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Sample records for advanced moon micro-imager

  1. The advanced Moon micro-imager experiment (AMIE) on SMART-1: Scientific goals and expected results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, P.; Cerroni, P.; Josset, J.-L.; Beauvivre, S.; Chevrel, S.; Muinonen, K.; Langevin, Y.; Barucci, M. A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Shkuratov, Yu.; Shevchenko, V.; Plancke, P.; Hofmann, B. A.; Josset, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Sodnik, Z.; Koschny, D.; Almeida, M.; Foing, B.

    2005-11-01

    The advanced Moon micro-imager experiment (AMIE) is the imaging system on board ESA mission to the Moon SMART-1; it makes use of a miniaturised detector and micro-processor electronics developed by SPACE X in the frame of the ESA technical programme. The AMIE micro-imager will provide high resolution CCD images of selected lunar areas and it will perform colour imaging through three filters at 750, 915 and 960 nm with a maximum resolution of 46 m/pixel at the perilune of 500 km. Specific scientific objectives will include (1) imaging of high latitude regions in the southern hemisphere, in particular the South Pole Aitken basin (SPA) and the permanently shadowed regions close to the South Pole, (2) determination of the photometric properties of the lunar surface from observations at different phase angles (physical properties of the regolith), (3) multi-band imaging for constraining the chemical and mineral composition of the surface, (4) detection and characterisation of lunar non-mare volcanic units, (5) study of lithological variations from impact craters and implications for crustal heterogeneity. The AMIE micro-imager will also support a Laser-link experiment to Earth, an On Board Autonomous Navigation investigation and a Lunar libration experiment coordinated with radio science measurements.

  2. Asteroid Moon Micro-imager Experiment (amie) For Smart-1 Mission, Science Objectives and Devel- Opment Status.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josset, J.-L.; Heather, D.; Dunkin, S.; Roussel, F.; Beauvivre, S.; Kraenhenbuehl, D.; Plancke, P.; Lange-Vin, Y.; Pinet, P.; Chevrel, S.; Cerroni, P.; de Sanctis, M.-C.; Dillelis, A.; Sodnik, Z.; Koschny, D.; Barucci, A.; Hofmann, B.; Josset, M.; Muinonen, K.; Pironnen, J.; Ehrenfreud, P.; Shkuratov, Y.; Shevchenko, V.

    The Asteroid Moon micro-Imager Experiment (AMIE), which will be on board the first ESA SMART-1 mission to the Moon (launch foreseen late 2002), is an imaging sys- tem with scientific, technical and public outreach oriented objectives. The science objectives are to imagine the Lunar South Pole (Aitken basin), permanent shadow areas (ice deposit), eternal light (crater rims), ancient Lunar Non- mare volcanism, local spectro-photometry and physical state of the lunar surface, and to map high latitudes regions (south) mainly at far side (Fig. 1). The technical objectives are to perform a laser-link experiment (detection of laser beam emitted by ESA Tenerife ground station), flight demonstration of new technologies, navigation aid (feasi- bility study), and on-board autonomy investigations. Figure 3: AMIE camera (< 0.5 kg) For better interpretation of the future imagery of the Moon by the instrument, laboratory measurements have been carried out by CSEM in Tampere (Finland), with support of the Observatory of Helsinki. The experimental set-up is composed of an optical system to image samples in verti- cal position, a light source and a photodiode to verify the stability of the incident flux. The optical system is com- posed of a lens to insure good focusing on the samples (focus with the camera is at distance > 100m) and a mirror to image downwards. The samples used were anorthosite from northern Finland, basalt from Antarctis, meteorites and other lunar analog materials. A spectralon panel has also been used to have flat fields references. The samples were imaged with dif- Figure 1: SMART-1 camera imaging the Moon (simulated view) ferent phase angles. Figure 4 shows images obtained with In order to have spectral information of the surface of the basalt and olivine samples, with different integration times Moon, the camera is equipped with a set of filters (Fig. 2), in order to have information in all areas. introduced between the CCD and the teleobjective. Bandpass

  3. Moon

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  MISR Views the Moon     View Larger Image On ... instruments to look at deep space and the waxing gibbous Moon. The purpose of this acrobatic feat is to assist in the calibration of ...

  4. Moon-Based Advanced Reusable Transportation Architecture: The MARTA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, R.; Bechtel, R.; Chen, T.; Cormier, T.; Kalaver, S.; Kirtas, M.; Lewe, J.-H.; Marcus, L.; Marshall, D.; Medlin, M.; McIntire, J.; Nelson, D.; Remolina, D.; Scott, A.; Weglian, J.; Olds, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Moon-based Advanced Reusable Transportation Architecture (MARTA) Project conducted an in-depth investigation of possible Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to lunar surface transportation systems capable of sending both astronauts and large masses of cargo to the Moon and back. This investigation was conducted from the perspective of a private company operating the transportation system for a profit. The goal of this company was to provide an Internal Rate of Return (IRR) of 25% to its shareholders. The technical aspect of the study began with a wide open design space that included nuclear rockets and tether systems as possible propulsion systems. Based on technical, political, and business considerations, the architecture was quickly narrowed down to a traditional chemical rocket using liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. However, three additional technologies were identified for further investigation: aerobraking, in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and a mass driver on the lunar surface. These three technologies were identified because they reduce the mass of propellant used. Operational costs are the largest expense with propellant cost the largest contributor. ISRU, the production of materials using resources on the Moon, was considered because an Earth to Orbit (ETO) launch cost of 1600 per kilogram made taking propellant from the Earth's surface an expensive proposition. The use of an aerobrake to circularize the orbit of a vehicle coming from the Moon towards Earth eliminated 3, 100 meters per second of velocity change (Delta V), eliminating almost 30% of the 11,200 m/s required for one complete round trip. The use of a mass driver on the lunar surface, in conjunction with an ISRU production facility, would reduce the amount of propellant required by eliminating using propellant to take additional propellant from the lunar surface to Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). However, developing and operating such a system required further study to identify if it was cost effective. The

  5. Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Moon. The Galileo spacecraft took these images on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. The dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins: Oceanus Procellarum (on the left), Mare Imbrium (center left), Mare Serenitatis and Mare Tranquillitatis (center), and Mare Crisium (near the right edge). This picture contains images through the Violet, 756 nm, 968 nm filters. The color is 'enhanced' in the sense that the CCD camera is sensitive to near infrared wavelengths of light beyond human vision. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  6. Advanced propulsion for LEO-Moon transport. 3: Transportation model. M.S. Thesis - California Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, Mark W.

    1992-01-01

    A simplified computational model of low Earth orbit-Moon transportation system has been developed to provide insight into the benefits of new transportation technologies. A reference transportation infrastructure, based upon near-term technology developments, is used as a departure point for assessing other, more advanced alternatives. Comparison of the benefits of technology application, measured in terms of a mass payback ratio, suggests that several of the advanced technology alternatives could substantially improve the efficiency of low Earth orbit-Moon transportation.

  7. Advanced propulsion for LEO-Moon transport. 1: A method for evaluating advanced propulsion performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Martin O.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a study to evaluate the benefits of advanced propulsion technologies for transporting materials between low Earth orbit and the Moon. A relatively conventional reference transportation system, and several other systems, each of which includes one advanced technology component, are compared in terms of how well they perform a chosen mission objective. The evaluation method is based on a pairwise life-cycle cost comparison of each of the advanced systems with the reference system. Somewhat novel and economically important features of the procedure are the inclusion not only of mass payback ratios based on Earth launch costs, but also of repair and capital acquisition costs, and of adjustments in the latter to reflect the technological maturity of the advanced technologies. The required input information is developed by panels of experts. The overall scope and approach of the study are presented in the introduction. The bulk of the paper describes the evaluation method; the reference system and an advanced transportation system, including a spinning tether in an eccentric Earth orbit, are used to illustrate it.

  8. AMIE/SMART-1 Moon North and South Poles First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josset, J. L.; Beauvivre, S.; Amie Science Team

    The Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment AMIE on board ESA SMART-1 the first European mission to the Moon launched on 27th September 2003 is an imaging system with scientific technical and public outreach oriented objectives The SMART-1 polar orbit around the Moon with an apolune at about 2500 km and a perilune at about 500 km allows to image the poles areas with different illumination conditions We present here the first results obtained by AMIE Camera System at North and South poles

  9. International Lunar Observatory Association Advancing 21st Century Astronomy from the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, Steve

    2015-08-01

    Long considered a prime location to conduct astronomical observations, the Moon is beginning to prove its value in 21st Century astronomy through the Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope aboard China’s Chang’e-3 Moon lander and through the developing missions of the International Lunar Observatory Association (ILOA). With 24 hours / Earth day of potential operability facilitating long-duration observations, the stable platform of the lunar surface and extremely thin exosphere guaranteeing superior observation conditions, zones of radio-quiet for radio astronomy, and the resources and thermal stability at the lunar South Pole, the Moon provides several pioneering advantages for astronomy. ILOA, through MOUs with NAOC and CNSA, has been collaborating with China to make historic Galaxy observations with the Chang’e-3 LUT, including imaging Galaxy M101 in December 2014. LUT has an aperture of 150mm, covers a wavelength range of 245 to 340 nanometers and is capable of detecting objects at a brightness down to 14 mag. The success of China’s mission has provided support and momentum for ILOA’s mission to place a 2-meter dish, multifunctional observatory at the South Pole of the Moon NET 2017. ILOA also has plans to send a precursor observatory instrument (ILO-X) on the inaugural mission of GLXP contestant Moon Express. Advancing astronomy and astrophysics from the Moon through public-private and International partnerships will provide many valuable research opportunities while also helping to secure humanity’s position as multi world species.

  10. Project APEX: Advanced manned exploration of the Martian moon Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisley, Joe G.; Akers, Jim

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design has been developed for a manned mission to the Martian moon Phobos. The spacecraft is to carry a crew of five and will be launched from Low Earth Orbit in the year 2010. The outbound trajectory to Mars uses a gravitational assisted swingby of Venus and takes eight months to complete. The stay at Phobos is scheduled for 60 days. During this time, the crew will be busily engaged in setting up a prototype fuel processing facility. The vehicle will then return to Earth orbit after a total mission duration of 656 days. The spacecraft is powered by three nuclear thermal rockets which also provide the primary electrical power via dual mode operation. The overall spacecraft length is 110 m, and the total mass departing from Low Earth Orbit is 900 metric tons.

  11. First Results at the Moon from the SMART-1 / AMIE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josset, J. L.; Beauvivre, S.; AMIE Team

    2005-08-01

    The Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment (AMIE), on board ESA SMART-1, the first European mission to the Moon (launched on 27th September 2003), is an imaging system with scientific, technical and public outreach oriented objectives. The science objectives are to image the Lunar South Pole, permanent shadow areas (ice deposit), eternal light (crater rims), ancient Lunar Non-mare volcanism, local spectro-photometry and physical state of the lunar surface, and to map high latitudes regions (south) mainly at far side (South Pole Aitken basin). The technical objectives are to perform a laserlink experiment (detection of laser beam emitted by ESA/Tenerife ground station), flight demonstration of new technologies and on-board autonomy navigation. The public outreach and educational objectives are to promote planetary exploration. We present here the first results obtained during the cruise phase and at the Moon.

  12. AMIE: Micro-Imaging System for SMART-1 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josset, J. L.

    1999-09-01

    The Asteroid Moon micro-Imager Experiment (AMIE) is an imaging system selected for the ESA moon mission SMART-1. AMIE is derived from the development efforts already under way for the Technological Research Program of ESA, the ROSETTA and MARS missions. Synthetic Objectives of AMIE during the SMART-1 mission: - Imaging Lunar South Pole (Aitken basin) Permanent shadow (ice deposit) Eternal light (crater rims) - Mapping of high latitudes regions (south) mainly at far side The present baseline plan considers an orbit with an apocenter of 10000 km and a pericenter of 300 km to 1800 km. At a distance of 300 km, the field of view of AMIE (5.3 deg x 5.3 deg) corresponds to 27 km. The pixel size for the 1024 x 1024 CCD is therefore 27 m at pericenter. The South polar region had been proposed as the focus of European lunar activities by the Lunar Science Advisory Group of ESA on the following grounds: 1. The possibility of ice deposits was already considered in 1995. This has now been confirmed by the results of the Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer, although contrarily to the expectations from Clementine the reservoir may be larger at the North pole. 2. The South pole is on the rim of a major geologic feature discovered by Clementine, the Aitken (our South polar) basin, more than 1500 km in diameter, the largest such feature on the Moon. It penetrated very deep into the farside crust, as witnessed by the contamination by mantle material, but was not filled up by lava flows as was the case for similar features on the near side. There is therefore a strong interest in investigating at close range the mineralogical composition of ejecta which provide a vertical sounding of the farside crust down to several ten km. AMIE will directly contribute to the characterisation of surface mineralogy and geology, in combination with other elements of the payload.

  13. Advanced Ion Mass Spectrometer for Giant Planet Ionospheres, Magnetospheres and Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, EC; Cooper, JF; Paschalidis, N.; Jones, SL; Rodriguez, M.; Ali, A.; Coplan, MA; Chornay, DJ; Sturner; Bateman, FB; Andre, N.; Fedorov, A.; Wurz, P.

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Ion Composition Spectrometer (AIMS) has been under development from various NASA sources (NASA LWSID, NASA ASTID, NASA Goddard IRADs) to measure elemental, isotopic, and simple molecular composition abundances of 1 eV/e to 25 keV/e hot ions with wide field-of-view (FOV) in the 1 - 60 amu mass range at mass resolution M/ΔM ≤ 60 over a wide dynamic range of intensities and penetrating radiation background from the inner magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn to the outer magnetospheric boundary regions and the upstream solar wind. This instrument will work for both spinning spacecraft and 3-axis stabilized spacecraft with wide field-of-view capability in both cases. It will measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) for the individual ion species; ion velocity moments of the IVDF will give the fluid parameters (density, flow velocity and temperature) of the individual ion species. Outer planet mission applications are Io Observer, Jupiter Europa Orbiter/Europa Clipper, Enceladus Orbiter, and Uranus Orbiter as described in the decadal survey, but would also be valuable for inclusion on other missions to outer planet destinations such as Saturn- Titan and Neptune-Triton and for future missions to terrestrial planets, Venus and Mars, the Moon, asteroids, and comets, and of course for geospace applications to the Earth.

  14. Advanced methods of low cost mission design for Jovian moons exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushevskii, Alexey; Koryanov, Victor; Tuchin, Andrey; Golubev, Yury; Tuchin, Denis

    2016-07-01

    DeltaV-low-cost gravity assists tours mission design of for the Jovian Moons exploration is considered (orbiters and probes around Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto), taking radiation hazard into account. Limited dynamic opportunities of using flybys require multiple gravity assists. Relevance of regular creation of optimum scenarios - sequences of passing of celestial bodies with definition of conditions of their execution is obvious. This work is devoted to the description of criteria for creation of such chains. New Multi-Tisserand coordinates [1,2] for this purpose are introduced for the best study of features for the radiation hazard decrease and the spacecraft asymptotic velocity reduction. One of main problems of the Jovian system mission design (JIMO, JUICE, Laplas P) is that the reduction of the asymptotic velocity of the spacecraft with respect to the satellite for the Jovian moon's capture is impossible. A valid reason is in the invariance of Jacobi integral and Tisserand parameter in a restricted three-body model (RTBP) [3]. Furthermore, the same-body flybys tour falls into the hazard radiation zone according the Tisserand-Poincaré graph. Formalized beam's algorithm to overcome this "problem of the ballistic destiny" with using full ephemeris model and with several coupled RTBP engaging has been implemented. Withal low-cost reduction of the spacecraft asymptotic velocity for the capture of the moon is required. The corresponding numerical scheme was developed with using Tisserand-Poincaré graph and the simulation of tens of millions of options. The Delta V-low cost searching was utilized also with help of the modeling of the multiple rebounds (cross gravity assists) of the beam of trajectories. The techniques are developed by the authors specifically to the needs of the mission "Laplas P" of Roscosmos. If we have answers to the questions "what kind of gravity assists", we need answer on the question "when". New Multi-Tisserand coordinates for this

  15. Moon Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    When teaching Moon phases, the focus seems to be on the sequence of Moon phases and, in some grade levels, how Moon phases occur. Either focus can sometimes be a challenge, especially without the use of models and observations of the Moon. In this month's column, the author describes some of the lessons that he uses to teach the phases of the Moon…

  16. Project APEX: Advanced Phobos Exploration. Manned mission to the Martian moon Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The manned exploration of Mars is a massive undertaking which requires careful consideration. A mission to the moon of Mars called Phobos as a prelude to manned landings on the Martian surface offers some advantages. One is that the energy requirements, in terms of delta 5, is only slightly higher than going to the Moon's surface. Another is that Phobos is a potential source of water and carbon which could be extracted and processed for life support and cryogenic propellants for use in future missions; thus, Phobos might serve as a base for extended Mars exploration or for exploration of the outer planets. The design of a vehicle for such a mission is the subject of our Aerospace System Design course this year. The materials and equipment needed for the processing plant would be delivered to Phobos in a prior unmanned mission. This study focuses on what it would take to send a crew to Phobos, set up the processing plant for extraction and storage of water and hydrocarbons, conduct scientific experiments, and return safely to Earth. The size, configuration, and subsystems of the vehicle are described in some detail. The spacecraft carries a crew of five and is launched from low Earth orbit in the year 2010. The outbound trajectory to Mars uses a gravitational assisted swing by of Venus and takes eight months to complete. The stay at Phobos is 60 days at which time the crew will be engaged in setting up the processing facility. The crew will then return to Earth orbit after a total mission duration of 656 days. Both stellar and solar observations will be conducted on both legs of the mission. The design of the spacecraft addresses human factors and life science; mission analysis and control; propulsion; power generation and distribution; thermal control; structural analysis; and planetary, solar, and stellar science. A 0.5 g artificial gravity is generated during transit by spinning about the lateral body axis. Nuclear thermal rockets using hydrogen as fuel are

  17. Project APEX: Advanced Phobos Exploration. Manned mission to the Martian moon Phobos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    The manned exploration of Mars is a massive undertaking which requires careful consideration. A mission to the moon of Mars called Phobos as a prelude to manned landings on the Martian surface offers some advantages. One is that the energy requirements, in terms of delta 5, is only slightly higher than going to the Moon's surface. Another is that Phobos is a potential source of water and carbon which could be extracted and processed for life support and cryogenic propellants for use in future missions; thus, Phobos might serve as a base for extended Mars exploration or for exploration of the outer planets. The design of a vehicle for such a mission is the subject of our Aerospace System Design course this year. The materials and equipment needed for the processing plant would be delivered to Phobos in a prior unmanned mission. This study focuses on what it would take to send a crew to Phobos, set up the processing plant for extraction and storage of water and hydrocarbons, conduct scientific experiments, and return safely to Earth. The size, configuration, and subsystems of the vehicle are described in some detail. The spacecraft carries a crew of five and is launched from low Earth orbit in the year 2010. The outbound trajectory to Mars uses a gravitational assisted swing by of Venus and takes eight months to complete. The stay at Phobos is 60 days at which time the crew will be engaged in setting up the processing facility. The crew will then return to Earth orbit after a total mission duration of 656 days. Both stellar and solar observations will be conducted on both legs of the mission. The design of the spacecraft addresses human factors and life science; mission analysis and control; propulsion; power generation and distribution; thermal control; structural analysis; and planetary, solar, and stellar science. A 0.5 g artificial gravity is generated during transit by spinning about the lateral body axis. Nuclear thermal rockets using hydrogen as fuel are

  18. Science Investigations with Laser Ranging to the Moon and Mars/Phobos: Recent Advances, Technology Demonstrations, and New Ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Williams, James G.; Folkner, William M.

    2010-05-01

    Since it's initiation by the Apollo 11 astronauts in 1969, LLR has strongly contributed to our understanding of the Moon's internal structure and the dynamics of the Earth-Moon system. The data provide for unique, multi-disciplinary results in the areas of lunar science, gravitational physics, Earth sciences, geodesy and geodynamics, solar system ephemerides, and terrestrial and celestial reference frames. However, the current distribution of the retroreflectors is not optimal, other weaknesses exist. A geographic distribution of new instruments on the lunar surface wider than the current distribution would be a great benefit; the accuracy of the lunar science parameters would increase several times. We are developing the next-generation of the LLR experiment. This work includes development of new retroreflector arrays and laser transponders to be deployed on the lunar surface by a series of proposed missions to the moon. The new laser instruments will enable strong advancements in LLR-derived science. Anticipated science impact includes lunar science, gravitational physics, geophysics, and geodesy. Thus, properties of the lunar interior, including tidal properties, liquid core and solid inner core can be determined from lunar rotation, orientation, and tidal response. Anticipated improvements in Earth geophysics and geodesy would include the positions and rates for the Earth stations, Earth rotation, precession rate, nutation, and tidal influences on the orbit. Strong improvements are also expected in several tests of general relativity. We address the science return enabled by the new laser retroreflectors. We also discuss deployment of pulsed laser transponders with future landers on Mars/Phobos. The development of active laser techniques would extend the accuracies characteristic of passive laser tracking to interplanetary distances. Highly-accurate time-series of the round-trip travel times of laser pulses between an observatory on the Earth and an optical

  19. Shoot the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont-Bloch, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    1. Introducing lunar imaging; 2. Choosing your imaging equipment; 3. Adapting your image device to the instrument; 4. Tuning your telescope for lunar imaging; 5. Wide-field, lunar imaging; 6. High-resolution, lunar imaging; 7. Essential image processing; 8. Advanced image processing; 9. Making 3D lunar images; 10. Measuring and identifying lunar features; 11. Photogenic features of the Moon; 12. Naming, archiving, printing and sharing lunar images; Appendix: maps of the Moon, Lunar 100 and other targets; Web pages, books and freeware for the Moon; Figure data; Index.

  20. Advanced Ion Mass Spectrometer for Giant Planet Ionosphere, Magnetospheres and Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, Edward; Cooper, John; Paschalidis, Nick; Jones, Sarah; Brinkerhoff, William; Paterson, William; Ali, Ashraf; Coplan, Michael; Chornay, Dennis; Sturner, Steve; Benna, Mehdi; Bateman, Fred; Fontaine, Dominique; Verdeil, Christophe; Andre, Nicolas; Blanc, Michel; Wurz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We present our Advanced Ion Mass Spectrometer (AIMS) for outer planet missions which has been under development from various NASA sources (NASA Living with a Star Instrument Development (LWSID), NASA Astrobiology Instrument Development (ASTID), NASA Goddard Internal Research and Development (IRAD)s) to measure elemental, isotopic, and simple molecular composition abundances of 1 V to 25 kV hot ions with wide field-of-view (FOV) in the 1 - 60 amu mass range at mass resolution M/ ΔM <= 60 over a wide dynamic range of particle intensities and penetrating radiation background from the inner magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn to the outer magnetospheric boundary regions and the upstream solar wind. This instrument will work for both spinning spacecraft and 3-axis stabilized spacecraft. AIMS will measure the ion velocity distribution functions (VDF) for the individual ion species from which velocity moments will give their ion density, flow velocity and temperature.

  1. Sparse Reconstruction for Micro Defect Detection in Acoustic Micro Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichun; Shi, Tielin; Su, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Hong, Yuan; Chen, Kepeng; Liao, Guanglan

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic micro imaging has been proven to be sufficiently sensitive for micro defect detection. In this study, we propose a sparse reconstruction method for acoustic micro imaging. A finite element model with a micro defect is developed to emulate the physical scanning. Then we obtain the point spread function, a blur kernel for sparse reconstruction. We reconstruct deblurred images from the oversampled C-scan images based on l1-norm regularization, which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and improve the accuracy of micro defect detection. The method is further verified by experimental data. The results demonstrate that the sparse reconstruction is effective for micro defect detection in acoustic micro imaging. PMID:27783040

  2. Sparse Reconstruction for Micro Defect Detection in Acoustic Micro Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichun; Shi, Tielin; Su, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Hong, Yuan; Chen, Kepeng; Liao, Guanglan

    2016-10-24

    Acoustic micro imaging has been proven to be sufficiently sensitive for micro defect detection. In this study, we propose a sparse reconstruction method for acoustic micro imaging. A finite element model with a micro defect is developed to emulate the physical scanning. Then we obtain the point spread function, a blur kernel for sparse reconstruction. We reconstruct deblurred images from the oversampled C-scan images based on l₁-norm regularization, which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and improve the accuracy of micro defect detection. The method is further verified by experimental data. The results demonstrate that the sparse reconstruction is effective for micro defect detection in acoustic micro imaging.

  3. Technology and science from Earth to Moon: SMART-1 experiments and their operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, A. E.; Lumb, R.; Racca, G. D.; Foing, B. H.; Dias-Almeida, M.

    2002-10-01

    SMART-1, the first European mission to the Moon aimed at demonstrating the Solar Electric propulsion hosts 10 Technology and Science experiments. The monitoring of the spacecraft plasma environment and the thruster contamination produced by thruster is carried out by SPEDE (Spacecraft Potential, Electron and Dust Experiment) and EPDP (Electric Propulsion Diagnostic Package). The miniaturised remote sensing instruments on-board SMART-1 are: AMIE (Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment), D-CIXS (Demonstration of a Compact Imaging X-ray Spectrometer), supported in its operation by XSM (X-ray Solar Monitor), and SIR (SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer). Technology experiments for deep-space communications and navigation are: KATE (Ka-Band TT&C Experiment), based on X/Kaband transponder which also supports RSIS (Radio-Science Investigations for SMART-1), Laser-link, demonstrating a deep-space laser communication link and OBAN (On-Board Autonomous Navigation experiment). The Experiments will be performed during two distinct phases of the SMART-1 mission, including 17-month Earth escape phase and a nominal 6-month operational phase in elliptical Moon orbit. The SMART-1 STOC (Science and Technology Operations Co-ordination) carries out the planning and co-ordination of the Technology and science experiments.

  4. Geological applications using an electrical micro imaging tool

    SciTech Connect

    Eubanks, D.; Seiler, D.; Russell, B.

    1995-11-20

    The resistivity micro imaging tool introduced by Halliburton produces electrical images that are being used in a variety of geological applications. The tool is a microresistivity-type imaging device with six independent articulating arms extending from the main body.Each arm is mounted with a pad containing a 25-electrode scanning array. The EMI tool and all other micro imaging devices measure changes in resistivity along the borehole wall that correspond to subtle changes in rock composition, grain texture, and fluid properties. High-end graphics software processes the data to produce highly visual 2D and 3D images of the borehole. The paper describes the use of this tool in fault analysis, fracture analysis, rock texture, strata dip analysis, and thin-bed analysis.

  5. Moon Rise

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aboard the International Space Station in May 2012, Expedition 31 astronaut Don Pettit opened the shutters covering the cupola observation windows in time to watch the moon rise. The time-lapse sce...

  6. September moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, M.

    2003-12-01

    Although Mars, through unprecedented proximity, caused great interest in its surface features this summer, its two tiny moons were worthy imaging targets too. A few degrees away was Uranus with Oberon and Titania and further west Neptune and satellite Triton.

  7. Focus on the Moon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Deborah

    1980-01-01

    Described is the observation of the moon with binoculars. Descriptions of the thin crescent moon, three-day-old moon, five-day-old moon, first quarter moon, 10-day-old moon and the full moon are presented and characteristics of each phase are included. (DS)

  8. The Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, P. H.; Taylor, G. J.

    Exciting recent developments in lunar geochemistry include the discovery that some lunar magmas had earthlike contents of water and remote-sensing evidence for crustal heterogeneity, including regions rich in magnesian spinel, regions of nearly pure anorthosite, regions of high Mg/Fe, and regions of evolved, silicic composition. The magma ocean hypothesis continues to be tested and refined. Concerns about the initial neodymium isotopic ratio of the ferroan anorthosites have been allayed by evidence that the whole Moon (and Mars and Earth) may have a depleted Nd/Sm ratio. However, age results still show no clear distinction between the ferroan anorthosites and the oldest Mg-suite rocks. Stable isotopic data show remarkably close kinship between the Moon and Earth, so close that it poses difficulty for most existing giant impact scenarios of lunar origin, as these models imply that the Moon forms mainly out of material spalled from a large, late interloping body.

  9. Shepherd Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Shepherd Moons

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter in February 2007. This sequence of pictures from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) shows the well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings; labels point out how these narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons (Metis and Adrastea).

  10. The Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, P. H.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotopic data suggest that there is a genetic relationship between the constituent matter of the Moon and Earth (Wiechert et al., 2001). Yet lunar materials are obviously different from those of the Earth. The Moon has no hydrosphere, virtually no atmosphere, and compared to the Earth, lunar materials uniformly show strong depletions of even mildly volatile constituents such as potassium, in addition to N2, O2, and H2O (e.g., Wolf and Anders, 1980). Oxygen fugacity is uniformly very low ( BVSP, 1981) and even the earliest lunar magmas seem to have been virtually anhydrous. These features have direct and far-reaching implications for mineralogical and geochemical processes. Basically, they imply that mineralogical diversity and thus variety of geochemical processes are subdued; a factor that to some extent offsets the comparative dearth of available data for lunar geochemistry.The Moon's gross physical characteristics play an important role in the more limited range of selenochemical compared to terrestrial geochemical processes. Although exceptionally large (radius=1,738 km) in relation to its parent planet, the Moon is only 0.012 times as massive as Earth. By terrestrial standards, pressures inside the Moon are feeble: the upper mantle gradient is 0.005 GPa km -1 (versus 0.033 GPa km -1 in Earth) and the central pressure is slightly less than 5 GPa. However, lunar interior pressures are sufficient to profoundly influence igneous processes (e.g., Warren and Wasson, 1979b; Longhi, 1992, 2002), and in this sense the Moon more resembles a planet than an asteroid.Another direct consequence of the Moon's comparatively small size was early, rapid decay of its internal heat engine. But the Moon's thermal disadvantage has resulted in one great advantage for planetology. Lunar surface terrains, and many of the rock samples acquired from them, retain for the most part characteristics acquired during the first few hundred million years of solar system existence. The

  11. The New Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2014-10-01

    Preface; 1. The importance of the Moon; 2. First steps; 3. Moon/Mars; 4. An international flotilla; 5. Moon rise from the ashes; 6. Moons past; 7. The pull of the far side; 8. False seas, real seas; 9. Inconstant Moon; 10. Moonlighting; 11. Lunar living room; 12. Lunar power; 13. Stepping stone; 14. Return to Earth; Index.

  12. Evolution of the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    From year to year, the moon never seems to change. Craters and other formations appear to be permanent now, but the moon didn't always look like this. Learn about how the moon evolved from its earl...

  13. MoonNEXT: A European Mission to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J. D.; Koschny, D.; Crawford, I.; Falcke, H.; Kempf, S.; Lognonne, P.; Ricci, C.; Houdou, B.; Pradier, A.

    2008-09-01

    preparation and technology demonstration for future exploration activities MoonNEXT will advance our understanding of the origin, structure and evolution of the Moon. These advances in understanding will come about through a range of geophysical and geochemical investigations. MoonNEXT will also assess the value of the lunar surface as a future site for performing science from the Moon, using radio astronomy as an example. The scientific objectives are: • To study the geophysics of the Moon, in particular the origin, differentiation, internal structure and early geological evolution of the Moon. • To obtain in-situ geochemical data from, within the Aitken Basin, where material from the lower crust and possibly the upper mantle may be found. • To investigate the nature of volatiles implanted into the lunar regolith at the South Pole and identify their species. • To study the environment at the lunar South pole, in particular to measure the radiation environment, the dust flux due to impact ejecta and micrometeoroids, and a possibly the magnetic field. • To study the effect of the lunar environment on biological systems. • To further our understanding of the ULF/VLF background radiation of the universe. • Investigate the electromagnetic environment of the moon at radio wavelengths with the potential to perform astronomical radio observations. Various mission scenarios are currently under study, incorporating options for a lander-only configuration or a lander with the possible addition of a rover. The working experimental payload includes cameras, broad band and short period seismometers, a radiation monitor, instruments to measure dust transport and micrometeoroid fluxes, instruments to provide elemental and mineralogical analyses of surface rocks, a mole for subsurface heat flow and regolith properties measurements, a radio antenna and a package containing a self sustaining biological system to observe the effects of the lunar environment. The addition of a

  14. An Investigation into the Potential of Embossed "Dotted" Moon as a Production Method for Children Using Moon as a Route to Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Steve; Douglas, Graeme; McLinden, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Dotted Moon is a useful and important resource to complement the range of options available to those teaching and learning Moon. Observation of a variety of Moon readers (including those at early stages of literacy as well as more advanced readers) showed that all participants were able to decode dotted Moon characters and engage in educational…

  15. Pluto's Spinning Moons

    NASA Video Gallery

    Most inner moons in the solar system keep one face pointed toward their central planet; this animation shows that certainly isn’t the case with the small moons of Pluto, which behave like spinning ...

  16. The moons of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, L. A.; Johnson, T. V.

    1982-01-01

    Knowledge gained of the 17 Saturn moons with observations by the Voyager spacecraft are reviewed. Titan was found to have the only atmosphere, which is opaque and precludes geologic inferences. Synchronous rotation is experienced by the 14 inner moons, with a constant inner face turned toward the planet. Phoebe is too far away from the planet to lose its spin to planetary tidal forces, and has an orbit inclined 150 deg from the equatorial plane, while Iapetus is inclined 14.7 deg in its orbit. The abundance of ice on the moons is accepted as evidence of condensation formation of the moons at very low temperatures. Newly discovered moons of Saturn, including both the shepherd moons, which are suspected to maintain the rings in place, and the moons discovered by earth-based astronomy, are discussed. Finally, photographs of all the moons are examined for definitive details.

  17. Phases of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The various aspects that the Moon presents to observers on the Earth as the proportion of its sunlit side which is visible changes in the course of its orbit around the Earth. There are four principle phases: new moon, first quarter, full moon and last quarter. One complete cycle of phases is termed a lunation, and is completed in just over 29½ days, the Moon's synodic period....

  18. The Moon's Origin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadogan, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Presents findings and conclusions about the origin of the moon, favoring the capture hypothesis of lunar origin. Advantage of the hypothesis is that it allows the moon to have been formed elsewhere, specifically in a hotter part of the solar nebula, accounting for chemical differences between earth and moon. (JN)

  19. Pluto's Intriguing Moons

    NASA Video Gallery

    We talk a lot about Charon, Pluto's largest moon that's about half the size of its host planet. But what about Pluto’s other moons? They're strange, to say the least. Pluto’s four smaller moons —...

  20. Our Battered Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Most people have probably heard the tale about the Moon being made out of Swiss cheese because, on Earth, the Moon looks like it is full of holes. Those holes are actually impact craters, circular depressions that formed when objects, such as rocks that orbit the Sun, smashed into the surface of the Moon. The activity described in this article,…

  1. Look to the Moon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Gerald Wm.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a strategy that helps students visualize and comprehend moon phase changes through activities that use an Earth-centered point of view along with direct observations of the moon. Describes activities that parents can use at home to help children become familiar with observing moon phases. (JRH)

  2. Perceptions about Moon Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rider, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Presents research on different techniques to determine the level of understanding among middle school students regarding the phases of the moon. Quotes student responses to provide some insight into students' level of understanding of general knowledge about the moon, moon phases, and modeling the phases. Presents implications for teachers. (KHR)

  3. High Resolution Maps of the Moon Surface with AMIE/SMART-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despan, Daniela; Erard, S.; Barucci, A.; Josset, J. L.; Beauvivre, S.; Chevrel, S.; Pinet, P.; Koschny, D.; Almeida, M.; Grieger, B.; Foing, B.; AMIE Team

    2008-09-01

    The Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment (AMIE) on board the ESA lunar mission Smart-1 has performed colour imaging of the lunar surface using various filters in the visible and NIR range. This micro-camera provided high resolution images of selected parts of the lunar surface, including the North and South pole areas. Being give that the SMART-1 mission was in a 300km x 300km orbit with perilune over the South pole, the coverage between the North and the South regions is different. The AMIE images were obtained using a tele-objective with 5.3° x 5.3° field of view and a sensor of 1024 x 1024 pixels. The output images have resolution 45m/pixel at 500km, and are encoded with 10 bits/pixel. The data for the North pole were obtained at a much higher altitude than the South pole data. From the 300 Km pericenter altitude, the same field of view corresponds to a spatial resolution about 27 m/pixel. The high resolution imaging of the Moon surface makes possible detailed analysis of the morphological features and physical characteristics of the lunar surface. In order to construct AMIE data maps, systematic analysis and processing is being carried on using the whole data set. Geometrical analysis of AMIE images relies on the SPICE system: image coordinates are computed to get precise projection at the surface, and illumination angles are computed to analyze the photometric sequences. Using this method, high resolution mosaics were constructed then compared to lower resolution Clementine UV-Vis and NIR images. Maps of both North and South pole were obtained as well as other regions of interest. Eventually, this method will be applied in all areas where AMIE has provided high resolution observations of the surface, typically a factor of 3 higher than the Clementine UV-Vis camera. New results will be presented at the conference.

  4. Micro-imaging of transient guest profiles in nanoporous host systems of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Tomas; Hibbe, Florian; Chmelik, Christian; Kärger, Jörg; Martinez-Joaristi, Alberto; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek; Ruthven, Douglas

    2012-10-01

    Nanoporous host materials giving rise to transient guest profiles of cylindrical symmetry during molecular uptake and release are shown to provide particularly advantageous conditions for the study of guest diffusion by micro-imaging. Considering zeolites of structure type DDR (Deca-dodecasil 3R) as a host system and short-chain length hydrocarbons as guest molecules, the benefits thus attainable in micro-imaging studies using interference microscopy are shown to include the determination of transient concentration profiles with improved accuracy, the option to overcome the disturbing impact of surface imperfections, and easy access to concentration-dependent diffusivities.

  5. Full moon and crime.

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, C P; Sharma, D

    1984-01-01

    The incidence of crimes reported to three police stations in different towns (one rural, one urban, one industrial) was studied to see if it varied with the day of the lunar cycle. The period of the study covered 1978-82. The incidence of crimes committed on full moon days was much higher than on all other days, new moon days, and seventh days after the full moon and new moon. A small peak in the incidence of crimes was observed on new moon days, but this was not significant when compared with crimes committed on other days. The incidence of crimes on equinox and solstice days did not differ significantly from those on other days, suggesting that the sun probably does not influence the incidence of crime. The increased incidence of crimes on full moon days may be due to "human tidal waves" caused by the gravitational pull of the moon. PMID:6440656

  6. Mapping technologically and economically important materials at lunar and terrestrial sites using Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standart, Douglas Laurence

    Project I: Using results from the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer (LP-GRS), we selected thorium (Th) anomalies on the Moon in an effort to detect material rich in KREEP (potassium, rare earth elements, phosphorus) using hyperspectral imagery. Four sites were chosen: Lassell Crater, Hansteen Alpha, Gruithuisen Domes, and Compton-Belkovich Thorium Anomaly (CBTA). Three of these sites are non-mare volcanic features within the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT), while Compton-Belkovich is located on the lunar farside. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) hyperspectral imager was used to analyze the composition of these locations. The spectra gathered from all four study sites all show pronounced absorptions at ~2.8 μm, indicating hydroxyl or water. This is significant for three reasons: (1) the strong absorption of hydroxyl/water shown at each of these volcanic sites supports the hypothesis that the lunar mantle is more hydrous than previously thought; (2) it suggests that KREEP may lie, possibly as uncoupled pods, beneath the anorthositic highlands near Compton-Belkovich as well as underlying other areas outside the previously defined PKT; and (3) it suggests that non-mare silicic volcanic features would have erupted prior to mare basalts due to their increased abundance of magmatic water, consistent with basaltic underplating. Project II: By targeting areas with anomalously high Th signatures, as seen by LP-ThGRS, we attempt to determine if Th hotspots are associated with ilmenite-rich basalts. To map ilmenite (FeTiO3), we employ a band depth technique that takes advantage of the fact that the visible-infrared reflectance spectrum of ilmenite exhibits low reflectance and a flat continuum slope. As a result, the spectra of ilmenite-bearing mare basalts will have a reduced 1-μm absorption. We demonstrate this effect by plotting ilmenite concentrations from Apollo basalt samples against the M3-derived, 1-μm absorption depths associated with the locations from which

  7. Application research on enhancing near-infrared micro-imaging quality by 2nd derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ma, Zhi-hong; Zhao, Liu; Wang, Bei-hong; Han, Ping; Pan, Li-gang; Wang, Ji-hua

    2013-08-01

    Near-infrared micro-imaging will not only provide the sample's spatial distribution information, but also the spectroscopic information of each pixel. In this thesis, it took the artificial sample of wheat flour and formaldehyde sodium sulfoxylate distribution given for example to research the data processing method for enhancing the quality of near-infrared micro-imaging. Near-infrared spectroscopic feature of wheat flour and formaldehyde sodium sulfoxylate being studied on, compare correlation imaging and 2nd derivative imaging were applied in the imaging processing of the near-infrared micro-image of the artificial sample. Furthermore, the two methods were combined, i.e. 2nd derivative compare correlation imaging was acquired. The result indicated that the difference of the correlation coefficients between the two substances, i.e. wheat flour and formaldehyde sodium sulfoxylate, and the reference spectrum has been increased from 0.001 in compare correlation image to 0.796 in 2nd derivative compare correlation image respectively, which enhances the imaging quality efficiently. This study will, to some extent, be of important reference significance to near-infrared micro-imaging method research of agricultural products and foods.

  8. Astronomy and space science from station Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    1995-02-01

    Lunar based telescopes and observatories can provide a long-term multi-wavelength window on the Universe. Here we discuss some basic constraints and specific facts regarding the use of the Moon as a site for astronomy and space science. We assess for this use the effects of gravity, rotation period, surface curvature, the seismic and tidal stability, as well as the tenuous atmosphere, temperature variations, weak magnetic fields on the Moon, micro-meteorite flux and the properties of the regolith. We discuss the thermal and electromagnetic environments on the Moon and the properties of the dark lunar sites for astronomical instruments. The interest in polar lunar observatories (with eventual ice existence), the coldest sites in the solar system, is also presented. We then summarise the respective advantages and drawbacks of Moon-based astronomy and space science in relation to ground-based and near-Earth orbit astronomy. Finally, we discuss the sicence of the Moon. We argue for the renewed interest of lunar exploration using advanced technologies for understanding the Earth/Moon history. The Moon is described as a test-bed for solar system exploration. It allows both remote and in-situ measurements for ground-truth validation of the understanding of other solar-system bodies.

  9. Interior of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of geophysical measurements made from Earth, from spacecraft in orbit around the Moon, and by astronauts on the lunar surface allow us to probe beyond the lunar surface to learn about its interior. Similarly to the Earth, the Moon is thought to consist of a distinct crust, mantle, and core. The crust is globally asymmetric in thickness, the mantle is largely homogeneous, and the core is probably layered, with evidence for molten material. This chapter will review a range of methods used to infer the Moon's internal structure, and briefly discuss the implications for the Moon's formation and evolution.

  10. Towards A Moon Village: Vision and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Habitat Design group discussed principles and concepts for a minimum base that would start with 4-10 crew, allowing a later evolution to 50 crew and elements contributed by Moon Village partners at large. Various aspects were assessed including habitats, laboratories, EVAs, pressurized vehicles, core modules, inflatable extensions, power systems, life support systems and bioreactors, ISRU using regolith, emergency, services, medical, escape, shelters. The Science and Technology group analyzed the importance and readiness level of technologies needed for lunar robotic landers and for the Moon Village. The current ESA lunar exploration activities focus on the contribution within ISS operations barter of the ESA service module to bring Orion capsule to the Moon starting with an automatic demonstration in 2018. It is encouraged to consolidate this path for using the ser-vice module for crewed missions EM2 and EM3 giving also the possibility of an ESA astronaut, together with advanced technology, operations and science utilization. They noted the interesting contribution of instruments, drill, communications, and landing in support to Russian lunar polar lander missions Luna 27. The Engaging Stakeholders working group started by identifying the main stakeholders and groups that play a role or that could play a role towards the Moon Village project. These stakeholders were classified on their influence towards the programme, and their attitude towards it. One clear conclusion was that most of the stakeholders showed a positive view towards the Moon Village programme, and that the most important step within a short term strategy should focus on the actions to be taken to engage stakeholders for the next ESA Ministerial to support the programme. Finally the group came up with some recommendations on which should be the actions to be taken by the ESA DG to engage the most direct stakeholders: ESA delegations, media, national governments, citizens, taxpayers, and to invite partners

  11. Apollo 11 Moon Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The crowning achievement for the Saturn V rocket came when it launched Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil Armstrong, Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, and Michael Collins, to the Moon in July 1969. In this photograph, astronaut Aldrin takes his first step onto the surface of the Moon.

  12. Moon: Old and New

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This video presents the moon as studied by man for more than 20 centuries. It reviews the history of lunar studies before the first moon landing, the major things learned since Apollo 11, and closes with a resume of lunar investigations scientists would like to undertake in the future.

  13. Compact Micro-Imaging Spectrometer (CMIS): Investigation of Imaging Spectroscopy and Its Application to Mars Geology and Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staten, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    Future missions to Mars will attempt to answer questions about Mars' geological and biological history. The goal of the CMIS project is to design, construct, and test a capable, multi-spectral micro-imaging spectrometer use in such missions. A breadboard instrument has been constructed with a micro-imaging camera and Several multi-wavelength LED illumination rings. Test samples have been chosen for their interest to spectroscopists, geologists and astrobiologists. Preliminary analysis has demonstrated the advantages of isotropic illumination and micro-imaging spectroscopy over spot spectroscopy.

  14. On the origin of the Moon by rotational fission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    Consistent with the current understanding of the Moon's bulk composition, internal structure, seismic and tectonic characteristics, evidence is discussed which suggests that the Moon originated by fission. The concepts discussed are: (1) all stars are members of close or contact binary systems; (2) advances in dynamical studies of the fission hypothesis show that stellar bodies also undergo fission; (3) the newly formed proto moon would have lost a large fraction of its original mass via mass transfer; and (4) due to the foregoing concepts the result would be a moon of terrestrial mantle material which was depleted in both metallic iron and volatiles.

  15. [Comparative research on the NIR and MIR micro-imaging of two similar plastic materials].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Ma, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Liu; Pan, Li-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Ji-Hua

    2011-09-01

    The NIR/MIR micro-imaging can supply not only the information of spectra, but also the information of spacial distribution of the sample, which is superior to the traditional NIR/MIR spectroscopy analysis. In the present paper, polyethylene and parafilm, with similar appearances, were regarded as the research objects, of which the NIR/MIR micro-imaging was collected. Chemical imaging (CI) and compare correlation imaging were carried out for the two materials respectively to discuss the imaging methods of the two materials. The result indicated that the differentiation of the CI values of the two materials in the NIR/MIR CI for material II was 0.004 8 and 0.254 8 respectively, while those in the NIR/MIR CI for material I were 0.002 6 and 0.326 5, respectively. Clear CI was acquired, and the two materials could be differentiated. The result of the compare correlation imagings indicated that the compare correlation imagings, in which the NIR/MIR spectra of the two materials were regarded as reference spectra respectively, can differentiate the two materials remarkably with clear imagings. In the compare correlation imagings of MIR micro-imaging, the difference of the correlation coefficients between the two materials' MIR spectra and the reference spectrum was more than 0.12, which showed a better imaging result; while a tiny difference of the correlation coefficients between the two materials' NIR spectra and the reference spectrum could be employed to show a clear imaging result for NIR compare correlation imaging so as to differentiate the two materials. This thesis, to some extent, can supply the reference to not only the rapid discrimination of the safety of the packaging material for agri-food, but also the imaging methods for NIR/MIR micro-imaging to differentiate the different materials.

  16. Colour Images Of The Moon From Amie On Smart-1: A Preliminary Analysys Of The Region Of Oppenheimer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerroni, Priscilla; Besse, S.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Josset, J.; Beauvivre, S.; Pinet, P.; Chevrel, S.; Barucci, M. A.; Langevin, Y.; Koshny, D.; Almeida, M.; Foing, B.; AMIE Team

    2006-09-01

    The Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment (AMIE) is the imaging system on board the ESA mission to the Moon SMART-1 which is closing towards its end on September 3rd, 2006. During the time spent in lunar orbit the AMIE camera provided high resolution CCD images of selected lunar areas where it performed colour imaging through three filters at 750, 915 and 960 nm with a maximum resolution of 27 m /pixel at the perilune of 300 km. The spectral bands have been selected in order to allow discrimination between mafic minerals which dominate the mare (revealed by the Fe2+ absorption feature at 950 nm) and the anorthosite rich highland materials. Data acquired by AMIE in push-broom modality on November 25th, 2005 for the lunar region of Oppenheimer centered at 36 S, 194 E have been preliminarily analysed . The ground resolution for these observations is of 73 m/px. A new calibration has been applied to the images based on flat-fielding from in-flight data; for the region considered three filters images have been co-registered, colour images and band-ratio images have been produced. An assessment of the results and a comparison with Clementine data from the same region is presented . Spectra have been extracted from a region in the floor of Oppenheimer and on the rim of a crater : a comparison with spectra from Clementine yields consistent results. Acknowledgements: P. Cerroni and M.C. De Sanctis acknowledge the support of ASI grant I/030/05

  17. The Moon Village Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Piero; Foing, Bernard H.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Haignere, Claudie; Schrogl, Kai-Uwe

    2016-07-01

    The "Moon Village" concept Space exploration is anchored in the International Space Station and in the current and future automatic and planetary automatic and robotic missions that pave the way for future long-term exploration objectives. The Moon represents a prime choice for scientific, operational and programmatic reasons and could be the enterprise that federates all interested Nations. On these considerations ESA is currently elaborating the concept of a Moon Village as an ensemble where multiple users can carry out multiple activities. The Moon Village has the ambition to serve a number of objectives that have proven to be of interest (including astronomy, fundamental research, resources management, moon science, etc. ) to the space community and should be the catalyst of new alliances between public and private entities including non-space industries. Additionally the Moon Village should provide a strong inspirational and education tool for the younger generations . The Moon Village will rely both on automatic, robotic and human-tendered structures to achieve sustainable moon surface operations serving multiple purposes on an open-architecture basis. This Europe-inspired initiative should rally all communities (across scientific disciplines, nations, industries) and make it to the top of the political agendas as a the scientific and technological undertaking but also political and inspirational endeavour of the XXI century. The current reflections are of course based on the current activities and plans on board the ISS and the discussion held in international fora such as the ISECG. The paper will present the status of these reflections, also in view of the ESA Council at Ministerial Level 2016, and will give an overview of the on-going activities being carried out to enable the vision of a Moon Village.

  18. Pluto's moons named

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-07-01

    In the end, it did not matter that the name Vulcan came in first place by a landslide in a nonbinding public vote to suggest names for the fourth and fifth known moons of Pluto. Despite the independent vote conducted by the SETI Institute in Mountain View, Calif., on behalf of the team that discovered the moons, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) did not select the name for a Plutonian moon. The decision came much to the dismay of actor William Shatner (who played Captain Kirk in Star Trek). Shatner had pushed for the name Vulcan to honor the home planet of Star Trek character Dr. Spock.

  19. Why the Moon?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, President George W. Bush proposed a new set of goals for NASA which have since been formalized by Congress as the revised United States Space Policy. A major goal is to return humans to the moon by 2020. This prompted a world-wide discussion about what our goals in space ought to be. In 2006 NASA surveyed potential stakeholders asking the question, "Why the Moon?" Responses were received from over 1000 entities including business, industry, academia, and 13 other space agencies. This presentation reports the responses to that questionnaire, as well as current plans for how the return to the moon will be accomplished.

  20. Origin of earth's moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The major geochemical properties of the moon are briefly considered along with the significant facts of the moon's geologic history, and then the three current hypotheses regarding the moon's origin, namely, fission, capture, and binary accretion, are reviewed. The individual merits and improbabilities associated with each mechanism are taken into consideration. Special attention is given to the binary accretion model as the most promising one. In the variants of this model, of crucial importance is the nature of the more general hypothesis assumed for planetary formation from the solar nebula. The two main models differ considerably in the amount of chemical fractionation they allow to accompany planetary formation.

  1. Steps to the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Dale, Alvin E.

    1976-01-01

    On July 20, 1969, man walked on the surface of the Moon and began a new chapter of his studies that will eventually disclose the geologic nature of the Earth's nearest neighbor. Although he has finally reached the Moon and sampled its substance, much work and study remain before he will know the full scientific significance of the first landing. This booklet briefly summarizes the steps man has taken to understand the Moon and what he thinks he has learned to date as a result of his centuries-long speculations and studies.

  2. Moons around Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this photo of Jupiter at 20:42:01 UTC on January 9, 2007, when the spacecraft was 80 million kilometers (49.6 million miles) from the giant planet. The volcanic moon Io is to the left of the planet; the shadow of the icy moon Ganymede moves across Jupiter's northern hemisphere.

    Ganymede's average orbit distance from Jupiter is about 1 million kilometers (620,000 miles); Io's is 422,000 kilometers (262,000 miles). Both Io and Ganymede are larger than Earth's moon; Ganymede is larger than the planet Mercury.

  3. What's New on the Moon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Bevan M.

    This document presents an overview of knowledge gained from the scientific explorations of the moon between 1969 and 1972 in the Apollo Program. Answers are given to questions regarding life on the moon, surface composition of rocks on the moon, the nature of the moon's interior, characteristics of lunar "soil," the age, history and…

  4. The Moon Beyond 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Over a hundred lunar scientists met in the clear mountain air of the Taos Ski Valley, September 12-14, 2002, to share their discoveries and, most importantly, their questions about the composition, geological evolution, and future exploration of the Moon. The wealth of data from the Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions, coupled with continued study of lunar samples, has led lunar scientists to pose sophisticated questions about the Moon. Because of the Moon's central role in planetary science, answers to these questions will help us understand the other rocky bodies in the Solar System. A fascinating array of missions is planned, including orbiting spacecraft and sample-return missions. Human habitation of the Moon may not be far beyond.

  5. ARTEMIS Orbits Magnetic Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's THEMIS spacecraft have completed their mission and are still working perfectly, so NASA is re-directing the outermost two spacecraft to special orbits around the Moon. Now called ARTEMIS, th...

  6. The Moon: Biogenic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Chang, Sherwood

    1992-01-01

    The specific objectives of the organic chemical exploration of the Moon involve the search for molecules of possible biological or prebiological origin. Detailed knowledge of the amount, distribution, and exact structure of organic compounds present on the Moon is extremely important to our understanding of the origin and history of the Moon and to its relationship to the history of the Earth and solar system. Specifically, such knowledge is essential for determining whether life on the Moon exists, ever did exist, or could develop. In the absence of life or organic matter, it is still essential to determine the abundance, distribution, and origin of the biogenic elements (e.g., H, C, O, N, S, P) in order to understand how the planetary environment may have influenced the course of chemical evolution. The history and scope of this effort is presented.

  7. Geometry and Moon Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kenneth W.; Harrell, Marvin E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity, designed to comply with the National Science Education Standards, that integrates science and mathematics concepts. Mathematical modeling of the moon's phases is employed to show students the role of mathematics in describing scientific phenomena. (DKM)

  8. Launching to the Moon, Mars, and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Vision for Space Exploration, announced in 2004, calls on NASA to finish constructing the International Space Station, retire the Space Shuttle, and build the new spacecraft needed to return to the Moon and go on the Mars. By exploring space, America continues the tradition of great nations who mastered the Earth, air, and sea, and who then enjoyed the benefits of increased commerce and technological advances. The progress being made today is part of the next chapter in America's history of leadership in space. In order to reach the Moon and Mars within the planned timeline and also within the allowable budget, NASA is building upon the best of proven space transportation systems. Journeys to the Moon and Mars will require a variety of vehicles, including the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle, the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, and the Lunar Surface Access Module. What America learns in reaching for the Moon will teach astronauts how to prepare for the first human footprints on Mars. While robotic science may reveal information about the nature of hydrogen on the Moon, it will most likely tale a human being with a rock hammer to find the real truth about the presence of water, a precious natural resource that opens many possibilities for explorers. In this way, the combination of astronauts using a variety of tools and machines provides a special synergy that will vastly improve our understanding of Earth's cosmic neighborhood.

  9. Feasibility and Safety of Fiber Optic Micro-Imaging in Canine Peripheral Airways

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziyang; Guo, Rui; Wu, Jingxing; Liu, Xun; Yao, Kaiqing; Lv, Fajin; Deng, Huisheng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility and safety of imaging canine peripheral airways (<1 mm) with an experimental micro-imaging fiber optic bronchoscope. Methods Twenty healthy dogs were scoped with a micro-imaging fiber optic bronchoscope (0.8 mm outer diameter). Images at various levels of the bronchioles, mucosal color, and tracheal secretions were recorded. The apparatus was stopped once it was difficult to insert. CT imaging was performed simultaneously to monitor progression. The safety of the device was evaluated by monitoring heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), mean artery pressure (MAP), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and arterial blood gases (partial pressure of arterial carbon-dioxide, PaCO2, partial pressure of arterial oxygen, PaO2, and blood pH). Results (1) According to the CT scan, the micro-imaging fiber was able to access the peripheral airways (<1 mm) in canines. (2) There was no significant change in the values of HR, MAP, pH and PaCO2 during the procedure (P>0.05). Comparing pre-manipulation and post-manipulation values, SpO2 (F = 13.06, P<0.05) and PaO2 (F = 3.01, P = 0.01) were decreased, whereas RR (F = 3.85, P<0.05) was elevated during the manipulation. (3) Self-limited bleeding was observed in one dog; severe bleeding or other complications did not occur. Conclusion Although the new apparatus had little effect on SpO2, PaO2 and RR, it can probe into small peripheral airways (<1 mm), which may provide a new platform for the early diagnosis of bronchiolar diseases. PMID:24416294

  10. Feasibility study of the detection of chlorpyrifos residuals on apple skin based on infrared micro-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoting; Zhu, Dazhou; Ma, Zhihong; Pan, Ligang; Wang, Dong; Wang, Jihua

    2012-10-01

    Infrared (IR) micro-imaging technology, also named chemical imaging, has potential applications in analytical technology. The IR micro-image provides not only the full spectrum information but also the component and structural information for each pixel point. Therefore, various groups of pesticides appear corresponding to the absorption peaks in the specific area of IR spectrum. In this study, the feasibility of using IR micro-imaging to detect chlopyrifos residuals on the surface of apple skin was explored. Different concentrations of chlorpyrifos solutions including 10,000, 1000, and 100 mg/L were sprayed on apple skin. Then IR micro-images were collected with a wavelength range of 4000 to 750 cm-1. The IR micro-image of chlorpyrifos pure powders was also collected for the contrasted analysis of characteristic absorption peaks. The results showed that there were seven, five, and four characteristic absorption peaks attributed to chlorpyrifos in the IR spectra of apple skin that was sprayed 10,000, 1000, and 100 mg/L chlorpyrifos solutions, respectively. With the decrease of chlorpyrifos solution concentration, the number of characteristic absorption peaks decreased. When the chlorpyrifos solution concentration was as low as 100 mg/L, the peak intensity could be still recognized. The second derivative spectra further validated the above conclusions. The detection limit of quantitative analysis was approximately 0.98 mg/L. The present study indicated that rapid detection of chlorpyrifos on the surface of an apple by IR micro-imaging technology was feasible. It provided useful foundation for the detection of fruits' and vegetables' pesticide residues by IR micro-imaging technology.

  11. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2016-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  12. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2014-05-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  13. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2015-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  14. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2013-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  15. The moons of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Torrence V.; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Soderblom, Laurence A.

    1987-01-01

    The topographies of the major moons of Uranus are described, and reasons for the appearances of the surfaces are given. Oberon and Titania, the two outermost major moons, have similar bulk properties but different appearances. Oberon appears to have been a largely passive structure for incoming projectiles, while Titania's surface shows extensive resurfacing. Umbriel and Ariel also have similar bulk properties and contrasting appearances, the former being totally bland except for two unexplained bright spots and the latter having a extensive network of surface faults. Miranda, the smallest and innermost of the major moons, has three large, remarkable ovoid regions on its surface. It is suggested that these ovoids are due to an uncompleted differentiation process.

  16. Moon - North Pole Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the Moon's north pole is a mosaic assembled from 18 images taken by Galileo's imaging system through a green filter as the spacecraft flew by on December 7, 1992. The left part of the Moon is visible from Earth; this region includes the dark, lava-filled Mare Imbrium (upper left); Mare Serenitatis (middle left); Mare Tranquillitatis (lower left), and Mare Crisium, the dark circular feature toward the bottom of the mosaic. Also visible in this view are the dark lava plains of the Marginis and Smythii Basins at the lower right. The Humboldtianum Basin, a 650-kilometer (400-mile) impact structure partly filled with dark volcanic deposits, is seen at the center of the image. The Moon's north pole is located just inside the shadow zone, about a third of the way from the top left of the illuminated region.

  17. HUBBLE SHOOTS THE MOON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In a change of venue from peering at the distant universe, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has taken a look at Earth's closest neighbor in space, the Moon. Hubble was aimed at one of the Moon's most dramatic and photogenic targets, the 58 mile-wide (93 km) impact crater Copernicus. The image was taken while the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) was aimed at a different part of the moon to measure the colors of sunlight reflected off the Moon. Hubble cannot look at the Sun directly and so must use reflected light to make measurements of the Sun's spectrum. Once calibrated by measuring the Sun's spectrum, the STIS can be used to study how the planets both absorb and reflect sunlight. (upper left) The Moon is so close to Earth that Hubble would need to take a mosaic of 130 pictures to cover the entire disk. This ground-based picture from Lick Observatory shows the area covered in Hubble's photomosaic with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.. (center) Hubble's crisp bird's-eye view clearly shows the ray pattern of bright dust ejected out of the crater over one billion years ago, when an asteroid larger than a mile across slammed into the Moon. Hubble can resolve features as small as 600 feet across in the terraced walls of the crater, and the hummock-like blanket of material blasted out by the meteor impact. (lower right) A close-up view of Copernicus' terraced walls. Hubble can resolve features as small as 280 feet across. Credit: John Caldwell (York University, Ontario), Alex Storrs (STScI), and NASA

  18. Introducing the Moon's Orbital Eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    I present a novel way to introduce the lunar orbital eccentricity in introductory astronomy courses. The Moon is perhaps the clearest illustration of the general orbital elements such as inclination, ascending node, eccentricity, perigee, and so on. Furthermore, I like the students to discover astronomical phenomena for themselves, by means of a guided exercise, rather than just telling them the facts.1 The inclination and nodes may be found by direct observation, monitoring carefully the position of the Moon among the stars. Even the regression of the nodes may be discovered in this way2 To find the eccentricity from students' observations is also possible,3 but that requires considerable time and effort. if a whole class should discover it in a short time, here is a method more suitable for a one-day class or home assignment. The level I aim at is, more or less, advanced high school or first-year college students. I assume them to be acquainted with celestial coordinates and the lunar phases, and to be able to use algebra and trigonometry.

  19. The Tethered Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Lupu, Roxana Elena; Dubrovolskis, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    A reasonable initial condition on Earth after the Moonforming impact is that it begins as a hot global magma ocean1,2. We therefore begin our study with the mantle as a liquid ocean with a surface temperature on the order of 3000- 4000 K at a time some 100-1000 years after the impact, by which point we can hope that early transients have settled down. A 2nd initial condition is a substantial atmosphere, 100-1000 bars of H2O and CO2, supplemented by smaller amounts of CO, H2, N2, various sulfur-containing gases, and a suite of geochemical volatiles evaporated from the magma. Third, we start the Moon with its current mass at the relevant Roche limit. The 4th initial condition is the angular momentum of the Earth-Moon system. Canonical models hold this constant, whilst some recent models begin with considerably more angular momentum than is present today. Here we present a ruthlessly simplified model of Earth's cooling magmasphere based on a full-featured atmosphere and including tidal heating by the newborn Moon. Thermal blanketing by H2O-CO2 atmospheres slows cooling of a magma ocean. Geochemical volatiles - chiefly S, Na, and Cl - raise the opacity of the magma ocean's atmosphere and slow cooling still more. We assume a uniform mantle with a single internal (potential) temperature and a global viscosity. The important "freezing point" is the sharp rheological transition between a fluid carrying suspended crystals and a solid matrix through which fluids percolate. Most tidal heating takes place at this "freezing point" in a gel that is both pliable and viscous. Parameterized convection links the cooling rate to the temperature and heat generation inside the Earth. Tidal heating is a major effect. Tidal dissipation in the magma ocean is described by viscosity. The Moon is entwined with Earth by the negative feedback between thermal blanketing and tidal heating that comes from the temperature-dependent viscosity of the magma ocean. Because of this feedback, the rate

  20. Martian Moon Blocks Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the transit of Mars' moon Phobos across the Sun. It is made up of images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the morning of the 45th martian day, or sol, of its mission. This observation will help refine our knowledge of the orbit and position of Phobos. Other spacecraft may be able to take better images of Phobos using this new information. This event is similar to solar eclipses seen on Earth in which our Moon passes in front of the Sun. The images were taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

  1. Finite element modelling for the investigation of edge effect in acoustic micro imaging of microelectronic packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen Lee, Chean; Zhang, Guang-Ming; Harvey, David M.; Ma, Hong-Wei; Braden, Derek R.

    2016-02-01

    In acoustic micro imaging of microelectronic packages, edge effect is often presented as artifacts of C-scan images, which may potentially obscure the detection of defects such as cracks and voids in the solder joints. The cause of edge effect is debatable. In this paper, a 2D finite element model is developed on the basis of acoustic micro imaging of a flip-chip package using a 230 MHz focused transducer to investigate acoustic propagation inside the package in attempt to elucidate the fundamental mechanism that causes the edge effect. A virtual transducer is designed in the finite element model to reduce the coupling fluid domain, and its performance is characterised against the physical transducer specification. The numerical results showed that the under bump metallization (UBM) structure inside the package has a significant impact on the edge effect. Simulated wavefields also showed that the edge effect is mainly attributed to the horizontal scatter, which is observed in the interface of silicon die-to-the outer radius of solder bump. The horizontal scatter occurs even for a flip-chip package without the UBM structure.

  2. Applications of synchrotron-based micro-imaging techniques for the analysis of Cultural Heritage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cotte, Marine; Chilida, Javier; Walter, Philippe; Taniguchi, Yoko; Susini, Jean

    2009-01-29

    The analysis of cultural Heritage objects is often technically challenging. When analyzing micro-fragments, the amount of matter is usually very tiny, hence requiring sensitive techniques. These samples, in particular painting fragments, may present multi-layered structures, with layer thickness of {approx}10 {mu}m. It leads to favor micro-imaging techniques, with a good lateral resolution (about one micrometer), that manage the discriminative study of each layer. Besides, samples are usually very complex in term of chemistry, as they are made of mineral and organic matters, amorphous and crystallized phases, major and minor elements. Accordingly, a multi-modal approach is generally essential to solve the chemical complexity of such hybrid materials. Different examples will be given, to illustrate the various possibilities of synchrotron-based micro-imaging techniques, such as micro X-ray diffraction, micro X-ray fluorescence, micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro FTIR spectroscopy. Focus will be made on paintings, but the whole range of museum objects (going from soft matter like paper or wood to hard matter like metal and glass) will be also considered.

  3. Laser 'Footprints' on the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    As the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) circles the moon, a sophisticated instrument bounces laser light off the moon's surface 28 times per second. An array of five sensors arranged in an X-shap...

  4. 2017 Eclipse and the Moon's Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar eclipses can only occur at New Moon, when the Moon is between the Earth and the Sun. But not every New Moon produces an eclipse. The Moon's orbit is slightly tilted, and as seen in this anima...

  5. Touching the Moon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLinden, Mike

    1995-01-01

    The Progressive Tactile Timetable was developed to enable pupils with visual impairments and severe learning difficulties to progress from use of concrete symbols (objects of reference) to the abstract tactile Moon code (a simplified raised line version of the Roman print alphabet). A case study illustrates its application with an adolescent with…

  6. The Moon Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Pat; Leddy, Diana; Johnson, Lindy; Biggam, Sue; Locke, Suzan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a first-grade research project that incorporates trade books and challenges misconceptions. Educators see the power of their students' wonder at work in their classrooms on a daily basis. This wonder must be nourished by students' own experiences--observing the moon on a crystal clear night--as well as by having…

  7. The Earth & Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. The Galileo spacecraft took the images in 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The image shows a partial view of the Earth centered on the Pacific Ocean about latitude 20 degrees south. The west coast of South America can be observed as well as the Caribbean; swirling white cloud patterns indicate storms in the southeast Pacific. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the Moon is the Tycho impact basin. The lunar dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins. This picture contains same scale and relative color/albedo images of the Earth and Moon. False colors via use of the 1-micron filter as red, 727-nm filter as green, and violet filter as blue. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  8. Crescent Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon -- the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft -- was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The Moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. In the picture are eastern Asia, the western Pacific Ocean and part of the Arctic. Voyager 1 was directly above Mt. Everest (on the night side of the planet at 25 degrees north latitude) when the picture was taken. The photo was made from three images taken through color filters, then processed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Image Processing Lab. Because the Earth is many times brighter than the Moon, the Moon was artificially brightened by a factor of three relative to the Earth by computer enhancement so that both bodies would show clearly in the print. Voyager 2 was launched Aug. 20, 1977, followed by Voyager 1 on Sept. 5, 1977, en route to encounters at Jupiter in 1979 and Saturn in 1980 and 1981. JPL manages the Voyager mission for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  9. The Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. The Galileo spacecraft took the images in 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The image shows a partial view of the Earth centered on the Pacific Ocean about latitude 20 degrees south. The west coast of South America can be observed as well as the Caribbean; swirling white cloud patterns indicate storms in the southeast Pacific. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the Moon is the Tycho impact basin. The lunar dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins. This picture contains same scale and relative color/albedo images of the Earth and Moon. False colors via use of the 1-micron filter as red, 727-nm filter as green, and violet filter as blue. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. Does the Moon Spin?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Robert; Simpson, Frances

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the question, "Does the Moon spin?", and show how the question is investigated. They emphasise the importance of the process by which people work out what they know, by "learning from the inside out." They stress that those involved in science education have to challenge current conceptions and ideas, making…

  11. The Moon Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Willmore, Sandra; Smith, Walter S.

    2006-01-01

    What Australia, Alaska, Qatar, Indiana, and Ohio have in common is the authentic writing More Observations Of Nature (MOON) project. In this unique project, teachers from these disparate geographic locations teamed up to instruct children in grades four through eight via the internet on a nearly universally challenging subject for teachers in the…

  12. Moon - North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the north polar region of the Moon was obtained by Galileo's camera during the spacecraft's flyby of the Earth-Moon system on December 7 and 8, 1992. The north pole is to the lower right of the image. The view in the upper left is toward the horizon across the volcanic lava plains of Mare Imbrium. The prominent crater with the central peak is Pythagoras, an impact crater some 130 kilometers (80 miles) in diameter. The image was taken at a distance of 121,000 kilometers (75,000 miles) from the Moon through the violet filter of Galileo's imaging system. According to team scientists, the viewing geometry provided by the spacecraft's pass over the north pole and the low sun-angle illumination provide a unique opportunity to assess the geologic relationships among the smooth plains, cratered terrain and impact ejecta deposits in this region of the Moon. JPL manages the Galileo Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  13. The tethered Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Lupu, Roxana; Dobrovolskis, Anthony; Sleep, Norman H.

    2015-10-01

    We address the thermal history of the Earth after the Moon-forming impact, taking tidal heating and thermal blanketing by the atmosphere into account. The atmosphere sets an upper bound of ∼100 W/m2 on how quickly the Earth can cool. The liquid magma ocean cools over 2-10 Myr, with longer times corresponding to high angular-momentum events. Tidal heating is focused mostly in mantle materials that are just beginning to freeze. The atmosphere's control over cooling sets up a negative feedback between viscosity-dependent tidal heating and temperature-dependent viscosity of the magma ocean. While the feedback holds, evolution of the Moon's orbit is limited by the modest radiative cooling rate of Earth's atmosphere. Orbital evolution is orders of magnitude slower than in conventional constant Q models, which promotes capture by resonances. The evection resonance is encountered early, when the Earth is molten. Capture by the evection resonance appears certain but unlikely to generate much eccentricity because it is encountered early when the Earth is molten and Q⊕ ≫Q☾. Tidal dissipation in the Earth becomes more efficient (Q⊕ ≪Q☾) later when the Moon is between ∼ 20R⊕ and ∼ 40R⊕. If lunar eccentricity grew great, this was when it did so, perhaps setting the table for some other process to leave its mark on the inclination of the Moon.

  14. [The moon and delivery].

    PubMed

    Romero Martínez, Jorge; Guerrero Guijo, Inmaculada; Artura Serrano, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    In different cultures and mythologies, the moon is related with fertility, pregnancy and delivery. Professional obstetricians also notice an increase in care demands on the days when the moon is full. Many studies have been made which try to correlate delivery processes to the phases of the moon with contradictory results. The authors plan to try to find any basis in fact which support these popular beliefs and to discover if lunar phases bear an influence on the distribution of deliveries. They carried out a descriptive transversal study on a total of 1715 unassisted deliveries over the course of ten complete lunar cycles. The authors have carried out a descriptive and inferential analysis, a one way ANOVA and a Kruskal Wallis test on their three data bases which are general, primipara and multipara in which they contemplated the total number of deliveries per phase, the mean of each phase, as well as the central day in each phase of the lunar cycle. The differences found in the distribution of deliveries over the four lunar phases, along with the comparison of the means and the comparison of the number of deliveries on the central day in each phase are not statistically significant. The different phases in the lunar cycle and especially the full moon do not appear to have any influence over the distribution of deliveries in this study.

  15. Europe reaches the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    A complex package of tests on new technologies was successfully performed during the cruise to the Moon, while the spacecraft was getting ready for the scientific investigations which will come next. These technologies pave the way for future planetary missions. SMART-1 reached its closest point to the lunar surface so far - its first ‘perilune’ - at an altitude of about 5000 kilometres at 18:48 Central European Time (CET) on 15 November. Just hours before that, at 06:24 CET, SMART-1’s solar-electric propulsion system (or ‘ion engine’) was started up and is now being fired for the delicate manoeuvre that will stabilise the spacecraft in lunar orbit. During this crucial phase, the engine will run almost continuously for the next four days, and then for a series of shorter burns, allowing SMART-1 to reach its final operational orbit by making ever-decreasing loops around the Moon. By about mid-January, SMART-1 will be orbiting the Moon at altitudes between 300 kilometres (over the lunar south pole) and 3000 kilometres (over the lunar north pole), beginning its scientific observations. The main purpose of the first part of the SMART-1 mission, concluding with the arrival at the Moon, was to demonstrate new spacecraft technologies. In particular, the solar-electric propulsion system was tested over a long spiralling trip to the Moon of more than 84 million kilometres. This is a distance comparable to an interplanetary cruise. For the first time ever, gravity-assist manoeuvres, which use the gravitational pull of the approaching Moon, were performed by an electrically-propelled spacecraft. The success of this test is important to the prospects for future interplanetary missions using ion engines. SMART-1 has demonstrated new techniques for eventually achieving autonomous spacecraft navigation. The OBAN experiment tested navigation software on ground computers to determine the exact position and velocity of the spacecraft using images of celestial objects taken

  16. Experience the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.; Benacchio, L.; Boccato, C.

    2011-10-01

    The Moon is, together with the Sun, the very first astronomical object that we experience in our life. As this is an exclusively visual experience, people with visual impairments need a different mode to experience it too. This statement is especially true when events, such as more and more frequent public observations of sky, take place. This is the reason why we are preparing a special package for visual impaired people containing three brand new items: 1. a tactile 3D Moon sphere in Braille with its paper key in Braille. To produce it we used imaging data obtained by NASA's mission Clementine, along with free image processing and 3D rendering software. In order to build the 3D small scale model funding by Europlanet and the Italian Ministry for Research have been used. 2. a multilingual web site for visually impaired users of all ages, on basic astronomy together with an indepth box about the Moon; 3. a book in Braille with the same content of the Web site mentioned above. All the items will be developed with the collaboration of visually impaired people that will check each step of the project and support their comments and criticism to improve it. We are going to test this package during the next International Observe the Moon Night event. After a first testing phase we'll collect all the feedback data in order to give an effective form to the package. Finally the Moon package could be delivered to all those who will demand it for outreach or educational goals.

  17. The interior of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Questions of lunar bulk chemistry are being considered, giving attention to the depletion of the moon in iron and compounds more volatile than iron. Currently four seismic stations are operating on the moon to provide data for the study of the lunar interior. The travel times of seismic waves generated by artificial impacts have been used to determine the structure of the outer 150 km of the moon. New evidence fails to resolve the controversy whether the lunar interior is hot or cold. A schematic cross section of the moon is presented and problems concerning the origin of the moon are considered.

  18. Moons Around Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This series of 10 Hubble Space Telescope images captures several small moons orbiting Saturn. Hubble snapped the five pairs of images while the Earth was just above the ring plane and the Sun below it. The telescope captured a pair of images every 97 minutes as it circled the Earth. Moving out from Saturn, the visible rings are: the broad C Ring, the Cassini Division, and the narrow F Ring.

    The first pair of images shows the large, bright moon Dione, near the middle of the frames. Two smaller moons, Pandora (the brighter one closer to Saturn) and Prometheus, appear as if they're touching the F Ring. In the second frame, Mimas emerges from Saturn's shadow and appears to be chasing Prometheus.

    In the second image pair, Mimas has moved towards the tip of the F Ring. Rhea, another bright moon, has just emerged from behind Saturn. Prometheus, the closest moon to Saturn, has rounded the F Ring's tip and is approaching the planet. The slightly larger moon Epimetheus has appeared.

    The third image pair shows Epimetheus, as a tiny dot just beyond the tip of the F Ring. Prometheus is in the lower right corner. An elongated clump or arc of debris in the F ring is seen as a slight brightening on the far side of this thin ring.

    In the fourth image pair, Epimetheus, in the lower right corner, streaks towards Saturn. The long ring arc can be seen in both frames.

    The fifth image pair again captures Mimas, beyond the tip of the F Ring. The same ring arc is still visible.

    In addition to the satellites, a pair of stars can be seen passing behind the rings, appearing to move towards the lower left due to Saturn's motion across the sky.

    The images were taken Nov. 21, 1995 with Wide Field Planetary Camera-2.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on

  19. Protecting the Moon for research: ILEWG report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    . Cellino Editors), Ad-vances in Space Research, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 1-192, 2006 -7th ILEWG Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon, Toronto Sept 2005, Programme and Proceedings on line at www.ilewg.org, R. Richards et al Editors -6th ILEWG Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon, Udaipur Nov. 2004, Proceedings ( N. Bhandari Editor), Journal Earth System Science, India, 114, No6, Dec 2005, pp. 573-841 -5th ILEWG Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon, Hawaii Nov 2003, Pro-ceedings ILC2005/ICEUM5 (S.M. Durst et al Editors), Vol 108, 1-576 pp, Science and Tech-nology Series, American Astronautical Society, 2004 -'The next steps in exploring deep space -A cosmic study by the IAA', W. Huntress, D. Stetson, R. Farquhar, J. Zimmerman, B. Clark, W. O'Neil, R. Bourke and B. Foing, Acta Astronautica, Vol 58, Issues 6-7, March-April 2006, p302-377 -IAA/ESA workshop on "Next Steps in Exploring Deep Space", ESTEC 22-23 sept. 2003 (B.H. Foing W. Huntress, conveners) Lunar Exploration, Planetary and Space Science, Vol 50, issue 14-15, Dec 2002 (B.H. Foing al) -ESLAB36 symposium on "Earth-like Planets and Moons", 2002, ESA-SP514, pp. 1-356, (B.H.Foing B. Battrick, editors) -'Lunar Exploration 2000', (B.H. Foing, D. Heather, Editors), Adv. Space Research Vol 30, Nr 8, 2002 -'Earth-Moon Relationships', Proceedings of the Conference held in Padova, Italy at the Ac-cademia Galileiana di Scienze Lettere ed Arti, Nov. 2000, (C. Barbieri and F. Rampazzi, Editors), in Earth, Moon , Planets Vol. 85-86, Nos 1-3, pp 1-575, 2001 -4th International Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon, ESTEC, 2000, ESA SP-462 (B.H. Foing M. Perry, editors) -Investing in Space: The Challenge for Europe. Long-Term Space Policy Committee, Second Report, May 1999. ESA-SP-2000 -2nd International Lunar Workshop, held at Kyoto in October 1996, Proceedings, H. Mizutani, editor, Japan Space Forum Publisher, 1997 International Lunar Workshop, 1994 May 31-June 3

  20. Synchrotron micro-imaging of soybean (Glycine max) leaves grown from magnetoprimed seeds - Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, A.; Guruprasad, K. N.; Kataria, S.; Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Sarkar, P. S.; Shripathi, T.; Kashyap, Y.; Sinha, A.

    2016-05-01

    The novel phase contrast technique (PCI) based on refractive index variations has been utilized in this work to image soft tissues like plant leaves. The feasibility study of synchrotron micro-imaging to assess the changes in the soybean leaf vascular structure was conducted for plants grown after magnetic field treatment of seeds. Soybean seeds were pre-treated with Static Magnetic Field of different strengths 150 mT and 200 mT for 1 hour to evaluate the effect of magnetopriming on leaf vascular structures, which has links with plant growth and productivity. The plants emerged after magnetic field treatment on seeds showed enhancement in the growth and leaf parameters. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the leaf venation has been performed using PCI technique to study this enhancement in the leaf structure.

  1. Ferry to the moon

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, G.

    1987-06-01

    Solar-electric propulsion for a fleet of lunar ferry vehicles may allow the creation of a permanent lunar base not long after the turn of the century with greater cost effectiveness than a fleet of chemically powered spacecraft. After delivery by the Space Shuttle to a 300-km earth orbit, the lunar ferry envisioned would travel in spiral trajectory to the moon under the power of 300-kW solar arrays and ten 30-kW Xe-ion engines; each of the solar arrays would be 12 x 61 m long. Each trip between the earth parking orbit and the moon would take about 1 year, so that a fleet of four ferries operating simultaneously could deliver 20 metric tons to a lunar base every 100 days.

  2. Ferry to the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme

    1987-01-01

    Solar-electric propulsion for a fleet of lunar ferry vehicles may allow the creation of a permanent lunar base not long after the turn of the century with greater cost effectiveness than a fleet of chemically powered spacecraft. After delivery by the Space Shuttle to a 300-km earth orbit, the lunar ferry envisioned would travel in spiral trajectory to the moon under the power of 300-kW solar arrays and ten 30-kW Xe-ion engines; each of the solar arrays would be 12 x 61 m long. Each trip between the earth parking orbit and the moon would take about 1 year, so that a fleet of four ferries operating simultaneously could deliver 20 metric tons to a lunar base every 100 days.

  3. Uranus moon - Titania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The terminator region of Titania, one of Uranus' five large moons, was captured in this Voyager 2 image obtained in the early morning hours of Jan. 24, 1986. Voyager was about 500,000 kilometers (300,000 miles) from Titania and inbound toward closest approach. This clear-filter, narrow-angle view is along the terminator -- the line between the sunlit and darkened parts of the moon. The low-angle illumination shows the shape of the surface very clearly. Among the features visible are long linear valleys perhaps 50-100 km (30-60 mi) wide and several hundred km (or mi) long. At least two directions of faulting are visible, as are many circular impact craters attributed to cosmic debris. The resolution of this image is about 9 km (6 mi). The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  4. The Tethered Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K.; Lupu, R.; Dobrovolskis, A.

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic collisions between terrestrial planets resemble somewhat the life cycle of the phoenix: worlds collide, are consumed in flame, and after the debris has cleared, shiny new worlds emerge aglow with possibilities. And glow they do, for they are molten. How brightly they glow, and for how long, is determined by their atmospheres and their moons. A reasonable initial condition on Earth after the Moon-forming impact is that it begins as a hot global magma ocean. We therefore begin our study with the mantle as a liquid ocean with a surface temperature on the order of 3000-4000 K at a time some 100-1000 years after the impact, by which point we can hope that early transients have settled down.

  5. The moon in heiligenschein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildey, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of 25 photometric digital images of the moon has been carried out to obtain a single image in a new mapping parameter, the Heiligenschein exponent. The data necessarily represent a range of lunar phases, but all are within 10 hours of full moon. The new parameter characterizes the rate at which lunar features brighten as their local phase angles approach zero. Although considerable contrast is present in this parameter, there is only a small correlation with normal albedo. In particular, the large albedo difference between maria and highlands is not simply reflected in Heiligenschein differences, which are larger within each category of terrain than the difference between the Heiligenschein averages of each. A correlation with age may be present in both the maria and the highlands, but its determination will require separation into distinct geochemical provinces. Copyright ?? 1978 AAAS.

  6. Babies and the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toepker, Terrence P.

    2000-02-01

    ``More babies are born under a full moon than at any other time.'' Many of us have heard this assertion, and a few years ago I tried to get data that would support it. The note ``A Lesson in Curve Fitting'' by Scott Calvin (Phys. Teach. 37, 340, Sept. 1999) provoked me to pass some of the data on to readers of The Physics Teacher.

  7. The New Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrhenius, G.

    1998-01-01

    The late heavy bombardment of the Moon extends in time to about 3.8 Ga and continues to about 3.5 Ga with decreasing frequency of recorded impacts on the Moon. It has been generally assumed that this phenomenon was due to an invasion of the inner solar system by a swarm of asteroidal-sized objects that hit the Moon and all of the terrestrial planets with severeness in proportion to their gravitation. The extension of the record on Earth, and more fragmentarily on Mars, into this time frame demonstrates a lack of the predicted devastating effects. The sedimentary record on Earth consists of segments of undisturbed laminated banded-iron formations that contain traces of what appears as biochemically evolved microbial life. This record reaches back in time beyond 3.86 Ga The martian igneous rock record indicates a crystallization age of 4.5 Ga, followed by shock events but without signs of remelting in late bombardment catastrophes. These observations suggest, as one possibility, a local source of bodies in lunar orbit that coalesced with the Moon. Alternatively, solar-system-wide impacts may have been sufficiently sporadic to have escaped recording in currently studied sedimentary sequences on Earth. The latter alternative would have to be coupled with an assumption of rapid recolonization of the hydrosphere by life. It would than have arisen anew after each sterilizing impact or emerged from protected survival niches. These are speculations about of the absence of a recorded late planetary impact period. Current experiments that aim at resolution of this problem will be discussed.

  8. Moon - False Color Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This false-color mosaic was constructed from a series of 53 images taken through three spectral filters by Galileo's imaging system as the spacecraft flew over the northern regions of the Moon on December 7, 1992. The part of the Moon visible from Earth is on the left side in this view. The color mosaic shows compositional variations in parts of the Moon's northern hemisphere. Bright pinkish areas are highlands materials, such as those surrounding the oval lava-filled Crisium impact basin toward the bottom of the picture. Blue to orange shades indicate volcanic lava flows. To the left of Crisium, the dark blue Mare Tranquillitatis is richer in titanium than the green and orange maria above it. Thin mineral-rich soils associated with relatively recent impacts are represented by light blue colors; the youngest craters have prominent blue rays extending from them. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the exploration of the Jupiter system in 1995-97, is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  9. Moon's North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Mariner 10 was launched on November 3, 1973, 12:45 am PST, from Cape Canaveral on an Atlas/Centaur rocket (a reconditioned Intercontinental Ballistic Missile - ICBM). Within 12 hours of launch the twin cameras were turned on and several hundred pictures of both the Earth and the Moon were acquired over the following days.

    In this unusual view eastern Mare Frigor is near the center of the disc, while Mare Crisiumis the large circular feature near the lower right limb. The heavily cratered region shown in the top of the mosaic shows portions of the Moon not seen from the Earth.

    This mosaic is composed of 22 frames acquired in orange (15), clear (4), UV (2), and UV-polarized (1) wavelengths by the Mariner 10 Spacecraft.

    The Mariner 10 mission is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  10. Jupiter's Moons: Family Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This montage shows the best views of Jupiter's four large and diverse 'Galilean' satellites as seen by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on the New Horizons spacecraft during its flyby of Jupiter in late February 2007. The four moons are, from left to right: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. The images have been scaled to represent the true relative sizes of the four moons and are arranged in their order from Jupiter.

    Io, 3,640 kilometers (2,260 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 03:50 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles). The original image scale was 13 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Io coordinates 6 degrees south, 22 degrees west. Io is notable for its active volcanism, which New Horizons has studied extensively.

    Europa, 3,120 kilometers (1,938 miles) in diameter, was imaged at 01:28 Universal Time on February 28 from a range of 3 million kilometers (1.8 million miles). The original image scale was 15 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Europa coordinates 6 degrees south, 347 degrees west. Europa's smooth, icy surface likely conceals an ocean of liquid water. New Horizons obtained data on Europa's surface composition and imaged subtle surface features, and analysis of these data may provide new information about the ocean and the icy shell that covers it.

    New Horizons spied Ganymede, 5,262 kilometers (3,268 miles) in diameter, at 10:01 Universal Time on February 27 from 3.5 million kilometers (2.2 million miles) away. The original scale was 17 kilometers per pixel, and the image is centered at Ganymede coordinates 6 degrees south, 38 degrees west. Ganymede, the largest moon in the solar system, has a dirty ice surface cut by fractures and peppered by impact craters. New Horizons' infrared observations may provide insight into the composition of the moon's surface and interior.

    Callisto, 4,820 kilometers (2,995 miles) in diameter, was imaged

  11. Impact origin of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, W.L.

    1998-12-31

    A few years after the Apollo flights to the Moon, it became clear that all of the existing theories on the origin of the Moon would not satisfy the growing body of constraints which appeared with the data gathered by the Apollo flights. About the same time, researchers began to realize that the inner (terrestrial) planets were not born quietly -- all had evidences of impacts on their surfaces. This fact reinforced the idea that the planets had formed by the accumulation of planetesimals. Since the Earth`s moon is unique among the terrestrial planets, a few researchers realized that perhaps the Moon originated in a singular event; an event that was quite probable, but not so probable that one would expect all the terrestrial planets to have a large moon. And thus was born the idea that a giant impact formed the Moon. Impacts would be common in the early solar system; perhaps a really large impact of two almost fully formed planets of disparate sizes would lead to material orbiting the proto-earth, a proto-moon. This idea remained to be tested. Using a relatively new, but robust, method of doing the hydrodynamics of the collision (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics), the author and his colleagues (W. Benz, Univ. of Arizona, and A.G.W. Cameron, Harvard College Obs.) did a large number of collision simulations on a supercomputer. The author found two major scenarios which would result in the formation of the Moon. The first was direct formation; a moon-sized object is boosted into orbit by gravitational torques. The second is when the orbiting material forms a disk, which, with subsequent evolution can form the Moon. In either case the physical and chemical properties of the newly formed Moon would very neatly satisfy the physical and chemical constraints of the current Moon. Also, in both scenarios the surface of the Earth would be quite hot after the collision. This aspect remains to be explored.

  12. The Moon Project: 1994 - 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.

    2013-04-01

    For over ten years I've been looking for the Moon and marking down my observations in my journals. One of my goals has been to see what I can teach myself, strictly by looking. I don't research the Moon. The following is a glimpse into the development of the Moon Project and also a hint of where it is heading next.

  13. Moon Color Visualizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    These color visualizations of the Moon were obtained by the Galileo spacecraft as it left the Earth after completing its first Earth Gravity Assist. The image on the right was acquired at 6:47 p.m. PST Dec. 8, 1990, from a distance of almost 220,000 miles, while that on the left was obtained at 9:35 a.m. PST Dec. 9, at a range of more than 350,000 miles. On the right, the nearside of the Moon and about 30 degrees of the far side (left edge) are visible. In the full disk on the left, a little less than half the nearside and more than half the far side (to the right) are visible. The color composites used images taken through the violet and two near infrared filters. The visualizations depict spectral properties of the lunar surface known from analysis of returned samples to be related to composition or weathering of surface materials. The greenish-blue region at the upper right in the full disk and the upper part of the right hand picture is Oceanus Procellarum. The deeper blue mare regions here and elsewhere are relatively rich in titanium, while the greens, yellows and light oranges indicate basalts low in titanium but rich in iron and magnesium. The reds (deep orange in the right hand picture) are typically cratered highlands relatively poor in titanium, iron and magnesium. In the full disk picture on the left, the yellowish area to the south is part of the newly confirmed South Pole Aitken basin, a large circular depression some 1,200 miles across, perhaps rich in iron and magnesium. Analysis of Apollo lunar samples provided the basis for calibration of this spectral map; Galileo data, in turn, permit broad extrapolation of the Apollo based composition information, reaching ultimately to the far side of the Moon.

  14. SMART-1/AMIE Camera Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josset, J.-L.; Beauvivre, S.; Cerroni, P.; de Sanctis, M. C.; Pinet, P.; Chevrel, S.; Langevin, Y.; Barucci, M. A.; Plancke, P.; Koschny, D.; Almeida, M.; Sodnik, Z.; Mancuso, S.; Hofmann, B. A.; Muinonen, K.; Shevchenko, V.; Shkuratov, Yu.; Ehrenfreund

    2007-03-01

    The Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment (AMIE), on board ESA SMART-1, the first European mission to the Moon, is an imaging system with scientific, technical and public outreach oriented objectives. This paper presents the first results obtained during

  15. SMART-1/AMIE Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josset, J.-L.; Beauvivre, S.; Cerroni, P.; de Sanctis, M. C.; Pinet, P.; Chevrel, S.; Langevin, Y.; Barucci, M. A.; Plancke, P.; Koschny, D.; Almeida, M.; Sodnik, Z.; Mancuso, S.; Hofmann, B. A.; Muinonen, K.; Shevchenko, V.; Shkuratov, Y.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Foing, B. H.

    2006-03-01

    The Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment (AMIE), on board ESA SMART-1, the first European mission to the Moon (launched on 27th September 2003), is a camera system with scientific, technical and public outreach oriented objectives.

  16. Does Vesta Have Moons?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, L. A.; Sykes, M.; Joy, S.; Tricarico, P.; O'Brien, D.; Li, J. Y.; Mutchler, M.; Memarsadeghi, N.; Safavi, H.; Gutierrez-Marques, P.; Nathues, A.; Sierks, H.; Schroder, S.; Polansky, C.; Jacobson, R.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Rayman, M.; Weinstein-Weiss, S.; Palmer, E.

    2011-01-01

    Previous searches for moons around Vesta have found nothing to an upper limit of 22.5 magnitude, that corresponds to 44 +/- 4 m diameter assuming the same albedo as Vesta. The Dawn mission's approach phase has dedicated satellite search observations consisting of two mosaic sequences bracketing the first observations of a complete rotation of Vesta scheduled for early July, 2011. In addition, we use the approach optical navigation image sequences for initial satellite searches. We will report any findings from these observations, and upper limits of magnitude and size.

  17. Magmatism on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, Chloé; Thorey, Clément; Pinel, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Volcanism on the Moon is dominated by large fissure eruptions of mare basalt and seems to lack large, central vent, shield volcanoes as observed on all the other terrestrial planets. Large shield volcanoes are constructed over millions to several hundreds of millions of years. On the Moon, magmas might not have been buoyant enough to allow for a prolonged activity at the same place over such lengths of time. The lunar crust was indeed formed by flotation of light plagioclase minerals on top of the lunar magma ocean, resulting in a particularly light and relatively thick crust. This low-density crust acted as a barrier for the denser primary mantle melts. This is particularly evident in the fact that subsequent mare basalts erupted primarily within large impact basins where at least part of the crust was removed by the impact process. Thus, the ascent of lunar magmas might have been limited by their reduced buoyancy, leading to storage zone formation deep in the lunar crust. Further magma ascent to shallower depths might have required local or regional tensional stresses. Here, we first review evidences of shallow magmatic intrusions within the lunar crust of the Moon that consist in surface deformations presenting morphologies consistent with models of magma spreading at depth and deforming an overlying elastic layer. We then study the preferential zones of magma storage in the lunar crust as a function of the local and regional state of stress. Evidences of shallow intrusions are often contained within complex impact craters suggesting that the local depression caused by the impact exerted a strong control on magma ascent. The depression is felt over a depth equivalent to the crater radius. Because many of these craters have a radius less than 30km, the minimum crust thickness, this suggests that the magma was already stored in deeper intrusions before ascending at shallower depth. All the evidences for intrusions are also preferentially located in the internal

  18. More Saturnian Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-10-01

    Saturn takes the lead Following the discovery of at least four additional moons of that planet, Saturn has again taken the lead as the planet with the greatest number of known natural satellites. A corresponding announcement was made today by an international team of astronomers [1] at a meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) in Pasadena (California, USA). The four new faint bodies were spotted during observations in August-September 2000 at several astronomical telescopes around the world. Subsequent orbital calculations have indicated that these objects are almost certainly new satellites of the giant planet. Two Saturnian moons found at La Silla ESO PR Photo 29a/00 ESO PR Photo 29a/00 [Preview - JPEG: 263 x 400 pix - 26k] [Normal - JPEG: 525 x 800 pix - 93k] ESO PR Photo 29b/00 ESO PR Photo 29b/00 [Preview - JPG: 289 x 400 pix - 43k] [Normal - JPG: 578 x 800 pix - 432k] ESO PR Photo 29c/00 ESO PR Photo 29c/00 [Animated GIF: 330 x 400 pix - 208k] Captions : The photos show the discovery images of two new Saturnian moons, as registered on August 7, 2000, with the Wide-Field Imager (WFI) camera at the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory. Photo PR 29a/00 displays the faint image of the newly discovered moon S/2000 S 1 in the lower right corner of the field. A spiral galaxy is seen in the upper left corner of this photo. The other objects are (background) stars in the Milky Way. Photo PR 29b/00 is a combination of three successive WFI exposures of the second moon, S/2000 S 2 . Because of its motion, there are three images (to the left). Photo PR 29c/00 is an animated GIF image of the same three exposures that demonstrates this motion. Technical details are found below. The observations of the first two objects are described on a Circular of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) that was issued today [2]. The images of these new moons were first registered on exposures made on August 7, 2000

  19. The Moon as a photometric calibration standard for microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdorf, Martin; Buehler, Stefan A.; Lang, Theresa; Michel, Simon; Hans, Imke

    2016-08-01

    Instruments on satellites for Earth observation on polar orbits usually employ a two-point calibration technique, in which deep space and an onboard calibration target provide two reference flux levels. As the direction of the deep-space view is in general close to the celestial equator, the Moon sometimes moves through the field of view and introduces an unwelcome additional signal. One can take advantage of this intrusion, however, by using the Moon as a third flux standard, and this has actually been done for checking the lifetime stability of sensors operating at visible wavelengths. As the disk-integrated thermal emission of the Moon is less well known than its reflected sunlight, this concept can in the microwave range only be used for stability checks and intercalibration. An estimate of the frequency of appearances of the Moon in the deep-space view, a description of the limiting factors of the measurement accuracy and models of the Moon's brightness, and a discussion of the benefits from complementing the naturally occurring appearances of the Moon with dedicated spacecraft maneuvers show that it would be possible to detect photometric lifetime drifts of a few percent with just two measurements. The pointing accuracy is the most crucial factor for the value of this method. Planning such observations in advance would be particularly beneficial, because it allows observing the Moon at well-defined phase angles and putting it at the center of the field of view. A constant phase angle eliminates the need for a model of the Moon's brightness when checking the stability of an instrument. With increasing spatial resolution of future microwave sensors another question arises, viz. to what extent foreground emission from objects other than the Moon will contaminate the flux entering the deep-space view, which is supposed to originate exclusively in the cosmic microwave background. We conclude that even the brightest discreet sources have flux densities below the

  20. Moon's Pink Mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.; Taylor, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Since the 2010 remote-sensing discovery of lunar regolith rich in Mg-Al spinel on the rims and central peaks of impact craters and inner rings of basins on the Moon, researchers have been designing experiments to better understand the origin and formation history of spinel-rich rocks and what they mean for the construction of the lunar crust. The newly detected rock type is referred to as pink spinel anorthosite, or PSA, due to high plagioclase and low abundance (<5%) of mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene. Two recent studies tested specific hypotheses of PSA production on the Moon. Juliane Gross (American Museum of Natural History and the Lunar and Planetary Institute, LPI) and colleagues at the LPI, University of Hawaii, and NASA Johnson Space Center conducted experiments to model the crystallization of spinel in impact melts from impact events. Tabb Prissel (Brown University) and colleagues from Brown conducted experiments to model a plutonic formation of spinel from magma-wallrock interactions. In each study, comparisons of the remote sensing data with Apollo lunar samples or lunar meteorites were crucial for testing the PSA formation hypotheses with the experimental results. Definitive answers aren't in yet. PSA could form from impact melting of the right target rocks. Equally likely is PSA formation by reaction of basaltic magma and crust. One big unknown is the effect space weathering has in determining the amount of spinel in the PSA..

  1. Martian Moon Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Caption: 'Close up of the Martian Moon Phobos taken by Viking Orbiter 1 on February 20, 1977. Viking Orbiter 1 took this close-up photo of the Martian satellite phobos from a range of 120 kilometers at 5:15 p.m. (PST) February 20, 1977. That is the closest range at which any spacecraft has photographed the tiny satellite. At that range, Phobos is too large to be captured in a single frame. This picture covers an area 3 by 3.5 kilometers across. However, the high relative speed of Orbiter 1 and Phobos caused some image smear so that the smallest surface feature identifiable is between 10 and 15 meters (32 and 49 feet) across. Special processing in JPL's Image Processing Lab should improve resolution. The picture shows a region in the northern hemisphere of Phobos that has striations and is heavily cratered. The striations, which appear to be grooves rather than crater chains, are about 100 to 200 meters wide and tens of kilometers long. Craters range in size from 10 meters to 1.2 kilometers in diameter. The surface of Phobos appears similar to the highland regions of the Moon which also was heavily cratered and ancient terrain. The dark region above the limb of Phobos is an artifact of processing and does not indicate an atmosphere.

  2. Jupiter's Hot, Mushy Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. Observations by instruments on the Galileo spacecraft and on telescopes atop Mauna Kea in Hawai'i indicate that lava flows on Io are surprisingly hot, over 1200 oC and possibly as much as 1300 oC; a few areas might have lava flows as hot as 1500 oC. Such high temperatures imply that the lava flows are composed of rock that formed by a very large amount of melting of Io's mantle. This has led Laszlo Keszthelyi and Alfred S. McEwen of the University of Arizona and me to reawaken an old hypothesis that suggests that the interior of Io is a partially-molten mush of crystals and magma. The idea, which had fallen out of favor for a decade or two, explains high-temperature hot spots, mountains, calderas, and volcanic plains on Io. If correct, Io gives us an opportunity to study processes that operate in huge, global magma systems, which scientists believe were important during the early history of the Moon and Earth, and possibly other planetary bodies as well. Though far from proven, the idea that Io has a ocean of mushy magma beneath its crust can be tested with measurements by future spacecraft.

  3. How High Is the Moon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Robert S.

    1996-01-01

    Presents background information on the method used by Hipparchus to determine the distance between the earth and the moon. Describes student activities that employ Hipparchus's Method and Aristarchus's Method for determining the relative distance of the sun and the moon from the earth and Eratosthenes's Method for finding the circumference of the…

  4. Full Moon and Empty Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauroesch, T. J.; Edinger, J. R., Jr.; Lauroesch, J. T.

    1996-01-01

    The hypothesis that weather is influenced by the occurrence of the full moon has been explored with respect to cloud coverage. Statistical analysis of 44 years of data has shown no apparent correlation between a clear sky and the occurrence of the full moon.

  5. The Moon in Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Troland, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    The Moon's cycle of phases is one of the most familiar natural phenomena, yet also one of the most misunderstood. This probably comes as no surprise, but research has found that a significant segment of the population, including both elementary students and teachers, mistakenly believes that the Moon's phases are caused by the shadow of the Earth.…

  6. Field Trip to the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the geology of a single area of the Moon, the Imbrium Basin, and shows how geologists have combined basic geologic principles with evidence collected by the Apollo missions to learn more about the history of the Moon as a whole. In this article, the author discusses lunar geology teaching tips and mapping the Imbrium Basin…

  7. EUVE observations of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. R.; McDonald, J. S.; Boyd, W. T.

    1993-03-01

    During its all-sky survey, the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite observed the Moon several times at first and last quarters, and once near the Dec. 10, 1992 lunar eclipse. We present a preliminary reduction and analysis of this data, in the form of EUV images of the Moon and derived albedos.

  8. SMART-1 leaves Earth on a long journey to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    s performance, and its interactions with the spacecraft and its environment, will be closely monitored by the Spacecraft Potential, Electron & Dust Experiment (SPEDE) and the Electric Propulsion Diagnostic Package (EPDP) to detect possible side-effects or interactions with natural electric and magnetic phenomena in nearby space. A promising technology, Solar Electric Primary Propulsion could be applied to numerous interplanetary missions in the Solar System, reducing the size and cost of propulsion systems while increasing manoeuvring flexibility and the mass available for scientific instrumentation. In addition to Solar Electric Primary Propulsion, SMART-1 will demonstrate a wide range of new technologies like a Li-Ion modular battery package; new-generation high-data-rate deep space communications in X and Ka bands with the X/Ka-band Telemetry and Telecommand Experiment (KaTE); a computer technique enabling spacecraft to determine their position autonomously in space, which is the first step towards fully autonomous spacecraft navigation. Digging for the Moon’s remaining secrets In April 2005 SMART-1 will begin the second phase of its mission, due to last at least six months and dedicated to the study of the Moon from a near polar orbit. For more than 40 years, the Moon has been visited by automated space probes and by nine manned expeditions, six of which landed on its surface. Nevertheless, much remains to be learnt about our closest neighbour, and SMART-1’s payload will conduct observations never performed before in such detail. The Advanced/Moon Micro-Imaging Experiment (AMIE) miniaturised CCD camera will provide high-resolution and high-sensitivity imagery of the surface, even in poorly lit polar areas. The highly compact SIR infrared spectrometer will map lunar materials and look for water and carbon dioxide ice in permanently shadowed craters. The Demonstration Compact Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (D-CIXS) will provide the first global chemical map of the Moon and

  9. The concept and the variants of the activities deployment on the Moon research and exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Victor; Lukiyashchenko, Vasily; Uspenskiy, Georgy; Tselin, Andrey

    The article presents the concept and the variants of the advanced Lunar program realization for the period up to 2050, oriented to the Moon investigation and its further exploration. The basic problems are considered decided by space and Lunar means for the Moon study, their creation technical problems as well as the preliminary technical and economical cost estimations of Lunar research and exploration phases.

  10. Rationale and Roadmap for Moon Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.; ILEWG Team

    We discuss the different rationale for Moon exploration. This starts with areas of scientific investigations: clues on the formation and evolution of rocky planets, accretion and bombardment in the inner solar system, comparative planetology processes (tectonic, volcanic, impact cratering, volatile delivery), records astrobiology, survival of organics; past, present and future life. The rationale includes also the advancement of instrumentation: Remote sensing miniaturised instruments; Surface geophysical and geochemistry package; Instrument deployment and robotic arm, nano-rover, sampling, drilling; Sample finder and collector. There are technologies in robotic and human exploration that are a drive for the creativity and economical competitivity of our industries: Mecha-electronics-sensors; Tele control, telepresence, virtual reality; Regional mobility rover; Autonomy and Navigation; Artificially intelligent robots, Complex systems, Man-Machine interface and performances. Moon-Mars Exploration can inspire solutions to global Earth sustained development: In-Situ Utilisation of resources; Establishment of permanent robotic infrastructures, Environmental protection aspects; Life sciences laboratories; Support to human exploration. We also report on the IAA Cosmic Study on Next Steps In Exploring Deep Space, and ongoing IAA Cosmic Studies, ILEWG/IMEWG ongoing activities, and we finally discuss possible roadmaps for robotic and human exploration, starting with the Moon-Mars missions for the coming decade, and building effectively on joint technology developments.

  11. ESA SMART-1 Mission to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.; Racca, Giuseppe D.; Marini, Andrea; Grande, Manuel; Huovelin, Juhani; Josset, Jean-Luc; Keller, Horst Uwe; Nathues, Andreas; Koschny, Detlef; Malkki, Ansi

    SMART-1 is the first of ESA’s Small Missions for Advanced Research and Technology. Its objective is to demonstrate Primary Solar Electric Propulsion for future Cornerstones (such as Bepi-Colombo) and to test new technologies for spacecraft and instruments. The 370 kg spacecraft is to be launched in summer 2003 as Ariane-5 auxiliary passenger and after a 15 month cruise is to orbit the Moon for 6 months with possible extension. SMART-1 will carry out observations during the cruise and in lunar orbit with a science and technology payload (19 kg total mass): a miniaturised high-resolution camera (AMIE) a near-infrared point-spectrometer (SIR) for lunar mineralogy a very compact X-ray spectrometer (D-CIXS) mapping surface elemental composition a Deep Space Communication experiment (KaTE) a radio-science investigations (RSIS) a Laser-Link Experiment an On Board Autonomous Navigation experiment (OBAN) and plasma sensors (SPEDE). SMART-1 will study accretional and bombardment processes that led to the formation of rocky planets and the origin and evolution of the Earth-Moon system. Its science investigations include studies of the chemical composition of the Moon of geophysical processes (volcanism tectonics cratering erosion deposition of ices and volatiles) for comparative planetology and the preparation for future lunar and planetary exploration.

  12. Origin of the moon - The collision hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    By the impact or collision hypothesis, the author means any theory that seeks to derive the Moon-forming material from the outcome of one or more collisions between the Earth and other Sun-orbiting bodies. The impacting body or bodies must be large - larger than the Moon and perhaps even larger than Mars. This definition does not assume that the formation of the Moon was necessarily a singular event. Among proponents of the collision hypothesis, there are those who think that a single event overwhelmingly dominated and those who think that a few (or even many) impact events were needed. There are even versions of the collision hypothesis that are not very different from extreme versions of one of the alternative origin scenarios of capture, fission, and binary accretion! This review proceeds by advancing 10 propositions that the author believes embody the most important issues confronting the theory. These propositions may or may not be true, but they form a framework for asking the right questions.

  13. Martian Moon, Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-362, 16 May 2003

    Mars has two satellites, Phobos and Deimos. In August and September, 1998, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) had four opportunities for close fly-bys of the inner moon, Phobos. This spectacular view, taken from the MOC archives of over 123,000 images, shows the large crater, Stickney, toward the upper right. Grooves, or troughs, radiate outward from Stickney and are known from Viking and Mariner 9 images to be prevalent all over the surface of Phobos. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper right. Another view of Phobos from 1998 can be seen in: MOC2-66, 11 September 1998, 'Phobos.'

  14. The Brick Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Science fiction writers, like Jules Verne in France and Edward Everett Hale in America, had discovered one of the most vital elements in the formula for space travel-a fertile imagination. The first known proposal for a marned-satellite appears in a story by Hale entitled 'The Brick Moon' published in 1899. The story involved a group of young Bostonians who planned to put an artificial satellite into polar orbit for sailors to use to determine longitude accurately and easily. They planned to send a brick satellite into orbit because the satellite would have to withstand fire very well. The Satellite's 37 inhabitants signaled the Earth in morse code by jumping up and down on the outside of the satellite.

  15. Shooting the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This story is about an unlikely NASA mission to the Moon. It was unlikely because it was started with far too little time and too-little money to complete. It was unlikely because it was able to take chances to accept risk of failure. It was unlikely because it was searching for the unthinkable: water-ice on the moon... Figure 1-1: LCROSS Mission. The mission of the Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) was to investigate the possibility of water ice in craters on the Moon s poles. This is certainly an interesting scientific topic in itself, but I intend to focus on the compelling experience of managing the LCROSS Project in the context of this storied Agency. Perhaps most interesting are the implications this story has for managing any development effort, lunar or not, and working a balance to achieve success. NASA is by design a risk-taking agency within the US Government. It could be argued that NASA s purpose in the aerospace community is to take on the really big challenges that either the corporate world can t afford, are not yet profitable endeavors, or are just too risky for private corporations to entertain. However, expectations of the Agency have evolved. A combination of grim human tragedies and some very public cost and schedule overruns have challenged the public s and Congress s tolerance for risk-taking within the Agency. NASA, which is supposed to be in the business of taking risks to do bold, difficult things, has become less and less able to do so within its cost framework. Yet effectively replacing prudent risk management with attempts to "risk-eliminate" is completely unaffordable. So where does risk-taking fit within the Agency, or within private/corporate organizations for that matter? Where astronauts play there is clearly concern about risk. When an organization puts humans in harm s way, it is understandably going to take extra effort to assure nobody gets hurt. Doing so, of course, costs money - a lot of money to pay for

  16. Earthquakes - on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Information obtained with the Apollo lunar seismic stations is discussed. The four types of natural seismic sources that have been identified are described, viz., thermal moonquakes, deep moonquakes, meteoroid impacts, and shallow moonquakes. It is suggested that: (1) the thermal quakes represent the slow cracking and movement of surface rocks; (2) the deep quakes are induced by the tide-generating force of the earth's gravity; (3) the meteoroids responsible for most of the observed impacts are in the mass range from 1 to 100 kg and are clustered in groups near the earth's orbit; and (4) the shallow quakes are similar to intraplate earthquakes and indicate that the moon is as seismically active as the interior regions of the earth's tectonic plates. The structure of the lunar interior as inferred from seismic signals due to both the last three natural sources and 'artificial' impacts of used spacecraft is examined in detail.

  17. Storms and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this 2-millisecond exposure of Jupiter at 04:41:04 UTC on January 24, 2007. The spacecraft was 57 million kilometers (35.3 million miles) from Jupiter, closing in on the giant planet at 41,500 miles (66,790 kilometers) per hour. At right are the moons Io (bottom) and Ganymede; Ganymede's shadow creeps toward the top of Jupiter's northern hemisphere.

    Two of Jupiter's largest storms are visible; the Great Red Spot on the western (left) limb of the planet, trailing the Little Red Spot on the eastern limb, at slightly lower latitude. The Great Red Spot is a 300-year old storm more than twice the size of Earth. The Little Red Spot, which formed over the past decade from the merging of three smaller storms, is about half the size of its older and 'greater' counterpart.

  18. Moon shots for management.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Gary

    2009-02-01

    In May 2008, a group of management scholars and senior executives worked to define an agenda for management during the next 100 years. The so-called renegade brigade, led by Gary Hamel, included academics, such as C.K. Prahalad, Peter Senge, and Jeffrey Pfeffer; new-age thinkers, like James Surowiecki; and progressive CEOs, such as Whole Foods' John Mackey, W.L. Gore's Terri Kelly, and IDEO's Tim Brown. What drew them together was a set of shared beliefs about the importance of management and a sense of urgency about reinventing it for a new era. The group's first task was to compile a roster of challenges that would focus the energies of management innovators around the world. Accordingly, in this article, Hamel (who has set up the Management Lab, a research organization devoted to management innovation) outlines 25 "moon shots"--ambitious goals that managers should strive to achieve and in the process create Management 2.0. Topping the list is the imperative of extending management's responsibilities beyond just creating shareholder value. To do so will require both reconstructing the field's philosophical foundations so that work serves a higher purpose and fully embedding the ideas of community and citizenship into organizations. A number of challenges focus on ameliorating the toxic effects of hierarchy. Others focus on better ways to unleash creativity and capitalize on employees' passions. Still others seek to transcend the limitations of traditional patterns of management thinking. Not all the moon shots are new, but many tackle issues that are endemic in large organizations. Their purpose is to inspire new solutions to long-simmering problems by making every company as genuinely human as the people who work there.

  19. μ-ViP: Customized virtual phantom for quantitative magnetic resonance micro-imaging at high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondeau-Mouro, C.; Kovrlija, R.; Gambarota, G.; Saint-Jalmes, H.

    2017-02-01

    The applications of Magnetic Resonance micro-Imaging (MRμI) cover nowadays a wide range of fields. However few of them present quantitative measurements when the sample of interest changes over time or in case of a long acquisition time. In this domain, two challenges have to be overcome: the introduction of a phantom as a reference signal and the guarantee that this signal is stable over the experiment duration while some conditions such as temperature and/or the moisture are varied. The aim of the present study was to implement a dedicated experimental set-up to generate a virtual phantom (ViP) signal in a vertical-bore 11.7 T NMR spectrometer, equipped with a micro-imaging probe. This study shows that the generation of a micro-imaging-dedicated ViP (μ-ViP) signal is of great benefit for on-line quality control of the spectrometer performance during acquisition in the case of real-time experiments. Thus, μViP represents a step towards improvement of the magnetic resonance signal quantification in small samples.

  20. Moon Mineralogy Mapper: Unlocking the Mysteries of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyon, Cassandra

    2006-01-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) is a state-of-the-art high spectral resolution imaging spectrometer that will characterize and map the mineral composition of the Moon. The M3 instrument will be flown on Chandrayaan-I, the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) mission to be launched in March 2008. The Moon is a cornerstone to understanding early solar system processes. M3 high-resolution compositional maps will dramatically improve our understanding about the early evolution of the terrestrial planets and will provide an assessment of lunar resources at high spatial resolution.

  1. MPST Software: MoonKommand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, John H.; Call, Jared A.; Khanampornpan, Teerapat

    2012-01-01

    This software automatically processes Sally Ride Science (SRS) delivered MoonKAM camera control files (ccf) into uplink products for the GRAIL-A and GRAIL-B spacecraft as part of an education and public outreach (EPO) extension to the Grail Mission. Once properly validated and deemed safe for execution onboard the spacecraft, MoonKommand generates the command products via the Automated Sequence Processor (ASP) and generates uplink (.scmf) files for radiation to the Grail-A and/or Grail-B spacecraft. Any errors detected along the way are reported back to SRS via email. With Moon Kommand, SRS can control their EPO instrument as part of a fully automated process. Inputs are received from SRS as either image capture files (.ccficd) for new image requests, or downlink/delete files (.ccfdl) for requesting image downlink from the instrument and on-board memory management. The Moon - Kommand outputs are command and file-load (.scmf) files that will be uplinked by the Deep Space Network (DSN). Without MoonKommand software, uplink product generation for the MoonKAM instrument would be a manual process. The software is specific to the Moon - KAM instrument on the GRAIL mission. At the time of this writing, the GRAIL mission was making final preparations to begin the science phase, which was scheduled to continue until June 2012.

  2. Detecting thermal phase transitions in corneal stroma by fluorescence micro-imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, P.; Rossi, F.; Ratto, F.; Bruno, I.; Nesi, P.; Pini, R.

    2008-02-01

    Thermal modifications induced in corneal stroma were investigated by the use of fluorescence microscopy. Freshly extracted porcine corneas were immersed for 5 minutes in a water bath at temperatures in the 35-90°C range and stored in formalin. The samples were then sliced in 200-μm-thick transversal sections and analyzed under a stereomicroscope to assess corneal shrinkage. Fluorescence images of the thermally treated corneal samples were acquired using a slow-scan cooled CCD camera, after staining the slices with Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescent dye which allowed to detect fluorescence signal from the whole tissue. All measurements were performed using an inverted epifluorescence microscope equipped with a mercury lamp. The thermally-induced modifications to the corneal specimens were evaluated by studying the grey level distribution in the fluorescence images. For each acquired image, Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and entropy analyses were performed. The spatial distribution of DFT absolute value indicated the spatial orientation of the lamellar planes, while entropy was used to study the image texture, correlated to the stromal structural transitions. As a result, it was possible to indicate a temperature threshold value (62°C) for high thermal damage, resulting in a disorganization of the lamellar planes and in full agreement with the measured temperature for corneal shrinkage onset. Analysis of the image entropy evidenced five strong modifications in stromal architecture at temperatures of ~45°C, 53°C, 57°C, 66°C, 75°C. The proposed procedure proved to be an effective micro-imaging method capable of detecting subtle changes in corneal tissue subjected to thermal treatment.

  3. Space Science in Action: Moon [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This videotape recording answers key questions about the Moon such as, What keeps it revolving around the Earth?, Why do we see only one side of the Moon?, and What is the origin of the Moon? Students learn about how the Moon has been studied throughout history, including recent lunar missions, its phases, eclipses, and how it causes tides on…

  4. Gardening Rates on the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    The narrow-angle camera (LROC NAC) aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has photographed a large percentage of the moon's surface multiple times. By looking for differences between earl...

  5. The Next 'Moon Shot' Moment

    NASA Video Gallery

    For the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy's speech to Congress, when he challenged our nation to land a man on the moon and return him safely to Earth, five NASA Langley employees answered the ...

  6. LRO Takes the Moon's Temperature

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the June 2011 lunar eclipse, scientists will be able to get a unique view of the moon. While the sun is blocked by the Earth, LRO's Diviner instrument will take the temperature on the lunar ...

  7. Where Is the Moon Tonight?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Susann M.; Cornell, Kevin F.; Basista, Beth A.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the activities that fifth-grade students experienced when learning about the moon, its phases, and eclipses. It illustrates how mathematics and science can be integrated to enhance the learning of both. (Contains 3 figures.)

  8. How Is Your Moon Geography?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlathery, Glenn

    1971-01-01

    Describes geography of the moon. A brief history of selenographic history is given and basic features including lunar seas, mountains, craters, rays, and faults are described. Lunar photographs are included. (JM)

  9. The Moon Beams on Westlake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Jeanne E.

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a community's experience with a lunar sample education kit containing actual pieces of moon rocks and soil on loan from NASA. School and community activities including mini-labs, seminars, and lunar sample viewing sessions, are described. (SA)

  10. Hints of a Shrinking Moon?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Newly discovered cliffs in the lunar crust indicate the moon shrank globally in the geologically recent past and might still be shrinking today, according to a team analyzing new images from NASA's...

  11. Lunar Orbiter: Moon and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The worlds first view of the Earth taken by a spacecraft from the vicinity of the Moon. The photo was transmitted to Earth by the United States Lunar Orbiter I and recieved at the NASA tracking station at Robledo de Chavela near Madrid, Spain. This crescent of the Earth was photographed August 23 at 16:35 GMT when the spacecraft was on its 16th orbit and just about to pass behind the Moon. This is the view the astronauts will have when they come around the backside of the Moon and face the Earth. The Earth is shown on the left of the photo with the U.S. east coast in the upper left, southern Europe toward the dark or night side of the Earth, and Antartica at the bottom of the Earth crescent. The surface of the Moon is shown on the right side of the photograph.

  12. More Surprises from the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Noah

    2011-01-01

    Even with the naked eye, the dark, extensive plains of the lunar maria can be clearly seen on the surface of the Moon. The maria formed after meteorite impacts created large craters that later filled with lava flows. Mare volcanism is the dominant type of volcanic activity on the Moon and the lavas are made up of basaltic rocks. However, non-mare volcanic deposits, though rare, have been observed on the lunar nearside. The deposits are distinguished from the maria because they are compositionally more evolved rich in silica, potassium and thorium. The deposits are limited in surface extent and it was unknown whether similar non-mare volcanism occurred at all on the Moon s farside. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Jolliff et al. report using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter images and compositional data to identify the rare occurrence of more compositionally evolved volcanic deposits in an isolated area on the Moon s farside. In the 1960s and 1970s, rock and soil samples were collected by the Apollo and Luna missions, by the USA and USSR respectively. This material represents a geologic treasure trove that continues to provide a wealth of information about the Moon and its evolution, and it was a very small fraction of these samples that gave the first hint that non-mare volcanic activity might have occurred. The samples contained fragments of complex volcanic rocks that were unrelated to the maria basalts. Violent bombardment of the Moon by meteorite impacts has caused significant mixing of the rocks at its surface, so the fragments could have had a source hundreds or thousands of kilometres away. The origin of the fragments was unknown. Several decades later, the Lunar Prospector mission used a gamma-ray spectrometer to map the distribution and abundance of various elements, including thorium, on the Moon s surface. The maps identified a distinct and large area of high thorium concentration, as well as several smaller, but equally peculiar areas of high thorium

  13. Moon - 18 Image Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This mosaic picture of the Moon was compiled from 18 images taken with a green filter by Galileo's imaging system during the spacecraft's flyby on December 7, 1992, some 11 hours before its Earth flyby at 1509 UTC (7:09 a.m. Pacific Standard Time) December 8. The north polar region is near the top part of the mosaic, which also shows Mare Imbrium, the dark area on the left; Mare Serenitatis at center; and Mare Crisium, the circular dark area to the right. Bright crater rim and ray deposits are from Copernicus, an impact crater 96 kilometers (60 miles) in diameter. Computer processing has exaggerated the brightness of poorly illuminated features near the day/night terminator in the polar regions, giving a false impression of high reflectivity there. The digital image processing was done by DLR the German aerospace research establishment near Munich, an international collaborator in the Galileo mission. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the exploration of the Jupiter system in 1995-97, is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  14. Infrared astronomy from the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Dan

    1988-01-01

    The Moon offers some remarkable opportunities for performing infrared astronomy. Although the transportation overhead can be expected to be very large compared with that for facilities in Earth orbit, certain aspects of the lunar environment should allow significant simplifications in the design of telescopes with background limited performance, at least in some parts of the thermal infrared spectrum. Why leave the Earth to perform infrared astronomy is addressed as is the reasons for going all the way to the Moon for its environment.

  15. High dynamic grayscale lithography with an LED-based micro-image stepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Hans-Christoph; Zeitner, Uwe D.; Leitel, Robert; Stumpf, Marko; Schleicher, Philipp; Bräuer, Andreas; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We developed a novel LED projection based direct write grayscale lithography system for the generation of optical surface profiles such as micro-lenses, diffractive elements, diffusors, and micro freeforms. The image formation is realized by a LCoS micro-display which is illuminated by a 405 nm UV High Power LED. The image on the display can be demagnified from factors 5x to 100x with an exchangeable lens. By controlling exposure time and LED power, the presented technique enables a highly dynamic dosage control for the exposure of h-line sensitive photo resist. In addition, the LCoS micro-display allows for an intensity control within the micro-image which is particularly advantageous to eliminate surface profile errors from stitching and limited homogeneity from LED illumination. Together with an accurate calibration of the resist response this leads to a superior low surface error of realized profiles below <0.2% RMS. The micro-display is mounted on a 3-axis (XYθ) stage for precise alignment. The substrate is brought into position with an air bearing stage which addresses an area of 500 × 500 mm2 with a positioning accuracy of <100 nm. As the exposure setup performs controlled motion in the z-direction the system to maintain the focal distance and lithographic patterning on non-planar surfaces to some extent. The exposure concept allows a high structure depth of more than 100 μm and a spatial resolution below 1 μm as well as the possibility of very steep sidewalls with angles larger than >80°. Another benefit of the approach is a patterning speed up to 100 cm2/h, which allows fabricating large-scale optics and microstructures in an acceptable time. We present the setup and show examples of micro-structures to demonstrate the performance of the system, namely a refractive freeform array, where the RMS surface deviation does not exceed 0.2% of the total structure depth of 75 μm. Furthermore, we show that this exposure tool is suitable to generate diffractive

  16. Moon 101: Introducing Students to Lunar Science and Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.; Allen, J. S.; Kring, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Moon 101 is designed with the purpose of familiarizing students with lunar geology and exploration. Armed with guiding questions, students read articles covering various lunar science topics and browse images from past and current lunar missions to familiarize themselves with available lunar data sets. Moon 101 was originally created for high school students preparing to conduct open-inquiry, lunar research. Most high school students' knowledge of lunar science is limited to lunar phases and tides, and their knowledge of lunar exploration is close to non-existent. Moon 101 provides a summary of the state of knowledge of the Moon's formation and evolution, and the exploration that has helped inform the lunar science community. Though designed for high school students, Moon 101 is highly appropriate for the undergraduate classroom, especially at the introductory level where resources for teaching lunar science are scarce. Moon 101 is comprised of two sections covering lunar science (formation and geologic evolution of the Moon) and one section covering lunar exploration. Students read information on the formation and geologic evolution of the Moon from sources such as the Planetary Science Research Discoveries (PSRD) website and the USGS professional paper A Geologic History of the Moon by Wilhelms. While these resources are not peer-reviewed journals, the information is presented at a level more advanced than articles from newspapers and popular science magazines. This ensures that the language is accessible to students who do not have a strong lunar/planetary science background, or a strong science background in general. Formation readings include information on older and current formation hypotheses, including the Giant Impact Hypothesis, the Magma Ocean hypothesis, and the age of the lunar crust. Lunar evolution articles describe ideas such as the Late Heavy Bombardment and geologic processes such as volcanism and impact cratering. After reading the articles

  17. Navigation and Obstacle Avoidance For Safe Moon Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Sasa, S.; Katayama, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Ninomiya, T.; Hamada, Y.; Yamamoto, H.

    geographical features just around the landing site for various moon exploration area. For the detection of such landing obstacles, the optical sensor systems might be the most promising solutions. As optical sensor sub-systems, monocular camera sys- tem (utilization of texture detection algorithms or application of theoretical algorithms such as "2nd moment analysis as the texture evaluation" or "Shape from Shading" etc.), or a stereo 3D measurement algorithm using multiple optical cameras have been studied. In the presentation, the study on the applicability of stereo camera system for the obstacle detection on the moon, and some experimental results using the recorded image of imitated terrain of the moon will be presented. Obstacle avoidance: When obstacles are detected and new landing target site is de- termined during the vertical descend phase by obstacle detection system, guidance and control to lead the lander to the newly determined target point is important. The estimation of such additional flight distance by the Monte Calro method is studied, assuming the obstacles existing possibility as Surveyer-7. To increase the mission payload, the amount of the fuel consumption to establish the safe landing has to be considered. Optimal control technique has been applied to design the guidance law to lead the lander to the target point avoiding the obstacles on the moon. Concluding Remark: Utilization of the recent advanced computer technology, espe- cially the image processing technology, will enable the safer landing and/or landing to the more risky area, such as the central hill of the crater, with optical obstacle avoid- ance capability. 2

  18. The Inside of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Roger J.

    2008-09-01

    Fundamental questions remain regarding the lunar interior, e.g.: Why did the Moon apparently cool so early? Why does the Moon have an asymmetric structure (nearside/farside)? What is the thickness of the lunar crust? How much of crustal variability is due to variable melting vs. impact redistribution? How big are impact basins and how deep did they excavate and thermally perturb the mantle? What was the temporal evolution of magmatism and brecciation? Did the mantle overturn subsequent to magma ocean solidification? How laterally heterogeneous is the lunar mantle? Does the Moon have a seismic discontinuity in the mantle? Does the Moon have a core? Does the Moon have a liquid outer core? Did the Moon have a core dynamo? Some of these questions will be at least partially answered in the next several years through new spacecraft investigations such as the GRAIL mission, which will map the lunar gravity field to unprecedented spatial resolution and accuracy. Furthermore, a long-lived, multi-station seismic network is also essential for understanding interior structure. Recent analyses of Apollo seismic data call into question the existence of the mantle discontinuity at 500-km depth, and the thickness of the lunar crust beneath the Apollo 12 and 14 landing sites now has multiple estimates. However, there is still a great deal that can be learned from existing lunar data sets. One productive approach would construct a set of self-consistent models that describe the coupled petrological-thermal evolution of the Moon. Such an investigation involves the high-level marriage of detailed petrological information from samples of the lunar crust and possibly mantle; of models that can predict accurately lunar solidi, liquidi, and equilibrium compositions; and of sophisticated thermal models that accurately incorporate the physics of melting and melt migration.

  19. A multiple-impact origin for the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufu, Raluca; Aharonson, Oded; Perets, Hagai B.

    2017-01-01

    The hypothesis of lunar origin by a single giant impact can explain some aspects of the Earth-Moon system. However, it is difficult to reconcile giant-impact models with the compositional similarity of the Earth and Moon without violating angular momentum constraints. Furthermore, successful giant-impact scenarios require very specific conditions such that they have a low probability of occurring. Here we present numerical simulations suggesting that the Moon could instead be the product of a succession of a variety of smaller collisions. In this scenario, each collision forms a debris disk around the proto-Earth that then accretes to form a moonlet. The moonlets tidally advance outward, and may coalesce to form the Moon. We find that sub-lunar moonlets are a common result of impacts expected onto the proto-Earth in the early Solar System and find that the planetary rotation is limited by impact angular momentum drain. We conclude that, assuming efficient merger of moonlets, a multiple-impact scenario can account for the formation of the Earth-Moon system with its present properties.

  20. Moon illusion in pictures: a multimechanism approach.

    PubMed

    Coren, S; Aks, D J

    1990-05-01

    The existence of the moon illusion in pictorial representations was demonstrated in 6 experiments. Ss either judged the size of the moon in pictures, depicted as on the horizon or high in the sky, or drew horizon and elevated moons. The horizon moon was consistently judged to be larger than the elevated moon, independent of the angle at which the pictures are viewed. The distance paradox usually observed with the moon illusion (horizon moon apparently closer than the elevated moon) also exists in pictures. The magnitude of both size and distance effects depends on the salience of depicted depth cues. The pattern of results suggests that the moon illusion is caused by several interacting mechanisms and that use of pictorial stimuli may allow the separation of various cognitive from physiological contributions to the illusion.

  1. Analysis of fracture networks in a reservoir dolomite by 3D micro-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorn, Maarten; Hoyer, Stefan; Exner, Ulrike; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    Narrow fractures in reservoir rocks can be of great importance when determining the hydrocarbon potential of such a reservoir. Such fractures can contribute significantly to - or even be dominant for - the porosity and permeability characteristics of such rocks. Investigating these narrow fractures is therefore important, but not always trivial. Standard laboratory measurements on sample plugs from a reservoir are not always suitable for fractured rocks. Thin section analysis can provide very important information, but mostly only in 2D. Also other sources of information have major drawbacks, such as FMI (Formation Micro-Imager) during coring (insufficient resolution) and hand specimen analysis (no internal information). 3D imaging of reservoir rock samples is a good alternative and extension to the methods mentioned above. The 3D information is in our case obtained by X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography (µCT) imaging. Our used samples are 2 and 3 cm diameter plugs of a narrowly fractured (apertures generally <200 µm) reservoir dolomite (Hauptdolomit formation) from below the Vienna Basin, Austria. µCT has the large advantage of being non-destructive to the samples, and with the chosen sample sizes and settings, the sample rocks and fractures can be imaged with sufficient quality at sufficient resolution. After imaging, the fracture networks need to be extracted (segmented) from the background. Unfortunately, available segmentation approaches in the literature do not provide satisfactory results on such narrow fractures. We therefore developed the multiscale Hessian fracture filter, with which we are able to extract the fracture networks from the datasets in a better way. The largest advantages of this technique are that it is inherently 3D, runs on desktop computers with limited resources, and is implemented in public domain software (ImageJ / FIJI). The results from the multiscale Hessian fracture filtering approach serve as input for porosity determination. Also

  2. Is the moon hot or cold.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Hanks, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    Basic observations are discussed which do not demand a presently cold moon and are consistent with a hot moon. It is suggested that an iron-deficient, highly resistive, hot lunar interior, capped by a cool, rigid lunar lithosphere with a thickness of several hundred kilometers, can explain the relevant observations and is a reasonable model of the moon today. The strength of the moon, lunar electrical conductivity profiles, the relative absence of present-day volcanic activity, and thermal history considerations are examined. Whether the deep interior of the moon is hot or cold has an important bearing on the overall composition of the moon and its origin.

  3. Monitoring dynamic reactions of red blood cells to UHF electromagnetic waves radiation using a novel micro-imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ping; Yong, Junguang; Shen, Hongtao; Zheng, Xianrong

    2012-12-01

    Multiple state-of-the-art techniques, such as multi-dimensional micro-imaging, fast multi-channel micro-spetrophotometry, and dynamic micro-imaging analysis, were used to dynamically investigate various effects of cell under the 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation. Cell changes in shape, size, and parameters of Hb absorption spectrum under different power density electromagnetic waves radiation were presented in this article. Experimental results indicated that the isolated human red blood cells (RBCs) do not have obviously real-time responses to the ultra-low density (15 μW/cm(2), 31 μW/cm(2)) electromagnetic wave radiation when the radiation time is not more than 30 min; however, the cells do have significant reactions in shape, size, and the like, to the electromagnetic waves radiation with power densities of 1 mW/cm(2) and 5 mW/cm(2). The data also reveal the possible influences and statistical relationships among living human cell functions, radiation amount, and exposure time with high-frequency electromagnetic waves. The results of this study may be significant on protection of human being and other living organisms against possible radiation affections of the high-frequency electromagnetic waves.

  4. The Habitability of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczeg, Tibor

    Following the vague guesswork of some writers in antiquity, early telescopic astronomy was strongly preoccupied with the ``World in the Moone.'' About the same time, as Kepler's charming ``Dream'' appeared posthumously, Wilkins set out to prove that there was no contradiction ``with reason or faith'' if we assumed the habitability of the Moon. For about two hundred years, this hypothesis remained quite popular (Cyrano, Fontenelle, Huygens) particularly among the wider public. That in spite of the reverberations, for instance, of the Whewell-Brewster controversy over the habitability of planets, now largely forgotten. On this background, the success of the famous ``Moon hoax of 1835'' seems more understandable. It was only in the middle of the 19th century that this idea began to slowly fade as the lack of lunar atmosphere became more and more obvious. The scientific evidence was mainly in connection with the lunar occultations (Bessel, John Herschel, and others), and also with the well-observed total solar eclipse of 1842. Yet, even later, rather fanciful assumptions about the lunar atmosphere collecting on the invisible far side of the Moon kept a modicum of believability alive for some years. Ultimately, however, the ``Selenites'' wandered over into the domain of science fiction -- the best representative being perhaps Wells' utopia in the ``First Men on the Moon'' exploring the inside of the Moon. The scientific studies concentrated more on the rather frustrating topic of lunar surface variations such as the disappearance of the crater Linnae. Nevertheless, as late as the 1960's, a possibly overly cautious NASA was ready to quarantine the returning Apollo astronauts, paying homage, perhaps, to the panspermia hypothesis.

  5. Heliophysics Science and the Moon: Potential Solar and Space Physics Science for Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This report addresses both these features new science enabled by NASAs exploration initiative and enabling science that is critical to ensuring a safe return to the Moon and onward to Mars. The areas of interest are structured into four main themes: Theme 1: Heliophysics Science of the Moon Studies of the Moons unique magnetodynamic plasma environment. Theme 2: Space Weather, Safeguarding the Journey Studies aimed at developing a predictive capability for space weather hazards. Theme 3: The Moon as a Historical Record Studies of the variation of the lunar regolith to uncover the history of the Sun, solar system, local interstellar medium, galaxy, and universe. Theme 4: The Moon as a Heliophysics Science Platform Using the unique environment of the lunar surface as a platform to provide observations beneficial to advancing heliophysics science.

  6. Resource Production on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    A self-sustaining settlement on the moon, or on other airless bodies such as asteroids, will require the ability to refine desired raw materials from available resources, such as lunar or asteroidal regolith. This work will focus on the example case of pro-duction from lunar regolith. The same process sequences could be used at other locations. Stony asteroids typically have regolith similar to that of the moon, and refining of asteroidal material could use the same techniques, adapted for microgravity. Likewise, Martian rock and soil could also be processed by the techniques discussed here.

  7. What's new on the moon?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of the Apollo program and other lunar probes, questions that remained unsolved during centuries of speculation and scientific study can now be answered concerning the composition, core, surface, age, and history of the moon. Data obtained from lunar samples and instruments on the lunar surface are being used to gain insight into the history of the earth and the other planets, planetary evolution, the development of planetary magnetic fields, the nature of the solar wind, and how the Sun operates. Projects suggested for using the moon to increase understanding of geophysics are described.

  8. Astronauts Capture Moon Illusion Photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Many odd looking moon photos have been captured over the years by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Even so, this photograph, taken by the crew over Russia on May 11, 2003, must have come as a surprise. The moon which is really a quarter of a million miles away, appears to be floating inside the Earth's atmosphere. The picture is tricky because of its uneven lighting. With the sun's elevation angle at only 6 degrees, night is falling on the left side of the image while it is still broad daylight on the right side. This gradient of sunlight is the key to the illusion.

  9. The Moon; twenty years later

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kerr, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    The 20th anniversary of the first landing on the Moon occurred on July 21, 1989. The vast majority of the Moon rocks collected by the Apollo mission astronauts await further study in the continuing effort to unravel the origin and evolution of Earth's nearest neighbor. Not that the 382-kilogram treasure trove of lunar samples has been gathering dust in the Planetary Materials Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. It is just that lunar scientists are being very sparing in their use of the rocks. 

  10. Geminid Meteors Impact the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Earth wasn’t the only celestial body to be treated to a Geminid showin December -- the moon also got in on the action! This video shows aGeminid impact flash in the upper right corner. The ...

  11. Geochemical Exploration of the Moon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Isidore

    1984-01-01

    Provides information based on explorations of the Apollo program about the geochemistry of the moon and its importance in developing an understanding of formation/evolution of the solar system. Includes description and some results of orbital remote sensing, lunar x-ray experiments, gamma-ray experiments, alpha-particle experiments, and the Apollo…

  12. The Moon and Its Origin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urey, Harold C.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the origin of the Moon on the basis of the Apollo expeditions as an accumulated gas sphere at its very beginning and, later, a satellite captured by the Earth. Indicates that the model would be substantially believable if further observations should be proved to exist as estimated. (CC)

  13. Topographic mapping of the Moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, S.S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Contour maps of the Moon have been compiled by photogrammetric methods that use stereoscopic combinations of all available metric photographs from the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions. The maps utilize the same format as the existing NASA shaded-relief Lunar Planning Charts (LOC-1, -2, -3, and -4), which have a scale of 1:2 750 000. The map contour interval is 500m. A control net derived from Apollo photographs by Doyle and others was used for the compilation. Contour lines and elevations are referred to the new topographic datum of the Moon, which is defined in terms of spherical harmonics from the lunar gravity field. Compilation of all four LOC charts was completed on analytical plotters from 566 stereo models of Apollo metric photographs that cover approximately 20% of the Moon. This is the first step toward compiling a global topographic map of the Moon at a scale of 1:5 000 000. ?? 1985 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  14. Backyard Astronomy: Observing Moon Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandou, Bob

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity involving the observation of moon phases that can provide a one-on-one learning experience and stimulate interaction between a child and an adult family member. This activity can also be initiated by teachers and outcomes can be integrated into the classroom science curriculum. (JRH)

  15. Lunar Dynamics on Internal Structure of the Moon on the orbit around the planet Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shigehisa

    2015-04-01

    This work concerns on problem of dynamics of the Moon rotating on the orbit around the Earth. First, the author introduces what about on the reference data which was updated by NASA in 2013. The NASA's mission of GRAIL (Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory)in 2012 was a key to obtain the lunar gravity field on the whole area of the Moon's surface. Now, the author introduces his dynamical model for obtaining an advanced understanding of the lunar internal structure inside of the Moon's surface. The data obtained by NASA had shown that the crust on the moon near side to the Earth was about 30 km thick and that on the moon far side to the Earth was was 50 km. Then, a bold modelling can be introduced for the existing Moon's internal structure referring to the fruuits of the research works in the field of the Earth's gravity found on the basis of the past contributions in the field of geodesy under several bold assumptions wich have been accepted in the fields of astronomy and of the space sciences. In brief, the Moon's gravity could reduce the lunar interface of the core must be surely excentric boldly about 10 km inside of the orbit on the radial line between the Moon and the Earth.Hence, the lunar magnetic field must be freezed to show the reversed polarity relative to that of the Earth. Neverthless, it should be updated to the details in the successive research.

  16. Of time and the moon.

    PubMed

    Wetherill, G W

    1971-07-30

    Considerable information concerning lunar chronology has been obtained by the study of rocks and soil returned by the Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 missions. It has been shown that at the time the moon, earth, and solar system were formed, approximately 4.6 approximately 10(9) years ago, a severe chemical fractionation took place, resulting in depletion of relatively volatile elements such as Rb and Pb from the sources of the lunar rocks studied. It is very likely that much of this material was lost to interplanetary space, although some of the loss may be associated with internal chemical differentiation of the moon. It has also been shown that igneous processes have enriched some regions of the moon in lithophile elements such as Rb, U, and Ba, very early in lunar history, within 100 million years of its formation. Subsequent igneous and metamorphic activity occurred over a long period of time; mare volcanism of the Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 sites occurred at distinctly different times, 3.6 approximately 10(9) and 3.3 approximately 10(9) years ago, respectively. Consequently, lunar magmatism and remanent magnetism cannot be explained in terms of a unique event, such as a close approach to the earth at a time of lunar capture. It is likely that these phenomena will require explanation in terms of internal lunar processes, operative to a considerable depth in the moon, over a long period of time. These data, together with the low present internal temperatures of the moon, inferred from measurements of lunar electrical conductivity, impose severe constraints on acceptable thermal histories of the moon. Progress is being made toward understanding lunar surface properties by use of the effects of particle bombardment of the lunar surface (solar wind, solar flare particles, galactic cosmic rays). It has been shown that the rate of micrometeorite erosion is very low (angstroms per year) and that lunar rocks and soil have been within approximately a meter of the lunar surface

  17. The Moon: Been there, done that?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Lunar science is planetary science. Lunar samples teach us about the formation and evolution of the Moon, and the history of all the planets. The Moon is a cornerstone for all rocky planets, since it formed and evolved similarly to Earth, Mars, Mercury, Venus, and large asteroids. Lunar robotic missions provide important science and engineering objectives, and keep our eyes on the Moon.

  18. Moon Park: A research and educational facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriki, Kyoichi; Saito, Takao; Ogawa, Yukimasa

    1992-01-01

    Moon Park has been proposed as an International Space Year (ISY) event for international cooperative efforts. Moon Park will serve as a terrestrial demonstration of a prototype lunar base and provide research and educational opportunities. The kind of data that can be obtained in the Moon Park facilities is examined taking the minimum number of lunar base residents as an example.

  19. From the Cover: Explaining the moon illusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Lloyd; Kaufman, James H.

    2000-01-01

    An old explanation of the moon illusion holds that various cues place the horizon moon at an effectively greater distance than the elevated moon. Although both moons have the same angular size, the horizon moon must be perceived as larger. More recent explanations hold that differences in accommodation or other factors cause the elevated moon to appear smaller. As a result of this illusory difference in size, the elevated moon appears to be more distant than the horizon moon. These two explanations, both based on the geometry of stereopsis, lead to two diametrically opposed hypotheses. That is, a depth interval at a long distance is associated with a smaller binocular disparity, whereas an equal depth interval at a smaller distance is associated with a larger disparity. We conducted experiments involving artificial moons and confirmed the hypothesis that the horizon moon is at a greater perceptual distance. Moreover, when a moon of constant angular size was moved closer it was also perceived as growing smaller, which is consistent with the older explanation. Although Emmert's law does not predict the size-distance relationship over long distances, we conclude that the horizon moon is perceived as larger because the perceptual system treats it as though it is much farther away. Finally, we observe that recent explanations substitute perceived size for angular size as a cue to distance. Thus, they imply that perceptions cause perceptions.

  20. Europa--Jupiter's Icy Ocean Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowes, L.

    1999-01-01

    Europa is a puzzle. The sixth largest moon in our solar system, Europa confounds and intrigues scientists. Few bodies in the solar system have attracted as much scientific attention as this moon of Jupiter because of its possible subsurface ocean of water. The more we learn about this icy moon, the more questions we have.

  1. Infrared astronomy from the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, Martin

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to exhibit the advantages and limitations to infrared astronomical observations form the moon. The most obvious apparent advantage is the lack of a lunar atmosphere; radiation arriving from the universe is neither extinguished nor refracted as it approaches the lunar surface. However, the Earth's atmosphere's protection against cosmic rays is also lost, and infrared detectors are highly sensitive to irradiation by energetic particles. A second apparent advantage is the relative ease with which beams from an array of telescopes can be interferometrically combined; again the vacuum environment with constant refractive index of unity throughout, permits combination without phase delay across the entire spectral range. But thermal radiation from optical components and stray radiation from the lunar environment, just outside the light path, tend to lessen that advantage, except in narrow-spectral-band spatial interferometry, in which only the radiation in individual spectral lines is mapped, and broad-band thermal emission can be effectively filtered out. On the Moon's night side, and in polar craters on the Moon, radiative cooling should permit the attainment of high sensitivity with large telescopes. Just as the proposed Edison spacecraft primary mirror is expected to reach temperatures around 40 K, so also large lunar primary mirrors might be expected to reach temperatures in that range, making the zodiacal glow the main source of noise at wavelengths shortward of 25 micrometers. The slow rota tion of the Moon, and the lack of vibrations from natural sources such as winds, should provide advantages in guiding on specific astronomical sources. To learn as much as possible about the difficulties of remote observations in a hostile environment, Antarctic observatories should be used as test beds for the rigors of lunar observations. The strenuous requirements for successful astronomical observations from the South Pole are similar to those

  2. Infrared astronomy from the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Martin

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to exhibit the advantages and limitations to infrared astronomical observations form the moon. The most obvious apparent advantage is the lack of a lunar atmosphere; radiation arriving from the universe is neither extinguished nor refracted as it approaches the lunar surface. However, the Earth's atmosphere's protection against cosmic rays is also lost, and infrared detectors are highly sensitive to irradiation by energetic particles. A second apparent advantage is the relative ease with which beams from an array of telescopes can be interferometrically combined; again the vacuum environment with constant refractive index of unity throughout, permits combination without phase delay across the entire spectral range. But thermal radiation from optical components and stray radiation from the lunar environment, just outside the light path, tend to lessen that advantage, except in narrow-spectral-band spatial interferometry, in which only the radiation in individual spectral lines is mapped, and broad-band thermal emission can be effectively filtered out. On the Moon's night side, and in polar craters on the Moon, radiative cooling should permit the attainment of high sensitivity with large telescopes. Just as the proposed Edison spacecraft primary mirror is expected to reach temperatures around 40 K, so also large lunar primary mirrors might be expected to reach temperatures in that range, making the zodiacal glow the main source of noise at wavelengths shortward of 25 micrometers. The slow rota tion of the Moon, and the lack of vibrations from natural sources such as winds, should provide advantages in guiding on specific astronomical sources. To learn as much as possible about the difficulties of remote observations in a hostile environment, Antarctic observatories should be used as test beds for the rigors of lunar observations. The strenuous requirements for successful astronomical observations from the South Pole are similar to those

  3. Update on Pluto's Tiniest Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark; Weaver, Harold; Buie, Marc; Merline, Douglas; Mutchler, Max; Soummer, Remi; Steffl, Andrew; Stern, S. Alan; Throop, Henry; Young, Leslie

    2013-04-01

    We report on the discovery and subsequent analysis of "P5", Pluto¹s fifth known moon (officially designated S/2012 (134340) 1), and also provide an update on the latest results for "P4" (S/2012 (134340) 1). P5 was discovered in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images from June and July 2012, and has since been recovered in HST images from 2011. P4, discovered in 2011, was imaged extensively by HST in 2012, and has also been recovered from archival images as far back as 2005. Preliminary orbital elements for P5 are: semimajor axis a = 42579 km; mean motion n = 17.8560 degrees/day; eccentricity e = 0.0048; inclination i = 0.88 degrees. For P4, these values are : a = 57711 km; n = 11.1910 degrees/day; e = 0.0029; i = 0.34 degrees. These values place the moons near, but not in, the 1:3 and 1:5 mean motion resonances with Charon, just as Nix and Hydra fall near the 1:4 and 1:6 resonances. While these associations are too close to have arisen by chance, the role of the near-resonances in the orbital history of the Pluto system is unknown. Photometry indicates that P5 is half as bright as P4 and ~ 5% is bright as Nix. This implies a diameter ~ 10 km if P5's albedo is 0.35, comparable to that of Charon. Searches for additional moons have been negative so far, suggesting that Pluto has no additional moons more than half as bright as P5 orbiting exterior to Charon. However, scattered light in the HST images prevents us from setting such a strict upper limit for any unseen moons interior to Charon's orbit.

  4. International lunar observatory / power station: from Hawaii to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, S.

    Astronomy's great advantages from the Moon are well known - stable surface, diffuse atmosphere, long cool nights (14 days), low gravity, far side radio frequency silence. A large variety of astronomical instruments and observations are possible - radio, optical and infrared telescopes and interferometers; interferometry for ultra- violet to sub -millimeter wavelengths and for very long baselines, including Earth- Moon VLBI; X-ray, gamma-ray, cosmic ray and neutrino detection; very low frequency radio observation; and more. Unparalleled advantages of lunar observatories for SETI, as well as for local surveillance, Earth observation, and detection of Earth approaching objects add significant utility to lunar astronomy's superlatives. At least nine major conferences in the USA since 1984 and many elsewhere, as well as ILEWG, IAF, IAA, LEDA and other organizations' astronomy-from-the-Moon research indicate a lunar observatory / power station, robotic at first, will be one of the first mission elements for a permanent lunar base. An international lunar observatory will be a transcending enterprise, highly principled, indispensable, soundly and broadly based, and far- seeing. Via Astra - From Hawaii to the Moon: The astronomy and scie nce communities, national space agencies and aerospace consortia, commercial travel and tourist enterprises and those aspiring to advance humanity's best qualities, such as Aloha, will recognize Hawaii in the 21st century as a new major support area and pan- Pacific port of embarkation to space, the Moon and beyond. Astronomical conditions and facilities on Hawaii's Mauna Kea provide experience for construction and operation of observatories on the Moon. Remote and centrally isolated, with diffuse atmosphere, sub-zero temperature and limited working mobility, the Mauna Kea complex atop the 4,206 meter summit of the largest mountain on the planet hosts the greatest collection of large astronomical telescopes on Earth. Lunar, extraterrestrial

  5. Eclipses by the Earth and by the Moon as Constraints on the AXAF Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    1998-01-01

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is scheduled for launch on September 1, 1998, on a mission lasting ten years. During this time AXAF will be subject to eclipses by the Earth and the Moon. Eclipses by the Earth will occur during regular 'seasons' six months apart. AXAF requires that none last longer than 120 minutes, and this constrains the orbit orientation. Eclipses by the Moon occur infrequently, but may pose serious operational problems. The AXAF perigee altitude can be chosen, once the other initial conditions are known, so that objectionable Moon-eclipses can be avoided by targeting the final burn.

  6. Moon Zoo: a Citizen Science Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugiolacchi, R.; Crawford, I. A.; Joy, K. H.

    2013-09-01

    Moon Zoo is a citizen science project that utilises internet crowd-sourcing techniques. Moon Zoo users are asked to review images from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)[1] spacecraft and perform tasks such as measuring impact crater sizes and identifying morphologically interesting features. The tasks are designed to address issues in lunar science and to aid future exploration of the Moon. In addition to its potential in delivering high quality science outputs, Moon Zoo is also an important educator resource, providing information about the geology of the Moon and geophysical processes in the inner solar system.

  7. Human factors for the Moon: the gap in anthropometric data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lia Schlacht, Irene; Foing, Bernard H.; Rittweger, Joern; Masali, Melchiorre; Stevenin, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    human factors contribution Present the ongoing research on this field Share innovative methodologies in order to acquire feedback from other specialist. This research is aimed at reconsidering the methodologies from the viewpoint of anthropometry and human system interaction in a different kind of gravity and carry out new investigations that may help to prepare for the next Moon mission, but which can also be used for advanced applications on Earth. Experimental setups and methodologies for achieving anthropometrical data will be described. In particular, combined studies involving bed rest, treadmills, parabolic flight, neutral buoyancy, and weight suspension with cables will be presented. From a spin-off perspective, this research is also extremely promising in terms of basic research aimed at better understanding human physiological mechanisms ruling equilibrium, deambulation, and related topics, which are also useful for applications on Earth.

  8. Bibliography. [of articles on moon and planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopal, Z.; Moutsoulas, M.; Waranius, F. B.

    1983-01-01

    A bibliography of articles entered into the data base at the Lunar and Planetary Institute Library from November 1982 through January 1983 is presented. An abstract of each article is given. The subjects covered by the articles include: the motion of the moon and dynamics of the earth-moon system: shape and gravity field of the moon; the physical structure of the moon, its thermal and stress history; the morphology of the lunar surface, the origin and stratigraphy of lunar formations, and mapping of the moon; the chemical composition of the moon, lunar petrology, mineralogy, and crystallography; electromagnetic properties of the moon; the planets; and other objects, including asteroids, comets, meteorites, and cosmic dust.

  9. Earthshine simulator: Idealized images of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thejll, Peter; Gleisner, Hans

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial albedo can be determined from observations of the relative intensity of earthshine. Images of the Moon at different lunar phases can be analyzed to derive the semi-hemispheric mean albedo of the Earth, and an important tool for doing this is simulations of the appearance of the Moon for any time. This software produces idealized images of the Moon for arbitrary times. It takes into account the libration of the Moon and the distances between Sun, Moon and the Earth, as well as the relevant geometry. The images of the Moon are produced as FITS files. User input includes setting the Julian Day of the simulation. Defaults for image size and field of view are set to produce approximately 1x1 degree images with the Moon in the middle from an observatory on Earth, currently set to Mauna Loa.

  10. Origin of the terrestrial planets and the moon.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S R

    1996-03-01

    Our ideas about the origin and evolution of the solar system have advanced significantly as a result of the past 25 years of space exploration. Metal-sulfide-silicate partitioning seems to have been present in the early dust components of the solar nebula, prior to chondrule formation. The inner solar nebula was depleted in volatile elements by early solar activity. The early formation of the gas giant, Jupiter, affected the subsequent development of inner solar system and is responsible for the existence of the asteroid belt, and the small size of Mars. The Earth and the other terrestrial planets accreted in a gas-free environment, mostly from volatile-depleted planetesimals which were already differentiated into metallic cores and silicate mantles. The origin of the Moon by a single massive impact with a body larger than Mars explains the angular momentum, orbital characteristics and unique nature of the Earth-Moon system. The density and chemical differences between the Earth and Moon are accounted for by deriving the Moon from the mantle of the impactor.

  11. Meteoritic material on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. W.; Ganapathy, R.; Higuchi, H.; Anders, E.

    1974-01-01

    Micrometeorites, ancient planetesimal debris from the early intense bombardment, and debris of recent, crater-forming projectiles are discussed and their amounts and compositions have been determined from trace element studies. The micrometeorite component is uniformly distrubuted over the entire lunar surface, but is seen most clearly in mare soils whereas, the ancient component is seen in highland breccias and soils. A few properties of the basin-forming objects are inferred from the trace element data. An attempt is made to reconstruct the bombardment history of the moon from the observation that only basin-forming objects fell on the moon after crustal differentiation. The apparent half-life of basin-forming bodies is close to the calculated value for earth-crossing planetesimals. It is shown that a gap in radiometric ages is expected between the Imbrium and Nectaris impacts, because all 7 basins formed in this interval lie on the farside or east limb.

  12. Materials refining on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2007-05-01

    Oxygen, metals, silicon, and glass are raw materials that will be required for long-term habitation and production of structural materials and solar arrays on the Moon. A process sequence is proposed for refining these materials from lunar regolith, consisting of separating the required materials from lunar rock with fluorine. The fluorine is brought to the Moon in the form of potassium fluoride, and is liberated from the salt by electrolysis in a eutectic salt melt. Tetrafluorosilane produced by this process is reduced to silicon by a plasma reduction stage; the fluorine salts are reduced to metals by reaction with metallic potassium. Fluorine is recovered from residual MgF and CaF2 by reaction with K2O.

  13. Impact ejecta on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The partitioning of energy and the distribution of the resultant ejecta on the moon is numerically modeled using a Eulerian finite difference grid. The impact of an iron meteoroid at 15 km/sec on a gabbroic anorthosite lunar crust is examined. The high speed impact induced flow is described over the entire hydrodynamic regime from a time where the peak pressures are 6 Mbar until the stresses everywhere in the flow are linearly elastic, and less than 5 kbar. Shock-induced polymorphic phase changes, (plagioclase and pyroxene to hollandite and perovskite), and the subsequent reversion to low pressure phases are demonstrated to enhance shock wave attenuation. A rate-dependent equation of state is used for describing the hysteretic effect of the phase change. Ballistic equations for a spherical planet are then applied to material with net velocity away from the moon.

  14. Europe rediscovers the Moon with SMART-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    all previous lunar landers have touched down so far. With SMART-1, Europe has played an active role in the international lunar exploration programme of the future and, with the data thus gathered, is able to make a substantial contribution to that effort. SMART-1 experience and data are also assisting in preparations for future lunar missions, such as India’s Chandrayaan-1, which will reuse SMART-1’s infrared and X-ray spectrometers. SMART-1 is equipped with completely new instruments, never used close to the Moon before. These include a miniature camera, and X-ray and infrared spectrometers, which are all helping to observe and study the Moon. Its solar panels use advanced gallium-arsenide solar cells, chosen in preference to traditional silicon cells. One of the experimental instruments onboard SMART-1 is OBAN, which has been testing a new navigation system that will allow future spacecraft to navigate on their own, without the need for control from the ground. Instruments and techniques tested in examining the Moon from SMART-1 will later help ESA's BepiColombo spacecraft to investigate the planet Mercury. For further information: ESA Media Relations Office Phone: + 33 1 5369 7155 Fax: + 33 1 5369 7296 Queries: media@esa.int Further information on the event at ESOC Jocelyne Landeau-Constantin Head of Corporate Communication Office ESA/ESOC Darmstadt, Germany : Tel. + 49 6151 90 26 96 / email: jlc@esa.int ACCREDITATION REQUEST FORM SMART-1 Moon impact - ESA/ESOC Darmstadt - Robert Bosch Strasse 5, Darmstadt, Germany a) Sunday 3 September b) Monday 4 September 2006 First name:___________________ Surname:_____________________ Media:______________________________________________________ Address: ___________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Tel:_______________________ Fax: ___________________________ Mobile:___________________ E-mail: _________________________ I will be attending the following

  15. Human Exploration of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendell, Wendell W.

    1999-01-01

    Human exploration of the Moon tilde-n or, more generally, human exploration of the solar system tilde-n began with the landing of Apollo 11 Lunar Module on the lunar surface. Human exploration continued with growing capability until the departure of the Apollo 17 lunar module from the lunar surface in 1972. Human exploration is currently experiencing what can be called euphemistically a hiatus.

  16. Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T.L.; Lee, K.T.

    2009-01-01

    Luminescence is typically described as light emitted by objects at low temperatures, induced by chemical reactions, electrical energy, atomic interactions, or acoustical and mechanical stress. An example is photoluminescence created when photons (electromagnetic radiation) strike a substance and are absorbed, resulting in the emission of a resonant fluorescent or phosphorescent albedo. In planetary science, there exists X-ray fluorescence induced by sunlight absorbed by a regolith a property used to measure some of the chemical composition of the Moon s surface during the Apollo program. However, there exists an equally important phenomenon in planetary science which will be designated here as photon luminescence. It is not conventional photoluminescence because the incoming radiation that strikes the planetary surface is not photons but rather cosmic rays (CRs). Nevertheless, the result is the same: the generation of a photon albedo. In particular, Galactic CRs (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) both induce a photon albedo that radiates from the surface of the Moon. Other particle albedos are generated as well, most of which are hazardous (e.g. neutrons). The photon luminescence or albedo of the lunar surface induced by GCRs and SEPs will be derived here, demonstrating that the Moon literally glows in the dark (when there is no sunlight or Earthshine). This extends earlier work on the same subject [1-4]. A side-by-side comparison of these two albedos and related mitigation measures will also be discussed.

  17. Moon - North Polar Mosaic, Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Moon. The Galileo spacecraft surveyed the Moon on December 7, 1992, on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-1997. The left part of this north pole view is visible from Earth. This color picture is a mosaic assembled from 18 images taken by Galileo's imaging system through a green filter. The left part of this picture shows the dark, lava-filled Mare Imbrium (upper left); Mare Serenitatis (middle left), Mare Tranquillitatis (lower left), and Mare Crisium, the dark circular feature toward the bottom of the mosaic. Also visible in this view are the dark lava plains of the Marginis and Smythii Basins at the lower right. The Humboldtianum Basin, a 650-kilometer (400-mile) impact structure partly filled with dark volcanic deposits, is seen at the center of the image. The Moon's north pole is located just inside the shadow zone, about a third of the way from the top left of the illuminated region. The Galileo project is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  18. Uranus moon - 1985U1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Several craters are seen on the surface of 1985U1, one of several small moons of Uranus discovered by Voyager 2. The spacecraft acquired this single image -- the only close-up it obtained of any of the new moons -- on Jan. 24, 1986. At the time, Voyager was at a distance of about 500,000 kilometers (300,000 miles) from 1985U1, yielding a resolution of about 10 km (6 mi) in this clear-filter, narrow-angle image. The moon was found Dec. 3O, 1985; it was the first and largest of nearly a dozen satellites discovered by the spacecraft cameras. This image shows 1985U1 to be a dark, nearly spherical object, with a diameter of about 150 km (90 mi); the dark surface reflects only 7 percent of the incident light. The picture was inserted into the Voyager encounter sequence late in its development. This image has had a complex history, having been recorded on the spacecraft tape recorder and first played back during the late afternoon of Jan. 24. An antenna-pointing problem at one of the Australian tracking stations led to loss of the data, so the image had to be transmitted a second time. It was successfully received shortly before 6 p.m. PST Jan. 26. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  19. Smart-1 Moon Impact Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayala, Andres; Rigger, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the operations to control the Moon impact of the 3-axis stabilized spacecraft SMART-1 in September 2006. SMART-1 was launched on 27/09/2003. It was the first ESA mission to use an Electric Propulsion (EP) engine as the main motor to spiral out of the Earth gravity field and reach a scientific moon orbit [1]. During September 2005 the last EP maneuvers were performed using the remaining Xenon, in order to compensate for the 3rd body perturbations of the Sun and Earth. These operations extended the mission for an additional year. Afterwards the EP performance became unpredictable and low, so that no meaningful operation for the moon impact could be done. To move the predicted impact point on the 16/8/2006 into visibility from Earth an alternative Delta-V strategy was designed. Due to their alignment, the attitude thrusters could not be used directly to generate the Delta-V, so this strategy was based on controlled angular momentum biasing. Firing along the velocity vector around apolune, the remaining Hydrazine left from the attitude control budget was used, to shift the impact to the required coordinates.

  20. Russian Planetary Program: Phobos and the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimov, E. M.; Marov, M. Ya.; Politshuk, G. M.; Zeleniy, L. M.

    2006-08-01

    Planetary exploration is a cornerstone of space science and technology development. Russia has a great legacy of the world recognized former space missions to the Moon and planets. Strategy of the Russian Federal Space Agency and the Russian Academy of Sciences planetary program for the coming decade is focused on space vehicle of new generation. The basic concept of this spacecraft development is the modern technology utilization, significant cost reduction and meeting objectives of the important science return. The bottom line is the use of middle class Soyuz-type launcher, which places the principal constraint on mass of the vehicle and mission profile. Flexibility in the design of space vehicle, including a possibility of SEP technology utilization, facilitates its adaptability for extended program of the solar system exploration. As the first step, the project is optimized around sample return mission from satellite of Mars Phobos ("Phobos-Grunt" or PSR) which is in the list of the Russian Federal Space Program for 2006 to 2015. It is to be launched in 2009 and completed in 2012. The experience gained from the former Russian "Phobos 88" serves as a clue to provide an important basis for the mission concept enabling solution of many problems of the project design and its implementation. There is a challenge to return relic matter from such small body like Phobos for the ground labs comprehensive study. The payload is also targeted for in-flight and extended remote sensing and in situ measurements using the capable instrument packages. The project is addressed as a milestone in the Russian program of the solar system study, with a potential for future ambitious missions to asteroids and comets pooling international efforts. Also endorsed by the Russian Federal Space Program is "Luna-Glob" mission to the Moon tentatively scheduled for 2011. The goal is to advance lunar science with the well instrumented orbiter, lander, and the network of penetrators. Return back

  1. Moon-Struck: Artists Rediscover Nature And Observe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Olson, Roberta J. M.

    We discuss rare early depictions of the Moon by artists who actually observed Earth's nearest neighbor rather than relying on stylized formulas. The earliest, from the 14th and 15th centuries, reveal that revolutionary advances in both pre-telescopic astronomy and naturalistic painting could go hand-in-hand. This link suggests that when painters observed the world, their definition of world could also include the heavens and the Moon. Many of the artists we discuss - e.g., Pietro Lorenzetti, Giotto, and Jan Van Eyck - actually studied the Moon, incorporating their studies into several works. We also consider the star map on the dome over the altar in the Old Sacristy of San Lorenzo, Florence (c. 1442), whose likely advisor was Toscanelli. In addition, we examine representations by artists who painted for Popes Julius II and Leo X - Raphael and Sebastiano del Piombo, both of whom were influenced by individuals at the papal court, such as the astronomer, painter, and cartographer Johann (Giovanni) Ruysch and Leonardo da Vinci. We also discuss Leonardo's pre-telescopic notes and lunar drawings as they impacted on art and science in Florence, where Galileo would study perspective and chiaroscuro. Galileo's representations of the Moon (engraved in his Sidereus Nuncius, 1610) are noted, together with those by Harriot and Galileo's friend, the painter Cigoli. During the 17th century, the Moon's features were telescopically mapped by astronomers with repercussions in art, e.g., paintings by Donati Creti and Raimondo Manzini as well as Adam Elsheimer. Ending with a consideration of the 19th-century artists/astronomers John Russell and John Brett and early lunar photography, we demonstrate that artistic and scientific visual acuity belonged to the burgeoning empiricism of the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries that eventually yielded modern observational astronomy.

  2. Supporting Crewed Missions using LiAISON Navigation in the Earth-Moon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Jason M.

    Crewed navigation in certain regions of the Earth-Moon system provides a unique challenge due to the unstable dynamics and observation geometry relative to standard Earth-based tracking systems. The focus of this thesis is to advance the understanding of navigation precision in the Earth-Moon system, analyzing the observability of navigation data types frequently used to navigate spacecraft, and to provide a better understanding of the influence of a crewed vehicle disturbance model for future manned missions in the Earth-Moon system. In this research, a baseline for navigation performance of a spacecraft in a Lagrange point orbit in the Earth-Moon system is analyzed. Using operational ARTEMIS tracking data, an overlap analysis of the reconstructed ARTEMIS trajectory states is conducted. This analysis provides insight into the navigation precision of a spacecraft traversing a Lissajous orbit about the Earth-Moon L1 point. While the ARTEMIS analysis provides insight into the navigation precision using ground based tracking methods, an examination of the benefits of introducing Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation (LiAISON) is investigated. This examination provides insight into the benefits and disadvantages of LiAISON range and range-rate measurements for trajectories in the Earth-Moon system. In addition to the characterization of navigation precision for spacecraft in the Earth-Moon system, an analysis of the uncertainty propagation for noisy crewed vehicles and quiet robotic spacecraft is given. Insight is provided on the characteristics of uncertainty propagation and how it is correlated to the instability of the Lagrange point orbit. A crewed vehicle disturbance model is provided based on either Gaussian or Poisson assumptions. The natural tendency for the uncertainty distribution in a Lagrange point orbit is to align with the unstable manifold after a certain period of propagation. This behavior is influenced directly by the unstable

  3. The binary fission origin of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, Alan B.

    1986-01-01

    The major arguments for and against the binary fission model of lunar origin are reviewed. Unresolved problems include: (1) how the protoearth acquired sufficient angular velocity to fission, and (2) how the earth-moon system lost its excess angular momentum after fission. Despite these uncertainties, the compositional similarities between the earth's mantle and the bulk moon suggest that the fission model is worth considering. The proposed sequence of events in the formation of the moon by binary fission is given.

  4. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Sushil K.

    2010-01-01

    In the spirit of the symposium and the theme of the session of this presentation, “Our solar system after Galileo, the grand vision,” I review briefly a relatively recently discovered phenomenon in the solar system - existence of atmospheres on certain moons, including Io, one of the four moons Galileo discovered four centuries ago. The origin of such atmospheres is discussed, and comparisons are made between various gassy moons.

  5. The Early Years: Seeing the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    Spotting the Moon in the sky is like finding a treasure--unexpected and beautiful. When children look for the Moon in the sky, they don't know where to look. The Moon is far away and most easily observed at a time when most young children are sleeping. Because direct contact isn't possible, adults have to be creative in how they help children…

  6. EUVE survey observations of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, J. S.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary survey images of the moon obtained by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer and results of data analysis are presented. The preliminary results indicate that the brightness of the moon varies little from observation to observation. Early results also show that the lunar albedo closely matches the relative reflectivity of mineral found on the moon's surface. Further studies are conducted during the spectroscopy phase of the EUVE mission to confirm current results regarding the presence of X-ray fluorescence in the data.

  7. Status of esa smart-1 mission to the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.; Racca, G. R.; Marini, A.; SMART-1 Technology Working Team

    2003-04-01

    SMART-1 is the first in the programme of ESA’s Small Missions for Advanced Research and Technology . Its objective is to demonstrate Solar Electric Primary Propulsion (SEP) for future Cornerstones (such as Bepi-Colombo) and to test new technologies for spacecraft and instruments. The spacecraft has been readied for launch in spring 2003 as an Ariane-5 auxiliary passenger. After a cruise with primary SEP, the SMART-1 mission is to orbit the Moon for a nominal period of six months, with possible extension. The spacecraft will carry out a complete programme of scientific observations during the cruise and in lunar orbit. SMART-1's science payload, with a total mass of some 19 kg, features many innovative instruments and advanced technologies. A miniaturised high-resolution camera (AMIE) for lunar surface imaging, a near-infrared point-spectrometer (SIR) for lunar mineralogy investigation, and a very compact X-ray spectrometer (D-CIXS) with a new type of detector and micro-collimator which will provide fluorescence spectroscopy and imagery of the Moon's surface elemental composition. The payload also includes an experiment (KaTE) aimed at demonstrating deep-space telemetry and telecommand communications in the X and Ka-bands, a radio-science experiment (RSIS), a deep space optical link (Laser-Link Experiment), using the ESA Optical Ground station in Tenerife, and the validation of a system of autonomous navigation SMART-1 lunar science investigations include studies of the chemical (OBAN) based on image processing. SMART-1 lunar science investigations include studies of the chemical composition and evolution of the Moon, of geophysical processes (volcanism, tectonics, cratering, erosion, deposition of ices and volatiles) for comparative planetology, and high resolution studies in preparation for future steps of lunar exploration. The mission could address several topics such as the accretional processes that led to the formation of planets, and the origin of the

  8. Very preliminary reference Moon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Raphaël F.; Gagnepain-Beyneix, Jeannine; Chevrot, Sébastien; Lognonné, Philippe

    2011-09-01

    The deep structure of the Moon is a missing piece to understand the formation and evolution of the Earth-Moon system. Despite the great amount of information brought by the Apollo passive seismic experiment (ALSEP), the lunar structure below deep moonquakes, which occur around 900 km depth, remains largely unknown. We construct a reference Moon model which incorporates physical constraints, and fits both geodesic (lunar mass and polar moment of inertia, and Love numbers) and seismological (body wave arrivals measured by Apollo network) data. In this model, the core radius is constrained by the detection of S waves reflected from the core. In a first step, for each core radius, a radial model of the lunar interior, including P and S wave velocities and density, is inverted from seismic and geodesic data. In a second step, the core radius is determined from the detection of shear waves reflected on the lunar core by waveform stacking of deep moonquake Apollo records. This detection has been made possible by careful data selection and processing, including a correction of the gain of horizontal sensors based on the principle of energy equipartition inside the coda of lunar seismic records, and a precise alignment of SH waveforms by a non-linear inversion method. The Very Preliminary REference MOON model (VPREMOON) obtained here has a core radius of 380 ± 40 km and an average core mass density of 5200 ± 1000 kg/m 3. The large error bars on these estimates are due to the poorly constrained S-wave velocity profile at the base of the mantle and to mislocation errors of deep moonquakes. The detection of horizontally polarized S waves reflected from the core and the absence of detection of vertically polarized S waves favour a liquid state in the outermost part of the core. All these results are consistent, within their error bars, with previous estimates based on lunar rotation dissipation ( Williams et al., 2001) and on lunar induced magnetic moment ( Hood et al., 1999).

  9. Capillary Optics Based X-Ray Micro-Imaging Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampai, D.; Dabagov, S. B.; Cappuccio, G.; Longoni, A.; Frizzi, T.; Cibin, G.

    2010-04-01

    A rapidly developed during the last few years micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μXRF) is a promising multi-elemental technique for non-destructive analysis. Typically it is rather hard to perform laboratory μXRF analysis because of the difficulty of producing an original small-size X-ray beam as well as its focusing. Recently developed for X-ray beam focusing polycapillary optics offers laboratory X-ray micro probes. The combination of polycapillary lens and fine-focused micro X-ray tube can provide high intensity radiation flux on a sample that is necessary in order to perform the elemental analysis. In comparison to a pinhole, an optimized "X-ray source-op tics" system can result in radiation density gain of more than 3 orders by the value. The most advanced way to get that result is to use the confocal configuration based on two X-ray lenses, one for the fluorescence excitation and the other for the detection of secondary emission from a sample studied. In case of X-ray capillary microfocusing a μXRF instrument designed in the confocal scheme allows us to obtain a 3D elemental mapping. In this work we will show preliminary results obtained with our prototype, a portable X-ray microscope for X-ray both imaging and fluorescence analysis; it enables μXRF elemental mapping simultaneously with X-ray imaging. A prototype of compact XRF spectrometer with a spatial resolution less than 100 μm has been designed.

  10. Embedding and Chemical Reactivation of Green Fluorescent Protein in the Whole Mouse Brain for Optical Micro-Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Yadong; Zhou, Hongfu; Jia, Yao; Liu, Ling; Liu, Xiuli; Rao, Gong; Li, Longhui; Wang, Xiaojun; Lv, Xiaohua; Xiong, Hanqing; Yang, Zhongqin; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-01-01

    Resin embedding has been widely applied to fixing biological tissues for sectioning and imaging, but has long been regarded as incompatible with green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled sample because it reduces fluorescence. Recently, it has been reported that resin-embedded GFP-labeled brain tissue can be imaged with high resolution. In this protocol, we describe an optimized protocol for resin embedding and chemical reactivation of fluorescent protein labeled mouse brain, we have used mice as experiment model, but the protocol should be applied to other species. This method involves whole brain embedding and chemical reactivation of the fluorescent signal in resin-embedded tissue. The whole brain embedding process takes a total of 7 days. The duration of chemical reactivation is ~2 min for penetrating 4 μm below the surface in the resin-embedded brain. This protocol provides an efficient way to prepare fluorescent protein labeled sample for high-resolution optical imaging. This kind of sample was demonstrated to be imaged by various optical micro-imaging methods. Fine structures labeled with GFP across a whole brain can be detected. PMID:28352214

  11. The ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager at Gale crater: Review of the first year of operations on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mouélic, S.; Gasnault, O.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Bridges, N. T.; Langevin, Y.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; Wiens, R. C.; Pinet, P.; Newsom, H. E.; Deen, R. G.; Bell, J. F.; Johnson, J. R.; Rapin, W.; Barraclough, B.; Blaney, D. L.; Deflores, L.; Maki, J.; Malin, M. C.; Pérez, R.; Saccoccio, M.

    2015-03-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, "Curiosity" landed near the base of a 5 km-high mound of layered material in Gale crater. Mounted on the rover mast, the ChemCam instrument is designed to remotely determine the composition of soils and rocks located a few meters from the rover, using a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) coupled to a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). We provide an overview of the diverse imaging investigations that were carried out by ChemCam's RMI during the first year of operation on Mars. 1182 individual panchromatic RMI images were acquired from Sol 10 to Sol 360 to document the ChemCam LIBS measurements and to characterize soils, rocks and rover hardware. We show several types of derived imaging products, including mosaics of images taken before and after laser shots, difference images to enhance the most subtle laser pits, merges with color Mastcam-100 images, micro-topography using the Z-stack technique, and time lapse movies. The very high spatial resolution of RMI is able to resolve rock textures at sub-mm scales, which provides clues regarding the origin (igneous versus sedimentary) of rocks, and to reveal information about their diagenetic and weathering evolution. In addition to its scientific value over the range accessible by LIBS (1-7 m), we also show that RMI can also serve as a powerful long distance reconnaissance tool to characterize the landscape at distances up to several kilometers from the rover.

  12. Embedding and Chemical Reactivation of Green Fluorescent Protein in the Whole Mouse Brain for Optical Micro-Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gang, Yadong; Zhou, Hongfu; Jia, Yao; Liu, Ling; Liu, Xiuli; Rao, Gong; Li, Longhui; Wang, Xiaojun; Lv, Xiaohua; Xiong, Hanqing; Yang, Zhongqin; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-01-01

    Resin embedding has been widely applied to fixing biological tissues for sectioning and imaging, but has long been regarded as incompatible with green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled sample because it reduces fluorescence. Recently, it has been reported that resin-embedded GFP-labeled brain tissue can be imaged with high resolution. In this protocol, we describe an optimized protocol for resin embedding and chemical reactivation of fluorescent protein labeled mouse brain, we have used mice as experiment model, but the protocol should be applied to other species. This method involves whole brain embedding and chemical reactivation of the fluorescent signal in resin-embedded tissue. The whole brain embedding process takes a total of 7 days. The duration of chemical reactivation is ~2 min for penetrating 4 μm below the surface in the resin-embedded brain. This protocol provides an efficient way to prepare fluorescent protein labeled sample for high-resolution optical imaging. This kind of sample was demonstrated to be imaged by various optical micro-imaging methods. Fine structures labeled with GFP across a whole brain can be detected.

  13. China (CNSA) views of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, S.

    prominent Chinese space scientists' remarks, are also the driving forces for China's determination to reach the Moon. Preliminary Studies Although China did not begin preliminary studies for lunar exploration seriously until the early 1990s, approximately the same time when the human spaceflight Project 921 started, lunar studies have been carried out in the nation for a few decades. The Advancement of Selenology, completed in 1977 by a team led by Ouyang Ziyuan at the CAS Institute of Geochemistry in Guiyang, is probably the most important work on the subject published in China. Under the direction of the Project 863 Experts Committee, a team of scientists led by Ouyang Ziyuan and Zhu Guibo of China Aerospace Industry Corporation in 1993 began to study the feasibility and necessity of lunar exploration by China. Based on a comprehensive survey of the nation's space technology and infrastructures, the feasibility study completed in 1995 believed it was possible to orbit a lunar satellite by 2000. In April 1997, CAS members Yang Jiachi, Wang Daheng and Chen Fangyun issued the "Proposal for Development of Our Nation's Lunar Exploration Technology" as part of the Project 863. The research and development of robotic rovers for lunar exploration began the following year. In May 2000 and January 2001, Tsinghua University organized two symposia on lunar exploration technology. The third lunar conference was held in March 2001 at Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics (BUAA) to discuss China's lunar exploration and human spaceflight in the 21st century. A feasibility study for China's lunar adventure was unveiled at the conference for the first time. Objectives and Scenarios The primary objective of the first stage of lunar exploration, according to the feasibility study, will be a comprehensive survey of the lunar surface through remote sensing. Based on this survey, areas for soft landings will be selected. Lunar rovers will further explore these areas to identify an

  14. Laurence Moon Bardet Biedl Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, A B; Niloy, Ahmed Al Muntasir; Shah, Tazin Afrose; Biswas, Sunil Kumar; Imran, A Khan; Murshed, Khaled Mahbub; Ahmed, Mashrafi

    2009-01-01

    A 14 year old Bangladeshi boy presented with obesity, reduced vision, mental retardation, hypogonadism, delayed development and learning difficulty. On examination, he had polydactyly, moon face, bilateral gynaecomastia, small penis and undescended testes. Retinitis pigmentosa was found on fundoscopy. With typical features, he was diagnosed as a case of Laurence-Moon-Bardet-Biedl syndrome. It is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with mutation in 6 loci identified so far. It is commonly found in communities with high inter-family marriage. Clinical features appear early in childhood and diagnosis is usually done by puberty. Prominent features include rod-cone dystrophy leading to blindness, postaxial polydactyly, central obesity, learning disability, hypogonadism in males and renal dysfunction. Relatives with a single affected gene may have obesity, hypertension, diabetes and renal disease. There is increased risk of renal cell carcinoma. There is no definite treatment. Early diagnosis and symptomatic, supportive and rehabilitative measures can reduce the disability. These include dietary modification, oral hypoglycaemic drugs, testosterone supplement etc. Relatives of the patient should be screened for renal abnormality.

  15. Taking Europe To The Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    The first step in this ESA initiated programme is a unique project called 'Euromoon 2000' which is currently being studied by ESA engineers/ scientists and key European Space Industries. The project is intended to celebrate Europe's entry into the New Millennium; and to promote public awareness and interest in science, technology and space exploration. Euromoon 2000 has an innovative and ambitious implementation plan. This includes a 'partnership with industry' and a financing scheme based on raising part of the mission's budget from sponsorship through a dynamic public relations strategy and marketing programme. The mission begins in earnest with the small (approx. 100 kg) LunarSat orbiter satellite, to be designed and built by 50 young scientists and engineers from across Europe. Scheduled for launch in 2000 as a secondary payload on a European Ariane 5 rocket, it will then orbit the Moon, mapping the planned landing area in greater detail in preparation of the EuroMoon Lander in 2001. The Lander's 40 kg payload allocation will accommodate amongst others scientific instrumentation for in-situ investigation of the unique site. Elements of specific support to the publicity and fund-raising campaign will also be considered. The Lander will aim for the 'Peak of Eternal Light' on the rim of the 20 km-diameter, 3 km-deep Shackleton South Pole crater - a site uniquely suited for establishing a future outpost. This location enjoys almost continuous sunlight thus missions can rely on solar power instead of bulky batteries or costly and potentially hazardous nuclear power generation. As a consequence of the undulating South Pole terrain there are also permanently shadowed areas - amongst the coldest in the Solar System resulting in conditions highly favourable for the formation of frozen volatiles (as suggested by the Clementine mission in 1994). Earlier this year (7th January 1998), NASA launched its Lunar Prospector satellite which is currently performing polar lunar

  16. Meteoritic material on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. W.; Ganapathy, R.; Higuchi, H.; Anders, E.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of meteoritic material are found on the moon: micrometeorites, ancient planetesimal debris from the "early intense bombardment," and debris of recent, craterforming projectiles. Their amounts and compositions have been determined from trace element studies. The micrometeorite component is uniformly distributed over the entire lunar surface, but is seen most clearly in mare soils. It has a primitive, C1-chondrite-like composition, and comprises 1 to 1.5 percent of mature soils. Apparently it represents cometary debris. The ancient component is seen in highland breccias and soils. Six varieties have been recognized, differing in their proportions of refractories (Ir, Re), volatiles (Ge, Sb), and Au. All have a fractionated composition, with volatiles depleted relative to siderophiles. The abundance patterns do not match those of the known meteorite classes. These ancient meteoritic components seem to represent the debris of an extinct population of bodies (planetisimals, moonlets) that produced the mare basins during the first 700 Myr of the moon's history. On the basis of their stratigraphy and geographic distribution, five of the six groups are tentatively assigned to specific mare basins: Imbrium, Serenitatis, Crisium, Nectaris, and Humorum or Nubium.

  17. Migration of Small Moons in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2013-02-01

    The motions of small moons through Saturn's rings provide excellent tests of radial migration models. In theory, torque exchange between these moons and ring particles leads to radial drift. We predict that moons with Hill radii r H ~ 2-24 km should migrate through the A ring in 1000 yr. In this size range, moons orbiting in an empty gap or in a full ring eventually migrate at the same rate. Smaller moons or moonlets—such as the propellers—are trapped by diffusion of disk material into corotating orbits, creating inertial drag. Larger moons—such as Pan or Atlas—do not migrate because of their own inertia. Fast migration of 2-24 km moons should eliminate intermediate-size bodies from the A ring and may be responsible for the observed large-radius cutoff of r H ~ 1-2 km in the size distribution of the A ring's propeller moonlets. Although the presence of Daphnis (r H ≈ 5 km) inside the Keeler gap challenges this scenario, numerical simulations demonstrate that orbital resonances and stirring by distant, larger moons (e.g., Mimas) may be important factors. For Daphnis, stirring by distant moons seems the most promising mechanism to halt fast migration. Alternatively, Daphnis may be a recent addition to the ring that is settling into a low inclination orbit in ~103 yr prior to a phase of rapid migration. We provide predictions of observational constraints required to discriminate among possible scenarios for Daphnis.

  18. After Apollo: Fission Origin of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, John A.

    1973-01-01

    Presents current ideas about the fission process of the Moon, including loss of mass. Saturnian rings, center of the Moon, binary stars, and uniformitarianism. Indicates that planetary formation may be best explained as a destructive, rather than a constructive process. (CC)

  19. Exploring the moon. [personal historical background perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jastrow, R.

    1981-01-01

    The genesis of lunar exploration programs is described. The idea that the dead moon could give important clues about the origin of the solar system germinated into plans for a soft landing on the moon and then into the Apollo program. The exchanges between NASA scientists and other astronomers that led to these plans are recounted.

  20. Origin and Evolution of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Cuixiang

    2014-01-01

    Since the Moon is the only natural satellite of the Earth, the research on the formation of the Moon can not only find out the formation mechanism of the satellites of Solar System planets but also reveal the evolution law of galaxies in the universe. Hence many hypotheses have been proposed for the Moon's formation, including fission,capture,condensation,and impact event hypothesis, but they all have problems. Recently, the author of this abstract discovered the formation mechanism of the Moon, which can be called ``evolution theory'', and described as follows: During some violent volcanic eruptions of the Earth, some rock debris such as pumice through deep rock hole could achieve a velocity no less than the first cosmic velocity (7.9 km/s) to enter an orbit around the Earth, one of the biggest debris is the young Moon. The orbit of the young Moon might be much closer to the Earth than it is today. There were a lot of ejecta from the Earth in the space. Hence, the Moon has merged these ejecta to become larger and larger, and farther and farther away from the Earth.This can be proved as follows: When the Moon moved around the Earth normally, the centrifugal force produced by the Moon's rotation around the Earth and the Earth's gravitation pull on the Moon had the same size. Let M be the mass of the Earth, m 1 be the mass of the Moon, r m be the radius of the Moon, r be the centroid distance between the Earth and the Moon, v be the tangential velocity of the Moon around the Earth, then Gm 1 M/r 2=m 1 v 2/r, therefore $v=\\sqrt{GM/r}$ . Near the orbit of the Moon, there were also many smaller prograde planetesimals moving around the Earth in circular orbits of radius r x (r-r m \\sqrt{GM/r}$ , which implies v x > v, these planetesimals would finally catch and merge with the Moon.Especially,if a planetesimals was large enough, it would impact the Moon forcefully, making the Moon's velocity increase to a larger

  1. Rise and fall of the Martian moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, Erik

    2016-08-01

    The two small satellites of Mars are thought to have accreted from a debris disk formed in a giant impact. Simulations suggest the moons were shepherded into formation by the dynamical influence of one or more short-lived massive inner moons.

  2. The Moon's Phases and the Self Shadow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Timothy; Guy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a new way of teaching the phases of the Moon. Through the introduction of a "self shadow" (an idea of a shadow that is not well-known), they illuminate students' understanding of the phases of the Moon and help them understand the distinction between the shadows that cause eclipses and the shadows that relate…

  3. Formative Assessment Probes: The Daytime Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2012-01-01

    The familiar adage "seeing is believing" implies that children will recall a particular phenomenon if they had the experience of seeing it with their own eyes. If this were true, then most children would believe that one could see the Moon in both daytime and at night. However, when children are asked, "Can you see the Moon in the daytime?" many…

  4. Planetary science: Signs of a wandering Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    2016-03-01

    The presence of ice at two positions on opposite sides of the Moon suggests that the satellite's orientation was once shifted away from its present spin axis -- a finding that has implications for the Moon's volcanic history. See Letter p.480

  5. Evolution of the moon: The 1974 model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    Investigations are reported of Apollo and Luna explorations which have brought about the understanding of the moon and its structure. It is shown that with this knowledge of the moon, a better understanding is presented of the earth's origin, structure and composition.

  6. The squint Moon and the witch ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.

    2015-06-01

    A witch ball is a reflecting sphere of glass. Looking into the disk that it subtends, the whole sky can be seen at one glance. This feature can be exploited to see and photograph the squint Moon illusion, in which the direction normal to the illuminated face of the Moon—its ‘attitude vector’—does not appear to point towards the Sun. The images of the Sun and Moon in the disk, the geodesic connecting them, the Moon’s attitude, and the squint angle (distinct from the tilt), can be calculated and simulated, for all celestial configurations and viewing inclinations. The Moon direction antipodal to the Sun, corresponding to full Moon, is a singularity of the attitude vector field, with index +1. The main features of the witch ball images also occur in other ways of imaging the squint Moon.

  7. Russian Scientific Project: "The Moon - 2012+"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A.; Petrova, N.

    2006-08-01

    The realization of the modern long-time programs of comprehensive investigation of the Moon in the framework: "SMART-1" (ESA, 2003+), "SELENE" (JAXA, 2007), "Chandrayaan" (India, 2007), "CHANG'E-I" (CNSA, 2007), "LRO" (NASA, 2008), and "Luna Glob" (Russia, 2012) are aimed at obtaining of broad information about lunar gravity field, precision position in the inertial coordinate system, geometrical and dynamical figure and lunar interior: qualitative parameter Q, Love number k[2], core's radius R[c], core's density etc. Russian scientific project "The Moon - 2012+" is directed on the decision of fundamental problems of celestial mechanics, selenodesy and geophysics of the Moon connected to carrying out of complex theoretical researches and computer modelling: 1. Spin-orbital long-time evolution and physical librations the multilayered Moon: ?) construction of the analytical theory of rotation of the two/ three-layer Moon and reception on its basis of physical libration tables for their application at processing precision supervisions; construction of a lunar annual book. b) The analysis of spin-orbital evolution of the early Moon, an estimation of internal energy dissipation, modelling of the long-term mechanism of maintenance free librations the Moon. 2. Geodynamics of a lunar core: the analysis of differentiation of a lunar core, detailed elaboration of plume-tectonics of a mantle and a core of the early Moon, evolution of a boundary layer a core - mantle, reconstruction of gravitational and viscous - mechanical interaction of a lunar core and a mantle, resonant dissipation of internal energy, calculation free and forced nutations a lunar core, free fluctuations of system a core - mantle. 3. Selenodesy of lunar far - side: the decision of a return problem lunar gravimetry, construction of geodynamic model of a lunar crust, a mantle and a core, border Moho, reconstruction initial mascons on the Moon, creation precision topographical and gravitational models of the

  8. Electromagnetic induction in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    The moon constitutes a nonhydromagnetic, but electrically conducting, target for the solar wind whose response reaches a peak as frequency increases and diminishes with further increase in frequency, suggesting the presence of the magnetic quadrupole moment. Magnetometer measurements of induction using Explorer and Apollo instruments are studied from both the harmonic and transient standpoint, and the resulting determination of internal bulk electrical conductivity is discussed. The closeness of the estimated internal temperature to the Ringwood-Essene solidus at 150-250 km depths suggests a layer of enhanced conductivity in lieu of high temperature. A reduced core radius estimate with a one-sigma upper limit of 360 km is reported. The discussion of lunar electrodynamics presented is restricted to the problem of induction, with only passing reference to flow fields and regional electric fields.

  9. The Moon in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Amanda

    2014-11-01

    While the Moon has been observed in the UV for decades, the real utility of this spectral region for unlocking some of the Moon’s secrets has only recently been understood. Previously the domain of atmospheric studies, the UV has now emerged as an important spectral region for studying surfaces. The ultraviolet regime is very sensitive to both space weathering effects and composition, including hydration. This presentation will cover a review of early UV lunar observations (e.g., Apollo 17, International Ultraviolet Explorer), as well as early laboratory studies that first shone a light on the importance of this spectral region. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) instrument, currently in orbit on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft, is providing critical mapping capabilities of UV signatures, including signals from the permanently shadowed regions of the poles. I will discuss some of these exciting results, and extend these to implications for other airless bodies in the solar system.

  10. Does the moon eat colors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, J.-P.

    1986-03-01

    The physical chemistry of tropospheric oxidants, particularly H2O2, and the conditions necessary for their dissolution are investigated to account for the supposed bleaching property of the moon at night. The chemistry of OH, HO2, and H2O2 is linked to the photodissociation of O3 through the production of O(1D). Gaseous H2O2 is removed by heterogeneous reactions involving aerosols and liquid water. The dissolution of H2O2, formed by the interaction of water vapor with ozone dissociation products, occurs inside of water droplets in the presence of a support liquid such as dew principally at night when the humidity is more significant. The daily solubility of ambient H2O2 is estimated, and the oxidizing capacity of H2O2 is seen to explain the bleaching properties of dew.

  11. Environmental Change in Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Vance, S.

    2014-12-01

    There is strong evidence that subsurface oceans could exist within several of the outer solar system's ice-rich moons, at Jupiter (Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto), Saturn (Enceladus and Titan), and Neptune (Triton). If liquid water is indeed available in these subsurface environments, then the availability of chemical energy becomes the greatest limitation on whether icy worlds could harbor life. Of these moons, the largest (Ganymede, Callisto, and Titan) are expected to harbor oceans deep within, and high-pressure H2O ice phases are expected farther beneath those deep oceans. In contrast, the oceans of smaller icy worlds—Europa, Enceladus, and Triton—are plausibly in direct contact with rock below. Given that serpentinization or other water-rock geochemical activity could supply reductants directly to their oceans, these icy worlds have the greatest chance to support present-day microbial life. Each of these three icy worlds displays spectacular resurfaced terrains that are very young (crater retention ages ~10s Myr and younger), with their internal activity linked to extremes in tidal heating today and/or in the geologically recent past. However, the degree of their tidal heating may have changed greatly over time. Europa is believed to experience cyclical tidal heating and activity; Enceladus may have experienced cyclical activity or a geologically recent pulse of activity; Triton may have experienced extreme tidal heating upon its capture and orbital circularization. Such dynamic pasts would pose challenges for any life within. We consider the possible effects of severe swings in the activity level of icy worlds, specifically the implications for delivery of chemical energy to their subsurface oceans.

  12. Life sciences on the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.

    Despite of the fact that the lunar environment lacks essential prerequisites for supporting life, lunar missions offer new and promising opportunities to the life sciences community. Among the disciplines of interest are exobiology, radiation biology, ecology and human physiology. In exobiology, the Moon offers an ideal platform for studies related to the understanding of the principles, leading to the origin, evolution and distribution of life. These include the analysis of lunar samples and meteorites in relatively pristine conditions, radioastronomical search for other planetary systems or Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI), and studies on the role of radiation in evolutionary processes and on the environmental limits for life. For radiation biology, the Moon provides an unique laboratory with built-in sources for optical as well as ionising radiation to investigate the biological importance of the various components of cosmic and solar radiation. Before establishing a lunar base, precursor missions will provide a characterisation of the radiation field, determination of depth dose distributions in different absorbers, the installation of a solar flare alert system, and a qualification of the biological efficiency of the mixed radiation environment. One of the most challenging projects falls into the domain of ecology with the establishment for the first time of an artificial ecosystem on a celestial body beyond the Earth. From this venture, a better understanding of the dynamics regulating our terrestrial biosphere is expected. It will also serve as a precursor of bioregenerative life support systems for a lunar base. The establishment of a lunar base with eventually long-term human presence will raise various problems in the fields of human physiology and health care, psychology and sociology. Protection guidelines for living in this hostile environment have to be established.

  13. Asteroid Ida and Its Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is the first full picture showing both asteroid 243 Ida and its newly discovered moon to be transmitted to Earth from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Galileo spacecraft--the first conclusive evidence that natural satellites of asteroids exist. Ida, the large object, is about 56 kilometers (35 miles) long. Ida's natural satellite is the small object to the right. This portrait was taken by Galileo's charge-coupled device (CCD) camera on August 28, 1993, about 14 minutes before the Jupiter-bound spacecraft's closest approach to the asteroid, from a range of 10,870 kilometers (6,755 miles). Ida is a heavily cratered, irregularly shaped asteroid in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter--the 243rd asteroid to be discovered since the first was found at the beginning of the 19th century. Ida is a member of a group of asteroids called the Koronis family. The small satellite, which is about 1.5 kilometers (1 mile) across in this view, has yet to be given a name by astronomers. It has been provisionally designated '1993 (243) 1' by the International Astronomical Union. ('1993' denotes the year the picture was taken, '243' the asteroid number and '1' the fact that it is the first moon of Ida to be found.) Although appearing to be 'next' to Ida, the satellite is actually in the foreground, slightly closer to the spacecraft than Ida is. Combining this image with data from Galileo's near-infrared mapping spectrometer, the science team estimates that the satellite is about 100 kilometers (60 miles) away from the center of Ida. This image, which was taken through a green filter, is one of a six-frame series using different color filters. The spatial resolution in this image is about 100 meters (330 feet) per pixel.

  14. Apollo astronaut supports return to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-12-01

    Nearly 40 years after the Apollo 17 Moon launch on 7 December 1972, former NASA astronaut Harrison Schmitt said there is "no question" that the Moon is still worth going to, "whether you think about the science of the Moon or the resources of the Moon, or its relationship to accelerating our progress toward Mars." Schmitt, a geologist and the lunar module pilot for that final Apollo mission, was speaking at a 6 December news briefing about lunar science at the AGU Fall Meeting. "By going back to the Moon, you accelerate your ability to go anywhere else," Schmitt said, because of the ability to gain experience on a solar system body just a 3-day journey from Earth; test new hardware and navigation and communication techniques; and utilize lunar resources such as water, hydrogen, methane, and helium-3. He said lunar missions also would be a way "to develop new generations of people who know how to work in deep space. The people who know how to work [there] are my age, if not older, and we need young people to get that kind of experience." Schmitt, 77, said that a particularly interesting single location to explore would be the Aitken Basin at the Moon's south pole, where a crater may have reached into the Moon's upper mantle. He also said a longer duration exploration program might be able to explore multiple sites.

  15. The Moon's eclipse from 15 June 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex; Paduraru, Catalin

    2011-06-01

    The authors present a video film of the Total Eclipse of the Moon from 15 June 2011, filmed in Feleac, Cluj-Napoca County, Romania. The eclipse shows evidently irregularities on the Earth's shadow on the Surface of the Moon. One discusses the origin of these irregularities. As is known the mountains on the Moon could be observed by a 20 times magnification. The film shows irregularities of the order of magnitude of 20 km, which could origin from mounts (in Africa, Kenya, which are on the line of seeing in this case), underwater depressions (very less probable in this concrete case), as well as from clouds, which could have about or more than 20 km above the Earth's Surface. The website by Catalin Paduraru, which can be found inside the text of the article http://www.astrosnake.com include also photographs from some previous eclipses of the Moon: 03.03.2007, Biescas, Spain; 14.03.2006, Izarra, Spain (Penumbral); 28.10.2004, Bucharest, Romania, as well as some photographs of the Moon: http://www.astrosnake.com/Pages/Moon/Moon.htm

  16. MIGRATION OF SMALL MOONS IN SATURN's RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J. E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-02-20

    The motions of small moons through Saturn's rings provide excellent tests of radial migration models. In theory, torque exchange between these moons and ring particles leads to radial drift. We predict that moons with Hill radii r {sub H} {approx} 2-24 km should migrate through the A ring in 1000 yr. In this size range, moons orbiting in an empty gap or in a full ring eventually migrate at the same rate. Smaller moons or moonlets-such as the propellers-are trapped by diffusion of disk material into corotating orbits, creating inertial drag. Larger moons-such as Pan or Atlas-do not migrate because of their own inertia. Fast migration of 2-24 km moons should eliminate intermediate-size bodies from the A ring and may be responsible for the observed large-radius cutoff of r {sub H} {approx} 1-2 km in the size distribution of the A ring's propeller moonlets. Although the presence of Daphnis (r {sub H} Almost-Equal-To 5 km) inside the Keeler gap challenges this scenario, numerical simulations demonstrate that orbital resonances and stirring by distant, larger moons (e.g., Mimas) may be important factors. For Daphnis, stirring by distant moons seems the most promising mechanism to halt fast migration. Alternatively, Daphnis may be a recent addition to the ring that is settling into a low inclination orbit in {approx}10{sup 3} yr prior to a phase of rapid migration. We provide predictions of observational constraints required to discriminate among possible scenarios for Daphnis.

  17. The initial thermal state of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    It is argued that the initial thermal state of the Moon was molten. The existence of young thrust fault scarps in the highlands and kbar stress drop, shallow moonquakes both suggest that the thermoelastic stresses in the outer crust are currently in the kbar range. This is expected if the Moon was initially molten, but not if the Moon had a magma ocean only a few hundred km deep. The thesis is also supported by reference to model studies of the concentrations of refractory incompatible elements.

  18. Gravitational radiation observations on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, R. T.; Saulson, P. R.; Armstrong, J. W.; Hellings, R. W.; Bender, P. L.; Drever, R. W. P.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses the features of a laser-interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) which is planned for operation in the Unitied States, with special attention given to the benefits gained from an addition of a low-mass laser gravitational wave antenna on the moon to the earth-based antennas. It is pointed out that the addition of a moon-based antenna would improve the angular resolution for burst signals by a factor of about 50 (in the plane containing the source, the moon, and the earth), which would be of major importance in studies of gravitational wave sources.

  19. Galileo Teacher Training Program - MoonDays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenatigala, T.; Doran, R.

    2012-09-01

    Moon is an excellent tool for classroom education. Many teachers fail to implement lunar science in classroom at several levels though - lack of guidance, finding the right materials, and implanting lessons in the school curriculum - just to name a few. To overcome this need, Galileo Teacher Training Program (GTTP) [1] present MoonDays, a resource guide for teachers globally which can be used both in and out of classroom. GTTP MoonDays includes scientific knowledge, hands-on activities, computing skills, creativity and disability based lesson plans.

  20. Lunar magnetism and an early cold moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangway, D. W.; Sharpe, H. A.

    1974-01-01

    Models of lunar magnetism have involved dynamo action in a fluid core in an early hot moon; an early cold moon magnetized some time before 4 billion years ago, which has subsequently heated up; and local field sources which, in some models, are related to impact. The present work examines the second possibility and shows that, provided the moon contained a few percent of metallic iron and was exposed to an extra-lunar field of about 10 or 20 oersted while much of it was still below the Curie point of iron, a restricted class of thermal evolution models, which satisfy the known constraints, can be derived.

  1. Mission to the Moon: Europe's priorities for the scientific exploration and utilisation of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battrick, Bruce; Barron, C.

    1992-06-01

    A study to determine Europe's potential role in the future exploration and utilization of the Moon is presented. To establish the scientific justifications the Lunar Study Steering Group (LSSG) was established reflecting all scientific disciplines benefitting from a lunar base (Moon studies, astronomy, fusion, life sciences, etc.). Scientific issues were divided into three main areas: science of the Moon, including all investigations concerning the Moon as a planetary body; science from the Moon, using the Moon as a platform and therefore including observatories in the broadest sense; science on the Moon, including not only questions relating to human activities in space, but also the development of artificial ecosystems beyond the Earth. Science of the Moon focuses on geographical, geochemical and geological observations of the Earth-Moon system. Science from the Moon takes advantage of the stable lunar ground, its atmosphere free sky and, on the far side, its radio quiet environment. The Moon provides an attractive platform for the observation and study of the Universe. Two techniques that can make unique cause of the lunar platform are ultraviolet to submillimeter interferometric imaging, and very low frequency astronomy. One of the goals of life sciences studies (Science on the Moon) is obviously to provide the prerequisite information for establishing a manned lunar base. This includes studies of human physiology under reduced gravity, radiation protection and life support systems, and feasibility studies based on existing hardware. The overall recommendations are essentially to set up specific study teams for those fields judged to be the most promising for Europe, with the aim of providing more detailed scientific and technological specifications. It is also suggested that the scope of the overall study activities be expanded in order to derive mission scenarios for a viable ESA lunar exploration program and to consider economic, legal and policy matters

  2. Our World: NASA's New Moon Robot

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA plans to use a six-legged, wheeled robot for missions to the moon and Mars called the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer, or Athlete. Athlete will be used to move the astronauts...

  3. Upstream Waves and Particles at the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Halekas, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter presents an up-to-date catalog of Moon-related particle populations and lunar upstream waves obtained from in situ measurements at low (<˜100 km) and high altitudes, aimed at organizing and clarifying the currently available information on this complex region, where multiple categories of waves and particles coexist. It then briefly outlines the observed properties of a variety of classes of lunar upstream waves, as well as their generation mechanisms currently proposed, in association with the lunar upstream particle distributions. The lunar upstream region magnetically connected to the Moon and its wake, the fore-moon, represents a remarkably rich zoo of different classes of waves and different types of particles. Although recent observations have substantially enhanced our knowledge by revealing a number of new categories of upstream particles and waves at the Moon, many fundamental questions remain unanswered, and these are outlined in the chapter.

  4. Bringing the Moon into the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschall, Laurence A.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a method to teach introductory astronomy students about the phases of the moon. Uses video techniques to aid students in developing the skill of visualizing the same phenomenon from different frames of reference. (JRH)

  5. The economics of mining the Martian moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Raymond S.; Blacic, James D.; Vaniman, David T.

    1987-01-01

    The costs for extracting and shipping volatiles such as water, carbon, and nitrogen that might be found on Phobos and Deimos are estimated. The costs are compared to the cost of shipping the same volatiles from earth, assuming the use of nuclear powered mining facilities and freighters. Mineral resources and possible products from the Martian moons, possible markets for these products, and the costs of transporting these resources to LEO or GEO or to transportation nodal points are examined. Most of the technology needed to mine the moons has already been developed. The need for extraterrestrial sources of propellants for ion propulsion systems and ways in which the mining of the moons would reduce the cost of space operations near earth are discussed. It is concluded that it would be commercially viable to mine the Martian moons, making a profit of at least a 10 percent return on capital.

  6. The moons of Uranus, Neptune and Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 2, launched in August 1977, will fly by Uranus in January, 1986, passing within 29,000 km of that planet's innermost moon, Miranda. It will subsequently encounter Neptune in August 1989, flying within 10,000 km of its inner satellite, Triton; images made of this moon by a high resolution camera are expected to reveal surface features as small as a few hundred meters in diameter. The composition of the Uranian moons will br inferred from their near-IR reflectance spectra and mean densities. While the spacecraft will not fly by Pluto, it is expected that the lessons learned from the Voyager encounters with Neptune and Uranus will expand current understanding of Pluto and its moon, Charon.

  7. NASA Developing Mining Robot for Moon, Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA is developing the RASSOR mining robot to collect soil, or regolith, on the moon or Mars so it can be processed into rocket fuel, breathable air and other commodities. By using materials availa...

  8. Moon Phase & Libration 2013: Additional Graphics

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows the phase and libration of the Moon throughout the year 2013, at hourly intervals. Each frame represents one hour. In addition, this version of the visualization shows addi...

  9. Yes, there was a moon race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Examination of newly disclosed evidence confirms that the Soviets were indeed striving to reach the moon before the U.S. in 1969. It is noted that a Soviet unmanned lunar probe crashed on the moon's surface only hours before the U.S. Apollo landing. Now confirmed openly are moon-exploration schedules that were competitive with Apollo plans, the names and histories of Soviet lunar boosters and landers, identities of the lunar cosmonauts; and even photos of manned lunar craft are available. Additional details on the troubled moon-probe program are presented: technical problems, continuous changes in goals, schedules, and planning, vehicle and personnel disasters, transfer of authority between ministries, and political power struggles in the scientific community.

  10. The Moons of Uranus, Neptune and Pluto.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert Hamilton; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1985-01-01

    In preparation for the Voyager flybys in 1989, the pace of ground-based investigations of the moons of Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto has quickened considerably. Information derived from these investigations is presented. (JN)

  11. Extreme perigees and apogees of the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeus, J.

    1981-08-01

    A study of extreme perigees and apogees of the moon is presented. While 0.0549 is the mean value of the moon's orbit eccentricity, it reaches a maximum every 206 days when the major axis of the moon's orbit is directed towards the sun, and a minimum when the major axis of the lunar orbit is at a right angle to the sun, with the variation of perigee distance much larger than that of apogee. The smallest and largest possible values for the distance between the centers of the earth and moon from 1750 through 2125 were calculated, the most extreme perigee being 356,375 km, January 4, 1912, an apogee being 406,720 km, February 3, 2125. Other information was deduced from the resulting table of distances, including the influence of the earth's variable distance to the sun and the saros period.

  12. LRO Exposes the Moon's Complex, Turbulent Youth

    NASA Video Gallery

    Using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), NASA scientists have created the first-ever comprehensive catalog of large craters on the moon. In this animation, lun...

  13. A Narrated Tour of the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    Although the moon has remained largely unchanged during human history, our understanding of it and how it has evolved over time has evolved dramatically. Thanks to new measurements, we have new and...

  14. NASA Camera Catches Moon 'Photobombing' Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    On July 5, 2016, the moon passed between NOAA's DSCOVR satellite and Earth. NASA's EPIC camera aboard DSCOVR snapped these images over a period of about four hours. In this set, the far side of the...

  15. In the Shadow of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A description of the moon's total eclipse indicating the path, traveling speed and duration, followed by a concise description of how a total eclipse happens and what scientists actually study with relations to an eclipse. (EB)

  16. Effective Methods of Teaching Moon Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Heather; Hintz, E. G.; Lawler, M. J.; Jones, M.; Mangrubang, F. R.; Neeley, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    This research investigates the effectiveness of several commonly used methods for teaching the causes of moon phases to sixth grade students. Common teaching methods being investigated are the use of diagrams, animations, modeling/kinesthetics and direct observations of moon phases using a planetarium. Data for each method will be measured by a pre and post assessment of students understanding of moon phases taught using one of the methods. The data will then be used to evaluate the effectiveness of each teaching method individually and comparatively, as well as the method's ability to discourage common misconceptions about moon phases. Results from this research will provide foundational data for the development of educational planetarium shows for the deaf or other linguistically disadvantage children.

  17. EPIC View of Moon Transiting the Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation features actual satellite images of the far side of the moon, illuminated by the sun, as it crosses between the DSCOVR spacecraft's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) and tele...

  18. Earth and Moon as viewed from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-368, 22 May 2003

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Globe diagram illustrates the Earth's orientation as viewed from Mars (North and South America were in view).

    Earth/Moon: This is the first image of Earth ever taken from another planet that actually shows our home as a planetary disk. Because Earth and the Moon are closer to the Sun than Mars, they exhibit phases, just as the Moon, Venus, and Mercury do when viewed from Earth. As seen from Mars by MGS on 8 May 2003 at 13:00 GMT (6:00 AM PDT), Earth and the Moon appeared in the evening sky. The MOC Earth/Moon image has been specially processed to allow both Earth (with an apparent magnitude of -2.5) and the much darker Moon (with an apparent magnitude of +0.9) to be visible together. The bright area at the top of the image of Earth is cloud cover over central and eastern North America. Below that, a darker area includes Central America and the Gulf of Mexico. The bright feature near the center-right of the crescent Earth consists of clouds over northern South America. The image also shows the Earth-facing hemisphere of the Moon, since the Moon was on the far side of Earth as viewed from Mars. The slightly lighter tone of the lower portion of the image of the Moon results from the large and conspicuous ray system associated with the crater Tycho.

    A note about the coloring process: The MGS MOC high resolution camera only takes grayscale (black-and-white) images. To 'colorize' the image, a Mariner 10 Earth/Moon image taken in 1973 was used to color the MOC Earth and Moon picture. The procedure used was as follows: the Mariner 10 image was converted from 24-bit color to 8-bit color using a JPEG to GIF conversion program. The 8-bit color image was converted to 8-bit grayscale and an associated lookup table mapping each gray value of the image to a red-green-blue color triplet (RGB). Each color triplet was root-sum-squared (RSS), and sorted in increasing RSS

  19. The Circumnavigation of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, C. S.

    The unsupported circumnavigation of the lunar surface, either around the equator or over both poles is the longest distance expedition that can be implemented on the lunar surface. This mini-review describes some of the attributes of this expedition and reviews some of the dangers that the team will face. By travelling at just under 16 km/hr along the western terminator around the equator the 29 day, 11,000 km, expedition can avoid darkness altogether and have 14 days of light to repair a vehicle should it break down. The minimum mean speed possible to avoid dark will be just over 10 km/hr. Periods of complete darkness, which will be encountered during the crossing of one of the poles during a polar circumnavigation (on account of the moon's small obliquity) or long-term breakdown during an equatorial circumnavigation, will impose challenges in navigation and vehicle manoeuvring not dissimilar to overwintering operations at the terrestrial poles. Pressurized lunar ball tents are described, together with some other field innovations for studies away from pressurized vehicles. The accomplishment of the first lunar circumnavigation will represent a significant milestone in Solar System expeditionary endeavour. Other lunar expeditions are listed.

  20. Water on the Moon Confirmed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-11-01

    When NASA's Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) and a companion rocket purposely slammed into a crater at the Moon's south pole on 9 October, some observers on Earth lamented as anticlimactic the raised plumes of material that were partially blocked by a crater ridge and were difficult to see with backyard telescopes. However, it turns out that the projectiles struck it big. “Indeed, yes, we found water. We didn’t find just a little bit; we found a significant amount,” said Anthony Colaprete, LCROSS principal investigator with the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif. At a 13 November news briefing, Colaprete lifted a 2-gallon plastic bucket and said preliminary results indicate that instruments detected about a dozen buckets' worth of water in parts of the two plumes, the first generated by the spent Centaur upper stage of the Atlas V launch vehicle at 1131 UTC and the second generated by LCROSS about 4 minutes later. NASA described the two plumes as a high-angle plume of vapor and fine dust and a lower-angle ejecta curtain of heavier material. LCROSS and the Centaur upper stage hit the permanently shadowed Cabeus crater.

  1. Nuclear technologies for Moon and Mars exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear technologies are essential to successful Moon and Mars exploration and settlements. Applications can take the form of nuclear propulsion for transport of crews and cargo to Mars and the Moon; surface power for habitats and base power; power for human spacecraft to Mars; shielding and life science understanding for protection against natural solar and cosmic radiations; radioisotopes for sterilization, medicine, testing, and power; and resources for the benefits of Earth. 5 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Why Is the Moon Synchronously Rotating?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-19

    and a retrograde initial rotation. Key words: Moon – planets and satellites: dynamical evolution and stability. 1 IN T RO D U C T I O N The origin of...tides, which should not be used for planets and moons of terrestrial composition (Efroimsky & Makarov 2013). In recent years, a more realistic model...Efroimsky & Williams 2009; Efroimsky 2012). In the framework of this model, the capture of Mercury into the current 3:2 spin– orbit resonance becomes a

  3. Long distance observations with the ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager: Eroded Mount Sharp deposits on Gale Crater floor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsom, Horton; Gasnault, Olivier; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Le Deit, Laetitia; Wiens, Roger; Anderson, Ryan; Herkenhoff, Ken; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Bridges, Nathan; Grotzinger, John P.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jacob, Samantha; MSL Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Curiosity's ChemCam includes a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) to provide context for the laser pits, to obtain long-range images, and for passive reflectance spectra (400-840 nm). Use of the RMI has been enhanced by a new autofocus algorithm using onboard analysis of RMI images. The RMI has the finest pixel scale on the rover with 19.6 μrad/pixel (1024x1024 grayscale), compared to Mastcam M100 color images (74 μrad/pixel). The pixel scale for RMI images is ~2 cm at 1 km, and ~26 cm at 12 km, beyond which HiRISE orbital resolution (25 cm/pixel) is better. Note: useful resolution of geological features requires 3-5 pixels. A major question for Gale Crater (age 3.6 BY), is whether the presently truncated deposits on Mt. Sharp originally extended across the crater floor, prior to the deposition of Peace Vallis and other fans at 3.2 BY? HiRISE imagery shows early, partly eroded deposits in the vicinity of the Peace Vallis fan, but the materials could have been impact related. Long distance RMI images of the deposits, however, confirm the presence of eroded buttes with at least 8-10 horizontal layers (0.8-1.6 m thick) in one example, consistent with a sedimentary origin. The layered buttes rise as much as 12 meters above the surrounding deposits. The later deposits embay the lower portions of the buttes and are probably a phase of the later Peace Vallis fan. The RMI images show the presence of blocks in this fan unit of about 50-80 cm, consistent with an enhanced retention of craters that has been noted for this unit. Another RMI observation just above the Peace Vallis channel shows an eroded bench or series of layered hills at the same level, that could also indicate early sediment deposits prior to Peace Vallis fan. Conclusions - The RMI images (and HiRISE images of other crater floor deposits) suggest at least some deposits possibly related to Mt. Sharp were present on the crater floor near the Peace Vallis fan and now are highly eroded, but their original thickness is

  4. Global and Local Gravity Field Models of the Moon Using GRAIL Primary and Extended Mission Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Sabaka, Terence J.; Nicholas, Joseph B.; Mazarico, Erwan; Rowlands, David D.; Loomis, Bryant D.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission was designed to map the structure of the lunar interior from crust to core and to advance the understanding of the Moon's thermal evolution by producing a high-quality, high-resolution map of the gravitational field of the Moon. The mission consisted of two spacecraft, which were launched in September 2011 on a Discovery-class NASA mission. Ka-band tracking between the two satellites was the single science instrument, augmented by tracking from Earth using the Deep Space Network (DSN).

  5. 2010 National Observe the Moon Night!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, Doris; Hsu, B. C.; Bleacher, L. V.; Day, B.; Jones, A.; Mitchell, B.; Shaner, A.; Shipp, S.

    2010-05-01

    We are creating a nation-wide, annual public outreach event called "National Observe the Moon Night” (NOMN) that provides opportunities for involving new partners in engaging the public in lunar science and exploration. The 2010 NOMN events will occur at our partner institutions - Ames Research Center (ARC; Moffett Field, CA), Goddard Space Flight Center (GFSC; Greenbelt, MD), Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI; Houston, TX), and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC; Huntsville, AL). The goal of National Observe the Moon Night is to engage the lunar science and education community, our partner networks, amateur astronomers, space enthusiasts, and the general public in annual lunar observation campaigns that share the excitement of lunar science and exploration. National Observe the Moon Night events will use NASA's "Tweet-ups" model and partners' dissemination networks to promote and recruit participation in the events. All information about NOMN will be supplied on a central website, accessible to the public (http://mymoon.lpi.usra.edu/nationalobservethemoonnight). Members of the public are encouraged to host their own NOMN events, and there will be a place for local astronomy clubs, schools, or other groups to post information about NOMN events they are organizing. To assist with their efforts, the website will contain downloadable documents of templates of advertising fliers, Moon maps, and activities that will be distributed at the national events, such as Moon calendar journals. After the events, participants will be able to continue using the website to follow links for more information about sites indicated on their Moon maps.

  6. The Impact History Of The Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    The bombardment history of the Earth-Moon system has been debated since the first recognition that the circular features on the Moon may be impact craters. Because the lunar impact record is the only planetary impact record to be calibrated with absolute ages, it underpins our understanding of geologic ages on every other terrestrial planet. One of the more remarkable results to come out of lunar sample analyses is the hypothesis that a large number of impact events occurred on the Moon during a narrow window in time approximately 3.8 to 4.1 billion years ago (the lunar cataclysm ). Subsequent work on the lunar and martian meteorite suites; remote sensing of the Moon, Mars, asteroids, and icy satellites; improved dynamical modeling; and investigation of terrestrial zircons extend the cataclysm hypothesis to the Earth, other terrestrial planets, and possibly the entire solar system. Renewed US and international interest in exploring the Moon offers new potential to constrain the Earth-Moon bombardment history. This paper will review the lunar bombardment record, timing and mechanisms for cataclysmic bombardment, and questions that may be answered in a new age of exploration.

  7. How Apollo Flew to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Nick

    2009-10-01

    Eos readers who were even young children in the summer of 1969 probably will remember the first Moon landing vividly. If, like myself, they went on to develop a lifelong interest in manned spaceflight, they will have read many accounts in the intervening years, as diverse as Norman Mailer's, Andrew Chaikin's, and the first-person reminiscences of NASA astronaut Michael Collins. The prospect of another book about the Moon landing at first may seem uninspiring, and I confess this was my original reaction to the prospect of reading this book. Additionally, in the intervening 40 years since Apollo 11, there have been some superb films including For All Mankind (1989) and In the Shadow of the Moon (2006). The Internet has brought new possibilities for space documentation. The best known Web site on the Apollo missions is the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal, which now is hosted by NASA at http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/. The Web site includes commentary from all of the surviving Moon walkers. Scottish space enthusiast W. David Woods created the companion Apollo Flight Journal, found at http://history.nasa.gov/afj//, which focuses on how the missions actually got to the Moon and back. Now Woods has distilled the information into the book How Apollo Flew to the Moon.

  8. Robotics and telepresence for moon missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallaberger, Christian

    1994-01-01

    An integrated moon program has often been proposed as a logical next step for today's space efforts. In the context of preparing for the possibility of launching a moon program, the European Space Agency is currently conducting an internal study effort which is focusing on the assessment of key technologies. Current thinking has this moon program organized into four phases. Phase 1 will deal with lunar resource exploration. The goal would be to produce a complete chemical inventory of the moon, including oxygen, water, other volatiles, carbon, silicon, and other resources. Phase 2 will establish a permanent robotic presence on the moon via a number of landers and surface rovers. Phase 3 will extend the second phase and concentrate on the use and exploitation of local lunar resources. Phase 4 will be the establishment of a first human outpost. Some preliminary work such as the building of the outpost and the installation of scientific equipment will be done by unmanned systems before a human crew is sent to the moon.

  9. New approaches to the Moon's isotopic crisis

    PubMed Central

    Melosh, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent comparisons of the isotopic compositions of the Earth and the Moon show that, unlike nearly every other body known in the Solar System, our satellite's isotopic ratios are nearly identical to the Earth's for nearly every isotopic system. The Moon's chemical make-up, however, differs from the Earth's in its low volatile content and perhaps in the elevated abundance of oxidized iron. This surprising situation is not readily explained by current impact models of the Moon's origin and offers a major clue to the Moon's formation, if we only could understand it properly. Current ideas to explain this similarity range from assuming an impactor with the same isotopic composition as the Earth to postulating a pure ice impactor that completely vaporized upon impact. Several recent proposals follow from the suggestion that the Earth–Moon system may have lost a great deal of angular momentum during early resonant interactions. The isotopic constraint may be the most stringent test yet for theories of the Moon's origin. PMID:25114301

  10. 76 FR 37641 - Safety Zone; Independence Day Fireworks Celebration for the City of Half Moon Bay, Half Moon Bay, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... the City of Half Moon Bay, Half Moon Bay, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone in the navigable waters of Half Moon Bay, off of Pillar Point Harbor beach, Half Moon Bay, CA in support of the Independence Day...

  11. Space Science for Children: All about the Moon [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This 23-minute videotape gives children, grades K-4, a close-up look at the moon in order to answer the following questions: (1) Why does the moon appear different every night? (2) What does the moon look like up close? (3) What is it like to walk on the moon? and (4) Could we live on the moon someday? A hands-on activity designed to demonstrate…

  12. Impact landing ends SMART-1 mission to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-09-01

    science at the same time,” Racca concluded. “Operating SMART-1 has been an extremely complex but rewarding task,” said Octavio Camino-Ramos, ESA SMART-1 Spacecraft Operations Manager. “The long spiralling trajectory around Earth to test solar electric propulsion (a low-thrust approach), the long exposure to radiation, the strong perturbations of the gravity fields of the Earth-Moon system and then the reaching of a lunar orbit optimised for the scientific investigations, have allowed us to gain valuable expertise in navigation techniques for low-thrust propulsion and innovative operations concepts: telemetry distribution and alerting through the internet, and a high degree of ground operations automation - a remarkable benchmark for the future,” he explained. “For ESA’s Science Programme, SMART-1 represents a great success and a very good return on investment, both from the technological and the scientific point of view,” said Professor Southwood, ESA’s Director of Science. “It seems that right now everyone in the world is planning on going to the Moon. Future scientific missions will greatly benefit from the technological and operational experience gained thanks to this small spacecraft, while the set of scientific data gathered by SMART-1 is already helping to update our current picture of the Moon.” Note to editors More images and further updates on the SMART-1 mission end can be found at:www.esa.int/smart-1 SMART-1, (Small Mission for Advanced Research and Technology) is the first European mission to the Moon. It was launched on 27 September 2003 on board an Ariane 5 rocket, from the CSG, Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana and reached its destination in November 2004 after following a long spiralling trajectory around Earth. In this phase, the spacecraft successfully tested for the first time in space the series of advanced technologies it carried on board. The technology demonstration part of the mission was declared successfully

  13. Recent Impacts on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Bowles, Z. R.; Daubar, I.; Povilaitis, R.; Thompson, S. D.; Thompson, T. J.; Wagner, R.

    2013-12-01

    Prior to Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) observations, an understanding of impact rates of meteoroids <1 m in size was based on extrapolation techniques from near-Earth object (NEO) knowledge [1,2,3], meteors in Earth's atmosphere [4], recent impacts recorded on Mars [5,6,7], and lunar 'flashes' (likely impacts) observed by teams such as those at Marshall Space Flight Center [8]. Since July of 2009, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) collects meter scale Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images, with repeat coverage in areas of high interest. Planned and serendipitous re-imaging with similar illumination conditions provides the means to detect temporal surface changes with the ultimate goal of measuring the current flux of impacts on the Moon. To easily detect a change at the surface, NAC-pairs separated in time (temporal pair), with similar illumination geometries are compared. Overlapping regions in a temporal pair are map projected and co-registered and a ratio is computed (second observation / first observation) and examined for temporal anomalies. Some changes are clearly distinguished as newly formed craters with rims and ejecta, while others are simply small (a few pixels) reflectance changes (crater not resolved). Detections are categorized as relatively high reflectance changes (HRC) or low reflectance changes (LRC) relative to the surrounding substrate. To date the LRCs outnumber the HRCs by a factor of ten. Clusters (>3) of changes were discovered in 48 temporal pairs. So far, we have identified 599 individual changes, with 547 LRCs and 48 HRCs. Of the 599 detections, sixteen represent resolved craters, and of these diameters range up to 20 m, suggesting bolide sizes up to ~1 m diameter. The total surface area examined to date is ~25,000 square km and the maximum time window between repeat images is 2.5 years, yielding an estimated minimum 364,000 new lunar craters per year (or one crater per year for every 104 square km) detectable at the scale

  14. Polarization of Saturn's moon Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejeta, C. T.; Boehnhardt, H.; Bagnulo, S.; Muinonen, K.; Kolokolova, L.; Tozzi, G.

    2012-12-01

    One way to constrain the surface properties of atmosphereless solar system objects is to investigate the properties of the polarized light scattered from their surfaces. Using FORS2 instrument of the ESO VLT, we have carried out a series of polarization measurements of Saturn's moon Iapetus, with an accuracy of ~0.1%, over the maximum phase angle range accessible from the ground (~ 6.0 deg), and over a broad spectral range (400 - 900 nm); thereby identifying the polarimetric characteristics of the bright surface material on its trailing side and, that of the dark material on its leading side. While our linear polarizatiom measurements of Iapetus' two hemispheres show an opposite trend of phase angle dependence, the polarization values measured for the two hemispheres around similar phase angles (between ~3 - 6.0deg) differ by a factor of three. Aimed at providing a quantitative assessment of the polarization observed for Iapetus, we have also carried out simulation of the scattering and absorption properties of light by a medium consisting of spherical volume of randomly positioned monodisperse particles. For this purpose, we used the numerically exact solutions of the Maxwell equations employing the multiple sphere T-matrix method [1]. The modeling entails physical characteristics of the particulate surface such as, porosity of the particulate medium; the number of constituent particles; the size, and optical properties of the scatterers. Our model has retrived, a particle size of ~ 0.10 ≤ r ≤ 0.20μm is dominating both the dark and bright material of Iapetus. Moreover, utilizing the scattering matrix parametrization for single-particle scattering with double Henyey-Greenstein (2HG) scattering phase function, to characterize the resulting multiple scattering, we have carried out coherent backscattering simulations for a spherical random media of scatterers [2], with the goal to obtain polarimetric phase function of Iapetus. The geometric albedo values of

  15. The Icy Moons of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Richard

    The Galilean satellites formed in a nebula of dust and gas that surrounded Jupiter toward the end of the formation of the giant planet itself. Their diverse initial compositions were determined by conditions in the circum-jovian nebula, just as the planets' initial properties were governed by their formation within the circum-solar nebula. The Galilean satellites subsequently evolved under the complex interplay of orbital and geophysical processes, which included the effects of orbital resonances, tides, internal differentiation, and heat. The history and character of the satellites can be inferred from consideration of the formation of planets and the satellites, from studies of their plausible orbital evolution, from measurements of geophysical properties, especially gravitational and magnetic fields, from observations of the compositions and geological structure of their surfaces, and from geophysical modeling of the processes that can relate these lines of evidence. The three satellites with large water-ice components, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are very different from one another as a result of the ways that these processes have played out in each case. Europa has a deep liquid-water ocean with a thin layer of surface ice, Ganymede and Callisto likely have relatively thin liquid water layers deep below their surfaces, and Callisto remains only partially differentiated, with rock and ice mixed through much of its interior. A tiny inner satellite, Amalthea, also appears to be largely composed of ice. Each of these moons is fascinating in its own right, and the ensemble provides a powerful set of constraints on the processes that led to their formation and evolution.

  16. College MOON Project Australia: Preservice Teachers Learning about the Moon's Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulholland, Judith; Ginns, Ian

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a report of the Australian segment of an international multi-campus project centred on improving understanding of the Moon's phases for preservice teachers. Instructional strategies adopted for a science education subject enabled Australian participants to make extended observations of the Moon's phases and keep observational data…

  17. Not So Rare Earth? New Developments in Understanding the Origin of the Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A widely accepted model for the origin of the Earth and Moon has been a somewhat specific giant impact scenario involving an impactor to proto-Earth mass ratio of 3:7, occurring 50-60 Ma after T(sub 0), when the Earth was only half accreted, with the majority of Earth's water then accreted after the main stage of growth, perhaps from comets. There have been many changes to this specific scenario, due to advances in isotopic and trace element geochemistry, more detailed, improved, and realistic giant impact and terrestrial planet accretion modeling, and consideration of terrestrial water sources other than high D/H comets. The current scenario is that the Earth accreted faster and differentiated quickly, the Moon-forming impact could have been mid to late in the accretion process, and water may have been present during accretion. These new developments have broadened the range of conditions required to make an Earth-Moon system, and suggests there may be many new fruitful avenues of research. There are also some classic and unresolved problems such as the significance of the identical O isotopic composition of the Earth and Moon, the depletion of volatiles on the lunar mantle relative to Earth's, the relative contribution of the impactor and proto-Earth to the Moon's mass, and the timing of Earth's possible atmospheric loss relative to the giant impact.

  18. A Multiple Impact Hypothesis for Moon Formation: Target Spin and Disk Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufu, R.; Aharonson, O.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate aspects of the multiple impact hypothesis for Moon's formation, whereby the proto-Earth suffers successive collisions, each forming a debris disk that accretes to form a moonlet. The moonlets tidally advance outward, and potentially coalesce to form the Moon. In addressing the fundamental problem of the Moon's formation, we consider smaller impactors than previously studied, and investigate the effect of new geometries using a Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics (SPH) code. For impacts within the equatorial plane, we find multiple impactors are effective in draining angular momentum from the target's initial spin due to the often-neglected angular momentum carried by escaping mass. Our simulations reveal new consequences of non-equatorial inclination of the impactor, also previously neglected. We note relationships with the resulting disks of corresponding equatorial cases, but find that the target's axis of rotation can now be tilted by a significant amount (10's of degrees) with sub-Mars size impactors. Importantly for distinguishing among competing Moon formation hypotheses, our results imply that (i) the rotational acceleration of the proto-Earth by successive impacts may be limited by angular momentum drain if the impacting population contains multiple members of medium size, and (ii) impacts onto such a non-rapidly rotation proto-Earth (well below break-up speed) can produce disks compatible with sub-Moon fragments in mass, momentum, and composition.

  19. "A Nightmare Land, a Place of Death": An Exploration of the Moon as a Motif in Herge's "Destination Moon" (1953) and "Explorers on the Moon" (1954)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauvais, Clementine

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses the symbolic meaning of the Moon in two "bande dessinee" books from the Tintin series, Herge's "Destination Moon" ("Objectif Lune," 1953) and its sequel "Explorers on the Moon" ("On a Marche sur la Lune," 1954). It argues that these two volumes stand out in the series for their graphic, narrative and philosophical emphasis on…

  20. On the origin of Earth's Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Amy C.

    2016-09-01

    The Giant Impact is currently accepted as the leading theory for the formation of Earth's Moon. Successful scenarios for lunar origin should be able to explain the chemical composition of the Moon (volatile content and stable isotope ratios), the Moon's initial thermal state, and the system's bulk physical and dynamical properties. Hydrocode simulations of the impact have long been able to match the bulk properties, but recent, more detailed work on the evolution of the protolunar disk has yielded great insight into the origin of the Moon's chemistry and its early thermal history. Here I show that the community has constructed the elements of an end-to-end theory for lunar origin that matches the overwhelming majority of observational constraints. In spite of the great progress made in recent years, new samples of the Moon, clarification of processes in the impact-generated disk, and a broader exploration of impact parameter space could yield even more insights into this fundamental and uniquely challenging geophysical problem.

  1. Water on The Moon, I. Historical Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin

    2011-10-01

    By mid-19th century, astronomers strongly suspected that the Moon was largely dry and airless, based on the absence of any observable weather. [1] In 1892, William H. Pickering made a series of careful occultation measurements that allowed him to conclude that the lunar surface's atmospheric pressure was less than 1/4000th of Earth's. [2] Any number of strange ideas arose to contradict this, including Danish astronomer/mathematician Peter Andreas Hansen's hypothesis, that the Moon's center of mass is offset by its center of figure by 59 kilometers, meaning that one or two scale-heights of atmosphere could hide on the far side of the Moon, where it might support water oceans and life. [3] Hans Höbiger's 1894 Welteislehre ("World Ice") theory, that the Moon and much of the cosmos is composed of water ice, became the favored cosmology of leaders of Third Reich Germany. [4] Respectable scientists realized that significant amounts of water on the Moon’s surface would rapidly sublime into the vacuum.

  2. The Moon as a way station for planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, M. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Moon can be on the pathway to the exploration of other planets in the solar system in three distinct ways: science, systems and technology experience, and as a fuel depot. The most important of these from the point of view of near term potential is to provide systems and technology development that increases capability and reduces the cost and risk of Mars exploration. The development of capability for a lunar program, if planned properly, can significantly influence strategies for sending humans to Mars. In conclusion, the exploration of the Moon should come before the exploration of Mars. This is a statement of developmental and operational logic that is almost self evident. Technological advancement could, however, make a different strategy reasonable. Principally, the development of a propulsion capability that could substantially reduce round trip mission times to Mars (to say 6 to 12 months) could eliminate much of the argument that the Moon is an essential stepping stone. This would reduce the problem to one of similitude with current space station program concepts. However, for any reasonably near term program, such technology does not appear likely to be available. Thus, the answer remains that lunar exploration should come first, and the expectation that it will make Mars exploration much more affordable and safe. The use of lunar propellant in an Earth-Mars transportation system is not practical with current propulsion systems; however, the discovery of caches of water ice at a lunar pole could change considerably the strategy for utilization of lunar resources in planetary exploration.

  3. Detection of microscopic particles present as contaminants in latent fingerprints by means of synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infra-red micro-imaging.

    PubMed

    Banas, A; Banas, K; Breese, M B H; Loke, J; Heng Teo, B; Lim, S K

    2012-08-07

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infra-red (SR-FTIR) micro-imaging has been developed as a rapid, direct and non-destructive technique. This method, taking advantage of the high brightness and small effective source size of synchrotron light, is capable of exploring the molecular chemistry within the microstructures of microscopic particles without their destruction at high spatial resolutions. This is in contrast to traditional "wet" chemical methods, which, during processing for analysis, often caused destruction of the original samples. In the present study, we demonstrate the potential of SR-FTIR micro-imaging as an effective way to accurately identify microscopic particles deposited within latent fingerprints. These particles are present from residual amounts of materials left on a person's fingers after handling such materials. Fingerprints contaminated with various types of powders, creams, medications and high explosive materials (3-nitrooxy-2,2-bis(nitrooxymethyl)propyl nitrate (PETN), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX), 2-methyl-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNT)) deposited on various - daily used - substrates have been analysed herein without any further sample preparation. A non-destructive method for the transfer of contaminated fingerprints from hard-to-reach areas of the substrates to the place of analysis is also presented. This method could have a significant impact on forensic science and could dramatically enhance the amount of information that can be obtained from the study of fingerprints.

  4. Declaring the Republic of the Moon - Some artistic strategies for re-imagining the Moon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Frenais., R.

    2014-04-01

    Sooner or later, humans are going back to the Moonwhether to mine it, to rehearse for a Mars mission or to just live there. But how will human activity there reflect what has happened on Earth since the last moon mission, to reflect the diversity and political and social changes that have happened since? Can artists imagine what it would be like to live on the Moon? Artists are already taking part in many scientific endeavours, becoming involved in emerging fields such as synthetic bioloogy, nanotechology, ecological remediation and enthusiastically participating in citizen science. There are already artists in Antarctica. It should be inevitable that artists will sooner or later accompany the next visit by humans to the Moon. But why wait? Artists are already imagining how it would be to live on the Moon, whether in their imaginations or though rehearsals in lunar analogues. In the recent exhibition 'Republic of the Moon' a number of visionary strategies were employed, from the use of earth-moon-earth 'moonbouncing' (Katie Paterson) to the breeding and imprinting of real geese as imagined astronauts. (Agnes Meyer-Brandis). The Outer Space Treaty and the (unsigned) Moon treaty were re-analysed and debates and even small demonstrations were organised protesting (or demanding) the industrial exploitation of the Moon. Fortuitously, China's Chang-e mission landed during the exhibition and the life and death of the rover Jade Rabbit brought a real life drama to the Republic of the Moon. There have been other artistic interventions into lunar exploration, including Aleksandra Mir's First Woman on the Moon, Alicia Framis's Moonlife project and of course the historic inclusion of two artistic artefacts into the Apollo missions, Monument to the Fallen Astronaut (still on the Moon) and the Moon Museum, reportedly inserted by an engineer into the leg of the Lunar Exploration Module. With the worldwide race by the Global Lunar X Prize teams to land a rover independently of any

  5. The Impact of Stars on Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    In other solar systems, the radiation streaming from the central star can have a destructive impact on the atmospheres of the stars close-in planets. A new study suggests that these exoplanets may also have a much harder time keeping their moons.Where Are the Exomoons?Moons are more common in our solar system than planets by far (just look at Jupiters enormous collection of satellites!) and yet we havent made a single confirmed discovery of a moon around an planet outside of our solar system. Is this just because moons have smaller signals and are more difficult to detect? Or might there also be a physical reason for there to be fewer moons around the planets were observing?Led by Ming Yang, a team of scientists from Nanjing University in China have explored one mechanism that could limit the number of moons we might find around exoplanets: photoevaporation.Artists illustration of the process of photoevaporation, in which the atmosphere of a planet is stripped by radiation from its star. [NASA Goddard SFC]Effects of RadiationPhotoevaporation is a process by which the harsh high-energy radiation from a star blasts a close-in planet, imparting enough energy to the atoms of the planets atmosphere for those atoms to escape. As the planets atmosphere gradually erodes, significant mass loss occurs on timescales of tens or hundreds of millions of years.How might this process affect such a planets moons? To answer this question, Yang and collaborators used an N-body code called MERCURY to model solar systems in which a Neptune-like planet at 0.1 AU gradually loses mass. The planet starts out with a large system of moons, and the team tracks the moons motions to determine their ultimate fates.Escaping BodiesEvolution of the planet mass (top) in a simulation containing 500 small moons. The evolution of the semimajor axes of the moons (middle) and their eccentricities (bottom) are shown, with three example moons, starting at different radii, highlighted in blue, red and green

  6. Global Moon Coverage via Hyperbolic Flybys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, Brent; Strange, Nathan; Campagnola, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The scientific desire for global coverage of moons such as Jupiter's Galilean moons or Saturn's Titan has invariably led to the design of orbiter missions. These orbiter missions require a large amount of propellant needed to insert into orbit around such small bodies, and for a given launch vehicle, the additional propellant mass takes away from mass that could otherwise be used for scientific instrumentation on a multiple flyby-only mission. This paper will present methods--expanding upon techniques developed for the design of the Cassini prime and extended missions--to obtain near global moon coverage through multiple flybys. Furthermore we will show with proper instrument suite selection, a flyby-only mission can provide science return similar (and in some cases greater) to that of an orbiter mission.

  7. Explaining the Birth of the Martian Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    A new study examines the possibility that Marss two moons formed after a large body slammed into Mars, creating a disk of debris. This scenario might be the key to reconciling the moons orbital properties with their compositions.Conflicting EvidenceThe different orbital (left) and spectral (right) characteristics of the Martian moons in the three different formation scenarios. Click for a better look! Phobos and Deimoss orbital characteristics are best matched by formation around Mars (b and c), and their physical characteristics are best matched by formation in the outer region of an impact-generated accretion disk (rightmost panel of c). [Ronnet et al. 2016]How were Marss two moons, Phobos and Deimos, formed? There are three standing theories:Two already-formed, small bodies from the outer main asteroid belt were captured by Mars, intact.The bodies formed simultaneously with Mars, by accretion from the same materials.A large impact on Mars created an accretion disk of material from which the two bodies formed.Our observations of the Martian moons, unfortunately, provide conflicting evidence about which of these scenarios is correct. The physical properties of the moons low albedos, low densities are consistent with those of asteroids in our solar system, and are not consistent with Marss properties, suggesting that the co-accretion scenario is unlikely. On the other hand, the moons orbital properties low inclination, low eccentricity, prograde orbits are consistent with bodies that formed around Mars rather than being captured.In a recent study,a team of scientists led by Thomas Ronnet and Pierre Vernazza (Aix-Marseille University, Laboratory of Astrophysics of Marseille) has attempted to reconcile these conflictingobservations by focusing on the third option.Moons After a Large ImpactIn the thirdscenario, an impactor of perhaps a few percent of Marss mass smashed into Mars, forming a debris disk of hot material that encircled Mars. Perturbations in the disk then

  8. Lunar Volatiles: An Earth-Moon Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.

    2011-01-01

    It has generally been accepted that the Moon is depleted in volatile elements. However, the recent discovery of measurable water in lunar glasses and apatites suggests that volatiles are not as depleted as was once thought. And, in fact, some authors have claimed that water contents of the lunar and terrestrial mantles are similar. Moderately volatile alkali elements may have a bearing on this issue. In general, bulk Moon alkalis are depleted relative to the bulk silicate Earth. Although the bulk lunar chemical composition is difficult to reconstruct, good correlations of alkali elements with refractory lithophile incompatible trace elements make this conclusion robust. These observations have been taken to mean that the Moon overall is depleted in volatiles relative to the Earth. Since water is more volatile than any of the alkali elements, presumably this conclusion is true for water, or even more so.

  9. Magnetism and the history of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangway, D. W.; Gose, W. A.; Pearce, G. W.; Carnes, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    All lunar samples measured to date contain a weak but stable remanent magnetization of lunar origin. The magnetization is carried by metallic iron and is considered to be caused by cooling from above the Curie point in the presence of a magnetic field. Although at present the moon does not have a global field, the remanent magnetization of the rock samples and the presence of magnetic anomalies, both on the near and far side of the moon, imply that the moon experienced a magnetic field during some portion of its history. The field could have been generated in a liquid iron core sustaining a self-exciting dynamo, but there are some basic thermal and geochemical objections that need to be resolved.

  10. Naming moon's features created 'Ocean of Storms'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Baz, F.

    1979-01-01

    The naming of lunar features from the time Galileo first viewed the moon through a telescope to the period of spaceborne lunar exploration is surveyed. Attention is given to Galileo's designation of terrae (highlands) and maria, and the 1651 scheme of Riccioli, which is responsible for the attributive names of maria and the commemoration of famous philosophers and astronomers by major craters. The standardization of lunar nomenclature by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in 1932 is noted, and the naming of far-side features discovered by the Luna 3 and Lunar Orbiter spacecraft by their respective nations is discussed. The designation of small features during the planning of the Apollo moon landings is explained, and the formalization of operational lunar designations and the names of surface features of Mercury, Venus and Mars and its moons are considered.

  11. The Early Shape of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.; Perera, V.; Nimmo, F.; Zuber, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    The origin and nature of the long-wavelength shape of the Moon has been a puzzle for at least 100 years [1-5]. Understanding its origin would provide insight into the patterns of mare volcanism, early thermal evolution, the history of the Moon's orientation, and the Moon's orbital evolution. Previously, we explained the shape and structure of the lunar farside highlands with a model of early tidal heating in the crust [6]. However, we left open the problem of the rest of the Moon's low-order shape, and we did not consider the lunar gravity field together with topography. To address these problems, and further assess the tidal-rotation (spherical harmonic degree-2) origins of the lunar shape, we consider three effects: the Moon's degree-1 spherical harmonics, the Moon's largest basins and mascons, and the choice of reference frame in which we analyze topography. We find that removing the degree-1 terms from a topography map helps illustrate the Moon's degree-2 shape, since the degree-1 harmonics have relatively high power. More importantly, however, when we fit spherical harmonics to topography outside of the largest lunar basins (including South-Pole Aitken, Imbrium, Serenitatis, Nectaris, and Orientale), the degree-2 coefficient values change significantly. When these best-fit harmonics are rotated into a reference frame that only contains the C2,0 and C2,2 harmonics (equivalent to the frame that would have once faced the Earth if the early Moon's shape controlled the moments of inertia), we find that gravity and topography data together imply a mixture of compensated and uncompensated degree-2 topography components. The compensated topography component can be explained by global-scale tidal heating in the early crust, while the uncompensated component can be explained by a frozen 'fossil bulge' that formed at a semi-major axis of about 32 Earth radii. To check these explanations, we can examine the ratios of the C2,0 and C2,2 harmonics for each component. We find

  12. Internal constitution and evolution of the moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Toksoz, M. N.

    1973-01-01

    The composition, structure and evolution of the moon's interior are narrowly constrained by a large assortment of physical and chemical data. Models of the thermal evolution of the moon that fit the chronology of igneous activity on the lunar surface, the stress history of the lunar lithosphere implied by the presence of mascons, and the surface concentrations of radioactive elements, involve extensive differentiation early in lunar history. This differentiation may be the result of rapid accretion and large-scale melting or of primary chemical layering during accretion; differences in present-day temperatures for these two possibilities are significant only in the inner 1000 km of the moon and may not be resolvable.

  13. Origin of the Moon. New Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimov, Erik M.; Krivtsov, Anton M.

    2012-10-01

    The origin of the Moon remains an unsolved problem of the planetary science. Researchers engaged in celestial dynamics, geophysics, and geochemistry are still discussing various models of creation of our closest cosmic neighbour. The most popular scenario, the impact hypothesis involving a collision early in the Earth's history, has been substantially challenged by the new data. The birth and development of a planet-moon system always plays a role in the formation of an entire planetary system around our Sun or around another star. This way, the story of our Moon acquires broader ramifications for one of the hottest topics of the modern scholarship. All this has motivated the authors of this book to consider a new concept and to compare the currently discussed theories, analyzing their advantages and shortcomings in explaining the experimental data.

  14. Tungsten Isotopes, Formation of the Moon, and Lopsided Addition to Earth and Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-06-01

    Two studies use vast improvements in measuring tungsten (W) isotopic composition to show that the Moon has a higher 182W/184W ratio than does the modern terrestrial mantle. The studies, done by Mathieu Touboul and colleagues at the University of Maryland, USA and Thomas Kruijer and colleagues at Westfalische Wilhelms University, Munster, Germany, required developing improved isotope separation and measurement techniques in order to make the measurements accurate and precise enough to see the small difference between lunar and terrestrial samples. The Moon has 182W/184W about 25 parts per million higher than the Earth. This is consistent with an interesting story told in both papers: the Moon and Earth both had the same W isotopic composition after the giant impact that formed the Moon, but the Earth acquired a disproportionate amount of chondritic material afterwards, which decreased the terrestrial 182W/184W value. The idea is consistent with current models of the numbers of projectiles that could have intersected the Earth-Moon system as planetary accretion was winding down. The implication is that immediately after the Moon formed it had the same tungsten isotopic composition as the Earth, an important fact that models for the giant impact origin of the Moon must explain.

  15. Laser Ranging to the Moon, Mars and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Williams, James G.; Shao, Michael; Nordtvedt, Kenneth L., Jr.; Murphy, Thomas W., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Current and future optical technologies will aid exploration of the Moon and Mars while advancing fundamental physics research in the solar system. Technologies and possible improvements in the laser-enabled tests of various physical phenomena are considered along with a space architecture that could be a cornerstone for robotic and human exploration in the solar system. In particular, accurate ranging to the Moon and Mars would not only lead to construction of a new space communication infrastructure enabling improved navigational accuracy, but would provide a significant improvement in several tests of gravitational theory: the equivalence principle, geodetic precession, PPN parameters beta and gamma, and the constancy of the gravitational constant G. Other tests would become possible with an optical architecture that would allow proceeding from cm to mm to sub-mm range accuracies. Looking to future exploration, what characteristics are desired for the next generation of ranging devices, what is the optimal architecture that would benefit both space exploration and fundamental physics, and what fundamental questions can be investigated?

  16. Volcanism and magnetism of the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. D. R.; Woolfson, M. M.

    1983-02-01

    It is proposed that the early Moon had molten material close to its surface, particularly in the equatorial region, due to a combination of fast accretion and tidal flexing after Earth capture. An eccentric orbit of the Earth-Moon system about an early Sun with a high magnetic dipole moment (8 × 1025 T m3) would give magnetic fields over 10-4 T on the lunar surface. These are produced by circular currents in an equatorial conducting ring, induced by variations in the solar field.

  17. The carbon chemistry of the moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eglinton, G.; Maxwell, J. R.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1972-01-01

    The analysis of lunar samples has shown that the carbon chemistry of the moon is entirely different from the carbon chemistry of the earth. Lunar carbon chemistry is more closely related to cosmic physics than to conventional organic chemistry. Sources of carbon on the moon are considered, giving attention to meteorites and the solar wind. The approaches used in the analysis of the samples are discussed, taking into account the method of gas chromatography employed and procedures used by bioscience investigators in the study of the lunar fines. The presence of indigenous methane and carbide in the lunar fines was established. Reactions and processes taking place on the lunar surface are discussed.

  18. The geologic evolution of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A synthesis of pre- and post-Apollo 11 studies is presented to produce an outline of the moon's geologic evolution from three lines of evidence: (1) relative ages of lunar landforms and rock types, (2) absolute ages of returned lunar samples, and (3) petrography, chemistry, and isotopic ratios of lunar rocks and soils. It is assumed that the ray craters, circular mare basins, and most intermediate circular landforms are primarily of impact origin, although many other landforms are volcanic or of hybrid origin. The moon's evolution is divided into four main stages, each including several distinct but overlapping events or processes.

  19. Two former faces of the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilhelms, D.E.; Davis, D.E.

    1971-01-01

    Systematic geologic mapping of the lunar near side has resulted in the assignment of relative ages to most visible features. As a derivative of this work, geologic and artistic interpretations have been combined to produce reconstructions of the Moon's appearance at two significant points in its history. The reconstructions, although generalized, show the Moon (1) as it probably appeared about 3.3 billion years ago after most of the mare materials had accumulated, and (2) about 4.0 billion years ago after formation of the youngest of the large multiringed basins, but prior to appreciable flooding by mare material.

  20. Evolution of the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touma, Jihad; Wisdom, Jack

    1994-01-01

    The tidal evolution of the Earth-Moon system is reexamined. Several models of tidal friction are first compared in an averaged Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics. With one of these models, full integrations of the tidally evolving Earth-Moon system are carried out in the complete, fully interacting, and chaotically evolving planetary system. Classic results on the history of the lunar orbit are confirmed by our more general model. A detailed history of the obliquity of the Earth which takes into account the evolving lunar orbit is presented.

  1. Martian Moon Eclipses Sun, in Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panel illustrates the transit of the martian moon Phobos across the Sun. It is made up of images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the morning of the 45th martian day, or sol, of its mission. This observation will help refine our knowledge of the orbit and position of Phobos. Other spacecraft may be able to take better images of Phobos using this new information. This event is similar to solar eclipses seen on Earth in which our Moon passes in front of the Sun. The images were taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

  2. Can Large Icy Moons Accrete Undifferentiated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choblet, G.; Monteux, J.; Tobie, G.; Le Feuvre, M.

    2012-12-01

    To explain the dichotomy in the degree of differentiation that seems to exist among various icy satellites of the Solar System, we characterize the early thermal evolution of an icy moon growing by km-size impacts. For each impact, we account for the topographic deformation, the deep impact heating and the ejecta heating. For that purpose, we have modified the 3D convection code Oedipus and we monitor the temperature and melt fraction evolution within the growing icy satellite. By exploring the accretionary parameter space, we determine the degree of differentiation of a growing icy moon.

  3. Can Large Icy Moons Accrete Undifferentiated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteux, J.; Choblet, G.; Tobie, G.; Le Feuvre, M.

    2012-09-01

    To explain the dichotomy in the degree of differentiation that seems to exist among various icy satellites of the Solar System, we characterize the early thermal evolution of an icy moon growing by km-size impacts. For each impact, we account for the topographic deformation, the deep impact heating and the ejecta heating. For that purpose, we have modified the 3D convection code Oedipus and we monitor the temperature and melt fraction evolution within the growing icy satellite. By exploring the accretionary parameter space, we determine the degree of differentiation of a growing icy moon.

  4. On the Moon-to-Earth Trajectories with Gravitational Escape from the Moon Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashkin, V.

    The Moon-to-Earth trajectories of "detour" type are found and studied in frame of the Moon-Earth-Sun-particle system. These trajectories use a passive flight to the Earth from an initial elliptic selenocentric orbit with a high aposelenium and differ from usual ones of a direct flight to the Earth using an initial hyperbolic selenocentric orbit. A qualitative theoretical analysis of these trajectories is performed. The Earth perturbation increases the selenocentric energy from a negative value first to zero and then to a positive one and therefore leads to a passive escape of the particle motion from the Moon attraction near the translunar libration point L2. This results in the particle flight to a distance of ~1.5 million km from the Earth where the Sun gravitation decreases the particle orbit perigee distance to a small value, that leads to the particle approach the Earth vicinity in ~100 days of the flight. A set of the Moon-to-Earth "detour" trajectories for the flight to the Earth-altitude of ~50 km for the atmospheric reentry is defined by a numerical method. The start from both the low orbit of the Moon satellite and the Moon surface is considered. Characteristics of these trajectories are presented. They are compared with the usual trajectories of the direct flight. The "detour" Moon-to-Earth trajectories with initial elliptic orbit and gravitational escape from the Moon attraction are shown to result in essential economy of energy relative to the usual ones with initial hyperbolic orbit. A more exact control system of navigation and correction is required for the Moon-to-the Earth "detour" flight of spacecraft.

  5. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These

  6. Felsic Volcanics on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Stopar, J.; Braden, S.; Hawke, B. R.; Robinson, M. S.; Glotch, T. D.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Seddio, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    fractions without intermediate compositions. Two possibilities are silicate-liquid immiscibility [4] and basaltic underplating [3] coupled with melting of fertile crustal rocks such as KREEP basalt or KREEP-rich Mg-suite rocks. A key question concerning lunar silicic volcanics is how to segregate felsic fractions following magmatic differentiation and then extrude sufficient material to form features as large as observed domes. Viscosities of lunar granitic magmas are over four orders of magnitude greater (>1M Pa-s) than the complementary mafic melts (40-50 Pa-s). Moreover, terrestrial-style tectonics and high water contents were not available to facilitate silicic eruptions. Perhaps some of the domes with moderate FeO (including the cumulodomes) have compositions similar to quartz-monzodiorite (10-14% FeO [5], intermediate viscosity), and contain felsic segregations, as evidenced by associations seen in some Apollo samples (e.g., 12013, 15405 [6]). The more silicic, Th-rich, and FeO-poor features such as the main C-B complex may represent the silica-enriched upper parts of a shallow, chemically evolved intrusive body. We should return to the Moon to investigate these unusual geologic features. References: [1] Glotch, T., et al. (2010) Science 329; [2] Lawrence, D., et al. (2003) JGR 108; [3] Hagerty, J., et al. (2006) JGR 111; [4] Hess, P., et al. (1975) PLSC 6. [5] Jolliff, B. (1998) Int. Geol. Rev. 40. [6] Meyer, C. (2012) Lunar Sample Compendium.

  7. Two Moons Meet over Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This beautiful image of the crescents of volcanic Io and more sedate Europa was snapped by New Horizons' color Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) at 10:34 UT on March 2, 2007, about two days after New Horizons made its closest approach to Jupiter.

    The picture was one of a handful of the Jupiter system that New Horizons took primarily for their artistic, rather than scientific value. This particular scene was suggested by space enthusiast Richard Hendricks of Austin, Texas, in response to an Internet request by New Horizons scientists for evocative, artistic imaging opportunities at Jupiter.

    This image was taken from a range of 4.6 million kilometers (2.8 million miles) from Io and 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from Europa. Although the moons appear close in this view, a gulf of 790,000 kilometers (490,000 miles) separates them. The night side of Io is illuminated here by light reflected from Jupiter, which is out of the frame to the right. Europa's night side is completely dark, in contrast to Io, because that side of Europa faces away from Jupiter.

    Here, Io steals the show with its beautiful display of volcanic activity. Three volcanic plumes are visible. Most conspicuous is the enormous 300-kilometer (190-mile) -high plume from the Tvashtar volcano at the 11 o'clock position on Io's disk. Two much smaller plumes are barely visible: one from the volcano Prometheus, at the 9 o'clock position on the edge of Io's disk, and one from the volcano Amirani, seen between Prometheus and Tvashtar along Io's terminator (the line dividing day and night). The plumes appear blue because of the scattering of light by tiny dust particles ejected by the volcanoes, similar to the blue appearance of smoke. In addition, the contrasting red glow of hot lava can be seen at the source of the Tvashtar plume.

    The images are centered at 1 degree north, 60 degrees west on Io, and 0 degrees north, 149 degrees west on Europa. The color in this

  8. LIBS for Martian Moons eXploration (MMX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, S.; Horiuchi, M.; Cho, Y.; Ishibashi, K.; Wada, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Nakamura, T.; Sugita, S.

    2016-10-01

    JAXA's Martian Moons Exploration (MMX) is planned to be a sample return mission from Phobos, one of the satellites of Mars. We propose adding a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (LIBS), which enables to determine the origin of the moons.

  9. NASA Now Minute: Geology: Structure of the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    This program shows how re-examining moon data from the Apollo days withmodern technology helps scientists determine the structure of the moon’sinterior. NASA Now Minutes are excerpts from a wee...

  10. Moon formation: Punch combo or knock-out blow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Gareth S.

    2017-01-01

    The twin isotopic signatures of the Moon and Earth are difficult to explain by a single giant impact. Impact simulations suggest that making the Moon by a combination of multiple, smaller moonlet-forming impacts may work better.

  11. The Latitude Dependence of Dielectric Breakdown on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Hayne, P. O.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Izenberg, N. R.

    2016-11-01

    Solar energetic particles may cause dielectric breakdown on the nightside of the Moon. We predict that breakdown weathering may have melted or vaporized about 4-11 wt% of impact gardened regolith on the Moon.

  12. Simulating the Phases of the Moon Shortly after Its Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noordeh, Emil; Hall, Patrick; Cuk, Matija

    2014-01-01

    The leading theory for the origin of the Moon is the giant impact hypothesis, in which the Moon was formed out of the debris left over from the collision of a Mars sized body with the Earth. Soon after its formation, the orbit of the Moon may have been very different than it is today. We have simulated the phases of the Moon in a model for its…

  13. Discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune.

    PubMed

    Holman, Matthew J; Kavelaars, J J; Grav, Tommy; Gladman, Brett J; Fraser, Wesley C; Milisavljevic, Dan; Nicholson, Philip D; Burns, Joseph A; Carruba, Valerio; Petit, Jean-Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Mousis, Oliver; Marsden, Brian G; Jacobson, Robert A

    2004-08-19

    Each giant planet of the Solar System has two main types of moons. 'Regular' moons are typically larger satellites with prograde, nearly circular orbits in the equatorial plane of their host planets at distances of several to tens of planetary radii. The 'irregular' satellites (which are typically smaller) have larger orbits with significant eccentricities and inclinations. Despite these common features, Neptune's irregular satellite system, hitherto thought to consist of Triton and Nereid, has appeared unusual. Triton is as large as Pluto and is postulated to have been captured from heliocentric orbit; it traces a circular but retrograde orbit at 14 planetary radii from Neptune. Nereid, which exhibits one of the largest satellite eccentricities, is believed to have been scattered from a regular satellite orbit to its present orbit during Triton's capture. Here we report the discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune, two with prograde and three with retrograde orbits. These exceedingly faint (apparent red magnitude m(R) = 24.2-25.4) moons, with diameters of 30 to 50 km, were presumably captured by Neptune.

  14. Discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Grav, Tommy; Gladman, Brett J.; Fraser, Wesley C.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Nicholson, Philip D.; Burns, Joseph A.; Carruba, Valerio; Petit, Jean-Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Mousis, Oliver; Marsden, Brian G.; Jacobson, Robert A.

    2004-08-01

    Each giant planet of the Solar System has two main types of moons. `Regular' moons are typically larger satellites with prograde, nearly circular orbits in the equatorial plane of their host planets at distances of several to tens of planetary radii. The `irregular' satellites (which are typically smaller) have larger orbits with significant eccentricities and inclinations. Despite these common features, Neptune's irregular satellite system, hitherto thought to consist of Triton and Nereid, has appeared unusual. Triton is as large as Pluto and is postulated to have been captured from heliocentric orbit; it traces a circular but retrograde orbit at 14 planetary radii from Neptune. Nereid, which exhibits one of the largest satellite eccentricities, is believed to have been scattered from a regular satellite orbit to its present orbit during Triton's capture. Here we report the discovery of five irregular moons of Neptune, two with prograde and three with retrograde orbits. These exceedingly faint (apparent red magnitude mR = 24.2-25.4) moons, with diameters of 30 to 50km, were presumably captured by Neptune.

  15. Stable Orbits about the Martian Moons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Results and Discussion..................................28 Phobos ........................................... 28 Typical Orbits...68 I Appendix C: Phobos Surface of Section Plots.............69 Appendix D: Deimos Surface of Section Plots.............93 Bibliography...Coordinate System ................................ 3 2. Gravitational Potential Due to Moon .... ............. 8 3. Phobos Surface of Section, H

  16. Nominally hydrous magmatism on the Moon

    PubMed Central

    McCubbin, Francis M.; Steele, Andrew; Hauri, Erik H.; Nekvasil, Hanna; Yamashita, Shigeru; Hemley, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    For the past 40 years, the Moon has been described as nearly devoid of indigenous water; however, evidence for water both on the lunar surface and within the lunar interior have recently emerged, calling into question this long-standing lunar dogma. In the present study, hydroxyl (as well as fluoride and chloride) was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry in apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH)] from three different lunar samples in order to obtain quantitative constraints on the abundance of water in the lunar interior. This work confirms that hundreds to thousands of ppm water (of the structural form hydroxyl) is present in apatite from the Moon. Moreover, two of the studied samples likely had water preserved from magmatic processes, which would qualify the water as being indigenous to the Moon. The presence of hydroxyl in apatite from a number of different types of lunar rocks indicates that water may be ubiquitous within the lunar interior, potentially as early as the time of lunar formation. The water contents analyzed for the lunar apatite indicate minimum water contents of their lunar source region to range from 64 ppb to 5 ppm H2O. This lower limit range of water contents is at least two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported value for the bulk Moon, and the actual source region water contents could be significantly higher. PMID:20547878

  17. Changing Perspectives on Mercury and the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denevi, Brett W.

    2015-11-01

    Airless, cratered, and not so different in size, the Moon and Mercury form a natural pair in the inner Solar System. For decades after the 1974 and 1975 Mariner 10 flybys of Mercury, with little compositional information, no concrete evidence for volcanism, and images of less than half of the planet, it was thought that Mercury’s surface may be similar to the lunar highlands: an ancient anorthositic flotation crust subsequently shaped mainly by impact cratering. However, observations from the recently completed MESSENGER mission to Mercury have upended our view of the innermost planet, revealing, for example, a crust that may be rich in graphite and that has been extensively resurfaced by volcanic activity, and geologic activity that may continue today to produce enigmatic “hollows” - a crust very different from that of the Moon. Meanwhile, the Moon has undergone its own revolution, as data from recent spacecraft such as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal sites of silicic volcanism indicative of complex differentiation in the mantle, tectonic activity that may be ongoing, recent volcanic activity that alters the paradigm that volcanism died on the Moon over a billion years ago, and evidence that the early chronology of the inner Solar System may not be as well known as once thought. As our views of these two bodies evolve, a new understanding of their differences informs our knowledge of the variety of processes and styles of planetary evolution, and their similarities point to commonalities among all airless bodies.

  18. Elementary Education: Elementary Students Simulate Moon Walk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes the project of a fourth- and fifth-grade class in simulating a moon walk. Teams consisted of the astronauts, the life support team, the flight program team, the communications team, the scientific team, and the construction team. Their visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center is also described. (SA)

  19. Cosmic-ray detectors on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, John

    1988-01-01

    The state of cosmic ray physics is reviewed. It is concluded that the nonexistent lunar magnetic field, the low lunar radiation background, and the lack of an atmosphere on the Moon provide an excellent environment for the study of high energy primary cosmic rays.

  20. The moon as a high temperature condensate.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The accretion during condensation mechanism, if it occurs during the early over-luminous stage of the sun, can explain the differences in composition of the terrestrial planets and the moon. An important factor is the variation of pressure and temperature with distance from the sun, and in the case of the moon and captured satellites of other planets, with distance from the median plane. Current estimates of the temperature and pressure in the solar nebula suggest that condensation will not be complete in the vicinity of the terrestrial planets, and that depending on location, iron, magnesium silicates and the volatiles will be at least partially held in the gaseous phase and subject to separation from the dust by solar wind and magnetic effects associated with the transfer of angular momentum just before the sun joins the Main Sequence. Many of the properties of the moon, including the 'enrichment' in Ca, Al, Ti, U, Th, Ba, Sr and the REE and the 'depletion' in Fe, Rb, K, Na and other volatiles can be understood if the moon represents a high temperature condensate from the solar nebula.

  1. The Sodium Tail of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matta, M.; Smith, S.; Baumgardner, J.; Wilson, J.; Martinis, C.; Mendillo, M.

    2009-01-01

    During the few days centered about new Moon, the lunar surface is optically hidden from Earth-based observers. However, the Moon still offers an observable: an extended sodium tail. The lunar sodium tail is the escaping "hot" component of a coma-like exosphere of sodium generated by photon-stimulated desorption, solar wind sputtering and meteoroid impact. Neutral sodium atoms escaping lunar gravity experience solar radiation pressure that drives them into the anti-solar direction forming a comet-like tail. During new Moon time, the geometry of the Sun, Moon and Earth is such that the anti-sunward sodium flux is perturbed by the terrestrial gravitational field resulting in its focusing into a dense core that extends beyond the Earth. An all-sky camera situated at the El Leoncito Observatory (CASLEO) in Argentina has been successfully imaging this tail through a sodium filter at each lunation since April 2006. This paper reports on the results of the brightness of the lunar sodium tail spanning 31 lunations between April 2006 and September 2008. Brightness variability trends are compared with both sporadic and shower meteor activity, solar wind proton energy flux and solar near ultra violet (NUV) patterns for possible correlations. Results suggest minimal variability in the brightness of the observed lunar sodium tail, generally uncorrelated with any single source, yet consistent with a multi-year period of minimal solar activity and non-intense meteoric fluxes.

  2. Apollo 8, Man Around the Moon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet presents a series of photographs depicting the story of the Apollo 8 mission around the moon and includes a brief description as well as quotes from the astronauts. The photographs show scenes of the astronauts training, the Saturn V rocket, pre-flight preparation, blast off, the earth from space, the lunar surface, the earth-based…

  3. Assessing the Dangers of Moon Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the sources, problems and some solutions to dust on the moon. While there appeared to be no long term effects from Lunar Dust in Apollo astronauts, the future lunar missions will be longer in duration, and therefore more problems may present themselves. Some of the se problems are reviewed, and plans to deal with them are reviewed.

  4. Meeting the Moon from a Global Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter S.

    2003-01-01

    Engages middle school students and preservice teachers in a long-term (16 weeks) investigation of the moon and provides an opportunity to share, via the internet, their observations with other students around the world. Explains the design of the study including multicultural connections, student observations, internet discussions, and…

  5. Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, D. E.; Hughes, J. K.

    1971-01-01

    A selection of the reconstructed photographs taken during 1966 and 1967 by five Lunar Orbiters is presented. The selection provides essentially complete coverage of the near and far sides of the moon in detail. The photographs were reprocessed from the original video data tapes.

  6. Using Persuasion to Plan a Moon Walk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Muriel

    1977-01-01

    Describes an exercise in learning about persuasion using a NASA exercise in group decision-making centered on a theoretical crash landing on the moon. Students experience the power of the authoritative voice, the persuasive power of facts, the bandwagon approach, and group manipulation. (TJ)

  7. Precession of the Earth-Moon System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2009-01-01

    The precession rate of the Earth-Moon system by the gravitational influence of the Sun is derived. Attention is focussed on a physically transparent but complete presentation accessible to first- or second-year physics students. Both a shortcut and a full analysis are given, which allows the inclusion of this material as an example of the physics…

  8. Using Moon Phases to Measure Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Janet; Lutz, Tracie; LaLonde, Donna E.

    2015-01-01

    Cultures need to accurately record dates and times for various societal purposes, ranging from knowing when to plant crops to planning travel. In ancient times, the sun and moon were used as measurement devices because of the scientific understanding of the physical world at that time. Ancient timekeepers monitored celestial events and either used…

  9. Nominally hydrous magmatism on the Moon.

    PubMed

    McCubbin, Francis M; Steele, Andrew; Hauri, Erik H; Nekvasil, Hanna; Yamashita, Shigeru; Hemley, Russell J

    2010-06-22

    For the past 40 years, the Moon has been described as nearly devoid of indigenous water; however, evidence for water both on the lunar surface and within the lunar interior have recently emerged, calling into question this long-standing lunar dogma. In the present study, hydroxyl (as well as fluoride and chloride) was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry in apatite [Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)(F,Cl,OH)] from three different lunar samples in order to obtain quantitative constraints on the abundance of water in the lunar interior. This work confirms that hundreds to thousands of ppm water (of the structural form hydroxyl) is present in apatite from the Moon. Moreover, two of the studied samples likely had water preserved from magmatic processes, which would qualify the water as being indigenous to the Moon. The presence of hydroxyl in apatite from a number of different types of lunar rocks indicates that water may be ubiquitous within the lunar interior, potentially as early as the time of lunar formation. The water contents analyzed for the lunar apatite indicate minimum water contents of their lunar source region to range from 64 ppb to 5 ppm H(2)O. This lower limit range of water contents is at least two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported value for the bulk Moon, and the actual source region water contents could be significantly higher.

  10. The new race to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Sue

    2014-10-01

    Private companies are vying to be the first to land on the Moon and win the $20m Google Lunar XPRIZE. Sue Bowler reports on how and why they are doing it, and what success in 2015 could mean for the future of space exploration.

  11. Conference on the Origin of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Various topics relating to lunar evolution are discussed. The Moon's ancient orbital history, geophysical and geochemical constraints favoring the capture hypothesis, the site of the lunar core, chemical and petrological constraints, dynamical constraints, and mathematical models are among the topics discussed.

  12. Differentiation of the matter of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    The following facts were uncovered in comparing the basaltic surface rocks of the moon with terrestrial tholeiitic basalts and ordinary chondrites: (1) there is an excess of the so-called refractory chemical elements, including the group of truly refractory elements, the rare earths, U, and Th, in comparison with their content in primitive terrestrial basalts and chondrites; (2) the so-called siderophilic elements have lower contents in the lunar surface rocks than in terrestrial rocks; (3) the low alkali content (Na, K, Rb) in lunar rocks is established; (4) there is a low content of H2O and the ordinary gases CO2, halides, etc.; (5) the low content of metals with high vapor pressure, (In, Tl, etc.) has been established. It is proposed that U and Th were carried from the internal areas to the peripheral rocks of the moon during magmatic activity, i.e., up to 3 billion years ago. This redistribution of U and Th lead to their concentration in surface layers of the moon, and the heat which they generated was lost into surrounding space. The conclusion is then reached that in order to understand processes on the moon, the chondritic model cannot be used.

  13. Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.

    2007-06-14

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the gamma-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of gamma-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disc). Since it is the only (almost) black spot in the gamma-ray sky, it provides a unique opportunity for calibration of gamma-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle. Therefore, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo gamma-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo -rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the GLAST LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of PAMELA.

  14. Crescent-shaped Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This picture of a crescent-shaped Earth and Moon -- the first of its kind ever taken by a spacecraft -- was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth. The Moon is at the top of the picture and beyond the Earth as viewed by Voyager. In the picture are eastern Asia, the western Pacific Ocean and part of the Arctic. Voyager 1 was directly above Mt. Everest (on the night side of the planet at 25 degrees north latitude) when the picture was taken. The photo was made from three images taken through color filters, then processed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Image Processing Lab. Because the Earth is many times brighter than the Moon, the Moon was artificially brightened by a factor of three relative to the Earth by computer enhancement so that both bodies would show clearly in the print. Voyager 2 was launched Aug. 20, 1977, followed by Voyager 1 on Sept. 5, 1977, en route to encounters at Jupiter in 1979 and Saturn in 1980 and 1981. JPL manages the Voyager mission for NASA.

  15. The Moon as a Science Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, J.; Burns, J. O.; Farrell, W. M.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J.; MacDowall, R.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Moon offers a valuable platform for space sciences studies: (1) No atmosphere, (2) Farside is radio quiet. There is a compelling science program: (1) Cosmic dawn and the dark ages, (2) Particle acceleration and space weather. The technology and engineering development are making good progress. A staged roadmap with science and technology development at every step is presented.

  16. The Moon System Adapted for Musical Notation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A means is presented for using William Moon's embossed symbols to represent musical notation for blind individuals, as an alternative to braille notation. The proposed system includes pitch symbols, octave indicators, duration symbols, accidentals, key signatures, rests, stress symbols, ornaments, and other symbols. (Author/JDD)

  17. Early History of the Moon: Zircon Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grange, M.L.; Nemchin, A.A.; Pidgeon, R.T.; Meyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Moon is believed to have formed from debris produced by a giant impact of a Mars sized body with the Earth (at around 4.51 Ga), forming a primitive body with a thick global layer of melt referred to as the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO). The crystallization of LMO created internal stratification of the Moon forming main geochemical reservoirs. The surface features on the Moon were shaped by the subsequent collision with several large impactors during a short period of time (3.9-4.0 Ga). This process known as the Late Heavy Bombardment is supported by models of planetary motion, suggesting that rapid migration of giant planets could have triggered a massive delivery of planetesimals from the asteroid belt into the inner Solar System at about 3.9 Ga. Although, general chronology of LMO and LHB is well established using both long lived (U-Pb, Rb-Sr, Sm-147-Nd-143 and Ar-Ar) and extinct (Hf-182-W-182 and 146Sm-142Nd) isotope systems, some of these systems such as Ar-Ar are known to reset easily during secondary thermal overprints. As a result important details in the timing of LMO and LHB remain unresolved. In addition, the relative weakness of these systems under high T conditions can potentially bias the chronological information towards later events in the history of the Moon.

  18. Concrete structure construction on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Shinji; Namba, Haruyuki; Kai, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Tetsuji

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a precast prestressed concrete structure system on the Moon and erection methods for this system. The horizontal section of the structural module is hexagonal so that various layouts of the modules are possible by connecting the adjacent modules to each other. For erection of the modules, specially designed mobile cranes are used.

  19. The MOON project and DBD matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2009-06-01

    This is a brief report on experimental studies of double beta decays (DBD) in Japan, the MOON project for spectroscopic studies of neutrino-less DBD (0vββ) and on experimental studies of DBD nuclear matrix elements. Experimental DBD studies in Japan were made by geochemical methods on 130Te, 128Te and 96Zr and by a series of ELEGANT(EL) counting methods, EL III on 76Ge, EL IV, V on 100Mo, 116Cd, and EL VI on 48Ca. Future counter experiments are MOON, CANDLES, XMASS and DCBA. The MOON project, which is based on EL V, aims at studies of the Majorana nature of the neutrino (v) and the v-mass spectrum by spectroscopic 0vββ experiments with the v-mass sensitivity of < mmv > = 100-30 meV. The MOON detector is a super ensemble of multi-layer modules, each being composed by PL scintillator plates and position-sensitive detector planes. DBD nuclear matrix elements have been studied experimentally by using charge exchange reactions. The 2-neutrino DBD matrix elements are expressed by successive single-β matrix elements through low-lying intermediate states.

  20. Morphologic studies of the Moon and planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Baz, F.; Maxwell, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    The impact, volcanic, and tectonic history of the Moon and planets were investigated over an eight year period. Research on the following topics is discussed: lunar craters, lunar basins, lunar volcanoes, correlation of Apollo geochemical data, lunar geology, Mars desert landforms, and Mars impact basins.

  1. Towards a Moon Village : Community Workshops Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    A series of Moon Village Workshops were organised at ESTEC and at ILEWG community events in 2015 and 2016. They gathered a multi-disciplinary group of professionals from all around the world to discuss their ideas about the concept of a Moon Village, the vision of ESA's Director General (DG) Jan Woerner of a permanent lunar base within the next decades [1]. Three working groups focused on 1) Moon Habitat Design; 2) science and technology potentials of the Moon Village, and 3) engaging stake-holders [2-3]. Their results and recommendations are presented in this abstract. The Moon Habitat Design group identified that the lunar base design is strongly driven by the lunar environment, which is characterized by high radiation, meteoroids, abrasive dust particles, low gravity and vacuum. The base location is recommended to be near the poles to provide optimized illumination conditions for power generation, permanent communication to Earth, moderate temperature gradients at the surface and interesting subjects to scientific investigations. The abundance of nearby available resources, especially ice at the dark bottoms of craters, can be exploited in terms of In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU). The identified infrastructural requirements include a navigation, data- & commlink network, storage facilities and sustainable use of resources. This involves a high degree of recycling, closed-loop life support and use of 3D-printing technology, which are all technologies with great potential for terrestrial spin-off applications. For the site planning of the Moon Village, proven ideas from urban planning on Earth should be taken into account. A couple of principles, which could improve the quality of a long-term living milieu on the Moon, are creating spacious environments, visibility between interior and exterior spaces, areas with flora, such as gardens and greenhouses, establishing a sustainable community and creating social places for astronauts to interact and relax. The

  2. Two Moons and the Pleiades from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Inverted image of two moons and the Pleiades from Mars

    Taking advantage of extra solar energy collected during the day, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit recently settled in for an evening of stargazing, photographing the two moons of Mars as they crossed the night sky. In this view, the Pleiades, a star cluster also known as the 'Seven Sisters,' is visible in the lower left corner. The bright star Aldebaran and some of the stars in the constellation Taurus are visible on the right. Spirit acquired this image the evening of martian day, or sol, 590 (Aug. 30, 2005). The image on the right provides an enhanced-contrast view with annotation. Within the enhanced halo of light is an insert of an unsaturated view of Phobos taken a few images later in the same sequence.

    On Mars, Phobos would be easily visible to the naked eye at night, but would be only about one-third as large as the full Moon appears from Earth. Astronauts staring at Phobos from the surface of Mars would notice its oblong, potato-like shape and that it moves quickly against the background stars. Phobos takes only 7 hours, 39 minutes to complete one orbit of Mars. That is so fast, relative to the 24-hour-and-39-minute sol on Mars (the length of time it takes for Mars to complete one rotation), that Phobos rises in the west and sets in the east. Earth's moon, by comparison, rises in the east and sets in the west. The smaller martian moon, Deimos, takes 30 hours, 12 minutes to complete one orbit of Mars. That orbital period is longer than a martian sol, and so Deimos rises, like most solar system moons, in the east and sets in the west.

    Scientists will use images of the two moons to better map their orbital positions, learn more about their composition, and monitor the presence of nighttime clouds or haze. Spirit took the five images that make up this composite with the panoramic camera, using the camera's broadband filter, which

  3. 27 CFR 9.231 - Moon Mountain District Sonoma County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Moon Mountain District... Viticultural Areas § 9.231 Moon Mountain District Sonoma County. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Moon Mountain District Sonoma County”. For purposes of part 4 of this...

  4. Moon Phase as a Context for Teaching Scale Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Ann; Dickerson, Daniel; Hopkins, Sara

    2007-01-01

    The Sun and the Moon are our most visible neighbors in space, yet their distance and size relative to the Earth are often misunderstood. Science textbooks fuel this misconception because they regularly depict linear images of Moon phases without respect to the actual sizes of the Sun, Earth, and Moon, nor their correlated distances from one…

  5. North Pole Region of the Moon as Seen by Clementine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lunar mosaic of 1500 Clementine images of the north polar region of the moon. The projection is orthographic centered on the north pole. The polar regions of the moon are of special interest because of the postulated occurrence of ice in permanently shadowed areas. The north pole of the moon is absent of the very rugged terrain seen at the south pole.

  6. Moon Watch: A Parental-Involvement Homework Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter; Gonzalez-Jensen, Margarita; Moy, Tracy

    2000-01-01

    Presents the goals, philosophy, and methods of the SPLASH (Student-Parent Laboratories Achieving Science at Home) program. Describes an at-home, parental-involvement activity called Moon Watch in which students and their parents observe how the phases of the moon and the moon's position in the sky change over a two-week period. (WRM)

  7. Two Moons and the Pleiades from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Inverted animation of PIA06340 Two Moons and the Pleiades from Mars Annotated animation of PIA06340 Two Moons and the Pleiades from Mars

    Taking advantage of extra solar energy collected during the day, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit recently settled in for an evening of stargazing, photographing the two moons of Mars as they crossed the night sky. In this view, the Pleiades, a star cluster also known as the 'Seven Sisters,' is visible in the lower left corner. The bright star Aldebaran and some of the stars in the constellation Taurus are visible on the right. Spirit acquired this image the evening of martian day, or sol, 590 (Aug. 30, 2005). The image on the right provides an enhanced-contrast view with annotation. Within the enhanced halo of light is an insert of an unsaturated view of Phobos taken a few images later in the same sequence.

    'It is incredibly cool to be running an observatory on another planet,' said planetary scientist Jim Bell of Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., lead scientist for the panoramic cameras on Spirit and Opportunity. In the annotated animation (figure 2), both martian moons, Deimos on the left and Phobos on the right, travel across the night sky in front of the constellation Sagittarius. Part of Sagittarius resembles an upside-down teapot. In this view, Phobos moves toward the handle and Deimos moves toward the lid. Phobos is the brighter object on the right; Deimos is on the left. Each of the stars in Sagittarius is labeled with its formal name. The inset shows an enlarged, enhanced view of Phobos, shaped rather like a potato with a hole near one end. The hole is the large impact creater Stickney, visible on the moon's upper right limb.

    On Mars, Phobos would be easily visible to the naked eye at night, but would be only about one-third as large as the full Moon appears from Earth. Astronauts staring at Phobos from

  8. Launching to the Moon, Mars, and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumrall, John P.

    2007-01-01

    America is returning to the Moon in preparation for the first human footprint on Mars, guided by the U.S. Vision for Space Exploration. This presentation will discuss NASA's mission today, the reasons for returning to the Moon and going to Mars, and how NASA will accomplish that mission. The primary goals of the Vision for Space Exploration are to finish the International Space Station, retire the Space Shuttle, and build the new spacecraft needed to return people to the Moon and go to Mars. Unlike the Apollo program of the 1960s, this phase of exploration will be a journey, not a race. In 1966, the NASA's budget was 4 percent of federal spending. Today, with 6/10 of 1 percent of the budget, NASA must incrementally develop the vehicles, infrastructure, technology, and organization to accomplish this goal. Fortunately, our knowledge and experience are greater than they were 40 years ago. NASA's goal is a return to the Moon by 2020. The Moon is the first step to America's exploration of Mars. Many questions about the Moon's history and how its history is linked to that of Earth remain even after the brief Apollo explorations of the 1960s and 1970s. This new venture will carry more explorers to more diverse landing sites with more capable tools and equipment. The Moon also will serve as a training ground in several respects before embarking on the longer, more perilous trip to Mars. The journeys to the Moon and Mars will require a variety of vehicles, including the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle, the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, and the Lunar Surface Access Module. The architecture for the lunar missions will use one launch to ferry the crew into orbit on the Ares I and a second launch to orbit the lunar lander and the Earth Departure Stage to send the lander and crew vehicle to the Moon. In order to reach the Moon and Mars within a lifetime and within budget, NASA is building on proven hardware and decades of experience derived from

  9. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  10. Learning the moon's phases through CL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Maria

    2013-04-01

    This work is a CLIL experience for a class of 14-year-old students, a first grade of a Secondary school, level B1/B2. It is presented an Astronomy lesson whose topic is about the Moon's phases, a quite difficult phenomenon to visualize. Students' attention is attracted by presenting them songs and a short documentary; comprehension is made easier using both Internet-based materials and a card game using Cooperative Learning strategies through Johnsons' ' Learning Together'. The lesson consists of three steps for a total length of three hours. The teacher assigns a time limit for each activity. During the pre-task step, students' interest for present-day music is used to catch their attention and make them aware of the importance of the Moon as an inspiring subject for artistic expression such as popular or rock music. Then the students are requested to brainstorm some simple ideas of ther own about the moon. In the task step, a clear short BBC video is shown in order to stimulate students' listening and comprehension skills and an animation is proposed to help them view the moon cycle. In the post-task step, students are engaged in a card game through Johnsons' 'Learning Together'.Learners are divided into pairs and they have to cooperate to rebuild the moon's cicle as fast as they can. Then the two pairs join together to form groups of four and check their answers. The Assessor shares the group's keys with the whole class. The teacher gives feedback. The groups celebrate their success by clapping their hands and saying what they appreciated regarding their way of working together as pairs and groups.

  11. Moon Munchies: Human Exploration Project Engineering Design Challenge--A Standards-Based Elementary School Model Unit Guide--Design, Build, and Evaluate (Lessons 1-6). Engineering By Design: Advancing Technological Literacy--A Standards-Based Program Series. EP-2007-08-92-MSFC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Kim M.

    2005-01-01

    In this unit, elementary students design and build a lunar plant growth chamber using the Engineering Design Process. The purpose of the unit is to help students understand and apply the design process as it relates to plant growth on the moon. This guide includes six lessons, which meet a number of national standards and benchmarks in…

  12. [Substrates and possible mechanisms of pineal gland moon-sensory function in context of redusome hypothesis of aging and control of biological time in ontogenesis].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S V

    2008-01-01

    As a result of comparison of the normative factors on human pineal gland volume (8 age groups, n=411) with similar factors obtained in the days of the moon phase extremes (n=49) the following phenomena have been determined. As a rule all the moon phase extremes, in particular the new moon, are accompanied by an appreciable reduce of pineal gland volume, a sort of systole. These changes depend on the age factor. The results of the research advance indirect arguments for the redusome hypothesis of aging.

  13. Molecular Imaging of Vasa Vasorum Neovascularization via DEspR-targeted Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound Micro-imaging in Transgenic Atherosclerosis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Decano, Julius L.; Moran, Anne Marie; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson; Herrera, Victoria L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Given that carotid vasa vasorum neovascularization is associated with increased risk for stroke and cardiac events, the present in vivo study was designed to investigate molecular imaging of carotid artery vasa vasorum neovascularization via target-specific contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) micro-imaging. Procedures Molecular imaging was performed in male transgenic rats with carotid artery disease and non-transgenic controls using dual endothelin1/VEGFsp receptor (DEspR)-targeted microbubbles (MBD) and the Vevo770 micro-imaging system and CEU imaging software. Results DEspR-targeted CEU-positive imaging exhibited significantly higher contrast intensity signal (CIS)-levels and pre-/post-destruction CIS-differences in seven of 13 transgenic rats, in contrast to significantly lower CIS-levels and differences in control isotype-targeted microbubble (MBC)-CEU imaging (n =8) and in MBD CEU-imaging of five non-transgenic control rats (P<0.0001). Ex vivo immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated binding of MBD to DEspR-positive endothelial cells; and association of DEspR-targeted increased contrast intensity signals with DEspR expression in vasa vasorum neovessel and intimal lesions. In vitro analysis demonstrated dose-dependent binding of MBD to DEspR-positive human endothelial cells with increasing %cells bound and number of MBD per cell, in contrast to MBC or non-labeled microbubbles (P<0.0001). Conclusion In vivo DEspR-targeted molecular imaging detected increased DEspR-expression in carotid artery lesions and in expanded vasa vasorum neovessels in transgenic rats with carotid artery disease. Future studies are needed to determine predictive value for stroke or heart disease in this transgenic atherosclerosis rat model and translational applications. PMID:20972637

  14. Constraining spacetime torsion with the Moon and Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    March, Riccardo; Bellettini, Giovanni; Tauraso, Roberto; Dell'Agnello, Simone

    2011-05-15

    We report a search for new gravitational physics phenomena based on Riemann-Cartan theory of general relativity including spacetime torsion. Starting from the parametrized torsion framework of Mao, Tegmark, Guth, and Cabi, we analyze the motion of test bodies in the presence of torsion, and, in particular, we compute the corrections to the perihelion advance and to the orbital geodetic precession of a satellite. We consider the motion of a test body in a spherically symmetric field, and the motion of a satellite in the gravitational field of the Sun and the Earth. We describe the torsion field by means of three parameters, and we make use of the autoparallel trajectories, which in general differ from geodesics when torsion is present. We derive the specific approximate expression of the corresponding system of ordinary differential equations, which are then solved with methods of celestial mechanics. We calculate the secular variations of the longitudes of the node and of the pericenter of the satellite. The computed secular variations show how the corrections to the perihelion advance and to the orbital de Sitter effect depend on the torsion parameters. All computations are performed under the assumptions of weak field and slow motion. To test our predictions, we use the measurements of the Moon's geodetic precession from lunar laser ranging data, and the measurements of Mercury's perihelion advance from planetary radar ranging data. These measurements are then used to constrain suitable linear combinations of the torsion parameters.

  15. Moon and Terrestrial Planets: Unresolved Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, H. H.

    2002-12-01

    Human exploration during Apollo began the documentation of the evolution of the Moon and of its importance in understanding the origin and evolution of the terrestrial planets. This revolution in planetary geology continues as a vigorous and vibrant arena for discovery and debate for new generations of geoscientists. Although much has been learned and, indeed, resolved in lunar science, we are left with major questions unresolved. One fundamental question is that of the origin of the Moon. A large consensus has developed in the planetary science community that the Moon was created by the "giant impact" of a Mars-sized asteroid on the Earth after the accretion of the Earth was largely complete and differentiation had begun. A minority, however, questions this consensus hypothesis because of increasing indications that the lower mantle of the Moon may be largely undifferentiated. If the issue of the high angular momentum of the Earth-Moon system can be resolved through new modeling studies, then capture of a co-orbiting planetesimal may be an important alternative to a "giant impact". Another important question, particularly in consideration of the terrestrial and Martian surface environments during the first 0.8 billion years of Earth history, is the impact record of that period as recorded on the Moon. Again, a large consensus has developed that the 50 or so large and very large impact basins identified on the Moon were created over a very short "cataclysm" between about 3.9 and 3.8 billion years ago. Here also, a minority suggests that this period of large basin formation, although distinct in lunar history, took place over several hundred million years and that the apparent cataclysm is an artifact of sampling the effects of the last few basin-forming impacts. Either way, a previously unavailable source of impactors appeared somewhere in the solar system and greatly affected terrestrial environments at the time the precursors to life were appearing on Earth

  16. Riddles about the origin and thermal history of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, B. Y.; Mayeva, S. V.

    1977-01-01

    Magmatic differentiation of the moon's interior, confirmed through calculations of thermal history, was studied. It appears that differentiation was a result of the moon's initial temperature whose origin remains unknown. In solving this problem, convective models of the moon were considered as well as a two layered differentiated model of the moon, operative over the past 3.5 billion years. The high content of long lived radioactive elements present was investigated in explaining the moon's current thermal properties. The controversy concerning the true nature of magmatic differentiation continues to be unsolved.

  17. Science opportunities in the human exploration of moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, Carl B.; O'Handley, Douglas A.; Nash, Douglas B.

    1989-01-01

    Human exploration of the moon will open up science opportunities not only in lunar science, but also in astronomy and astrophysics, life science, solar and space physics, earth science, and even evolutionary biology. These opportunities may be categorized as those involving study of the moon itself, those in which the moon is used as a platform for investigations, and those conducted in transit between earth and the moon. This paper describes some of these opportunities, and calls on the science community to continue and expand its efforts to define the opportunities, and to work toward their inclusion in plans to return humans permanently to the moon.

  18. The Motion of a Satellite of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lass, Harry

    1960-01-01

    The motion of a satellite of the Moon depends on the potential field due to the Moon as well as the gravitational effects of the Earth and Sun. If one chooses a frame of reference attached to the Moon, it can be shown that the force field resulting from the Sun can be neglected when compared with the perturbing field of the Moon resulting from its oblateness. The effect of the Earth's field on the satellite is of the some order of magnitude as the Moon's perturbing field and must be included in an analysis of the motion of a satellite of the Moon. We will assume that the distance between Earth and Moon remains constant, and we will consider satellite orbits of small eccentricity. It will be shown that a nearly circular polar orbit will digress less than 1 deg from a polar orbit and that the change in eccentricity is less than a factor of e in one year.

  19. Volatile content of lunar volcanic glasses and the presence of water in the Moon's interior.

    PubMed

    Saal, Alberto E; Hauri, Erik H; Cascio, Mauro L; Van Orman, James A; Rutherford, Malcolm C; Cooper, Reid F

    2008-07-10

    The Moon is generally thought to have formed and evolved through a single or a series of catastrophic heating events, during which most of the highly volatile elements were lost. Hydrogen, being the lightest element, is believed to have been completely lost during this period. Here we make use of considerable advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry to obtain improved limits on the indigenous volatile (CO(2), H(2)O, F, S and Cl) contents of the most primitive basalts in the Moon-the lunar volcanic glasses. Although the pre-eruptive water content of the lunar volcanic glasses cannot be precisely constrained, numerical modelling of diffusive degassing of the very-low-Ti glasses provides a best estimate of 745 p.p.m. water, with a minimum of 260 p.p.m. at the 95 per cent confidence level. Our results indicate that, contrary to prevailing ideas, the bulk Moon might not be entirely depleted in highly volatile elements, including water. Thus, the presence of water must be considered in models constraining the Moon's formation and its thermal and chemical evolution.

  20. Low energy ion distribution around the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Tanaka, T.; Asamura, K.; Nishino, M. N.; Yamamoto, T.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2009-04-01

    More than a year has passed since MAP-PACE onboard KAGUYA (SELENE) started continuous observation of the low energy charged particles around the Moon from 100km-altitude polar orbit. MAP (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment) was developed for the comprehensive measurement of the magnetic field and three-dimensional plasma around the Moon. MAP consists of MAP-LMAG (Lunar MAGnetometer) and MAP-PACE (Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment). MAP-PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). Since each sensor has hemispherical field of view, two electron sensors and two ion sensors that are installed on the spacecraft panels opposite to each other can make full 3-dimensional measurements of low energy electrons and ions. One of the ion sensors IMA is an energy mass spectrometer. IMA measures mass identified ion energy spectra that have never been obtained at 100km altitude around the Moon. Low energy charged particles around the Moon were vigorously observed by Moon orbiting satellites and plasma instrumentation placed on the lunar surface in 1960s and 1970s. Though there were some satellites that explored the Moon afterwards, most of them were dedicated to the global mapping of the lunar surface. There has been almost no new information about the low energy charged particles around the Moon except the low energy electron measurement by Lunar Prospector, the lunar wake plasma data obtained by WIND during its Moon fly-by, and reports on remote detection of the lunar ions, lunar electrons and ULF waves generated by electron beams around the lunar wake. The newly observed data show characteristic ion distributions around the Moon. Besides the solar wind, MAP-PACE-IMA discovered four clearly distinguishable ion distributions: 1) Solar wind ions reflected/scattered at the lunar surface, 2) Solar wind ions reflected by magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, 3) Ions that are

  1. MOON for spectroscopic studies of double beta decays and the present status of the MOON-1 prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, H.; Ejiri, H.; Fushimi, K.; Ichihara, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Hazama, R.; Umehara, S.; Yoshida, S.; Ogama, T.; Sakiuchi, T.; Hai, V. H.; Sugaya, Y.; Moon Collaboration

    2006-05-01

    The MOON (Molybdenum Observatory Of Neutrinos) project, as an extension of ELEGANT V, aims at spectroscopic studies of double beta decays from 100Mo with a sensitivity of the Majorana neutrino mass around 30 meV. Measurements with good energy and position resolutions enable one to select true signals and to reject background ones. A prototype MOON detector (MOON Phase-1A) with 142 g 100Mo was built and is running at the Oto underground laboratory. The present report describes briefly the outline of the MOON project and the present status of MOON-1.

  2. To the Moon on a Shoestring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, T. F.; Rasmussen, S.

    2013-09-01

    The Euroluna Team is one of the around 30 teams competing in the Google Lunar X PRIZE Competition. The goal of the competition is to be the first team to successfully land a vehicle on the Moon, drive 500 m, and send video of the drive back to Earth. The Euroluna Team was formed in 2007, and the first flight hardware was acquired in 2010. Euroluna is financed privately with small funds. We have not received any external financial support. Therefore we have made an effort to keep all investments low. This has resulted in a design that uses new technologies and old technologies in a new way. Components are largely based on the Cubesat family and an ion thruster is being used for propulsion. A special strategy for landing on the Moon is under development. Special software of own design is being used for simulation of trajectories and energy consumption.

  3. Economic Geology of the Moon: Some Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Stephen L.

    1992-01-01

    Supporting any but the smallest lunar facility will require indigenous resources due to the extremely high cost of bringing material from Earth. The Moon has also attracted interest as a resource base to help support near-Earth space activities, because of the potential lower cost once the necessary infrastructure has been amortized. Obviously, initial lunar products will be high-volume, bulk commodities, as they are the only ones for which the economics of lunar production are conceivably attractive. Certain rarer elements, such as the halogens, C, and H, would also be extremely useful (for propellant, life support, and/or reagents), and indeed local sources of such elements would vastly improve the economics of lunar resource extraction. The economic geology of the Moon is discussed.

  4. Multispectral Mapping of the Moon by Clementine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eliason, Eric M.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Robinson, M.; Lucey, Paul G.; Duxbury, T.; Malaret, E.; Pieters, Carle; Becker, T.; Isbell, C.; Lee, E.

    1998-01-01

    One of the chief scientific objectives of the Clementine mission at the Moon was to acquire global multispectral mapping. A global digital map of the Moon in 11 spectral bandpasses and at a scale of 100 m/pixel is being produced at the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff Arizona Near-global coverage was acquired with the UVVIS camera (central wavelengths of 415, 750, 900, 950, and 1000 nm) and the NIR camera (1102, 1248, 1499, 1996, 2620, and 2792 nary). We expect to complete processing of the UVVIS mosaics before the fall of 1998, and to complete the NIR mosaics a year later. The purpose of this poster is to provide an update on the processing and to show examples of the products or perhaps even a wall-sized display of color products from the UVVIS mosaics.

  5. Future Astronomical Observatories on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O. (Editor); Mendell, Wendell W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers at a workshop which consider the topic astronomical observations from a lunar base are presented. In part 1, the rationale for performing astronomy on the Moon is established and economic factors are considered. Part 2 includes concepts for individual lunar based telescopes at the shortest X-ray and gamma ray wavelengths, for high energy cosmic rays, and at optical and infrared wavelengths. Lunar radio frequency telescopes are considered in part 3, and engineering considerations for lunar base observatories are discussed in part 4. Throughout, advantages and disadvantages of lunar basing compared to terrestrial and orbital basing of observatories are weighted. The participants concluded that the Moon is very possibly the best location within the inner solar system from which to perform front-line astronomical research.

  6. Helping the Moon take a selfie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, William H.

    2014-09-01

    It is a fundamental result of introductory optics that a plane mirror must be at least one half of your height if you want to see your entire body. Students are commonly confused about whether this is still true as you back very far away from the mirror. An interesting student question proposed that we observe the Moon’s image in a small makeup mirror. If someone on the Moon had a telescope large enough to see you and your surroundings clearly, would that person also be able to peer over your shoulder and see the entire Moon in your mirror, as you do? The answer provides a useful ‘view’ on mirror reflections.

  7. Water: Communicator In Moon-Earth Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Joan S.

    The Moon's myriad effects upon Earth have been objects of fascination, and subjects for literary works and scientific speculation throughout history. Although many of Moon's influences upon Earth involve water, tidal movement is clearly the most readily associated effect. While very obvious, it however represents only one of a multitude of ways in which lunar forces effect this planet, and all life upon it. Much less apparent, though essential for all of life, is the wide spectrum of subtle fluctuating influences upon the water in the cells of living systems. Water's capacity to respond to extremely subtle changes in physical influences (such as gravitational fields), as associated with Moon phases (N.B. also with planetary constellations and sunspot activity), enables it to communicate such inputs to living systems. The periodicity of changes in natural systems has been of interest to man throughout history. However, only in more recent times has insight into water's behaviour led to its being recognised as a link between the periodicities seen in abiotic (Moon and other planetary) systems and biotic systems. Particular attention has long been paid to systematic fluctuations in agriculture and forestry: Different growth patterns are observed in connection with the Moon phases (and zodiac constellations) at planting time; different characteristics (e.g., fire resistance, pliability, firmness, etc.) of wood are seen in trees harvested at different phases and constellations. . The usefulness of such correlations has influenced planting and harvesting patterns in more traditional-oriented agriculture and forestry. Its acceptance by science has, however, been long in coming. The case similar, as regards physiological fluctuations observed in the medical field. A documented case in point is the correlation between the Moon-phase and risk of hemorrhage during surgery: This is one of many observations on periodicity in body functions, which deserve more research attention

  8. Nightside electromagnetic response of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Smith, B. F.; Sonett, C. P.; Colburn, D. S.; Schwartz, K.

    1972-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of the Moon to excitation by the time dependent fluctuations of the interplanetary magnetic field is given for the dark or antisolar hemisphere of the Moon. Six hours of time series data from the Explorer 35 magnetometer and the lunar surface magnetometer on Apollo 12 are used to obtain the Fourier spectral amplitudes of the surface and interplanetary fields from which transfer functions are calculated for the east-west, north-south, and vertical directions at the Apollo site. A critical discussion of lunar conductivity profiles derived from night side radial magnetic field data and vacuum scattering theory is presented. Limitations are shown that there is no evidence for a lunar core as conducting as 0.01 mhos/m.

  9. A picture of the moon's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Brian; Mendillo, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Atomic sodium is a useful tracer of the tenuous lunar atmosphere because of its high efficiency in scattering sunlight at the D1 (5896 angstroms) and D2 (5890 angstroms) wavelengths. In 1988, Earth-based instruments revealed the presence of sodium at a density of less than 50 atoms per cubic centimeter at lunar altitudes below 100 kilometers. Telescopic observations that are made with a coronograph technique to block out the disk of the moon allow a true picture of the circumlunar atmosphere to be obtained and show the presence of sodium out to a distance of several lunar radii. The distribution of sodium has a solar zenith angle dependence, suggesting that most of the sodium that reaches great altitudes is liberated from the moon's surface by solar photons (by heating or sputtering) or by solar wind impact, in contrast to a source driven by uniform micrometeor bombardment.

  10. Tidal deceleration of the moon's mean motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, M. K.; Eanes, R. J.; Tapley, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    The secular change in the mean motion of the moon, n, caused by the tidal dissipation in the ocean and solid earth is due primarily to the effect of the diurnal and semidiurnal tides. The long-period ocean tides produce an increase in n, but the effects are only 1 percent of the diurnal and semidiurnal ocean tides. In this investigation, expressions for these effects are obtained by developing the tidal potential in the ecliptic reference system. The computation of the amplitude of equilibrium tide and the phase corrections is also discussed. The averaged tidal deceleration of the moon's mean motion, n, from the most recent satellite ocean tide solutions is -25.25 +/- 0.4 arcseconds/sq century. The value for n inferred from the satellite-determined ocean-tide solution is in good agreement with the value obtained from the analysis of 20 years of lunar laser-ranging observations.

  11. Some thoughts on astronomy from the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Harlan J.

    1990-07-01

    Factors related and unrelated to lunar astronomy are set forth in an argument for the establishment of planning and facilities development for lunar-based astronomy. The moon is both an important site for permanent occupation following the similar use of a space station and for exploration and exploitation with potential economic returns. In terms of astronomy, the moon provides an ideal environment for observations in the UV, IR, and optical bands. A comparison of evolutionary and revolutionary approaches to developing lunar observatories is given, and the use of smaller instruments is emphasized which guarantees valuable results at a lower cost. The smaller instruments can then be applied to the subsequent development of a lunar observatory with high capability.

  12. Stennis engineer part of LCROSS moon mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Karma Snyder, a project manager at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, was a senior design engineer on the RL10 liquid rocket engine that powered the Centaur, the upper stage of the rocket used in NASA's Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission in October 2009. Part of the LCROSS mission was to search for water on the moon by striking the lunar surface with a rocket stage, creating a plume of debris that could be analyzed for water ice and vapor. Snyder's work on the RL10 took place from 1995 to 2001 when she was a senior design engineer with Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne. Years later, she sees the project as one of her biggest accomplishments in light of the LCROSS mission. 'It's wonderful to see it come into full service,' she said. 'As one of my co-workers said, the original dream was to get that engine to the moon, and we're finally realizing that dream.'

  13. Economic geology of the Moon: Some considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillett, Stephen L.

    Supporting any but the smallest lunar facility will require indigenous resources due to the extremely high cost of bringing material from Earth. The Moon has also attracted interest as a resource base to help support near-Earth space activities, because of the potential lower cost once the necessary infrastructure has been amortized. Obviously, initial lunar products will be high-volume, bulk commodities, as they are the only ones for which the economics of lunar production are conceivably attractive. Certain rarer elements, such as the halogens, C, and H, would also be extremely useful (for propellant, life support, and/or reagents), and indeed local sources of such elements would vastly improve the economics of lunar resource extraction. The economic geology of the Moon is discussed.

  14. Launching to the Moon, Mars, and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivers, C. Herbert

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the planned launching to the Moon, and Mars. It is important to build beyond the capacity to ferry astronauts and cargo to low Earth orbit. NASA is starting to design new vehicles using the past lessons to minimize cost, and technical risks. The training and education of engineers that will continue the work of designing, testing and flying the vehicles is important to NASA.

  15. The 2012 Moon and Mars Analog Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Lee

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 Moon and Mars Analog Mission Activities (MMAMA) scientific investigations were completed on Mauna Kea volcano in Hawaii in July 2012. The investigations were conducted on the southeast flank of the Mauna Kea volcano at an elevation of approximately 11,500 ft. This area is known as "Apollo Valley" and is in an adjacent valley to the Very Large Baseline Array dish antenna.

  16. Some results of Moon's gravitational field investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigel, Y. I.; Zazulyak, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    The task of studying the gravitational field of the moon is important for long-term planning of its research using manned and robotic spacecrafts. Determination of harmonic expansion coefficients of selenopotential may not be reliable because of their construction based on different data and different methods of mathematical processing. With mutual comparative assessment of selenopotential models we can get some information about the reliability determination harmonic coefficients.

  17. The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter reference trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.; Lam, Try

    2006-01-01

    The proposed NASA Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission would have used a single spacecraft to orbit Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa in succession. The enormous Delta-Velocity required for this mission (nearly [25 km/s]) would necessitate the use of very high efficiency electric propulsion. The trajectory created for the proposed baseline JIMO mission may be the most complex trajectory ever designed. This paper describes the current reference trajectory in detail and describes the processes that were used to construct it.

  18. A new moon-induced structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole

    2014-11-01

    Cassini UVIS stellar occultations show prominent gaps within Saturn's ring located only a few km from the Encke and Keeler gap edges. These transparent regions feature sharp edges and measure a few km in radial width. Already the Voyager 2 PPS experiment registered such a gap near the inner Encke gap edge.All gaps identified so far have been found exclusively downstream of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis, respectively. Interestingly, none has been observed at the inner Keeler gap edge, where temporal and spatial variability of the edge are still poorly understood and most likely driven by the Prometheus 32:31 ILR located nearby. There is evidence for a weak trend between radial width and relative azimuthal distance to the moon. Trends for features found near the inner and outer Encke gap edge are consistent with each other. Two occultations, one tracking and one double star occultation, allow to investigate spatial and temporal morphology of these gaps. Our preliminary results suggest that these structures are individual gaps with an aspect ratio of about 1:5 and may thus be about 10km long.Embedded moons are known to create observable structures - gaps and kinematic wakes - in the surrounding ring. While Pan and Daphnis are massive enough to open a circumferential gap, smaller objects create the propeller features. These new results, however, reveal the existence of a previously unknown and unpredicted moon-associated structure. Its existence offers another avenue in searching for embedded objects, although our preliminary search did not produce examples apart from those reported here for Pan and Daphnis.We acknowledge Tracy Becker for providing an initial list of positive detections. This work is supported by the Cassini project.

  19. The New Face of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, J. N.

    2012-07-01

    The beginning of this century ushered a new era in lunar exploration. It started with the Smart-1 mission, launched in 2003, that was followed in quick succession by Kaguya, Change-1, Chandrayaan-1, LRO, LCROSS, Change-2 and the most recent GRAIL mission, launched in late 2011. Results obtained by these missions have strengthened some of the existing postulates of lunar evolution, such as the global magma hypothesis, questioned many of our earlier views on moon and generated renewed interest in laboratory studies of lunar samples. Moon can no longer be considered as a bone-dry object. Signatures of hydroxyl and water molecules were found at high latitude lunar regions by Chandrayaan-1 mission and LCROSS mission detected water in the plume generated by a planned impact on a permanently shadowed lunar polar site. Laboratory studies confirmed presence of hydroxyl as a structural component in minerals present in lunar rocks. The permanently shadowed regions turned out to be some of the coldest place in the solar system and could potentially host surface/sub-surface water ice and frozen volatiles. New results obtained by these missions suggest the presence of previously unidentified lunar rock types, young volcanic and tectonic activities, layering within the top kilometre of the lunar surface and the possibility that moon host a very tenuous exosphere. Interesting new features of solar wind interactions with the lunar surface and localized lunar magnetic field have also been delineated. The ongoing effort to reconstruct the new face of the moon will get a boost from results from the GRAIL mission on gravity anomalies and from other upcoming missions, LADEE, Chandrayaan-2, Luna Resource and Luna Glob. A general overview of our current ideas of lunar evolution will be presented along with a preview of upcoming efforts to better understand our closest neighbour in space.

  20. EUVE photometric observations of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. R.; McDonald, J. S.; Boyd, W. T.; Bowyer, S.

    1994-03-01

    During its all-sky survey, the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite observed the Moon several times at first and last quarters, and once immediately following the Dec. 10 1992 lunar eclipse. We present here a portion of this data, in the form of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images of the Moon and derived geometric albedos. From the EUVE photometer data we obtain average geometric albedos of 0.15% (+/- 0.03%), 3.1% (+/- 0.3%), and 3.5% (+/- 0.3%), over wavelength intervals of 150-240 A, 400-580 A, and 550-650 A, respectively. An upper limit geometric albedo of 0.13% is obtained for the wavelength interval 75-180 A. Also, using previously published ROSAT data, we estimate a lunar geometric albedo of 0.014% (+/- 0.002%) over the wavelength interval 50-80 A. These EUV albedos (and previously published far-ultraviolet albedos) are well fit by the scaled reflectivities of SiO2 and Al2O3. Over the wavelength ranges of the EUVE photometers, the observed brightness of the Moon seems to be largely consistent with reflected sunlight rather than X-ray fluorescence. Since the L- and M-shell fluorescence signal is expected to be carried by only small number of emission lines, however, it will require EUV observations of higher spectral resolution (approximately less than 5 A) to determine their exact contribution, if any, to the lunar EUV spectrum.

  1. The Moon In The Classic Maya World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Giuliano

    During the Classic Period of the Maya civilization (250-900 A.D.) we have many documents in which it is possible to see the interest of this people on the principal lunar phenomena as the phases and the eclipses in particular. On a number of stelae, lintels and many other inscriptions (in Copan, Quirigua, Tikal, etc.), we can see that in correspondence of the dedication date of the monument, the Maya point out the phase of the Moon and its position in a period of six months corresponding to half year of eclipse. In some parts of the Dresda Codex (one of the four original codices of the Maya) we can see some pages in which were indicated the days of the Tzolkin calendar (the religious calendar of 260 days) in which it is possible to observe a lunar or solar eclipse. The periods of 177 or 148 days are allotted in a sequence that corresponds to the exact interval between the eclipses. The accuracy in the observations and in the calculations of the phases of the Moon, also in very old epochs, is an interesting evidence of the fundamental importance of the Moon in the Maya civilisation.

  2. Habitable moons around extrasolar giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. M.; Kasting, J. F.; Wade, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Possible planetary objects have now been discovered orbiting nine different main-sequence stars. These companion objects (some of which might actually be brown dwarfs) all have a mass at least half that of Jupiter, and are therefore unlikely to be hospitable to Earth-like life: jovian planets and brown dwarfs support neither a solid nor a liquid surface near which organisms might dwell. Here we argue that rocky moons orbiting these companions could be habitable if the planet-moon system orbits the parent star within the so-called 'habitable zone', where life-supporting liquid water could be present. The companions to the stars 16 Cygni B and 47 Ursae Majoris might satisfy this criterion. Such a moon would, however, need to be large enough (>0.12 Earth masses) to retain a substantial and long-lived atmosphere, and would also need to possess a strong magnetic field in order to prevent its atmosphere from being sputtered away by the constant bombardment of energetic ions from the planet's magnetosphere.

  3. Habitable moons around extrasolar giant planets.

    PubMed

    Williams, D M; Kasting, J F; Wade, R A

    1997-01-16

    Possible planetary objects have now been discovered orbiting nine different main-sequence stars. These companion objects (some of which might actually be brown dwarfs) all have a mass at least half that of Jupiter, and are therefore unlikely to be hospitable to Earth-like life: jovian planets and brown dwarfs support neither a solid nor a liquid surface near which organisms might dwell. Here we argue that rocky moons orbiting these companions could be habitable if the planet-moon system orbits the parent star within the so-called 'habitable zone', where life-supporting liquid water could be present. The companions to the stars 16 Cygni B and 47 Ursae Majoris might satisfy this criterion. Such a moon would, however, need to be large enough (>0.12 Earth masses) to retain a substantial and long-lived atmosphere, and would also need to possess a strong magnetic field in order to prevent its atmosphere from being sputtered away by the constant bombardment of energetic ions from the planet's magnetosphere.

  4. The moon as a high temperature condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The accretion during condensation mechanism is used to explain the differences in composition of the terrestrial planets and the moon. Many of the properties of the moon, including the enrichment in Ca, Al, Ti, U, Th, Ba, Sr and the REE and the depletion in Fe, Rb, K, Na and other volatiles can be understood if the moon represents a high temperature condensate from the solar nebula. Thermodynamic calculations show that Ca, Al and Ti rich compounds condense first in a cooling nebula. The high temperature mineralogy is gehlenite, spinel perovskite, Ca-Al-rich pyroxenes and anorthite. The model is consistent with extensive early melting, shallow melting at 3 A.E. and with presently high speed internal temperatures. It is predicted that the outer 250 km is rich in plagioclase and FeO. The low iron content of the interior in this model raises the interior temperatures estimated from electrical conductivity by some 800 C. The lunar crust is 80 percent gabbroic anorthosite, 20 percent basalt and is about 250-270 km thick. The lunar mantle is probably composed of spinel, merwinite and diopside with a density of 3.4 g/cu cm.

  5. Formation, Habitability, and Detection of Extrasolar Moons

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Darren; Kipping, David; Limbach, Mary Anne; Turner, Edwin; Greenberg, Richard; Sasaki, Takanori; Bolmont, Émeline; Grasset, Olivier; Lewis, Karen; Barnes, Rory; Zuluaga, Jorge I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The diversity and quantity of moons in the Solar System suggest a manifold population of natural satellites exist around extrasolar planets. Of peculiar interest from an astrobiological perspective, the number of sizable moons in the stellar habitable zones may outnumber planets in these circumstellar regions. With technological and theoretical methods now allowing for the detection of sub-Earth-sized extrasolar planets, the first detection of an extrasolar moon appears feasible. In this review, we summarize formation channels of massive exomoons that are potentially detectable with current or near-future instruments. We discuss the orbital effects that govern exomoon evolution, we present a framework to characterize an exomoon's stellar plus planetary illumination as well as its tidal heating, and we address the techniques that have been proposed to search for exomoons. Most notably, we show that natural satellites in the range of 0.1–0.5 Earth mass (i) are potentially habitable, (ii) can form within the circumplanetary debris and gas disk or via capture from a binary, and (iii) are detectable with current technology. Key Words: Astrobiology—Extrasolar planets—Habitability—Planetary science—Tides. Astrobiology 14, 798–835. PMID:25147963

  6. Himalia, a Small Moon of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured images of Himalia, the brightest of Jupiter's outer moons, on Dec. 19, 2000, from a distance of 4.4 million kilometers (2.7 million miles).

    This near-infrared image, with a resolution of about 27 kilometers (17 miles) per pixel, indicates that the side of Himalia facing the spacecraft is roughly 160 kilometers (100 miles) in the up-down direction. Himalia probably has a non-spherical shape. Scientists believe it is a body captured into orbit around Jupiter, most likely an irregularly shaped asteroid.

    In the main frame, an arrow indicates Himalia. North is up. The inset shows the little moon magnified by a factor of 10, plus a graphic indicating Himalia's size and the direction of lighting (with sunlight coming from the left). Cassini's pictures of Himalia were taken during a brief period when Cassini's attitude was stabilized by thrusters instead of by a steadier reaction-wheel system. No spacecraft or telescope had previously shown any of Jupiter's outer moons as more than a star-like single dot.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  7. Formation and composition of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Many of the properties of the Moon, including the enrichment in Ca, Al, Ti, U, Th, Ba, Sr, and the REE and the depletion in Fe, Rb, K, Na, and other volatiles can be understood if the Moon represents a high-temperature condensate from the solar nebula. Thermodynamic calculations show that Ca-, Al-, and Ti-rich compounds condense first in a cooling nebula. The initial high temperature mineralogy is gehlenite, spinel, perovskite, Ca-Al-rich pyroxenes, and anorthite. Inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites such as the Allende meteorite are composed primarily of these minerals and, in addition, are highly enriched in refractories such as REE relative to carbonaceous chondrites. These inclusions can yield basalt and anorthosite in the proportions required to eliminate the europium anomaly, leaving a residual spinel-melilite interior. A deep interior high in Ca-Al does not imply an unacceptable mean density or moment of inertia for the Moon. The inferred high-U content of the lunar interior, both from the Allende analog and the high heat flow, indicates a high-temperature interior. The model is consistent with extensive early melting, with shallow melting at 3 AE, and with presently high deep internal temperatures. It is predicted that the outer 250 km is rich in plagioclase and FeO. The low iron content of the interior in this model raises the interior temperatures estimated from electrical conductivity by some 800 C.

  8. A new moon-induced structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.; Esposito, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    Embedded moons are known to create an observable propeller-shaped structure in the surrounding ring which consists of a gap and kinematic wake. In the cases of Pan and Daphnis, the moons are sufficiently massive to open a circumferential gap - the Encke and Keeler gap, respectively. New results, however, reveal the existence of a previously unknown moonassociated structure found at the Encke and Keeler gap edges. By analyzing Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrometer (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) and Voyager 2 Photopolarimeter (PPS) occultations we found a few kilometer wide gaps located within a few kilometers of the ring edges. These transparent regions feature sharp edges and have so far been found exclusively downstream of the respective embedded moon. Gap characteristics for features found near the inner and outer Encke gap edges are consistent with each other. Two occultations with special observing geometries, one tracking and one double-star, allow to investigate spatial and temporal morphology of these gaps. Our preliminary results suggest that these structures are individual gaps with an aspect ratio of about 1:5 and may thus be about 10km long. Their existence offers another avenue in searching for embedded objects although our preliminary search did not produce examples apart from those reported here for Pan and Daphnis.

  9. Formation, habitability, and detection of extrasolar moons.

    PubMed

    Heller, René; Williams, Darren; Kipping, David; Limbach, Mary Anne; Turner, Edwin; Greenberg, Richard; Sasaki, Takanori; Bolmont, Emeline; Grasset, Olivier; Lewis, Karen; Barnes, Rory; Zuluaga, Jorge I

    2014-09-01

    The diversity and quantity of moons in the Solar System suggest a manifold population of natural satellites exist around extrasolar planets. Of peculiar interest from an astrobiological perspective, the number of sizable moons in the stellar habitable zones may outnumber planets in these circumstellar regions. With technological and theoretical methods now allowing for the detection of sub-Earth-sized extrasolar planets, the first detection of an extrasolar moon appears feasible. In this review, we summarize formation channels of massive exomoons that are potentially detectable with current or near-future instruments. We discuss the orbital effects that govern exomoon evolution, we present a framework to characterize an exomoon's stellar plus planetary illumination as well as its tidal heating, and we address the techniques that have been proposed to search for exomoons. Most notably, we show that natural satellites in the range of 0.1-0.5 Earth mass (i) are potentially habitable, (ii) can form within the circumplanetary debris and gas disk or via capture from a binary, and (iii) are detectable with current technology.

  10. Facts and Suggestions from a Brief History of the Galilean Moons and Space Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, John

    2010-05-01

    energetic enough to change isotopic ratios in the affected surface materials. The sputtered materials partially escape either directly to the magnetosphere or indirectly through exospheric losses, so these additionally contribute at trace levels to the magnetospheric interconnections of surface composition for all the moons. In order to determine the intrinsic composition of the moons from EJSM surface and exospheric measurements, we must first peel back the surficial patina of space weathering products. Conversely, future measurements of the magnetospheric ion composition at high resolution in elemental and significant isotopic abundances, including as products of space weathering on the moon surfaces, can be projected back to the Io source for huge advancements of our knowledge on the origins of Io volcanism and more generally of the Jupiter system. These are some of the relevant facts for space weathering from 400 years of Jupiter system exploration, the main suggestion is that one the highest returns on international investments in the EJSM mission would be from advancement of capabilities for in-situ sample analysis in the magnetosphere and from moon surfaces to cover the full range of elements and key isotopes. Modest investments in appropriate technologies for ion and neutral gas measurements to this level would be insignificant in cost as compared to Earth sample return. This suggestion was submitted by Cooper et al. [4] to the ongoing decadal survey of planetary science and mission priorities in the United States. References: [1] Stebbins, J., Publ. Astron. Soc. Pacific 38 (225), 321-322, 1926; [2] Burke, B.F., and K. L. Franklin, J. Geophys. Res. 60, 213-217, 1955. [3] Morabito, L. A., et al., Science 204, 972, 1979; [4] Cooper, J. F., and 21 Co-authors, Space Weathering Impact on Solar System Surfaces and Mission Science, Community White Paper submitted to Planetary Science Decadal Survey, 2013--2022. National Research Council, Washington, D.C., Sept. 15, 2009.

  11. Trauma and the full moon: a waning theory.

    PubMed

    Coates, W; Jehle, D; Cottington, E

    1989-07-01

    There exists a popular belief in the causal relationship between the moon's phase and the incidence of major trauma. In this retrospective study we reviewed 1,444 trauma victims admitted to the hospital during one calendar year. Full moons were defined as three-day periods in the 29.531-day lunar cycle, with the middle day being described in the world almanac as the full moon. Victims of violence included those patients sustaining blunt assault, gunshot wounds, and stabbings. There was no statistical difference in number of trauma admissions between the full moon, 129 patients per 36 days (mean, 3.58), and nonfull moon days, 1,315 patients per 330 days (mean, 3.98). Mortality rate, 5.4% versus 10.3%; mean Injury Severity Score, 13 versus 15; and mean length of stay, ten versus 12 days, were not significantly different during the full moon and nonfull moon days. Victims of violence were admitted at a similar frequency on full moon, 16 patients per 36 days (mean, 0.444), and nonfull moon days, 183 patients per 330 days (mean, 0.555). We conclude that the belief in the deleterious effects of the full moon on major trauma is statistically unfounded.

  12. Jupiter's and Saturn's ice moons: geophysical aspects and opportunities of geophysical survey of the planetary geoelectrical markers and oreols of the subsurface liquid ocean on the surface ice moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozorovich, Yuri; Linkin, Vacheslav; Kosov, Alexandr; Fournier-Sicre, Alain; Klimov, Stanislav; Novikov, Denis; Ivanov, Anton; Skulachev, Dmitriy; Menshenin, Yaroslav

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new conceptual and methodological approach for geophysical survey of the planetary geoelectrical markers and oreols of the subsurface liquid ocean on the surface ice moons on the base "conceptual design phase" of the future space missions on the ice moons. At the design stage of such projects is considered the use of various space instruments and tools for the full the complex geophysical studies of the manifestations and planetary processes of the subsurface liquid ocean on the surface ice moons. The existence of various forms of the cryolithozone on terrestrial planets and their moons: advanced Martian permafrost zone in the form of existing of the frozen polar caps, subsurface frozen horizons, geological markers and oreols of the martian ancient (relict) ocean, subsurface oceans of Jupiter's and Saturn's moons-Europe and Enceladus, with the advanced form of permafrost freezes planetary caps, it allows to develop a common methodological basis and operational geophysical instruments (tools) for the future space program and planning space missions on these unique objects of the solar system, specialized for specific scientific problems of planetary missions. Geophysical practices and methodological principles, used in 1985-2015 by aurthors [ 1-5 ], respectively, as an example of the comprehensive geophysical experiment MARSES to study of the Martian permafrost zone and the martian ancient (relict) ocean, creating the preconditions for complex experimental setting and geo-physical monitoring of operational satellites of Jupiter and Saturn- Europe and Enceladus. This range of different planetary (like) planets with its geological history and prehistory of the common planetology formation processes of the planets formation and to define the role of a liquid ocean under the ice as a climate indicator of such planets, which is extremely important for the future construction of the geological and climatic history of the Earth. Main publications: [1

  13. The Moon as a unifying sociological attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, C.; Pachera, S.; Ciucci, A.

    We propose to develop an economic, fully automated telescope to equip a variety of public and private buildings, such as disco dancings, pubs, resting houses, hospitals, schools etc., optimized to image and project the Moon, both in daylight and nightime. We strongly believe that the wide spread conscience of being part of a common Universe, by imaging the real Moon ( not a series of computer files) and following its changing course, distributed in places where the soul is usually taken in a wave of loneliness, can have a profound effect. In fact, living such an experience of observation in places where people of all ages usually meet, can help them to mix up socially and have fun and acquire new interests and fulfillment. They could confront their doubts, opinions, curiosity. The Moon is the natural choice, being visible even in polluted cities, it comes to the Zenith of a large band on the Earth encompassing each emisphere, it has deeply rooted meanings in all civilizations, and it is therefore the perfect astronomical object towards which humanity should direct its view above the ground. The possibility of the instrument to zoom in and out and to move across the surface of the Moon or to observe in real time the slowly moving line of the terminator, is intended just for the sheer wonder of it. No didactic use is meant to begin with, although interest is sure to be stimulated and may be followed up in many ways. Our object is indeed to make young and older people throughout the world feel our satellite nearer and more familiar in the shapes and names of its features, truly a constant presence in our everyday natural surroundings. When the time will come for human coloniz ation, the Moon could no longer be considered such an extraneous, exotic and faraway new home. The telescope can be built in very large quantities by a variety of firms practically even in underdeveloped countries, easily automated and connected to the world wide web.

  14. Earth Port-Moon Port design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A pair of compatible transfer stations or Space Ports and associated transfer vehicles was designed in order to support permanent manned lunar facilities. One of the Space Ports was placed in earth orbit (not necessarily Low Earth Orbit - LEO), and the other in lunar orbit. The primary purposes of the Space Ports was to support the lunar surface facility, the return of lunar manufactured items to the earth, and the transfer of lunar manufactured items to space vehicles and earth orbital space stations. The design was constrained by the following: (1) The orbital altitudes and inclinations of the Earth Port and Moon Port were chosen to minimize the overall cost of transporting materials to and from the moon. The ETO (Earth-to-Orbit) costs were considered separately to allow consideration of initiating planetary missions, etc., from the Earth Port. (2) A new earth launch point was chosen to facilitate the support of the lunar facility. This launch point was chosen to minimize overall costs, maximize overall safety, and to avoid political problems. To this end, it was mandatory the launch site be owned by the United States or one of its close allies. In addition, the launch would take place over water and expendable stages would drop into the ocean. Space shuttle type vehicles could be used if appropriate provisions were made for aborts, SRB and ET impact, etc. The ground track and impact point studies included space shuttle type vehicles, current ELV's (expendable launch vehicles, and HLLV's (heavy lift launch vehicles). (3) The Earth Port and Moon Port orbits were selected so that transfer trajectories between the two facilities could be initiated often without major plane change penalties. The amount of these penalties was calculated. Families of Earth Port to Moon Port and Moon Port to Earth Port trajectories were calculated to document the energy requirements and penalties. (4) Space Port module designs included module systems definitions, module masses, system

  15. An EUVE Spectrum of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. R.; McDonald, J. S.; Boyd, W. T.; Bowyer, S.

    1993-05-01

    During its all-sky survey, the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite observed the Moon several times at first and last quarters, and once near the December 10, 1992, lunar eclipse. We present here results for the EUV albedo of the Moon, and examine for the first time an EUVE spectrum of the Moon. Extreme ultraviolet observations of the Moon are of considerable interest, since it has been speculated that lunar EUV emissions are primarily due to L- and M-shell X-ray fluorescence and may provide a useful diagnostic of surface elemental abundances. Using the EUVE photometer observations, we have determined average lunar geometric albedos of 0.15% (+/- 0.02%), 3.1% (+/- 0.2%), and 3.5% (+/- 0.2%), over wavelength intervals of 150--240\\ang, 400--580\\ang, and 550--650\\ang, respectively. An upper limit geometric albedo of 0.13% is obtained for the wavelength interval 75--180\\ang. Also, using previously published ROSAT data we estimate a lunar geometric albedo of 0.0097% (+/- 0.0012%) over the wavelength interval 50--80\\ang. These EUV albedos, and previously published far-ultraviolet albedos from Apollo 17 and Mariner 10, are well fit by the scaled reflectivities of SiO_2 and Al_2O_3. Over the wavelength ranges of the EUVE photometers, the observed brightness of the Moon seems to be largely consistent with reflected sunlight rather than X-ray fluorescence. Since the L- and M-shell fluorescence signal is expected to be carried by only a few emission lines, however, EUV observations with higher spectral resolution are required to determine their exact contribution, if any, to the lunar EUV spectrum. Using a 1/2 hour spectrum obtained by the EUVE spectrometers on December 10, 1992, we will determine the level of the X-ray fluorescence contribution to the lunar EUV spectrum. This work has been supported by NASA contract NAS5-30180.

  16. Modelling elements for the Moon s near surface dusty plasma environment characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, F.; Hilgers, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    F. Cipriani (1), A. Hilgers(1), D. Rodgers(1) (1) ESA/ESTEC, Noordwijk, The Netherlands (fabrice.cipriani@esa.int / Fax: +31-71-5654697) Characterizing the Moon's electrostatically charged regolith, the levitation and transport of charged dust grains and their role in the surface current balance, is of primary importance to prepare future lunar missions. Observations carried out during Apollo missions brought evidence for a dust levitation process [1] and allowed to study lunar grains charging characteristics [2]. Lately, Lunar Prospector electron reflectometry data allowed to gain insights into the magnitude and the variability of lunar surface charging, revealing significant electrostatic potentials under different plasma conditions, depending on the Moon's local environment (Solar Wind, tail lobes, Earth's plasma sheet) (see e.g. [3,4]). Although theoretical studies have tackled the problem of regolith and dust grains charging, numerical modeling tools can be useful to simulate dust charging and transport over the complex features of the lunar topography, including the effects of the near surface magnetic environment, and interaction with mission elements as a lunar lander [5]. In the present study we use on the one hand a 3D PIC simulation code to investigate, under simplifying assumptions: 1) charging of the lunar surface under different plasma conditions encountered along the Moon orbit, 2) charging of a complex surface feature (typically a crater), and 3) charging, levitation and transport of dust grains in the near surface environment. One the other hand, we analyze limitations of the current tool and the physics to be further implemented in order to address dust charging and transport processes at the Moon surface relevant to the exploration of the Moon. References [1] Stubbs et al, (2006) Advance in Space Research, 37, 59-66 [2] Horanyi et al, (1998) JGR, Volume 103, Issue E4 [3] Halekas et al, (2008) JGR, Volume 113, Issue A9 [4] Poppe et al, (2011) GRL

  17. Endogenous Lunar Volatiles: Insights into the Abundances of Volatiles in the Moon from Lunar Apatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, Francis

    2016-01-01

    At the time of publication of New Views of the Moon, it was thought that the Moon was bone dry with less than about 1 ppb H2O. However in 2007, initial reports at the 38th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference speculated that H-species were present in both apatites and pyroclastic volcanic lunar glasses. These early reports were later confirmed through peer-review, which motivated many subsequent studies on magmatic volatiles in and on the Moon within the last decade. Some of these studies have cast into question the post-Apollo view of lunar formation, the distribution and sources of volatiles in the Earth-Moon system, and the thermal and magmatic evolution of the Moon. The mineral apatite has been one of the pillars of this new field of study, and it will be the primary focus of this abstract. Although apatite has been used both to understand the abundances of volatiles in lunar systems as well as the isotopic compositions of those volatiles, the focus here will be on the abundances of F, Cl, and H2O. This work demonstrates the utility of apatite in advancing our understanding of lunar volatiles, hence apatite should be among the topics covered in the endogenous lunar volatile chapter in NVM II. Truncated ternary plot of apatite X-site occupancy (mol%) from highlands apatite and mare basalt apatite plotted on the relative volatile abundance diagram from. The solid black lines delineate fields of relative abundances of F, Cl, and H2O (on a weight basis) in the melt from which the apatite crystallized. The diagram was constructed using available apatite/melt partitioning data for fluorine, chlorine, and hydroxyl.

  18. MoonRIDERS: NASA and Hawaiis Innovative Lunar Surface Flight Experiment for Landing in Late 2017

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelso, R. M.; Romo, R.; Mackey, P. J.; Phillips, J. R., III; Cox, R. E.; Hogue, M. D.; Calle, C. I.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, NASA Kennedy Space Center, Hawaii's state aerospace agency PISCES, and two Hawaii high schools Iolani and Kealakehe have come together in a unique collaboration called MoonRIDERS. This strategic partnership will allow Hawaii students to participate directly in sending a science experiment to the surface of the moon. The MoonRIDERS project started in the spring of 2014, with each institution responsible for its own project costs and activities. PISCES, given its legislative direction in advancing planetary surface systems, saw this collaboration as an important opportunity to inspire a young generation and encourage STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) learning. Under the guidance of PISCES and NASA, the students will be involved hands-on from start to finish in the engineering, testing, and validation of a space technology called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS). Dust is a critical issue for space exploration, as evidenced by the Apollo lunar missions and Mars rovers and landers. Dust creates a number of problems for humans and hardware, including inhalation, mechanical interference, wear and tear on spacesuits, inhibition of heat transfer on radiators, and reduced efficiency of solar panels. To address this, the EDS is designed to work on a variety of materials, and functions by generatingelectrodynamic fields to clear away the dust. The Google Lunar XPRIZE (GLXP), a space competition "designed to inspire pioneers to do robotic space transport on a budget," serves as a likely method for the MoonRIDERS to get their project to the moon. The EDS would potentially be flown as a hosted payload on a competitor's lander (still to be chosen). This briefing will provide an overview of the technology, the unique partnership, progress update and testing leading to this flight opportunity.

  19. On-Orbit Cross-Calibration of AM Satellite Remote Sensing Instruments using the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, James J.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Barnes, Robert A.; Stone, Thomas C.

    2003-01-01

    On April 14,2003, three Earth remote sensing spacecraft were maneuvered enabling six satellite instruments operating in the visible through shortwave infrared wavelength region to view the Moon for purposes of on-orbit cross-calibration. These instruments included the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) radiometer on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra spacecraft, the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) and Hyperion instrument on Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) spacecraft, and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) on the SeaStar spacecraft. Observations of the Moon were compared using a spectral photometric mode for lunar irradiance developed by the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) project located at the United States Geological Survey in Flagstaff, Arizona. The ROLO model effectively accounts for variations in lunar irradiance corresponding to lunar phase and libration angles, allowing intercomparison of observations made by instruments on different spacecraft under different time and location conditions. The spacecraft maneuvers necessary to view the Moon are briefly described and results of using the lunar irradiance model in comparing the radiometric calibration scales of the six satellite instruments are presented here.

  20. Pressurized Rover for Moon and Mars Surface Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, Barbara; Ransom, Stephen; Mohanty, Susmita; Özdemir, Kürsad; Häuplik-Meusburger, Sandra; Frischauf, Norbert; Hoheneder, Waltraut; Waclavicek, René

    The work described in this paper was done under ESA and Thales Alenia Space contract in the frame of the Analysis of Surface Architecture for European Space Exploration -Element Design. Future manned space missions to the Moon or to Mars will require a vehicle for transporting astronauts in a controlled and protected environment and in relative comfort during surface traverses of these planetary bodies. The vehicle that will be needed is a pressurized rover which serves the astronauts as a habitat, a refuge and a research laboratory/workshop. A number of basic issues influencing the design of such a rover, e.g. habitability, human-machine interfaces, safety, dust mitigation, interplanetary contamination and radiation protection, have been analysed in detail. The results of these analyses were subsequently used in an investigation of various designs for a rover suitable for surface exploration, from which a single concept was developed that satisfied scientific requirements as well as environmental requirements encoun-tered during surface exploration of the Moon and Mars. This concept was named in memory of the late Sir Arthur C. Clark RAMA (Rover for Advanced Mission Applications, Rover for Advanced Moon Applications, Rover for Advanced Mars Applications) The concept design of the pressurized rover meets the scientific and operational requirements defined during the course of the Surface Architecture Study. It is designed for surface missions with a crew of two or three lasting up to approximately 40 days, its source of energy, a liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen fuel cell, allowing it to be driven and operated during the day as well as the night. Guidance, navigation and obstacle avoidance systems are foreseen as standard equipment to allow it to travel safely over rough terrain at all times of the day. The rover allows extra-vehicular activity and a remote manipulator is provided to recover surface samples, to deploy surface instruments and equipment and, in general

  1. Vicarious calibration of GOES imager visible channel using the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, X.; Stone, T.C.; Yu, F.; Han, D.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we study the feasibility of a method for vicarious calibration of the GOES Imager visible channel using the Moon. The measured Moon irradiance from 26 undipped moon imagers exhausted all the potential Moon appearances between July 1998 and December 2005, together with the seven scheduled Moon observation data obtained after November 2005, were compared with the USGS lunar model results to estimate the degradation rate of the GOES-10 Imager visible channel. A total of nine methods of determining the space count and identifying lunar pixels were employed in this study to measure the GOES-10 Moon irradiance. Our results show that the selected mean and the masking Moon appears the best method. Eight of the nine resulting degradation rates range from 4.5%/year to 5.0%/year during the nearly nine years of data, which are consistent with most other degradation rates obtained for GOES-10 based on different references. In particular, the degradation rate from the Moon-based calibration (4.5%/year) agrees very well with the MODIS-based calibration (4.4%/year) over the same period, confirming the capability of relative and absolute calibration based on the Moon. Finally, our estimate of lunar calibration precision as applied to GOES-10 is 3.5%.

  2. GRAIL Webcast: Twin Spacecraft Bound for the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    The moon has captivated humanity's collective imagination for hundreds of years, but despite study with telescopes, astronauts and robotic probes, our nearest neighbor remains a mystery. NASA's Gra...

  3. A soft X-ray image of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Aschenbach, B.; Hasinger, G.; Pfeffermann, E.; Snowden, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    A soft X-ray image of the moon obtained by the Roentgen Observatory Satellite ROSAT clearly shows a sunlit crescent, demonstrating that the moon's X-ray luminosity arises from backscattering of solar X-rays. The moon's optically dark side is also X-ray dark, and casts a distinct shadow on the diffuse cosmic X-ray background. Unexpectedly, the dark side seems to emit X-rays at a level about one percent of that of the bright side; this emission very probably results from energetic solar-wind electrons striking the moon's surface.

  4. The prototype detector for MOON (Molybdenum Observatory Of Neutrinos)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon Collaboration; Nakamura, H.; Ogama, T.; Shimada, Y.; Sugaya, Y.

    2005-06-01

    The MOON (Molybdenum Observatory Of Neutrinos), as an extension of ELEGANT V, is a hybrid ββ and solar neutrino experiment with 100Mo. It aims at measuring neutrino-less ββ decay with sensitivity to the Majorana mass of the order of 50 meV and charged current interactions of 7Be solar neutrinos. One detector option of MOON is a super-module with one ton of 100Mo foils and fiber-plate scintillator planes. A prototype detector, MOON-1 with ˜ 0.5 kg of Mo foils, is being constructed. Simulation studies, test experiments and the status of MOON are discussed.

  5. Moon-based Earth Observation for Large Scale Geoscience Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huadong; Liu, Guang; Ding, Yixing

    2016-07-01

    The capability of Earth observation for large-global-scale natural phenomena needs to be improved and new observing platform are expected. We have studied the concept of Moon as an Earth observation in these years. Comparing with manmade satellite platform, Moon-based Earth observation can obtain multi-spherical, full-band, active and passive information,which is of following advantages: large observation range, variable view angle, long-term continuous observation, extra-long life cycle, with the characteristics of longevity ,consistency, integrity, stability and uniqueness. Moon-based Earth observation is suitable for monitoring the large scale geoscience phenomena including large scale atmosphere change, large scale ocean change,large scale land surface dynamic change,solid earth dynamic change,etc. For the purpose of establishing a Moon-based Earth observation platform, we already have a plan to study the five aspects as follows: mechanism and models of moon-based observing earth sciences macroscopic phenomena; sensors' parameters optimization and methods of moon-based Earth observation; site selection and environment of moon-based Earth observation; Moon-based Earth observation platform; and Moon-based Earth observation fundamental scientific framework.

  6. Earth after the Moon-forming Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2006-01-01

    The Hadean Earth is widely and enduringly pictured as a world of exuberant volcanism, exploding meteors, huge craters, infernal heat, and billowing sulfurous steams; i.e., a world of fire and brimstone punctuated with blows to the head. In the background the Moon looms gigantic in the sky. The popular image has given it a name that celebrates our mythic roots. A hot early Earth is an inevitable consequence of accretion. The Moon-forming impact ensured that Earth as we know it emerged from a fog of silicate vapor. The impact separated the volatiles from the silicates. It took approx. 100 years to condense and rain out the bulk of the vaporized silicates, although relatively volatile elements may have remained present in the atmosphere throughout the magma ocena stage. The magma ocean lasted approx. 2 Myr, its lifetime prolonged by tidal heating and thermal blanketing by a thick CO2-rich steam atmosphere. Water oceans condensed quickly after the mantle solidified, but for some 10-100 Myr the surface would have stayed warm (approx. 500 K) until the CO2 was removed into the mantle. Thereafter the faint young Sun suggests that a lifeless Earth would always have been evolving toward a bitterly cold ice world, but the cooling trend was fiequently interrupted by volcanic or impact induced thaws. A cartoon history of water, temperature, and carbon dioxide in the aftermath of the moon-formining-impact is shown. How long it stays hot depends on how long it takes to scrub the C02 out of the atmosphere.

  7. The Origin of the Moon and Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, F. M.

    2004-12-01

    In 1879, George Darwin(1) had proposed that the moon originated from a rapidly spinning Earth on which equatorial gravitative attraction was nearly overcome by centrifical force. During a 1964 conference, D.U. Wise(2) and others analyzed this hypothesis in greater detail. However, recent studies warranted a fundamentally new approach with regards to the origin of the solar system. A re-examination of the spin-off (fission) hypothesis of the moon from the earth, using slightly different assumptions than scientists had previously used (allowing for a more extreme version of an expanding earth), provided the earth's original radius (357 km), density (3.13 x 104 g/cc) and spin rate (0.132 radians/sec.). It was found that Neptune underwent a similar development with the fission of Triton. The remarkably large initial densities, of both Earth and Neptune (7.2 x 105 gm/cc) are consistent with the overall theory(3,4) previously discussed regarding the evolution of the solar system from a neutron star type proto-sun's dense core. The primary calculations involve conservation of angular momentum of each of the rotating and revolving planetary systems. (1) Darwin, G. H. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. (London) 170, 1 (1879) (2) D.U. Wise, ``The Earth-Moon System" p. 213, Marsden and Cameron Eds. Plenum Press (1966) (3) Fred M. Johnson, ``Voyage Into Astronomy", Kendall/ Hunt Publ., (1977) (4) Fred M. Johnson, Mem. Soc. Roy. des Sciences de Liége, 6th series, vol. III, p. 609-627 (1972).

  8. Evidence for a "Wet" Early Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Neal, Clive R.

    2013-01-01

    The Moon was thought to have lost its volatiles during impact(s) of a Mars-size planetesimal with the proto Earth [1] and during degassing of an early planet-wide magma ocean [2]. This view of an anhydrous Moon, however, has been challenged by recent discoveries of water on its surface [3-5] and in lunar volcanics [6-10] and regoliths [11]. Indigenous water is suggested to be heterogeneously distributed in the lunar interior and some parts of lunar mantle may contain as much water as Earth's upper mantle [6,10]. This water is thought to have been brought in part through solar wind implantation [3-5,8,11] and meteorite/cometary impacts [3,4,8,12] after the formation of the primary crust. Here we measured water in primary products of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) thereby by-passing the processes of later addition of water to the Moon through impact events or during mantle overturn as suggested by previous studies (e.g., [8,12]). So far, ferroan anorthosite (FAN) is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the LMO [2]. It is generally accepted that plagioclase, after crystallization, floated in the LMO and formed FAN as the original crust [2]. Therefore, any indigenous water preserved in FAN was partitioned from the LMO. These data can be used to estimate the water content of the magma ocean at the time of plagioclase crystallization, as well as that of the mare magma source regions.

  9. Measuring the Apparent Size of the Moon with a Digital Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellery, Adam; Hughes, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Moon appears to be much larger closer to the horizon than when higher in the sky. This is called the "Moon illusion" since the observed size of the Moon is not actually larger when the Moon is just above the horizon. This paper describes a technique for verifying that the observed size of the Moon is not larger on the horizon. The technique…

  10. The ESA SMART-1 Mission to the Moon: Goals and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.; Racca, G. R.; SMART-1 Science and Technology Working Team

    2000-10-01

    SMART-1 is the first in the programme of ESA's Small Missions for Advanced Research and Technology . Its objective is to demonstrate Solar Electric Primary Propulsion (SEP) for future Cornerstones (such as Bepi-Colombo) and to test new technologies for spacecraft and instruments. The project aims to have the spacecraft ready in October 2002 for launch as an Ariane-5 auxiliary payload. After a cruise with primary SEP, the SMART-1 mission is to orbit the Moon for a nominal period of six months, with possible extension. The spacecraft will carry out a complete programme of scientific observations during the cruise and in lunar orbit. SMART-1's science payload, with a total mass of some 15 kg, features many innovative instruments and advanced technologies. A miniaturised high-resolution camera (AMIE) for lunar surface imaging, a near-infrared point-spectrometer (SIR) for lunar mineralogy investigation, and a very compact X-ray spectrometer (D-CIXS) with a new type of detector and micro-collimator which will provide fluorescence spectroscopy and imagery of the Moon's surface elemental composition. The payload also includes an experiment (KaTE) aimed at demonstrating deep-space telemetry and telecommand communications in the X and Ka-bands, a radio-science experiment (RSIS), a deep space optical link (Laser-Link Experiment), using the ESA Optical Ground station in Tenerife, and the validation of a system of autonomous navigation SMART-1 lunar science investigations include studies of the chemical (OBAN) based on image processing. SMART-1 lunar science investigations include studies of the chemica composition and evolution of the Moon, of geophysical processes (volcanism, tectonics, cratering, erosion, deposition of ices and volatiles) for comparative planetology, and high resolution studies in preparation for future steps of lunar exploration. The mission could address several topics such as the accretional processes that led to the formation of planets, and the origin

  11. Collection of interstellar gas on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häberli, Roman M.; Reber, Martin J.; Bassi, Marco L.

    1997-09-01

    The isotopic composition of He and Ne in the local interstellar medium (LISM) is of great scientific interest, since it will help us to understand the chemical evolution of our galaxy since the formation of the solar system 4.6 × 10 9 years ago. In addition, the He isotope ratio is of cosmological interest as it is linked to primordial (Big Bang) nucleosynthesis and gives us a clue to the baryon density in the universe. To measure the abundance of He and Ne and their isotopes in situ in the interstellar gas is very ambitious due to the low density. Remote sensing, however, gives us only little information on the isotopic composition. Currently, most of the information on He and Ne isotopes comes from the measurement of pick-up ions and of the anomalous component of the cosmic rays, however, the measurement errors are still too high to reach firm conclusions. Recently, a novel measurement method has been proposed, using the foil collection technique and the Moon as a collection platform (Reber et al., 1995). In this notice a detailed description of the experiment is given. The foil collection technique uses thin metallic foils to trap the atoms which impinge on the foil. After retrieval of the foil the trapped particles are extracted by stepwise heating and the released atoms can be analysed using laboratory mass spectrometers. This technique was applied for the first time to successfully measure the noble gas composition of the solar wind (Geiss et al., 1970, 1972). (Interestingly enough, this experiment has been carried out on the Moon as well.) It has been tried before to measure the composition of the interstellar gas applying the foil collection method on an Earth orbiting satellite. However, in this case the measurements might be contaminated by the high fluxes of magnetospheric particles. It is shown that by using the Moon as a platform to collect the interstellar atoms one can overcome these difficulties. The experiment has to be carried out during the

  12. Lunar Flashlight: Illuminating the Moon's South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayne, P. O.; Cohen, B. A.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.; Camacho, J. M.; Sellar, R. G.; Reiter, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reflectance data from LRO instruments suggest water ice and other volatiles may be present on the surface in lunar permanently shadowed regions, though the detection is not yet definitive. Understanding the composition, quantity, distribution, and form of water and other volatiles associated with lunar permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) is identified as a NASA Strategic Knowledge Gap (SKG) for Human Exploration. These polar volatile deposits are also scientifically interesting, having the potential to reveal important information about the delivery of water to the Earth-Moon system.

  13. Effects of Spacecraft Landings on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, P. T.; Lane, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    The rocket exhaust of spacecraft landing on the Moon causes a number of observable effects that need to be quantified, including: disturbance of the regolith and volatiles at the landing site; damage to surrounding hardware such as the historic Apollo sites through the impingement of high-velocity ejecta; and levitation of dust after engine cutoff through as-yet unconfirmed mechanisms. While often harmful, these effects also beneficially provide insight into lunar geology and physics. Research results from the past 10 years is summarized and reviewed here.

  14. Effects of Spacecraft Landings on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.

    2013-01-01

    The rocket exhaust of spacecraft landing on the Moon causes a number of observable effects that need to be quantified, including: disturbance of the regolith and volatiles at the landing site; damage to surrounding hardware such as the historic Apollo sites through the impingement of high-velocity ejecta; and levitation of dust after engine cutoff through as-yet unconfirmed mechanisms. While often harmful, these effects also beneficially provide insight into lunar geology and physics. Some of the research results from the past 10 years is summarized and reviewed here.

  15. Moon Technology For A New Artform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The keystone of the density slicing process is an instrument called a densitometer, which can "see" many subtle gradations not visible to the human eye. This instrument was integrated into a computerized system which analyzed the tonal density of a moon photo, assigned a color code to each of the various shades, and created on a video monitor a new picture in which each color represented a particular measurement, such as height or depth. Density slicing, applied to telescopic photos and later to close-up views acquired by unmanned spacecraft, provided the foundation for NASA's extensive study and selection of safe Apollo landing sites.

  16. Haloes around the Moon and the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex; Gaina, Danielle A.

    2008-10-01

    The authors observations of the Haloes around the Moon and the Sun during few last years are reported. A Historical review of the phenomenon is given since the observations by Benvenuto Cellini and Gaston Tissandier is given. A photograph (from eight available) of the Halo around the Sun observed in Chisinau on 21 May 2007 is included. The Halo from 21 May 2007 occured after a very fast increasing of the air temperature during one day by more than 15 Deg. The authors consider, that the phenomenon is due to scattering of light on Cirri clouds(7 km altitude), present on the sky during that day. They formed due to very fast heating.

  17. Approaching Moons from Resonance via Invariant Manifolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Rodney L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the approach phase from the final resonance of the endgame scenario in a tour design is examined within the context of invariant manifolds. Previous analyses have typically solved this problem either by using numerical techniques or by computing a catalog of suitable trajectories. The invariant manifolds of a selected set of libration orbits and unstable resonant orbits are computed here to serve as guides for desirable approach trajectories. The analysis focuses on designing an approach phase that may be tied into the final resonance in the endgame sequence while also targeting desired conditions at the moon.

  18. Detection of sedimentary structural elements using formation micro imager technique, a case study from South Mansoura-1 well, Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Wahed, Ahmed G.; Anan, Tarek I.

    2016-12-01

    A detailed structure and sedimentology interpretation was performed for the South Mansoura-1 well. The Formation Micro Imager (FMI) is recorded and interpreted over the interval 9100-8009 ft. This interval belongs to Sidi Salem and Qawasim Formations. Based on azimuth trend of manually picked dips (bed boundaries), the interval can be divided into 4 structural dip zones (Zone 1 (9100-8800 ft), variable azimuth direction with the major trends mainly to SW&NE; Zone 2 (8800-8570 ft), bedding dip azimuth is mainly to the NW; Zone 3 (8570-8250 ft), bedding dip azimuth is mainly to the NE; and Zone 4 (8250-8009 ft), bedding dip azimuth is mainly to the NW). Lamination identified over the interval shows a dominant dip azimuth trend toward North North-West direction. The interbedded shale units are highly laminated and show little evidence of bioturbation. Sand exhibits abundant cross bedding showing a dominant dip azimuth trends toward NNE and NE and more locally to the E. Sixteen truncations identified over the interval show variable azimuth trend with the major trend mainly to the North North-West.

  19. Alpha-spectrometry and fractal analysis of surface micro-images for characterisation of porous materials used in manufacture of targets for laser plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aushev, A. A.; Barinov, S. P.; Vasin, M. G.; Drozdov, Yu M.; Ignat'ev, Yu V.; Izgorodin, V. M.; Kovshov, D. K.; Lakhtikov, A. E.; Lukovkina, D. D.; Markelov, V. V.; Morovov, A. P.; Shishlov, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of employing the alpha-spectrometry method to determine the characteristics of porous materials used in targets for laser plasma experiments. It is shown that the energy spectrum of alpha-particles, after their passage through porous samples, allows one to determine the distribution of their path length in the foam skeleton. We describe the procedure of deriving such a distribution, excluding both the distribution broadening due to statistical nature of the alpha-particle interaction with an atomic structure (straggling) and hardware effects. The fractal analysis of micro-images is applied to the same porous surface samples that have been studied by alpha-spectrometry. The fractal dimension and size distribution of the number of the foam skeleton grains are obtained. Using the data obtained, a distribution of the total foam skeleton thickness along a chosen direction is constructed. It roughly coincides with the path length distribution of alpha-particles within a range of larger path lengths. It is concluded that the combined use of the alpha-spectrometry method and fractal analysis of images will make it possible to determine the size distribution of foam skeleton grains (or pores). The results can be used as initial data in theoretical studies on propagation of the laser and X-ray radiation in specific porous samples.

  20. Alpha-spectrometry and fractal analysis of surface micro-images for characterisation of porous materials used in manufacture of targets for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aushev, A A; Barinov, S P; Vasin, M G; Drozdov, Yu M; Ignat'ev, Yu V; Izgorodin, V M; Kovshov, D K; Lakhtikov, A E; Lukovkina, D D; Markelov, V V; Morovov, A P; Shishlov, V V

    2015-06-30

    We present the results of employing the alpha-spectrometry method to determine the characteristics of porous materials used in targets for laser plasma experiments. It is shown that the energy spectrum of alpha-particles, after their passage through porous samples, allows one to determine the distribution of their path length in the foam skeleton. We describe the procedure of deriving such a distribution, excluding both the distribution broadening due to statistical nature of the alpha-particle interaction with an atomic structure (straggling) and hardware effects. The fractal analysis of micro-images is applied to the same porous surface samples that have been studied by alpha-spectrometry. The fractal dimension and size distribution of the number of the foam skeleton grains are obtained. Using the data obtained, a distribution of the total foam skeleton thickness along a chosen direction is constructed. It roughly coincides with the path length distribution of alpha-particles within a range of larger path lengths. It is concluded that the combined use of the alpha-spectrometry method and fractal analysis of images will make it possible to determine the size distribution of foam skeleton grains (or pores). The results can be used as initial data in theoretical studies on propagation of the laser and X-ray radiation in specific porous samples. (laser plasma)

  1. Project “The Moon 2012+”: Spin-orbital evolution, geophysics and selenodesy of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Alexander; Petrova, Natalia

    2008-07-01

    The Russian scientific project "The Moon - 2012+" is directed at solving fundamental problems of celestial mechanics, selenodesy and geophysics of the Moon through the pursuance of theoretical research and computer simulations of the following fields. 1. Spin-orbital longtime evolution and physical librations of the multilayered Moon: (a) development of the analytical theory of rotation of the two- /three-layer Moon and construction of the physical libration's tables for processing accurate observations and for constructing a lunar annual book; and (b) analysis of the spin-orbital evolution of the early Moon, an estimation of internal energy dissipation, and modeling of the long-term mechanism maintaining the free librations of the Moon. 2. Geodynamics of a lunar core: analysis of differentiation of a lunar core, detailed elaboration of plume-tectonics of mantle and a core of the early Moon, evolution of a boundary layer of a core-mantle boundary, reconstruction of the gravitational and viscous-mechanical interactions of a lunar core and mantle, research on resonant dissipation of internal energy, and calculation of free and forced nutations of a lunar core and of free fluctuations of a core-mantle system. 3. Selenodesy of lunar far-side: solution of an inverse problem in lunar gravimetry, construction of a geodynamic model of the lunar crust and of a Moho's boundary, reconstruction of initial mascons on the far-side of the Moon, and creation of accurate topographical and gravitational models of the Moon on the basis of modern observations.

  2. The moon's acceleration produced by the ocean tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, A. F.; Afonso, G. B.

    2003-08-01

    The well-known tides induced on Earth by the Sun and the Moon have had several long-term effects over the age of Earth. Most notably, the transfer of angular momentum from Earth to the Moon has resulted in an appreciable secular increase in the length of the day and a retreat of the Moon from Earth. The implications of employing the present rate of tidal energy dissipation on a geological timescale are catastrophic: around 1500 Ma the Moon would have been close to Earth, with the consequence that the much larger tidal forces would have disrupted the Moon. Based on the data about the Earth's rotation, since 1623, provided by IERS, we investigated the secular perturbations in the past of the Earth-Moon system. Using IERS data and the equation for the transfer of rotational angular momentum from Earth to the lunar orbital angular momentum due to tidal friction of the Moon and the Sun we found equations for the Earths angular velocity and semi-major axis of Moons orbit. Our model furnishes a point of maximum approximation of the Moon at 4500 Ma, in a good agreement with the modern theories about the Earth-Moon system formation and with the results obtained through the analysis of sedimentary cyclic rhythmites. Thus, our model gives a good description of the Earth-Moon system past for any time. It can be further improved by including recent, high-accurate measurements and more reliable data concerning the ancient Earth's rotation values for comparison.

  3. Prospect for UV observations from the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, Margarita; Mathew, Joice; Mohan, Rekhesh; Sreejith, A. G.; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah; Kappelmann, Norbert; Sharma, Arpit; Narayan, Rahul

    2014-10-01

    Space astronomy in the last 40 years has largely been done from spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) for which the technology is proven and delivery mechanisms are readily available. However, new opportunities are arising with the surge in commercial aerospace missions. We describe here one such possibility: deploying a small instrument on the Moon. This can be accomplished by flying onboard the Indian entry to the Google Lunar X PRIZE competition, Team Indus mission, which is expected to deliver a nearly 30 kgs of payloads to the Moon, with a rover as its primary payload. We propose to mount a wide-field far-UV (130-180 nm) imaging telescope as a payload on the Team Indus lander. Our baseline operation is a fixed zenith pointing but with the option of a mechanism to allow observations of different attitudes. Pointing towards intermediate ecliptic latitude (50∘ or above) ensures that the Sun is at least 40∘ off the line of sight at all times. In this position, the telescope can cover higher galactic latitudes as well as parts of Galactic plane. The scientific objectives of such a prospective are delineated and discussed.

  4. The moon: Composition determined by nebular processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, J.W.; Hertogen, J.; Anders, E.

    1978-01-01

    The bulk composition of the Moon was determined by the conditions in the solar nebula during its formation, and may be quantitatively estimated from the premise that the terrestrial planets were formed by cosmochemical processes similar to those recorded in the chondrites. The calculations are based on the Ganapathy-Anders 7-component model using trace element indicators, but incorportate improved geophysical data and petrological constraints. A model Moon with 40 ppb U, a core 2% by weight (1.8% metal with ???35% Ni and 0.2% FeS) and Mg/(Fe2++Mg)?????0.75 meets the trace element restrictions, and has acceptable density, heat flow and moment of inertia ratio. The high Ni content of the core permits low-Ti mare basalts to equilibrate with metal, yet still retain substantial Ni. The silicate resembles the Taylor-Jakes?? composition (and in some respects the waif Ganapathy-Anders Model 2a), but has lower SiO2. Minor modifications of the model composition (U=30-35 ppb) yield a 50% melt approximating Apollo 15 green glass and a residuum of olivine plus 3 to 4% spinel; the low SiO2, favors spinel formation, and, contrary to expectation, Cr is not depleted in the liquid. There may no longer be any inconsistency between the cosmochemical approach and arguments based on experimental petrology. ?? 1978 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  5. Magnetosphere, rings, and moons of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, A.F.

    1984-10-01

    The observation of an ultraviolet aurora on Uranus implies the existence of a magnetosphere. It is suggested that the magnetospheres of Uranus and Saturn may be very similar. Charged particle sputtering of water ice surfaces on the Uranian moons may maintain an oxygen ion plasma torus similar to the heavy ion plasma torus at Saturn. Atmospheric cosmic ray albedo neutron decay may sustain an inner radiation belt with omnidirectional proton fluxes. If the 100 keV ion fluxes near 7 RU are similar to Saturnian ion fluxes at such energies, the Uranian aurora may be maintained by ion precipitation from the radiation belts at nearly the strong diffusion rate. This mechanism predicts comparable aurorae over both magnetic poles of Uranus, in contrast with the Faraday disc dynamo mechanism, which powers an aurora only over the sunlit pole of uranus. If, however, the 100 kev ion fluxes at Uranus are comparable to those at Saturn, any exposed methane ice surfaces on the moons and rings of Uranus would be quickly transformed by ion impacts to a black, carbonaceous polymer.

  6. Searching for alien artifacts on the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. C. W.; Wagner, R. V.

    2013-08-01

    The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has a low probability of success, but it would have a high impact if successful. Therefore it makes sense to widen the search as much as possible within the confines of the modest budget and limited resources currently available. To date, SETI has been dominated by the paradigm of seeking deliberately beamed radio messages. However, indirect evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence could come from any incontrovertible signatures of non-human technology. Existing searchable databases from astronomy, biology, earth and planetary sciences all offer low-cost opportunities to seek a footprint of extraterrestrial technology. In this paper we take as a case study one particular new and rapidly-expanding database: the photographic mapping of the Moon's surface by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to 0.5 m resolution. Although there is only a tiny probability that alien technology would have left traces on the moon in the form of an artifact or surface modification of lunar features, this location has the virtue of being close, and of preserving traces for an immense duration. Systematic scrutiny of the LRO photographic images is being routinely conducted anyway for planetary science purposes, and this program could readily be expanded and outsourced at little extra cost to accommodate SETI goals, after the fashion of the SETI@home and Galaxy Zoo projects.

  7. The spectral irradiance of the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Stone, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    Images of the Moon at 32 wavelengths from 350 to 2450 nm have been obtained from a dedicated observatory during the bright half of each month over a period of several years. The ultimate goal is to develop a spectral radiance model of the Moon with an angular resolution and radiometric accuracy appropriate for calibration of Earth-orbiting spacecraft. An empirical model of irradiance has been developed that treats phase and libration explicitly, with absolute scale founded on the spectra of the star Vega and returned Apollo samples. A selected set of 190 standard stars are observed regularly to provide nightly extinction correction and long-term calibration of the observations. The extinction model is wavelength-coupled and based on the absorption coefficients of a number of gases and aerosols. The empirical irradiance model has the same form at each wavelength, with 18 coefficients, eight of which are constant across wavelength, for a total of 328 coefficients. Over 1000 lunar observations are fitted at each wavelength; the average residual is less than 1%. The irradiance model is actively being used in lunar calibration of several spacecraft instruments and can track sensor response changes at the 0.1% level. ?? 2005. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Earth After the Moon Forming Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The Hadean Earth is widely and enduringly pictured as a world of exuberant volcanism, exploding meteors, huge craters, infernal heat, and billowing sulfurous steams; i.e., a world of fire and brimstone punctuated with blows to the head. In the background the Moon looms gigantic in the sky. The popular image has given it a name that celebrates our mythic roots. A hot early Earth is an inevitable consequence of accretion. The Moon-forming impact ensured that Earth as we know it emerged from a fog of silicate vapor. The impact separated the volatiles from the silicates. It took -100 years to condense and rain out the bulk of the vaporized silicates, although relatively volatile elements may have remained present in the atmosphere throughout the magma ocena stage. The magma ocean lasted approx. 2 Myr, its lifetime prolonged by tidal heating and thermal blanketing by a thick (CO2-rich steam atmosphere. Water oceans condensed quickly after the mantle solidified, but for some 10-100 Myr the surface would have stayed warm (approx. 500 K) until the CO2 was removed into the mantle. Thereafter the faint young Sun suggests that a lifeless Earth would always have been evolving toward a bitterly cold ice world, but the cooling trend was frequently interrupted by volcanic or impact induced thaws.

  9. Moon - 2 Views of Orientale Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    These pictures of the Moon were taken by the Galileo spacecraft at (right photo) 6:47 p.m. PST Dec.8, 1990 from a distance of almost 220,000 miles, and at (left photo) 9:35 a.m. PST Dec. 9, 1990 at a range of more than 350,000 miles. The picture on the right shows the dark Oceanus Procellarum in the upper center, with Mare Imbrium above it and the smaller circular Mare Humorum below. The Orientale Basin, with a small mare in its center, is on the lower left near the limb or edge. Between stretches the cratered highland terrain, with scattered bright young craters on highlands and maria alike. The picture at left shows the globe of the Moon rotated, putting Mare Imbrium on the eastern limb and moving the Orientale Basin almost to the center. The extent of the cratered highlands on the far side is very apparent. At lower left, near the limb, is the South Pole Aitken basin, similar to Orientale but very much older and some 1,200 miles in diameter. This feature was previously known as a large depression in the southern far side; this image shows its Orientale like structure and darkness relative to surrounding highlands.

  10. Saturn's 15th moon, 1980S28

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Voyager 1 has found a 15th moon orbiting Saturn, visible near the bottom of this picture taken on Nov. 6, 1980, when the spacecraft was still 8 million kilometers (5 million miles) from Saturn. Voyager imaging team scientists discovered the moon Nov. 7, 1980, in the first of several programmed searches for new satellites of Saturn. The unique location of the 15th satellite, just 800 kilometers (500 miles) outside the outer edge of the A-ring, is especially significant in that this small body, approximately 100 kilometers (50 miles) in diameter, may be responsible for defining the outer edge of Saturn's bright ring system. The orbital period of the new satellite is approximately 14 hours, 20 minutes, the shortest orbit of any of Saturn's known satellites. The very narrow F-ring, approximately 4,000 kilometers (2,500 miles) outside the outer edge of the A-ring, is seen prominently in this picture. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  11. Environment Challenges for Exploration of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Blackwell, William C., Jr.; Coffey, Victoria N.; Cooke, William B.; Howard, James W.; Parker, Linda N.; Sharp, John; Schunck, Greg; Suggs. Robert W.; Wang, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program is designing a new generation of human rated launch and space transportation vehicles to first replace the Space Shuttle fleet, then support develop of a permanent human habitat on the Moon, and ultimately prepare for human exploration of Mars. The ambitious first step beyond low Earth orbit is to develop the infrastructure required for conducting missions to a variety of locations on the lunar surface for periods of a week and establishment of a permanent settlement at one of the lunar poles where crews will serve for periods on the order of approx.200 days. We present an overview of the most challenging aspects of the lunar environment that will need to be addressed when developing transport and habitat infrastructure for long term human presence on the Moon including low temperatures and dusty regolith surfaces, radiation environments due to galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles, charging of lunar infrastructure when exposed to lunar plasma environments, and secondary meteor environments generated by primary impacts on the lunar surface.

  12. Astronomy on the Moon: Geological considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    1992-01-01

    The Moon is an excellent site for astronomical observations. This paper describes two geological aspects related to astronomy from the Moon. First it evaluates the sources of gases near a lunar base as input to calculations reported in a separate paper on the growth of an artificial lunar atmosphere. The results suggest that mining for He-3 could produce the most gas (1 kg/sec), but rocket exhaust (0.1 kg/sec) and habitat venting (0.5 kg/sec) are also important. Second, the paper discusses criteria that need to be considered when determining the site of a lunar astronomical facility. These are longitude and latitude (equatorial sites are favored), topography (important to be relatively flat for ease of installation), distance from a lunar base (to be free of seismic noise, dust, and gases), the site's value to lunar geoscience (other factors being equal, a geologically diverse site is better), and its value as a materials resource (mining and observatories are incompatible).

  13. Galileo Earth/Moon News Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-12-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release (Part 1 of 2) begins with a presentation given by William J. O'Neil (Galileo Project Manager) describing the status and position of the Galileo spacecraft 7 days prior to the Galileo Earth-2 flyby. Slides are presented including diagrams of the Galileo spacecraft trajectory, trajectory correction maneuvers, and the Venus and asteroid flybys. Torrence Johnson (Galileo Project Scientist) follows Mr. O'Neil with an explanation of the Earth/Moon science activities that will be undertaken during the second Galileo/Earth encounter. These activities include remote sensing, magnetospheric and plasma measurements, and images taken directly from Galileo of the Earth and Moon. Dr. Joseph Veverka (Galileo Imaging Team, Cornell University) then gives a brief presentation of the data collected by the first Galileo/Gaspra asteroid flyby. Images sampled from the 57 photographs taken of Gaspra are presented along with discussions of Gaspra's morphology, shape and size, and surface features. These presentations are followed by a question and answer period given for the benefit of scientific journalists whose subjects include overall Galileo spacecraft health, verification of the Gaspra images timeframe, and the condition of certain scientific spacecraft instruments. Part 2 of this video can be retrieved by using Report No. NONP-NASA-VT-2000001078.

  14. Regional and Localized Deposits on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.

    1996-01-01

    Earth-based telescopic remote sensing studies have provided important information concerning lunar pyroclastic deposits. Combined with the returned lunar sample studies and analyses of lunar photography, we have learned a great deal about the nature and origin of these explosive volcanic materials. Lunar pyroclastic deposits are more numerous, extensive, and widely distributed than previously thought. Two generic classes of lunar pyroclastics have been identified, regional and localized. From the former, two separate spectral compositional groups have been identified; one is dominated by Fe(2+)-bearing glasses, the other is composed of ilmenite-rich black spheres. Comparatively, three separate spectral groups have been identified among the localized deposits: highlands-rich, olivine-rich, and mare-rich. Returned sample studies and the recently collected Galileo and Clementine data also corroborate these findings. Albedo data and multispectral imagery suggest that the thicker core deposits of the regional dark mantle deposits (RDMD) are surrounded by pyroclastic debris and subjacent highlands material. The presence of a major component of pyroclastic debris in the regolith surrounding the core regional deposits has important implications for the resource potential of these materials. Both telescopic and orbital spectra indicate that the regional pyroclastic deposits are rich in iron, titanium and oxygen-bearing minerals. Particle shapes vary from simple glass spheres to compound droplets with quench crystallized textures. Their small grain size and friability make them ideal indigenous feedstock. Compared to other resource feedstock sources on the Moon, these pyroclastic materials may be the best oxygen resource on the Moon.

  15. Moon meteoritic seismic hum: Steady state prediction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lognonne, P.; Feuvre, M.L.; Johnson, C.L.; Weber, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    We use three different statistical models describing the frequency of meteoroid impacts on Earth to estimate the seismic background noise due to impacts on the lunar surface. Because of diffraction, seismic events on the Moon are typically characterized by long codas, lasting 1 h or more. We find that the small but frequent impacts generate seismic signals whose codas overlap in time, resulting in a permanent seismic noise that we term the "lunar hum" by analogy with the Earth's continuous seismic background seismic hum. We find that the Apollo era impact detection rates and amplitudes are well explained by a model that parameterizes (1) the net seismic impulse due to the impactor and resulting ejecta and (2) the effects of diffraction and attenuation. The formulation permits the calculation of a composite waveform at any point on the Moon due to simulated impacts at any epicentral distance. The root-mean-square amplitude of this waveform yields a background noise level that is about 100 times lower than the resolution of the Apollo long-period seismometers. At 2 s periods, this noise level is more than 1000 times lower than the low noise model prediction for Earth's microseismic noise. Sufficiently sensitive seismometers will allow the future detection of several impacts per day at body wave frequencies. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Magnetosphere, Rings, and Moons of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, A. F.

    1984-01-01

    The observation of an ultraviolet aurora on Uranus implies the existence of a magnetosphere. It is suggested that the magnetospheres of Uranus and Saturn may be very similar. Charged particle sputtering of water ice surfaces on the Uranian moons may maintain an oxygen ion plasma torus similar to the heavy ion plasma torus at Saturn. Atmospheric cosmic ray albedo neutron decay may sustain an inner radiation belt with omnidirectional proton fluxes. If the 100 keV ion fluxes near 7 RU are similar to Saturnian ion fluxes at such energies, the Uranian aurora may be maintained by ion precipitation from the radiation belts at nearly the strong diffusion rate. This mechanism predicts comparable aurorae over both magnetic poles of Uranus, in contrast with the Faraday disc dynamo mechanism, which powers an aurora only over the sunlit pole of uranus. If, however, the 100 kev ion fluxes at Uranus are comparable to those at Saturn, any exposed methane ice surfaces on the moons and rings of Uranus would be quickly transformed by ion impacts to a black, carbonaceous polymer.

  17. Hi'iaka: Haumea's Rapidly Spinning Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    An image from the Keck telescope of the dwarf planet Haumea (center) and its two moons, Hiiaka (above) and Namaka (below). [Caltech/Keck/Mike Brown]Recent observations of Hiiaka, the largest satellite of the dwarf planet Haumea, reveal that the moon is spinning much more rapidly than expected. What could this tell us about how Haumea and its moons formed?A Distant DwarfThe dwarf planet Haumea orbits beyond Neptune and has a mass of roughly 1/3 that of Pluto. Like Pluto, Haumea also has companions: two satellites of roughly 0.5% and 0.05% of Haumeas mass, orbiting at rather large distances of 36 and 70 Haumea radii (roughly 26,000 and 50,000 km).In a recently published study, a team led by Danielle Hastings (UC Los Angeles and Florida Institute of Technology) explored Hubble and Magellan observations of Hiiaka Haumeas larger, outer satellite to determine the rate at which it rotates on its axis.Hiiakas light curve, phase-folded at its most likely rotation period of 9.8 hours. The double peak is due to the fact that Hiiaka is likely not a spherical body, so it shows two maxima in brightness in each full rotation. [Hastings et al. 2016]Rapid RotationNominally, wed expect Hiiaka to be rotating synchronously its rotation period should be the same as its orbital period of 49.5 days. We expect this because the amount of time needed for tidal forces to despin Hiiaka to synchronous rotation should be much shorter than the time needed for these forces to produce Hiiakas observed low eccentricity and large semimajor axis.Therefore it was quite the surprise when Hastings and collaborators analyzed Hiiakas light curve and found that the moon revolves on its axis once every 9.8 hours! Thats roughly 120 times faster than the expected synchronous rate.Formation TheoriesWhat does this discovery reveal about Hiiakas formation? Hastings and collaborators propose three possible scenarios. They then use analytic calculations and numerical simulations to try to constrain them based on

  18. Origin of Martian Moons from Binary Asteroid Dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Lyons, Valerie J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The origin of the Martian moons Deimos and Phobos is controversial. A common hypothesis for their origin is that they are captured asteroids, but the moons show no signs of having been heated by passage through a (hypothetical) thick martian atmosphere, and the mechanism by which an asteroid in solar orbit could shed sufficient orbital energy to be captured into Mars orbit has not been previously elucidated. Since the discovery by the space probe Galileo that the asteroid Ida has a moon 'Dactyl', a significant number of asteroids have been discovered to have smaller asteroids in orbit about them. The existence of asteroid moons provides a mechanism for the capture of the Martian moons (and the small moons of the outer planets). When a binary asteroid makes a close approach to a planet, tidal forces can strip the moon from the asteroid. Depending on the phasing, either or both can then be captured. Clearly, the same process can be used to explain the origin of any of the small moons in the solar system.

  19. Planetary science: Cooking up the Moon in two steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desch, Steve

    2015-12-01

    Compared to Earth, the Moon is depleted in volatile species like water, sodium and potassium. Simulations suggest that much of the Moon formed from hot, volatile-poor melt in a disk of debris after initially amassing cooler, volatile-rich melt.

  20. The Moon in the 14th Century Frescoes in Padova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellinati, Claudio

    Padova, already in the 14th century a great cultural center of international reputation, struggled with the problems posed by the Moon with Pietro d'Abano, physician and astronomer. But it was with the great painters of that time, namely Giotto and Giusto de'Menabuoi, that its most intimate connections with the contemporary popular culture and theology were illustrated. Giotto depicts the Moon in the Giudizio Universale of the Scrovegni Chapel (1305). The Moon appears on the upper part of the painting, to the left of Christ the Judge, to crown together with the Sun, His presence. The Moon is a heavenly body similar to those appearing on Roman coins of emperors, to signify the Judge is an immortal creature. The color is pale, witeish, almost veiled. More important, the Moon has a face that by popular belief was that of Cain, condemned to amass `mucchi di rovi spinosi' for the fire of the damned (Dante Alighieri, Divina Commedia, Inferno XX, 126). Giusto de' Menabuoi on the other hand expounds, in the Crucifixion of the Duomo (1375 ca), a theological interpretation. The day of God's justice, following the death of the Savior, the Moon will burn and the Sun will pale (Isaiah, 24, 23). And indeed the Moon has a dark reddish colour. Therefore, while in Giotto the Moon is seen as in the popular beliefs, Giusto underlines the theological visions of his times with the words of the prophets.

  1. Back to the moon: the lure of lunar exploration.

    PubMed

    David, Leonard

    2003-05-01

    Interest in returning to the Moon is growing and has sparked plans for a NASA robotic sample return probe to the South Pole-Aitken basin. Japan and the European Space Agency also have plans for lunar probes and China is interested in expanding its new space program to the Moon.

  2. Pursuit Curves for the Man in the Moone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    This article considers an old version of the classical pursuit problem as posed by Francis Godwin in 1599, who imagines a wedge of swans flying from the earth to the moon in twelve days, always flying at constant speed toward the moon. The return trip, during which the swans always fly toward the earth at the same speed, takes eight days. A little…

  3. The penumbral Moon's eclipse form 16 september 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Adrian; Pteancu, Mircea; Zaharia, Cristian

    2016-10-01

    The web page represents circumstances and photographs from the Moon's partial/penumbral eclipse from 16 September 2016 obtained from few various places in Romania (East Europe). A part of photographs give the maximum phase of the Eclipse, while another give the reddened Moon.

  4. Gold Olive Branch Left on the Moon by Neil Armstrong

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This is the gold replica of an olive branch, the traditional symbol of peace, left on the Moon's surface by Apollo 11 crewmembers. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, placed the small replica (less than half a foot in length) on the Moon. The gesture represented a wish for peace for all mankind.

  5. Accretion of the Moon from non-canonical discs.

    PubMed

    Salmon, J; Canup, R M

    2014-09-13

    Impacts that leave the Earth-Moon system with a large excess in angular momentum have recently been advocated as a means of generating a protolunar disc with a composition that is nearly identical to that of the Earth's mantle. We here investigate the accretion of the Moon from discs generated by such 'non-canonical' impacts, which are typically more compact than discs produced by canonical impacts and have a higher fraction of their mass initially located inside the Roche limit. Our model predicts a similar overall accretional history for both canonical and non-canonical discs, with the Moon forming in three consecutive steps over hundreds of years. However, we find that, to yield a lunar-mass Moon, the more compact non-canonical discs must initially be more massive than implied by prior estimates, and only a few of the discs produced by impact simulations to date appear to meet this condition. Non-canonical impacts require that capture of the Moon into the evection resonance with the Sun reduced the Earth-Moon angular momentum by a factor of 2 or more. We find that the Moon's semi-major axis at the end of its accretion is approximately 7R⊕, which is comparable to the location of the evection resonance for a post-impact Earth with a 2.5 h rotation period in the absence of a disc. Thus, the dynamics of the Moon's assembly may directly affect its ability to be captured into the resonance.

  6. Forum on Concepts and Approaches for Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference primarily discuss instruments and techniques for conducting science on Jupiter's icy moons, and geologic processes on the moons themselves. Remote sensing of satellites, cratering on satellites, and ice on the surface of Europa are given particular attention. Some papers discuss Jupiter's atmosphere, or exobiology.

  7. ESO Observations of New Moon of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-08-01

    Two astronomers, both specialists in minor bodies in the solar system, have performed observations with ESO telescopes that provide important information about a small moon, recently discovered in orbit around the solar system's largest planet, Jupiter. Brett Gladman (of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and working at Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, France) and Hermann Boehnhardt ( ESO-Paranal) obtained detailed data on the object S/1999 J 1 , definitively confirming it as a natural satellite of Jupiter. Seventeen Jovian moons are now known. The S/1999 J 1 object On July 20, 2000, the Minor Planet Center (MPC) of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) announced on IAU Circular 7460 that orbital computations had shown a small moving object, first seen in the sky in 1999, to be a new candidate satellite of Jupiter. The conclusion was based on several positional observations of that object made in October and November 1999 with the Spacewatch Telescope of the University of Arizona (USA). In particular, the object's motion in the sky was compatible with that of an object in orbit around Jupiter. Following the official IAU procedure, the IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams designated the new object as S/1999 J 1 (the 1st candidate Satellite of Jupiter to be discovered in 1999). Details about the exciting detective story of this object's discovery can be found in an MPC press release and the corresponding Spacewatch News Note. Unfortunately, Jupiter and S/1999 J 1 were on the opposite side of the Sun as seen from the Earth during the spring of 2000. The faint object remained lost in the glare of the Sun in this period and, as expected, a search in July 2000 through all available astronomical data archives confirmed that it had not been seen since November 1999, nor before that time. With time, the extrapolated sky position of S/1999 J 1 was getting progressively less accurate. New observations were thus urgently needed to "recover

  8. Looking for planetary moons in the spectra of distant Jupiters.

    PubMed

    Williams, D M; Knacke, R F

    2004-01-01

    More than 100 nearby stars are known to have at least one Jupiter-sized planet. Whether any of these giant gaseous planets has moons is unknown, but here we suggest a possible way of detecting Earth-sized moons with future technology. The planned Terrestrial Planet Finder observatory, for example, will be able to detect objects comparable in size to Earth. Such Earth-sized objects might orbit their stars either as isolated planets or as moons to giant planets. Moons of Jovian-sized planets near the habitable zones of main-sequence stars should be noticeably brighter than their host planets in the near-infrared (1-4 microm) if their atmospheres contain methane, water, and water vapor, because of efficient absorption of starlight by these atmospheric components. By taking advantage of this spectral contrast, future space observatories will be able to discern which extrasolar giant planets have Earth-like moons capable of supporting life.

  9. MSX Observations of the Eclipsed Moon at 4 Microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. W.; Little, S. J.; Murdock, T. L.

    1997-07-01

    The lunar eclipse of September 27, 1996 presented the opportunity to observe the 4 micron emission from the moon during totality. The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite made observations three times during the totality phase of the eclipse. These observations in Bands B1 (4.22 - 4.36 microns) and B2 (4.24 - 4.45 microns) were used to construct images of the eclipsed moon. The images have been analyzed for temperature and location of thermal anomalies on the moon as well as for temperatures of extended maria and highland areas. Maps of the moon to illustrate the location and brightness of thermal anomalies first seen by Saari and Shorthill (1965) and temperature comparisons with microwave measurements of selected regions on the moon (Sandor and Clancy, 1995) will be made. References: Saari, J. M., and R. W. Shorthill, 1965, Nature, 205, p. 964. Sandor, Brad J., and R. Todd Clancy, 1995, Icarus, 115, p. 387.

  10. THE FATE OF MOONS OF CLOSE-IN GIANT EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Namouni, Fathi

    2010-08-20

    We show that the fate of moons of a close-in giant planet is mainly determined by the migration history of the planet in the protoplanetary disk. As the planet migrates in the disk from beyond the snow line toward a multi-day period orbit, the formed and forming moons become unstable as the planet's sphere of influence shrinks. Disk-driven migration is faster than the moons' tidal orbital evolution. Moons are eventually ejected from around close-in exoplanets or forced into collision with them before tides from the planet affect their orbits. If moons are detected around close-in exoplanets, they are unlikely to have been formed in situ, instead they were captured from the protoplanetary disk on retrograde orbits around the planets.

  11. After Apollo - Fission origin of the moon. [from planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The present work maintains that the Apollo moon data substantiate the fission theory of the origin of the moon. It has been objected to this theory that prior to fission, the total mass and angular momentum of the earth-moon system would have to be greater than the present total of the earth and the moon, which would imply that angular momentum must have been lost since the fission. The present work states that this loss of momentum can be accounted for by the subsequent boiling off of a large amount of the original lunar mass. This would also mean that the moon ought to be greatly impoverished in volatiles, which it, indeed, is according to Apollo data. It is suggested that at one time the solar system was a binary star, namely, the sun and Jupiter. Successive fissions of Jupiter would have created other planets, which themselves could undergo fission, producing satellites.

  12. Earth-moon system: Dynamics and parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breedlove, W. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical development of the equations of motion governing the earth-moon system is presented. The earth and moon were treated as finite rigid bodies and a mutual potential was utilized. The sun and remaining planets were treated as particles. Relativistic, non-rigid, and dissipative effects were not included. The translational and rotational motion of the earth and moon were derived in a fully coupled set of equations. Euler parameters were used to model the rotational motions. The mathematical model is intended for use with data analysis software to estimate physical parameters of the earth-moon system using primarily LURE type data. Two program listings are included. Program ANEAMO computes the translational/rotational motion of the earth and moon from analytical solutions. Program RIGEM numerically integrates the fully coupled motions as described above.

  13. Plasma erosion of moons in the outer solar system (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, T. A.

    2010-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields of the giant planets are excellent plasma containers. Their magnetospheres dominate large volumes of space that include most of these planets’ major moons. They are also dynamic environments that produce energetic ions and electrons. In this talk I will describe current knowledge on the effects of these ions and electrons on these moons’ surfaces. Plasma bombardment leaves its signature on many of the moons, especially those deep in the most intense part of their parent planets’ magnetospheres. The effects include chemical alteration (radiolysis), which often results in distinctive asymmetries between moons’ leading and trailing hemispheres. The plasma also erodes moons’ surfaces in a process called sputtering, producing tenuous atmospheres. Amazingly, magnetospheres also act to redistribute material between moons: material lost from one moon is eventually ionized and transported through the magnetosphere, where it can impact other moons.

  14. MOON (Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos) for double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomachi, M.; Doe, P.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Engel, J.; Finger, M.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fushimi, K.; Gehman, V.; Gorin, A.; Greenfield, M.; Hazama, R.; Ichihara, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Ishii, H.; Itahashi, T.; Kavitov, P.; Kekelidze, V.; Kuroda, K.; Kutsalo, V.; Manouilov, I.; Matsuoka, K.; Nakamura, H.; Ogama, T.; Para, A.; Rielage, K.; Rjazantsev, A.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Shichijo, Y.; Shima, T.; Shimada, Y.; Shirkov, G.; Sissakian, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Titov, A.; Vatulin, V.; Vilches, O. E.; Voronov, V.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Will, D. I.; Yoshida, S.

    2005-01-01

    The MOON (Molybdenum Observatory Of Neutrinos) project aims at studies of double beta decays with a high sensitivity of ˜0.03 eV and real-time studies of low-energy solar neutrinos. Two β rays from 100Mo are measured in coincidence for the 0νββ studies. The inverse β rays from solar neutrino captures of 100Mo are measured in delayed coincidence with the following β decay of 100Tc. Measurements with good energy resolution and good position resolution enable one to select true signals. A prototype MOON detector (MOON 1) is now under development. The present report describes briefly the outline of the MOON project and the status of MOON 1.

  15. Faxing Structures to the Moon: Freeform Additive Construction System (FACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott; Wilcox, Brian; McQuin, Christopher; Townsend, Julie; Rieber, Richard; Barmatz, Martin; Leichty, John

    2013-01-01

    Using the highly articulated All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) robotic mobility system as a precision positioning tool, a variety of print head technologies can be used to 3D print large-scale in-situ structures on planetary surfaces such as the moon or Mars. In effect, in the same way CAD models can be printed in a 3D printer, large-scale structures such as walls, vaults, domes, berms, paving, trench walls, and other insitu derived elements can be FAXed to the planetary surface and built in advance of the arrival of crews, supplementing equipment and materials brought from earth. This paper discusses the ATHLETE system as a mobility / positioning platform, and presents several options for large-scale additive print head technologies, including tunable microwave "sinterator" approaches and in-situ concrete deposition. The paper also discusses potential applications, such as sintered-in-place habitat shells, radiation shielding, road paving, modular bricks, and prefabricated construction components.

  16. Development of the fibre positioning unit of MOONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David; Atkinson, David; Beard, Stephen; Cochrane, William; Drass, Holger; Guinouard, Isabelle; Lee, David; Taylor, William; Rees, Phil; Watson, Steve

    2016-08-01

    The Multi-Object Optical and Near-Infrared Spectrograph (MOONS) will exploit the full 500 square arcmin field of view offered by the Nasmyth focus of the Very Large Telescope and will be equipped with two identical triple arm cryogenic spectrographs covering the wavelength range 0.64μm-1.8μm, with a multiplex capability of over 1000 fibres. This can be configured to produce spectra for chosen targets and have close proximity sky subtraction if required. The system will have both a medium resolution (R 4000-6000) mode and a high resolution (R 20000) mode. The fibre positioning units are used to position each fibre independently in order to pick off each sub field of 1.0" within a circular patrol area of 85" on sky (50mm physical diameter). The nominal physical separation between FPUs is 25mm allowing a 100% overlap in coverage between adjacent units. The design of the fibre positioning units allows parallel and rapid reconfiguration between observations. The kinematic geometry is such that pupil alignment is maintained over the patrol area. This paper presents the design of the Fibre Positioning Units at the preliminary design review and the results of verification testing of the advanced prototypes.

  17. After the Moon-forming Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, K.; Sleep, N. H.

    2006-12-01

    We address the first several hundred million years of Earth's history. The Moon-forming impact left Earth enveloped in a hot silicate atmosphere that cooled and condensed over ~1000 yrs. As it cooled the Earth degassed its volatiles into the atmosphere. It took another ~2 Myrs for the magma ocean to freeze at the surface. The cooling rate was determined by atmospheric thermal blanketing. Tidal heating by the new Moon was a major energy source to the deep mantle. After the mantle solidified geothermal heat became climatologically insignificant, which allowed the steam atmosphere to condense, and left behind a ~100 bar, ~500 K CO2 atmosphere. Thereafter cooling was governed by how quickly CO2 was removed from the atmosphere. If subduction were efficient this could have taken as little as 10 million years. In this case the faint young Sun suggests that a lifeless Earth should have been cold and its oceans white with ice. But if carbonate subduction were inefficient the CO2 would have mostly stayed in the atmosphere, which would have kept the surface near ~500 K for many tens of millions of years. Hydrous minerals are harder to subduct than carbonates and there is a good chance that the Hadean mantle was dry. Hadean heat flow was locally high enough to ensure that a global ice cover was thin (<5 m) in places. Moreover hundreds or thousands of asteroid impacts would have big enough to melt the ice triggering brief impact summers. We suggest that plate tectonics as it works now was inadequate to handle typical Hadean heat flows of 0.2- 0.5 W/m2. In its place we hypothesize a convecting mantle capped by a ~100 km deep basaltic mush that was relatively permeable to heat flow. Recycling and distillation of hydrous basalts produced granitic rocks very early, which is consistent with preserved >4 Ga detrital zircons. Overall, Earth could have been habitable as early as 10-20 Myrs after the Moon-forming impact.

  18. Radiation exposure in the moon environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Matthiae, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    During a stay on the moon humans are exposed to elevated radiation levels due to the lack of substantial atmospheric and magnetic shielding compared to the Earth's surface. The absence of magnetic and atmospheric shielding allows cosmic rays of all energies to impinge on the lunar surface. Beside the continuous exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR), which increases the risk of cancer mortality, exposure through particles emitted in sudden nonpredictable solar particle events (SPE) may occur. SPEs show an enormous variability in particle flux and energy spectra and have the potential to expose space crew to life threatening doses. On Earth, the contribution to the annual terrestrial dose of natural ionizing radiation of 2.4 mSv by cosmic radiation is about 1/6, whereas the annual exposure caused by GCR on the lunar surface is roughly 380 mSv (solar minimum) and 110 mSv (solar maximum). The analysis of worst case scenarios has indicated that SPE may lead to an exposure of about 1 Sv. The only efficient measure to reduce radiation exposure is the provision of radiation shelters. Measurements on the lunar surface performed during the Apollo missions cover only a small energy band for thermal neutrons and are not sufficient to estimate the exposure. Very recently some data were added by the Radiation Dose Monitoring (RADOM) instrument operated during the Indian Chandrayaan Mission and the Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRaTER) instrument of the NASA LRO (Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter) mission. These measurements need to be complemented by surface measurements. Models and simulations that exist describe the approximate radiation exposure in space and on the lunar surface. The knowledge on the radiation exposure at the lunar surface is exclusively based on calculations applying radiation transport codes in combination with environmental models. Own calculations are presented using Monte-Carlo simulations to calculate the radiation environment on the moon and organ doses on the

  19. Landslides on Earth, Mars, Moon and Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, Maria Teresa; Xiao, Zhiyong; Komatsu, Goro; Peruccacci, Silvia; Fiorucci, Federica; Cardinali, Mauro; Santangelo, Michele; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2015-04-01

    Landslides play an important role in the evolution of landscapes on Earth and on other solid planets of the Solar System. On Earth, landslides have been recognized in all continents, and in subaerial and submarine environments. The spatial and temporal range of the observed slope failures is extremely large on Earth. Surface gravity is the main factor driving landslides in solid planets. Comparison of landslide characteristics, e.g. the landslide types and sizes (area, volume, fall height, length) on various planetary bodies may help in understanding the effect of surface gravity on failure initiation and propagation. In the last decades, planetary exploration missions have delivered an increasing amount of high-resolution imagery, which enables to resolve and identify morphologic structures on planetary surfaces in great detail. Here, we present three geomorphological inventories of extraterrestrial landslides on Mars, Moon and Mercury. To recognize and map the landslides on the three Solar System bodies, we adopt the same visual criteria commonly used by geomorphologists to identify terrestrial slope failures in aerial photographs or satellite images. Landslides are classified based on the morphological similarity with terrestrial ones. In particular, we focus on rock slides mapped in Valles Marineris, Mars, and along the internal walls of impact craters on the Moon and Mercury. We exploit the three inventories to study the statistical distributions of the failure sizes (e.g., area, volume, fall height, length), and we compare the results with similar distributions obtained for terrestrial landslides. We obtain indications on the effect of the different surface gravity on landslides on Earth and Mars through the relationship between the landslide area and volume on the two planets. From the analysis of the area, we hypothesize that the lack of medium size landslides on Mars is due to the absence of erosive processes, which are induced on Earth chiefly by water

  20. Alkali element constraints on Earth-Moon relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Drake, M. J.; Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Given their range of volatilities, alkali elements are potential tracers of temperature-dependent processes during planetary accretion and formation of the Earth-Moon system. Under the giant impact hypothesis, no direct connection between the composition of the Moon and the Earth is required, and proto-lunar material does not necessarily experience high temperatures. Models calling for multiple collisions with smaller planetesimals derive proto-lunar materials mainly from the Earth's mantle and explicitly invoke vaporization, shock melting and volatility-related fractionation. Na/K, K/Rb, and Rb/Cs should all increase in response to thermal volatization, so theories which derive the Moon substantially from Earth's mantle predict these ratios will be higher in the Moon than in the primitive mantle of the Earth. Despite the overall depletion of volatile elements in the Moon, its Na/K and K/Rb are equal to or less than those of Earth. A new model presented here for the composition of Earth's continental crust, a major repository of the alkali elements, suggests the Rb/Cs of the Moon is also less than that of Earth. Fractionation of the alkali elements between Earth and Moon are in the opposite sense to predictions based on the relative volatilities of these elements, if the Moon formed by high-T processing of Earth's mantle. Earth, rather than the Moon, appears to carry a signature of volatility-related fractionation in the alkali elements. This may reflect an early episode of intense heating on Earth with the Moon's alkali budget accreting from cooler material.

  1. Low-Latency Lunar Surface Telerobotics from Earth-Moon Libration Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Daniel; Thronson, Harley

    2011-01-01

    Concepts for a long-duration habitat at Earth-Moon LI or L2 have been advanced for a number of purposes. We propose here that such a facility could also have an important role for low-latency telerobotic control of lunar surface equipment, both for lunar science and development. With distances of about 60,000 km from the lunar surface, such sites offer light-time limited two-way control latencies of order 400 ms, making telerobotic control for those sites close to real time as perceived by a human operator. We point out that even for transcontinental teleoperated surgical procedures, which require operational precision and highly dexterous manipulation, control latencies of this order are considered adequate. Terrestrial telerobots that are used routinely for mining and manufacturing also involve control latencies of order several hundred milliseconds. For this reason, an Earth-Moon LI or L2 control node could build on the technology and experience base of commercially proven terrestrial ventures. A lunar libration-point telerobotic node could demonstrate exploration strategies that would eventually be used on Mars, and many other less hospitable destinations in the solar system. Libration-point telepresence for the Moon contrasts with lunar telerobotic control from the Earth, for which two-way control latencies are at least six times longer. For control latencies that long, telerobotic control efforts are of the "move-and-wait" variety, which is cognitively inferior to near real-time control.

  2. 78 FR 25530 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel HOWLIN AT THE MOON...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... MOON; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY: Maritime Administration, Department of Transportation... the applicant the intended service of the vessel HOWLIN AT THE MOON is: ] Intended Commercial Use...

  3. Moon-Magnetosphere Interactions at Saturn: Recent Highlights from Cassini Observations and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, S.; Kriegel, H.; Saur, J.; Neubauer, F. M.; Wennmacher, A.; Motschmann, U.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2012-09-01

    Since the arrival of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn in July 2004, newly collected plasma and magnetic field data have greatly expanded our knowledge on the giant planet's magnetosphere and its multifaceted family of moons. More than 160 orbits around the planet have already been accomplished by Cassini, encompassing 85 close flybys of Saturn's largest satellite Titan as well as 20 encounters of Enceladus. This small icy moon had been identified as the major source of magnetospheric plasma and neutral particles during the first year of Cassini's tour in the Saturnian system. In addition, the spacecraft has paid visits to several of the other icy satellites in the inner and middle magnetosphere: Rhea (3 flybys), Dione (3 flybys) and Tethys (1 flyby). The inner icy satellites and Titan are located within Saturn's magnetosphere for average solar wind conditions, revolving around the giant planet on prograde orbits in its equatorial plane. Since their orbital velocities are clearly exceeded by the speed of the at least partially corotating magnetospheric plasma, the moons are continuously "overtaken" by the magnetospheric flow. Thus, their trailing hemispheres are permanently exposed to a bombardment with thermal magnetospheric plasma. The characteristics of the resulting plasma interaction process depend on the properties of the moon itself as well as on the parameters (density, velocity, temperature, magnetic field strength) of the incident magnetospheric flow and the energetic particle population. In this presentation, we shall review some recent advances in our understanding of the interaction between Saturn's moons and their plasma environment: Enceladus: Electron absorption by submicron dust grains within the plume gives rise to a negative sign of the Hall conductance in Enceladus' plume. The resulting twist of the magnetic field, referred to as the Anti-Hall effect, has been observed during all targeted Enceladus flybys accomplished to date. We present an

  4. When the beachhopper looks at the moon: The moon compass hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enright, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The function of moon position for shoreline orientation by talitrids is investigated. Three major results were found: (1) Observed cases of compensation for changes in the direction of the moon are based on physiological rhythm with a period of about 25 hours which can persist for at least several days under constant conditions. (2) The zeitgeber for physiological rhythm may be either moonlight or some other factor associated with the tides. (3) If talitrids are long removed from environmental entrainment, either artifically or naturally, the internal rhythm no longer exerts an appreciable influence on the angle of lunar orientation; in such cases the system deteriorates into constant angle orientation, with an angle which is determined by the beach orgin, but may be modified by lighting conditions.

  5. Polarized electromagnetic response of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.; Smith, B. F.; Colburn, D. S.; Schubert, G.; Schwartz, K.

    1974-01-01

    The strong anisotropy in Apollo 15 Lunar Surface Magnetometer (LSM) signals resulting from electromagnetic induction in the moon, forced by fluctuations of the interplanetary magnetic field, is shown to result from intense polarization of the induced field. Arguments are given to show that the anisotropy cannot be explained wholly by asymmetric lunar induction in the presence of the diamagnetic cavity, but must be related to a regional influence. The weaker Apollo 12 anisotropy may also be associated with a regional influence. The site of Apollo 15 LSM at the edge of the Imbrium Basin suggests a preliminary model for calculations based on the possibility that Imbrium and perhaps Serenitatis are sources of the regional effect. Lastly, since the very low frequency induction seems free of the anisotropy, our earlier estimate of deep conductivity remains unchanged.

  6. Distant retrograde orbits for the Moon's exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, Vladislav

    We discuss the properties of the distant retrograde orbits (which are called quasi-satellite orbits also) around Moon. For the first time the distant retrograde orbits were described by J.Jackson in studies on restricted three body problem at the beginning of 20th century [1]. In the synodic (rotating) reference frame distant retrograde orbit looks like an ellipse whose center is slowly drifting in the vicinity of minor primary body while in the inertial reference frame the third body is orbiting the major primary body. Although being away the Hill sphere the third body permanently stays close enough to the minor primary. Due to this reason the distant retrograde orbits are called “quasi-satellite” orbits (QS-orbits) too. Several asteroids in solar system are in a QS-orbit with respect to one of the planet. As an example we can mention the asteroid 2002VE68 which circumnavigates Venus [2]. Attention of specialists in space flight mechanics was attracted to QS-orbits after the publications of NASA technical reports devoted to periodic moon orbits [3,4]. Moving in QS-orbit the SC remains permanently (or at least for long enough time) in the vicinity of small celestial body even in the case when the Hill sphere lies beneath the surface of the body. The properties of the QS-orbit can be studied using the averaging of the motion equations [5,6,7]. From the theoretical point of view it is a specific case of 1:1 mean motion resonance. The integrals of the averaged equations become the parameters defining the secular evolution of the QS-orbit. If the trajectory is robust enough to small perturbations in the simplified problem (i.e., restricted three body problem) it may correspond to long-term stability of the real-world orbit. Our investigations demonstrate that under the proper choice of the initial conditions the QS-orbits don’t escape from Moon or don’t impact Moon for long enough time. These orbits can be recommended as a convenient technique for the large

  7. Size and shape of Saturn's moon Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zebker, Howard A.; Stiles, Bryan; Hensley, Scott; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lunine, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Cassini observations show that Saturn's moon Titan is slightly oblate. A fourth-order spherical harmonic expansion yields north polar, south polar, and mean equatorial radii of 2574.32 ± 0.05 kilometers (km), 2574.36 ± 0.03 km, and 2574.91 ± 0.11 km, respectively; its mean radius is 2574.73 ± 0.09 km. Titan's shape approximates a hydrostatic, synchronously rotating triaxial ellipsoid but is best fit by such a body orbiting closer to Saturn than Titan presently does. Titan's lack of high relief implies that most—but not all—of the surface features observed with the Cassini imaging subsystem and synthetic aperture radar are uncorrelated with topography and elevation. Titan's depressed polar radii suggest that a constant geopotential hydrocarbon table could explain the confinement of the hydrocarbon lakes to high latitudes.

  8. Structure of the moon. [Apollo seismic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Dainty, A. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Anderson, K. R.

    1974-01-01

    Seismic data fron the four stations of the Apollo passive seismic network have been analyzed to obtain the velocity structure of the moon. Analysis of body wave phases from artificial impacts of known impact time and position yields a crustal section. In the Mare Cognitum region the crust is about 60 km thick and is layered. In the 20-km-thick upper layer, velocity gradients are high and microcracks may play an important role. The 40-km-thick lower layer has a nearly constant 6.8-km/sec velocity. There may be a thin high-velocity layer present beneath the crust. The determination of seismic velocities in the lunar mantle is attempted by using natural impacts and deep moonquakes. The simplest model that can be proposed for the mantle consists of a 'lithosphere' overlying an 'asthenosphere'.

  9. Terrestrial passage theory of the moon illusion.

    PubMed

    Reed, C F

    1984-12-01

    Theories of the celestial, or moon, illusion have neglected geometric characteristics of movement along and above the surface of the earth. The illusion occurs because the characteristics of terrestrial passage are attributed to celestial passage. In terrestrial passage, the visual angle subtended by an object changes discriminably as an essentially invariant function of elevation above the horizon. In celestial passage, by contrast, change in visual angle is indiscriminable at all elevations. If a terrestrial object gains altitude, its angular subtense fails to follow the expansion projected for an orbital course: Angular diminution or constancy is equivalent to distancing. On the basis of terrestrial projections, a similar failure of celestial objects in successive elevations is also equivalent to distancing. The illusion occurs because of retinal image constancy, not--as traditionally stated--despite it.

  10. Evolution of the moon: The 1974 model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    The interpretive evolution of the moon can be divided now into seven major stages beginning sometime near the end of the formation of the solar system. These stages and their approximate durations in time are as follows: (1) The Beginning: 4.6 billion years ago, (2) The Melted Shell: 4.6 to 4.4 billion years ago, (3) The Cratered Highlands: 4.4 to 4.1 billion years ago, (4) The Large Basins: 4.1 to 3.9 billion years ago, (5) The Light-colored Plains: 3.9 to 3.8 billion years ago, (6) The Basaltic Maria: 3.8 to 3.0(?) billion years ago, and (7) The Quiet Crust: 3.0(?) billion years ago to the present. The contributions of the Apollo and Luna exploration toward the study of those stages of evolution are reviewed.

  11. Did Ptolemy understand the moon illusion?

    PubMed

    Ross, H E; Ross, G M

    1976-01-01

    Ptolemy is often wrongly credited with an explanation of the moon illusion based on the size-distance invariance principle. This paper elucidates the two Ptolemaic accounts: one in the Almagest, based on atmospheric refraction, and the other in the Optics, based on the difficulty of looking upwards. It is the latter passage which has been thought to refer to size-distance invariance, but it is more probable that it refers to the idea that the visual rays are diminished by the force of gravity (i.e. that the retinal image is reduced in size). Alhazen was probably the first author to explain the illusion by the size-distance invariance principle, and Roger Bacon the first to explain the enlarged apparent distance of the horizon by the presence of intervening objects. Della Porta was the first to credit Ptolemy with these explanations, and this mistake was repeated by many subsequent authors.

  12. Earth-Moon-Sun System: Eclipses Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    Everybody understands what is meant by an eclipse: a body that covers another one. However, the general audience and the students in particular do not know exactly “What the relative positions of the Earth, the Sun and the Moon have to be in order for an eclipse to take place?”You can read a newspaper or watch TV and observe that the information about an eclipse is not correct. In my country, it was stated, in a very important newspaper, that “the solar eclipse will take place tomorrow because there will be a Full Moon”.Teaching this topic in schools or in educational sessions in observatories, it is a good idea to introduce a simple model that maintains the proportion between the diameters and distances of these three bodies. This contribution will introduce this model, showing their applications in the playgrounds of the school, for sunny days or in the classroom for cloudy days.

  13. Propelling Exploration to the Moon and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    As the Constellation Program enters its fourth year, the Ares Projects have made substantial progress toward sending human explorers beyond Earth orbit. The Ares I crew launch vehicle, which will take six astronauts or cargo to the International Space Station or four astronauts to rendezvous with Ares V for missions to the Moon, is the first human-rated vehicle NASA has developed in over 30 years. Since the Exploration Systems Architecture Study in 2005, the Ares Projects have completed a successful system requirements review, system definition review, and preliminary design review for the Ares I crew launch vehicle. The Ares I elements are well into development, beginning with the Shuttle-derived, five-segment solid rocket motor that will provide first-stage propulsion. The first stage team has poured its first production simulation article motor and will be pouring and firing the first five-segment development motor in 2009. Large-scale tooling has been installed and tested to produce propellant tanks for the liquid-fuel upper stage at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Alabama. The initial upper stage units and main propulsion test article will be manufactured and tested at MSFC before transferring to Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana. The upper stage engine team has completed powerpack testing using Apollo J-2 heritage hardware and begun construction of a new altitude test stand at Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. The flight and integrated testing group has designed and built hardware for the Ares I-X test flight scheduled for 2009, as well as begun refurbishing existing infrastructure to support ground testing. Additionally, a base configuration has been selected for the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, which will send the Altair lunar lander and Orion to the Moon. Today, the Ares Projects are well on the way to building America s next generation of exploration-capable launch vehicles.

  14. Developing Fabrication Technologies to Provide On Demand Manufacturing for Exploration of the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Monica S.; Good, James E.; Gilley, Scott D.; Howard, Richard W.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's human exploration initiative poses great opportunity and risk for manned and robotic missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Engineers and scientists at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are developing technologies for in situ fabrication capabilities during lunar and Martian surface operations utilizing provisioned and locally refined materials. Current fabrication technologies must be advanced to support the special demands and applications of the space exploration initiative such as power, weight and volume constraints. In Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) will advance state-of-the-art technologies in support of habitat structure development, tools, and mechanical part fabrication. The repair and replacement of space mission components, such as life support items or crew exercise equipment, fall within the ISFR scope. This paper will address current fabrication technologies relative to meeting ISFR targeted capabilities, near-term advancement goals, and systematic evaluation of various fabrication methods.

  15. Gravitational Wave Detection on the Moon and the Moons of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung; YethadkaVenkateswara, Krishna

    2004-01-01

    The Moon and the moons of Mars should be extremely quiet seismically and could therefore become sensitive gravitational wave detectors, if instrumented properly. Highly sensitive displacement sensors could be deployed on these planetary bodies to monitor the motion induced by gravitational waves. A superconducting displacement sensor with a 10-kg test mass cooled to 2 K will have an intrinsic instrument noise of 10(exp -16) m Hz(exp -1/2). These sensors could be tuned to the lowest two quadrupole modes of the body or operated as a wideband detector below its fundamental mode. An interesting frequency range is 0.1 to approx. 1 Hz, which will be missed by both the ground detectors on the Earth and LISA and would be the best window for searching for stochastic background gravitational waves. Phobos and Deimos have their lowest quadrupole modes at 0.2 to approx. 0.3 Hz and could offer a sensitivity h(sub min) = 10(exp -22) Hz(exp -1/2) within their resonance peaks, which is within two orders of magnitude from the goal of the Big Bang Observer (BBO). The lunar and Martian moon detectors would detect many interesting foreground sources in a new frequency window and could serve as a valuable precursor for BBO.

  16. GCR-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon: The Moon as a CR Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lee, Kerry; Andersen, Vic

    2007-01-01

    We report on the results of a preliminary study of the GCR-induced photon luminescence of the Moon using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence when there is no sunshine or Earthshine. From the photon fluence we derive the energy spectrum which can be utilized to design an orbiting optical instrument for measuring the GCR-induced luminescence. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of its radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior. Also, we investigate transient optical flashes from high-energy CRs impacting the lunar surface (boulders and regolith). The goal is to determine to what extent the Moon could be used as a rudimentary CR detector. Meteor impacts on the Moon have been observed for centuries to generate such flashes, so why not CRs?

  17. (abstract) A Solar Electric Propulsion Mission to the Moon and Beyond!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Pieters, C. M.; Konopliv, A.; Metzger, A.; Sercel, J.; Hickman, M.; Palac, D.; Sykes, M.

    1994-01-01

    The technological development of solar electric propulsion has advanced significantly over the last few years. Mission planners are now seriously studying which missions would benefit most from solar electric propulsion (SEP) and NASA's Solar System Exploration Division is contributing funding to ground and space qualification tests. In response to the impending release of NASA's Announcement of Opportunity for Discovery class planetary missions, we have undertaken a pre-Phase A study of a SEP mission to the Moon. This mission will not only return a wealth of new scientific data but will open up a whole new era of planetary exploration.

  18. New `Moons' of Saturn May Be Transient Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    ring plane crossings (RPX) . At the corresponding times, the Sun illuminates the thin Saturnian rings exactly from the side. Due to its own orbital motion around the Sun, the Earth will cross the ring plane either once or three times, just before and/or after a solar RPX event. In 1995, this happened on May 22 and August 10, and there will be a third Earth RPX event on February 11, 1996. RPX Events Offer Improved Possibilities to Discover Faint Moons The apparent brightness of Saturn's rings decreases dramatically around the time of a solar RPX event. It is then much easier to detect faint moons which would otherwise be lost in the strong glare of Saturn's ring system. Also, the edge-on view improves the chances of detecting faint and dilute rings [3]. Moreover, numerous `mutual events' (eclipses and occultations) occur between the moons during this period; exact timing of these events allows highly improved determination of the motions and orbits around Saturn of these objects. The most recent Earth RPX event took place on August 10, 1995. At this time, Saturn was situated nearly opposite the Sun (in `opposition'), as seen from the Earth, and conditions were very favourable for astronomical observations from both hemispheres. However, because of the longer nights during the southern winter, observing possibilities were particularly good in the south and thus at the ESO La Silla Observatory. The ADONIS Observations Here, a team of astronomers (Jean-Luc Beuzit, Bruno Sicardy and Francois Poulet of the Paris Observatory; Pablo Prado from ESO) followed this rare event during 6 half-nights around August 10, 1995, with the advanced ADONIS adaptive optics camera at the ESO 3.6-m telescope. This instrument neutralizes the image-smearing effects of the atmospheric turbulence and records very sharp images on an infrared-sensitive 256 x 256 pixel detector with a scale of 0.05 arcsec/pixel. Most of the Saturn images were taken through the `short K' filter with a central

  19. Astronomers Use Moon in Effort to Corral Elusive Cosmic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    neutrinos, but the scientists pointed sets of VLA antennas around the edge of the Moon in hopes of seeing brief bursts of radio waves emitted when the neutrinos they sought passed through the Moon and interacted with lunar material. Such interactions, they calculated, should send the radio bursts toward Earth. This technique was first used in 1995 and has been used several times since then, with no detections recorded. The latest VLA observations have been the most sensitive yet done. "Our observations have set a new upper limit -- the lowest yet -- for the amount of the type of neutrinos we sought," Mutel said. "This limit eliminates some models that proposed bursts of these neutrinos coming from the halo of the Milky Way Galaxy," he added. To test other models, the scientists said, will require observations with more sensitivity. "Some of the techniques we developed for these observations can be adapted to the next generation of radio telescopes and assist in more-sensitive searches later," Mutel said. "When we develop the ability to detect these particles, we will open a new window for observing the Universe and advancing our understanding of basic astrophysics," he said. The scientists reported their work in the December edition of the journal Astroparticle Physics.

  20. Moon orientation in adult and young sandhoppers under artificial light.

    PubMed

    Ugolini, Alberto; Boddi, Vieri; Mercatelli, Luca; Castellini, Carlo

    2005-10-22

    Our experiments, carried out at night and during the day on adults and laboratory-born young of the sandhopper Talitrus saltator, deal with the identification and use of the moon as an orientating factor. Sandhoppers were released in an apparatus (a Plexiglas dome) that produced a scenario similar to the natural one (with artificial sky, moon or sun illuminated at different intensities). When tested at night, the adult and young sandhoppers used the artificial moon like the natural one, independently of the intensity of illumination of the artificial sky and moon. In other words, sandhoppers tested at night always identified the artificial moon as the moon and never as the sun. In daytime releases, the seaward orientation failed at low intensities of artificial sky and sun illumination (3.07 and 1.55 microW cm2, respectively), whereas the sun compass was used effectively at higher levels of artificial sun and sky illumination. The innate ability of moon compass orientation in inexpert young sandhoppers was demonstrated even under artificial light.

  1. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session" Moon and Mercury" included the following reports:Helium Production of Prompt Neutrinos on the Moon; Vapor Deposition and Solar Wind Implantation on Lunar Soil-Grain Surfaces as Comparable Processes; A New Lunar Geologic Mapping Program; Physical Backgrounds to Measure Instantaneous Spin Components of Terrestrial Planets from Earth with Arcsecond Accuracy; Preliminary Findings of a Study of the Lunar Global Megaregolith; Maps Characterizing the Lunar Regolith Maturity; Probable Model of Anomalies in the Polar Regions of Mercury; Parameters of the Maximum of Positive Polarization of the Moon; Database Structure Development for Space Surveying Results by Moon -Zond Program; CM2-type Micrometeoritic Lunar Winds During the Late Heavy Bombardment; A Comparison of Textural and Chemical Features of Spinel Within Lunar Mare Basalts; The Reiner Gamma Formation as Characterized by Earth-based Photometry at Large Phase Angles; The Significance of the Geometries of Linear Graben for the Widths of Shallow Dike Intrusions on the Moon; Lunar Prospector Data, Surface Roughness and IR Thermal Emission of the Moon; The Influence of a Magma Ocean on the Lunar Global Stress Field Due to Tidal Interaction Between the Earth and Moon; Variations of the Mercurian Photometric Relief; A Model of Positive Polarization of Regolith; Ground Truth and Lunar Global Thorium Map Calibration: Are We There Yet?;and Space Weathering of Apollo 16 Sample 62255: Lunar Rocks as Witness Plates for Deciphering Regolith Formation Processes.

  2. Moon Farside, Quiet Cone and the "RLI" Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.

    The Farside of the Moon is a unique place. Radio emissions coming from the Earth, and notably the from Telecommunication Satellites orbiting the Earth, don't get there since shielded by the Moon's spherical body. A radio telescope placed inside Crater Daedalus (just at the center of the Farside) would thus sense no man-made RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) and would be ideal for all radio astronomical and SETI searches. Above the Farside, a conical region extends into space, the ``Quiet Cone'', tangent to the Moon surface and with apex a few thousands of kilometers above the Moon. The size of the Quiet Cone, however, is only vaguely known, and changes in time, because the orbits of secret military satellites around the Earth are of course unknown. The only way to know the current, actual size of the Quiet Cone is to send a radiometer into orbit around the Moon and find out where the RFI coming from the Earth is actually shielded and where it is not. The RLI Experiment (RLI is an acronym for ``Radiometro Lunare Italiano'', i.e. Italian Moon Radiometer), is currently under construction by an Italian team coordinated by this author as Principal Investigator. The RLI is hopefully going to be put into orbit around the Moon before 2007. This will be done by placing the RLI radiometer aboard the ``Trailbalzer'', the first American commercial Moon spacecraft, built by TransOrbital Inc.. The RLI Experiment will take direct measurements of the intensity of man-made RFI around two frequencies: The band in between 10.7 and 11.8 GHz (main frequency band of European TV transmissions and, in part, also of American TV transmissions) and The band in between 10 Hz and 10 kHz, to get a Fourier spectrum of the very thin Moon atmosphere. A scientific and technical description of the RLI mission is given in this paper.

  3. The interaction between Saturn's moons and their plasma environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sven; Roussos, Elias; Paty, Carol S.

    2015-11-01

    Since the arrival of the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn in July 2004, newly collected plasma and magnetic field data have greatly expanded our knowledge on the interaction between the giant planet's multifaceted family of moons and its magnetospheric environment. Cassini has already accomplished more than 200 orbits around Saturn, encompassing 111 flybys of the giant planet's largest moon Titan and 20 encounters of Enceladus. This small icy moon had been identified as the major source of magnetospheric plasma and neutral particles during the first year of Cassini's tour in the Saturnian system. In addition, the spacecraft has paid visits to several other icy satellites in the inner and middle magnetosphere: Rhea, Dione and Tethys. Depending on the ambient magnetospheric flow parameters as well as the properties of its atmosphere/ionosphere and surface, each of these moons generates a characteristic and unique set of perturbation signatures in the magnetospheric plasma incident upon it. Therefore, observations made during close flybys of Saturn's moons by the Cassini plasma and magnetic field detectors contain valuable diagnostic information on the properties of the moons' atmospheres, surfaces and even their interiors. However, the spacecraft can measure these plasma and magnetic field perturbations only along its trajectory, whereas the interaction between the moons and their plasma environments constitutes a complex three-dimensional process. Therefore, sophisticated models are required in order to place the data collected along Cassini's flyby trajectories within the context of the full three-dimensional moon-plasma interaction scenarios. In this review, we combine observations from the Cassini mission with sophisticated modeling results to draw a comprehensive picture of the interaction between Saturn's largest moons and their highly dynamic plasma environments.

  4. Determining the Eccentricity of the Moon's Orbit without a Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Ancient Greek astronomers knew that Moon's distance from the Earth was not constant. Ptolemy's model of the Moon's motion implied that the Moon ranged in distance from 33 to 64 Earth radii. This implied that its angular size ranged nearly a factor of two. Tycho Brahe's model of the Moon's motion implied a smaller distance range, some ±3 percent at syzygy. However, the ancient and Renaissance astronomers are notably silent on the subject of measuring the angular size of the Moon as a check on the implied range of distance from their models of the position of the Moon. Using a quarter-inch hole in a piece of cardboard that slides along a yardstick, we show that pre-telescopic astronomers could have measured an accurate mean value of the angular size of the Moon, and that they could have determined a reasonably accurate value of the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. The principal calibration for each observer is to measure the apparent angular diameter of a 91 mm disk viewed at a distance of 10 meters, giving a true angular size of 31.3 arcmin (the Moon's mean angular size). Because the sighting hole is not much bigger than the size of one's pupil, each observer obtains a personal correction factor with which to scale the raw measures. If one takes data over the course of 7 lunations (7.5 anomalistic months), any systematic errors which are a function of phase should even out over the course of the observations. We find that the random error of an individual observation of ±0.8 arcmin can be achieved.

  5. Student Moon Observations and Spatial-Scientific Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Merryn; Wilhelm, Jennifer; Yang, Hongwei

    2015-07-01

    Relationships between sixth grade students' moon journaling and students' spatial-scientific reasoning after implementation of an Earth/Space unit were examined. Teachers used the project-based Realistic Explorations in Astronomical Learning curriculum. We used a regression model to analyze the relationship between the students' Lunar Phases Concept Inventory (LPCI) post-test score variables and several predictors, including moon journal score, number of moon journal entries, student gender, teacher experience, and pre-test score. The model shows that students who performed better on moon journals, both in terms of overall score and number of entries, tended to score higher on the LPCI. For every 1 point increase in the overall moon journal score, participants scored 0.18 points (out of 20) or nearly 1% point higher on the LPCI post-test when holding constant the effects of the other two predictors. Similarly, students who increased their scores by 1 point in the overall moon journal score scored approximately 1% higher in the Periodic Patterns (PP) and Geometric Spatial Visualization (GSV) domains of the LPCI. Also, student gender and teacher experience were shown to be significant predictors of post-GSV scores on the LPCI in addition to the pre-test scores, overall moon journal score, and number of entries that were also significant predictors on the LPCI overall score and the PP domain. This study is unique in the purposeful link created between student moon observations and spatial skills. The use of moon journals distinguishes this study further by fostering scientific observation along with skills from across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines.

  6. Return to the Moon: Lunar robotic science missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.

    1992-01-01

    There are two important aspects of the Moon and its materials which must be addressed in preparation for a manned return to the Moon and establishment of a lunar base. These involve its geologic science and resource utilization. Knowledge of the Moon forms the basis for interpretations of the planetary science of the terrestrial planets and their satellites; and there are numerous exciting explorations into the geologic science of the Moon to be conducted using orbiter and lander missions. In addition, the rocks and minerals and soils of the Moon will be the basic raw materials for a lunar outpost; and the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) of lunar materials must be considered in detail before any manned return to the Moon. Both of these fields -- planetary science and resource assessment -- will necessitate the collection of considerable amounts of new data, only obtainable from lunar-orbit remote sensing and robotic landers. For over fifteen years, there have been a considerable number of workshops, meetings, etc. with their subsequent 'white papers' which have detailed plans for a return to the Moon. The Lunar Observer mission, although grandiose, seems to have been too expensive for the austere budgets of the last several years. However, the tens of thousands of man-hours that have gone into 'brainstorming' and production of plans and reports have provided the precursor material for today's missions. It has been only since last year (1991) that realistic optimism for lunar orbiters and soft landers has come forth. Plans are for 1995 and 1996 'Early Robotic Missions' to the Moon, with the collection of data necessary for answering several of the major problems in lunar science, as well as for resource and site evaluation, in preparation for soft landers and a manned-presence on the Moon.

  7. Learning evaluation of Moon's synchronous rotation mediated by computational resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagundes, A. L.; da Silva, T.; Barroso, M. F.

    2014-10-01

    We report in this poster a learning evaluation about Moon's synchronous rotation by analyzing results of the use of hypermedia The Sun, Earth and Moon in blended learning intervention of an introductory physics discipline. The animation is displayed in a dynamic interactive screen on which the user has control of the progress of the animation sequence. The results are obtained from quantitative and qualitative analysis of issues drawn from a pre-test and a learning assessment counting with 77 students respondents. Learning outcomes indicate that animation helps in learning the phenomenon of Moon's synchronous rotation and students evaluate the use of animations as a motivator and facilitator of learning.

  8. Spin-orbital evolution, geophysics and selenodesy of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A.; Petrova, N.

    All modern discoveries require taking a new view of the evolution of the Moon, its origin and thermal history: 1. All data and also the modern theories of heat evolution of our satellite give evidences that the Moon has a little (no more 400-500 km) core. 2. The models of formation of the lunar core are consistent with a variety of scenarios. For pure compositions (Fe or FeS, small or large core radii) an entirely solid core is likely, the mean composition of the core is close to the eutectic composition (20 - 25% S). 3. Great importance for core's parameters refinement is the determination of physical librations parameters - librations angles, dissipative Love number k2 and qualitative parameter Q - in various experiments. 4. Present research predict possible values of the periods of new modes for the different models of a lunar core (two-layer or three-layer model, dissipation model) and with various set of parameters: core's radius, thickness of fluid outer core, density for a core's different states of aggregation. 5. The models of convection's evolution of the Moon, calculated by Konrad, Spohn, 1997; Spohn et al., 2001, predict the appearance of several plumes of various intensity and location. Convection model of mascon's formation should be considered (Petrova, Gusev, 2001). The Russian scientific project "The Moon - 2012+" is directed on the solution of fundamental problems of celestial mechanics, selenodesy and geophysics of the Moon - that is connected with pursuance of theoretical researches and computer's modeling: 1. Spin-orbital longtime evolution and physical librations of the multilayered Moon: a) development of the analytical theory of rotation of the two / three-layer Moon and construction on its basis of the physical libration's tables for processing accurate observations and for constructing a lunar annual book; b) analysis of the spin - orbital evolution of the early Moon, an estimation of internal energy dissipation, modeling of the long

  9. Astrobiology Field Research in Moon/Mars Analogue Environments: Preface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foing, B. H.; Stoker, C.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2011-01-01

    Extreme environments on Earth often provide similar terrain conditions to landing/operation sites on Moon and Mars. Several field campaigns (EuroGeoMars2009 and DOMMEX/ILEWG EuroMoonMars from November 2009 to March 2010) were conducted at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) in Utah. Some of the key astrobiology results are presented in this special issue on Astrobiology field research in Moon/Mars analogue environments relevant to investigate the link between geology, minerals, organics and biota. Preliminary results from a multidisciplinary field campaign at Rio Tinto in Spain are presented.

  10. Interplanetary dust and debris, as observed from the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. Chantal

    1994-06-01

    The visible trace of the interplanetary dust cloud, so-called the zodiacal light, has already been photographed from the Moon, more than twenty years ago (part 1). The interplanetary dust grains do not only scatter solar light; they produce a thermal emission in the near infrared domain; also they may impact the Earth and Moon system as they spiral towards the Sun (part 2). The main problems which can be anticipated for Moon based observations of faint astronomical sources are likely to be due to zodiacal light and zodiacal emission; the induced contamination would however be reduced by appropriate choices in the periods of observation (part 3).

  11. Spectroscopic Studies of Double Beta Decays and MOON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2007-10-01

    This is a brief review of future spectroscopic experiments of neutrino-less double beta decays (0νββ) and the MOON (Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos) project. Spectroscopic 0νββ experiments of MOON, SuperNEMO and DCBA are planned to study Majorana masses in the quasi-degenerate (QD) and inverted mass hierarchy (IH) regions. MOON aims at 0νββ studies with the ν-mass sensitivities of 100-30 meV by means of a super ensemble of multi-layer modules, each being consist of a scintillator plate, two tracking detector planes and a thin ββ source film.

  12. Quantification of false positives within Moon Zoo crater annotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, P.; Thacker, N.

    2014-04-01

    The Moon Zoo citizen science project [1] allows members of the public to annotate lunar images, providing researchers with a wealth of location and size information regarding the population of small craters on the Moon. To date, approximately 4 million images have been inspected. Here, we show how a quantitative pattern recognition system can be used to estimate the quantity of contamination in Moon Zoo data from erroneous annotations. The proposed method produces not only estimates of true verses false crater annotations, but also a full error covariance, with additional conformity checks, which is essential for the meaningful interpretation of measurements, e.g. for plotting error bars.

  13. The effects of moon illumination, moon angle, cloud cover, and sky glow on night vision goggle flight performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loro, Stephen Lee

    This study was designed to examine moon illumination, moon angle, cloud cover, sky glow, and Night Vision Goggle (NVG) flight performance to determine possible effects. The research was a causal-comparative design. The sample consisted of 194 Fort Rucker Initial Entry Rotary Wing NVG flight students being observed by 69 NVG Instructor Pilots. The students participated in NVG flight training from September 1992 through January 1993. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Observations were analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance and a Wilcox matched pairs signed-ranks test for difference. Correlations were analyzed using Pearson's r. The analyses results indicated that performance at high moon illumination levels is superior to zero moon illumination, and in most task maneuvers, superior to >0%--50% moon illumination. No differences were found in performance at moon illumination levels above 50%. Moon angle had no effect on night vision goggle flight performance. Cloud cover and sky glow have selective effects on different maneuvers. For most task maneuvers, cloud cover does not affect performance. Overcast cloud cover had a significant effect on seven of the 14 task maneuvers. Sky glow did not affect eight out of 14 task maneuvers at any level of sky glow.

  14. A planetary quarantine laboratory on the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, Barry E.

    2004-11-01

    In January of 2004 NASA was directed by the President of the United States to setting a goal to establish a permanent human tended scientific outpost on the Moon by 2015-2020. Discussions on what kind of facilities on the Moon would be most beneficial to science have already begun. One of the highest priority goals for the NASA Mars exploration program has been how to proceed with the return of Martian soil and rock samples directly to Earth for extensive laboratory analysis. However scientific debates exist on how to obtain pristine samples from Mars without introducing terrestrial contaminants and also for preventing the back contamination of the Earth"s biosphere by putative Martian microbes. In 1976, the Viking Labeled Release experiment provided peer-reviewed scientific evidence for possible microbial activity in the upper soil layers of Mars in two different locations on the planet. Although the LR evidence is not considered as absolute proof of life on Mars by many in the scientific community, the Viking LR data should be taken seriously as an important signpost that life, either as dormant endospores (which may have been revived on the addition of the LR nutrient solution), or found as a currently thriving microbial community, might pose a serious risk to the terrestrial biosphere in the event of a sample return spacecraft failure. Examples of spacecraft technological failures include most recently the British built Beagle 2 lander, the NASA Mars Climate Orbiter and Mars Polar Lander. These examples show there is no guarantee of a 100% foolproof spacecraft. In 2001 the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council published that the likelihood of life on Mars is low, "but it is not zero" and proposed the construction of a level-4 biohazard containment facility "like no other on the Earth". Since at this time we cannot guess whether any putative Martian organisms would be toxic or pathogenic to Earth life, every effort should be made to ensure that

  15. Highly siderophile element depletion in the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James M. D.; Walker, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    abundances between mare basalts from the Apollo 12, 15 and 17 sites, and from unknown regions of the Moon (La Paz mare basalts, MIL 05035), indicates relatively homogeneous and low HSE abundances within the lunar interior. Low absolute HSE abundances and chondritic Re/Os of mare basalts are consistent with a late accretion addition of ∼0.02 wt.% of the Moon's mass to the mantle, prior to the formation of the lunar crust. Late accretion must also have occurred significantly prior to cessation of lunar mantle differentiation (>4.4 Ga), to enable efficient mixing and homogenization within the mantle. Low lunar HSE abundances are consistent with proportionally 40 times more late accretion to Earth than the Moon. Disproportional late accretion to the two bodies is consistent with the small 182W excess (∼21-28 ppm) measured in lunar rocks, compared to the silicate Earth.

  16. A possible space VLBI constellation utilizing the stable orbits around the TLPs in the Earth-Moon system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Tang, Jingshi; Hou, Xiyun

    2016-07-01

    Current studies indicate that there are stable orbits around but far away from the triangular libration points .Two special quasi-periodic orbits around each triangular libration points L4 , L5 in the Earth-Moon sys-tem perturbed by Sun are gain , and the stable orbits discussed in this work are ideal places for space colonies because no orbit control is needed. These stable orbits can also be used as nominal orbits for space VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) stations. The two stations can also form baselines with stations on the Earth and the Moon, or with stations located around another TLP. Due to the long distance between the stations, the observation precision can be greatly enhanced compared with the VLBI stations on the Earth. Such a VLBI constellation not only can advance the radio astronomy, but also can be used as a navigation system for human activities in the Earth-Moon system and even in the solar system. This paper will focus on the navigation constellation coverage issues, and the orbit determination accuracy problems within the Earth-Moon sys-tem and interplanetary space.

  17. EARTH, MOON, SUN, AND CV ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M. M.

    2009-11-01

    Net tidal torque by the secondary on a misaligned accretion disk, like the net tidal torque by the Moon and the Sun on the equatorial bulge of the spinning and tilted Earth, is suggested by others to be a source to retrograde precession in non-magnetic, accreting cataclysmic variable (CV) dwarf novae (DN) systems that show negative superhumps in their light curves. We investigate this idea in this work. We generate a generic theoretical expression for retrograde precession in spinning disks that are misaligned with the orbital plane. Our generic theoretical expression matches that which describes the retrograde precession of Earths' equinoxes. By making appropriate assumptions, we reduce our generic theoretical expression to those generated by others, or to those used by others, to describe retrograde precession in protostellar, protoplanetary, X-ray binary, non-magnetic CV DN, quasar, and black hole systems. We find that spinning, tilted CV DN systems cannot be described by a precessing ring or by a precessing rigid disk. We find that differential rotation and effects on the disk by the accretion stream must be addressed. Our analysis indicates that the best description of a retrogradely precessing spinning, tilted, CV DN accretion disk is a differentially rotating, tilted disk with an attached rotating, tilted ring located near the innermost disk annuli. In agreement with the observations and numerical simulations by others, we find that our numerically simulated CV DN accretion disks retrogradely precess as a unit. Our final, reduced expression for retrograde precession agrees well with our numerical simulation results and with selective observational systems that seem to have main-sequence secondaries. Our results suggest that a major source to retrograde precession is tidal torques like that by the Moon and the Sun on the Earth. In addition, these tidal torques should be common to a variety of systems where one member is spinning and tilted, regardless if

  18. Imaging the Moon's Core with Seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Renee C.; Lin, Pei-Ying Patty; Garnero, Ed J.; Williams, Quetin C.; Lognonne, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Constraining the structure of the lunar core is necessary to improve our understanding of the present-day thermal structure of the interior and the history of a lunar dynamo, as well as the origin and thermal and compositional evolution of the Moon. We analyze Apollo deep moonquake seismograms using terrestrial array processing methods to search for the presence of reflected and converted energy from the lunar core. Although moonquake fault parameters are not constrained, we first explore a suite of theoretical focal spheres to verify that fault planes exist that can produce favorable core reflection amplitudes relative to direct up-going energy at the Apollo stations. Beginning with stacks of event seismograms from the known distribution of deep moonquake clusters, we apply a polarization filter to account for the effects of seismic scattering that (a) partitions energy away from expected components of ground motion, and (b) obscures all but the main P- and S-wave arrivals. The filtered traces are then shifted to the predicted arrival time of a core phase (e.g. PcP) and stacked to enhance subtle arrivals associated with the Moon s core. This combination of filtering and array processing is well suited for detecting deep lunar seismic reflections, since we do not expect scattered wave energy from near surface (or deeper) structure recorded at varying epicentral distances and stations from varying moonquakes at varying depths to stack coherently. Our results indicate the presence of a solid inner and fluid outer core, overlain by a partial-melt-containing boundary layer (Table 1). These layers are consistently observed among stacks from four classes of reflections: P-to-P, S-to-P, P-to-S, and S-to-S, and are consistent with current indirect geophysical estimates of core and deep mantle properties, including mass, moment of inertia, lunar laser ranging, and electromagnetic induction. Future refinements are expected following the successful launch of the GRAIL lunar

  19. SELENE: The Moon-Orbiting Observatory Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, H.; Kato, M.; Sasaki, S.; Iijima, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Takizawa, Y.

    The Moon-orbiting SELENE (Selenological and Engineering Explorer) mission is prepared in Japan for lunar science and technology development. The launch target has been changed from 2005 to 2006 because of the launch failure of H2A rocket in 2003. The spacecraft consists of a main orbiting satellite at about 100 km altitude in the polar orbit and two sub-satellites in the elliptical orbits. The scientific objectives of the mission are; 1) study of the origin and evolution of the Moon, 2) in-situ measurement of the lunar environment, and 3) observation of the solar-terrestrial plasma environment. SELENE carries the instruments for scientific investigation, including mapping of lunar topography and surface composition, measurement of the gravity and magnetic fields, and observation of lunar and solar-terrestrial plasma environment. The total mass of scientific payload is about 300 kg. The mission period will be 1 year. If extra fuel is available, the mission will be extended in a lower orbit around 50 km. The elemental abundances are measured by x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers. Alpha particles from the radon gas and polonium are detected by an alpha particle spectrometer. The mineralogical abundance is characterized by a multi-band imager. The mineralogical composition is identified by a spectral profiler which is a continuous spectral analyzer. The surface topographic data are obtained by a high resolution terrain camera and a laser altimeter. The inside structure up to 5 km below the lunar surface is observed by the radar sounder experiment using a 5 MHz radio wave. A magnetometer and an electron reflectometer provides data on the lunar surface magnetic field. Doppler tracking of the orbiter via the sub-satellite when the orbiter is in the far side is used to determine the gravity field of the far side. Radio sources on the two sub-satellites are used to conduct differential VLBI observation from the ground stations. The lunar environment of high energy particles

  20. Laser altimetry of Mercury, Moon, and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Torrence, M. H.; Barnouin, O. S.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Since March 29 of this year, the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has been ranging twice daily to the surface of Mercury from orbit, collecting more than 1 million ranges each month. Mercury joins Earth, Moon, and Mars as a planetary body mapped precisely by laser altimetry from orbit. Ranging covers nearly all of the northern hemisphere. The southern hemisphere largely lies beyond the 1800-km range of MLA from MESSENGER's eccentric orbit, but the 10-cm-precision MLA data will eventually be complemented by less precise radio occultation and limb profiling measurements by the MESSENGER spacecraft, as well as by digital topographic models produced by stereo photogrammetry. Mercury topography is distinguished from its larger and smaller counterparts by a relatively low (<10 km) dynamic range, less than half that of Earth, Moon, and Mars, and two-thirds that of its nearest neighbor, Venus. There are ample indications from the topography of Mercury impact structures as well as from its low-degree shape that Mercury's thermal evolution was complex and differed from those of other terrestrial planets. Central to the thermal history are the extensive contractional tectonic features for which altimetry quantifies accommodated strain. As well, MLA profiles of extensional graben within more than two dozen impact craters and basins, together with topographic and gravity field observations, will constrain the evolution of Mercury's upper crust and lithosphere. Lidar topographic data provide a wealth of geological contextual information regarding impact crater formation and modification, tectonics, volcanism, lithospheric strength, thermal evolution, and internal structure. Topography is essential for orthorectification of images and calibration of reflectance data. Geodetic topography, referenced to the center of mass, in conjunction with gravity, allows an assessment of the distribution of