas connecting the physics of blurring with a proposed reconstruction scheme, dubbed Maximum Mixing Method, have been presented. It has been shown that this physically motivated, non-information theoretic, non-probabilistic, non-Bayesian approach can be turned into a powerful deconvolution technique, competitive with, and having as a special case, the Maximum Entropy Method. Further work within the proposed framework is required to fully explore the consequences of the theory. A paper including proofs and examples is in preparation.

  12. Measures on mixing angles

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Gielen, Steffen; Pope, C. N.; Turok, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We address the problem of the apparently very small magnitude of CP violation in the standard model, measured by the Jarlskog invariant J. In order to make statements about probabilities for certain values of J, we seek to find a natural measure on the space of Kobayashi-Maskawa matrices, the double quotient U(1){sup 2}/SU(3)/U(1){sup 2}. We review several possible, geometrically motivated choices of the measure, and compute expectation values for powers of J for these measures. We find that different choices of the measure generically make the observed magnitude of CP violation appear finely tuned. Since the quark masses and the mixing angles are determined by the same set of Yukawa couplings, we then do a second calculation in which we take the known quark mass hierarchy into account. We construct the simplest measure on the space of 3x3 Hermitian matrices which reproduces this known hierarchy. Calculating expectation values for powers of J in this second approach, we find that values of J close to the observed value are now rather likely, and there does not seem to be any fine-tuning. Our results suggest that the choice of Kobayashi-Maskawa angles is closely linked to the observed mass hierarchy. We close by discussing the corresponding case of neutrinos.

  13. Mixing in polymeric microfluidic devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Davis, Robert H.; Brotherton, Christopher M. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO)

    2006-04-01

    This SAND report describes progress made during a Sandia National Laboratories sponsored graduate fellowship. The fellowship was funded through an LDRD proposal. The goal of this project is development and characterization of mixing strategies for polymeric microfluidic devices. The mixing strategies under investigation include electroosmotic flow focusing, hydrodynamic focusing, physical constrictions and porous polymer monoliths. For electroosmotic flow focusing, simulations were performed to determine the effect of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with heterogeneous surface potential. The heterogeneous surface potential caused recirculations to form within the microchannel. These recirculations could then be used to restrict two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the mixing region surface potential to the average channel surface potential was made large in magnitude and negative in sign, and when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the characteristic diffusion time was minimized. Based on these results, experiments were performed to evaluate the manipulation of surface potential using living-radical photopolymerization. The material chosen to manipulate typically exhibits a negative surface potential. Using living-radical surface grafting, a positive surface potential was produced using 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and a neutral surface was produced using a poly(ethylene glycol) surface graft. Simulations investigating hydrodynamic focusing were also performed. For this technique, mixing is enhanced by using a tertiary fluid stream to constrict the two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the tertiary flow stream flow-rate to the mixing streams flow-rate was maximized. Also, like the electroosmotic focusing mixer, mixing was also maximized when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the

  14. Magnetoresistive-superconducting mixed sensors for biomagnetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Fermon, C.; Dyvorne, H.; Jacquinot, J. F.; Polovy, H.; Walliang, A. L.

    2010-05-01

    When coupled to a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, a superconducting loop containing a constriction can be a very sensitive magnetometer. It has thermal noise levels of few fT/sqrt(Hz), comparable to low- Tc SQUID noise, with a flat frequency response. These mixed sensors are good candidates for detection of weak biomagnetic signals, like a cardiac or neuronal signature. Furthermore, being sensitive to the flux, mixed sensors can be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) especially at low fields. They are very robust and accept strong RF pulses with a very short recovery time compared to tuned RF coils, which allow measurements of broad signals (short relaxation time or multiple resonances). We will first present the last generation sensors having a noise level of 3 fT/sqrt(Hz) and we will show signals measured at low frequency (magnetocardiography-magnetoencephalography range) and at higher frequency (NMR signals). The use of additional flux transformers for improving the signal-to-noise will be discussed. Finally, we will present perspectives for low-field MRI, which can be combined with neural signal detection (MEG), especially for brain anatomy and temporal response on the same experimental setup.

  15. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    acceleration. Their scaling, spectral and invariant properties differ substantially from those of classical Kolmogorov turbulence. At atomistic and meso-scales, the non-equilibrium dynamics depart dramatically from a standard scenario given by the Gibbs statistic ensemble average and quasi-static Boltzmann equation. The singular aspect and the similarity of the non-equilibrium dynamics at macroscopic scales are interplayed with the fundamental properties of the Euler and compressible Navier-Stokes equations and with the problem sensitivity to the boundary conditions at discontinuities. The state-of-the-art numerical simulations of multi-phase flows suggest new methods for predictive modeling of the multi-scale non-equilibrium dynamics in fluids and plasmas, up to peta-scale level, for error estimate and uncertainty quantification, as well as for novel data assimilation techniques. The Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, was held on 27 July-7 August 2009 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. This was a highly informative and exciting meeting, and it strengthened and reaffirmed the success of TMB-2007. TMB-2009 brought together over 180 participants from five continents, ranging from students to members of National Academies of Sciences and Engineering and including researchers at experienced and early stages of their carriers from leading scientific institutions in academia, national laboratories, corporations and industry, from developed and developing countries. The success of TMB-2009 came from the successful work of all the participants, who were responsible professionals caring for the quality of their research and sharing their scientific vision. The level of presentations was high; about 170 presentations included over 60 invited lectures and 15 tutorials (4500 minutes of talks in total), about 40 posters and two Round Tables. TMB-2009 covered 17 different topics

  16. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-09

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

  17. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: ASPHALT HOT MIX

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the asphalt hot mix industry. A representative asphalt hot mix plant was defined, based on the results of an industrial survey, to assess the severity of emissions from this industry. Source severity was defined as the ratio of th...

  18. Mixed-Methods Research Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-Method studies have emerged from the paradigm wars between qualitative and quantitative research approaches to become a widely used mode of inquiry. Depending on choices made across four dimensions, mixed-methods can provide an investigator with many design choices which involve a range of sequential and concurrent strategies. Defining…

  19. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs signals. In this respect, depending on the subcellular localization from which the activating signals emanate, defined scaffolds specify which substrates are amenable to be phosphorylated. Recent evidence has unveiled direct interactions among different scaffold protein species. These scaffold-scaffold macro-complexes could constitute an additional level of regulation for ERK signals and may serve as nodes for the integration of incoming signals and the subsequent diversification of the outgoing signals with respect to substrate engagement. PMID:27303664

  20. Sending Signals Dynamically

    PubMed Central

    Smock, Robert G.; Gierasch, Lila M.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins mediate transmission of signals along intercellular and intracellular pathways and between the exterior and the interior of a cell. The dynamic properties of signaling proteins are crucial to their functions. We discuss emerging paradigms for the role of protein dynamics in signaling. A central tenet is that proteins fluctuate among many states on evolutionarily selected energy landscapes. Upstream signals remodel this landscape, causing signaling proteins to transmit information to downstream partners. New methods provide insight into the dynamic properties of signaling proteins at the atomic scale. The next stages in the signaling hierarchy—how multiple signals are integrated and how cellular signaling pathways are organized in space and time—present exciting challenges for the future, requiring bold multidisciplinary approaches. PMID:19359576