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Sample records for advanced mycosis fungoides

  1. Phototherapy of Mycosis Fungoides.

    PubMed

    Hodak, Emmilia; Pavlovsky, Lev

    2015-10-01

    Therapies based on ultraviolet light have long been established in mycosis fungoides (MF). They have traditionally included whole-body ultraviolet light B, both broad-band and narrow-band, and psoralen plus ultraviolet A. Phototherapy may be applied alone in early stage MF or in combination with systemic therapy in refractory early stage MF and advanced MF. This article reviews the most frequently used forms of phototherapy for MF with emphasis on efficacy, safety, and practical considerations. PMID:26433842

  2. Mycosis fungoides: classic disease and variant presentations.

    PubMed

    Howard, M S; Smoller, B R

    2000-06-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a peripheral non-Hodgkin's T-cell neoplastic process, representing the most common type of primary cutaneous malignant lymphoma. Neoplastic lesions classically show skin predilection and characteristic clinical and histologic features in patch, plaque, and tumor stages. In addition, several clinicopathologic variants of mycosis fungoides have been delineated, including poikiloderma atrophicans vasculare (parapsoriasis variegata), Sézary syndrome, granulomatous mycosis fungoides, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides, folliculocentric mycosis fungoides, syringotropic mycosis fungoides, and Woringer Kolopp disease. We will review the salient features of patch, plaque, and tumor stage mycosis fungoides in this article and follow with a discussion of these variant clinicopathologic presentations and of therapeutic modalities. PMID:10892710

  3. Mycosis Fungoides Variants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Escala, M Estela; González, Belén Rubio; Guitart, Joan

    2014-06-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that usually manifests as patches and plaques with a propensity for nonphotoexposed areas. MF is a common mimicker of inflammatory and infectious skin diseases, because it can be manifested with a wide variety of clinical and pathologic presentations. These atypical presentations of MF may be difficult to diagnose, requiring a high level of suspicion and careful clinicopathologic correlation. Within this array of clinical presentations, the World Health Organization classification recognizes 3 MF variants: folliculotropic MF, pagetoid reticulosis, and granulomatous slack skin. These 3 variants, as well as hypopigmented MF, are addressed in this article. PMID:26837197

  4. "Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides" is not always mycosis fungoides!

    PubMed

    Werner, Betina; Brown, Sonya; Ackerman, A Bernard

    2005-02-01

    We conducted a critical review of hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in historical perspective with emphasis on criteria clinical and histopathologic for diagnosis of that lymphoma as they are set forth in every article ever written about it. Toward that end, we undertook analysis of each article in the medical literature that mentioned hypopigmentation in mycosis fungoides (34 in toto). Each was scrutinized regarding content, photographs of lesions clinical pictured, and photomicrographs. On the basis of all the information in the 34 publications available to us, we made a determination about which patients had mycosis fungoides without doubt, which surely did not, and which about whom no judgment could be made by us because too little data requisite for such a decision was provided, especially in terms of photographs of lesions clinical and of photomicrographs. To date, 106 patients with "hypopigmented mycosis fungoides" have been reported on. Features clinical and findings histopathologic in 23 of those 106 patients were sufficient to permit us to determine, with a high degree of confidence, whether or not a particular patient truly had mycosis fungoides. In our judgment, 19 patients did have mycosis fungoides, whereas at least four patients did not. In regard to the other 83 patients, the information provided by the authors simply was not sufficient to allow us to come to a decision that we could justify. PMID:15677981

  5. Genetics Home Reference: mycosis fungoides

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as environmental exposure or certain bacterial or viral infections, are involved in the development of mycosis fungoides . ... behaviors. Blood. 2010 Aug 5;116(5):767-71. doi: 10.1182/blood-2009-11-251926. Epub ...

  6. [Gemcitabine Monotherapy for Advanced Mycosis Fungoides--Two Case Reports and a Literature Review].

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, Mamiko; Takasu, Hiroshi; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2015-12-01

    Gemcitabine, a pyrimidine nucleoside analogue, is gaining recognition as a potential therapeutic agent for advanced-stage and refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). We report of 2 patients whose advanced-stage mycosis fungoides was not sufficiently controlled by prior CHOP therapy. Both patients showed great improvement in the skin lesions with weekly gemcitabine therapy (1,000-1,200 mg/m2). The patients received four and 8 cycles of gemcitabine monotherapy, respectively, and no grade 3-4 hematological or hepatic adverse events occurred. This is the first report of the efficacy of gemcitabine for CTCL in Japan. Gemcitabine is well tolerated and is an effective monotherapy for CTCL. PMID:26809303

  7. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, I M; Ramos-Caro, F A; Hassanein, A M

    2000-01-01

    We present a case of purely hypopigmented mycosis fungoides of 8-years duration in an 18-year-old woman who responded readily to psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) treatment. The literature pertaining to hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is reviewed. PMID:11085673

  8. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mycosis fungoides*

    PubMed Central

    Atalla, Angelo; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Siqueira, Denise Bittencourt; Toledo, Gabriela Cumani

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis Fungoides is typically an indolent disease in early stages. However, approximately 30% of patients have advanced staged disease at presentation and 20% will develop it at some time. These patients have a poorer prognosis with a median survival of 2-4 years. The only curative option for mycosis fungoides may be hematopoietic allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We report the case of a patient with mycosis fungoides in an advanced stage (IIB), refractory to treatment options. She underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The patient remains in complete remission nineteen months after allo-HSCT. Allogeneic transplantation can alter the natural history of mycosis fungoides and should be considered in patients who have refractory disease or short-lived responses with standard therapies. PMID:24346924

  9. Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Stage IB-IVB Mycosis Fungoides or Sezary Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-21

    Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome

  10. Mycosis fungoides presenting as pigmented purpuric dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Shannon; Walsh, Noreen; D'Intino, Yolanda; Langley, Richard G B

    2006-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides, a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, typically presents as indolent, progressive, and persistent erythematous patches or plaques with mild scaling and over time can evolve into tumor stage with tumor nodules. Other presentations include eczematous, psoriasiform, poikilodermatous, and hypopigmented patches. We report Mycosis fungoides in a 14-year-old boy presenting as pigmented purpuric dermatitis and review the relevant literature. This is a rare presentation of a condition that is uncommon in the pediatric population. In our patient, histologic features were typical of Mycosis fungoides presenting as pigmented purpuric dermatitis. The clinical features, pathology, molecular biology, and the relationship between these two entities are discussed. PMID:16918631

  11. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides treated successfully with puva.

    PubMed

    Khanna, N; Dogra, D; Manchanda, Y; Singh, M K

    1999-01-01

    Hypopigmented lesions are rarely encountered in mycosis fungoides. We here report a 22-year old female patient who presented with a 5-year history of asymptomatic progressively increasing discrete and confluent hypopigmented macules and a 1-year history of a few itchy erythematous, scaly, indurated plaques. The histological features were consistent with a clinical diagnosis of mycosis fungoides. She was successfully treated with PUVA therapy. PMID:20921689

  12. Immunotactoid glomerulopathy associated with mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Torrelo, A.; Rivera, M. T.; Mampaso, F.; España, A.; Marcèn, R.; Ortuño, J.; Ledo, A.

    1990-01-01

    A patient with mycosis fungoides developed a nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed deposits of a highly organized fibrillar material which did not stain with the typical amyloid stains; this picture was consistent with the diagnosis of non-amyloidotic fibrillary glomerulopathy or immunotactoid glomerulopathy. We believe this is the first case reported of immunotactoid glomerulopathy associated with mycosis fungoides. Possible pathogenetic implications are discussed with reference to previous publications. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2235815

  13. Koebner Phenomenon and Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Lebas, Eve; Libon, Florence; Nikkels, Arjen F.

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most frequent type of primary cutaneous T-cell/NK-cell lymphoma. The Koebner phenomenon is defined as the appearance of cutaneous lesions on previously noninvolved skin following trauma and is observed in a series of cutaneous diseases including psoriasis, lichen planus, viral warts, molluscum contagiosum, etc. In this case report, 3 patients with longstanding MF are presented, the 1st with the appearance of a circumscribed early-stage type MF lesion rapidly following a surgical excision of an infundibular cyst, the 2nd with the appearance of a unique unilateral palmar tumoral MF lesion at the pressure site of a crutch, and the 3rd presented localized MF early stage lesions at the friction site of a belt. This report suggests that some MF patients may experience Koebner phenomenon-induced MF lesions and that MF should be added to the long list of skin diseases potentially exhibiting the Koebner phenomenon. PMID:26557075

  14. Unusual variants of mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Abeldaño, Alejandra; Arias, Mariana; Benedetti, Adriana; Ochoa, Karina; Maskin, Matías; Pellerano, Graciela; Kien, María Cristina; Chouela, Edgardo

    2011-01-01

    Unusual variants of mycosis fungoides (MF) differ substantially from the classical presentation, and most of them resemble other dermatologic diseases. The authors reviewed files of patients with MF who consulted our clinic between November 1995 and June 2010 to evaluate the relative frequency and clinical behavior of these variants. Among 98 patients with MF, 32 (32.65%) had unusual variants. The most common types included follicular MF (31.25%), hypopigmented MF (18.75%), poiquilodermic MF (15.6%), and erythrodermic MF (12.5%). Less common variants included unilesional MF, bullosa MF, ichthyosiform MF, granulomatous slack skin, and pigmented purpura-like MF. Progressive disease and MF-related death were most commonly associated with follicular MF, bullosa MF, and erythrodermic MF. PMID:21980706

  15. [Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation followed by oral bexarotene in a patient with advanced mycosis fungoides].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Barrio, S; Izu, R; García-Ruiz, J C; Acebo, E; Martínez de Lagrán, Z; Díaz-Pérez, J L

    2008-09-01

    We describe the case of a 17-year-old patient with rapidly progressing and aggressive mycosis fungoides, with multiple cutaneous tumors and large cell transformation. She was initially treated with 3 cycles of high-dose chemotherapy with mega-CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) without response, leading to the decision to undertake autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Partial remission of the disease was achieved with this treatment and subsequent introduction of oral bexarotene led to complete remission, which has been maintained for more than 3 years with good tolerance of oral therapy. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the use of oral bexarotene. PMID:18682170

  16. ELECTRON BEAM THERAPY OF MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Malcolm A.; Schneidman, Harold M.; Farber, Eugene M.; Kaplan, Henry S.

    1961-01-01

    Ionizing radiation in the form of x-ray therapy is the best modality of treatment available at the present time for single, isolated lesions of mycosis fungoides. However, for generalized mycosis fungoides, generalized x-ray therapy is technically difficult and dangerous. It is now possible to employ electron beam therapy for generalized mycosis fungoides, using energies which confine the dose to the superficial layers of the skin and thus avoid hematopoietic injury. A technique for wide field electron beam therapy has been developed for this purpose which has been effective and well tolerated in limited trials to date. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 4.Figure 4.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 5.Figure 5.Figure 6. AFigure 6. A PMID:13863947

  17. Minimal residual disease in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pa-Fan; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Jee, Shiou-Hwa

    2006-05-01

    We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy with stage I hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in whom minimal residual disease was detected with T-cell receptor gamma-polymerase chain reaction after the disease was in complete clinical remission. We further cloned and sequenced the T-cell receptor gamma-polymerase chain reaction product of the lesion in remission and found that the original T-cell clone still existed in decreased amounts. The patient was followed up for 3 1/2 years without any new lesions developing. The clinical significance of this residual malignant T-cell clone in mycosis fungoides remains to be elucidated. PMID:16631939

  18. Emerging treatment options for early mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Guarino, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a candidate for skin-directed therapies in its initial stages. In recent years, therapeutic options outside of the normal treatment recommendations such as topical imiquimod, topical tazarotene, topical methotrexate, excimer light sources, and photodynamic therapy have been published with variable results. These alternatives have been useful in cases of localized mycosis fungoides that do not respond to routine treatments; nevertheless, more studies on these methods are still needed. This article summarizes the literature and data that are known so far about these treatments. PMID:23450851

  19. A case of hypopigmented mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Choe, Y B; Park, K C; Cho, K H

    2000-08-01

    We experienced a 26-year-old woman in whom widespread hypopigmented macules and patches developed as the initial clinical feature of mycosis fungoides. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis. The patients was treated with PUVA, and the lesion progressively disappeared within five months. PMID:10989581

  20. Decreased interleukin-21 expression in skin and blood in advanced mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Kabasawa, Miyoko; Sugaya, Makoto; Oka, Tomonori; Takahashi, Naomi; Kawaguchi, Makiko; Suga, Hiraku; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Takahashi, Takehiro; Shibata, Sayaka; Fujita, Hideki; Asano, Yoshihide; Tada, Yayoi; Kadono, Takafumi; Okochi, Hitoshi; Sato, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin (IL)-21 is regarded as a potent antitumor agent, which increases the cytotoxicity of both natural killer (NK) and CD8(+) T cells. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-21 in mycosis fungoides (MF). IL-21 mRNA expression levels in patch and plaque MF were significantly higher than those in normal skin. IL-21 mRNA expression levels in tumor MF were significantly decreased compared with those in patch and plaque MF. Interestingly, mRNA expression levels of IL-21 in MF lesional skin significantly correlated with those of T-helper type-1 cytokines/chemokines such as CXCL10, CXCL11 and γ-interferon. Immunohistochemistry showed that IL-21 was expressed by keratinocytes in patch and plaque MF. Furthermore, serum IL-21 levels in patients with tumor MF were significantly lower than those of healthy controls and plaque MF. Thus, IL-21 expression was significantly downregulated in skin and blood of patients with tumor MF, which may contribute to progression of MF. Our study suggests that recombinant IL-21 would be a promising therapy for MF. PMID:26825047

  1. Environmental risk factors for mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Yonit; Tur, Ethel

    2007-01-01

    The rising incidence rates of mycosis fungoides (MF) call for an explanation. Thus, environmental and lifestyle factors were speculated to play a role in the development of lymphoproliferative diseases. It is thought that continuous activation of skin T helper lymphocytes leads to malignant transformation of a specific clone. Possible risk factors that have been implicated are occupational chemical exposure, radiation, drugs and infections. The carcinogenic process is probably multifactorial and multistep, combining the genetic predisposition of the individual and his immune status with various exogenous factors. Using advanced and accurate exposure assessment tools, recent epidemiological data indicate that occupational exposure to chemicals, primarily to aromatic halogenated hydrocarbons, is a major risk factor to develop MF in men (odds ratio 4.6), while exposure to pesticides, a subgroup of the aromatic halogenated hydrocarbons, is a risk factor in both genders (odds ratio 6.8 for men and 2.4 for women). Apparently, concomitant infection with Staphylococcus aureus or with Borrelia species and chronic exposure to UVR are minor risk factors for the development of MF. Further assessment of occupational and environmental exposures is essential for the evaluation of their contribution to the etiology of MF. This will allow the application of preventive and surveillance measures along with adjustment of existing health policies. PMID:17641490

  2. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides associated with atopy in two children.

    PubMed

    Onsun, N; Kural, Y; Su, O; Demirkesen, C; Büyükbabani, N

    2006-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is very rare in children. Hypopigmented lesions of this disease are usually observed in dark-skinned individuals and often show a T supressor CD8(+) phenotype. Two Caucasian children with predominantly hypopigmented lesions of mycosis fungoides are presented here. Atopy was a concomitant feature in both. PMID:17014650

  3. Free-floating collagen fibers in interstitial mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Gerardo; Crisman, Giuliana; Zalaudek, Iris; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Stefanato, Catherine M

    2010-06-01

    We present a case of interstitial mycosis fungoides showing pseudodovascular clefts with "free-floating" collagen fibers surrounded by neoplastic T lymphocytes. Such a finding further expands the histopathologic spectrum of mycosis fungoides and could be taken into account in its differential diagnosis from granuloma annulare, inflammatory morphea, and interstitial granulomatous drug reaction. PMID:20145533

  4. Mycosis Fungoides: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Akinbami, Akinsegun A; Osikomaiya, Bodunrin I; John-Olabode, Sarah O; Adediran, Adewumi A; Osinaike, Olajumoke; Uche, Ebele I; Ismail, Ayobami K; Dosunmu, Adedoyin O; Odesanya, Mojeed; Dada, Akinola; Okunoye, Olaitan

    2014-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF), also known as Alibert-Bazin syndrome or granuloma fungoides, is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Cutaneous lymphomas are an uncommon, heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) of T- and B-cell origin where the skin is the primary organ of involvement. This is a case of a 60-year-old Nigerian woman, who was diagnosed and managed as a case of chronic dermatitis but further investigations confirmed a diagnosis of MF; she was thereafter managed with topical glucocorticoids/chemotherapy and improved on these treatments. We make a plea for better awareness of the disease among physicians and pathologists in Africa. PMID:25232282

  5. Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Mycosis Fungoides

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  6. Mycosis fungoides with unusual vitiligo-like presentation.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayanta Kumar; Gangopadhyay, Asok Kumar

    2004-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF), the commonest variant of primary cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), is relatively uncommon among the Asians. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is a rare variant usually observed in dark-skinned individuals, especially children. Hypopigmented MF usually responds well to therapy, particularly to PUVA, and has a comparatively benign course. Mycosis fungoides in a 16-year-old boy, with extensive asymptomatic hypopigmented lesions developing gradually all over the body over eight years and vitiligo-like skin lesions developing for seven years, with no systemic features, is presented for its unusual clinical features and conspicuous histopathological findings of prominent epidermotropism. The case showed fairly good response to PUVASOL therapy. PMID:17642645

  7. Pigmented purpuric dermatosis or mycosis fungoides: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Abdul Latheef, Ettappurath N; Davul, Hena; Ashraf, Febin

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented purpuric dermatoses (PPD), a group of vascular disorders with variable clinical picture is reported in all races and age groups with a male predilection. There are reports of mycosis fungoides manifesting as pigmented purpura as well as progression of PPD to cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The diagnostic dilemma is compounded by PPD manifesting histological similarity to mycosis fungoides. Currently, it is believed that PPD with monoclonal T-cell population is more likely to progress to malignancy. We report a 31-year-old male patient who presented with the lichenoid clinical variant of PPD lesions that mimicked mycosis fungoides on histopathology. Gene rearrangement studies identified a polyclonal T-cell population. The patient responded to photochemotherapy, which is beneficial in both PPD and mycosis fungoides. Our case signifies the limitations of current diagnostic modalities in accurately distinguishing PPD from cutaneous lymphoma. Data on disease progression in similar cases may enable us to formulate better diagnostic definitions. PMID:27294054

  8. Pigmented purpuric dermatosis or mycosis fungoides: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Abdul Latheef, Ettappurath N.; Davul, Hena; Ashraf, Febin

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented purpuric dermatoses (PPD), a group of vascular disorders with variable clinical picture is reported in all races and age groups with a male predilection. There are reports of mycosis fungoides manifesting as pigmented purpura as well as progression of PPD to cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The diagnostic dilemma is compounded by PPD manifesting histological similarity to mycosis fungoides. Currently, it is believed that PPD with monoclonal T-cell population is more likely to progress to malignancy. We report a 31-year-old male patient who presented with the lichenoid clinical variant of PPD lesions that mimicked mycosis fungoides on histopathology. Gene rearrangement studies identified a polyclonal T-cell population. The patient responded to photochemotherapy, which is beneficial in both PPD and mycosis fungoides. Our case signifies the limitations of current diagnostic modalities in accurately distinguishing PPD from cutaneous lymphoma. Data on disease progression in similar cases may enable us to formulate better diagnostic definitions. PMID:27294054

  9. Intraocular involvement with subretinal pigment epithelium infiltrates by mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Erny, B. C.; Egbert, P. R.; Peat, I. M.; Shorrock, K.; Rosenthal, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular mycosis fungoides in a 48-year-old man. The patient presented with decreased visual acuity, white subretinal lesions, and vitritis. Post-mortem histopathology revealed malignant T cell infiltrates consistent with mycosis fungoides in the retina, vitreous, and between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane Focal atrophy of the RPE, along with the sub-RPE infiltrates, correlated with the clinically visible fundus lesions. Images PMID:1751471

  10. A Case of Mycosis Fungoides and Lymphomatoid Papulosis Occurring Simultaneously in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Bognet, Rachel A.; Kozic, Heidi; Lee, Jason B.; Sahu, Joya; Hyde, Patrice M.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported an association between lymphomatoid papulosis and other lymphomas, such as mycosis fungoides, Hodgkin’s disease, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The association between lymphomatoid papulosis and mycosis fungoides has been reported to be between seven and 39 percent. Although a relationship is acknowledged between lymphomatoid papulosis and mycosis fungoides, our understanding is limited. The authors report a case of mycosis fungoides and lymphomatoid papulosis in a child. PMID:23198014

  11. [Interstitial mycosis fungoid: a rare variant of mycosis fungoids. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Marie-Thérèse; Comoz, François; Dompmartin-Blanchere, Anne; Bagot, Martine; Ortonne, Nicolas

    2011-02-01

    Mycosis fungoids can present with various clinical and histological features, with only a few of them being recognized as distinct entities in the current WHO and EORTC classifications. Histologically, mycosis fungoids (MF) usually show a superficial perivascular or band-like lymphocytic infiltrate with epidermotropism. We here report two cases of a rare histological variant of MF, called interstitial in the literature. Our first patient, a 71-year-old male, had a previously diagnosed MF, which clinically evolved towards nodules, showing histologically an interstitial lymphocytic infiltrate without epidermotropism and without large cell transformation. The second patient was a 64-year-old female with widespread plaques and nodules. Histologically, a dense dermal interstitial infiltrate was observed, with foci of epidermotropism, without large cell transformation. At relapse after treatment, she presented with plaques, papules and nodules, histologically showing a slight interstitial lymphocytic infiltrate that resembled granuloma annulare or inflammatory morphea. In both patients, clinical aspect suggested MF and a dominant T-cell clone was found in lesional skin. Nodules in MF are not always the hallmark of large cell transformation, but may correspond to unusual interstitial lesions. Diagnosis of such rare variant may be difficult and requires a good clinical pathological correlation together with the search for foci of epidermotropism on skin biopsy and for a dominant cutaneous T-cell clone. PMID:21349387

  12. Mycosis fungoides with a CD56+ immunophenotype.

    PubMed

    Wain, E Mary; Orchard, Guy E; Mayou, Susan; Atherton, David J; Misch, Klaus J; Russell-Jones, Robin

    2005-07-01

    We report 3 cases of mycosis fungoides (MF) with a CD56+ cytotoxic immunophenotype. Each patient presented with a different clinical phenotype: one exhibited limited poikilodermatous patches (skin stage T1); one, widespread hypopigmented lesions (skin stage T2); and one, poikiloderma with a single cutaneous tumor (skin stage T3). MF was confirmed both histologically and by the presence of a T-cell receptor clone in lesional skin in all cases. CD56 and T-cell intracellular antigen-1 were expressed by the malignant lymphocytes in all patients and two expressed CD8. No sample demonstrated loss of the pan T-cell markers CD2 or CD3. None of the 3 developed systemic disease and T-cell receptor gene analysis of peripheral blood was polyclonal in all cases. Only 3 cases of CD56+ MF have been reported previously, none of which exhibited tumor-stage disease. Currently, the disease in our patients appears to be behaving in a manner similar to that predicted for MF with a normal immunophenotype but the prognosis has to be guarded in view of the rarity of this subtype. PMID:15965442

  13. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Hassab-El-Naby, Hussein M M; El-Khalawany, Mohamed A

    2013-04-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) is uncommon clinical variant that was commonly observed in dark-skinned individuals. We described the clinical characteristics, pathological features, immunohistochemical profile and prognosis of HMF in Egyptian patients. During the period from January 2004 to December 2011, we were able to diagnose and follow up 27 patients with HMF. The study included 18 males (66.7%) and 9 females (33.3%) with a mean age of 35.39 ±13.13 years. The duration ranged from 1 to 6 years with a mean of 3.26 ±1.7 years. The majority of patients were skin type IV (63%) and presented with multiple (88.9%), asymptomatic (74.1%), ill-defined (70.4%) and non-scaly (77.8%) lesions distributed on the trunk (81.5%). Histologically, epidermotropic lymphocytes were observed in 100%, basal alignment of lymphocytes in 81.5%, Pautrier's microabscesses in 29% and folliculotropism in 18.5%. Immunostaining showed predominance of epidermal CD8+ cells in 51.9% while in 29.6% CD4+ cells were predominant. Phototherapy was effective in 86.7% of patients with success rate 66.7% of narrow band (NB) ultraviolet-B and 80% of psoralen ultraviolet-A. HMF among Egyptians could be classified as non-aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic CD8+ variant. It is common among middle age males with skin type IV and mostly well respond to phototherapy. PMID:23379648

  14. Mycosis fungoides progression and chronic solvent exposure.

    PubMed

    Nikkels, Arjen F; Quatresooz, Pascale; Delvenne, Philippe; Balsat, Alain; Piérard, Gérald E

    2004-01-01

    The effect of repeated exposure to specific chemicals on the initiation or progression of mycosis fungoides (MF) remains unsettled. A patient with low-grade patch stage MF progressively developed MF plaques restricted to his arms, and a tumour on his right thigh. These areas were subject to repeated exposure to solvents. His thigh was indeed in close contact with his trousers pocket where he used to store a wiping rag drenched into white spirit and cellulosic thinner. Immunophenotyping these lesions revealed a dense LCA+, CD2+, CD3+, CD4+, CD5+, CD7+, CD45+, CD45RO+ T-cell infiltrate admixed with many factor XIIIa+ dendrocytes. T-cell receptor rearrangement analysis identified a monoclonal T-cell infiltrate. An internal work-up remained negative. Stopping further solvent exposure failed to improve his condition. Oral corticotherapy combined with low-dose interferon-alpha2a halted disease progression. This observation suggests that long-term solvent exposure may trigger MF and hasten its progression from the patch stage to the plaque and tumour stages. PMID:15057012

  15. A rare presentation of erythrodermic mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam

    2012-05-01

    Although rare, of all the cutaneous lymphoid malignancies, cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) constitute 65% of all lymphomas, of which 50% are patients with mycosis fungoides (MF). The erythrodermic variant of MF, a malignancy of mature, skin homing, clonal T lymphocytes, usually presents in mid to late adulthood. We present a man in his late 30s with intractable progressive erythroderma of 18 months' duration, patchy alopecia, palmoplantar keratoderma, mucosal thickening, hyperpigmentation, and intense itching as a case of erythrodermic MF. There was no systemic involvement. Diagnosis was confirmed by biopsies from multiple sites and immunohistochemistry. He was categorized with stage IIIA MF according to the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas/European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (ISCL/EORTC) revised classification system. Psoralen plus UVA therapy and low-dose methotrexate resulted in clearance of lesions; regular follow-up visits were conducted to monitor progression to Sézary syndrome (SS). Progression to SS has to be monitored regularly in these patients. PMID:22768436

  16. Inflammatory vitiligo-like macules that simulate hypopigmented mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Petit, Thomas; Cribier, Bernard; Bagot, Martine; Wechsler, Janine

    2003-01-01

    Two cases of an inflammatory vitiligo-like condition that simulated mycosis fungoides are reported. Both patients presented acquired hypopigmented macules sharply limited by an erythematous and papular border. The clinical aspect was suggestive of inflammatory vitiligo. Mycosis fungoides was suspected on skin specimens showing a dense band-like lymphocytic infiltrate with discrete nuclear atypias and marked exocytosis. This infiltrate was made of CD3 positive lymphocytes. CD8 positive lymphocytes were numerous in one case, few in the other. There was a loss of melanocytes in the lesional skin and absence of dominant T-cell clones in both cases. No repigmentation was observed after PUVA or local chemotherapy. The authors emphasized that erythematous and papular borders surrounding hypopigmented macules, CD8 positive lymphocytic infiltrate, absence of T-cell clonal rearrangement are helpful to rule out mycosis fungoides. PMID:12948929

  17. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a review of its clinical features and pathophysiology*

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Fabricio Cecanho; Sanches, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Several distinct clinical forms of mycosis fungoides have been described. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides should be regarded as a subtype of mycosis fungoides, insofar as it presents some peculiar characteristics that contrast with the clinical features of the classical form. Most patients with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides are younger than patients typically diagnosed with classical mycosis fungoides. In addition to typical dark-skinned individuals impairment, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides has also been described in Asian patients. The prognosis for hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is much better than for classical mycosis fungoides: hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is diagnosed when there are only patches of affected skin, and lesions usually will not progress beyond terminal stages, although they can persist for many years. Diagnosis should involve clinicopathologic correlation: skin biopsy analysis often reveals intense epidermotropism, characterized by haloed, large, and atypical CD8+ lymphocytes with convoluted nuclei, in contrast to mild to moderate dermal lymphocytic infiltrate. These CD8+ cells, which participate in T helper 1-mediated immune responses, prevent evolution to mycosis fungoides plaques and tumors and could be considered the main cause of the inhibition of melanogenesis. Therefore, hypopigmentation could be considered a marker of good prognosis for mycosis fungoides. PMID:24474105

  18. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a review of its clinical features and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Fabricio Cecanho; Sanches, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Several distinct clinical forms of mycosis fungoides have been described. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides should be regarded as a subtype of mycosis fungoides, insofar as it presents some peculiar characteristics that contrast with the clinical features of the classical form. Most patients with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides are younger than patients typically diagnosed with classical mycosis fungoides. In addition to typical dark-skinned individuals impairment, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides has also been described in Asian patients. The prognosis for hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is much better than for classical mycosis fungoides: hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is diagnosed when there are only patches of affected skin, and lesions usually will not progress beyond terminal stages, although they can persist for many years. Diagnosis should involve clinicopathologic correlation: skin biopsy analysis often reveals intense epidermotropism, characterized by haloed, large, and atypical CD8+ lymphocytes with convoluted nuclei, in contrast to mild to moderate dermal lymphocytic infiltrate. These CD8+ cells, which participate in T helper 1-mediated immune responses, prevent evolution to mycosis fungoides plaques and tumors and could be considered the main cause of the inhibition of melanogenesis. Therefore, hypopigmentation could be considered a marker of good prognosis for mycosis fungoides. PMID:24474105

  19. Juvenile mycosis fungoides diagnosed before 18 years of age.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amitai, Dan; Michael, David; Feinmesser, Meora; Hodak, Emmilia

    2003-01-01

    The literature regarding mycosis fungoides in children is sparse. To shed further light on the characteristics of mycosis fungoides in the paediatric population we analysed the clinicopathological features of 10 patients in whom this malignancy was diagnosed before the age of 18 years. All were Jews and Arabs with histologically proven patch/early plaque stage disease: 4 in stage IA, 4 in IB and 2 with unilesional disease. Seven patients had hypopigmented lesions either constituting the sole manifestation (2 patients) or in combination with classic lesions (5 patients); of these, 3 had light skin and 4 pigmented skin. Most patients had immunohistochemical features characteristic of mycosis fungoides, with a predominance of CD4+ T cells. Some had deletion of CD7+ cells. In 3 patients, however, the epidermotropic cells were exclusively or predominantly CD8+ cells. All patients responded to conventional therapy and during an average follow-up of 3.4 years only one patient showed stage progression, but without extracutaneous involvement. It is concluded that juvenile mycosis fungoides is characterized by early stage disease, occasionally with unilesional disease, usually with hypopigmented lesions irrespective of skin colour, and a good response to therapy. On the basis of our experience and review of the literature, it appears that the CD8+ phenotype is over-represented in juvenile disease. PMID:14690342

  20. Decreased CD117 expression in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides correlates with hypomelanosis: lessons learned from vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Singh, Zeba N; Tretiakova, Maria S; Shea, Christopher R; Petronic-Rosic, Vesna M

    2006-09-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides is an uncommon clinical variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. We hypothesized that hypomelanosis in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides may have a similar mechanism as in vitiligo, a condition in which it is believed that alterations in expression of CD117 (stem cell factor receptor/KIT protein) on epidermal melanocytes and abnormal interactions between melanocytes and surrounding keratinocytes may play a pathogenic role. To test the hypothesis that similar mechanisms might also explain hypopigmentation in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides, skin specimens from five cases each of hypopigmented mycosis fungoides and vitiligo were studied immunohistochemically for immunophenotype of the infiltrating cells, CD117 (expressed by epidermal melanocytes), and pan melanoma cocktail of antigens (gp100, tyrosinase, and MART-1) expression; cases of conventional mycosis fungoides and normal skin were studied in parallel as controls. Our findings confirm a predominance of CD8+ neoplastic T cells in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides. Similarly, the epidermal lymphocytic infiltrate in vitiligo was also composed of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, in contrast to an epidermal infiltrate composed of CD4+ T cells in conventional mycosis fungoides. The average number of epidermal CD117 expressing cells followed the same pattern of decreased expression in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides as in vitiligo, whereas the levels in conventional mycosis fungoides were higher, and similar to that observed in normal skin. Furthermore, a decreased number of melanocytes per high-power field of the length of the biopsy was present in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides and vitiligo, as compared with either conventional mycosis fungoides or normal skin, suggesting a correlation between decreased expression of CD117 and decreased number of melanocytes. We propose that decreased expression of CD117 and its downstream events in melanocytes may be initiated by cytotoxic effects of melanosomal

  1. Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical review and update*

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Thamy; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the diagnostic and classificatory concepts of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome in light of the latest normative publications. It describes the great variability of the clinical expression of mycosis fungoides in its early stages as well as the histopathological and immunohistochemical aspects that help with diagnosis. The diagnostic criteria required for characterizing Sézary syndrome and the staging system used for both mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome are described. PMID:23197199

  2. Folliculotropic Mycosis Fungoides in an Adolescent: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Meeta Dipak; Khadke, Mona P; Ameet, Dandale L; Rachita, Dhurat S

    2016-01-01

    Folliculotropic mycosis fungoides (FMF) is an uncommon and aggressive form of mycoses fungoides with preferential involvement of head and neck region. Lesions of FMF present as erythematous plaques or papules with follicular prominences, acneiform lesions, cysts, nodules, patches of scarring alopecia, and prurigo-like lesions. The mean age of diagnosis is at 60 years and it is extremely rare in childhood and adolescence. We report a case of a 16-year-old male patient who presented with a 2-month history of an asymptomatic erythematous infiltrated plaque over the forehead. Histological examination was consistent with diagnosis of FMF. He was successfully treated with local electron beam therapy. PMID:27512205

  3. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in a 10-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Manzur, A; Zaidi, S T H

    2006-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) presenting with hypopigmented lesions is an uncommon clinical variant of the disease, usually described in dark-skinned patients. We report a case of hypopigmented CTCL in a 10-year-old boy. The disease has responded favorably to narrowband UVB therapy. This case illustrates the importance of clinical suspicion for mycosis fungoides in patients with widespread hypopigmentation. PMID:17083901

  4. Hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia in mycosis fungoides: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Matt; Maloney, Denise; Duvic, Madeleine

    2002-06-01

    The most common variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) is mycosis fungoides (MF), a malignant proliferation of atypical CD4+ CD45Ro+ T-cells that initially proliferate in the skin and later invades lymph nodes and other organs including the blood (Sezary syndrome). The pathogenesis of CTCL is largely unknown. We present definitive data showing a correlation between degree and prevalence of hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia and clinical stage of MF. Hypomagnesemia was present in 22.2% of MF patients with early stage (n = 27), 38.5% of intermediate stage (n = 13), and 67.5% of advanced stage disease (n = 40). Hypocalcemia was present in 8.3% of MF patients with early stage (n = 24), 54.5% with intermediate stage (n = 11), and 61.0% with advanced stage disease (n = 41). The odds ratios for having hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia in patients with stage II or higher MF compared with stage I patients were 5.33 and 16.24, respectively. Hypomagnesemia has been associated with immune function abnormalities including the development of T-cell leukemia-lymphoma in rats. We hypothesize that the hypomagnesemia may play a role in the progression or pathogenesis of MF or the Sezary syndrome (SS). This retrospective case series is the first study ever to report a relationship between serum cations and CTCL in humans. PMID:12152999

  5. How I treat mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Sean; Hoppe, Richard; Prince, H Miles

    2016-06-23

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma variant and is closely related to a rare leukemic variant, Sézary syndrome (SS). MF patients at risk of disease progression can now be identified and an international consortium has been established to address the prognostic relevance of specific biologic factors and define a prognostic index. There are a lack of randomized clinical trial data in MF/SS and evidence is based on a traditional "stage-based" approach; treatment of early-stage disease (IA-IIA) involves skin directed therapies which include topical corticosteroids, phototherapy (psoralen with UVA or UVB), topical chemotherapy, topical bexarotene, and radiotherapy including total skin electron beam therapy. Systemic approaches are used for refractory early-stage and advanced-stage disease (IIB-IV) and include bexarotene, interferon α, extracorporeal photopheresis, histone deacetylase inhibitors, and antibody therapies such as alemtuzumab, systemic chemotherapy, and allogeneic transplantation. However, despite the number of biologic agents available, the treatment of advanced-stage disease still represents an unmet medical need with short duration of responses. Encouragingly, randomized phase 3 trials are assessing novel agents, including brentuximab vedotin and the anti-CCR4 antibody, mogamulizumab. A broader understanding of the biology of MF/SS will hopefully identify more effective targeted therapies. PMID:27151889

  6. Selected inflammatory imitators of mycosis fungoides: histologic features and utility of ancillary studies.

    PubMed

    Arps, David P; Chen, Stephanie; Fullen, Douglas R; Hristov, Alexandra C

    2014-10-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common primary cutaneous lymphoma; however, it remains a significant diagnostic challenge, in part because of the overlap with several inflammatory dermatoses. Despite advances in immunohistochemistry and molecular diagnostics, false-positive, false-negative, and indeterminate diagnoses are not uncommon. In most cases, the overall balance of morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features must be considered carefully because there are few sensitive and specific clues to the diagnosis. Moreover, an appropriate clinical presentation is essential to the diagnosis and helps to favor or exclude inflammatory/reactive processes. Herein, we discuss 3 important inflammatory dermatoses that may closely simulate mycosis fungoides, and we review the use of ancillary studies in these challenging cases. PMID:25268195

  7. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a clinical mimicker of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Tolkachjov, Stanislav N; Comfere, Nneka I

    2015-02-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) is a rare variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) that often manifests in younger patients with darker skin types in a centripetal distribution.(1) Average age of diagnosis is often 14 years.(2) The diagnosis is often missed due to its low incidence and lack of clinical suspicion. Misdiagnosis and failure to obtain biopsies lead to a long latency period from onset of hypopigmented patches to diagnosis and treatment. HMF has a clinically benign course and responds well to therapy; however, relapse is common.(3) We report a case of HMF misdiagnosed as vitiligo in order to illuminate diagnostic, histopathological, and treatment modalities. PMID:25689815

  8. Co-existence of various clinical and histopathological features of mycosis fungoides in a young female.

    PubMed

    Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Soghrati, Mehrnaz; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Najafian, Jamshid; Rajabi, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and a rare disorder that typically affects older adults with erythematous scaling patches and plaques. Hypopigmented patches are a rare clinical variant of the disease. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides (GMF) is also a rare type of CTCL. No particular clinical criteria are available for the diagnosis of GMF, because of its variable presentations, and so the detection of GMF is primarily considered as a histopathological diagnosis. Rarely, a co-existence of more than one clinical or histopathological feature of mycosis fungoides may be present. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of MF that shows the simultaneous co-existence of more than one clinical and histopathological variant of MF. We present a 29-year-old female with clinical presentations of both classic and hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF), and also the histopathological features of the classic and granulomatous types of the disease. PMID:25814741

  9. Co-Existence of Various Clinical and Histopathological Features of Mycosis Fungoides in a Young Female

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Soghrati, Mehrnaz; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Najafian, Jamshid; Rajabi, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and a rare disorder that typically affects older adults with erythematous scaling patches and plaques. Hypopigmented patches are a rare clinical variant of the disease. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides (GMF) is also a rare type of CTCL. No particular clinical criteria are available for the diagnosis of GMF, because of its variable presentations, and so the detection of GMF is primarily considered as a histopathological diagnosis. Rarely, a co-existence of more than one clinical or histopathological feature of mycosis fungoides may be present. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of MF that shows the simultaneous co-existence of more than one clinical and histopathological variant of MF. We present a 29-year-old female with clinical presentations of both classic and hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF), and also the histopathological features of the classic and granulomatous types of the disease. PMID:25814741

  10. Granulomatous Mycosis Fungoides in an Adolescent-A Rare Encounter and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Iris; Wohlmuth, Christoph; Duvic, Madeleine

    2016-09-01

    Granulomatous mycosis fungoides (GMF) is a rare form of mycosis fungoides (MF) characterized by an infiltrate of atypical lymphocytes, histiocytes, and multinucleated giant cells. Clinically, GMF has a slowly progressing course with a worse prognosis than other forms of MF. With its peak incidence being in the fifth to sixth decade, GMF is rare in children and adolescents. Herein we describe a 14-year-old boy with GMF. PMID:27595880

  11. Early-stage mycosis fungoides variants: case-based review.

    PubMed

    Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee; Tschen, Jaime A; Duvic, Madeleine; Vega, Francisco

    2010-10-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The diagnosis of classic MF is based on a combination of clinical presentation, histopathology, and T-cell monoclonality detected by molecular studies. However, the diagnosis can be difficult in cases of early MF because of the subtle nature of histologic findings and, in cases of variants of MF, because of the unusual clinical and/or pathologic features. In this review, we presented the most frequent variants of MF at early stage including hypopigmented, folliculotropic, pagetoid reticulosis, unilesional, granulomatous, and ichthyosis forms. This case-based clinicopathologic review provides the notion that a comprehensive clinicopathologic correlation is of substantial importance to render the diagnosis of MF. In addition, we discuss the role of molecular studies, which are highly sensitive and recently more applicable to routinely processed skin biopsy specimens in the diagnosis of MF. PMID:20850703

  12. Childhood hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a commonly delayed diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gameiro, Ana; Gouveia, Miguel; Tellechea, Óscar; Moreno, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCLs) are exceedingly rare in children and adolescents, with mycosis fungoides (MF) being the most frequent PCL diagnosed in childhood. There are numerous unusual clinical variants of MF, including the hypopigmented type form (HMF). HMF is exceptional overall, but comparatively common among children. We present an 8-year-old boy with a 3-year history of progressive, generalised, scaly, hypopigmented round patches and few erythematous papules. He was first diagnosed with pityriasis alba (PA), and moisturisers were prescribed with no improvement. Skin biopsy showed typical features of MF, and the patient was successfully treated with narrowband ultraviolet B. HMF may simulate atopic dermatitis, PA, pityriasis lichenoides, tinea versicolour, vitiligo, postinflammatory hypopigmentation or leprosy. Therefore, persistent and unusual hypopigmented lesions should be biopsied to rule out this rare variant of MF. PMID:25538219

  13. Annular hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a novel ringed variant.

    PubMed

    Uhlenhake, Elizabeth E; Mehregan, Darius M

    2012-05-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) is a relatively uncommon variant of cutaneous lymphoma that is mostly seen in darker skin types. We present a novel and unique clinical presentation in an African-American female patient, consisting of regular hypopigmented annular rings in areas of normal skin and in more typical hypopigmented patches of MF. The lesions appeared diffusely on all extremities, anterior chest and back. Histopathologic examination showed an atypical lymphocytic infiltrate at the dermal-epidermal junction with epidermotropism and few Pautrier's collections. The patient was otherwise healthy and improved with narrowband ultraviolet (UV)-B. This case represents a presentation of a most unusual variant of hypopigmented MF, for which we propose the name 'annular hypopigmented MF'. PMID:22515225

  14. Delay in the histopathologic diagnosis of mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Skov, Anne G; Gniadecki, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The diagnosis of mycosis fungoides (MF) is difficult in early stages and is based on a combination of clinical findings and histopathologic criteria. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic delay in MF and to investigate the rationale for multiple biopsies in a single-centre, retrospective study of 157 patients with MF. The first biopsy was diagnostic for MF in 25% of cases. The median diagnostic delay was 2.3 years and depended on whether the diagnosis was established after one or multiple biopsies. The chance of a biopsy resulting in a diagnosis of MF was 25% irrespective of the number of the biopsy in the sequence. There was a significant diagnostic delay, especially in patients in whom the initial biopsy was not specific. Sampling error and unnecessary postponement of subsequent biopsies are likely factors and therefore multiple biopsies should be considered in patients with skin lesions suggesting MF. PMID:25228392

  15. The Three Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Hyperkeratotic Plantar Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Young; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Cho, Yong-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Hwa; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2011-01-01

    The localized early-stage of Mycosis fungoides (MF) (stage IA-IIA) is usually treated with topical agents, such as nitrogen mustard, steroids, and phototherapy (UVB/PUVA) as first line therapy; response to these initial treatments is usually good. However, hyperkeratotic plantar lesions are clinically rare and have decreased responsiveness to topical agents. For such cases, physicians may consider local radiotherapy. Here, a case of an 18-year-old Korean woman who was treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for hyperkeratotic plantar lesions that were refractory to UVA-1, methotrexate, and topical steroids is reported. Complete remission was attained after radiotherapy. During the one-year follow-up period, there has been no evidence of disease recurrence and no chronic complications have been observed. PMID:22028574

  16. SGN-35 in CD30-positive Lymphoproliferative Disorders (ALCL), Mycosis Fungoides (MF), and Extensive Lymphomatoid Papulosis (LyP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    CD-30 Positive Anaplastic Large T-cell Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell; Lymphomatoid Papulosis; Mycosis Fungoides; Skin Lymphoma; Cutaneous Lymphomas; Lymphoma; Hematologic Disorder

  17. Evaluation of cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with mycosis fungoides*

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mycosis fungoides, the most common subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, is more common in patients aged 45-55. OBJECTIVE Cardiovascular risk factors have been investigated in several skin diseases. However, the relation between cardiovascular diseases and mycosis fungoides remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess cardiovascular risk factors in patients with mycosis fungoides. METHODS 32 patients with mycosis fungoides and 26 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, homocystein, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein – cholesterol, were measured in the sera of patients. RESULTS Patients had significantly higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, low-density lipoprotein - cholesterol, total cholesterol (p= 0.032) (p< 0.001) (p= 0.001) (p< 0.001). There was a positive correlation between the levels of homo-cysteine and total cholesterol (p= 0.001, r = +0.431). Additionally, a significantly positive correlation was found between the levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and low-density lipoprotein - cholesterol (p= 0.014, r = +0.320) in patient group. CONCLUSIONS Patients with mycosis fungoides had significantly higher levels of total-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein -cholesterol, homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein than healthy subjects. The present study has demonstrated an increased rate of cardiovascular risk in patients with mycosis fungoides. Even though the etiology of these associations is elusive, dermatologists should be sensitized to investigate metabolic derangements in patients with mycosis fungoides, in order to lessen mortality and comorbidity with a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:25672297

  18. Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: Current challenges in assessment, management and prognostic markers.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Charlotte Fm; Newland, Kate; McCormack, Christopher; Lade, Stephen; Prince, H Miles

    2016-08-01

    Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome are the most common variants of the cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Assessment of a patient with a suspected diagnosis requires thorough history taking and physical examination, in combination with skin biopsy. In some cases flow cytometry, molecular studies and imaging are also required in order to diagnose and stage the disease. Staging is derived from the tumour-node-metastasis-blood classification and is currently our best attempt to stratify prognosis and hence guide management in this complex disease. Many other clinical, biological and pathological factors may help to distinguish groups at risk and predict prognosis more accurately. Management remains heavily guided by staging, such that patients with early-stage disease generally begin treatment with skin-directed or local therapies and those with advanced-stage disease have many treatment options, including chemotherapy, the use of biological agents, local and total body radiotherapy, as well as haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Besides staging, many other patient-related factors influence the treatment strategy, particularly where symptom relief is paramount. There are many challenges remaining in the study of Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome and, given the rarity of the disease, concerted worldwide efforts are required to conduct efficient and effective research. PMID:25988337

  19. Indications of a considerable decrease in the death rate in mycosis fungoides by PUVA treatment.

    PubMed

    Swanbeck, G; Roupe, G; Sandström, M H

    1994-11-01

    PUVA therapy has its roots in ancient India and Egypt and began to come into general use in the highly developed countries in the middle of the 1970's (1). The first reports of PUVA treatment of mycosis fungoides were published in 1976 (2); these were followed by several other studies in the two following years (3-7). Some of the early work on PUVA therapy was carried out in Sweden (8,9), and the modality was in general use in most major clinics by 1977. The dramatic effect on mycosis fungoides of PUVA therapy is well known, but whether the death rate is influenced is not known. For ethical reasons no controlled clinical studies have been performed. Sweden is a highly organized country with reliable death statistics at least for diseases as conspicuous as mycosis fungoides. The purpose of the present study was to provide data on the death rate in mycosis fungoides in Sweden from 1961 to 1990, which we think is relevant to the question whether PUVA treatment decreases the death rate in mycosis fungoides. PMID:7701883

  20. Folliculotropic mycosis fungoides with large-cell transformation presenting as dissecting cellulitis of the scalp.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, A C; Lessin, S R; Wilson, D M; Salhany, K E

    1997-03-01

    Follicular mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) in which malignant lymphocytes preferentially infiltrate hair follicles. This report describes a patient with follicular mycosis fungoides presenting in a manner similar to dissecting cellulitis of the scalp with nonhealing, draining nodular lesions. Follicular mucinosis associated with folliculotropic mycosis fungoides resulted in follicular disruption and deep dissecting cellulitis. Large-cell transformation of CTCL was present in the initial diagnostic scalp and axillary lymph node specimens. The patient died from progressive CTCL 9 months following initial diagnosis despite electron beam radiation, topical mechlorethamine, interferon-alpha, and systemic chemotherapy. This case indicates that large-cell transformation of folliculotropic mycosis fungoides is an aggressive form of CTCL, and that folliculotropic mycosis fungoides can give rise to lesions which resemble dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on follicular epithelium adjacent to lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-positive folliculotropic lymphoma cells in this report provides insight into lymphocyte homing mechanisms in folliculotropic MF. PMID:9085153

  1. Mycosis fungoides in Iranian population: an epidemiological and clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Fatemi Naeini, Farahnaz; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Sadeghiyan, Hamidreza; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Najafian, Jamshid; Pourazizi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Extensive studies on Iranian MF patients are absent. The present study aimed to produce updated clinical information on Iranian MF patients. Methods. This was a retrospective, descriptive, single-center study, including all cases of MF seen in the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Isfahan, Iran, between 2003 and 2013. Data systematically recorded for each patient included clinical, biological, histological, and molecular findings. Results. Eighty-six patients with clinical and histologic diagnosis of MF were included in the study. Thirty-nine patients (45.3%) were male. Female predominance was observed in patients (male : female ratio is 1 : 1.2). Patients were between 7 and 84 years of age (median: 41). The interval from disease onset to diagnosis ranged from 0 to 55 years (median: 1 year). Eighteen cases (20.9%) had unusual variants of MF. The most common types included hypopigmented and poikilodermatous MF. Childhood cases of MF constituted 5.8% (5/86) of all patients. The early stages were seen in 82 cases (95.34%). Conclusion. The major differences in epidemiologic characteristics of MF in Iran are the lack of male predominance and the lower age of patients at the time of diagnosis. PMID:25694829

  2. Profile and outcome of childhood mycosis fungoides in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, E; Tay, Y K; Giam, Y C

    2000-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. It usually occurs in middle-aged and elderly persons, although several reports have described its occurrence in young children. The aim of this study was to review the profile and outcome of childhood MF in Singapore from 1989 to 1998. A total of nine patients (six males and three females) were diagnosed with MF before the age of 21 years. There were four Chinese, four Malay, and one Indian. The age at the time of histologic diagnosis ranged from 6 to 20 years (mean 14.3 years). Eight of the nine patients presented with hypopigmented patches and plaques. According to TNM staging, three were in stage 1A and six in stage 1B. The treatment modalities included psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) (n = 5), UVB (n = 2), and potent topical steroids (n = 2). We found that PUVA induced a faster clinical remission, but maintenance PUVA was required to prolong the relapse-free interval. This study also highlighted the need to consider MF in the differential diagnosis of hypopigmented dermatoses in dark-skinned individuals, especially if they occur on the buttocks. PMID:11085660

  3. Mycosis Fungoides in Iranian Population: An Epidemiological and Clinicopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi Naeini, Farahnaz; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Sadeghiyan, Hamidreza; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Najafian, Jamshid; Pourazizi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Extensive studies on Iranian MF patients are absent. The present study aimed to produce updated clinical information on Iranian MF patients. Methods. This was a retrospective, descriptive, single-center study, including all cases of MF seen in the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Isfahan, Iran, between 2003 and 2013. Data systematically recorded for each patient included clinical, biological, histological, and molecular findings. Results. Eighty-six patients with clinical and histologic diagnosis of MF were included in the study. Thirty-nine patients (45.3%) were male. Female predominance was observed in patients (male : female ratio is 1 : 1.2). Patients were between 7 and 84 years of age (median: 41). The interval from disease onset to diagnosis ranged from 0 to 55 years (median: 1 year). Eighteen cases (20.9%) had unusual variants of MF. The most common types included hypopigmented and poikilodermatous MF. Childhood cases of MF constituted 5.8% (5/86) of all patients. The early stages were seen in 82 cases (95.34%). Conclusion. The major differences in epidemiologic characteristics of MF in Iran are the lack of male predominance and the lower age of patients at the time of diagnosis. PMID:25694829

  4. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, M J; Lazarus, H M; Carreras, J; Laport, G G; Cutler, C S; Wiernik, P H; Hale, G A; Maharaj, D; Gale, R P; Rowlings, P A; Freytes, C O; Miller, A M; Vose, J M; Maziarz, R T; Montoto, S; Maloney, D G; Hari, P N

    2014-11-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant from 2000-2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4-206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/ refractory disease. The majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared with myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs 44 years, P=0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95% confidence interval (CI) 12-27%) and 22% (95% CI 15-31%), respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41-60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50-71%) at 5 years. PFS at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22-40%) and 17% (95% CI 9-26%), respectively. OS at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45-63%) and 32% (95% CI 22-44%), respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5-year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  5. ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES AND SEZARY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Carreras, Jeanette; Laport, Ginna G.; Cutler, Corey S.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Hale, Gregory A.; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Gale, Robert Peter; Rowlings, Phillip A.; Freytes, César O; Miller, Alan M.; Vose, Julie M.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Montoto, Silvia; Maloney, David G.; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2014-01-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant (CIBMTR) from 2000–2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4–206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/refractory disease. Majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared to myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs. 44 y p= 0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95 % CI 12–27%) and 22% (95 % CI 15–31%) respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41–60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50–71%) at 5 years. Progression free survival (PFS) at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22–40%) and 17% (95% CI 9–26%) respectively. Overall survival at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45–63%) and 32% (95% CI 22–44%) respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5 year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half of them remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  6. TOX Acts an Oncological Role in Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Luo, Yixin; Liu, Jie; Liu, Yuehua; Sun, Qiuning

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a low-grade lymphoma characterized by clonal expansion of atypical CD4+ skin-homing T lymphocytes. Herein, we examined the role of thymocytes selection associated HMG-box (TOX), a gene previously found to be unregulated in MF skin biopsies, in MF pathogenesis. TOX encodes a high-mobility group family (HMG) domain DNA binding nuclear protein, which regulates the differentiation of developing T-cells. First, we confirmed that TOX expression levels in MF were increased compared with those in benign inflammatory dermatitis (BID) and normal skin. In addition, TOX level increased with the progression MF from patch stage to tumor stage. Overexpression of TOX accelerated the proliferation and migration of MF cell lines in vitro, which were blocked by AKT inhibitors. In conclusion, our study confirmed that TOX was highly expressed in MF lesions and accelerates the proliferation and migration of MF. TOX is a diagnostic marker for MF and may play a pathogenic role in disease progression. PMID:25811617

  7. Whole-genome sequencing reveals oncogenic mutations in mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    McGirt, Laura Y.; Jia, Peilin; Baerenwald, Devin A.; Duszynski, Robert J.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Zic, John A.; Zwerner, Jeffrey P.; Hucks, Donald; Dave, Utpal; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), is unknown. Although genetic alterations have been identified, none are considered consistently causative in MF. To identify potential drivers of MF, we performed whole-genome sequencing of MF tumors and matched normal skin. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing of MF samples and exome sequencing of CTCL cell lines were also performed. Multiple mutations were identified that affected the same pathways, including epigenetic, cell-fate regulation, and cytokine signaling, in MF tumors and CTCL cell lines. Specifically, interleukin-2 signaling pathway mutations, including activating Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) mutations, were detected. Treatment with a JAK3 inhibitor significantly reduced CTCL cell survival. Additionally, the mutation data identified 2 other potential contributing factors to MF, ultraviolet light, and a polymorphism in the tumor suppressor p53 (TP53). Therefore, genetic alterations in specific pathways in MF were identified that may be viable, effective new targets for treatment. PMID:26082451

  8. Bullous pemphigoid. Occurrence in a patient with mycosis fungoides receiving PUVA and topical nitrogen mustard therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.W.; Ali, M.; Murray, J.C.; Hazra, T.A.

    1985-04-01

    A 57-year-old woman with mycosis fungoides developed blisters within cutaneous plaques while receiving PUVA therapy and topical nitrogen mustard. Direct and indirect immunofluorescence studies showed the findings of bullous pemphigoid. Her bullous disease was controlled after cessation of these therapies and institution of prednisone and methotrexate. During the 5 months following completion of a course of electron-beam therapy, she has been free of the cutaneous manifestations of both diseases. Previous instances of PUVA-related pemphigoid have occurred in psoriatics. The role of ultraviolet light in the induction of pemphigoid is discussed, particularly with regard to its possible interaction with the altered skin of psoriasis or mycosis fungoides. Some of the rare cases of bullous mycosis fungoides might actually have represented ultraviolet-unmasked bullous pemphigoid.

  9. Pediatric mycosis fungoides in Singapore: a series of 46 children.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yee Kiat; Koh, Mark Jean Aan; Giam, Yoke Chin; Tang, Mark Boon Yang; Chong, Wei Sheng; Tan, Suat Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated Asian children with mycosis fungoides (MF). We report a series of patients from a tertiary dermatologic institution in Singapore. A retrospective review was performed of patients younger than 16 years old diagnosed with MF between 2000 and 2008 at the National Skin Centre, Singapore. Forty-six patients were identified. At initial presentation, a provisional diagnosis of MF was made in 19 patients (41.3%), pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC) in 11 (23.9%) and postinflammatory hypopigmentation due to eczema or other causes in 11 (23.9%). After skin biopsy, the hypopigmented variant of MF was diagnosed in 42 patients (91.3%). There was one case each of PLC-like MF, pigmented purpuric dermatosis-like MF, classic MF, and solitary MF. Pityriasis lichenoides coexisted in three cases (6.5%). All except one patient presented with the early patch-plaque stage of disease (stage IA/B). The disease did not progress in any of our patients after a mean follow-up of 71.0 ± 52.5 months. Twenty-seven patients (58.7%) had complete disease clearance after a mean duration of 27.1 ± 28.1 months; 15 (49.7%) of 32 patients who received narrowband ultraviolet B treatment had complete clearance within an average of 8.9 ± 5.3 months, but 7 patients relapsed within 14.9 ± 14.8 months. One patient with solitary MF failed multiple treatment modalities before eventually achieving disease clearance with photodynamic therapy. Hypopigmented MF is the most common MF variant in Asian children. The diagnostic difficulty is in differentiating this from PLC, which may coexist with MF. Long-term prognosis is generally favorable. PMID:24890628

  10. Follicular mycosis fungoides – A report of four Indian cases

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, T.; Inchara, Y. K.; Antony, Meryl

    2009-01-01

    Background: Follicular Mycosis Fungoides (FMF) is an under-recognized disease in India. Its clinical mimics include Hansen’s disease and Sarcoidosis. Aims: To describe the clinical and pathological features of FMF. Materials and Methods: All cases of FMF between January and December 2007 were retrieved. Cases of conventional epidermotropic MF with a minor follicular component were excluded. Slides were reviewed by two observers. The following criteria were assessed: degree and density of folliculotropism of lymphocytes, location of folliculotropism (infundibular / isthmic / bulbar), follicular mucin, eosinophils, granulomas, and conventional epidermotropism. Each feature was assigned a semi-quantitative grade. Results: There were four cases of FMF, with an equal gender distribution and a mean age of 17.5 years. All lesions were on the face. They presented as: hypopigmented patches (2) and erythematous plaques (2). Alopecia was seen in two cases. The clinical diagnosis was Hansen’s disease in all four, with a differential of Alopecia mucinosa / Sarcoidosis in two cases.The histological features seen were: disproportionate folliculotropism, lymphocyte tagging with haloes, follicular mucin, and nucleomegaly / convolution in all four cases, prominent eosinophils (2), epithelioid granulomas (1), eccrine infiltration (4), parakeratosis at the follicular ostia (2), and sebaceotropism (1). The infiltrate was bulbar (4) and isthmic (2). The rest of the epidermis showed no hint of conventional MF. Conclusion: The preferential features for FMF were involvement of face, dominant folliculotropism, nuclear atypia and convolution, and follicular mucin. Presence of granulomas and eosinophils necessitated exclusion of infectious causes. The absence of findings of MF in the rest of the epidermis should not deter pathologists from rendering this diagnosis. PMID:20838548

  11. Treatment of pruritus in early-stage hypopigmented mycosis fungoides with aprepitant.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Gallo, David; Albarrán Planelles, Cristina; Linares Barrios, Mario; Fernández Anguita, María José; Márquez Enríquez, Juan; Rodríguez Mateos, María Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Pruritus is a symptom that significantly affects the patient's quality of life in cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). The most effective treatments are those that address the condition itself; however, it is often not possible to control this symptom. Lymphoma-related pruritus normally becomes more severe as CTCL progresses, constituting an important factor for quality of life in these patients. Substance P is a neuromodulator which appears to play a key role in pruritus. Aprepitant is a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist affecting the substance P receptor. So far, several cases have been documented with an antipruritic response to the drug aprepitant in advanced-stage mycosis fungoides (MF). In this paper, we describe an excellent response to aprepitant in a female patient with severe pruritus secondary to hypopigmented stage I MF. We would also like to stress the absence of nausea and vomiting of this combined therapy of interferon and aprepitant. Aprepitant could improve tolerance to interferon. PMID:24517320

  12. The utility of bexarotene in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Manisha R; Scarisbrick, Julia J

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is an umbrella term that encompasses a group of neoplasms that have atypical T-lymphocytes in the skin. Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common type of CTCL and Sézary syndrome (SS) is the leukemic form. Treatment for CTCL is dependent on the stage of disease and response to previous therapy. Therapy is divided into skin-directed treatment, which tends to be first line for early-stage disease, and systemic therapy, which is reserved for refractory CTCL. Bexarotene is a rexinoid and was licensed in Europe in 2002 for use in patients with advanced disease that have been refractory to a previous systemic treatment. We review the use of bexarotene as monotherapy and in combination with other treatments. PMID:25678803

  13. Retrospective 5-year review of 131 patients with mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome seen at the National Skin Centre, Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eugene Sern Ting; Tang, Mark Boon Yang; Tan, Suat Hoon

    2006-11-01

    A total of 131 new cases of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome were diagnosed clinically and histopathologically at our centre over a 5-year period. There were 87 males and 44 females with a mean age of 36.3 years (range 3-87 years) and no racial predilection. Of the 62 patients (47.3%) with classical mycosis fungoides, the majority were male (male : female = 4.2:1). There was one patient with Sézary syndrome. Patients aged older than 50 years were more likely to present with a longer duration of symptoms and advanced disease. In contrast to classical mycosis fungoides, the 47 patients diagnosed with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides had early stage disease, were younger, and no gender predilection was noted. The mean duration of follow up was 19.7 months (range 0.2-54.8 months). Complete remission was achieved in 24.7% and 53.8% of patients followed up at 1 and 3 years, respectively, using skin-directed and systemic treatment modalities appropriate for the stage of disease. There were five patients with progressive disease and three patients with advanced disease who died from disease-related complications. The most significant prognostic factors for 1-year and 3-year outcomes were the patient's duration of symptoms and stage of disease at presentation. PMID:17034466

  14. Case-control study of possible causative factors in mycosis fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Tuyp, E.; Burgoyne, A.; Aitchison, T.; MacKie, R.

    1987-02-01

    A detailed case control study was carried out on 53 patients (33 males and 20 females) with histologically proven mycosis fungoides and on an age- and sex-matched control population. Possible causative factors investigated included occupation, recreation, and exposure to petrochemicals, pesticides, insecticides, and potential carcinogens. Exposure to plants of the Compositae family, tanning history, and chronic sun exposure were also investigated, as were smoking history, drug ingestion history, and other skin disease. Personal and family histories of other malignancies were also investigated. The only statistically significant difference to emerge was that the patients with mycosis fungoides had significantly more family history of atopic dermatitis. In view of the absence of any significant difference between patients and controls with regard to personal history of atopic dermatitis, this difference may be the result of multiple statistical testing rather than a phenomenon of true biological significance.

  15. [Treatment of mycosis fungoides with Zovirax (acyclovir). Study of 2 patients].

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Thiele, B; Steigleder, G K

    1985-04-01

    We report on two female patients suffering from mycosis fungoides, tumorous type but without systemic involvement, who have been treated with 400 mg Zovirax (Acyclovir) 3 times daily (about 15 mg/kg/day) for 12 days. The follow-up period amounted to 11 and 14 days, respectively. This therapy did not result in regression of the disease; one patient even showed progression of her skin tumors. PMID:4002770

  16. Cutaneous Lymphoma International Consortium Study of Outcome in Advanced Stages of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: Effect of Specific Prognostic Markers on Survival and Development of a Prognostic Model

    PubMed Central

    Scarisbrick, Julia J.; Prince, H. Miles; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Quaglino, Pietro; Horwitz, Steven; Porcu, Pierluigi; Stadler, Rudolf; Wood, Gary S.; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Pham-Ledard, Anne; Foss, Francine; Girardi, Michael; Bagot, Martine; Michel, Laurence; Battistella, Maxime; Guitart, Joan; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Martinez-Escala, Maria Estela; Estrach, Teresa; Papadavid, Evangelia; Antoniou, Christina; Rigopoulos, Dimitis; Nikolaou, Vassilki; Sugaya, Makoto; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Gniadecki, Robert; Sanches, José Antonio; Cury-Martins, Jade; Miyashiro, Denis; Servitje, Octavio; Muniesa, Cristina; Berti, Emilio; Onida, Francesco; Corti, Laura; Hodak, Emilia; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Rodríguez-Peralto, Jose L.; Knobler, Robert; Porkert, Stefanie; Bauer, Wolfgang; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Grandi, Vieri; Cowan, Richard; Rook, Alain; Kim, Ellen; Pileri, Alessandro; Patrizi, Annalisa; Pujol, Ramon M.; Wong, Henry; Tyler, Kelly; Stranzenbach, Rene; Querfeld, Christiane; Fava, Paolo; Maule, Milena; Willemze, Rein; Evison, Felicity; Morris, Stephen; Twigger, Robert; Talpur, Rakhshandra; Kim, Jinah; Ognibene, Grant; Li, Shufeng; Tavallaee, Mahkam; Hoppe, Richard T.; Duvic, Madeleine; Whittaker, Sean J.; Kim, Youn H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advanced-stage mycosis fungoides (MF; stage IIB to IV) and Sézary syndrome (SS) are aggressive lymphomas with a median survival of 1 to 5 years. Clinical management is stage based; however, there is wide range of outcome within stages. Published prognostic studies in MF/SS have been single-center trials. Because of the rarity of MF/SS, only a large collaboration would power a study to identify independent prognostic markers. Patients and Methods Literature review identified the following 10 candidate markers: stage, age, sex, cutaneous histologic features of folliculotropism, CD30 positivity, proliferation index, large-cell transformation, WBC/lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and identical T-cell clone in blood and skin. Data were collected at specialist centers on patients diagnosed with advanced-stage MF/SS from 2007. Each parameter recorded at diagnosis was tested against overall survival (OS). Results Staging data on 1,275 patients with advanced MF/SS from 29 international sites were included for survival analysis. The median OS was 63 months, with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 77% and 52%, respectively. The median OS for patients with stage IIB disease was 68 months, but patients diagnosed with stage III disease had slightly improved survival compared with patients with stage IIB, although patients diagnosed with stage IV disease had significantly worse survival (48 months for stage IVA and 33 months for stage IVB). Of the 10 variables tested, four (stage IV, age > 60 years, large-cell transformation, and increased lactate dehydrogenase) were independent prognostic markers for a worse survival. Combining these four factors in a prognostic index model identified the following three risk groups across stages with significantly different 5-year survival rates: low risk (68%), intermediate risk (44%), and high risk (28%). Conclusion To our knowledge, this study includes the largest cohort of patients with advanced-stage MF/SS and

  17. Calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia in a patient with granulomatous mycosis fungoides and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Iwakura, Takamasa; Ohashi, Naro; Tsuji, Naoko; Naito, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Shinsuke; Ono, Masafumi; Fujikura, Tomoyuki; Tsuji, Takayuki; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Yasuda, Hideo; Kato, Akihiko; Fujiyama, Toshiharu; Tokura, Yoshiki; Fujigaki, Yoshihide

    2013-05-01

    An 86-year-old man, diagnosed as having mycosis fungoides in May 2008 and treated with repeated radiation therapy, was admitted to our hospital for initiation of hemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in April 2012. On admission, his corrected serum calcium level was 9.3 mg/dL, and his intact parathyroid hormone level was 121.9 pg/mL (normal range 13.9-78.5 pg/mL), indicating secondary hyperparathyroidism due to ESRD. After starting hemodialysis, urinary volume diminished rapidly. The serum calcium level increased (12.7 mg/dL), and the intact parathyroid hormone level was suppressed (< 5 pg/mL), while the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) level increased (114 pg/mL, normal range: 20.0-60.0 pg/mL) in June 2012. The possibilities of sarcoidosis and tuberculosis were ruled out. Skin biopsies from tumorous lesions revealed a diagnosis of granulomatous mycosis fungoides. The serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels and the degrees of skin lesions went in parallel with the increased serum calcium and calcitriol levels. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed as having calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia possibly associated with granulomatous mycosis fungoides. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides is rare, and its association with calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia has not been reported. Careful attention to calcium metabolism is needed in patients with granulomatous mycosis fungoides, especially in patients with ESRD. PMID:24175265

  18. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in type v skin: a report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Ranawaka, Ranthilaka R; Abeygunasekara, Priyanka H; de Silva, M V Chandu

    2011-01-01

    Five patients with type V skin were studied to describe the clinical manifestations, pathological features, and treatment response in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF). The mean age of patients was 22.4 years at diagnosis, with a mean of 36 months of diagnostic delay. Two were children aged 11 and 13 years. Skin patches were limited to sunlight-covered body areas. In tropical climate, exposure to natural sunlight possibly cured the lesions on sun-exposed areas at early stage of onset. HMF may frequently be misinterpreted as eczema, vitiligo, or progressive macular hypomelanosis clinically and histopathologically as seen in our case series. PMID:23198169

  19. Inflammatory vitiligo versus hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in a 58-year-old Indian female.

    PubMed

    Soro, Luis A; Gust, Anthony J; Purcell, Stephen M

    2013-10-01

    Vitiligo, particularly the rarer inflammatory variant, may be difficult to distinguish from hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) clinically. Complicating the distinction is that when biopsies are taken from the periphery of early vitiliginous lesions or from lesions with an inflammatory border (inflammatory vitiligo), a dermal lymphocytic infiltrate, exocytosis, interface dermatitis, and mild spongiosis may be seen, all resembling the findings seen in hypopigmented MF. We present a case demonstrating the difficulty in differentiating between these two diseases and examine some characteristic clinical and histopathological features of each. Often, a conclusive diagnosis cannot be made, necessitating close follow-up of the patient and monitoring for progression of their disease over time. PMID:24350017

  20. Hypopigmented Mycosis Fungoides in Type V Skin: A Report of 5 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ranawaka, Ranthilaka R.; Abeygunasekara, Priyanka H.; de Silva, M. V. Chandu

    2011-01-01

    Five patients with type V skin were studied to describe the clinical manifestations, pathological features, and treatment response in hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF). The mean age of patients was 22.4 years at diagnosis, with a mean of 36 months of diagnostic delay. Two were children aged 11 and 13 years. Skin patches were limited to sunlight-covered body areas. In tropical climate, exposure to natural sunlight possibly cured the lesions on sun-exposed areas at early stage of onset. HMF may frequently be misinterpreted as eczema, vitiligo, or progressive macular hypomelanosis clinically and histopathologically as seen in our case series. PMID:23198169

  1. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: a report of 7 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stone, M L; Styles, A R; Cockerell, C J; Pandya, A G

    2001-02-01

    Over the last 2 decades, hypopigmented macules have been reported with increasing frequency as an initial presentation of mycosis fungoides (MF). We retrospectively reviewed 7 patients with hypopigmented MF. The mean age was 35 years at disease onset, with a mean of 5.5 years' duration of illness before presentation. All of our patients were Fitzpatrick skin type IV or V, and most reported pruritus. Histologic findings in all cases were consistent with MF. Treatment with topical nitrogen mustard produced repigmentation in 4 of 6 patients. PMID:11236223

  2. Inflammatory vitiligo versus hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in a 58-year-old Indian female

    PubMed Central

    Soro, Luis A.; Gust, Anthony J.; Purcell, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo, particularly the rarer inflammatory variant, may be difficult to distinguish from hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) clinically. Complicating the distinction is that when biopsies are taken from the periphery of early vitiliginous lesions or from lesions with an inflammatory border (inflammatory vitiligo), a dermal lymphocytic infiltrate, exocytosis, interface dermatitis, and mild spongiosis may be seen, all resembling the findings seen in hypopigmented MF. We present a case demonstrating the difficulty in differentiating between these two diseases and examine some characteristic clinical and histopathological features of each. Often, a conclusive diagnosis cannot be made, necessitating close follow-up of the patient and monitoring for progression of their disease over time. PMID:24350017

  3. Managing Patients with Cutaneous B-Cell and T-Cell Lymphomas Other Than Mycosis Fungoides.

    PubMed

    Kheterpal, Meenal; Mehta-Shah, Neha; Virmani, Pooja; Myskowski, Patricia L; Moskowitz, Alison; Horwitz, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas (CL) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms characterized with clinical and histopathological variation, as well as overlap with benign dermatoses. Diagnosis and treatment of CLs is challenging and often requires a multidisciplinary approach. However, prognostic knowledge of these conditions and awareness of treatment options can help optimize appropriate use of available regimens, thereby improving care for patients. Here, we review the most recent literature and outline treatment themes for managing patients with cutaneous B-cell and T-cell lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides. PMID:27101016

  4. Extracorporeal Photopheresis in the Treatment of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zic, John A

    2015-10-01

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an immunomodulating procedure that leads to an expansion of peripheral blood dendritic cell populations and an enhanced TH1 immune response in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Because of its excellent side effect profile and moderate efficacy, ECP is considered first-line therapy for erythrodermic mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome. Patients with a measurable but low blood tumor burden are most likely to respond to ECP, and the addition of adjunctive immunostimulatory agents may also increase response rates. There may be a role for ECP in the treatment of refractory early stage MF, but data are limited. PMID:26433848

  5. Follow-up of patients with mycosis fungoides after interferon α2b treatment failure

    PubMed Central

    Studziński, Maciej; Giebel, Sebastian; Krause, Anna; Olejniczak, Monika; Grzanka, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of T cell cutaneous lymphoma( CTCL) is a controversial subject and the effectiveness of treatment is still low. Aim Report of single center experience of management CTCL after progression after first line treatment. Material and methods We present 41 patients with CTCL, 29 received interferon α2b in first line, and 12 of them received second line therapy. Results Overall response rate for second line therapy was 60%. Conclusions Results of the follow-up of patients with mycosis fungoides after interferon α2b treatment failure with the literature review and discussion. PMID:26015774

  6. Frequency of hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in Egyptian patients presenting with hypopigmented lesions of the trunk.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, Mona; El-Nabarawy, Eman; El Nemr, Reham; Hassan, Abeer M

    2015-11-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) is an uncommon variant of mycosis fungoides with an unknown exact frequency. We aimed to study the frequency of HMF in a cohort of Egyptian patients presenting to a tertiary care center in Cairo, Egypt, with hypopigmented lesions of the trunk. Hundred patients with hypopigmented lesions involving the trunk (with or without other sites involvement) were subjected to thorough clinical and histopathological examination. Immunohistochemical studies (S100, CD4, and CD8) were performed when indicated. Constellation of findings was used to reach a final diagnosis. Sixteen cases had HMF (16%). Other than HMF, our cohort included hypopigmented parapsoriasis en plaque (42 cases), postinflammatory hypopigmentation (28 cases), progressive macular hypomelanosis (12 cases), and pityriasis alba (2 cases). In comparison with other hypopigmented disorders, HMF was significantly associated with progressive disease course (P = 0.004), affection of distal upper limbs (P = 0.005), proximal lower limbs (P = 0.003), large-sized lesions (>5 cm) (P < 0.0001), well-defined margin (P < 0.0001), scaliness (P = 0.002), erythema (P < 0.0001), atrophy (P = 0.012), and mottled pigmentation (P < 0.0001). Awareness of HMF and its characteristic clinical features is mandatory to avoid underdiagnosis or overdiagnosis with subsequent morbidity or unnecessary aggressive therapy, respectively. PMID:26262921

  7. A Prospective, Open-Label Study of Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in Mycosis Fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Kamstrup, Maria R.; Specht, Lena; Skovgaard, Gunhild L.; Gniadecki, Robert

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of low-dose (4 Gy) total skin electron beam therapy as a second-line treatment of Stage IB-II mycosis fungoides in a prospective, open-label study. Methods and Materials: Ten patients (6 men, 4 women, average age 68.7 years [range, 55-82 years]) with histopathologically confirmed mycosis fungoides T2-T4 N0-N1 M0 who did not achieve complete remission or relapsed within 4 months after treatment with psoralen plus ultraviolet-A were included. Treatment consisted of low-dose total skin electron beam therapy administered at a total skin dose of 4 Gy given in 4 fractions over 4 successive days. Results: Two patients had a complete clinical response but relapsed after 3.5 months. Six patients had partial clinical responses, with a mean duration of 2.0 months. One patient had no clinical response. Median time to relapse was 2.7 months. One patient died of unrelated causes and did not complete treatment. Acute side effects included desquamation, xerosis, and erythema of the skin. No severe side effects were observed. Conclusion: Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy can induce complete and partial responses in Stage IB-II mycosis fungoides; however, the duration of remission is short. Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy may find application in palliative treatment of mycosis fungoides because of limited toxicity and the possibility of repeating treatments for long-term disease control.

  8. Coexistence of patch stage mycosis fungoides and interstitial granuloma annulare in the same patient: a pitfall in the clinicopathologic diagnosis of mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Koochek, Arash; Fink-Puches, Regina; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2012-04-01

    Several clinical and histopathologic variants of mycosis fungoides (MF) have been well described, including the often elusive interstitial MF. Differentiation from other inflammatory disorders, such as interstitial granuloma annulare (GA) and inflammatory morphea, may be extremely difficult. We report a case of MF and GA coexisting in a 54-year-old woman who initially presented to clinic in 2000 with slightly scaly patches on the trunk and extremities, histopathologically diagnostic of MF. A second biopsy taken a few months later revealed an interstitial infiltrate that was initially interpreted as interstitial MF. Over the following 10 years, additional biopsies revealed features of conventional MF. In 2009, a new biopsy showed unequivocal features of interstitial GA. Reevaluation of the original biopsy, diagnostic of "interstitial MF," revealed that this, too, could be better classified as interstitial GA than interstitial MF. Our case illustrates that MF and interstitial GA may coexist simultaneously, thus representing a pitfall in the histopathologic diagnosis of MF. Given the similarities in clinicopathologic presentation, dermatologists and dermatopathologists should be cautious not to inadvertently misinterpret GA as interstitial MF. PMID:22240773

  9. Efficacy of narrowband ultraviolet B twice weekly for hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in Asians.

    PubMed

    Kanokrungsee, S; Rajatanavin, N; Rutnin, S; Vachiramon, V

    2012-03-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. To date, there have been no data published about the efficacy of a twice-weekly regimen of narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) for the treatment of hypopigmented MF. We retrospectively reviewed 11 patients with hypopigmented MF who were treated with NB-UVB twice weekly between 2001 and 2010. Of the 11 patients, 7 achieved a complete response with a mean of 40 treatments; the remaining 4 patients had a partial response. Upon discontinuation of treatment, three patients had clinical relapse after complete remission. Median time to relapse was 10 months. A twice-weekly regimen of NB-UVB is an effective treatment for hypopigmented MF with minimal side-effects. However, the relapse rate is high, and unfortunately, no clinical or histological features can predict the relapse of the disease. PMID:22276982

  10. Interstitial Mycosis Fungoides With Lichen Sclerosus-Like Clinical and Histopathological Features.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Burak; Kempf, Werner; Seckin, Dilek; Ergun, Tulin; Yucelten, Deniz; Demirkesen, Cuyan

    2016-02-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) simulates a variety of dermatologic disorders histopathologically and clinically, well deserving the designation of a great mimicker. Interstitial MF is a rare, but well-recognized histopathological variant resembling the interstitial form of granuloma annulare or the inflammatory phase of morphea. From a clinical standpoint, MF can have a wide array of manifestations, including an anecdotal presentation with lesions clinically suggestive of lichen sclerosus (LS). We herein report a 25-year-old man with a history of patch-stage MF who later developed widespread LS-like lesions histopathologically consistent with interstitial MF. In some biopsies, additional features resembling LS were discerned. We think that our case might represent a unique variant of interstitial MF presenting with LS-like lesions. The diagnostic challenge arising from this uncommon presentation is discussed together with review of the literature. PMID:26630682

  11. Flow Cytometric Analysis of T, B, and NK Cells Antigens in Patients with Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Yazıcı, Serkan; Bülbül Başkan, Emel; Budak, Ferah; Oral, Barbaros; Adim, Şaduman Balaban; Ceylan Kalin, Zübeyde; Özkaya, Güven; Aydoğan, Kenan; Saricaoğlu, Hayriye; Tunali, Şükran

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological correlation and prognostic value of cell surface antigens expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with mycosis fungoides (MF). 121 consecutive MF patients were included in this study. All patients had peripheral blood flow cytometry as part of their first visit. TNMB and histopathological staging of the cases were retrospectively performed in accordance with International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas/European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (ISCL/EORTC) criteria at the time of flow cytometry sampling. To determine prognostic value of cell surface antigens, cases were divided into two groups as stable and progressive disease. 17 flow cytometric analyses of 17 parapsoriasis (PP) and 11 analyses of 11 benign erythrodermic patients were included as control groups. Fluorescent labeled monoclonal antibodies were used to detect cell surface antigens: T cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, TCRαβ+, TCRγδ+, CD7+, CD4+CD7+, CD4+CD7−, and CD71+), B cells (HLA-DR+, CD19+, and HLA-DR+CD19+), NKT cells (CD3+CD16+CD56+), and NK cells (CD3−CD16+CD56+). The mean value of all cell surface antigens was not statistically significant between parapsoriasis and MF groups. Along with an increase in cases of MF stage statistically significant difference was found between the mean values of cell surface antigens. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cell surface antigens in patients with mycosis fungoides may contribute to predicting disease stage and progression. PMID:26788525

  12. Clinicopathological features of mycosis fungoides in patients exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Soo; Jang, Jun Gyu; Han, Sang Hwa; Park, Jong Bin; Kang, Dong Young; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2013-08-01

    There are no reports on the clinicopathological features of mycosis fungoides (MF) among veterans exposed to Agent Orange, one of the herbicides used during the Vietnam War. To evaluate the clinical, histopathological and genotypic findings of Vietnam War veterans with MF and a positive history of exposure to Agent Orange, we performed a comparative clinicopathological study between MF patients with a history of Agent Orange exposure and those without a history of Agent Orange exposure. Twelve Vietnam War veterans with MF were identified. The mean interval from Agent Orange exposure to diagnosis was 24.5 years (range, 9-35). Skin lesions were significantly present on exposed and unexposed areas. Most patients (75%) experienced pruritus (mean visual analog scale score of 6.7). MF was manifested by plaques in 10 patients and by lichenification in five. Histopathological features of most cases were consistent with MF. Biopsy specimens also demonstrated irregular acanthosis (66.7%). In the comparative study, MF patients with a history of Agent Orange exposure differed significantly from those without exposure to Agent Orange in demographic and clinical characteristics. In addition, patients with exposure had an increased tendency for lesions in the exposed area. Notably, our patients showed a higher frequency (33.3%) of mycosis fungoides palmaris et plantaris than in previous studies. Histologically, irregular acanthosis was more frequently observed than ordinary MF. Our results indicate that dermatologists should pay close attention to these clinicopathological differences. Careful assessment of history of exposure to defoliants is warranted in some cases suspicious for MF. PMID:23724870

  13. STAT3/5-Dependent IL9 Overexpression Contributes to Neoplastic Cell Survival in Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Vieyra-Garcia, Pablo A.; Wei, Tianling; Naym, David Gram; Fredholm, Simon; Fink-Puches, Regina; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Odum, Niels; O'Malley, John T.; Gniadecki, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Sustained inflammation is a key feature of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Resident IL9–producing T cells have been found in skin infections and certain inflammatory skin diseases, but their role in MF is currently unknown. Experimental Design We analyzed lesional skin from patients with MF for the expression of IL9 and its regulators. To determine which cells were producing IL9, high-throughput sequencing was used to identify malignant clones and Vb-specific antibodies were employed to visualize malignant cells in histologic preparations. To explore the mechanism of IL9 secretion, we knocked down STAT3/5 and IRF4 by siRNA transfection in CTCL cell lines receiving psoralen+UVA (PUVA) ± anti-IL9 antibody. To further examine the role of IL9 in tumor development, the EL-4 T-cell lymphoma model was used in C57BL/6 mice. Results Malignant and reactive T cells produce IL9 in lesional skin. Expression of the Th9 transcription factor IRF4 in malignant cells was heterogeneous, whereas reactive T cells expressed it uniformly. PUVA or UVB phototherapy diminished the frequencies of IL9- and IL9r-positive cells, as well as STAT3/5a and IRF4 expression in lesional skin. IL9 production was regulated by STAT3/5 and silencing of STAT5 or blockade of IL9 with neutralizing antibodies potentiated cell death after PUVA treatment in vitro. IL9-depleted mice exhibited a reduction of tumor growth, higher frequencies of regulatory T cells, and activated CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. Conclusion Our results suggest that IL9 and its regulators are promising new targets for therapy development in mycosis fungoides. PMID:26851186

  14. Consequences of p16 tumor suppressor gene inactivation in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome and role of the bmi-1 and ras oncogenes in disease progression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlei; Toulev, Albena; Kamarashev, Jivko; Qin, Jian-Zhong; Dummer, Reinhard; Döbbeling, Udo

    2007-07-01

    In examining the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome, we found the cell cycle-regulating protein p16 to be absent in T cells. Immunohistochemical staining with p16-specific antibodies showed that the number of p16-expressing cells in cutaneous lesions decreases in late stages. The repression of p16 was not attributable to deletion or methylation of this gene; however, the Bmi-1 oncogene, a known suppressor of p16, was present in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome cell lines and skin lesions. The absence of p16 correlated with the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein on cyclin D/CDK4- or cyclin D/CDK6-specific sites. Ki-ras, which stimulates phosphorylation of retinoblastoma via cyclin-dependent kinases, was found in all tested cutaneous T-cell lymphoma samples; and its expression generally was stronger in advanced stages. Thus, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cells show changes in oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression that increase proliferation. PMID:17442375

  15. Review of the treatment of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: A stage-based approach

    PubMed Central

    AL Hothali, Ghadah I.

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary Syndrome (SS) are the most common subtypes of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Most of patients have indolent and incurable course of disease. Therefore, treatment should be reaching the optimal benefit with minimizing the toxicity as much as possible. To achieve this aim, the management should follow a -stage-based-approach. Treatment of early-stage MF (IA–IIA) involves skin-directed therapy (SDT) including topical corticosteroids, phototherapy, topical chemotherapy, topical retinoids and radiotherapy. For aggressive/recalcitrant early-stage MF or advanced-stage MF, systemic therapy should be considered including interferone-alpha, oral retinoids including bexarotine and more recently acitretin, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), fusion toxin denileukin diftitox and chemotherapy drugs. Combined drug regimens can be considered in some situations to get the synergistic effect while lowering the individual drug’s doses on the other hand. By exception of aggressive stages, chemotherapy should always come after other systemic drugs have been tried or contraindicated. Novel drugs should be considered in situations when all systemic drugs have failed. PMID:24421750

  16. Evolving Insights in the Pathogenesis and Therapy of Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Henry K.; Mishra, Anjali; Hake, Timothy; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are a heterogeneous group of malignancies derived from skin-homing T cells. The most common forms of CTCL are Mycosis Fungoides (MF) and Sezary Syndrome (SS). Accurate diagnosis remains a challenge due to the heterogeneity of presentation and the lack of highly characteristic immunophenotypical and genetic markers. Over the past decade molecular studies have improved our understanding of the biology of CTCL. The identification of gene expression differences between normal and malignant T-cells has led to promising new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers that now need validation to be incorporated into clinical practice. These biomarkers may also provide insight into the mechanism of development of CTCL. Additionally, treatment options have expanded with the approval of new agents, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors. A better understanding of the cell biology, immunology and genetics underlying the development and progression of CTCL will allow the design of more rational treatment strategies for these malignancies. This review summarizes the clinical epidemiology, staging and natural history of MF and SS; discusses the immunopathogenesis of MF and the functional role of the malignant T-cells; and reviews the latest advances in MF and SS treatment. PMID:21883142

  17. Mycosis fungoides--an underwriting prospective with emphasis on staging and risk selection.

    PubMed

    Iacovino, J R

    1994-01-01

    Mycosis Fungoides is a T-cell lymphoma having a broad clinical spectrum ranging from localized cutaneous to rapidly fatal systemic disease. Early clinical presentation is non specific, delaying correct diagnosis. Compared to clinical, the insurable spectrum is narrow. Staging for skin, lymph node and other organ manifestations is presented. Factors which influence mortality within each stage are elucidated. The survival curves of stages and stage groupings are illustrated and discussed to facilitate risk classification. Cutaneous (T) and lymph node (LN) stages are the most important prognosticators. Substages T1/T2, LN1/LN2 without associated palpable adenopathy, eosinophilia, visceral and blood positive findings are insurable. It would be most appropriate to place them in a tumor class of mild/moderate risk after the initial excessive mortality period ends. Higher T and LN substages, adenopathy and visceral disease have highly adverse mortality. These ultimately reveal a flattening of survival curves at 8-10 years. Although numerous treatment modalities have been used, none appear to consistently prolong life expectancy except in the earliest stage skin disease. PMID:10147101

  18. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in childhood and adolescence: a long-term retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Castano, Ekaterina; Glick, Sharon; Wolgast, Lucia; Naeem, Rizwan; Sunkara, Jaya; Elston, Dirk; Jacobson, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Patients with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) present at a younger age than those with classic MF. Our goal was to describe the clinical presentation, histopathologic features and long-term outcome in patients who developed HMF before the age of 21. It was observed that among 69 pediatric patients diagnosed with MF between 1992 and 2010, 50 had HMF. Thirty-five patients had clinical follow-up. There were 37 males and 32 females with a mean age of 13.6 years. Most patients were African American or Hispanic and presented with multiple hypopigmented patches. All biopsies showed epidermotropism of T-lymphocytes, whereas fibroplasia and lichenoid infiltrate were variable. All specimens tested were CD8+. Treatment modalities included topical steroids, narrow band ultraviolet B and psoralen and ultraviolet A. HMF patients were followed for <1-12 years. Most children responded to treatment, but recurrence rates were high. One patient progressed to plaque/tumor stage. Others did not progress; however, many were lost to follow-up. We present a large cohort of children with HMF and report on the features of disease and progression. A major difference in histology of HMF was lack of fibroplasia and lichenoid infiltrate, probably because of presentation in the early patch stage. Most patients have a waxing-and-waning course and relapse after discontinuation of therapy, requiring repetitive treatment. PMID:24320808

  19. Mycosis fungoides in Arab children and adolescents: a report of 36 patients from Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arti; AlSaleh, Qasem A; Al-Ajmi, Hejab; Al-Sabah, Homoud; Elkashlan, Muhammad; Al-Shemmari, Salem; Demierre, Marie-France

    2010-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is rare in children and adolescents. This study was aimed to determine the clinicoepidemiologic features of juvenile onset (≤18 yrs) MF in Kuwait. Thirty-six children and adolescents (≤18 yrs) with MF registered in a referral photobiology unit for cutaneous lymphomas between July 1991 and June 2009 were included in this study. Children and adolescents were observed to constitute 16.6% of the total number of patients with MF, with 97% of patients of Arab ethnicity. The age-adjusted incidence rate of MF in children and adolescents among the total population was 0.29/100,000 persons/year. Among 36 Arab children and adolescents, boys outnumbered girls by 1.25:1. Mean and median age at onset of disease was 9 years, and age at diagnosis was 13 years. Patch stage disease was the most common clinical variant (75%) with 56% with pure hypopigmented MF-variant. The majority of patients (75%) had stage IB (TNM and B staging) disease. The study highlights a high prevalence and incidence of juvenile MF in Kuwait with a predominantly hypopigmented presentation. PMID:21138468

  20. Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides: frequent expression of a CD8+ T-cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; McCalmont, Timothy H

    2002-04-01

    Hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) is a form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in which hypopigmentation occurs in the absence of classic lesions of MF. Hypopigmented MF predominantly affects people with dark complexions. The natural history of this variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is similar to that of conventional MF, although the disease onset is usually in childhood or adolescence. In a retrospective study we evaluated the clinical, histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular characteristics of hypopigmented MF in 15 patients. Similar to other reports, the disease onset occurred in childhood and adolescence in most of the cases. The survival rate was comparable with that of classic MF. We did not observe progression to systemic disease or lymph node involvement. Histopathologically hypopigmented lesions were indistinguishable from hyperpigmented or erythematous patches. On immunohistochemical analysis a predominantly CD8+ infiltrate was detected in the majority of cases (nine of 15 patients). To determine whether epidermotropic CD8+ T cells represent the malignant T-cell clone or whether these cells are innocent, tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes, we performed microdissection of epidermotropic CD8+ T cells and analyzed T-cell receptor-gamma chain gene for rearrangements. The epidermotropic CD8+ T lymphocytes showed clonal T-cell receptor gene rearrangement and therefore represented the malignant T-cell clone. We conclude that hypopigmented MF tends to occur in young people and that it belongs to the group of CD8+ cutaneous T-cell lymphomas in the majority of cases. PMID:11914622

  1. A new protoparvovirus in human fecal samples and cutaneous T cell lymphomas (mycosis fungoides).

    PubMed

    Phan, Tung G; Dreno, Brigitte; da Costa, Antonio Charlys; Li, Linlin; Orlandi, Patricia; Deng, Xutao; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Siqueira, Juliana; Knol, Anne-Chantal; Halary, Franck; Dantal, Jacques; Alexander, Kathleen A; Pesavento, Patricia A; Delwart, Eric

    2016-09-01

    We genetically characterized seven nearly complete genomes in the protoparvovirus genus from the feces of children with diarrhea. The viruses, provisionally named cutaviruses (CutaV), varied by 1-6% nucleotides and shared ~76% and ~82% amino acid identity with the NS1 and VP1 of human bufaviruses, their closest relatives. Using PCR, cutavirus DNA was found in 1.6% (4/245) and 1% (1/100) of diarrhea samples from Brazil and Botswana respectively. In silico analysis of pre-existing metagenomics datasets then revealed closely related parvovirus genomes in skin biopsies from patients with epidermotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL or mycosis fungoides). PCR of skin biopsies yielded cutavirus DNA in 4/17 CTCL, 0/10 skin carcinoma, and 0/21 normal or noncancerous skin biopsies. In situ hybridization of CTCL skin biopsies detected viral genome within rare individual cells in regions of neoplastic infiltrations. The influence of cutavirus infection on human enteric functions and possible oncolytic role in CTCL progression remain to be determined. PMID:27393975

  2. Mycosis fungoides: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography in staging and monitoring the effect of therapy

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Maria Mathew; D’Souza, Paschal; Sharma, Rajnish; Jaimini, Abhinav; Mondal, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman, diagnosed as a case of mycosis fungoides (MF), underwent [18F]-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) examination. The study revealed intense FDG uptake in a large ulceroproliferative right thigh lesion, indurated plaques in the chest wall and left thigh, along with multiple sites of cutaneous involvement, axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. The patient underwent chemotherapy with CHOP regimen, radiotherapy for the right thigh lesion, along with topical corticosteroids and emollients for the disseminated cutaneous involvement. Repeat [18F]-FDG PET/CT study performed a year later, showed near complete disease regression specifically of the ulceroproliferative lesion and indurated cutaneous plaques, no change in lymphadenopathy, and a subtle diffuse progression of the remaining cutaneous lesions. A multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, staging and treatment of MF has long been suggested for optimizing outcomes from management of patients with this disease. This case highlights the potential role of incorporating PET/CT as a single modality imaging technique in the staging and assessment of response to therapy. PMID:25829740

  3. Syringotropic mycosis fungoides responding well to VELP chemotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LUO, YANG; ZHANG, LI; SUN, YU-JIAO; DU, HUA; YANG, GUI-LAN

    2016-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF), a low-malignant lymphoproliferative disorder, is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The current study reported a case of syringotropic MF, a rare variant of MF, which presented with reactive B cell proliferation, lymphoid follicle formation, hair loss and lymphadenopathy. The clinical manifestations of the patient were MF-like lumps. Immunohistochemical staining of AE1/AE3 showed that there were abundant infiltrated lymphocytes surrounding the syringocystadenoma. In addition, the direction of the lymphocyte arrangement was consistent with the meandering direction of syringocystadenoma. The patient did not respond to 1-month narrowband (311-nm) ultraviolet therapy; however, a good response was obtained subsequent to one cycle of chemotherapy with vincristine sulfate, etoposide, L-asparaginase and prednisone acetate (know as the VELP regimen). After 7 days of VELP chemotherapy, the skin lesions were ameliorated, hair loss was improved and lymphadenopathy disappeared. No lymphadenopathy or new skin lesions were observed during 6 months of follow-up. PMID:27313668

  4. Conjunctival Involvement of T-Cell Lymphoma in a Patient with Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Aldrees, Sultan S.; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Alghamdi, Sarah A.; Logan, Patrick T.; Callejo, Sonia; Burnier, Miguel N.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ocular involvement in mycosis fungoides (MF) cases occurs in one-third of patients with the eyelid being the most frequent site affected; however, conjunctival involvement is rarely reported. Herein, we report a rare case of conjunctival involvement of MF. Case Presentation. A 66-year-old man who was previously diagnosed with MF in 2010 and was treated presented in 2014 complaining of foreign body sensation and redness in both eyes. Slit lamp examination of both eyes showed erythematous conjunctival growth that extended circumferentially. Physical examination revealed erythematous skin lesions on different body parts. Conjunctival biopsy was performed and revealed a dense, highly polymorphic lymphocytic population. The immunophenotype demonstrated a neoplastic T-cell origin consistent with MF. A diagnosis of conjunctival involvement by MF was made. The conjunctiva was treated with radiotherapy resulting in tumor regression. There were no recurrences at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusion. T-cell lymphoma should be considered in patients with a history of MF presenting with conjunctival and skin lesions. PMID:26989539

  5. Interferon and low dose methotrexate improve outcome in refractory mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Nambo, M Jesús; Neri, Natividad; Castañeda, Claudia; Cleto, Sergio; Gonzalez, Martha; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith

    2007-12-01

    Treatment of refractory mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome remain unsatisfactory. In this study, we assessed the efficacy and toxicity of low-dose methotrexate (10 mg/m(2), biweekly) and interferon (9.0 MU, three times a week) as induction therapy by 6 or 12 months, followed, if patients achieved a complete remission, by interferon maintenance until toxicity or relapse. In an intent-to-treat analysis, 158 patients were considered evaluable. Complete response (biopsy proven) was observed in 112 patients (49 [31%] at 6 months and 63 [49%] at 12 months); thus, the complete response rate was 74%. With a median follow-up of 155 months (range, 62-181), progression-free disease was 71% and overall survival was 69%. Acute toxicity was mild, treatment was well tolerated, and to date no late toxicity has been observed. We conclude that this regimen is a benefit to this setting of patients, with excellent outcome and mild toxicity. PMID:18158775

  6. Long term outcomes of 1263 patients with Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome from 1982 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Talpur, Rakhshandra; Singh, Lotika; Daulat, Seema; Liu, Ping; Seyfer, Sarah; Trynosky, Tanya; Wei, Wei; Duvic, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this prospectively collected single center study cohort of MF/SS 1263 patients is to evaluate the significance of stage and risk of disease progression from initial presentation, and to examine other prognostic factors. Patients and Methods The prognostic variables effecting overall survival (OS) were examined in a unique prospective cohort of 1263 mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary Syndrome (SS) patients seen by one investigator at MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1982–2009. Kaplan and Meier estimates were used to determine median overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and disease specific survival (DSS). Cox’s proportional hazards regression model assessed prognostic factors. Results Mean age at diagnosis was 55.33 years. Early MF (Stage IA-IIA) represented 71.5% (903 of 1263) and advanced (Stage IIB–IVB), 28.5% (360 of 1263) patients. Progression to a higher stage occurred in 147 patients (11.6 %) of whom 112 (12%) were early and 35 (9.7%) advanced. Death from disease occurred in 102/1263 (8.1%) patients. Median OS was 24.44 years, PFS was 16 years, and median DSS was not reached. OS and PFS were significantly better for early stage patients with patches (T1a/T2a) than with patches/plaques (T1b/T2b). PFS analyzed in 1241 patients found only 337 (27.2%) had disease progression or had died from disease. Risk factors associated with progression or deaths were advanced age, plaque stage, LDH level, and tumor area. Conclusions Improved outcome of MF/SS, reflected by overall survival and PFS for all stages, may result from earlier diagnosis, new therapies, and aggressive treatment of infections. PMID:22850569

  7. Granuloma annulare with a mycosis fungoides-like distribution and palisaded granulomas of CD68-positive histiocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Barusevicius, Alan; Lessin, Stuart R

    2004-07-01

    We describe 3 unusual cases of granuloma annulare with multiple macular lesions in a distribution that simulated mycosis fungoides in patients with no associated underlying diseases. Repeated biopsies showed typical well-formed palisading granulomas and no evidence of an atypical lymphocytic infiltrate. There was no vasculitis, neutrophilic, eosinophilic, or interstitial infiltrate. The patients had no associated underlying diseases. Most of the histiocytes in the palisading granulomas were strongly positive for CD68. The lymphocytes were a minor component of the granulomatous inflammation and were predominantly CD8(+) T-cells. The findings in these cases add to the spectrum of previously defined granulomatous eruptions of the skin. PMID:15243522

  8. The current management of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome and the role of radiotherapy: Principles and indications

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Ercole; Rubino, Laura; Buglione, Michela; Antognoni, Paolo; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Bertoni, Francesco; Parmiggiani, Manuela; Barbieri, Paola; Bertoni, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the current treatment of mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) focusing on the role of radiotherapy (RT), its principles and indications, and the perspectives of the novel irradiation technologies. Background MF and SS are rare lymphoproliferative diseases whose incidence is increasing. For a long time RT has been used as a single modality or in integrated treatment programs for these diseases. Materials and methods The latest systematic reviews, primary studies and new diagnostic and treatment guidelines on MF and SS were analyzed. Clinical outcomes together with the technical aspects and the role of RT were also evaluated. Results New data are available on pathogenesis, diagnostic criteria, classification and staging procedures for MF and SS and several local and systemic therapies are proposed. Localized RT can cure “minimal stage” MF while total skin electron beam irradiation (TSEI) may cure initial-stage disease and may offer important symptom relief (itch, erythroderma) in a more advanced setting. Despite its efficacy, RT is not largely used, mainly because of some technical difficulties but new RT technologies may be proposed to treat large skin surfaces. Conclusions New treatment programs offer good results, with median survival of more than 12 years in early-stage MF, but the median survival of 2.5 years or less in advanced stages is still a challenge. RT remains an option for all stages with a good cost/effectiveness ratio in a curative or palliative setting. New RT technologies can overcome some technical problems of treating large skin surfaces. PMID:24936325

  9. Revisiting Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in Mycosis Fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Cameron; Young, James; Navi, Daniel; Riaz, Nadeem; Lingala, Bharathi; Kim, Youn; Hoppe, Richard

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a highly effective treatment for mycosis fungoides (MF). The standard course consists of 30 to 36 Gy delivered over an 8- to 10-week period. This regimen is time intensive and associated with significant treatment-related toxicities including erythema, desquamation, anhydrosis, alopecia, and xerosis. The aim of this study was to identify a lower dose alternative while retaining a favorable efficacy profile. Methods and Materials: One hundred two MF patients were identified who had been treated with an initial course of low-dose TSEBT (5-<30 Gy) between 1958 and 1995. Patients had a T stage classification of T2 (generalized patch/plaque, n = 51), T3 (tumor, n = 29), and T4 (erythrodermic, n = 22). Those with extracutaneous disease were excluded. Results: Overall response (OR) rates (>50% improvement) were 90% among patients with T2 to T4 disease receiving 5 to <10 Gy (n = 19). In comparison, OR rates between the 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy subgroups were 98% and 97%, respectively. There was no significant difference in median progression free survival (PFS) in T2 and T3 patients when stratified by dose group, and PFS in each was comparable to that of the standard dose. Conclusions: OR rates associated with low-dose TSEBT in the ranges of 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy are comparable to that of the standard dose ({>=} 30 Gy). Efficacy measures including OS, PFS, and RFS are also favorable. Given that the efficacy profile is similar between 10 and <20 Gy and 20 and <30 Gy, the utility of TSEBT within the lower dose range of 10 to <20 Gy merits further investigation, especially in the context of combined modality treatment.

  10. Vitiligo vs. hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (histopathological and immunohistochemical study, univariate analysis).

    PubMed

    El-Darouti, Mohammad A; Marzouk, Salonaz A; Azzam, Omar; Fawzi, Marwa Mohsen; Abdel-Halim, Mona R E; Zayed, Amira A; Leheta, Tahra M

    2006-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common skin disease characterized by the presence of well circumscribed, depigmented milky white macules devoid of identifiable melanocytes. On the other hand, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare variant of MF which presents clinically as persistent hypopigmented macules and patches. Both disorders show a predominance of CD8+ T cells in tissue samples and hence the differentiation between the two diseases on clinical, histopathological and even immunohistochemical grounds may offer great difficulty. The aim of this work is to identity certain histopathological clues which might help to differentiate between the two diseases. The study included 54 patients (26 vitiligo patients and 28 patients with Hypopigmented MF). Skin biopsies were taken and examined by hematoxylin and eosin and CD3, CD4 and CD8 markers were performed for ten vitiligo and nine MF patients. We have found that epidermotropism, hydropic degeneration of basal cells, partial loss of pigment, preservation of some melanocytes, presence of lymphocytes within the papillary dermis, increased density of the dermal infiltrate and wiry fibrosis of the papillary dermal collagen were detected with a significantly higher incidence in hypopigmented MF rather than vitiligo (P-values < 0.0001, < 0.00011, < 0.00011, = 0.001, = 0.008 and = 0.001 respectively). On the other hand, focal thickening of the basement membrane, complete loss of pigmentation, total absence of melanocytes, as well as absence or sparsness of lymphocytes in the dermal papillae were seen much more frequently in vitiligo. Statistical analysis of these differences was significant with P-values < 0.00011, < 0.00011, < 0.00011, = 0.008 respectively, regarding these pathological criteria. We conclude that differentiation of hypopigmented MF from vitiligo is possible by relying on the histopathological clues described in this study. This is particularly useful in areas of the world where cost benefit is crucial. PMID:16436337

  11. Childhood mycosis fungoides: experience of 28 patients and response to phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Laws, Philip M; Shear, Neil H; Pope, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), is rare in childhood. The prognosis and response to treatment are poorly described in children. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the response to phototherapy in a pediatric cohort. A retrospective cohort study of all patients diagnosed with MF before the age of 18 years and referred to the regional CTCL phototherapy service was performed between January 1990 and April 2012. Twenty-eight patients were identified (13 boys, 15 girls). The mean age at presentation was 11.6 ± 3.9 years. The hypopigmented variant was noted in 79% of patients. All patients had stage I disease (IA = 10, IB = 17, unknown = 1). The median follow-up after diagnosis was 43 months (range 6-274 mos). Narrowband ultraviolet B (NbUVB; 311 nm) was used as first-line phototherapy in 18 patients and psoralen (bath) plus ultraviolet A (PUVA) was used in 8 patients. Complete or partial response was observed in 19 of 22 patients (86%). A further course of phototherapy was required in 7 of 12 patients (58%) treated with NbUVB after a median of 4 months (range 4-29 mos). A further course of phototherapy was required in four of eight patients (50%) successfully treated with PUVA after a median of 45.5 months (range 30-87 mos). No disease progression was noted over the follow-up (median 43 mos). The majority of patients in our cohort had hypopigmented MF. Phototherapy offers an effective option for treatment of childhood MF, although the period of remission may be greater in patients treated with PUVA. PMID:24916067

  12. Canine cutaneous epitheliotropic lymphoma (mycosis fungoides) is a proliferative disorder of CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P. F.; Olivry, T.; Naydan, D.

    1994-01-01

    Canine epitheliotropic lymphoma (mycosis fungoides [MF]) is a spontaneous neoplasm of skin and mucous membranes that occurs in old dogs (mean age 11 years) and has no breed predilection. The lesions evolve from a patch-plaque stage with prominent epitheliotropism into a tumor stage in which distant metastasis is observed. Unlike human MF, epitheliotropism of the lymphoid infiltrate is still prominent in tumor stage lesions. Tropism of the lymphoid infiltrate for adnexal structures, especially hair follicles and apocrine sweat glands, was marked in all clinical stages of canine MF. Twenty-three cases of MF were subjected to extensive immunophenotypic analysis in which reagents specific for canine leukocyte antigens and fresh frozen tissue sections of the canine lesions were used. Canine MF proved to be a T cell lymphoma in which the epitheliotropic lymphocytes consistently expressed CD3 (22 cases) and CD8 (19 cases); CD3+CD4-CD8- lymphocytes predominated in the remaining 4 cases. In this regard, canine MF clearly differed from human MF in which a CD4 immunophenotype predominates in the T cell infiltrate. Lack of expression of CD45RA by epitheliotropic T cells and intense expression of a beta 1 integrin (VLA-4-like) suggested that T cells in canine MF belonged to the memory subpopulation, as has been suggested for T cells in human MF. Pan-T cell antigen loss or discordant expression also proved useful as phenotypic indicators of neoplasia in canine MF. Loss of CD5 was observed in epitheliotropic T cells in 63% of cases. Discordance of neoplastic T cell Thy-1 expression was frequently observed between epithelial and dermal or submucosal compartments. We conclude that canine MF still represents a useful spontaneous animal disease model of human cutaneous T cell lymphoma, despite the immunophenotypic differences, which may reflect operational differences between human and canine skin-associated lymphoid tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure

  13. Full clinical recovery after topical acyclovir treatment of Epstein-Barr virus associated cutaneous B-cell lymphoma in patient with mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Copur, M Sitki; Deshpande, Anita; Mleczko, Kris; Norvell, Max; Hrnicek, Gordon J; Woodward, Suzette; Frankforter, Scott; Mandolfo, Natalie; Fu, Kai; Chan, Wing C

    2005-06-01

    Primary cutaneous T- and B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases with varied clinical presentations and prognosis. The use of new molecular, histological, and clinical criteria has improved their recognition. Cutaneous B-cell and T-cell lymphomas are seldom found together in the same patient. Here we report a rare case of mycosis fungoides variant of a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) which later developed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated cutaneous B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. The patient initially presented with generalized erythroderma, extensive plaques, and axillary lymphadenopathy. Histopathology and immunophenotyping of her tumor from the right breast nodule revealed a T-cell lymphoma consistent with mycosis fungoides. She was initially treated with pentostatin, followed by topical mechlorethamine and topical steroids. After progression of her mycosis fungoides with worsening diffuse skin lesions on this regimen, her treatments were changed to oral bexarotene with an initial partial response followed by stable disease. Three years from her initial presentation, she developed ulcerated cauliflower-like nodules on her forehead. Biopsy of these lesions revealed EBV-positive large- and medium-sized pleomorphic B-cells consistent with EBV-driven B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. She was treated with topical acyclovir cream on the involved skin areas while continuing with oral bexarotene for mycosis fungoides. Skin lesions gradually diminished and totally disappeared after four weeks of topical acyclovir treatment. Bexarotene treatment was continued for another year until the mycosis fungoides progressed and became wide spread causing her death four and a half years after the initial diagnosis. The coexistence of two cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphomas of different lineage in the same patient and the complete clinical response of EBV-related B-cell cutaneous component to topical acyclovir makes this rare case particularly interesting. PMID

  14. Cell Surface Differentiation Antigens of the Malignant T Cell in Sezary Syndrome and Mycosis Fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Barton F.; Bunn, Paul; Mann, Dean; Thomas, Charles; Eisenbarth, George S.; Minna, John; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1981-01-01

    Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and rabbit heteroantisera, we have studied the cell surface markers of peripheral blood (PB) Sezary cells from six patients with mycosis fungoides or Sezary syndrome, disease grouped within the spectrum of cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL). Furthermore, we have studied two cell lines (Hut 78 and Hut 102) derived from malignant Sezary T cells from CTCL patients. The monoclonal antibody 3A1 defines a major human PB T cell subset (85% of PB T cells) while the antigen defined by the monoclonal antibody 4F2 is present on a subset (70%) of activated PB T cells and on circulating PB monocytes. In contrast to normal subjects in whom 60-70% of circulating PB mononuclear cells were 3A1+ T cells, PB mononuclear cells from six CTCL patients studied had an average of only 10.6±3.2% 3A1+ T cells. Whereas 85% of E-rosette positive cells from normal individuals were 3A1+, virtually all E-rosette positive T cells from the Sezary patients were 3A1-. Two patients with high numbers of circulating Sezary T cells had both aneuploid and diploid PB T cell populations present; after separation of PB T cells into 3A1+ and 3A1- cell suspensions, all 3A1- cells were found to be aneuploid. In contrast to normal resting PB T cells which were 4F2-, all PB Sezary cells were 4F2+, suggesting a state of activation. The 3A1 antigen was on a variety of acute lymphoblastic leukemia T cell lines (HSB-2, RPMI-8402, MOLT4, CEM) but was absent on the Hut 78 and Hut 102 Sezary T cell lines. Using rabbit anti-human T and anti-human Ia (p23, 30) antisera, we found that all malignant Sezary PB cells tested were killed by anti-T cell antiserum plus complement but not by anti-Ia plus complement. In contrast, Sezary cell lines Hut 78 and 102, were killed by both anti-T cell antiserum and anti-Ia plus complement. Similar to 3A1- normal PB T cells, 3A1- Sezary PB T cells proliferated poorly to phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A. However, 3A1- Sezary T cells were able to

  15. A randomized trial comparing combination electron-beam radiation and chemotherapy with topical therapy in the initial treatment of mycosis fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, F.J.; Bunn, P.A. Jr.; Steinberg, S.M.; Stocker, J.L.; Ihde, D.C.; Fischmann, A.B.; Glatstein, E.J.; Schechter, G.P.; Phelps, R.M.; Foss, F.M.; )

    1989-12-28

    Mycosis fungoides is a T-cell lymphoma that arises in the skin and progresses at highly variable rates. Nonradomized studies have suggested that early aggressive therapy may improve the prognosis in this usually fatal disease. We studied 103 patients with mycosis fungoides, who, after complete staging, were randomly assigned to receive either combination therapy, consisting of 3000 cGy of electron-beam radiation to the skin combined with parenteral chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, etoposide, and vincristine (n = 52) or sequential topical treatment (n = 51). The prognostic factors were well balanced in the two groups. Combined therapy produced considerable toxicity: 12 patients required hospitalization for fever and transient neutropenia, 5 had congestive heart failure, and 2 were later found to have acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Patients receiving combined therapy had a significantly higher rate of complete response, documented by biopsy, than patients receiving conservative therapy (38 percent vs. 18 percent; P = 0.032). After a median follow-up of 75 months, however, there was no significant difference between the treatment groups in disease-free or overall survival. We conclude that early aggressive therapy with radiation and chemotherapy does not improve the prognosis for patients with mycosis fungoides as compared with conservative treatment beginning with sequential topical therapies.

  16. Phenotypic Variation in Different Lesions of Mycosis Fungoides Biopsied Within a Short Period of Time From the Same Patient.

    PubMed

    Kash, Natalie; Massone, Cesare; Fink-Puches, Regina; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Phenotypic variants of mycosis fungoides (MF) include mainly the expression of cytotoxic markers by neoplastic cells (either α/β or γ/δ cytotoxic). To manage the patient properly, distinction from other cutaneous cytotoxic natural killer/T-cell lymphomas is paramount. Particularly for cutaneous γ/δ T-cell lymphoma, distinction is often based on clinicopathologic correlation (presence of tumors at first diagnosis as opposed to patches only in MF). The authors report a case of cytotoxic MF characterized by expression of TCRγ in two of three biopsies performed within a time frame of 1 week. The patient presented with patches, plaques, and 1 tumor at the time of first diagnosis; thus, distinction from cutaneous γ/δ T-cell lymphoma was not possible on clinical grounds alone. The diagnosis of MF was established, thanks to the phenotypic variations revealed by the three biopsies, with 1 lacking expression of cytotoxic proteins (TIA-1 and granzyme B) and of TCRγ. This case shows the importance to perform several biopsies in cases of cutaneous lymphoma, as morphologic and phenotypic features are variable and information gathered from a single biopsy may result in a wrong diagnosis. PMID:26885605

  17. Hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia: a form of cutaneous T-cell dyscrasia distinct from hypopigmented mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Magro, Cynthia M; Hagen, Joshua W; Crowson, Arthur N; Liu, Yen Chen; Mihm, Martin; Drucker, Natalie M; Yassin, Aminah H

    2014-07-01

    Hypopigmentation in cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disease should not always be equated with hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (MF). A form of hypopigmented pre-lymphomatous T-cell dyscrasia falling under the designation of the so-called hypopigmented interface variant of T-cell dyscrasia has recently been proposed. The aim of the present study was to establish hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia as its own entity apart from other T-cell dyscrasias and MF using a patient case series. Twenty four cases of hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia were identified in the dermatopathology database of Weill Medical College of Cornell University. There were 17 females and seven males (mean age, 36 years). In children and adolescents, the patients were most commonly of African American extraction. Truncal photo-protected areas manifesting as large solitary patches or multiple smaller macules were characteristic; disease progression to MF occurred in only one patient. The lesions responded to topical steroids and light therapy. The pathology was defined by a cell poor interface associated with degeneration of keratinocytes and melanocytes, and by lymphocytes whose nuclei showed low-grade cerebriform atypia, and which expressed a significant reduction in CD7 and CD62L expression. In 50% of the cases, the implicated cell type was of the CD8 subset. Clonality was not identified. Hypopigmented interface T-cell dyscrasia is a distinct entity separate from and rarely progressive to MF. PMID:24806661

  18. New insights into associated co-morbidities in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides).

    PubMed

    Hodak, Emmilia; Lessin, Stuart; Friedland, Rivka; Freud, Tamar; David, Michael; Pavlovsky, Lev; Shapiro, Jonathan; Cohen, Arnon D

    2013-07-01

    Studies of associated cancer in patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) have focused primarily on secondary cancers in North American and European populations. This study investigated the association between MF and malignancies, anxiety and depression in the Israeli population. Data on Israeli patients with MF and age- and gender-matched controls were collected from a database of population- based cohort (683 patients; 1,700 controls) and an institution- based cohort (343 patients; 846 controls) and analysed by univariate and multivariate methods. MF was significantly associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma in both cohorts (multivariate odds ratio (OR) 7.83, univariate OR ∞, respectively); acute leukaemia (multivariate OR 10.1, first cohort) and lung cancer (multivariate OR 10.15, second cohort). MF was significantly associated with anxiety and depression (multivariate OR 1.59, OR 1.51, respectively in first cohort). The current study provides support to the associations between MF and other cancers: Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute leukaemia and lung cancer. The study also emphasizes the association between MF and anxiety and depression. PMID:23303582

  19. Reduced Intensity Conditioning Before Partially Matched Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome

  20. Characterization of unconventional electron fields for the treatment of mycosis fungoides using the total skin irradiation technique

    SciTech Connect

    González, M. A. Pagnan Mitsoura, E.; Oviedo, J.O. Hernández; Vázquez, D. R. Ruesga

    2014-11-07

    Mycosis fungoides is a cutaneous lymphoma that accounts for 2–3% of all lymphomas. Several clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of TSEBT (Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy) in patients with mycosis fungoides. It is important to develop this technique and make it available to a larger number of patients in Mexico. Because large fields for electron TSEBT are required in order to cover the entire body of the patient, beam characterization at conventional treatment distances is not sufficient and a calibration distance of 500cm or higher is required. Materials and methods: Calibration of radiochromic Gafchromic® EBT2 film (RCF) for electrons was performed in a solid water phantom (Scanditronix Wellhöfer) at a depth of 1.4cm and a Source Axis Distance (SAD) of 100cm. A polynomial fit was applied to the calibration curve, in order to obtain the equation relating dose response with optical density. The spatial distribution is obtained in terms of percentage of the dose, placing 3×3cm samples of RCF on the acrylic screen, which is placed in front of the patient in order to obtain maximum absorbed dose on the skin, covering an area of 200×100cm{sup 2}. The Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curve was obtained placing RCF samples at depths of 0, 1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9cm in the solid water phantom, irradiated with an ELEKTA SINERGY Linear Accelerator electron beam, with an energy of 6 MeV, at a Source Skin Distance (SSD) of 500cm, with 1000MU = 100Gy, with a cone of 40×40cm and gantry angle of 90°. The RCFs were scanned on a flatbed scanner (EPSON EXPRESSION 10000 XL) and the images were processed with the ImageJ program using a region of interest (ROI) of 1×1cm{sup 2}. Results: The relative spatial dose distribution and the percentage depth dose for a SSD of 500±0.5cm, over an area of 200×100cm{sup 2} was obtained, resulting to an effective maximum dose depth (Z{sub ref}) for electrons of 1.4±0.05cm. Using the same experimental data

  1. Characterization of unconventional electron fields for the treatment of mycosis fungoides using the total skin irradiation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagnan González, M. A.; Hernández Oviedo, J. O.; Mitsoura, E.; Ruesga Vázquez, D. R.

    2014-11-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a cutaneous lymphoma that accounts for 2-3% of all lymphomas. Several clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of TSEBT (Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy) in patients with mycosis fungoides. It is important to develop this technique and make it available to a larger number of patients in Mexico. Because large fields for electron TSEBT are required in order to cover the entire body of the patient, beam characterization at conventional treatment distances is not sufficient and a calibration distance of 500cm or higher is required. Materials and methods: Calibration of radiochromic Gafchromic® EBT2 film (RCF) for electrons was performed in a solid water phantom (Scanditronix Wellhöfer) at a depth of 1.4cm and a Source Axis Distance (SAD) of 100cm. A polynomial fit was applied to the calibration curve, in order to obtain the equation relating dose response with optical density. The spatial distribution is obtained in terms of percentage of the dose, placing 3×3cm samples of RCF on the acrylic screen, which is placed in front of the patient in order to obtain maximum absorbed dose on the skin, covering an area of 200×100cm2. The Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curve was obtained placing RCF samples at depths of 0, 1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9cm in the solid water phantom, irradiated with an ELEKTA SINERGY Linear Accelerator electron beam, with an energy of 6 MeV, at a Source Skin Distance (SSD) of 500cm, with 1000MU = 100Gy, with a cone of 40×40cm and gantry angle of 90°. The RCFs were scanned on a flatbed scanner (EPSON EXPRESSION 10000 XL) and the images were processed with the ImageJ program using a region of interest (ROI) of 1×1cm2. Results: The relative spatial dose distribution and the percentage depth dose for a SSD of 500±0.5cm, over an area of 200×100cm2 was obtained, resulting to an effective maximum dose depth (Zref) for electrons of 1.4±0.05cm. Using the same experimental data, horizontal and vertical

  2. Serum Vitamin D and Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphism in Mycosis Fungoides Patients: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Hoda; Hegazy, Rehab A.; Gawdat, Heba I.; Mehaney, Dina A.; Kamel, Marwa M.; Fawzy, Marwa M.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Darwish, Hebatallah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D has been considered a key player in various malignancies including cutaneous cancers. To date, mycosis fungoides (MF) has been the least studied in relation to vitamin D. Furthermore, the vitamin D receptor (VDR) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have not been tackled before in the context of MF, despite their incrimination in numerous diseases. Aim of study To assess the role of vitamin D in MF by measuring its serum level, and studying VDR SNPs (TaqI, BsmI, FokI) in different stages of MF. Patients and Methods 48 patients with various stages of MF, and 45 healthy controls were included. Complete history, full clinical examination and a five mm punch skin biopsy were performed to all recruited patients. Venous blood samples were withdrawn from both patients and controls to determine the serum vitamin D level and VDR gene polymorphisms. Results Serum vitamin D level was significantly lower in patients (5.3–33.7 nmol/L)] compared to controls (8.3–90.1 nmol/L)] (P<0.001). A significant difference was observed between patients and controls regarding the FokI polymorphism only, being higher in patients (P = 0.039). Also Vitamin D serum levels differed significantly in patients with FokI genotypes (P = 0.014). No significant correlations were detected between any of the studied parameters and the demographic and clinical data of the included subjects. Conclusion Depressed vitamin D and FokI polymorphism are potentially involved in the context of MF. VDR gene polymorphisms warrant further larger scale investigations to detect the exact genes involved in the pathogenesis of such an enigmatic disease. PMID:27336155

  3. Origin Use of CD4, CD8, and CD1a Immunostains in Distinguishing Mycosis Fungoides from its Inflammatory Mimics: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tirumalae, Rajalakshmi; Panjwani, Poonam K

    2012-01-01

    Patch-stage/early mycosis fungoides (MF) is difficult to differentiate from benign dermatoses, despite several robust histologic criteria. Most studies include advanced lesions and data about early disease is limited. Objectives: (1) To compare the CD4:CD8 ratio in patch-stage MF versus inflammatory mimics. (2) To study patterns of CD1a expression in the epidermis and dermis in the two groups. Materials and Methods: Twenty cases each of early MF and inflammatory dermatoses were selected. The diagnoses were established after clinicopathologic correlation, repeat biopsies, and follow-up. The inflammatory group included pityriasis lichenoides chronica, actinic reticuloid, lichenoid purpura, and various psoriasiform dermatoses. Immunohistochemistry was done for CD4, CD8, and CD1a. Epidermal CD4, CD8 cells were quantified and CD1a was graded semi-quantitatively in the epidermis and dermis. Results: The average CD4:CD8 ratio was 4.2 in MF (range: 1-16.8), and 0.9 in inflammatory diseases (range: 0.43-5), which was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). None of the MF cases had a ratio <1. Four cases of pityriasis lichenoides chronica had a ratio >1. CD1a cells had a continuous or confluent epidermal pattern in almost all cases of MF, while they occurred as small or large groups in the dermis. In inflammatory dermatoses, there were either isolated or scattered CD1a+ cells in both epidermis and dermis. Conclusions: Elevated CD4:CD8 ratio favors MF. But there is an overlap in the lower range with pityriasis lichenoides chronica. These cases require good clinicopathologic correlation and follow-up. Patterns of CD1a expression are more reliable. Immunostains buttress morphology and are a valuable addition. PMID:23248358

  4. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization in early-stage mycosis fungoides: recurrent deletion of tumor suppressor genes BCL7A, SMAC/DIABLO, and RHOF.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Angelo; Bernardini, Laura; Valenzano, Francesco; Bottillo, Irene; De Simone, Clara; Capizzi, Rodolfo; Capalbo, Anna; Romano, Francesca; Novelli, Antonio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Amerio, Pierluigi

    2008-12-01

    The etiology of mycosis fungoides (MF), the most frequent form of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), is poorly understood. No specific genetic aberration has been detected, especially in early-stage disease, possibly due to the clinical and histological heterogeneity of patient series and to the different sources of malignant cells (skin, blood, or lymph node) included in most studies. Frozen skin biopsies from 16 patients with early-stage MF were studied using array-based comparative genomic hybridization. A DNA pool from healthy donors was used as the reference. Results demonstrated recurrent loss of 19, 7p22.1-p22.3, 7q11.1-q11.23, 9q34.12, 12q24.31, and 16q22.3-q23.1, and gain of 8q22.3-q23.1 and 21q22.12. The 12q24.31 region was recurrently deleted in 7/16 patients. Real-time PCR investigation for deletion of genes BCL7A, SMAC/DIABLO, and RHOF-three tumor suppressor genes with a putative role in hematological malignancies-demonstrated that they were deleted in 9, 10, and 13 cases, respectively. The identified genomic alterations and individual genes could yield important insights into the early steps of MF pathogenesis. PMID:18663754

  5. Prognostic factors in primary cutaneous lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides and the Sézary syndrome. The French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Grange, F; Hedelin, G; Joly, P; Beylot-Barry, M; D'Incan, M; Delaunay, M; Vaillant, L; Avril, M F; Bosq, J; Wechsler, J; Dalac, S; Grosieux, C; Franck, N; Esteve, E; Michel, C; Bodemer, C; Vergier, B; Laroche, L; Bagot, M

    1999-06-01

    Prognostic studies of primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCL) other than mycosis fungoides (MF) and the Sézary syndrome (SS; non-MF/SS PCL) have been mainly performed on subgroups or on small numbers of patients by using univariate analyses. Our aim was to identify independent prognostic factors in a large series of patients with non-MF/SS PCL. We evaluated 158 patients who were registered in the French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas database from January 1, 1986 to March 1, 1997. Variables analyzed for prognostic value were: age; sex; type of clinical lesions; maximum diameter, location, and number of skin lesions; cutaneous distribution (ie, local, regional, or generalized); prognostic group according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) classification for PCL; B- or T-cell phenotype; serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level; and B symptoms. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using a model of relative survival. Forty-nine patients (31%) died. The median relative survival time was 81 months. In univariate analysis, EORTC prognostic group, serum LDH level, B symptoms, and variables related to tumor extension (ie, distribution, maximum diameter, and number of skin lesions) were significantly associated with survival. When these variables were considered together in a multivariate analysis, EORTC prognostic group and distribution of skin lesions remained statistically significant, independent prognostic factors. This study confirms the good predictive value of the EORTC classification for PCL and shows that the distribution of skin lesions at initial evaluation is an important prognostic indicator. PMID:10339469

  6. Interleukin-32 is progressively expressed in Mycosis Fungoides independent of helper T-cell 2 and helper T-cell 9 polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ohmatsu, Hanako; Humme, Daniel; Gulati, Nicholas; Gonzalez, Juana; Möbs, Markus; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Cardinale, Irma; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Sterry, Wolfram; Krueger, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Mycosis Fungoides (MF), the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is characterized by a helper T cell 2 (Th2)-skewing with a mature CD4+ memory T-cell phenotype. Using skin samples from MF patients (n=21), healthy volunteers (n=17), individuals with atopic dermatitis (n=17) and psoriasis (n=9), we found interleukin (IL)-32 mRNA expression significantly higher in MF samples than in samples from benign inflammatory skin diseases, and its expression increases with disease progression. By immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, we confirmed IL-32 protein expression in many CD3+CD4+ T cells and some epidermotropic T cells in MF lesions. MyLa cells (a MF cell line) express IL-32, which in turn could promote cellular proliferation and viability in a dose-dependent fashion. IL-32-treated MyLa and CTCL HH cells up-regulated cell proliferation and survival genes. Of the major “polarizing” T-cell cytokines, only IFNγ mRNA increases with MF progression and positively correlates with IL-32 mRNA expression. Th2 cytokines do not positively correlate with IL-32 mRNA expression or MF progression. Furthermore, by flow cytometry, IL-32 production by circulating activated T-cells in healthy individuals was found in both IFNγ+ and IFNγ− cells but not in IL-4+ or IL-13+ cells. In conclusion, we have identified IL-32+ cells as the likely tumor cells in MF, and demonstrated that IL-32 mRNA expression increases with MF progression and is significantly higher than those in other skin diseases, and that some IL-32+ T cells are independent from the defined Th subsets. Thus IL-32 may play a unique role in MF progression as an autocrine cytokine. PMID:24938282

  7. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Cocco, Pierluigi; La Vecchia, Carlo; Chang, Ellen T.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Kadin, Marshall E.; Spinelli, John J.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Kane, Eleanor V.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Kasten, Carol; Feldman, Andrew L.; Wang, Sophia S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) are rare cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Their etiology is poorly understood. Methods A pooled analysis of 324 MF/SS cases and 17217 controls from 14 case–control studies from Europe, North America, and Australia, as part of the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) Subtypes Project, was carried out to investigate associations with lifestyle, medical history, family history, and occupational risk factors. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results We found an increased risk of MF/SS associated with body mass index equal to or larger than 30kg/m2 (OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.03 to 2.40), cigarette smoking for 40 years or more (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.31), eczema (OR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.73 to 3.29), family history of multiple myeloma (OR = 8.49, 95% CI = 3.31 to 21.80), and occupation as crop and vegetable farmers (OR = 2.37, 95% CI = 1.14 to 4.92), painters (OR = 3.71, 95% CI = 1.94 to 7.07), woodworkers (OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.18 to 4.08), and general carpenters (OR = 4.07, 95% CI = 1.54 to 10.75). We also found a reduced risk of MF/SS associated with moderate leisure time physical activity (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.97). Conclusions Our study provided the first detailed analysis of risk factors for MF/SS and further investigation is needed to confirm these findings in prospective data and in other populations. PMID:25174030

  8. The Therapeutic Potential of AN-7, a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, for Treatment of Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome Alone or with Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeiz, Neta; Rephaeli, Ada; Nudelman, Abraham; Weitman, Michal; Tarasenko, Nataly; Gorovitz, Batia; Maron, Leah; Yehezkel, Shiran; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Lubin, Ido; Hodak, Emmilia

    2016-01-01

    The 2 histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) including mycosis fungoides/sezary syndrome (MF/SS), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and romidepsin, are associated with low rates of overall response and high rates of adverse effects. Data regarding combination treatments with HDACIs is sparse. Butyroyloxymethyl diethylphosphate (AN-7) is a novel HDACI, which was found to have selective anticancer activity in several cell lines and animal models. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer effects of AN-7 and SAHA, either alone or combined with doxorubicin, on MF/SS cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with Sezary syndrome (SPBL). MyLa cells, Hut78 cells, SPBL, and PBL from healthy normal individuals (NPBL) were exposed to the test drugs, and the findings were analyzed by a viability assay, an apoptosis assay, and Western blot. AN-7 was more selectively toxic to MyLa cells, Hut78 cells, and SPBL (relative to NPBL) than SAHA and also acted more rapidly. Both drugs induced apoptosis in MF/SS cell lines, SAHA had a greater effect on MyLa cell line, while AN-7 induced greater apoptosis in SPBL; both caused an accumulation of acetylated histone H3, but AN-7 was associated with earlier kinetics; and both caused a downregulation of the HDAC1 protein in MF/SS cell lines. AN-7 acted synergistically with doxorubicin in both MF/SS cell lines and SPBL, and antagonistically with doxorubicin in NPBL. By contrast, SAHA acted antagonistically with doxorubicin on MF/SS cell lines, SPBL, and NPBL, leaving <50% viable cells. In conclusion, AN-7 holds promise as a therapeutic agent in MF/SS and has several advantages over SAHA. Our data provide a rationale for combining AN-7, but not SAHA, with doxorubicin to induce the cell death in MF/SS. PMID:26752418

  9. Phase II Intergroup Trial of Alisertib in Relapsed and Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma and Transformed Mycosis Fungoides: SWOG 1108

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Paul M.; Li, Hongli; Spier, Catherine; Mahadevan, Daruka; LeBlanc, Michael; Ul Haq, Mansoor; Huber, Bryan D.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Wagner-Johnston, Nina D.; Horwitz, Steven M.; Fisher, Richard I.; Cheson, Bruce D.; Smith, Sonali M.; Kahl, Brad S.; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Aurora A kinase (AAK) is upregulated in highly proliferative lymphomas, suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Alisertib is a novel oral AAK inhibitor without adverse safety signals in early-phase studies that demonstrated preliminary activity in T-cell lymphoma. This phase II study was conducted to further investigate the efficacy of alisertib in relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PTCL). Patients and Methods Eligible patients with histologically confirmed relapsed/refractory PTCL or transformed Mycosis fungoides (tMF) received alisertib 50 mg twice a day for 7 days on 21-day cycles. Results Of 37 eligible patients, the histologic subtypes enrolled included PTCL not otherwise specified (n = 13), angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (n = 9), tMF (n = 7), adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia (n = 4), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (n = 2), and extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (n = 2). Grade 3 and 4 adverse events in ≥ 5% of patients included neutropenia (32%), anemia (30%), thrombocytopenia (24%), febrile neutropenia (14%), mucositis (11%), and rash (5%). Treatment was discontinued most commonly for disease progression. Among the PTCL subtypes, the overall response rate was 30%, whereas no responses were observed in tMF. Aurora B kinase was more commonly overexpressed than AAK in tumor specimens. Analysis of AAK, Aurora B kinase, MYC, BCL-2, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ, and Notch1 expression revealed no association with response. Conclusion Alisertib has antitumor activity in PTCL, including heavily pretreated patients. These promising results are being further investigated in an ongoing international, randomized phase III trial comparing alisertib with investigator's choice in PTCL. PMID:26077240

  10. [Bone marrow biopsy in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, chronic lymphoid leukemia and mycosis fungoides. 1. Incidence and infiltration patterns].

    PubMed

    Silva, M R; Mieza, M A; Saad, F A; Kerbauy, J; Burnier Júnior, M N

    1990-01-01

    Seventy bone marrow biopsies belonging to 53 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and micosis fungoides were studied. Bone marrow involvement was analyzed in correlation to staging before and after treatment. Bone marrow involvement was most frequently seen in CLL and IL followed by WDLL and PDLL/N and PDLL/D. Highest incidences after treatment were in CLL, WDLL, and PDLL/N and PDLL/D. With respect to staging, WDLL disseminated to bone marrow only in the late stages (III or IV), whereas the nodular and diffuse forms of PDLL presented similar infiltration in all stages. HLL and IL presented a slight trend to infiltrate only in the later stages. The pattern of bone marrow infiltration was also analyzed considering staging before and after treatment. No clear correlation was observed between staging and a specific pattern of bone marrow involvement in most cases, and disease evolution and treatment do not seem to change infiltration pattern. PMID:2287861

  11. Predictors of response to extracorporeal photopheresis in advanced mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McGirt, Laura Y.; Thoburn, Christopher; Hess, Allan; Vonderheid, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) has been utilized for more than 20 years to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), but a clinical response can take up to 9 months to manifest. This study was undertaken to determine whether clinical features, laboratory values, cytokine levels, or gene expression levels of tumor markers are useful to predict the subsequent response to ECP in CTCL patients with blood involvement. Methods Twenty-one patients with CTCL treated with ECP as monotherapy for at least 6 months were retrospectively identified. Laboratory and clinical data and blood obtained at baseline, 3, and 6 months of treatment were used for analysis. Results In pretreatment blood specimens, a lower percentage of Sézary cells and a higher absolute eosinophil count were associated with a favorable clinical response. Clinical evidence of an early response after 3 months of ECP did not reliably predict a favorable response at 6 months or beyond. Comparison of cytokines, gene transcripts, and other laboratory measures of disease did not correlate with the subsequent clinical response, although lactate dehydrogenase levels tended to decrease progressively in ECP-responsive cases and increase progressively in ECP-non-responsive cases. Additionally, serum levels of TNF-α significantly increased from baseline to 6 months of ECP, but was not found to correlate with the clinical response. Conclusions Although we found that increased eosinophils and decreased percentage of Sézary cells were associated with a favorable clinical response to ECP, we were not able to identify the predictors of ECP response within the first 3 months of treatment. PMID:20626820

  12. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characterization of a new formulation containing synergistic proportions of interferons alpha-2b and gamma (HeberPAG®) in patients with mycosis fungoides: an open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The synergistic combination of interferon (IFN) alpha-2b and IFN gamma results in more potent in vitro biological effects mediated by both IFNs. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate by first time the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of this combination in patients with mycosis fungoides. Methods An exploratory, prospective, open-label clinical trial was conducted. Twelve patients, both genders, 18 to 75 years-old, with mycosis fungoides at stages IB to III, were eligible for the study. All of them received intramuscularly a single high dose (23 × 106 IU) of a novel synergistic IFN mixture (HeberPAG®) for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. Serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma concentrations were measured during 96 hours by commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIA) specific for each IFN. Other blood IFN-inducible markers and laboratory variables were used as pharmacodynamics and safety criteria. Results The pharmacokinetic evaluation by EIA yielded a similar pattern for both IFNs that are also in agreement with the well-known described profiles for these molecules when these are administered separately. The average values for main parameters were: Cmax: 263 and 9.3 pg/mL; Tmax: 9.5 and 6.9 h; AUC: 4483 and 87.5 pg.h/mL, half-life (t1/2): 4.9 and 13.4 h; mean residence time (MRT): 13.9 and 13.5 h, for serum IFN alpha-2b and IFN gamma, respectively. The pharmacodynamic variables were strongly stimulated by simultaneous administration of both IFNs: serum neopterin and beta-2 microglobulin levels (β2M), and stimulation of 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS1) mRNA expression. The most encouraging data was the high increment of serum neopterin, 8.0 ng/mL at 48 h, not been described before for any unmodified or pegylated IFN. Additionally, β2M concentration doubled the pre-dose value at 24–48 hours. For both variables the values remained clearly upper baseline levels at 96 hours. Conclusions HeberPAG®possesses improved

  13. Acquisition of CD30 and CD15 accompanied with simultaneous loss of all pan-T-cell antigens in a case of histological transformation of mycosis fungoides with involvement of regional lymph node: an immunophenotypic alteration resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Deepti M; Sebastian, Siby; Wang, Endi

    2015-03-01

    : Acquired expression of CD30 is frequently noted in histological transformation of mycosis fungoides (MF), but simultaneous gain of CD15 accompanied with loss of pan-T-cell antigens are extremely rare. We report an unusual case of transformed MF with such an immunophenotypic alteration resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma. The patient was an 81-year-old male with MF, who was initially treated with topical steroids and phototherapy. Despite the initial response, the patient developed a tumor-like skin lesion that was confirmed to be CD30-positive large T-cell lymphoma and was subsequently found to have a regional lymph node involvement by pleomorphic large cell lymphoma. Besides CD30, pleomorphic large cells were positive for CD15 but negative for all B cell- and T cell-specific antigens. Epstein-Barr virus was negative. Polymerase chain reaction-based assays demonstrated a clonal rearrangement of T-cell receptor gamma gene but detected no B-cell clone. The mechanism and clinical significance of this phenotypic conversion remains to be elucidated. PMID:23612034

  14. Analysis of differential β variable region of T cell receptor expression and NAV3/TNFRSF1B gene mutation in mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Ren, Jingyu; Guo, Shuping; Bai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze the predominant expression of the variable region of T cell receptor (TRBV) and determine whether NAV3 or TNFRSF1B gene mutation involved in the pathogenesis of MF. Results TRBV5-7 expression increased from the normal, early-stage to advanced-stage lesion in MF patient. By contrast, TRBV2 decreased with the lesion developed. We found no mutations of NAV3 or TNFRSF1B in the lesions from this study. Materials and Methods Real-time PCR were used to screen differential expression of TRBV in different lesions. Mutational analyses were used to validate genetic alterations in the skin lesions. Conclusions The identification of TRBV gene expression differences between normal and different stages of MF lesions provide insight into promising new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. None of the reported genetic abnormalities suggests complexity of progress from a primary cytogenetic event to an advanced stage with poor prognosis in MF. PMID:26918607

  15. Clinical End Points and Response Criteria in Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: A Consensus Statement of the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium, and the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Elise A.; Whittaker, Sean; Kim, Youn H.; Duvic, Madeleine; Prince, H. Miles; Lessin, Stuart R.; Wood, Gary S.; Willemze, Rein; Demierre, Marie-France; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Bernengo, Maria Grazia; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Bagot, Martine; Estrach, Teresa; Guitart, Joan; Knobler, Robert; Sanches, José Antonio; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Sugaya, Makoto; Dummer, Reinhard; Pittelkow, Mark; Hoppe, Richard; Parker, Sareeta; Geskin, Larisa; Pinter-Brown, Lauren; Girardi, Michael; Burg, Günter; Ranki, Annamari; Vermeer, Maartan; Horwitz, Steven; Heald, Peter; Rosen, Steve; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Dreno, Brigette; Vonderheid, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), the major forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, have unique characteristics that distinguish them from other types of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Clinical trials in MF/SS have suffered from a lack of standardization in evaluation, staging, assessment, end points, and response criteria. Recently defined criteria for the diagnosis of early MF, guidelines for initial evaluation, and revised staging and classification criteria for MF and SS now offer the potential for uniform staging of patients enrolled in clinical trials for MF/SS. This article presents consensus recommendations for the general conduct of clinical trials of patients with MF/SS as well as methods for standardized assessment of potential disease manifestations in skin, lymph nodes, blood, and visceral organs, and definition of end points and response criteria. These guidelines should facilitate collaboration among investigators and collation of data from sponsor-generated or investigator-initiated clinical trials involving patients with MF or SS. PMID:21576639

  16. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: a study from the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    de Masson, Adèle; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Bouaziz, Jean-David; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Aubin, François; Garciaz, Sylvain; d'Incan, Michel; Dereure, Olivier; Dalle, Stéphane; Dompmartin, Anne; Suarez, Felipe; Battistella, Maxime; Vignon-Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Rivet, Jacqueline; Adamski, Henri; Brice, Pauline; François, Sylvie; Lissandre, Séverine; Turlure, Pascal; Wierzbicka-Hainaut, Ewa; Brissot, Eolia; Dulery, Rémy; Servais, Sophie; Ravinet, Aurélie; Tabrizi, Reza; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Joly, Pascal; Socié, Gérard; Bagot, Martine

    2014-03-01

    The treatment of advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas remains challenging. In particular, large-cell transformation of mycosis fungoides is associated with a median overall survival of two years for all stages taken together. Little is known regarding allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this context. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of 37 cases of advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation, including 20 (54%) transformed mycosis fungoides. Twenty-four patients (65%) had stage IV disease (for mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome) or disseminated nodal or visceral involvement (for non-epidermotropic primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas). After a median follow up of 29 months, 19 patients experienced a relapse, leading to a 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 56% (95%CI: 0.38-0.74). Estimated 2-year overall survival was 57% (95%CI: 0.41-0.77) and progression-free survival 31% (95%CI: 0.19-0.53). Six of 19 patients with a post-transplant relapse achieved a subsequent complete remission after salvage therapy, with a median duration of 41 months. A weak residual tumor burden before transplantation was associated with increased progression-free survival (HR=0.3, 95%CI: 0.1-0.8; P=0.01). The use of antithymocyte globulin significantly reduced progression-free survival (HR=2.9, 95%CI: 1.3-6.2; P=0.01) but also transplant-related mortality (HR=10(-7), 95%CI: 4.10(-8)-2.10(-7); P<0.001) in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, the use of antithymocyte globulin was the only factor significantly associated with decreased progression-free survival (P=0.04). Allogeneic stem cell transplantation should be considered in advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including transformed mycosis fungoides. PMID:24213148

  17. Stages of Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  18. Treatment Options by Stage (Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  20. Treatment Options for Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... following PDQ summaries: Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment A sign of ... or laser that directs UVB radiation at the skin. Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of ...

  1. General Information about Mycosis Fungoides and the Sezary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... topical (put on the skin in a cream, lotion, or ointment ). The way the chemotherapy is given ... steroid . Topical corticosteroids may be in a cream, lotion, or ointment. Retinoids , such as bexarotene , are drugs ...

  2. Myocosis fungoides--an update on a non-mycotic disease.

    PubMed

    Makdisi, Joy; Friedman, Adam

    2013-07-01

    Mycosis fungoides was first described in 1806 by the French physician Jean Louis Alibert in a patient whose skin lesions developed into mushroom-like tumors. Though it is not an infectious disease, it was termed mycosis fungoides (MF) due to its fungating appearance. In 1870, Bazin further described MF, proposing the three classical stages of the cutaneous disease: patch, plaque, and tumor. The term cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) was first utilized in 1975 by Lutzner et al to describe a group of malignant infiltrative disorders of the skin including MF and Sézary syndrome. CTCLs comprise a spectrum of extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas that are characterized by primary cutaneous involvement of a dominant clonal T-cell. As molecular biology and immunohistochemistry techniques have become more developed, CTCL has become understood to be a heterogeneous assembly of disorders that vary with regards to clinical course, histopathology, therapeutic considerations, and prognosis. MF, a low-grade lymphoproliferative disorder, is the most common type of CTCL, comprising 54% of CTCLs. It is a rare, extranodal, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and is an epidermotropic neoplasm composed of CD4+ (helper) lymphocytes Sézary syndrome is a related leukemic subtype of CTCL that presents with diffuse skin involvement as well as circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood. PMID:23884501

  3. Dose-Escalation Trial of Carfilzomib With and Without Romidepsin in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-10

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  4. Guttural pouch mycosis in a 6-month-old filly

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Abstract A 6-month-old filly was presented with unilateral epistaxis. Based on clinical signs, endoscopic examination, and postmortem examination, guttural pouch mycosis was diagnosed. The young age of the filly and the fact that this was the 2nd diagnosis of guttural pouch mycosis on this farm was unusual. PMID:16604984

  5. Silicon Phthalocyanine 4 and Photodynamic Therapy in Stage IA-IIA Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  6. [Dementia in Patients with Central Nervous System Mycosis].

    PubMed

    Morita, Akihiko; Ishihara, Masaki; Konno, Michiko

    2016-04-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) mycosis is a potentially life-threatening but treatable neurological emergency. CNS mycoses progress slowly and are sometimes difficult to distinguish from dementia. Though most patients with CNS mycosis have an underlying disease, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and/or use of immunosuppressants, cryptococcosis can occur in non-immunosuppressed persons. One of the major difficulties in accurate diagnosis is to detect the pathogen in patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures. Thus, the clinical diagnosis is often made by combining circumstantial evidence, including mononuclear cell-dominant pleocytosis with low glucose and protein elevation in the CSF, as well as positive results from an antigen-based assay and a (1-3)-beta-D-glucan assay using plasma and/or CSF. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostics, which are not performed as routine examinations and are mostly performed as part of academic research in Japan, are sensitive tools for the early diagnosis of CNS mycosis. Mognetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to assess the complications of fungal meningitis, such as abscess, infarction, and hydrocephalus. Clinicians should realize the advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic tools. Early and accurate diagnosis, including identification of the particular fungal species, enables optimal antifungal treatment that produces good outcomes in patients with CNS mycosis. PMID:27056851

  7. Exophiala pisciphila: a novel cause of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis.

    PubMed

    Kebbe, Jad; Mador, M Jeffery

    2016-07-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) is a hypersensitivity reaction to fungal antigens, which may particularly plague uncontrolled asthmatics. Non-aspergillus fungal organisms may be implicated and may elicit a more severe immunologic response. Exophiala pisciphila, a marine organism, has not been reported as a culprit yet. However, this report indicates it may be implicated in unrelenting symptoms in a severe asthmatic patient who had become dependent on corticosteroids. Proper identification and adequate therapy of this organism led to complete resolution of respiratory symptoms, with adequate subsequent control of the asthma. ABPM may complicate asthma and lead to a lack of its control. Proper awareness, testing and treatment of non-aspergillus pulmonary mycosis is essential to proper asthma care and beneficial for its control. PMID:27499992

  8. Exophiala pisciphila: a novel cause of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis

    PubMed Central

    Mador, M. Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) is a hypersensitivity reaction to fungal antigens, which may particularly plague uncontrolled asthmatics. Non-aspergillus fungal organisms may be implicated and may elicit a more severe immunologic response. Exophiala pisciphila, a marine organism, has not been reported as a culprit yet. However, this report indicates it may be implicated in unrelenting symptoms in a severe asthmatic patient who had become dependent on corticosteroids. Proper identification and adequate therapy of this organism led to complete resolution of respiratory symptoms, with adequate subsequent control of the asthma. ABPM may complicate asthma and lead to a lack of its control. Proper awareness, testing and treatment of non-aspergillus pulmonary mycosis is essential to proper asthma care and beneficial for its control. PMID:27499992

  9. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  10. Computed tomographic spectrum of intracranial mycosis: correlation with histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, M.A.; Stern, J.; deNapoli, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    Four cases of intracerebral fungal infection are reviewed. The clinical course is outlined, and the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics are analyzed in light of known pathological data. The CT appearance of intracranial mycosis is dependent on the type of fungus as well as the dominant infecting form, i.e., yeast or hyphae. The hyphal form leads predominantly to a CT pattern consistent with vascular occlusion and secondary abscess formation; the yeast form generally results in noncaseating granulomas, which appear on CT scan as nodular enhancing lesions. If the patient survives the acute infective process, these fungal lesions undergo a prolonged subacute phase, and may eventually calcify.

  11. Romidepsin and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  12. Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis due to Alternaria: Case report and review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhagteshwar; Denning, David W

    2012-01-01

    While allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and mycosis are well recognised, no cases have been described related to Alternaria spp. Alternaria is a common sensitising fungus in asthmatics and related to thunderstorm asthma. We report a case of an asthmatic who presented with worsening asthma control, mild eosinophilia on high dose inhaled corticosteroids (800 μg/day), a total IgE of 3800 KIU/L, an Alternaria-specific IgE of 21.3 KUa/L and positive skin prick test, negative specific IgE and skin prick test to Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium spp., Cladosporium spp., Trichophyton spp. and a normal CT scan of the thorax. He responded well to a short course of oral prednisolone and then oral itraconazole, given over 17 months but relapsed 1 month after stopping it. PMID:24371728

  13. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  14. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  15. Invasive Mycosis Due to Species of Blastobotrys in Immunocompromised Patients with Reduced Susceptibility to Antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil; Babu, Rachana; Bijulal, Swapna; Abraham, Mohan; Sasidharan, P.; Kathuria, Shallu; Sharma, Cheshta; Meis, Jacques F.

    2014-01-01

    Cases of invasive mycosis due to Blastobotrys serpentis and B. proliferans identified by sequencing in a preterm patient and a rhabdomyosarcoma patient, respectively, are reported. Both species revealed elevated fluconazole and echinocandin MICs by the CLSI broth microdilution method. Additionally, B. serpentis exhibited high amphotericin B MICs, thus posing serious therapeutic challenges. PMID:25165080

  16. Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous

  17. 3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T

  18. PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin

  19. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large

  20. A patient with allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2012-10-01

    Allergic Bronchopulmonary Mycosis (ABPM) is an exagregated immunologic response to fungal colonization in the lower airways. It may cause by many kinds of fungal, but Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause of ABPM, although other Aspergillus and other fungal organisms, like Candida albicans, have been implicated. Aspergllus fumigatus and Candida albicans may be found as outdoor and indoor fungi, and cause the sensitization, elicitation of the disease pathology, and its clinical manifestations. Several diagnostic procedurs may be impicated to support the diagnosis of ABPM caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans. A case of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans in a 48 year old man was discussed. The patient was treated with antifungal, corticosteroids, and antibiotic for the secondary bacterial infection. The patient's condition is improved without any significant side effects. PMID:23314973

  1. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides sensu lato causing deep soft tissue mycosis following a penetrating injury

    PubMed Central

    Figtree, Melanie; Weeks, Kerry; Chan, Leonie; Leyton, Arda; Bowes, Andrew; Giuffre, Bruno; Sullivan, Martin; Hudson, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    Colletotrichum species have been rarely implicated in human disease. We describe a case of deep soft tissue mycosis following a penetrating injury with a lemon tree thorn. Direct Blankophor BA (Bayer) stain from intraoperative tissue showed fungal elements. Pure growth fungus was apparent at 2–4 days. Morphological features provisionally identified the isolate as a coelomycetous fungus, likely Colletotrichum species. This was confirmed with molecular analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) region. PMID:24432213

  2. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Epithelial Cancer, Malignant Lymphoma, or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Chondrosarcoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small

  4. Systemic mycosis in a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with detection of cystofilobasidiales DNA.

    PubMed

    Field, Cara L; Tuttle, Allison D; Sidor, Inga F; Nyaoke, Akinyi; Deering, Kathleen M; Gilbert-Marcheterre, Kelly; Risatti, Guillermo; Spoon, Tracey; Meegan, Jenny; Romano, Tracy A; Frasca, Salvatore; Dunn, J Lawrence

    2012-03-01

    A 6-yr-old, intact male California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with a systemic mycosis died after 5 wk of antifungal drug therapy. Antemortem clinical findings included hind flipper swelling, ring-lesions on skin of the flippers, and dermal nodules that increased in size and number spreading from the hind flippers and ventral abdomen to the foreflippers and muzzle. Lesions were accompanied by severe lymphadenopathy and development of systemic clinical signs despite therapy using itraconazole and later voriconazole. Histopathologic evaluation of biopsies revealed granulomatous dermatitis due to infection by fungus-producing yeast cells in tissue. Isolation attempts, using biopsied skin and tissue samples collected at necropsy, failed to yield growth of a fungus producing yeast cells like those in histologic section. Consensus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests of biopsied skin for fungal DNA produced an amplicon having significant sequence identity with a Cystofilobasidiales, a fungus belonging to a subclade that includes several Cryptococcus spp. Histopathologic evaluation of necropsy tissues revealed a systemic mycosis with yeast cells disseminated throughout subcutis, lymph nodes, and viscera. Hepatic necrosis was identified associated with acute liver failure, possibly from the voriconazole administration. This is the first report documenting the clinical presentation, treatment, and pathologic findings of infection associated with Cystofilobasidiales in a marine mammal and serves to expand the understanding of mycoses in pinnipeds. PMID:22448522

  5. Geosmithia argillacea: An Emerging Cause of Invasive Mycosis in Human Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Challipalli, Malliswari; Anderson, Victoria; Shea, Yvonne R.; Marciano, Beatriz; Hilligoss, Dianne; Marquesen, Martha; DeCastro, Rosamma; Liu, Yen-chun; Sutton, Deanna A.; Wickes, Brian L.; Kammeyer, Patricia L.; Sigler, Lynne; Sullivan, Kathleen; Kang, Elizabeth M.; Malech, Harry L.; Holland, Steven M.; Zelazny, Adrian M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase that leads to defective production of microbicidal superoxide and other oxidative radicals, resulting in increased susceptibility to invasive infections, especially those due to fungi. Methods. Geosmithia argillacea was identified from cultured isolates by genomic sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region. Isolates previously identified as Paecilomyces variotii, a filamentous fungus closely resembling G. argillacea, were also examined. Results. We identified G. argillacea as the cause of invasive mycosis in 7 CGD patients. In 5 cases, the fungus had been previously identified morphologically as P. variotii. All patients had pulmonary lesions; 1 had disseminated lesions following inhalational pneumonia. Infections involved the chest wall and contiguous ribs in 2 patients and disseminated to the brain in 1 patient. Four patients with pneumonia underwent surgical intervention. All patients responded poorly to medical treatment, and 3 died. Conclusions. We report the first cases of invasive mycosis caused by G. argillacea in CGD patients. G. argillacea infections in CGD are often refractory and severe with a high fatality rate. Surgical intervention has been effective in some cases. G. argillacea is a previously underappreciated and frequently misidentified pathogen in CGD that should be excluded when P. variotii is identified morphologically. PMID:21367720

  6. Comparison of superficial mycosis treatment using Butenafine and Bifonazole nitrate clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Abdul Bari, Mohammed A

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections are commonly encountered by the physician. And the continuously changing epidemiology of invasive fungal infections results in the need for an expanded armamentarium of antifungal therapies. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Butenafine (BTF) versus Bifonazole (BFZ) in the treatment of superficial mycosis in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial. Of 96 patients, 48 applied (BTF) cream and 48 applied (BFZ) cream for 2 weeks to tinea versicolor, corporis and cruris treat, while tinea of feet & hands was treated for 4 weeks duration. Efficacy was assessed after the end of treatment and 2 weeks later. At the end of therapy, we find somewhat more patients using (BTF) than using (BFZ) had a mycologic cure ((BTF), 87.5%; (BFZ) 83.3%) and effective clinical response ((BTF), 91.7%; (BFZ), 83.3%). (BTF) provides rapid and persistent antifungal activity and symptom relief in patients with superficial mycosis during treatment. And patients continued to improve for at least 2 weeks after treatment. The Rates of mycologic cure and effective treatment with (BTF) were higher than with (BFZ) at cessation of treatment and 2 weeks later. However, no significant difference found between the two drugs (p> 0.05). PMID:23283047

  7. Comparison of Superficial Mycosis Treatment using Butenafine and Bifonazole nitrate Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Mohammed A. Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections are commonly encountered by the physician. And the continuously changing epidemiology of invasive fungal infections results in the need for an expanded armamentarium of antifungal therapies. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Butenafine (BTF) versus Bifonazole (BFZ) in the treatment of superficial mycosis in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial. Of 96 patients, 48 applied (BTF) cream and 48 applied (BFZ) cream for 2 weeks to tinea versicolor, corporis and cruris treat, while tinea of feet & hands was treated for 4 weeks duration. Efficacy was assessed after the end of treatment and 2 weeks later. At the end of therapy, we find somewhat more patients using (BTF) than using (BFZ) had a mycologic cure ((BTF), 87.5%; (BFZ) 83.3%) and effective clinical response ((BTF), 91.7%; (BFZ), 83.3%). (BTF) provides rapid and persistent antifungal activity and symptom relief in patients with superficial mycosis during treatment. And patients continued to improve for at least 2 weeks after treatment. The Rates of mycologic cure and effective treatment with (BTF) were higher than with (BFZ) at cessation of treatment and 2 weeks later. However, no significant difference found between the two drugs (p> 0.05). PMID:23283047

  8. White-Nose Syndrome: Human Activity in the Emergence of an Extirpating Mycosis.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Hannah T; Barton, Hazel A

    2013-12-01

    In winter 2006, the bat population in Howe Cave, in central New York State, USA, contained a number of bats displaying an unusual white substance on their muzzles. The following year, numerous bats in four surrounding caves displayed unusual winter hibernation behavior, including day flying and entrance roosting. A number of bats were found dead and dying, and all demonstrated a white, powdery substance on their muzzles, ears, and wing membranes, which was later identified as the conidia of a previously undescribed fungal pathogen, Geomyces destructans. The growth of the conidia gave infected bats the appearance of having dunked their faces into powdered sugar. The disease was named white-nose syndrome and represents an emerging zoonotic mycosis, likely introduced through human activities, which has led to a precipitous decline in North American bat species. PMID:26184962

  9. Rare case of subcutaneous mycosis with intrathoracic extension due to Chaetomium strumarium.

    PubMed

    Verma, R; Vasudevan, B; Badwal, S; Sriram, R; Neema, S; Kharayat, V

    2015-08-01

    A 47-year-old man presented with a 10-year history of multiple lumps over his left upper arm and shoulder and the adjoining left side of his chest and upper back. His medical history included diabetes mellitus type 2. The patient was a farmer and used to lift sacks of grains and fertilizers onto his shoulders as part of his work, although he did not recollect any history of specific trauma. Skin biopsy revealed granulomatous reaction with Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon, while periodic-acid-Schiff and Grocott-Gomori stains confirmed fungal elements. Sabouraud agar grew Chaetomium species, and lactophenol blue mount confirmed the fungus as Chaetomium strumarium. Radiography and computed tomography of the chest revealed intrathoracic extension of the mycetoma. The patient responded well to treatment with oral Itraconazole. Subcutaneous mycosis due to C. strumarium is rarely reported in the literature, and the intrathoracic extension makes it an even rarer entity. PMID:25703412

  10. Exophiala angulospora Causes Systemic Mycosis in Atlantic Halibut: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Overy, David P; Groman, David; Giles, Jan; Duffy, Stephanie; Rommens, Mellisa; Johnson, Gerald

    2015-03-01

    Filamentous black yeasts from the genus Exophiala are ubiquitous, opportunistic pathogens causing both superficial and systemic mycoses in warm- and cold-blooded animals. Infections by black yeasts have been reported relatively frequently in a variety of captive and farmed freshwater and marine fishes. In November 2012, moribund and recently dead, farm-raised Atlantic Halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus were necropsied to determine the cause of death. Histopathology revealed that three of seven fish were affected by a combination of an ascending trans-ductual granulomatous mycotic nephritis, necrotizing histiocytic encephalitis, and in one fish the addition of a fibrogranulomatous submucosal branchitis. Microbial cultures of kidney using selective mycotic media revealed pure growth of a black-pigmenting septated agent. Application of molecular and phenotypic taxonomy methodologies determined that all three isolates were genetically consistent with Exophiala angulospora. This is the first report of E. angulospora as the causal agent of systemic mycosis in Atlantic Halibut. PMID:25496596

  11. PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS: CHALLENGES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A VACCINE AGAINST AN ENDEMIC MYCOSIS IN THE AMERICAS

    PubMed Central

    TABORDA, Carlos. P.; URÁN, M.E.; NOSANCHUK, J. D.; TRAVASSOS, L.R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by Paracoccidioides spp, is an important endemic mycosis in Latin America. There are two recognized Paracoccidioides species, P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii, based on phylogenetic differences; however, the pathogenesis and disease manifestations of both are indistinguishable at present. Approximately 1,853 (~51,2%) of 3,583 confirmed deaths in Brazil due to systemic mycoses from 1996-2006 were caused by PCM. Antifungal treatment is required for patients with PCM. The initial treatment lasts from two to six months and sulfa derivatives, amphotericin B, azoles and terbinafine are used in clinical practice; however, despite prolonged therapy, relapses are still a problem. An effective Th1-biased cellular immune response is essential to control the disease, which can be induced by exogenous antigens or modulated by prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines. Stimulation of B cells or passive transference of monoclonal antibodies are also important means that may be used to improve the efficacy of paracoccidioidomycosis treatment in the future. This review critically details major challenges facing the development of a vaccine to combat PCM. PMID:26465365

  12. Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis due to fungi other than Aspergillus: a global overview.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Anuradha; Agarwal, Kshitij; Kathuria, Shallu; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Randhawa, Harbans Singh; Meis, Jacques F

    2014-02-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) is a hypersensitivity-mediated disease of worldwide distribution. We reviewed 143 reported global cases of ABPM due to fungi other than aspergilli. The commonest etiologic agent was Candida albicans, reported in 60% of the cases, followed by Bipolaris species (13%), Schizophyllum commune (11%), Curvularia species (8%), Pseudallescheria boydii species complex (3%) and rarely, Alternaria alternata, Fusarium vasinfectum, Penicillium species, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Stemphylium languinosum, Rhizopus oryzae, C. glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Trichosporon beigelii. India accounted for about 47% of the globally reported cases of ABPM, attributed predominantly to C. albicans, followed by Japan (16%) where S. commune predominates, and the remaining one-third from the USA, Australia and Europe. Notably, bronchial asthma was present in only 32% of ABPM cases whereas its association with development of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is known to be much more frequent. The cases reviewed herein revealed a median IgE value threefold higher than that of ABPA, suggesting that the etiologic agents of ABPM incite a stronger immunological response than that by aspergilli in ABPA. ABPM is currently underdiagnosed, warranting comprehensive basic and clinical studies in order to elucidate its epidemiology and to devise a more effective therapy. PMID:23383677

  13. PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS: CHALLENGES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF A VACCINE AGAINST AN ENDEMIC MYCOSIS IN THE AMERICAS.

    PubMed

    Taborda, Carlos P; Urán, M E; Nosanchuk, J D; Travassos, L R

    2015-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by Paracoccidioides spp, is an important endemic mycosis in Latin America. There are two recognized Paracoccidioides species, P. brasiliensis and P. lutzii, based on phylogenetic differences; however, the pathogenesis and disease manifestations of both are indistinguishable at present. Approximately 1,853 (~51,2%) of 3,583 confirmed deaths in Brazil due to systemic mycoses from 1996-2006 were caused by PCM. Antifungal treatment is required for patients with PCM. The initial treatment lasts from two to six months and sulfa derivatives, amphotericin B, azoles and terbinafine are used in clinical practice; however, despite prolonged therapy, relapses are still a problem. An effective Th1-biased cellular immune response is essential to control the disease, which can be induced by exogenous antigens or modulated by prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines. Stimulation of B cells or passive transference of monoclonal antibodies are also important means that may be used to improve the efficacy of paracoccidioidomycosis treatment in the future. This review critically details major challenges facing the development of a vaccine to combat PCM. PMID:26465365

  14. Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer and Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Intraocular Lymphoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Myelofibrosis; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory

  15. Bipolaris hawaiiensis as etiologic agent of allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis: first case in a paediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Anuradha; Randhawa, Harbans S; Singh, Varinder; Khan, Z U; Ahmad, S; Kathuria, Shallu; Roy, P; Khanna, Geetika; Chandra, Jagdish

    2011-10-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) is a worldwide hypersensitivity lung disease of multiple etiologies with Aspergillus fumigatus as the most common etiologic agent. We report the first instance of Bipolaris hawaiiensis causing ABPM in a paediatric patient. A six-year-old girl presented in June 2009 with productive cough, exertional dyspnoea, occasional wheezing, restricted air entry in left infra-scapular and infra-axillary areas, 7% eosinophils (absolute count 540/mm(3)) and total IgE 1051.3 IU/m in the sera. Bronchoscopy revealed narrowing of left main bronchus and mucoid impaction of the left lower lobe segmental bronchi. Cytological examination of BAL revealed few eosinophils, Charcot-Leyden crystals and mucus embedded hyphae. Examination of KOH wet mounts of repeated sputum and BAL specimens revealed septate, brownish hyphae and culture of the specimens resulted in the isolation of multiple colonies of a fungus later identified as B. hawaiiensis based on phenotypic characters and sequencing of internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 regions of rDNA. In addition, (1-3)-β-D-glucan was demonstrated in serum (316 pg/ml) by Fungitell kit, supportive of fungal infection/colonization. Histopathologic studies of a bronchial biopsy revealed necrotic debris, macrophage aggregates, lymphocytes, polymorphs and PAS positive hypae. The patient was administered oral itraconazole for 12 weeks, intravenous liposomal amphotericin B for one month, weekly bronchoscopic suctioning and voriconazole instillation, resulting in reduced mucopurulent secretions and considerable clinical improvement. A serum sample collected on 5 November demonstrated precipitins against antigens of the B. hawaiiensis isolate. In March 2010, intradermal skin testing revealed a strong, type I hypersensitivity (induration diam-12 mm) against B. hawaiiensis. The patient relapsed with wheezing and difficulty in respiration in April 2010. Considering the positive type I cutaneous hypersensitivity, the

  16. Data on morphological features of mycosis induced by Colletotrichum nymphaeae and Lecanicillium longisporum on citrus orthezia scale.

    PubMed

    Mascarin, Gabriel Moura; Guarín-Molina, Juan Humberto; Arthurs, Steven Paul; Humber, Richard Alan; de Andrade Moral, Rafael; Demétrio, Clarice Garcia Borges; Delalibera, Ítalo

    2016-09-01

    We describe symptoms of mycosis induced by two native fungal entomopathogens of the citrus orthezia scale, Praelongorthezia praelonga (Hemiptera: Ortheziidae), an important pest of citrus orchards. The data presented in this article are related to the article entitled "Seasonal prevalence of the insect pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum nymphaeae in Brazilian citrus groves under different chemical pesticide regimes" [1]. The endemic fungal pathogen, C. nymphaeae, emerges through the thin cuticular intersegmental regions of the citrus orthezia scale body revealing orange salmon-pigmented conidiophores bearing conidial masses, as well as producing rhizoid-like hyphae that extend over the citrus leaf. By contrast, nymphs or adult females of this scale insect infected with Lecanicillium longisporum exhibit profuse outgrowth of bright white-pigmented conidiophores with clusters of conidia emerging from the insect intersegmental membranes, and mycosed cadavers are commonly observed attached to the leaf surface by hyphal extensions. These morphological differences are important features to discriminate these fungal entomopathogens in citrus orthezia scales. PMID:27274531

  17. Disseminated mycosis in veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus) caused by Chamaeleomyces granulomatis, a new fungus related to Paecilomyces viridis.

    PubMed

    Sigler, Lynne; Gibas, Connie Fe C; Kokotovic, Branko; Bertelsen, Mads F

    2010-09-01

    An outbreak of disseminated granulomatous disease occurred in a group of veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus) in a zoo collection. An adult female and six offspring developed large granulomas in multiple organs and were euthanized. At necropsy, roughly spherical yellow-to-white nodules 1 to 3 mm in diameter were grossly visible in the liver and other organs. Histopathology revealed fungal elements that were spherical to ovoid in shape, fragments of slender to irregularly swollen hyphae, and occasional conidia produced on phialides. Fungal isolates were initially suspected on the basis of morphology results to represent Paecilomyces viridis, a species known only from one outbreak of fatal mycosis in carpet chameleons (Furcifer lateralis). Data obtained from morphological studies and from phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal rRNA (rDNA) sequence data revealed the Danish chameleon isolates to be a related undescribed anamorphic species within the family Clavicipitaceae that includes many insect pathogens. Chamaeleomyces granulomatis gen. et sp. nov. is given as the name for the newly described fungus, and P. viridis is transferred to the new genus as Chamaeleomyces viridis comb. nov. Chamaeleomyces species are distinguished by having basally swollen phialides tapering to a narrow neck, conidia in fragile chains, and pale green to greenish-gray colonies. Both species are dimorphic, producing a transitory yeast stage characterized by ovoid-to-subglobose or subcylindrical yeast-like cells. Chamaeleomyces species appear to be rare but aggressive pathogens of chameleons. PMID:20660211

  18. Disseminated Mycosis in Veiled Chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus) Caused by Chamaeleomyces granulomatis, a New Fungus Related to Paecilomyces viridis▿

    PubMed Central

    Sigler, Lynne; Gibas, Connie Fe C.; Kokotovic, Branko; Bertelsen, Mads F.

    2010-01-01

    An outbreak of disseminated granulomatous disease occurred in a group of veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus) in a zoo collection. An adult female and six offspring developed large granulomas in multiple organs and were euthanized. At necropsy, roughly spherical yellow-to-white nodules 1 to 3 mm in diameter were grossly visible in the liver and other organs. Histopathology revealed fungal elements that were spherical to ovoid in shape, fragments of slender to irregularly swollen hyphae, and occasional conidia produced on phialides. Fungal isolates were initially suspected on the basis of morphology results to represent Paecilomyces viridis, a species known only from one outbreak of fatal mycosis in carpet chameleons (Furcifer lateralis). Data obtained from morphological studies and from phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal rRNA (rDNA) sequence data revealed the Danish chameleon isolates to be a related undescribed anamorphic species within the family Clavicipitaceae that includes many insect pathogens. Chamaeleomyces granulomatis gen. et sp. nov. is given as the name for the newly described fungus, and P. viridis is transferred to the new genus as Chamaeleomyces viridis comb. nov. Chamaeleomyces species are distinguished by having basally swollen phialides tapering to a narrow neck, conidia in fragile chains, and pale green to greenish-gray colonies. Both species are dimorphic, producing a transitory yeast stage characterized by ovoid-to-subglobose or subcylindrical yeast-like cells. Chamaeleomyces species appear to be rare but aggressive pathogens of chameleons. PMID:20660211

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Sézary syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma after mycosis fungoides , accounting for approximately 3 to 5 percent of cases ... be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of ...

  20. A Phase II Study of Single Agent Brentuximab Vedotin in Relapsed/Refractory CD30 Low (<10%) Mature T Cell Lymphoma (TCL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepato-splenic T-cell Lymphoma; Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma; NK T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Mycosis Fungoides

  1. A case of syringotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma treated with local radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Rojymon; Scala, Matthew; Fung, Maxwell A

    2009-01-01

    Syringotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (SCTCL) is a variant of mycosis fungoides that is characterized by the presence of lymphocytic infiltration of eccrine glandular structures and the absence of the classic features of MF, such as epidermotropism and Pautrier's microabscesses. We report a patient with SCTCL who presented with multiple hypopigmented patches and localized alopecia who was treated with local radiotherapy with excellent local control. In our experience, local electron radiation offers local control in early stage SCTCL, and it may be possible to reserve systemic therapy for more advanced stages of the disease. PMID:19103368

  2. An overview of cutaneous T cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bagherani, Nooshin; Smoller, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that are characterized by a cutaneous infiltration of malignant monoclonal T lymphocytes. They typically afflict adults with a median age of 55 to 60 years, and the annual incidence is about 0.5 per 100,000. Mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, and primary cutaneous peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are the most important subtypes of CTCL. CTCL is a complicated concept in terms of etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. Herein, we summarize advances which have been achieved in these fields. PMID:27540476

  3. Subcutaneous Mycosis Due to Cladosporium cladosporioides and Bipolaris cynodontis from Assam, North-East India and Review of Published Literature.

    PubMed

    Nath, Reema; Barua, Shyamanta; Barman, Jahnabi; Swargiary, Pallabi; Borgohain, Mondita; Saikia, Lahari

    2015-12-01

    A large number of phaeoid fungi cause infection in humans and other animals which is characterized by the basic development of sclerotic body, dark-coloured filamentous hyphae as well as yeast-like cells in the invaded tissue. Two cases of subcutaneous mycosis in immunocompetent male patients aged 55 and 58 years attending Dermatology outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in Assam, north-east India, are reported. The first case was diagnosed as chromoblastomycosis which was caused by Cladosporium cladosporioides. The patient clinically presented with a chronic verrucous and nodular growth of 32-year duration on the left foot and leg. Identification of the species was done by sequencing the D1/D2 region of LSU (large subunit 28S rDNA). The patient was treated with surgical resection and oral itraconazole which showed good clinical response and total regression of lesion after 9 months. The second case due to Bipolaris cynodontis presented as verrucous exophytic growth over the dorsum of the right foot of 1-year duration which was diagnosed as chromoblastomycosis. The identification of the species was done by sequencing the ITS region. The patient was started with oral itraconazole but was lost to follow-up. Chromoblastomycosis due to Cladosporium cladosporioides is rare. Bipolaris cynodontis is not yet reported as a cause of human infection. The aetiological role of this fungus was confirmed by repeated isolation of the fungus from the lesion and direct microscopy. Molecular identification methods can increase the spectrum of black moulds causing human infection in coming years. We are reporting these two cases with review of the available literature. PMID:26198088

  4. Clinical Significance and Molecular Characterization of Nonsporulating Molds Isolated from the Respiratory Tracts of Bronchopulmonary Mycosis Patients with Special Reference to Basidiomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Kathuria, Shallu; Agarwal, Kshitij; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Meis, Jacques F.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsporulating molds (NSMs), especially basidiomycetes, have predominantly been reported as human pathogens responsible for allergic and invasive disease. Their conventional identification is problematic, as many isolates remain sterile in culture. Thus, inconclusive culture reports might adversely affect treatment decisions. The clinical significance of NSMs in pulmonary mycoses is poorly understood. We sequenced the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and D1/D2 domain of the larger subunit (LSU) of 52 NSMs isolated from respiratory specimens. The basidiomycetes were the predominant NSMs, of which Schizophyllum commune was the most common agent in allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM), followed by Ceriporia lacerata in invasive fungal disease. Porostereum spadiceum, Phanaerochaete stereoides, Neosartorya fischeri, and Marasmiellus palmivorus were the other molds observed. Application of ITS and LSU region sequencing identified 92% of the isolates. The antifungal susceptibility data revealed that all basidiomycetes tested were susceptible to amphotericin B and resistant to caspofungin, fluconazole, and flucytosine. Except for 3 isolates of S. commune and a solitary isolate of M. palmivorus, all basidiomycetes had low MICs for itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole. Basidiomycetes were isolated from patients with ABPM, invasive pulmonary mycosis/pneumonia, or fungal balls. In addition, the majority of the basidiomycetes were isolated from patients with chronic respiratory disorders who were sensitized to one of the basidiomycetous fungi and demonstrated precipitating antibodies against the incriminating fungi, indicating an indolent tissue reaction. Thus, isolation of basidiomycetes from the lower respiratory tract could be significant, and it is important to monitor these patients in order to prevent subsequent lung damage. PMID:23903552

  5. [Epidemiological transition of mycosis diseases in sub-Saharan Africa: from surface to depth].

    PubMed

    Chandenier, J; Desoubeaux, G

    2015-02-01

    Fungi are schematically responsible for three distinct kinds of infections: superficial mycoses, subcutaneous and deep ones. The current socio-epidemiological transition observed in sub-Saharan Africa does not actually lead to similar consequences regarding these three categories of fungal entities. For instance, it has long been known that superficial mycoses are very prevalent in tropical areas, since they are partly due to the warm climate and the promiscuity. They are mostly caused by dermatophytic fungi or Malassezia sp. (Pityriasis versicolor). Subcutaneous mycoses are rarer, and usually due to dimorphic fungi which are accidentally inoculated into the body after a skin injury or a trauma. Sometimes very spectacular, the clinical outcome is then described as chronic. Thus, chromoblastomycosis, rhinoentomophtoromycosis or mycetoma are some examples of subcutaneous mycoses which remain well-known by practitioners of endemic countries. Deep mycoses (or invasive / systemic mycoses) are defined by fungal infections of deep anatomical sites that should be normally sterile. By contrast with the other entities mentioned above, the outcome may be rapidly fatal for the patient. One of the most outstanding examples was the great increasing of cryptococcal meningitis during the HIV outbreak in the 80'. A few other similar mycoses may be feared in a near future, since they usually occur in contexts of important immunosuppression which are about to be definitely experienced in Africa: overall increase of chronic diseases like diabetes, lengthening life expectancy and its associated diseases, widespread medical practices which were only seen in advanced intensive care units, onco-haematology departments or graft centers so far. Thus, the deep mycoses will inevitably increase in Africa, as they did in all developed countries over the last two decades. The consequences will not only be limited to the clinical management as described above: the diagnostic approach is also

  6. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Single-Stranded RNA Virus Infectious to a Marine Fungoid Protist, Schizochytrium sp. (Thraustochytriaceae, Labyrinthulea)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Yoshitake; Nagasaki, Keizo; Mise, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Tetsuro; Honda, Daiske

    2005-01-01

    Thraustochytrids are cosmopolitan osmoheterotrophic microorganisms that play important roles as decomposers, producers of polyunsaturated fatty acids, and pathogens of mollusks, especially in coastal ecosystems. SssRNAV, a novel single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus infecting the marine fungoid protist Schizochytrium sp. (Labyrinthulea, Thraustochytriaceae) was isolated from the coastal water of Kobe Harbor, Japan, in July 2000, and its basic characteristics were examined. The virus particle is icosahedral, lacks a tail, and is ca. 25 nm in diameter. SssRNAV formed crystalline arrays and random assemblies within the cytoplasm of host cells, and it was also concentrated along the intracellular membrane structures. By means of one-step growth experiments, the lytic cycle and the burst size were estimated to be <8 h and 5.8 × 103 to 6.4 × 104 infectious units per host cell, respectively. SssRNAV had a single molecule of ssRNA that was approximately 10.2 kb long, three major proteins (37, 34, and 32 kDa), and two minor proteins (80 and 18 kDa). Although SssRNAV was considered to have some similarities with invertebrate viruses belonging to the family Dicistroviridae based on its partial nucleotide sequence, further genomic analysis is required to determine the detailed classification and nomenclature of SssRNAV. Our results indicate that viral infection is one of the significant factors controlling the dynamics of thraustochytrids and provide new insights into understanding the ecology of these organisms. PMID:16085844

  7. Delivery of Amphotericin B for Effective Treatment of Candida Albicans Induced Dermal Mycosis in Rats via Emulgel System: Formulation and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Vaishya, Pooja; Jain, Sumeet; Pandey, Vikas; Bansal, Divya; Dubey, Nazneen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amphotericin B (AmB) is among the gold standard antifungal agents used for the treatment of the wide range of fungal infections. However, the drug has various side- effects. Transdermal approach for the delivery of drug is one of the accepted and convenient modes of drug delivery. Aim: The current work was designed to formulate and to evaluate the AmB emulgel system. Materials and Methods: In the preparation of AmB emulgel, Carbopol 930 was used as a gel in this study. The formulation was evaluated for viscosity, spreadability, drug content, drug release and in vitro and in vivo antifungal testing. Results: AmB emulgel was found to penetrate skin effectively and without any irritation. Further, in vivo studies revealed effective therapeutic potential against Candida albicans induced dermal mycosis. Conclusions: The current work, for the first time, revealed effective delivery of AmB across the skin. PMID:25071257

  8. Isolation and characterization of a novel single-stranded RNA Virus infectious to a marine fungoid protist, Schizochytrium sp. (Thraustochytriaceae, Labyrinthulea).

    PubMed

    Takao, Yoshitake; Nagasaki, Keizo; Mise, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Tetsuro; Honda, Daiske

    2005-08-01

    Thraustochytrids are cosmopolitan osmoheterotrophic microorganisms that play important roles as decomposers, producers of polyunsaturated fatty acids, and pathogens of mollusks, especially in coastal ecosystems. SssRNAV, a novel single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus infecting the marine fungoid protist Schizochytrium sp. (Labyrinthulea, Thraustochytriaceae) was isolated from the coastal water of Kobe Harbor, Japan, in July 2000, and its basic characteristics were examined. The virus particle is icosahedral, lacks a tail, and is ca. 25 nm in diameter. SssRNAV formed crystalline arrays and random assemblies within the cytoplasm of host cells, and it was also concentrated along the intracellular membrane structures. By means of one-step growth experiments, the lytic cycle and the burst size were estimated to be <8 h and 5.8 x 10(3) to 6.4 x 10(4) infectious units per host cell, respectively. SssRNAV had a single molecule of ssRNA that was approximately 10.2 kb long, three major proteins (37, 34, and 32 kDa), and two minor proteins (80 and 18 kDa). Although SssRNAV was considered to have some similarities with invertebrate viruses belonging to the family Dicistroviridae based on its partial nucleotide sequence, further genomic analysis is required to determine the detailed classification and nomenclature of SssRNAV. Our results indicate that viral infection is one of the significant factors controlling the dynamics of thraustochytrids and provide new insights into understanding the ecology of these organisms. PMID:16085844

  9. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Ligation of the ipsilateral common carotid artery and topical treatment for the prevention of epistaxis from guttural pouch mycosis in horses.

    PubMed

    Cousty, M; Tricaud, C; De Beauregard, T; Picandet, V; Bizon-Mercier, C; Tessier, C

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of ligation of the ipsilateral common carotid artery (CCA) combined with various antimycotic treatments for the prevention of epistaxis in horses with guttural pouch mycosis. For each case, ipsilateral ligation of the CCA was performed, followed by application of various topical medications under endoscopic guidance. Frequency and number of treatments, outcome and recurrence of haemorrhage were retrospectively recorded. Twenty-four horses were included. Topical medication was administered by detachment of the diphtheric membrane and spraying (n=16) or by intralesional injection directly in the plaques using a transendoscopic needle (n=8). Epistaxis recurred in five horses (20.8 per cent), causing death of four horses (16.6 per cent). The mean number of treatments was 6.3±4.0 (range 2-14) for all topical treatments. Ligation of the ipsilateral CCA and topical medication carries a fair prognosis for avoidance of recurrent episodes of epistaxis, but fatal haemorrhage can occur. Removal of the fungal plaque and topical treatment of the underlying lesion appeared to speed up resolution of the mycotic mucosal lesions. The described technique is a salvage procedure when financial or technical constraints prevent the use of transarterial catheter occlusion techniques. PMID:26657942

  11. Role of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor in Host Defense Against Pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans Infection during Murine Allergic Bronchopulmonary Mycosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gwo-Hsiao; Olszewski, Michal A.; McDonald, Roderick A.; Wells, Jason C.; Paine, Robert; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Toews, Galen B.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in host defense in a murine model of pulmonary cryptococcosis induced by intratracheal inoculation of Cryptococcus neoformans. Pulmonary C. neoformans infection of C57BL/6 mice is an established model of an allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis. Our objective was to determine whether GM-CSF regulates the pulmonary Th2 immune response in C. neoformans-infected C57BL/6 mice. Long-term pulmonary fungistasis was lost in GM-CSF knockout (GM−/−) mice, resulting in increased pulmonary burden of fungi between weeks 3 and 5. GM-CSF was required for the early influx of macrophages and CD4 and CD8 T cells into the lungs but was not required later in the infection. Lack of GM-CSF also resulted in reduced eosinophil recruitment and delayed recruitment of mononuclear cells into the airspace. Macrophages from GM+/+ mice showed numerous hallmarks of alternatively activated macrophages: higher numbers of intracellular cryptococci, YM1 crystals, and induction of CCL17. These hallmarks are absent in macrophages from GM−/− mice. Mucus-producing goblet cells were abundantly present within the bronchial epithelial layer in GM+/+ mice but not in GM−/− mice at week 5 after infection. Production of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines was impaired in the absence of GM-CSF, consistent with both reduced C. neoformans clearance and absence of allergic lung pathology. PMID:17322386

  12. Recent Advances in Our Understanding of the Environmental, Epidemiological, Immunological, and Clinical Dimensions of Coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chinh; Barker, Bridget Marie; Hoover, Susan; Nix, David E.; Ampel, Neil M.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.; Orbach, Marc J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Coccidioidomycosis is the endemic mycosis caused by the fungal pathogens Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii. This review is a summary of the recent advances that have been made in the understanding of this pathogen, including its mycology, genetics, and niche in the environment. Updates on the epidemiology of the organism emphasize that it is a continuing, significant problem in areas of endemicity. For a variety of reasons, the number of reported coccidioidal infections has increased dramatically over the past decade. While continual improvements in the fields of organ transplantation and management of autoimmune disorders and patients with HIV have led to dilemmas with concurrent infection with coccidioidomycosis, they have also led to advances in the understanding of the human immune response to infection. There have been some advances in therapeutics with the increased use of newer azoles. Lastly, there is an overview of the ongoing search for a preventative vaccine. PMID:23824371

  13. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphomas That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-30

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Localized Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult

  14. Leucoderma associated with flares of erythrodermic cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: four cases. The French Study Group of Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bouloc, A; Grange, F; Delfau-Larue, M H; Dieng, M T; Tortel, M C; Avril, M F; Revuz, J; Bagot, M; Wechsler, J

    2000-10-01

    We describe four patients with erythrodermic cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (two with erythrodermic mycosis fungoides, and two with Sézary syndrome) who presented with extensive hypopigmented lesions that occurred during flares of their cutaneous disease. These cases must be distinguished from previously described hypopigmented mycosis fungoides where hypopigmented lesions were the sole manifestation of the lymphoma. In two cases a biopsy was performed on hypopigmented skin, showing an infiltrate of atypical lymphocytes with epidermotropism and absence of melanocytes, as in vitiligo. It is suggested that the hypopigmentation could be due to the cytotoxicity of tumour or reactional lymphocytes directed against melanocytes. PMID:11069466

  15. Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: A Review with a Focus on Targeted Agents.

    PubMed

    Devata, Sumana; Wilcox, Ryan A

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of extranodal lymphomas involving the skin. Diagnosis of the two main subtypes of CTCL-mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS)-is based on the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (ISCL/EORTC) classification system, which utilizes clinical, histopathological, molecular biologic, and immunopathologic features. Risk stratification, based on TNMB (tumor, node, metastasis, and blood) staging, provides prognostic information, with limited-stage disease conferring the longest median overall survival. Skin-directed therapies are preferred in the management of limited-stage disease, whereas advanced-stage disease requires systemic therapies. As the mechanisms of CTCL pathogenesis are increasingly understood, new monoclonal antibodies, checkpoint inhibitors, immunomodulatory agents, and small molecules are under investigation and may provide additional therapeutic options for those with advanced CTCL. This review examines the current landscape of targeted therapies in the treatment of CTCLs. PMID:26923912

  16. Immunopathogenesis and therapy of cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ellen J.; Hess, Stephen; Richardson, Stephen K.; Newton, Sara; Showe, Louise C.; Benoit, Bernice M.; Ubriani, Ravi; Vittorio, Carmela C.; Junkins-Hopkins, Jacqueline M.; Wysocka, Maria; Rook, Alain H.

    2005-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogenous group of lymphoproliferative disorders caused by clonally derived, skin-invasive T cells. Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) are the most common types of CTCLs and are characterized by malignant CD4+/CLA+/CCR4+ T cells that also lack the usual T cell surface markers CD7 and/or CD26. As MF/SS advances, the clonal dominance of the malignant cells results in the expression of predominantly Th2 cytokines, progressive immune dysregulation in patients, and further tumor cell growth. This review summarizes recent insights into the pathogenesis and immunobiology of MF/SS and how these have shaped current therapeutic approaches, in particular the growing emphasis on enhancement of host antitumor immune responses as the key to successful therapy. PMID:15841167

  17. [Skin memory: the clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Gaide, Olivier

    2016-03-30

    Activated T lymphocytes give rise to daughter cells that can persist for decades in our body, while retaining their ability to provide a strong immune response. Recent advances have highlighted the fact that a significant portion of these memory cells are found directly in peripheral tissues and lack the capacity to migrate to the blood. We have recently shown that these cells, called Tissue Resident Memory T cells (T(RM)), play a major role in the immune response, regardless of the antigenic challenge. They have a backup of circulating central memory T cells (T(CM)) that bear the exact same T cell receptor. For the clinician, this knowledge is very useful as it allows a better understanding and better choice of therapeutics for several cutaneous diseases, such as contact dermatitis and cutaneous T cell lymphoma (Mycosis Fungoides vs Sezary). PMID:27172692

  18. Skin cancer and photoaging in ethnic skin.

    PubMed

    Halder, Rebat M; Ara, Collette J

    2003-10-01

    Skin cancer prevalence in ethnic skin is low. Squamous cell carcinoma, hypopigmented mycosis fungoides, and acral lentiginous melanoma are the most serious types of skin cancer noted in the darker-skinned population. Photoaging occurs less frequently and is less severe in ethnic skin. PMID:14717413

  19. Advance directives

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Rory; Mailo, Kevin; Angeles, Ricardo; Agarwal, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To establish the prevalence of patients with advance directives in a family practice, and to describe patients’ perspectives on a family doctor’s role in initiating discussions about advance directives. Design A self-administered patient questionnaire. Setting A busy urban family medicine teaching clinic in Hamilton, Ont. Participants A convenience sample of adult patients attending the clinic over the course of a typical business week. Main outcome measures The prevalence of advance directives in the patient population was determined, and the patients’ expectations regarding the role of their family doctors were elucidated. Results The survey population consisted of 800 participants (a response rate of 72.5%) well distributed across age groups; 19.7% had written advance directives and 43.8% had previously discussed the topic of advance directives, but only 4.3% of these discussions had occurred with family doctors. In 5.7% of cases, a family physician had raised the issue; 72.3% of respondents believed patients should initiate the discussion. Patients who considered advance directives extremely important were significantly more likely to want their family doctors to start the conversation (odds ratio 3.98; P < .05). Conclusion Advance directives were not routinely addressed in the family practice. Most patients preferred to initiate the discussion of advance directives. However, patients who considered the subject extremely important wanted their family doctors to initiate the discussion. PMID:25873704

  20. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  1. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  2. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  3. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  4. Advanced computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Advanced concepts in hardware, software and algorithms are being pursued for application in next generation space computers and for ground based analysis of space data. The research program focuses on massively parallel computation and neural networks, as well as optical processing and optical networking which are discussed under photonics. Also included are theoretical programs in neural and nonlinear science, and device development for magnetic and ferroelectric memories.

  5. Advanced Nanoemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryd, Michael M.; Mason, Thomas G.

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in the growing field of nanoemulsions are opening up new applications in many areas such as pharmaceuticals, foods, and cosmetics. Moreover, highly controlled nanoemulsions can also serve as excellent model systems for investigating basic scientific questions about soft matter. Here, we highlight some of the most recent developments in nanoemulsions, focusing on methods of formation, surface modification, material properties, and characterization. These developments provide insight into the substantial advantages that nanoemulsions can offer over their microscale emulsion counterparts.

  6. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  7. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  8. Advanced capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. D.; Buritz, R. S.; Taylor, A. R.; Bullwinkel, E. P.

    1982-11-01

    An experimental development program was conducted to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. High rep rate and low rate capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, and high frequency ac capacitors for series resonant inverters were considered. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film. Initially, low breakdown strength was thought to be related to inclusions of conductive particles. The effect of filtration of the casting solution was investigated. These experiments showed that more filtration was not the entire solution to low breakdown. The film samples were found to contain dissolved ionic impurities that move through the dielectric when voltage is applied and cause enhancement of the electric field. These contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and can be partially removed. However, these treatments did not significantly improve the breakdown characteristics. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films. this is the first step toward a replacement for kraft paper.

  9. Advanced capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, J. B.; Buritz, R. S.

    1984-10-01

    This report describes an experimental program to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. Five classes of capacitors were considered: high rep rate and low rep rate pulse capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, high frequency AC capacitors for series resonant inverters, and AC filter capacitors. To meet these requirements, existing dielectric materials were modified, and new materials were developed. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film with fewer imperfections that could operate at significantly higher electrical stresses. It was shown that contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and that they can be partially removed. As far as developed, however, these treatments did not significantly improved the breakdown characteristics. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films -- the first step toward a replacement for Kraft paper. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. This material was selected for further study in model capacitor designs.

  10. Future advances.

    PubMed

    Celesia, Gastone G; Hickok, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Future advances in the auditory systems are difficult to predict, and only educated guesses are possible. It is expected that innovative technologies in the field of neuroscience will be applied to the auditory system. Optogenetics, Brainbow, and CLARITY will improve our knowledge of the working of neural auditory networks and the relationship between sound and language, providing a dynamic picture of the brain in action. CLARITY makes brain tissue transparent and offers a three-dimensional view of neural networks, which, combined with genetically labeling neurons with multiple, distinct colors (Optogenetics), will provide detailed information of the complex brain system. Molecular functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will allow the study of neurotransmitters detectable by MRI and their function in the auditory pathways. The Human Connectome project will study the patterns of distributed brain activity that underlie virtually all aspects of cognition and behavior and determine if abnormalities in the distributed patterns of activity may result in hearing and behavior disorders. Similarly, the programs of Big Brain and ENIGMA will improve our understanding of auditory disorders. New stem-cell therapy and gene therapies therapy may bring about a partial restoration of hearing for impaired patients by inducing regeneration of cochlear hair cells. PMID:25726297

  11. A mycosis-like granuloma of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, E.M.; Yasutake, W.T.; Lehman, W.L.

    1955-01-01

    Mycoses of systemic distribution are rarely observed in fresh-water fish in this country. In a recent review of atypical cell growths in fishes, Nigrelli cited the only known instance of a mycetoma in a North American fresh-water fish which occurred in the head of fingerling landlocked salmon from an Idaho hatchery. The fungus associated with this granuloma was characterized by a branching septate mycelium. Rucker reported a streptomycete which was pathogenic to blueblack salmon. This organism produced internal nodules containing masses of hyphae but no inflammatory response. A pathogenic fungus has been observed frequently in marine fish, however, and in both marine and fresh-water fish in Europe. This organism was tentatively classified as a Phycomycete in or near the order Chytridiales and was assigned to the genus and species Ichthyophonus hoferi, later reclassified as Ichthyosporidium hoferi. The graduloma described in this report occurs in fresh-water trout and is apparently caused by a budding, yeast-like form with no hyphae which evokes a tremendous inflammatory reaction. Morphologically, the organism does not resemble the previously described Ichthyosporidium. The lesions were first seen accidentally in sections prepared from a diplobacillus infection of brook trout termed “kidney disease.” Subsequently, the granuloma was observed in three widely separated infections involving the diplobacillus in each instance.The histological material was received in a fixed condition; thus, no cultural data was available and the nomenclature and classification of the mycotic organism were not attempted. The present distribution of the disease, however, with its potential threat to domestic fish populations, seemed to warrant a description and discussion of the disease. Efforts are in progress to culture the organism.

  12. [Gas-forming mycosis of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Kuss, M; Franzen, W; Engelking, R; Altenburg, A

    1993-01-01

    We report on the case of a 22-year-old heroin-dependent diabetic woman. She presented with a gas-forming fungal infection of the kidney caused by Candida tropicalis. The patient was successfully treated by conservative means. Problems in the diagnosis and therapy of this rare disease are discussed. PMID:8447045

  13. Individualized eye shields for use in electron beam therapy as well as low-energy photon irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asbell, S.O.; Siu, J.; Lightfoot, D.A.; Brady, L.W.

    1980-04-01

    Thin lead eye shields formed with a rubber hammer over smooth wooden mandril and coated with dental acrylic have been used on 25 patients undergoing electron beam treatment for mycosis fungoides or superficial x-ray irradiation with no significant difficulties. The shields may be fabricated in less than two hours and exactly fit the contour and size of the eye. Details of the fabrication process and evaluation of the shielding effectiveness are presented.

  14. [A girl with hypopigmented skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Martens, Bibi; Abdul Hamid, Myrurgia; Martens, Herm

    2014-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl visited the department of Dermatology with an asymptomatic hypopigmented skin eruption on her upper legs, groins and trunk since 7 years. Histopathological analysis established the diagnosis of hypopigmented mycosis fungoides, a rare subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma which is most commonly seen at younger age. The lesions are successfully treated with clobetasol 0.05% ointment 4 days a week. PMID:25027222

  15. Ichthyosiform Large Plaque Parapsoriasis: Report of a Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Falguni; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Biswas, Projna; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Biswas, Saugato

    2013-01-01

    Large plaque parapsoriasis (LPP) is an idiopathic, chronic scaly dermatosis classified within parapsoriasis group of diseases, occurring commonly in middle aged patients of all races and geographic regions. LPP and its variants are closely related to the patch stage of mycosis fungoides. The two types of LPP mostly described are the poikilodermatous and retiform parapsoriasis. We are reporting an ichthyosiform LPP for its rarity. PMID:24082186

  16. The Use of Interferons in the Treatment of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Spaccarelli, Natalie; Rook, Alain H

    2015-10-01

    Interferons are polypeptides that naturally occur in the human body as a part of the innate immune response. By harnessing these immunomodulatory functions, synthetic interferons have shown efficacy in combating various diseases including cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. This article closely examines the qualities of interferon alfa and interferon gamma and the evidence behind their use in the 2 most common types of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, namely, mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome. PMID:26433845

  17. Bortezomib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  18. Clinical implementation of total skin electron irradiation treatment with a 6 MeV electron beam in high-dose total skin electron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, J. F.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-01

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) is a special treatment technique offered by modern radiation oncology facilities, given for the treatment of mycosis fungoides, a rare skin disease, which is type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma [1]. During treatment the patient's entire skin is irradiated with a uniform dose. The aim of this work is to present implementation of total skin electron irradiation treatment using IAEA TRS-398 code of practice for absolute dosimetry and taking advantage of the use of radiochromic films.

  19. Romidepsin: evidence for its potential use to manage previously treated cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Poligone, Brian; Lin, Janet; Chung, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) encompasses a heterogeneous group of neoplasms of skin-homing T cells, which includes mycosis fungoides, the most common form, and Sézary syndrome, the leukemia equivalent of mycosis fungoides. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are currently under investigation for their therapeutic value in a variety of conditions. Through multiple mechanisms, they induce apoptosis or inhibition of tumor cell growth. Some studies have also shown histone deacetylase inhibitors to have synergistic activity with existing therapeutic agents in selected conditions. Romidepsin is a histone deacetylase inhibitor with a promising efficacy and safety profile that may represent a valuable treatment alternative for patients with treatment-resistant mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome. Aims: To review emerging evidence regarding the use of romidepsin in the management of treatment-resistant CTCL. Evidence review: There is evidence that romidepsin can induce significant and durable responses in patients with refractory CTCL. In two independent Phase II trials including a total of 167 patients with CTCL, there was an overall response rate of 34% with a partial response of 28% and complete response rate of 6%. The most frequent toxicities reported from the Phase II trials were nausea, vomiting, fatigue, anorexia, and dysgeusia. Clinical potential: Romidepsin may be an effective therapeutic option for patients with CTCL who have had treatment failure with multiple standard treatment modalities. PMID:21468238

  20. Low-Dose Palliative Radiotherapy for Cutaneous B- and T-Cell Lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Neelis, Karen J. Schimmel, Erik C.; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Senff, Nancy J.; Willemze, Rein; Noordijk, Evert M.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of low-dose palliative radiotherapy for both low-grade malignant cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (CBCLs) and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (mycosis fungoides). Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients with low-grade CBCL (10 primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell and 8 primary cutaneous follicle center lymphomas) with 44 symptomatic plaques and tumors underwent low-dose (4 Gy in two fractions) local radiotherapy. A total of 31 patients with mycosis fungoides were treated at 82 symptomatic sites, initially with 4 Gy and later with 8 Gy in two fractions. Results: The complete response rate for CBCL lesions was 72%. Of the 44 B-cell lymphoma lesions, 13 were re-treated to the same site after a median of 6.3 months because of persistent (n = 8) or recurrent (n = 5) symptomatic disease. Of the mycosis fungoides patients treated with 4 Gy in two fractions (17 lesions), 70% failed to respond. Increasing the dose to 8 Gy in two fractions yielded a complete response rate of 92% (60 of 65 lesions). The patients in whom low-dose radiotherapy failed were retreated with 20 Gy in eight fractions. Conclusion: Our results have demonstrated that low-dose involved-field radiotherapy induces a high response rate in both CBCL and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma lesions without any toxicity. Therefore, this treatment is now our standard palliative treatment. At progression, it is safe and feasible to apply greater radiation doses.

  1. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw in Association With Chemotherapy in the Setting of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    DeSesa, Christopher R; Appugounder, Suganya; Haberland, Christel; Johnson, Michael P

    2016-02-01

    T-cell lymphomas (TCLs) account for approximately 15 to 20% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas in the United States. The most common form of TCL is cutaneous TCL (CTCL), with Sézary syndrome and mycosis fungoides being the most prevalent subtypes. Sézary syndrome is the more aggressive form and often is referred to as a late-stage variant of mycosis fungoides. Clinically, it is characterized by diffuse erythroderma, cutaneous edema, pruritus, nonhealing cutaneous ulcers, and lymphadenopathy. Patients also can present with changes to their nails, hyperpigmentation, alopecia, palmoplantar keratoderma, ectropion, and hepatosplenomegaly. The overall prognosis for patients with Sézary syndrome is poor. The literature regarding oral manifestations of CTCL mostly report those of mycosis fungoides because it is the most common subtype of CTCL. Currently, there are only 2 reports in the scientific literature of intraoral manifestations of Sézary syndrome. This case report describes a patient with Sézary syndrome who presented with rapidly progressing erythematous lesions of the gingiva and multifocal osteonecrosis of the maxilla and mandible. This is the third reported case of an intraoral manifestation of Sézary syndrome and the first reported case of osteonecrosis in the setting of CTCL. PMID:26296596

  2. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  3. Advance Care Planning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... Is Advance Care Planning? Advance care planning involves learning about the types of decisions that might need ...

  4. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator advanced studies, Mercury mission transport requirements, definition of super solar electric propulsion/solar sail mission discriminators, and advanced planning activities.

  5. Advanced midwifery practice or advancing midwifery practice?

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel; Leap, Nicky; Homer, Caroline

    2010-09-01

    Advanced midwifery practice is a controversial notion in midwifery, particularly at present in Australia. The proposed changes in legislation around access to the publicly funded Medical Benefits Scheme (MBS) and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) in 2009-2010 have meant that the issue of advanced midwifery practice has again taken prominence. Linking midwifery access to MBS and PBS to a safety and quality framework that includes an 'advanced midwifery credentialling framework' is particularly challenging. The Haxton and Fahy paper in the December 2009 edition of Women and Birth is timely as it enables a reflection upon these issues and encourages debate and discussion about exactly what is midwifery, what are we educating our students for and is working to the full scope of practice practising at advanced level? This paper seeks to address some of these questions and open up the topic for further debate. PMID:20018582

  6. Nail Alterations in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: A Case Series and Review of Nail Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Brian E.; Wulkan, Adam; Kerdel, Francisco; El-Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) encompasses a broad range of lymphoproliferative diseases affecting the skin and can be clinically misleading due to its variable presentation. Nail alterations commonly appear in advanced-stage mycosis fungoides and true Sézary syndrome; however, they may be present in any stage of the disease. Although proper recognition of nail involvement in CTCL has both clinical and therapeutic value, specific nail findings have been infrequently described in the current literature. Observations We describe 4 patients with CTCL who presented with clinically significant nail alterations. The most common findings were nail discoloration, thickening, crumbling, onycholysis, and onychomadesis. Other notable findings included splinter hemorrhages, subungual hyperkeratosis, and anonychia. Conclusions and Message The described cases illustrate many of the documented nail findings associated with CTCL and emphasize the variable nature of nail manifestations. The presence of specific nail alterations should increase the clinical suspicion of CTCL – especially in patients with concomitant systemic and/or cutaneous manifestations – and early biopsy specimens should be taken for diagnosis. Nail alterations should also be accurately described and monitored in all patients with biopsy-confirmed CTCL to help identify treatment response and detect disease recurrence. PMID:27170938

  7. Demographic patterns of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma incidence in Texas based on two different cancer registries

    PubMed Central

    Litvinov, Ivan V; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Rahme, Elham; Jennings, Michelle A; Risser, David R; Gangar, Pamela; Netchiporouk, Elena; Moreau, Linda; Prieto, Victor G; Sasseville, Denis; Duvic, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymohomas (CTCLs) are rare, but potentially devastating malignancies, with Mycosis fungoides and Sézary Syndrome being the most common. In our previous study, we identified and described regions of geographic clustering of CTCL cases in Texas by analyzing ∼1990 patients using two distinct cancer registries. In the current work, we describe in detail demographic patterns for this malignancy in our study population and apply logistic regression models to analyze the incidence of CTCL by sex, race, age, and clinical stage at the time of diagnosis. Furthermore, using Fisher's exact test, we analyze changes in incidence over time in the identified Houston communities with unusually high CTCL incidence. While CTCL primarily affects Caucasian individuals >55 years old, we confirm that it presents at a younger age and with more advanced disease stages in African-American and Hispanic individuals. Also, we demonstrate a significant increase in CTCL incidence over time in the identified communities. Spring, Katy, and Houston Memorial areas had high baseline rates. Furthermore, a statistically significant disease surge was observed in these areas after ∼2005. This report supplements our initial study documenting the existence of geographic clustering of CTCL cases in Texas and in greater detail describes demographic trends for our patient population. The observed surge in CTCL incidence in the three identified communities further argues that this malignancy may be triggered by one or more external etiologic agents. PMID:26136403

  8. Advanced information society (12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsuzaki, Seisuke

    In this paper, the original Japanese idea of "advanced information society" was reviewed at the first step. Thus, advancement of information/communication technology, advancement of information/communication needs and tendency of industrialization of information" were examined. Next, by comparing studies on advanced information society in various countries, the Japanese characteristics of consensus building was reviewed. Finally, in pursuit of prospect and tasks for the society, advancement of innovation and convergence information/communication technology, information/communication needs, institutional environment for utilization of information/communication and countermeasures against information pollution. Matching of information/communication technology and needs, besides with countermeasures against information pollution were discussed.

  9. Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Stallworthy, Elizabeth J

    2013-04-16

    Advance care planning should be available to all patients with chronic kidney disease, including end-stage kidney disease on renal replacement therapy. Advance care planning is a process of patient-centred discussion, ideally involving family/significant others, to assist the patient to understand how their illness might affect them, identify their goals and establish how medical treatment might help them to achieve these. An Advance Care Plan is only one useful outcome from the Advance Care Planning process, the education of patient and family around prognosis and treatment options is likely to be beneficial whether or not a plan is written or the individual loses decision making capacity at the end of life. Facilitating Advance Care Planning discussions requires an understanding of their purpose and communication skills which need to be taught. Advance Care Planning needs to be supported by effective systems to enable the discussions and any resulting Plans to be used to aid subsequent decision making. PMID:23586906

  10. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  11. Paracoccidioides-host Interaction: An Overview on Recent Advances in the Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Haroldo C.; Assato, Patrícia A.; Marcos, Caroline M.; Scorzoni, Liliana; de Paula E Silva, Ana C. A.; Da Silva, Julhiany De Fátima; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Alarcon, Kaila M.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii are etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an important endemic mycosis in Latin America. During its evolution, these fungi have developed characteristics and mechanisms that allow their growth in adverse conditions within their host through which they efficiently cause disease. This process is multi-factorial and involves host–pathogen interactions (adaptation, adhesion, and invasion), as well as fungal virulence and host immune response. In this review, we demonstrated the glycoproteins and polysaccharides network, which composes the cell wall of Paracoccidioides spp. These are important for the change of conidia or mycelial (26°C) to parasitic yeast (37°C). The morphological switch, a mechanism for the pathogen to adapt and thrive inside the host, is obligatory for the establishment of the infection and seems to be related to pathogenicity. For these fungi, one of the most important steps during the interaction with the host is the adhesion. Cell surface proteins called adhesins, responsible for the first contact with host cells, contribute to host colonization and invasion by mediating this process. These fungi also present the capacity to form biofilm and through which they may evade the host’s immune system. During infection, Paracoccidioides spp. can interact with different host cell types and has the ability to modulate the host’s adaptive and/or innate immune response. In addition, it participates and interferes in the coagulation system and phenomena like cytoskeletal rearrangement and apoptosis. In recent years, Paracoccidioides spp. have had their endemic areas expanding in correlation with the expansion of agriculture. In response, several studies were developed to understand the infection using in vitro and in vivo systems, including alternative non-mammal models. Moreover, new advances were made in treating these infections using both well-established and new antifungal agents. These

  12. Advanced Airspace Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    A general overview of the Advanced Airspace Concept (AAC) is presented. The topics include: 1) Limitations of the existing system; 2) The Advanced Airspace Concept; 3) Candidate architecture for the AAC; 4) Separation assurance and conflict avoidance system (TSAFE); and 5) Ground-Air Interactions. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  13. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  14. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  15. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  16. Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Life Support (ALS) Systems are presented. The topics include: 1) Fundamental Need for Advanced Life Support; 2) ALS organization; 3) Requirements and Rationale; 4) Past Integrated tests; 5) The need for improvements in life support systems; 6) ALS approach to meet exploration goals; 7) ALS Projects showing promise to meet exploration goals; and 9) GRC involvement in ALS.

  17. Drilling at Advanced Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Doug

    1977-01-01

    Instances where drilling is useful for advanced language are discussed. Several types of drills are recommended, with the philosophy that advanced level drills should have a lighter style and be regarded as a useful, occasional means of practicing individual new items. (CHK)

  18. Advanced Chemical Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave; Alexander, Leslie A.; Krebsbach, Al

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed of advanced chemical propulsion technology application to space science (Code S) missions. The purpose was to begin the process of selecting chemical propulsion technology advancement activities that would provide greatest benefits to Code S missions. Several missions were selected from Code S planning data, and a range of advanced chemical propulsion options was analyzed to assess capabilities and benefits re these missions. Selected beneficial applications were found for higher-performing bipropellants, gelled propellants, and cryogenic propellants. Technology advancement recommendations included cryocoolers and small turbopump engines for cryogenic propellants; space storable propellants such as LOX-hydrazine; and advanced monopropellants. It was noted that fluorine-bearing oxidizers offer performance gains over more benign oxidizers. Potential benefits were observed for gelled propellants that could be allowed to freeze, then thawed for use.

  19. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  20. Advanced information society(7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  1. Advanced information society(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  2. Advanced launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Jan C.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is presented. The costs, reliability, capabilities, infrastructure are briefly described. Quality approach, failure modes, structural design, technology benefits, and key facilities are outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs.

  3. Advanced camera for surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampin, Mark; Ford, Holland C.; Bartko, Frank; Bely, Pierre Y.; Broadhurst, Tom; Burrows, Christopher J.; Cheng, Edward S.; Crocker, James H.; Franx, Marijn; Feldman, Paul D.; Golimowski, David A.; Hartig, George F.; Illingworth, Garth; Kimble, Randy A.; Lesser, Michael P.; Miley, George H.; Postman, Marc; Rafal, Marc D.; Rosati, Piero; Sparks, William B.; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; White, Richard L.; Sullivan, Pamela; Volmer, Paul; LaJeunesse, Tom

    2000-07-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) is a third generation instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). It is currently planned for installation in HST during the fourth servicing mission in Summer 2001. The ACS will have three cameras.

  4. The Advanced Energy Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliken, JoAnn; Joseck, Fred; Wang, Michael; Yuzugullu, Elvin

    The President's Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI), launched in 2006, addresses the challenges of energy supply and demand facing our Nation by supporting research and development of advanced technologies for transportation and stationary power generation. The AEI portfolio includes clean coal, nuclear and renewable energy technologies (solar and wind) for stationary power generation and advanced battery technologies, cellulosic ethanol as a fuel and hydrogen fuel cells for transportation. These research and development programs are underpinned by comprehensive life-cycle analysis efforts using models such as Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) and Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) to enable a better understanding of the characteristics and trade-offs associated with advanced energy options and to help decision makers choose viable pathways for clean, reliable and affordable energy.

  5. Advances in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, David L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Advances in electronics and computer science have enabled industries (pulp/paper, iron/steel, petroleum/chemical) to attain better control of their processes with resulting increases in quality, productivity, profitability, and compliance with government regulations. (JN)

  6. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  7. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  8. Advanced Lab Consortium ``Conspiracy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Jonathan F.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Laboratory instruction is a time-honored and essential element of an undergraduate physics education. But, from my vantage point, it has been neglected by the two major professional societies, APS and AAPT. At some schools, it has been replaced by ``research experiences,'' but I contend that very few of these experiences in the research lab, particularly in the junior year, deliver what they promise. It is time to focus the attention of APS, AAPT, and the NSF on the advanced lab. We need to create an Advanced Lab Consortium (ALC) of faculty and staff to share experiments, suppliers, materials, pedagogy, ideas, in short to build a professional network for those committed to advanced lab instruction. The AAPT is currently in serious discussions on this topic and my company stands ready with both financial and personnel resources to support the effort. This talk is a plea for co-conspirators.

  9. Descendants and advance directives.

    PubMed

    Buford, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Some of the concerns that have been raised in connection to the use of advance directives are of the epistemic variety. Such concerns highlight the possibility that adhering to an advance directive may conflict with what the author of the directive actually wants (or would want) at the time of treatment. However, at least one objection to the employment of advance directives is metaphysical in nature. The objection to be discussed here, first formulated by Rebecca Dresser and labeled by Allen Buchanan as the slavery argument and David DeGrazia the someone else problem, aims to undermine the legitimacy of certain uses of advance directives by concluding that such uses rest upon an incorrect assumption about the identity over time of those ostensibly governed by the directives. There have been numerous attempts to respond to this objection. This paper aims to assess two strategies that have been pursued to cope with the problem. PMID:25743056

  10. Advanced space propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been actively involved in the evaluation and development of advanced spacecraft propulsion. Recent program elements have included high energy density propellants, electrode less plasma thruster concepts, and low power laser propulsion technology. A robust advanced technology program is necessary to develop new, cost-effective methods of spacecraft propulsion, and to continue to push the boundaries of human knowledge and technology.

  11. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support provided by Science Applications, Inc. staff members to Earth and Planetary Exploration Division, OSSA/NASA, for the period 1 February 1981 to 30 April 1982 are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation, planetary missions performance, solar system exploration committee support, Mars program planning, Galilean satellite mission concepts, and advanced propulsion data base. The work covers 80 man-months of research. Study reports and related publications are included in a bibliography section.

  12. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  13. Advanced drilling systems study

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, K.G.; Livesay, B.J.

    1995-03-01

    This work was initiated as part of the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) Program. It is being performed through joint finding from the Department of Energy Geothermal Division and the Natural Gas Technology Branch, Morgantown Energy Technology Center. Interest in advanced drilling systems is high. The Geothermal Division of the Department of Energy has initiated a multi-year effort in the development of advanced drilling systems; the National Research Council completed a study of drilling and excavation technologies last year; and the MIT Energy Laboratory recently submitted a proposal for a national initiative in advanced drilling and excavation research. The primary reasons for this interest are financial. Worldwide expenditures on oil and gas drilling approach $75 billion per year. Also, drilling and well completion account for 25% to 50% of the cost of producing electricity from geothermal energy. There is incentive to search for methods to reduce the cost of drilling. Work on ideas to improve or replace rotary drilling technology dates back at least to the 1930`s. There was a significant amount of work in this area in the 1960`s and 1970`s; and there has been some continued effort through the 1980`s. Undoubtedly there are concepts for advanced drilling systems that have yet to be studied; however, it is almost certain that new efforts to initiate work on advanced drilling systems will build on an idea or a variation of an idea that has already been investigated. Therefore, a review of previous efforts coupled with a characterization of viable advanced drilling systems and the current state of technology as it applies to those systems provide the basis for the current study of advanced drilling.

  14. Polish Lymphoma Research Group Experience With Bexarotene in the Treatment of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sokolowska-Wojdylo, Malgorzata; Florek, Aleksandra; Zaucha, Jan Maciej; Chmielowska, Ewa; Giza, Agnieszka; Knopinska-Posluszny, Wanda; Kulikowski, Waldemar; Prejzner, Witold; Romejko-Jarosinska, Joanna; Paszkiewicz-Kozik, Ewa; Osowiecki, Michal; Walewski, Jan; Rogowski, Wojciech; Grzanka, Aleksandra; Placek, Waldemar; Lugowska-Umer, Hanna; Kowalczyk, Anna; Nowicki, Roman; Jurczak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Bexarotene, a synthetic retinoid licensed for the treatment of refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), has been used clinically in Poland since 2007 in 21 patients. The objective of our retrospective, multicenter study was to evaluate our experience with bexarotene therapy, including efficacy, safety, and survival outcomes. We retrospectively identified 21 adult patients who were treated with bexarotene between the years 2007 and 2012. Starting dose of bexarotene was 300 mg/m per day. The analysis included 3 patients with early-stage mycosis fungoides (MF), 16 patients with advanced-stage MF, and 2 patients with Sézary syndrome (SS). The mean duration of therapy with bexarotene was 14.5 months. Use of bexarotene resulted in an overall response rate of 81.0%, although the overall mortality rate was 52.8%. In our study, early-stage CTCL responded better than advanced-stage CTCL (100.0% vs. 77.8%, respectively). The mean time to observable response was 1.8 months, and the mean duration of the response was 16.4 months. Most significant side effects were hyperlipidemia, hypothyroidism, and a bleeding gastric ulcer. Based on the results of our analysis, bexarotene is a valuable tool in the treatment of refractory early-stage CTCL. Although a majority of patients initially responded to therapy, the high mortality rate in the advanced-stage group suggests that bexarotene does not completely resolve the therapeutic problems in all stages of CTCL. Patient stratification for bexarotene treatment may need a thorough reassessment, in that bexarotene may not be an effective drug in the very advanced stages of CTCL. PMID:24732904

  15. A direct advance on advance directives.

    PubMed

    Shaw, David

    2012-06-01

    Advance directives (ADs), which are also sometimes referred to as 'living wills', are statements made by a person that indicate what treatment she should not be given in the event that she is not competent to consent or refuse at the future moment in question. As such, ADs provide a way for patients to make decisions in advance about what treatments they do not want to receive, without doctors having to find proxy decision-makers or having recourse to the doctrine of necessity. While patients can request particular treatments in an AD, only refusals are binding. This paper will examine whether ADs safeguard the autonomy and best interests of the incompetent patient, and whether legislating for the use of ADs is justified, using the specific context of the legal situation in the United Kingdom to illustrate the debate. The issue of whether the law should permit ADs is itself dependent on the issue of whether ADs are ethically justified; thus we must answer a normative question in order to answer the legislative one. It emerges that ADs suffer from two major problems, one related to autonomy and one to consent. First, ADs' emphasis on precedent autonomy effectively sentences some people who want to live to death. Second, many ADs might not meet the standard criteria for informed refusal of treatment, because they fail on the crucial criterion of sufficient information. Ultimately, it transpires that ADs are typically only appropriate for patients who temporarily lose physical or mental capacity. PMID:21133977

  16. Recruit and ADVANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, Sue V.

    2007-04-01

    Beginning in 2001, the National Science Foundation launched the ADVANCE Initiative, which has now awarded more than 70 million to some thirty institutions for transformations to advance women. Results of studies on how to attract and retain women students and faculty underpinned our ADVANCE Institutional Transformation grant funded by the NSF for 3.7 million for five years, beginning in 2001. As co-principal investigator on this grant, I insured that this research informed the five major threads of the grant: 1) Four termed ADVANCE professors to mentor junior women faculty in each college; 2) Collection of MIT-Report-like data indicators to assess whether advancement of women really occurs during and after the institutional transformation undertaken through ADVANCE; 3) Family-friendly policies and practices to stop the tenure clock and provide active service, modified duties, lactation stations and day care; 4) Mini-retreats to facilitate access for tenure-track women faculty to male decision-makers and administrators for informal conversations and discussion on topics important to women faculty; 5) Removal of subtle gender, racial, and other biases in promotion and tenure. The dynamic changes resulting from the grant in quality of mentoring, new understanding of promotion and tenure, numbers of women retained and given endowed chairs, and emergence of new family friendly policies gave me hope for genuine diversification of leadership in science and technology. As the grant funding ends, the absence of NSF prestige and monitoring, coupled with a change in academic leadership at the top, provide new challenges for institutionalization, recruitment, and advancement of women into leadership positions in science and engineering.

  17. Brentuximab Vedotin + Rituximab as Frontline Therapy for Pts w/ CD30+ and/or EBV+ Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    ; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III

  18. Advanced access appointments

    PubMed Central

    Hudec, John C.; MacDougall, Steven; Rankin, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine the effects of advanced access (same-day physician appointments) on patient and provider satisfaction and to determine its association with other variables such as physician income and patient emergency department use. DESIGN Patient satisfaction survey and semistructured interviews with physicians and support staff; analysis of physician medical insurance billings and patient emergency department visits. SETTING Cape Breton, NS. PARTICIPANTS Patients, physicians, and support staff of 3 comparable family physician practices that had not implemented advanced access and an established advanced access practice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-reported provider and patient satisfaction, physician office income, and patients’ emergency department use. RESULTS The key benefits of implementation of advanced access were an increase in provider and patient satisfaction levels, same or greater physician office income, and fewer less urgent (triage level 4) and nonurgent (triage level 5) emergency department visits by patients. CONCLUSION Currently within the Central Cape Breton Region, 33% of patients wait 4 or more days for urgent appointments. Findings from this study can be used to enhance primary care physician practice redesign. This research supports many benefits of transitioning to an advanced access model of patient booking. PMID:20944024

  19. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  20. Advanced thermionic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, G. D.; Hansen, L. K.; Rasor, N. S.

    1974-01-01

    Basic analytical and experimental exploration was conducted on several types of advanced thermionic energy converters, and preliminary analysis was performed on systems utilizing advanced converter performance. The Pt--Nb cylindrical diode which exhibited a suppressed arc drop, as described in the preceding report, was reassembled and the existence of the postulated hydrid mode of operation was tentatively confirmed. Initial data obtained on ignited and unignited triode operation in the demountable cesium vapor system essentially confirmed the design principles developed in earlier work, with a few exceptions. Three specific advanced converter concepts were selected as candidates for concentrated basic study and for practical evaluation in fixed-configuration converters. Test vehicles and test stands for these converters and a unique controlled-atmosphere station for converter assembly and processing were designed, and procurement was initiated.

  1. Advanced transmission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.; Bill, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command share an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, this paper presents highlights from that portion of the program in drive train technology and the related mechanical components. The major goals of the program are to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability; reduce the weight, noise, and vibration; and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. The current activity emphasizes noise reduction technology and analytical code development followed by experimental verification. Selected significant advances in technology for transmissions are reviewed, including advanced configurations and new analytical tools. Finally, the plan for future transmission research is presented.

  2. Advanced rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Charles J.

    1993-01-01

    Existing NASA research contracts are supporting development of advanced reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites for use in liquid rocket engines of the future. Advanced rocket propulsion concepts, such as modular platelet engines, dual-fuel dual-expander engines, and variable mixture ratio engines, require advanced materials and structures to reduce overall vehicle weight as well as address specific propulsion system problems related to elevated operating temperatures, new engine components, and unique operating processes. High performance propulsion systems with improved manufacturability and maintainability are needed for single stage to orbit vehicles and other high performance mission applications. One way to satisfy these needs is to develop a small engine which can be clustered in modules to provide required levels of total thrust. This approach should reduce development schedule and cost requirements by lowering hardware lead times and permitting the use of existing test facilities. Modular engines should also reduce operational costs associated with maintenance and parts inventories.

  3. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  4. Advanced rocket propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrien, Charles J.

    1993-02-01

    Existing NASA research contracts are supporting development of advanced reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites for use in liquid rocket engines of the future. Advanced rocket propulsion concepts, such as modular platelet engines, dual-fuel dual-expander engines, and variable mixture ratio engines, require advanced materials and structures to reduce overall vehicle weight as well as address specific propulsion system problems related to elevated operating temperatures, new engine components, and unique operating processes. High performance propulsion systems with improved manufacturability and maintainability are needed for single stage to orbit vehicles and other high performance mission applications. One way to satisfy these needs is to develop a small engine which can be clustered in modules to provide required levels of total thrust. This approach should reduce development schedule and cost requirements by lowering hardware lead times and permitting the use of existing test facilities. Modular engines should also reduce operational costs associated with maintenance and parts inventories.

  5. Cascaded humidified advanced turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhamkin, M.; Swenson, E.C.; Cohn, A.; Bradshaw, D.; Taylor, R.; Wilson, J.M.; Gaul, G.; Jahnke, F.; Polsky, M.

    1995-05-01

    This article describes how, by combining the best features of simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants, the CHAT cycle concept offers power producers a clean, more efficient and less expensive alternative to both. The patented cascaded advanced turbine and its cascaded humidified advanced turbine (CHAT) derivative offer utilities and other power producers a practical advanced gas turbine power plant by combining commercially-available gas turbine and industrial compressor technologies in a unique way. Compared to combined-cycle plants, a CHAT power plant has lower emissions and specific capital costs-approximately 20 percent lower than what is presently available. Further, CHAT`s operating characteristics are especially well-suited to load following quick start-up scenarios and they are less susceptible to power degradation from higher ambient air temperature conditions.

  6. Advanced Worker Protection System

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) is a liquid-air-based, self-contained breathing and cooling system with a duration of 2 hrs. AWPS employs a patented system developed by Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS), and was demonstrated at their facility in Houston, TX as well as at Kansas State University, Manhattan. The heart of the system is the life-support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack is combined with advanced protective garments, an advanced liquid cooling garment (LCG), a respirator, and communications and support equipment. The prototype unit development and testing under Phase 1 has demonstrated that AWPS has the ability to meet performance criteria. These criteria were developed with an understanding of both the AWPS capabilities and the DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities protection needs.

  7. Advanced ramjet concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leingang, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Uniquely advantageous features, on both the performance and weight sides of the ledger, can be achieved through synergistic design integration of airbreathing and rocket technologies in the development of advanced orbital space transport propulsion systems of the combined cycle type. In the context of well understood advanced airbreathing and liquid rocket propulsion principles and practices, this precept of synergism is advanced mainly through six rather specific examples. These range from the detailed component level to the overall vehicle system level as follows: using jet compression; achieving a high area ratio rocket nozzle; ameliorating gas generator cycle rocket system deficiencies; using the in-duct special rocket thrust chamber assembly as the principal scramjet fuel injection operation; using the unstowed, covered fan as a duct closure for effecting high area ratio rocket mode operation; and creating a unique airbreathing rocket system via the onboard, cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction process.

  8. Commercialization of advanced batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, J.

    1996-11-01

    Mader and Associates has been working as a contractor for the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District) for the past several years. During this period it has performed various assessments of advanced battery technology as well as established the Advanced Battery Task Force. The following paper is Mader`s view of the status of battery technologies that are competing for the electric vehicle (EV) market being established by the California Air Resources Board`s Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Mandate. The ZEV market is being competed for by various advanced battery technologies. And, given the likelihood of modifications to the Mandate, the most promising technologies should capture the following market share during the initial 10 years: Lead-Acid--8.4%, Nickel Metal Hydride--50.8%, Sodium Sulfur--7.8%, Lithium Ion 33.0%.

  9. The Advanced LIGO Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritschel, Peter

    2016-03-01

    After decades of development, the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are now operating, and they completed their first observational run in early 2016. Advanced LIGO consists of two 4-km scale interferometric detectors located at separate sites in the US. The first year of detector commissioning that led to the first observation run produced instruments that have several times better sensitivity to gravitational-wave strain than previous instruments. At their final design sensitivity, the detectors will be another factor of 2-3x more sensitive than current performance. This talk will cover the design of Advanced LIGO, explain how the sensitivity improvements have been achieved, and lay out the path to reaching final design sensitivity.

  10. [Advanced Composites Technology Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julian, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This final report closes out the W02 NASA Grant #NCC5-646. The FY02 grant for advanced technology initiatives through the Advanced Composites Technology Institute in Bridgeport, WV, at the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) Bridgeport Manufacturing Technology Center, is complete; all funding has been expended. RCBI continued to expand access to technology; develop and implement a workforce-training curriculum; improve material development; and provide prototyping and demonstrations of new and advanced composites technologies for West Virginia composites firms. The FY 02 efforts supported workforce development, technical training and the HST development effort of a super-lightweight composite carrier prototype and expanded the existing technical capabilities of the growing aerospace industry across West Virginia to provide additional support for NASA missions. Additionally, the Composites Technology and Training Center was awarded IS0 9001 - 2000 certification and Cleanroom Class 1000 certification during this report period.

  11. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  12. Advanced Solar Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, J. H.; Hobgood, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Solar Power System (ASPS) concentrator uses a technically sophisticated design and extensive tooling to produce very efficient (80 to 90%) and versatile energy supply equipment which is inexpensive to manufacture and requires little maintenance. The advanced optical design has two 10th order, generalized aspheric surfaces in a Cassegrainian configuration which gives outstanding performance and is relatively insensitive to temperature changes and wind loading. Manufacturing tolerances also have been achieved. The key to the ASPS is the direct absorption of concentrated sunlight in the working fluid by radiative transfers in a black body cavity. The basic ASPS design concepts, efficiency, optical system, and tracking and focusing controls are described.

  13. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2005-02-08

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. The advanced containment system comprises a plurality of casing sections with each casing section interlocked to an adjacent casing section. Each casing section includes a complementary interlocking structure that interlocks with the complementary interlocking structure on an adjacent casing section. A barrier filler substantially fills the casing sections and may substantially fill the spaces of the complementary interlocking structure to form a substantially impermeable barrier. Some of the casing sections may include sensors so that the casing sections and the zone of interest may be remotely monitored after the casing sections are emplaced in the ground.

  14. MR Neurography: Advances

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Zhao, Lianxin; Carrino, John A.; Trueblood, Eo; Koceski, Saso; Shteriev, Filip; Lenkinski, Lionel; Sinclair, Christopher D. J.; Andreisek, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    High resolution and high field magnetic resonance neurography (MR neurography, MRN) is shown to have excellent anatomic capability. There have been considerable advances in the technology in the last few years leading to various feasibility studies using different structural and functional imaging approaches in both clinical and research settings. This paper is intended to be a useful seminar for readers who want to gain knowledge of the advancements in the MRN pulse sequences currently used in clinical practice as well as learn about the other techniques on the horizon aimed at better depiction of nerve anatomy, pathology, and potential noninvasive evaluation of nerve degeneration or regeneration. PMID:23589774

  15. Advanced engine study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.; Denman, T. F.; Shied, R. A.; Black, J. R.; Fierstein, A. R.; Clark, G. L.; Branstrom, B. R.

    1993-01-01

    A design and analysis study was conducted to provide advanced engine descriptions and parametric data for space transfer vehicles. The study was based on an advanced oxygen/hydrogen engine in the 7,500 to 50,000 lbf thrust range. Emphasis was placed on defining requirements for high-performance engines capable of achieving reliable and versatile operation in a space environment. Four variations on the expander cycle were compared, and the advantages and disadvantages of each were assessed. Parametric weight, envelope, and performance data were generated over a range of 7,500 to 50,000 lb thrust and a wide range of chamber pressure and nozzle expansion ratio.

  16. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  17. Avionics advanced development strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, D.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed here is the problem of how to put together an integrated, phased, and affordable avionics advanced development program that links and applies to operational, evolving, and developing programs/vehicles, as well as those in the planning phases. Collecting technology needs from individual programs/vehicles and proposed technology items from individual developers usually results in a mismatch and something that is unaffordable. A strategy to address this problem is outlined with task definitions which will lead to avionics advanced development items that will fit within an overall framework, prioritized to support budgeting, and support the scope of NASA space transportations needs.

  18. Advances in attosecond science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calegari, Francesca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Stagira, Salvatore; Vozzi, Caterina; Nisoli, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond science offers formidable tools for the investigation of electronic processes at the heart of important physical processes in atomic, molecular and solid-state physics. In the last 15 years impressive advances have been obtained from both the experimental and theoretical points of view. Attosecond pulses, in the form of isolated pulses or of trains of pulses, are now routinely available in various laboratories. In this review recent advances in attosecond science are reported and important applications are discussed. After a brief presentation of various techniques that can be employed for the generation and diagnosis of sub-femtosecond pulses, various applications are reported in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter physics.

  19. Technological advances in teleradiology.

    PubMed

    Orphanoudakis, S C; Kaldoudi, E; Tsiknakis, M

    1996-06-01

    Teleradiology consists of a set of added-value telematic services, implemented over an advanced telecommunications infrastructure and supported by different information technologies and related applications. The main goal of teleradiology is to provide different levels of support for remote diagnostic imaging procedures. This paper considers technological advances in this important area, including a discussion of the various added-value telematic services, applications supporting these services, and the required information technology and telecommunications infrastructure. Teleradiology is also considered in the general context of an integrated regional health telematics network, emphasizing its role and its interaction with other information and networking services. PMID:8832235

  20. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  1. Advanced Neuroimaging of Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Prashant; Steven, Andrew; Rath, Tanya; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-05-01

    Although tinnitus may originate in damage to the peripheral auditory apparatus, its perception and distressing symptomatology are consequences of alterations to auditory, sensory, and limbic neural networks. This has been described in several studies, some using advanced structural MR imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging. An understanding of these complex changes could enable development of targeted treatment. New MR imaging techniques enabling detailed depiction of the labyrinth may be useful when diagnosis of Meniere disease is equivocal. Advances in computed tomography and MR imaging have enabled noninvasive diagnosis of dural arteriovenous fistulae. PMID:27154611

  2. Advanced sensors technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G.; Costello, David J.; Davis, Jerry G.; Horst, Richard L.; Lessard, Charles S.; Peel, H. Herbert; Tolliver, Robert

    1992-01-01

    This project assesses the state-of-the-art in advanced or 'smart' sensors technology for NASA Life Sciences research applications with an emphasis on those sensors with potential applications on the space station freedom (SSF). The objectives are: (1) to conduct literature reviews on relevant advanced sensor technology; (2) to interview various scientists and engineers in industry, academia, and government who are knowledgeable on this topic; (3) to provide viewpoints and opinions regarding the potential applications of this technology on the SSF; and (4) to provide summary charts of relevant technologies and centers where these technologies are being developed.

  3. Advanced Monitoring systems initiative

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

  4. 17-DMAG in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstr

  5. Lenalidomide as Maintenance Therapy After Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma That is Resistant to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  6. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. Technological advances transforming rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, William H.; Mao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances over the past decade have revolutionized many areas of rheumatology, ranging from diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic development to the mechanistic understanding of rheumatic diseases. This overview highlights key technological innovations and discusses the major impact that these developments are having on research and clinical practice. PMID:26439404

  8. Advanced Civilian Aeronautical Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper discusses alternatives to currently deployed systems which could provide revolutionary improvements in metrics applicable to civilian aeronautics. Specific missions addressed include subsonic transports, supersonic transports and personal aircraft. These alternative systems and concepts are enabled by recent and envisaged advancements in electronics, communications, computing and Designer Fluid Mechanics in conjunction with a design approach employing extensive synergistic interactions between propulsion, aerodynamics and structures.

  9. Advances in photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Baron, Elma D; Kirkland, Eugene B; Domingo, Diana Santo

    2008-08-01

    Major advancements in the realm of photoprotection have occurred over the last decade providing potential means to reduce the prevalence of ultraviolet radiation-related skin problems. This review elucidates current photoprotective methods and recent developments that may hold future promise. PMID:18819220

  10. Advancement's Sticky Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The author did not expect to be surprised or disturbed by the data from the latest Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) salary survey; however, she was. CASE has been conducting the survey since 1982, so she assumed the findings would mirror her own salary history and those of her peers. While she suspected that older women…

  11. Skimming & Scanning. Advanced Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Edward B.

    Part of a series intended to develop essential specialized reading skills, this text/workbook is designed to provide instruction and practice in skimming and scanning for students reading at the seventh through tenth grade reading levels, considered the advanced level. Part 1 of the book deals with skimming. A lesson defines skimming (the rapid…

  12. Advancing beyond AP Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Bruce G.

    2009-01-01

    A quiet revolution is picking up steam in the nation's private secondary schools, with broad implications for college admissions and for teaching and learning on both sides of the transition from high school to college. About 50 of the nation's leading college-preparatory schools have opted out of the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP)…

  13. Impedance cardiography: recent advancements.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, Gerard; Strasz, Anna; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Gąsiorowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the presentation of recent advancements in impedance cardiography regarding methodical approach, applied equipment and clinical or research implementations. The review is limited to the papers which were published over last 17 months (dated 2011 and 2012) in well recognised scientific journals. PMID:23042327

  14. Advances in fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Denise Araujo Lapa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses the main advances in fetal surgical therapy aiming to inform health care professionals about the state-of-the-art techniques and future challenges in this field. We discuss the necessary steps of technical evolution from the initial open fetal surgery approach until the development of minimally invasive techniques of fetal endoscopic surgery (fetoscopy). PMID:27074241

  15. NIST ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Not-yet-possible technologies are the domain of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Advanced Technology Program. The ATP is a unique partnership between government and private industry to accelerate the development of high-risk technologies that promise sign...

  16. Oklahoma's Advanced School Funding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gary

    A new means of funding school operations known as advanced school funding allows Oklahoma schools financing during the temporary cash shortfalls. The program consists of the Oklahoma Development Authority issuing revenue bonds purchased by E. F. Hutton and Company, Inc., which then sells the tax free bonds to investors throughout the country. A…

  17. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  18. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-12-31

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  19. Advanced Concept Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaput, Armand; Johns, Zachary; Hodges, Todd; Selfridge, Justin; Bevirt, Joeben; Ahuja, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Concepts Modeling software validation, analysis, and design. This was a National Institute of Aerospace contract with a lot of pieces. Efforts ranged from software development and validation for structures and aerodynamics, through flight control development, and aeropropulsive analysis, to UAV piloting services.

  20. Management of advanced melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanson, L. )

    1986-01-01

    This book presents papers on the subject of management of advanced melanoma. The topics covered are: non-investigational cytotoxic agents; high-dosage chemotherapy in antologous bone marrow transplantation; Radiotherapy of melanomas; hyperthermia; ureal melanoma; surgical treatment of recurrent a metastatic melanoma; role of interferons in management of melanoma and molecular genetics of melanoma.

  1. Advancing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  2. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  3. Advances in Planetary Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in Planetary Geology is a new series intended to serve the planetary geology community with a form for quick and thorough communications. There are no set lists of acceptable topics or formats, and submitted manuscripts will not undergo a formal review. All submissions should be in a camera ready form, preferably spaced, and submitted to the editor.

  4. Advances in satellite oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, O. B.; Cheney, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Technical advances and recent applications of active and passive satellite remote sensing techniques to the study of oceanic processes are summarized. The general themes include infrared and visible radiometry, active and passive microwave sensors, and buoy location systems. The surface parameters of sea surface temperature, windstream, sea state, altimetry, color, and ice are treated as applicable under each of the general methods.

  5. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. The Advancement Checkup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    It is proposed that an external audit of a college advancement program is analogous to a periodic physical examination that offers objectivity and expertise. Audits are appropriate at the time of administrative transitions, performance difficulties, and even periods of sustained success. Guidelines and expectations are discussed. (MSE)

  7. Advanced Distribution Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avazov, Artur R.; Sobinova, Liubov A.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the advisability of using advanced distribution management systems in the electricity distribution networks area and considers premises of implementing ADMS within the Smart Grid era. Also, it gives the big picture of ADMS and discusses the ADMS advantages and functionalities.

  8. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Oct 8,2015 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  9. Cartoons as Advance Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Cindy L.; Williams, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated student reaction to the use of cartoons as advance organizers for online discussions in an online course. A convenience sample of 15 students participated in the study by contributing cartoons, participating in online discussions, and completing a survey. Overall, survey results indicated student reaction to the…

  10. Advanced Plant Habitat (APH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Reed, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) hardware will be a large growth volume plant habitat, capable of hosting multigenerational studies, in which environmental variables (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, carbon dioxide level light intensity and spectral quality) can be tracked and controlled in support of whole plant physiological testing and Bio-regenerative Life Support System investigations.

  11. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development and progress of the Advanced Gas Turbine engine program is examined. An analysis of the role of ceramics in the design and major engine components is included. Projected fuel economy, emissions and performance standards, and versatility in fuel use are also discussed.

  12. Advanced radiator concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diem-Kirsop, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid droplet radiator and the liquid belt radiator currently under study by the NASA LeRC are discussed. These advanced concepts offer benefits in reduced mass, compact stowage, and ease of deployment. Operation and components of the radiators are described, heat transfer characteristics are discussed, and critical technologies are identified. The impact of the radiators on large power systems is also assessed.

  13. Advanced fossil energy utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.; Spivey, J.; Pennline, H.; Granite, E.

    2010-01-01

    This special issue of Fuel is a selection of papers presented at the symposium ‘Advanced Fossil Energy Utilization’ co-sponsored by the Fuels and Petrochemicals Division and Research and New Technology Committee in the 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Spring National Meeting Tampa, FL, on April 26–30, 2009.

  14. Infant Development: Recent Advances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremner, Gavin, Ed.; Slater, Alan, Ed.; Butterworth, George, Ed.

    Noting that the last 30 years have seen enormous increases in the understanding of infancy, this book examines the current state of knowledge regarding infant development. The book's contents stem from meetings of the British Infancy Research Group. Although the book was intended for advanced undergraduates, it would also be useful for advanced…

  15. Advanced Chemical Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Leslie, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Chemical Propulsion (ACP) provides near-term incremental improvements in propulsion system performance and/or cost. It is an evolutionary approach to technology development that produces useful products along the way to meet increasingly more demanding mission requirements while focusing on improving payload mass fraction to yield greater science capability. Current activities are focused on two areas: chemical propulsion component, subsystem, and manufacturing technologies that offer measurable system level benefits; and the evaluation of high-energy storable propellants with enhanced performance for in-space application. To prioritize candidate propulsion technology alternatives, a variety of propulsion/mission analyses and trades have been conducted for SMD missions to yield sufficient data for investment planning. They include: the Advanced Chemical Propulsion Assessment; an Advanced Chemical Propulsion System Model; a LOx-LH2 small pumps conceptual design; a space storables propellant study; a spacecraft cryogenic propulsion study; an advanced pressurization and mixture ratio control study; and a pump-fed vs. pressure-fed study.

  16. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Eleven study tasks are described and key results are discussed for the following: advanced planning activity; cost estimation research; planetary missions performance handbooks-revisions; multiple discipline science assessment; asteroid workshop; galilean lander mission strategies; asteroid exploration study; ion drive transport capabilities; Mars strategy study; Venus surface sample return; and ion drive/solar sail assessment study.

  17. Advanced electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, L.G.

    1980-07-01

    The Advanced Electric Vehicle is defined as an automobile which can fulfill the general-purpose role of today's internal-combustion-engine-powered car without utilizing petroleum fuels directly. It relies principally on the utilization of electricity. A number of candidate systems are described. The present status of each is discussed as are the problems to be overcome before implementation can proceed.

  18. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  19. Where Advancement Fails.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trachtman, Leon E.

    1987-01-01

    Faculty members and advancement officers tend to come from different environments and to inhabit different worlds. The failure of the two to understand one another and work together in the interest of their institutions is discussed. The central administration must serve as a bridge between the two. (MLW)

  20. Interfaces for Advanced Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, James D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the coming generation of supercomputers that will have the power to make elaborate "artificial realities" that facilitate user-computer communication. Illustrates these technological advancements with examples of the use of head-mounted monitors which are connected to position and orientation sensors, and gloves that track finger and…

  1. Horizontal drilling technology advances

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-04

    Horizontal drilling technology is making further advances in the Texas Austin chalk play as such drilling continues to spread in many U.S. land areas. One company has completed a Cretaceous Austin chalk oil well with the longest horizontal well bore in Texas and what at 1 1/6 miles is believed to be the world's longest medium radius horizontal displacement.

  2. Advanced Chemical Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, L.

    2004-11-01

    Improving the performance and reliability characteristics of chemical propulsion systems requires research and testing of higher-performance propellants, higher efficiency thrusters, cryogenics technology, lightweight components and advancements in propulsion system design and assessment. Propellants are being investigated to identify practical combinations with higher efficiencies and better thermal properties to reduce thermal control requirements. This includes combinations with modest increases, such as LOX-hydrazine, as well as a new evaluation of major improvements available from fluorine-bearing oxidizers. Practical ways of implementing cryogenic propulsion to further increase efficiency are also being studied. Some potential advances include small pump-fed engines, and improvements in cryocooler technology and tank pressure control. Gelled propellants will be tested to determine the practicality of letting propellants freeze at low environmental temperatures and thawing them only when required for use. The propellant tank is typically the single highest non-expendable mass in a chemical propulsion system. Lightweight tank designs, materials and methods of fabrication are being investigated. These are projected to offer a 45-50 percent decrease in tank mass, representing the potential inert system mass savings. Mission and systems analyses are being conducted to guide the technology research and set priorities for technology investment, based on estimated gains in payload and mission capabilities. This includes development of advanced assessment tools and analyses of specific missions selected from Science Missions' Directorate. The goal is to mature a suite of reliable advanced propulsion technologies that will promote more cost efficient missions through the reduction of interplanetary trip time, increased scientific payload mass fraction and longer on-station operations. This talk will review the Advanced Chemical technology development roadmap, current

  3. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  4. Leukoderma associated with Sézary syndrome: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mark; Tan, Suat Hoon; Lim, Lay Cheng

    2003-11-01

    We describe a patient with Sézary syndrome who was initially seen with the rare occurrence of both generalized erythroderma and extensive leukoderma of his lower limbs. Apart from the absence of melanocytes in the leukodermic skin, histopathologic features of both areas were identical, showing an infiltrate of atypical lymphocytes with epidermotropism. This form of Sézary syndrome-associated leukoderma is clinically distinguishable from hypopigmented mycosis fungoides in which hypopigmented lesions are the sole manifestation of the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. PMID:14576642

  5. Clinicopathological correlation of acquired hypopigmentary disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha B; Kubba, Raj; Kubba, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Acquired hypopigmentary disorders comprise a significant group of disorders that affect Indians and Asians. The pigment disturbance in darker skin individuals can be very distressing to the patient and the family. These disorders cover a wide array of pathologies including infections, autoimmune processes, lymphoproliferative disorders, and sclerosing diseases. Histological diagnosis is particularly important because treatments for these diseases are varied and specific. This review will focus on histopathological diagnosis based on clinicopathological correlation for commonly encountered disorders such as leprosy, vitiligo, lichen sclerosus, pityriasis alba (PA), and pityriasis versicolor (PV). Atypical or uncommon clinical presentation of classic diseases such as hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) and hypopigmented sarcoidosis are also included. PMID:23619442

  6. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. Animals Eponyms in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Pooja; Kumar, Jeevan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jain, VK

    2014-01-01

    The world of Dermatology is flooded with inflexions among clinical conditions and signs and syndromes; making it interesting, but a tougher subject to remember. Signs and syndromes have always fascinated residents, but simultaneously burdened their minds, as these attractive names are difficult to remember. This work was undertaken to review dermatological conditions and signs based on commonly encountered daily words and objects like animals, etc. Fifty dermatological conditions were found to be based on animal eponyms. For example, the usage of animal terminology in dermatology like leonine facies is present in leprosy, sarcoidosis, mycosis fungoides (MF), and airborne contact dermatitis (ABCD). PMID:25484417

  8. The differential diagnosis of atopic dermatitis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Krol, Alfons; Krafchik, Bernice

    2006-01-01

    Atopic is the most common of the dermatitides seen in infancy and childhood, but there are numerous other diseases that can mimic the skin findings. These include seborrheic dermatitis, immunodeficiency, and psoriasis in infancy; scabies, tinea corporis infection, perioral, nummular, contact, and molluscum dermatitis in childhood. It is sometimes extremely difficult to differentiate between ichthyosis and AD, and it is also important to differentiate AD from erythrodermic conditions including acrodermatitis enteropathica, biotin deficiency, and Netherton syndrome. A rare condition in children that may mimic AD is mycosis fungoides. PMID:16669989

  9. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Hodgkin's Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Skin-Directed Therapies in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong V; Bohjanen, Kimberly A

    2015-10-01

    Early stage mycosis fungoides represents the most common clinical presentation of cutaneous lymphoma, with skin-directed therapies long established in its treatment. These therapies continue to change as new treatment regimens emerge. Other skin-directed treatments include light and radiation therapy. Therapies with higher levels of evidence and less systemic toxicity are usually preferred as first-line treatment. However, even these established therapies, like topical corticosteroids and carmustine, lack randomized clinical trials to establish their efficacy. Research is also needed to further define the role of combination topical therapies and how skin-directed therapies can be used as adjuvants to systemic medications. PMID:26433841

  11. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  12. Total skin electron irradiation techniques: a review

    PubMed Central

    Milecki, Piotr; Skórska, Małgorzata; Fundowicz, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) has been employed as one of the methods of mycosis fungoides treatment since the mid-twentieth century. In order to improve the effects and limit the complications following radiotherapy, a number of varieties of the TSEI method, frequently differing in the implementation mode have been developed. The paper provides a systematic review of the different varieties of TSEI. The discussed differences concerned especially: (i) technological requirements and geometric conditions, (ii) the alignment of the patient, (iii) the number of treatment fields, and (iv) dose fractionation scheme. PMID:24278046

  13. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large

  14. Actinic reticuloid

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.L.; Vale, M.; Dermer, P.; Ragaz, A.; Michaelides, P.; Gladstein, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    A 58-year-old man has his condition diagnosed as actinic reticuloid on the basis of clinical and histologic findings and phototesting data. He had clinical features resembling mycosis fungoides in light-exposed areas. Histologic findings disclosed a bandlike infiltrate with atypical mononuclear cells in the dermis and scattered atypical cells in the epidermis. Electron microscopy disclosed mononuclear cells with bizarre, convoluted nuclei, resembling cerebriform cells of Lutzner. Phototesting disclosed a diminished minimal erythemal threshold to UV-B and UV-A. Microscopic changes resembling actinic reticuloid were reproduced in this patient 24 and 72 hours after exposure to 15 minimal erythemal doses of UV-B.

  15. Advanced Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation describes a number of advanced space propulsion technologies with the potential for meeting the need for dramatic reductions in the cost of access to space, and the need for new propulsion capabilities to enable bold new space exploration (and, ultimately, space exploitation) missions of the 21st century. For example, current Earth-to-orbit (e.g., low Earth orbit, LEO) launch costs are extremely high (ca. $10,000/kg); a factor 25 reduction (to ca. $400/kg) will be needed to produce the dramatic increases in space activities in both the civilian and government sectors identified in the Commercial Space Transportation Study (CSTS). Similarly, in the area of space exploration, all of the relatively 'easy' missions (e.g., robotic flybys, inner solar system orbiters and landers; and piloted short-duration Lunar missions) have been done. Ambitious missions of the next century (e.g., robotic outer-planet orbiters/probes, landers, rovers, sample returns; and piloted long-duration Lunar and Mars missions) will require major improvements in propulsion capability. In some cases, advanced propulsion can enable a mission by making it faster or more affordable, and in some cases, by directly enabling the mission (e.g., interstellar missions). As a general rule, advanced propulsion systems are attractive because of their low operating costs (e.g., higher specific impulse, ISD) and typically show the most benefit for relatively 'big' missions (i.e., missions with large payloads or AV, or a large overall mission model). In part, this is due to the intrinsic size of the advanced systems as compared to state-of-the-art (SOTA) chemical propulsion systems. Also, advanced systems often have a large 'infrastructure' cost, either in the form of initial R&D costs or in facilities hardware costs (e.g., laser or microwave transmission ground stations for beamed energy propulsion). These costs must then be amortized over a large mission to be cost-competitive with a SOTA

  16. Advanced information processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Design and performance details of the advanced information processing system (AIPS) for fault and damage tolerant data processing on aircraft and spacecraft are presented. AIPS comprises several computers distributed throughout the vehicle and linked by a damage tolerant data bus. Most I/O functions are available to all the computers, which run in a TDMA mode. Each computer performs separate specific tasks in normal operation and assumes other tasks in degraded modes. Redundant software assures that all fault monitoring, logging and reporting are automated, together with control functions. Redundant duplex links and damage-spread limitation provide the fault tolerance. Details of an advanced design of a laboratory-scale proof-of-concept system are described, including functional operations.

  17. Advances in Norovirus Biology

    PubMed Central

    Karst, Stephanie M.; Wobus, Christiane E.; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Green, Kim Y.

    2014-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a major cause of epidemic and sporadic gastroenteritis worldwide, and can chronically infect immunocompromised patients. Efforts to develop effective vaccines and antivirals have been hindered by the uncultivable nature and extreme genetic diversity of human noroviruses. Although they remain a particularly challenging pathogen to study, recent advances in norovirus animal models and in vitro cultivation systems have led to an increased understanding of norovirus molecular biology and replication, pathogenesis, cell tropism, and innate and adaptive immunity. Furthermore, clinical trials of vaccines consisting of nonreplicating virus-like particles have shown promise. In this review, we summarize these recent advances and discuss controversies in the field, which is rapidly progressing towards generation of antiviral agents and increasingly effective vaccines. PMID:24922570

  18. Recent Advances in Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G; Laborda, Eduardo; Molina, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry. The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of 'nano-impacts'. PMID:26246984

  19. Advanced life support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Summary reports on each of the eight tasks undertaken by this contract are given. Discussed here is an evaluation of a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS), including modeling and analysis of Physical/Chemical Closed Loop Life Support (P/C CLLS); the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) evolution - Intermodule Ventilation study; advanced technologies interface requirements relative to ECLSS; an ECLSS resupply analysis; the ECLSS module addition relocation systems engineering analysis; an ECLSS cost/benefit analysis to identify rack-level interface requirements of the alternate technologies evaluated in the ventilation study, with a comparison of these with the rack level interface requirements for the baseline technologies; advanced instrumentation - technology database enhancement; and a clean room survey and assessment of various ECLSS evaluation options for different growth scenarios.

  20. Advanced far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > {lambda} > 50 {mu}m are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide.

  1. Epilepsy: new advances.

    PubMed

    Moshé, Solomon L; Perucca, Emilio; Ryvlin, Philippe; Tomson, Torbjörn

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy affects 65 million people worldwide and entails a major burden in seizure-related disability, mortality, comorbidities, stigma, and costs. In the past decade, important advances have been made in the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease and factors affecting its prognosis. These advances have translated into new conceptual and operational definitions of epilepsy in addition to revised criteria and terminology for its diagnosis and classification. Although the number of available antiepileptic drugs has increased substantially during the past 20 years, about a third of patients remain resistant to medical treatment. Despite improved effectiveness of surgical procedures, with more than half of operated patients achieving long-term freedom from seizures, epilepsy surgery is still done in a small subset of drug-resistant patients. The lives of most people with epilepsy continue to be adversely affected by gaps in knowledge, diagnosis, treatment, advocacy, education, legislation, and research. Concerted actions to address these challenges are urgently needed. PMID:25260236

  2. Advanced Separation Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

  3. Advanced CCD camera developments

    SciTech Connect

    Condor, A.

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  4. Advanced Clothing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James; Orndoff, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Clothing System (ACS) is to use advanced commercial off-the-shelf fibers and antimicrobial treatments with the goal of directly reducing the mass and volume of a logistics item. The current clothing state-of-the-art on the International Space Station (ISS) is disposable, mostly cotton-based, clothing with no laundry provisions. Each clothing article has varying use periods and will become trash. The goal is to increase the length of wear of the clothing to reduce the logistical mass and volume. The initial focus has been exercise clothing since the use period is lower. Various ground studies and an ISS technology demonstration have been conducted to evaluate clothing preference and length of wear. The analysis indicates that use of ACS selected garments (e.g. wool, modacrylic, polyester) can increase the breakeven point for laundry to 300 days.

  5. Advanced Clothing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Thilini; Broyan, James; Orndoff, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Clothing System (ACS) is to use advanced commercial off-theshelf fibers and antimicrobial treatments with the goal of directly reducing the mass and volume of a logistics item. The current clothing state-of-the-art on the International Space Station (ISS) is disposable, mostly cotton-based, clothing with no laundry provisions. Each clothing article has varying use periods and will become trash. The goal is to increase the length of wear of the clothing to reduce the logistical mass and volume. The initial focus has been exercise clothing since the use period is lower. Various ground studies and an ISS technology demonstration have been conducted to evaluate clothing preference and length of wear. The analysis indicates that use of ACS selected garments (e.g. wool, modacrylic, polyester) can increase the breakeven point for laundry to 300 days.

  6. Technical advances power neuroscience

    SciTech Connect

    Barinaga, M.

    1991-01-01

    New techniques are helping researchers study the development of nerve cells in cell cultures and in vivo. These new methods are offering insights into the brain that were not available even a couple of years ago. Among the new advances discussed are imaging technology for evaluating the thinking human brain. One area in which researchers have made recent progress is the quest for ways to create immortal cell lines from specific types of nerve cells. Other projects using genetically engineered retroviruses and tumor-inducing genes, as well as gene regulation are discussed. Recent advances in neuroscience techniques apply not only to neurons, but also to whole brains as well. One example is a high-resulution electroencephalogram (EEG). Although the EEG cannot pin down the actual sites of activity as precisely as static brain imaging methods, it complements them with real-time recording that can keep up with the very rapid pace of brain activity.

  7. Advanced Sensor Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, D. C.; Howard, D. E.; Smith, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Sensor Concepts project was conducted under the Center Director's Discretionary Fund at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Its objective was to advance the technology originally developed for the Glovebox Integrated Microgravity Isolation Technology project. The objective of this effort was to develop and test several new motion sensors. To date, the investigators have invented seven new technologies during this endeavor and have conceived several others. The innovative basic sensor technology is an absolute position sensor. It employs only two active components, and it is simple, inexpensive, reliable, repeatable, lightweight, and relatively unobtrusive. Two sensors can be utilized in the same physical space to achieve redundancy. The sensor has micrometer positional accuracy and can be configured as a two- or three-dimensional sensor. The sensor technology has the potential to pioneer a new class of linear and rotary sensors. This sensor is the enabling technology for autonomous assembly of modular structures in space and on extraterrestrial locations.

  8. Advanced ground station architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zillig, David; Benjamin, Ted

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a new station architecture for NASA's Ground Network (GN). The architecture makes efficient use of emerging technologies to provide dramatic reductions in size, operational complexity, and operational and maintenance costs. The architecture, which is based on recent receiver work sponsored by the Office of Space Communications Advanced Systems Program, allows integration of both GN and Space Network (SN) modes of operation in the same electronics system. It is highly configurable through software and the use of charged coupled device (CCD) technology to provide a wide range of operating modes. Moreover, it affords modularity of features which are optional depending on the application. The resulting system incorporates advanced RF, digital, and remote control technology capable of introducing significant operational, performance, and cost benefits to a variety of NASA communications and tracking applications.

  9. Advanced Virgo: AN Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fafone, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years on the development of gravitational wave detectors. Several km-scale interferometers have already operated at interesting sensitivity levels. In particular, the interferometric detector for gravitational waves Virgo completed its fourth science run in August 2011, when the upgrade toward the second-generation detector Advanced Virgo started. This major upgrade is planned to be completed by 2015. The expected final sensitivity of Advanced Virgo is about ten times better than the sensitivity reached by its predecessor. Many of the components of the detector will be changed to meet this goal, including new core optics, a more powerful laser, an improved vacuum system, the implementation of the signal-recycling technique. In this paper the description of the project and the expected schedule are presented.

  10. Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Army/NASA Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program is charged with developing and demonstrating a light, quiet, and durable drivetrain for next-generation rotorcraft in two classes: a 10,000-20,000 Future Attack Air Vehicle capable of both tactical ground support and air-to-air missions, and a 60,000-80,000 lb Advanced Cargo Aircraft, for heavy-lift field-support operations. Specific ART objectives encompass a 25-percent reduction in drivetrain weight, a 10-dB noise level reduction at the transmission source, and the achievement of a 5000-hr MTBF. Four candidate drivetrain systems have been carried to a conceptual design stage, together with projections of their mission performance and life-cycle costs.

  11. Recent Advances in Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G; Laborda, Eduardo; Molina, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler–Volmer and Marcus–Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry. The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of ‘nano-impacts’. PMID:26246984

  12. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2004-06-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  13. Advanced composites X

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    In the past ten years, high volume, high performance applications of advanced composites in transportation have grown substantially. The 10th annual ASM/ESD Advanced Composites Conference and Exposition presents the latest developments in composite applications and technologies with over 70 papers presented. The conference is organized in tracks covering body, chassis, powertrain and infrastructure applications, material sciences, manufacturing processes and recycling. Polymer composite and metal matrix composite technologies are included throughout. Body sessions feature adhesive bonding, analysis and test methods and crash energy absorption. The Chassis sessions showcase polymer and metal composite applications. The Powertrain/Propulsion track includes emerging materials as well as design and processing case studies. The Materials Science track features papers on new materials, their performance and theoretical treatment. Manufacturing Processes sessions cover process, modelling, fiber preforming and emerging manufacturing methods. The Infrastructure and Recycling track includes a panel discussion of infrastructure applications and technical papers on the recycling of polymer composites and nondestructive testing.

  14. Advanced Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Early NASA missions (Gemini, Apollo, Mars Viking) employed new ablative TPS that were tailored for the entry environment. After 40 years, heritage ablative TPS materials using Viking or Pathfinder era materials are at or near their performance limits and will be inadequate for future exploration missions. Significant advances in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable any subsequent human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. This poster summarizes some recent progress at NASA in developing families of advanced rigid/conformable and flexible ablators that could potentially be used for thermal protection in planetary entry missions. In particular the effort focuses technologies required to land heavy (approx.40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate future exploration plans.

  15. Advanced signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, D. J.

    1985-12-01

    A collection of papers on advanced signal processing in radar, sonar, and communications is presented. The topics addressed include: transmitter aerials, high-power amplifier design for active sonar, radar transmitters, receiver array technology for sonar, new underwater acoustic detectors, diversity techniques in communications receivers, GaAs IC amplifiers for radar and communication receivers, integrated optical techniques for acoustooptic receivers, logarithmic receivers, CCD processors for sonar, acoustooptic correlators, designing in silicon, very high performance integrated circuits, and digital filters. Also discussed are: display types, scan converters in sonar, display ergonomics, simulators, high throughput sonar processors, optical fiber systems for signal processing, satellite communications, VLSI array processor for image and signal processing, ADA, future of cryogenic devices for signal processing applications, advanced image understanding, and VLSI architectures for real-time image processing.

  16. Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation is planned to be a 10-15 minute "catalytic" focused presentation to be scheduled during one of the working sessions at the TIM. This presentation will focus on Advanced Life Support technologies key to future human Space Exploration as outlined in the Vision, and will include basic requirements, assessment of the state-of-the-art and gaps, and include specific technology metrics. The presentation will be technical in character, lean heavily on data in published ALS documents (such as the Baseline Values and Assumptions Document) but not provide specific technical details or build to information on any technology mentioned (thus the presentation will be benign from an export control and a new technology perspective). The topics presented will be focused on the following elements of Advanced Life Support: air revitalization, water recovery, waste management, thermal control, habitation systems, food systems and bioregenerative life support.

  17. [Research advances in dendrochronology].

    PubMed

    Fang, Ke-Yan; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Liu, Chang-Zhi; Cao, Chun-Fu; Chen, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Fei-Fei

    2014-07-01

    Tree-ring studies in China have achieved great advances since the 1990s, particularly for the dendroclimatological studies which have made some influence around the world. However, because of the uneven development, limited attention has been currently paid on the other branches of dendrochronology. We herein briefly compared the advances of dendrochronology in China and of the world and presented suggestions on future dendrochronological studies. Large-scale tree-ring based climate reconstructions in China are highly needed by employing mathematical methods and a high quality tree-ring network of the ring-width, density, stable isotope and wood anatomy. Tree-ring based field climate reconstructions provide potentials on explorations of climate forcings during the reconstructed periods via climate diagnosis and process simulation. PMID:25345035

  18. Advanced information society(5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanizawa, Ippei

    Based on the advancement of information network technology information communication forms informationalized society giving significant impact on business activities and life style in it. The information network has been backed up technologically by development of computer technology and has got great contribution by enhanced computer technology and communication equipments. Information is transferred by digital and analog methods. Technical development which has brought out multifunctioned modems of communication equipments in analog mode, and construction of advanced information communication network which has come out by joint work of computer and communication under digital technique, are described. The trend in institutional matter and standardization of electrical communication is also described showing some examples of value-added network (VAN).

  19. Advanced Polymer Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, Ross E.

    2012-07-25

    Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

  20. Advances in Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    We review the principle and some recent applications of Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT). The advances of the phase-resolved Doppler OCT method are described. Functional OCT algorithms which are based on an extension of the phase-resolved scheme are also introduced. Recent applications of Doppler OCT for quantification of flow, imaging of microvasculature and vocal fold vibration, and optical coherence elastography are briefly discussed. PMID:24443649

  1. Advanced studies program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlf, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered are presented in view graph form and include the following: (1) Space Station Engineering; (2) level 1 engineering organization; (3) advanced studies program organization; (4) NASA Center support areas; (5) work breakdown; (6) Space Station Freedom (SSF) Program Phases; (7) distributed systems evolution; (8) Space Shuttle ET mating analogy to on-orbit tank mating; (9) reference growth concept; (10) technology assessment process; (11) SSF technology priorities; (12) accomplishments; and (13) near term direction.

  2. ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2004-05-01

    The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

  3. Advances in photovoltaic technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, G. A.; Bailey, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    The advances in solar cell efficiency, radiation tolerance, and cost in the last 10 years are presented. The potential performance of thin-film solar cells in space is examined, and the cost and the historical trends in production capability of the photovoltaics industry are considered with respect to the needs of satellite solar power systems. Attention is given to single-crystal cells, concentrator and cascade cells, and thin-film solar cells.

  4. Advanced turboprop vibratory characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, A. V.; Fulton, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    The assembly of SR5 advanced turboprop blades to develop a structural dynamic data base for swept props is reported. Steady state blade deformation under centrifugal loading and vibratory characteristics of the rotor assembly were measured. Vibration was induced through a system of piezoelectric crystals attached to the blades. Data reduction procedures are used to provide deformation, mode shape, and frequencies of the assembly at predetermined speeds.

  5. Advanced concentrator panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D. M.; Bedard, R. J., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The prototype fabrication of a lightweight, high-quality cellular glass substrate reflective panel for use in an advanced point-focusing solar concentrator was completed. The reflective panel is a gore shaped segment of an 11-m paraboloidal dish. The overall concentrator design and the design of the reflective panels are described. prototype-specific panel design modifications are discussed and the fabrication approach and procedure outlined.

  6. Recent advances in dermoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Teresa; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Lallas, Aimilios; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The use of dermoscopy has offered a new morphological dimension of skin lesions and has provided an effective diagnostic tool to differentiate melanoma from other benign or malignant skin tumors but also to support the clinical diagnosis in general dermatology. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the most recent and important advances in the rising world of dermoscopy. PMID:26949523

  7. Advanced worker protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J.

    1995-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles. Phase I of the project has resulted in a full scale prototype Advanced Worker Protection Ensemble (AWPE, everything the worker will wear), with sub-scale support equipment, suitable for integrated testing and preliminary evaluation. Phase II will culminate in a full scale, certified, pre-production AWPS and a site demonstration.

  8. Polarized advanced fuel reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The d-/sup 3/He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs.

  9. The Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th} {approx} 9{center dot}10{sup 19} m{sup -2}{center dot}s{sup -1}) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Advanced Small Rechargeable Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald

    1989-01-01

    Lithium-based units offer highest performance. Paper reviews status of advanced, small rechargeable batteries. Covers aqueous systems including lead/lead dioxide, cadmium/nickel oxide, hydrogen/nickel oxide, and zinc/nickel oxide, as well as nonaqueous systems. All based on lithium anodes, nonaqueous systems include solid-cathode cells (lithium/molybdenum disulfide, lithium/titanium disulfide, and lithium/vanadium oxide); liquid-cathode cells (lithium/sulfur dioxide cells); and new category, lithium/polymer cells.

  11. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  12. Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies are presented. The topics include: 1) Monitoring & Controlling the Environment; 2) Illustrative Example: Canary 3) Ground-based Commercial Technology; 4) High Capability & Low Mass/Power + Autonomy = Key to Future SpaceFlight; 5) Current Practice: in Flight; 6) Current Practice: Post Flight; 7) Miniature Mass Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration and Long Duration Human Flight; 8) Hardware and Data Acquisition System; 9) 16S rDNA Phylogenetic Tree; and 10) Preview of Porter.

  13. Advanced propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    A variety of Advanced Propulsion Concepts (APC) is discussed. The focus is on those concepts that are sufficiently near-term that they could be developed for the Space Exploration Initiative. High-power (multi-megawatt) electric propulsion, solar sails, tethers, and extraterrestrial resource utilization concepts are discussed. A summary of these concepts and some general conclusions on their technology development needs are presented.

  14. Advanced composites for windmills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourquardez, G.

    A development status assessment is conducted for advanced composite construction techniques for windmill blade structures which, as in the case of composite helicopter rotors, promise greater reliability, longer service life, superior performance, and lower costs. Composites in wind turbine applications must bear aerodynamic, inertial and gravitational loads in complex interaction cycles. Attention is given to large Darrieus-type vertical axis windmills, to which composite construction methods may offer highly effective pitch-control mechanisms, especially in the 'umbrella' configuration.

  15. Advanced geothermal technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Whetten, J.T.; Murphy, H.D.; Hanold, R.J.; Myers, C.W.; Dunn, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Research and development in advanced technologies for geothermal energy production continue to increase the energy production options for the Nation. The high-risk investment over the past few years by the US Department of Energy in geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma energy resources is producing new means to lower production costs and to take advantage of these resources. The Nation has far larger and more regionally extensive geothermal resources than heretofore realized. At the end of a short 30-day closed-loop flow test, the manmade hot dry rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was producing 10 MW thermal - and still climbing - proving the technical feasibility of this new technology. The scientific feasibility of magma energy extraction has been demonstrated, and new field tests to evaluate this technology are planned. Analysis and field tests confirm the viability of geopressured-geothermal energy and the prospect that many dry-hole or depleted petroleum wells can be turned into producing geopressured-geothermal wells. Technological advances achieved through hot dry rock, magma, geopressured, and other geothermal research are making these resources and conventional hydrothermal resources more competitive. Noteworthy among these technological advances are techniques in computer simulation of geothermal reservoirs, new means for well stimulation, new high-temperature logging tools and packers, new hard-rock penetration techniques, and new methods for mapping fracture flow paths across large underground areas in reservoirs. In addition, many of these same technological advances can be applied by the petroleum industry to help lower production costs in domestic oil and gas fields. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  17. Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming

    1998-01-01

    Researchers from the NASA Lewis Research Center have obtained the first combustion/emissions data under extreme future engine operating conditions. In Lewis' new world-class 60-atm combustor research facility--the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR)--a flametube was used to conduct combustion experiments in environments as extreme as 900 psia and 3400 F. The greatest challenge for combustion researchers is the uncertainty of the effects of pressure on the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Consequently, U.S. engine manufacturers are using these data to guide their future combustor designs. The flametube's metal housing has an inside diameter of 12 in. and a length of 10.5 in. The flametube can be used with a variety of different flow paths. Each flow path is lined with a high-temperature, castable refractory material (alumina) to minimize heat loss. Upstream of the flametube is the injector section, which has an inside diameter of 13 in. and a length of 0.5-in. It was designed to provide for quick changeovers. This flametube is being used to provide all U.S. engine manufacturers early assessments of advanced combustion concepts at full power conditions prior to engine production. To date, seven concepts from engine manufacturers have been evaluated and improved. This collaborated development can potentially give U.S. engine manufacturers the competitive advantage of being first in the market with advanced low-emission technologies.

  18. Advanced gearbox technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Cedoz, R. W.; Salama, E. E.; Wagner, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced 13,000 HP, counterrotating (CR) gearbox was designed and successfully tested to provide a technology base for future designs of geared propfan propulsion systems for both commercial and military aircraft. The advanced technology CR gearbox was designed for high efficiency, low weight, long life, and improved maintainability. The differential planetary CR gearbox features double helical gears, double row cylindrical roller bearings integral with planet gears, tapered roller prop support bearings, and a flexible ring gear and diaphragm to provide load sharing. A new Allison propfan back-to-back gearbox test facility was constructed. Extensive rotating and stationary instrumentation was used to measure temperature, strain, vibration, deflection and efficiency under representative flight operating conditions. The tests verified smooth, efficient gearbox operation. The highly-instrumented advanced CR gearbox was successfully tested to design speed and power (13,000 HP), and to a 115 percent overspeed condition. Measured CR gearbox efficiency was 99.3 percent at the design point based on heat loss to the oil. Tests demonstrated low vibration characteristics of double helical gearing, proper gear tooth load sharing, low stress levels, and the high load capacity of the prop tapered roller bearings. Applied external prop loads did not significantly affect gearbox temperature, vibration, or stress levels. Gearbox hardware was in excellent condition after the tests with no indication of distress.

  19. Advanced Microturbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Laura

    2005-04-29

    Dept. of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-00-CH11061 was originally awarded to Honeywell International, Inc. Honeywell Power Systems Inc. (HPSI) division located in Albuquerque, NM in October 2000 to conduct a program titled Advanced Microturbine Systems (AMS). The DOE Advanced Microturbines Systems Program was originally proposed as a five-year program to design and develop a high efficiency, low emissions, durable microturbine system. The period of performance was to be October 2000 through September 2005. Program efforts were underway, when one year into the program Honeywell sold the intellectual property of Honeywell Power Systems Inc. and HPSI ceased business operations. Honeywell made an internal decision to restructure the existing program due to the HPSI shutdown and submitted a formal request to DOE on September 24, 2001 to transfer the Cooperative Agreement to Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services (HES&S) in Phoenix, AZ in order to continue to offer support for DOE's Advanced Microturbine Program. Work continued on the descoped program under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00-CH11061 and has been completed.

  20. Advanced Rigid Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate s (ESMD) Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project (TDP) and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate s (ARMD) Hypersonics Project are developing new advanced rigid ablators in an effort to substantially increase reliability, decrease mass, and reduce life cycle cost of rigid aeroshell-based entry systems for multiple missions. Advanced Rigid Ablators combine ablation resistant top layers capable of high heat flux entry and enable high-speed EDL with insulating mass-efficient bottom that, insulate the structure and lower the areal weight. These materials may benefit Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) vendors and may potentially enable new NASA missions for higher velocity returns (e.g. asteroid, Mars). The materials have been thermally tested to 400-450 W/sq cm at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Lab (LHMEL), Hypersonics Materials Evaluation Test System (HyMETS) and in arcjet facilities. Tested materials exhibit much lower backface temperatures and reduced recession over the baseline materials (PICA). Although the EDL project is ending in FY11, NASA in-house development of advanced ablators will continue with a focus on varying resin systems and fiber/resin interactions.

  1. Advanced battery development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In order to promote national security by ensuring that the United States has an adequate supply of safe, assured, affordable, and environmentally acceptable energy, the Storage Batteries Division at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, is responsible for engineering development of advanced rechargeable batteries for energy applications. This effort is conducted within the Exploratory Battery Technology Development and Testing (ETD) Lead center, whose activities are coordinated by staff within the Storage Batteries Division. The ETD Project, directed by SNL, is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Systems Research, Energy Storage and Distribution Division (DOE/OESD). SNL is also responsible for technical management of the Electric Vehicle Advanced Battery Systems (EV-ABS) Development Project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS). The ETD Project is operated in conjunction with the Technology Base Research (TBR) Project, which is under the direction of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Together these two projects seek to establish the scientific feasibility of advanced electrochemical energy storage systems, and conduct the initial engineering development on systems suitable for mobile and stationary commercial applications.

  2. Advances in Irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, W. R.

    This is the first volume of Advances in Irrigation, a new serial publication by the publishers of Advances in Agronomy and Advances in Hydroscience and designed to follow the same format. The editor is a well-known researcher and writer on irrigation and related subjects and has assembled a collection of highly regarded and respected authors for the initial volume. The readership for this volume will probably be mainly specialists and students interested in irrigation and an occasional design engineer.The seven contributions in this volume fall roughly into two classes: research and practice. Three papers (“Conjunctive Use of Rainfall and Irrigation in Semi-arid Regions,” by Stewart and Musik, “Irrigation Scheduling Using Soil Moisture Measurements: Theory and Practice,” by G. S. and M. D. Campbell, and “Use of Solute Transport Models to Estimate Salt Balance Below Irrigated Cropland,” by Jury) cover topics that have been the subject of a number of reviews. The contributions here provide brief, well-written, and authoritative summaries of the chosen topics and serve as good introductions or reviews. They should lend themselves well to classroom use in various ways. They also should be helpful to the nonspecialist interested in getting a sense of the subject without going into great detail.

  3. Advances in surgery. Volume 17

    SciTech Connect

    Shires, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the advancements made in surgery. The topics discussed are: Diagnostic uses of computerized tomography of abdomen; kidney surgery advancements, evaluation and management of pheochromocytomas; trauma of spleen and liver and microsurgery applications.

  4. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Started State by State Info FAQs Educational Webcasts Links Current Research In the News Legal Issues ... How to write a Psychiatric Advance Directive?" View webcast (15:04) What are Psychiatric Advance Directives? View ...

  5. Accelerating advanced-materials commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maine, Elicia; Seegopaul, Purnesh

    2016-05-01

    Long commercialization times, high capital costs and sustained uncertainty deter investment in innovation for advanced materials. With appropriate strategies, technology and market uncertainties can be reduced, and the commercialization of advanced materials accelerated.

  6. Criteria for Evaluating Advancement Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heemann, Warren, Ed.

    Criteria for evaluating college and university advancement programs are presented, based on the efforts of professional area trustees and advisory committees of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). The criteria can be useful in three ways: as the basis of internal audits of advancement programs or program components; as the…

  7. TIMSS Advanced 2008 Assessment Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garden, Robert A.; Lie, Svein; Robitaille, David F.; Angell, Carl; Martin, Michael O.; Mullis, Ina V.S.; Foy, Pierre; Arora, Alka

    2006-01-01

    Developing the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) Advanced 2008 Assessment Frameworks was a collaborative venture involving mathematics and physics experts from around the world. The document contains two frameworks for implementing TIMSS Advanced 2008--one for advanced mathematics and one for physics. It also contains…

  8. TIMSS Advanced 2015 Assessment Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ina V. S., Ed.; Martin, Michael O., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The "TIMSS Advanced 2015 Assessment Frameworks" provides the foundation for the two international assessments to take place as part of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement's TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study) Advanced 2015--Advanced Mathematics and Physics. Chapter 1 (Liv…

  9. Advances in ice mechanics - 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.S.; Hallam, S.D.; Maatanen, M.; Sinha, N.K.; Sodhi, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the interaction of icebergs with offshore platforms. Topics considered at the symposium included advances in ice mechanics in the United Kingdom, ice mechanics in Finland, recent advances in ice mechanics in Canada, advances in sea ice mechanics in the USA, foundations, monitoring, hazards, risk assessment, and deformation.

  10. Advanced satellite communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  11. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  12. Advanced composite fuselage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Smith, Peter J.; Horton, Ray E.

    1993-01-01

    Boeing's ATCAS program has completed its third year and continues to progress towards a goal to demonstrate composite fuselage technology with cost and weight advantages over aluminum. Work on this program is performed by an integrated team that includes several groups within The Boeing Company, industrial and university subcontractors, and technical support from NASA. During the course of the program, the ATCAS team has continued to perform a critical review of composite developments by recognizing advances in metal fuselage technology. Despite recent material, structural design, and manufacturing advancements for metals, polymeric matrix composite designs studied in ATCAS still project significant cost and weight advantages for future applications. A critical path to demonstrating technology readiness for composite transport fuselage structures was created to summarize ATCAS tasks for Phases A, B, and C. This includes a global schedule and list of technical issues which will be addressed throughout the course of studies. Work performed in ATCAS since the last ACT conference is also summarized. Most activities relate to crown quadrant manufacturing scaleup and performance verification. The former was highlighted by fabricating a curved, 7 ft. by 10 ft. panel, with cocured hat-stiffeners and cobonded J-frames. In building to this scale, process developments were achieved for tow-placed skins, drape formed stiffeners, braided/RTM frames, and panel cure tooling. Over 700 tests and supporting analyses have been performed for crown material and design evaluation, including structural tests that demonstrated limit load requirements for severed stiffener/skin failsafe damage conditions. Analysis of tests for tow-placed hybrid laminates with large damage indicates a tensile fracture toughness that is higher than that observed for advanced aluminum alloys. Additional recent ATCAS achievements include crown supporting technology, keel quadrant design evaluation, and

  13. Advanced rotorcraft transmission program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program is an Army-funded, joint Army/NASA program to develop and demonstrate lightweight, quiet, durable drivetrain systems for next generation rotorcraft. ART addresses the drivetrain requirements of two distinct next generation aircraft classes: Future Air Attack Vehicle, a 10,000 to 20,000 lb. aircraft capable of undertaking tactical support and air-to-air missions; and Advanced Cargo Aircraft, a 60,000 to 80,000 lb. aircraft capable of heavy life field support operations. Both tiltrotor and more conventional helicopter configurations are included in the ART program. Specific objectives of ART include reduction of drivetrain weight by 25 percent compared to baseline state-of-the-art drive systems configured and sized for the next generation aircraft, reduction of noise level at the transmission source by 10 dB relative to a suitably sized and configured baseline, and attainment of at least a 5000 hr mean-time-between-removal. The technical approach for achieving the ART goals includes application of the latest available component, material, and lubrication technology to advanced concept drivetrains that utilize new ideas in gear configuration, transmission layout, and airframe/drivetrain integration. To date, candidate drivetrain systems were carried to a conceptual design stage, and tradeoff studies were conducted resulting in selection of an ART transmission configuration for each of the four contractors. The final selection was based on comparative weight, noise, and reliability studies. A description of each of the selected ART designs is included. Preliminary design of each of the four selected ART transmission was completed, as have mission impact studies wherein comparisons of aircraft mission performance and life cycle costs are undertaken for the next generation aircraft with ART and with the baseline transmission.

  14. Advanced wind turbine design

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, P.M.; Jaffrey, A.

    1995-09-01

    Garrad Hassan have a project in progress funded by the UK Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to assess the prospects and cost benefits of advanced wind turbine design. In the course of this work, a new concept, the coned rotor design, has been developed. This enables a wind turbine system to operate in effect with variable rotor diameter augmenting energy capture in light winds and shedding loads in storm conditions. Comparisons with conventional design suggest that a major benefit in reduced cost of wind generated electricity may be possible.

  15. Advanced imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the Advanced Imaging System CCD based camera. The AIS1 camera system was developed at Photometric Ltd. in Tucson, Arizona as part of a Phase 2 SBIR contract No. NAS5-30171 from the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The camera project was undertaken as a part of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) project. This document is intended to serve as a complete manual for the use and maintenance of the camera system. All the different parts of the camera hardware and software are discussed and complete schematics and source code listings are provided.

  16. Advanced SCADA concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Sciacca, S.C. ); Block, W.R. )

    1995-01-01

    The typical utility system planner faces a wide variety of concepts and applications to consider when procuring a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system. The system's performance requirements are influenced by an arena of rapidly advancing technologies and a highly competitive business environment. Unlike other elements of the electric utility industry, these changes are not evolving specifically for the SCADA industry; they are being driven by other technology forums, with a profound impact on the SCADA system of the future. This article explores some of these concepts and suggests technology and business issues to consider when planning for the SCADA system of tomorrow.

  17. Advanced turboprop project

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, R.D.; Vrabel, D.

    1988-01-01

    At the direction of Congress, a task force headed by NASA was organized in 1975 to identify potential fuel saving concepts for aviation. The result was the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program implemented in 1976. An important part of the program was the development of advanced turboprop technology for Mach 0.65 to 0.85 applications having the potential fuel saving of 30 to 50 percent relative to existing turbofan engines. A historical perspective is presented of the development and the accomplishments that brought the turboprop to successful flight tests in 1986 and 1987.

  18. Advances in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Prakashchand; Jindal, Ankita; Saini, V.K.; Jindal, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of long-term diabetes mellitus (DM). Over the last 2 decades lot of work has been on early diagnosis of DR and screening programs have been designed to help the masses. Large numbers of clinical studies have been done for patients of diabetes and DR wherein the role of blood sugar control, metabolic control, role of oral medicines for DR, role of imaging, fluorescein angiography, and retinal photocoagulation has been studied. Newer treatment modalities are being devised and studied for better patient care. We discuss these issues in our review highlight and newer advances over the last few years. PMID:25364670

  19. Advanced composites technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. Critical technology issues that must be addressed and solved to develop composite primary structures for transport aircraft are delineated. The program schedule and milestones are included. Work completed in the first 3 years of the program indicates the potential for achieving composite structures that weigh less and are cost effective relative to conventional aluminum structure. Selected technical accomplishments are noted. Readers who are seeking more in-depth technical information should study the other papers included in these proceedings.

  20. [Advance in imaging spectropolarimeter].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-quan; Xiangli, Bin; Huang, Min; Hu, Liang; Zhou, Jin-song; Jing, Juan-juan

    2011-07-01

    Imaging spectropolarimeter (ISP) is a type of novel photoelectric sensor which integrated the functions of imaging, spectrometry and polarimetry. In the present paper, the concept of the ISP is introduced, and the advances in ISP at home and abroad in recent years is reviewed. The principles of ISPs based on novel devices, such as acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF), are illustrated. In addition, the principles of ISPs developed by adding polarized components to the dispersing-type imaging spectrometer, spatially modulated Fourier transform imaging spectrometer, and computer tomography imaging spectrometer are introduced. Moreover, the trends of ISP are discussed too. PMID:21942063

  1. Advanced sensors and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, Raymond S.; Zimmerman, Joe E.; Douglas, Kevin R.; Morrison, Rusty

    1990-01-01

    NASA is currently investigating the readiness of Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation to meet the requirements of new initiatives in space. The following technical objectives and technologies are briefly discussed: smart and nonintrusive sensors; onboard signal and data processing; high capacity and rate adaptive data acquisition systems; onboard computing; high capacity and rate onboard storage; efficient onboard data distribution; high capacity telemetry; ground and flight test support instrumentation; power distribution; and workstations, video/lighting. The requirements for high fidelity data (accuracy, frequency, quantity, spatial resolution) in hostile environments will continue to push the technology developers and users to extend the performance of their products and to develop new generations.

  2. Advances in Therapeutic Cholangioscopy

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Renata Nobre; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, cholangioscopy is an established modality in diagnostic and treatment of pancreaticobiliary diseases. The more widespread use and the recent development of new technologies and accessories had renewed the interest of endoscopic visualization of the biliary tract, increasing the range of indications and therapeutic procedures, such as diagnostic of indeterminate biliary strictures, lithotripsy of difficult bile duct stones, ablative techniques for intraductal malignancies, removal of foreign bodies and gallbladder drainage. These endoscopic interventions will probably be the last frontier in the near future. This paper presents the new advances in therapeutic cholangioscopy, focusing on the current clinical applications and on research areas. PMID:27403156

  3. Advanced soldering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, J.L.; Golden, J.; Frear, D.R.; Hosking, F.M.; Keicher, D.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1993-02-20

    Advanced soldering processes are discussed in a complete manner. The ability to meet the needs of electronic manufacturing, while addressing the environmental issues are challenging goals. Government regulations mandate the elimination of most solvents in solder flux removal. Alternative approaches to promoting wetting are discussed. Inert atmosphere soldering, acid vapor fluxless soldering, atomic and ionic hydrogen as reactive atmospheres, fluxless laser soldering in a controlled atmosphere are offered as soldering mechanisms for the future. Laser are discussed as alternate heat sources. Various types of lasers, advantages of lasers, and fiber optic beam delivery are considered.

  4. Advanced communications satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, J. N.

    1983-01-01

    There is a rapidly growing demand for satellite circuits, particularly for domestic service within the U.S. NASA's current program is aimed at developing the high risk, advanced satellite communications technologies required to significantly increase the capacity of future satellite communications systems. Attention is given to aspects of traffic distribution and service scenario, problems related to effects of rain attenuation, details regarding system configuration, a 30/20 GHz technology development approach, an experimental flight system, the communications payload for the experimental flight system, a typical experiment flight system coverage, and a typical three axis stabilized flight spacecraft.

  5. Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-22

    An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

  6. Advanced Turboprop Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Roy D.; Vrabel, Deborah

    1988-01-01

    At the direction of Congress, a task force headed by NASA was organized in 1975 to identify potential fuel saving concepts for aviation. The result was the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program implemented in 1976. An important part of the program was the development of advanced turboprop technology for Mach 0.65 to 0.85 applications having the potential fuel saving of 30 to 50 percent relative to existing turbofan engines. A historical perspective is presented of the development and the accomplishments that brought the turboprop to successful flight tests in 1986 and 1987.

  7. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Vaderhobli, Ram M

    2011-07-01

    The use of materials to rehabilitate tooth structures is constantly changing. Over the past decade, newer material processing techniques and technologies have significantly improved the dependability and predictability of dental material for clinicians. The greatest obstacle, however, is in choosing the right combination for continued success. Finding predictable approaches for successful restorative procedures has been the goal of clinical and material scientists. This article provides a broad perspective on the advances made in various classes of dental restorative materials in terms of their functionality with respect to pit and fissure sealants, glass ionomers, and dental composites. PMID:21726695

  8. Advance Care Planning

    Cancer.gov

    The thirteenth module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores the attitudes and practices of African Americans related to completion of advance directives, and recommends effective strategies to improve decision-making in the setting of serious, life-threatening illness, in ways that augment patient autonomy and support patient-centered goal-setting and decision-making among African American patients and their families.

  9. Advanced information society (10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Informationalization in Japan has spread among various fields of industrial and social life in wide and depth by drastic advancement in technology and networking. Looking at the change in industrial structure as well as international trend in information the Japanese Government regards the role of information and communication technology as infrastructure to be important, and is under the way of constructing various measures with ministries and agencies concerned with them. This paper describes how administrative agencies involved in information and communication such as Ministry of Postal Services, Ministry of International Trade and Industry cope with informationalization, and mentions future direction in information policies.

  10. Mandibular Advancement Splints.

    PubMed

    Bamagoos, Ahmad A; Sutherland, Kate; Cistulli, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    Although mandibular advancement splints (MAS) are not as efficacious as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in reducing obstructive respiratory events, patient adherence and preference are greater than CPAP. Additionally, the effectiveness of both treatments on general health outcomes, cognitive function, and quality of life appears to be equivalent. The main barrier for the implementation of MAS treatment in clinical practice is the interindividual variability in response to MAS treatment. Several prediction tools have been proposed to enhance patient selection for MAS treatment. Phenotyping obstructive sleep apnea patients may reveal patient characteristics that enable the prediction of response to MAS treatment. PMID:27542880

  11. Advanced radiographic imaging techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, J. B.; Brown, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Examination of the nature and operational constraints of conventional X-radiographic and neutron imaging methods, providing a foundation for a discussion of advanced radiographic imaging systems. Two types of solid-state image amplifiers designed to image X rays are described. Operational theory, panel construction, and performance characteristics are discussed. A closed-circuit television system for imaging neutrons is then described and the system design, operational theory, and performance characteristics are outlined. Emphasis is placed on a description of the advantages of these imaging systems over conventional methods.

  12. Advanced Electrophysiologic Mapping Systems

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and demand in Ontario for catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias guided by advanced nonfluoroscopy mapping systems. Particular attention was paid to ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). Clinical Need Tachycardia Tachycardia refers to a diverse group of arrhythmias characterized by heart rates that are greater than 100 beats per minute. It results from abnormal firing of electrical impulses from heart tissues or abnormal electrical pathways in the heart because of scars. Tachycardia may be asymptomatic, or it may adversely affect quality of life owing to symptoms such as palpitations, headaches, shortness of breath, weakness, dizziness, and syncope. Atrial fibrillation, the most common sustained arrhythmia, affects about 99,000 people in Ontario. It is associated with higher morbidity and mortality because of increased risk of stroke, embolism, and congestive heart failure. In atrial fibrillation, most of the abnormal arrhythmogenic foci are located inside the pulmonary veins, although the atrium may also be responsible for triggering or perpetuating atrial fibrillation. Ventricular tachycardia, often found in patients with ischemic heart disease and a history of myocardial infarction, is often life-threatening; it accounts for about 50% of sudden deaths. Treatment of Tachycardia The first line of treatment for tachycardia is antiarrhythmic drugs; for atrial fibrillation, anticoagulation drugs are also used to prevent stroke. For patients refractory to or unable to tolerate antiarrhythmic drugs, ablation of the arrhythmogenic heart tissues is the only option. Surgical ablation such as the Cox-Maze procedure is more invasive. Catheter ablation, involving the delivery of energy (most commonly radiofrequency) via a percutaneous catheter system guided by X-ray fluoroscopy, has been used in place of surgical ablation for many patients. However, this conventional approach in catheter ablation

  13. (1→3)-β-D-glucanemia in deep mycosis

    PubMed Central

    Obayashi, Taminori

    1997-01-01

    Factor G, a coagulation proenzyme of the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus), is extremely sensitive to (1→3)-β-D-glucan, which is a characteristic cell-wall constituent of fungi. Using this factor and by a digestion study with (1→3)-β-D-glucan, we showed that blood from patients with deep m ycosis contains the glucan. It was detected in 39 out of 41 fungal febrile episodes (sensitivity 90%), but in none of the 59 nonfungal febrile episodes (specificity 100%). PMID:18472857

  14. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and asthma, suggesting that efforts to eradicate fungi from the airways and environments of these patients should be considered. PMID:24928648

  15. Cutaneous and pulmonary mycosis in green anacondas (Euncectes murinus).

    PubMed

    Miller, Debra L; Radi, Zaher A; Stiver, Shane L; Thornhill, Timothy D

    2004-12-01

    Two dead, captive green anacondas (Eunectes murinus), including one male and one female, submitted for necropsy were in poor body condition, having multiple, scattered, dark red foci on the scales and mottled lungs. Both snakes had severe mycotic dermatitis. In addition, the male snake had mycotic stomatitis, and the female snake had mycotic pneumonia. Trichophyton sp., Verticillium sp., and Alternaria sp. were isolated from the dermal lesions. The pulmonary lesions were morphologically consistent with Aspergillus sp. Bacterial organisms isolated from skin and internal organs included Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Providencia rettgeri. Mycotic diseases can be devastating to reptiles, and suboptimal husbandry and captivity were likely the predisposing factors that led to opportunistic invasion in these snakes. PMID:15732602

  16. Disseminated mycosis in a killer whale (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Abdo, Walied; Kawachi, Takeshi; Sakai, Hiroki; Fukushi, Hideto; Kano, Rui; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Shirouzu, Hiroshi; Kakizoe, Yuko; Tuji, Hajime; Yanai, Tokuma

    2012-01-01

    Hematological findings in a female killer whale (Orcinus orca) undergoing rehabilitation after sudden severe anorexia revealed continuing increases in serum lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase activities as well as fibrinogen concentration. Serologic evidence of herpesvirus infection and skin vesicles were detected 2 weeks into the treatment regimen of antibiotics and corticosteroids. The whale showed signs of improvement after treatment with anti-herpesvirus drugs, but sudden severe anorexia reappeared, along with marked elevation of fibrinogen concentration that continued until the death. Postmortem examination revealed multiple light tan foci of necrosis in the skeletal and cardiac muscles, and lung consolidation. Microscopic findings indicated disseminated fungal granulomas in the skeletal and cardiac muscles, as well as myocarditis, mycotic embolic thromboarteritis of cardiac blood vessels, and bronchopneumonia with numerous typical Aspergillus-like fungi. Mucor-like structures in granulomas in the heart and skeletal muscle and Aspergillus-like fungi in the lungs were identified using periodic acid-Schiff, Gomori methenamine silver stain, and immunohistochemistry. The present case involves dual infection with Mucor and Aspergillus species in a killer whale with concurrent herpesvirus. PMID:22362957

  17. Advanced desiccant materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czanderna, A. W.; Thomas, T. M.

    1986-05-01

    The long-range goal of this task is to understand the role of surface phenomena in desiccant cooling materials. The background information includes a brief introduction to desiccant cooling systems (DCS) and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The purpose, background, rationale, and long-term technical approach for studying advanced desiccant materials are then treated. Experimental methods for measuring water vapor sorption by desiccants are described, and the rationale is then given for choosing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for measuring sorption isotherms, rates, and cyclic stability. Background information is given about the QCM, including the quartz crystal resonator itself, the support structure for the quartz crystal, and the advantages and limitations of a QCM. The apparatus assembled and placed into operation during CY 1985 is described. The functions of the principal components of the equipment, i.e., the QCM, vacuum system, pressure gauges, residual gas analyzer, constant temperature bath, and data acquisition system, are described as they relate to the water vapor sorption measurements now under way. The criteria for narrowing the potential candidates as advanced desiccant materials for the initial studies are given. Also given is a list of 20 principal candidate materials identified based on the criteria and data available in the literature.

  18. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.

  19. Advanced Metering Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-15

    The report provides an overview of the development of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). Metering has historically served as the cash register for the utility industry. It measured the amount of energy used and supported the billing of customers for that usage. However, utilities are starting to look at meters in a whole different way, viewing them as the point of contact with customers in supporting a number of operational imperatives. The combination of smart meters and advanced communications has opened up a variety of methods for utilities to reduce operating costs while offering new services to customers. A concise look is given at what's driving interest in AMI, the components of AMI, and the creation of a business case for AMI. Topics covered include: an overview of AMI including the history of metering and development of smart meters; a description of the key technologies involved in AMI; a description of key government initiatives to support AMI; an evaluation of the current market position of AMI; an analysis of business case development for AMI; and, profiles of 21 key AMI vendors.

  20. Advances in Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Wireless video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a minimally invasive technology that has revolutionized the approach to small intestinal disease investigation and management. Designed primarily to provide diagnostic imaging of the small intestine, VCE is used predominantly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and suspected Crohn’s disease; however, numerous other indications have been established, including the assessment of celiac disease, investigation of small bowel tumors, and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes. Since the introduction of small bowel VCE in 2000, more than 1600 articles have been published describing the evolution of this technology. The main adverse outcome is capsule retention, which can potentially be avoided by careful patient selection or by using a patency capsule. Despite the numerous advances in the past 15 years, limitations such as incomplete VCE studies, missed lesions, and time-consuming reporting remain. The inability to control capsule movement for the application of targeted therapy or the acquisition of tissue for histologic analysis remains among the greatest challenges in the further development of capsule technology. This article outlines the recent technological and clinical advances in VCE and the future directions of research in this field. PMID:27482183

  1. Advanced Virgo phase cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaaf, L.; Agatsuma, K.; van Beuzekom, M.; Gebyehu, M.; van den Brand, J.

    2016-05-01

    A century after the prediction of gravitational waves, detectors have reached the sensitivity needed to proof their existence. One of them, the Virgo interferometer in Pisa, is presently being upgraded to Advanced Virgo (AdV) and will come into operation in 2016. The power stored in the interferometer arms raises from 20 to 700 kW. This increase is expected to introduce higher order modes in the beam, which could reduce the circulating power in the interferometer, limiting the sensitivity of the instrument. To suppress these higher-order modes, the core optics of Advanced Virgo is equipped with a thermal compensation system. Phase cameras, monitoring the real-time status of the beam constitute a critical component of this compensation system. These cameras measure the phases and amplitudes of the laser-light fields at the frequencies selected to control the interferometer. The measurement combines heterodyne detection with a scan of the wave front over a photodetector with pin-hole aperture. Three cameras observe the phase front of these laser sidebands. Two of them monitor the in-and output of the interferometer arms and the third one is used in the control of the aberrations introduced by the power recycling cavity. In this paper the working principle of the phase cameras is explained and some characteristic parameters are described.

  2. Aeroacoustics of advanced propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    1990-01-01

    The aeroacoustics of advanced, high speed propellers (propfans) are reviewed from the perspective of NASA research conducted in support of the Advanced Turboprop Program. Aerodynamic and acoustic components of prediction methods for near and far field noise are summarized for both single and counterrotation propellers in uninstalled and configurations. Experimental results from tests at both takeoff/approach and cruise conditions are reviewed with emphasis on: (1) single and counterrotation model tests in the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 (low speed) and 8 by 6 (high speed) wind tunnels, and (2) full scale flight tests of a 9 ft (2.74 m) diameter single rotation wing mounted tractor and a 11.7 ft (3.57 m) diameter counterrotation aft mounted pusher propeller. Comparisons of model data projected to flight with full scale flight data show good agreement validating the scale model wind tunnel approach. Likewise, comparisons of measured and predicted noise level show excellent agreement for both single and counterrotation propellers. Progress in describing angle of attack and installation effects is also summarized. Finally, the aeroacoustic issues associated with ducted propellers (very high bypass fans) are discussed.

  3. Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distefano, E.; Noll, C.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment (ALFE) is a Hitchhiker experiment flown on board the Shuttle of STS-39 as part of the Space Test Payload-1 (STP-1). The purpose of ALFE is to evaluate new propellant management components and operations under the low gravity flight environment of the Space Shuttle for eventual use in an advanced spacecraft feed system. These components and operations include an electronic pressure regulator, an ultrasonic flowmeter, an ultrasonic point sensor gage, and on-orbit refill of an auxiliary propellant tank. The tests are performed with two transparent tanks with dyed Freon 113, observed by a camera and controlled by ground commands and an on-board computer. Results show that the electronic pressure regulator provides smooth pressure ramp-up, sustained pressure control, and the flexibility to change pressure settings in flight. The ultrasonic flowmeter accurately measures flow and detects gas ingestion. The ultrasonic point sensors function well in space, but not as a gage during sustained low-gravity conditions, as they, like other point gages, are subject to the uncertainties of propellant geometry in a given tank. Propellant transfer operations can be performed with liquid-free ullage equalization at a 20 percent fill level, gas-free liquid transfer from 20-65 percent fill level, minimal slosh, and can be automated.

  4. Advances in speech processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ince, A. Nejat

    1992-10-01

    The field of speech processing is undergoing a rapid growth in terms of both performance and applications and this is fueled by the advances being made in the areas of microelectronics, computation, and algorithm design. The use of voice for civil and military communications is discussed considering advantages and disadvantages including the effects of environmental factors such as acoustic and electrical noise and interference and propagation. The structure of the existing NATO communications network and the evolving Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) concept are briefly reviewed to show how they meet the present and future requirements. The paper then deals with the fundamental subject of speech coding and compression. Recent advances in techniques and algorithms for speech coding now permit high quality voice reproduction at remarkably low bit rates. The subject of speech synthesis is next treated where the principle objective is to produce natural quality synthetic speech from unrestricted text input. Speech recognition where the ultimate objective is to produce a machine which would understand conversational speech with unrestricted vocabulary, from essentially any talker, is discussed. Algorithms for speech recognition can be characterized broadly as pattern recognition approaches and acoustic phonetic approaches. To date, the greatest degree of success in speech recognition has been obtained using pattern recognition paradigms. It is for this reason that the paper is concerned primarily with this technique.

  5. Aeroacoustics of advanced propellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneweg, John F.

    The aeroacoustics of advanced, high speed propellers (propfans) are reviewed from the perspective of NASA research conducted in support of the Advanced Turboprop Program. Aerodynamic and acoustic components of prediction methods for near and far field noise are summarized for both single and counterrotation propellers in uninstalled and configurations. Experimental results from tests at both takeoff/approach and cruise conditions are reviewed with emphasis on: (1) single and counterrotation model tests in the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 (low speed) and 8 by 6 (high speed) wind tunnels, and (2) full scale flight tests of a 9 ft (2.74 m) diameter single rotation wing mounted tractor and a 11.7 ft (3.57 m) diameter counterrotation aft mounted pusher propeller. Comparisons of model data projected to flight with full scale flight data show good agreement validating the scale model wind tunnel approach. Likewise, comparisons of measured and predicted noise level show excellent agreement for both single and counterrotation propellers. Progress in describing angle of attack and installation effects is also summarized. Finally, the aeroacoustic issues associated with ducted propellers (very high bypass fans) are discussed.

  6. NASA advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic fields are described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification. Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: (1) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot Wind Tunnel; and (2) far field noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off-design conditions. Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at takeoff but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise are also illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  7. NASA Advanced Propeller Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic i e l d s a r e described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification . Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: ( 1 ) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8-by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel and ( 2 ) farfield noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9-by 15-Font Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off design conditions . Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at take off but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise a real so illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  8. Advanced PFBC transient analysis

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.S.; Bonk, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    Transient modeling and analysis of advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems is a research area that is currently under investigation by the US Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC). The object of the effort is to identify key operating parameters that affect plant performance and then quantify the basic response of major sub-systems to changes in operating conditions. PC-TRAX{trademark}, a commercially available dynamic software program, was chosen and applied in this modeling and analysis effort. This paper describes the development of a series of TRAX-based transient models of advanced PFBC power plants. These power plants burn coal or other suitable fuel in a PFBC, and the high temperature flue gas supports low-Btu fuel gas or natural gas combustion in a gas turbine topping combustor. When it is utilized, the low-Btu fuel gas is produced in a bubbling bed carbonizer. High temperature, high pressure combustion products exiting the topping combustor are expanded in a modified gas turbine to generate electrical power. Waste heat from the system is used to raise and superheat steam for a reheat steam turbine bottoming cycle that generates additional electrical power. Basic control/instrumentation models were developed and modeled in PC-TRAX and used to investigate off-design plant performance. System performance for various transient conditions and control philosophies was studied.

  9. Advanced Geosynchronous Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    For improved understanding of chaotic processes and the diurnal cycle, an advanced GOES imager must also have the multi-spectral spectral bands used by low earth orbit (LEO) imagers, with on-orbit calibration for all bands. A synergy between GEO and LEO radiometry would enable earth system scientists to fuse the remote sensing data from all the spaceborne platforms. These additional radiometric capabilities are designed to observe important physical processes that vary rapidly and unpredicably: smoke, fires, precipitation, ozone, volcanic ash, cloud phase and height, and surface temperature. We believe the technology now exists to develop an imaging system that can meet future weather reporting and earth system science needs. To meet this need, we propose a design for a comprehensive geosynchronous atmospheric imager. This imager is envisioned to fly on a GOES-N class spacecraft, within the volume, weight and power constraints of a platform similar to GOES-N while delivering 100 times more data and radiometric quality than the GOES-N imager. The higher data rate probably requires its own ground station, which could serve as a systems prototype for NOAA's next generation of operational satellites. For operational compatibility, our proposed advanced GOES imaging system contains the GOES-R requirements as a subset, and the GOES-N imager capabilities (and the sounder's imaging channels) as a further subset.

  10. Advances in Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ryan; Enns, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Wireless video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a minimally invasive technology that has revolutionized the approach to small intestinal disease investigation and management. Designed primarily to provide diagnostic imaging of the small intestine, VCE is used predominantly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and suspected Crohn's disease; however, numerous other indications have been established, including the assessment of celiac disease, investigation of small bowel tumors, and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes. Since the introduction of small bowel VCE in 2000, more than 1600 articles have been published describing the evolution of this technology. The main adverse outcome is capsule retention, which can potentially be avoided by careful patient selection or by using a patency capsule. Despite the numerous advances in the past 15 years, limitations such as incomplete VCE studies, missed lesions, and time-consuming reporting remain. The inability to control capsule movement for the application of targeted therapy or the acquisition of tissue for histologic analysis remains among the greatest challenges in the further development of capsule technology. This article outlines the recent technological and clinical advances in VCE and the future directions of research in this field. PMID:27482183

  11. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing

  12. USMC UGS technology advancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartup, David C.; Barr, Michael E.; Hirz, Philip M.; Kipp, Jason; Fishburn, Thomas A.; Waller, Ezra S.; Marks, Brian A.

    2008-04-01

    Technology advancements for the USMC UGS system are described. Integration of the ARL Blue Radio/CSR into the System Controller and Radio Repeater permit the TRSS system to operate seamlessly within the Family of UGS concept. In addition to the Blue Radio/CSR, the TRSS system provides VHF and SATCOM radio links. The TRSS system is compatible with a wide range of imagers, including those with both analog and digital interfaces. The TRSS System Controller permits simultaneous monitoring of 2 camera inputs. To complement enhanced compatibility and improved processing, the mechanical housing of the TRSS System Controller has been updated. The SDR-II, a system monitoring device, also incorporates four Blue Radio/CSRs along with other communication capabilities, making it an ideal choice for a monitoring station within the Family of UGS. Field testing of L-3 Nova's UGS system at YPG has shown flawless performance, capturing all 126 targets.

  13. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley Miller; Rich Gebert; William Swanson

    1999-11-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a manner that has not been done before. The AHPC concept consists of a combination of fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emission with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC is currently being tested at the 2.7-MW scale at the Big Stone power station.

  14. Advancing family psychology.

    PubMed

    Fiese, Barbara H

    2016-02-01

    To realize the broad and complex nature of the field of family psychology, I have slightly revised the mission statement of the Journal of Family Psychology (JFP) to capture contemporary scholarship in family psychology and to advance systems perspectives in this top-tier scientific journal. Over the next 6 years, I hope that authors will consider JFP as an outlet for their best work in the following areas: (1) JFP addresses societal challenges faced by families today; (2) JFP publishes important studies on what makes couple and family relationships work; (3) JFP is a leader in publishing reports that use cutting-edge sophisticated approaches to research design and data analysis; and (4) JFP imparts knowledge about effective therapy and prevention programs relevant to couples and families. The journal is also expanding its publication rate to eight issues per year. PMID:26845635

  15. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2005-05-24

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

  16. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2004-10-12

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

  17. TOOLKIT FOR ADVANCED OPTIMIZATION

    2000-10-13

    The TAO project focuses on the development of software for large scale optimization problems. TAO uses an object-oriented design to create a flexible toolkit with strong emphasis on the reuse of external tools where appropriate. Our design enables bi-directional connection to lower level linear algebra support (for example, parallel sparse matrix data structures) as well as higher level application frameworks. The Toolkist for Advanced Optimization (TAO) is aimed at teh solution of large-scale optimization problemsmore » on high-performance architectures. Our main goals are portability, performance, scalable parallelism, and an interface independent of the architecture. TAO is suitable for both single-processor and massively-parallel architectures. The current version of TAO has algorithms for unconstrained and bound-constrained optimization.« less

  18. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

    1999-10-15

    This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

  19. Advanced Hysteroscopic Surgery Training

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, Glenda R.; Erian, Anna-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Hysteroscopic surgery is pivotal in management of many gynecological pathologies. The skills required for performing advanced hysteroscopic surgery (AHS), eg, transcervical hysteroscopic endometrial resection (TCRE), hysteroscopic polypectomy and myomectomy in the management of menorrhagia, hysteroscopic septulysis in fertility-related gynecological problems and hysteroscopic removal of chronically retained products of conception and excision of intramural ectopic pregnancy ought to be practiced by contemporary gynecological surgeons in their day-to-day clinical practice. AHS is a minimally invasive procedure that preserves the uterus in most cases. Whilst the outcome is of paramount importance, proper training should be adopted and followed through so that doctors, nurses, and institutions may deliver the highest standard of patient care. PMID:25392678

  20. Advanced drilling systems study.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Kenneth G.; Livesay, Billy Joe; Finger, John Travis

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the results of a study of advanced drilling concepts conducted jointly for the Natural Gas Technology Branch and the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of alternative rock cutting concepts and drilling systems are examined. The systems cover the range from current technology, through ongoing efforts in drilling research, to highly speculative concepts. Cutting mechanisms that induce stress mechanically, hydraulically, and thermally are included. All functions necessary to drill and case a well are considered. Capital and operating costs are estimated and performance requirements, based on comparisons of the costs for alternative systems to conventional drilling technology, are developed. A number of problems common to several alternatives and to current technology are identified and discussed.

  1. Advanced strategic missile development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickler, R. L.

    1981-05-01

    The M-X program is taking two paths: (1) the current development and projected deployment of a survivable land based ICBM (the M-X) in a multiple protective structure system, and (2) a building block development of readiness posture and strategic futures technology that could be used for a wide range of projected needs in the event of major changes in the threat or the political climate. The blend of aerospace and civil engineering technologies which has resulted in the systems concept necessary to assure the continued survivability of the land based strategic missile force is summarized. Recent advanced technology development activities, which have been focused on systems upgrade options to the current ICBM force, basing options which may be required for special force elements, small missile options for airborne applications, penetration technology to counter SAM and ABM threats, and systems concepts for unique targeting requirements are reviewed.

  2. Advances in Nanoimprint Lithography.

    PubMed

    Traub, Matthew C; Longsine, Whitney; Truskett, Van N

    2016-06-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL), a molding process, can replicate features <10 nm over large areas with long-range order. We describe the early development and fundamental principles underlying the two most commonly used types of NIL, thermal and UV, and contrast them with conventional photolithography methods used in the semiconductor industry. We then describe current advances toward full commercial industrialization of UV-curable NIL (UV-NIL) technology for integrated circuit production. We conclude with brief overviews of some emerging areas of research, from photonics to biotechnology, in which the ability of NIL to fabricate structures of arbitrary geometry is providing new paths for development. As with previous innovations, the increasing availability of tools and techniques from the semiconductor industry is poised to provide a path to bring these innovations from the lab to everyday life. PMID:27070763

  3. [Advanced pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis].

    PubMed

    Triebel, H J; von Hülst, M; Schofer, M

    1987-09-01

    A severe course of microlithiasis alveolaris pulmonum in a 28-year old patient is described. The disease, which had progressed to a very advanced stage at the time of examination, produced in the plain radiograph of the thorax an extensive, homogeneous, ground-glass like shadow of practically all organs of the thorax. The typical miliary (spot-like) shadow ("sandstorm lung") is visible only in the lateral and apical parts of the lung. CT revealed massive calcareous deposits which increased in craniocaudal and ventrodorsal direction. Bullous metaplasia of the lung was particularly striking in the apical region. No effective therapy is known so far. A combined heart and lung transplantation might be the only therapy that could prolong the patient's life. PMID:3659783

  4. Advanced night vision goggles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thacker, Clinton

    2003-02-01

    The Advanced Night Vision Goggle (ANVG) program is developing integrated wide field of view (WFOV) helmet-mounted image intensifier night vision goggle systems. ANVG will provide a FOV of approximately 40° (vertical) × 100° (horizontal) and an integrated heads-up display for overlay of flight symbology and/or FLIR imagery. The added FLIR complements the I2 imagery in out of the window or ground applications. ANVG will significantly improve safety, situational awareness, and mission capabilities in differing environments. ANVG achieves the ultra wide FOV using four image intensifier tubes in a head-mounted configuration. Additional features include a miniature flat panel display and a lightweight uncooled FLIR. The integrated design will demonstrate the capability of helmet-mounted I2 and FLIR image fusion. Fusion will be accomplished optically and will offer significant opportunities for ground applications. This paper summarizes the basic technologies, lessons learned, and program status.

  5. The Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-GeV third-generation synchrotron radiation storage ring and full-energy positron injector. Construction project funding began in 1989, and ground breaking took place on 5 May 1990. Construction of all accelerator facilities was completed in January 1995 and storage ring commissioning is underway. First observation of x-rays from a bending magnet source took place on 26 March 1995. Nearly all performance specifications of the injector have been reached, and first observations indicate that the reliability, dynamic aperture, emittance, and orbit stability in the storage ring are satisfactory. Observation of radiation from the first of 20 insertion device beamlines is scheduled for October 1995. Start of regular operations is expected to take place well before the APS Project target date of December 1996.

  6. Recent advances in VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Iman, Arash

    2016-09-01

    Within the last two decades, vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) have attracted rising interest from both industry and science. They have proven to be versatile lasers which can be specifically designed for research and applications that require a particular regime of operation. Various emission schemes ranging from narrow-linewidth emission, pulsed light or multimode emission to a frequency-converted output are feasible owing to remarkable device features. Being composed of a semiconductor gain mirror and an external cavity, not only is a unique access to high-brightness output and a high-beam quality is provided, but also wavelength flexibility. Moreover, the exploitation of intra-cavity frequency conversion further extends the accessible spectral range from the ultraviolet (UV) to the terahertz (THz). In this work, recent advances in the field of VECSELs are highlighted.

  7. Advanced turbine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of an advanced convective cooling concept applied to rocket turbine airfoils which operate in a high pressure hydrogen and methane environment was investigated. The concept consists of a central structural member in which grooves are machined. The grooves are temporarily filled with a removable filler and the entire airfoil is covered with a layer of electroformed nickel, or nickel base alloy. After removal of the filler, the low thermal resistance of the nickel closure causes the wall temperature to be reduced by heat transfer to the coolant. The program is divided in the following tasks: (1) turbine performance appraisal; (2) coolant geometry evaluation; (3) test hardware design and analysis; and (4) test airfoil fabrication.

  8. Electrolytes for advanced batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomgren, George E.

    The choices of the components of the electrolyte phase for advanced batteries (lithium and lithium ion batteries) are very sensitive to the electrodes which are used. There are also a number of other requirements for the electrolyte phase, which depend on the cell design and the materials chosen for the battery. The difficulty of choice is compounded when the cell is a rechargeable one. This paper looks at each of these requirements and the degree to which they are met for lithium and lithium ion batteries. The discussion is broken into sections on anode or negative electrode stability requirements, cathode or positive electrode stability requirements, conductivity needs, viscosity and wetting requirements. The effects of these properties and interactions on the performance of batteries are also discussed.

  9. The Advanced Helical Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D; Tallerico, L J; Gidding, D A; Murphy, M J; Chase, J B

    2009-10-26

    A high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) generator called the Advanced Helical Generator (AHG) has been designed, built, and successfully tested. The AHG incorporates design principles of voltage and current management to obtain a high current and energy gain. Its design was facilitated by the use of modern modeling tools as well as high precision manufacture. The result was a first-shot success. The AHG delivered 16 Mega-Amperes of current and 11 Mega-Joules of energy to a quasi-static 80 nH inductive load. A current gain of 154 times was obtained with a peak exponential rise time of 20 {micro}s. We will describe in detail the design and testing of the AHG.

  10. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  11. Advanced servo manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Holt, W.E.; Kuban, D.P.; Martin, H.L.

    1988-10-25

    An advanced servo manipulator has modular parts. Modular motor members drive individual input gears to control shoulder roll, shoulder pitch, elbow pitch, wrist yaw, wrist pitch, wrist roll, and tong spacing. The modules include a support member, a shoulder module for controlling shoulder roll, and a sleeve module attached to the shoulder module in fixed relation thereto. The shoulder roll sleeve module has an inner cylindrical member rotatable relative to the outer cylindrical member, and upon which a gear pod assembly is mounted. A plurality of shafts are driven by the gears, which are in turn driven by individual motor modules to transmit rotary power to control elbow pitch as well as to provide four different rotary shafts across the bendable elbow joint to supply rotary motive power to a wrist member and tong member. 41 figs.

  12. Advanced servo manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Holt, William E.; Kuban, Daniel P.; Martin, H. Lee

    1988-01-01

    An advanced servo manipulator has modular parts. Modular motor members drive individual input gears to control shoulder roll, shoulder pitch, elbow pitch, wrist yaw, wrist pitch, wrist roll, and tong spacing. The modules include a support member, a shoulder module for controlling shoulder roll, and a sleeve module attached to the shoulder module in fixed relation thereto. The shoulder roll sleeve module has an inner cylindrical member rotatable relative to the outer cylindrical member, and upon which a gear pod assembly is mounted. A plurality of shafts are driven by the gears, which are in turn driven by individual motor modules to transmit rotary power to control elbow pitch as well as to provide four different rotary shafts across the bendable elbow joint to supply rotary motive power to a wrist member and tong member.

  13. Advanced subsystems development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    The concept design for a small (less than 10 MWe) solar thermal electric generating plant was completed using projected 1985 technology. The systems requirements were defined and specified. The components, including an engineering prototype for one 15 kWe module of the generating plant, were conceptually designed. Significant features of the small solar thermal power plant were identified as the following: (1) 15 kWe Stirling-cycle engine/alternator with constant power output; (2) 10 meter point-focusing paraboloidal concentrator with cantilevered cellular glass reflecting panels; (3) primary heat pipe with 800 C output solar cavity receiver; (4) secondary heat pipe with molten salt thermal energy storage unit; (5) electric energy transport system; and (6) advanced battery energy storage capability.

  14. Advanced glycation end products

    PubMed Central

    Gkogkolou, Paraskevi; Böhm, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the progressive accumulation of damage to an organism over time leading to disease and death. Aging research has been very intensive in the last years aiming at characterizing the pathophysiology of aging and finding possibilities to fight age-related diseases. Various theories of aging have been proposed. In the last years advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have received particular attention in this context. AGEs are formed in high amounts in diabetes but also in the physiological organism during aging. They have been etiologically implicated in numerous diabetes- and age-related diseases. Strategies inhibiting AGE accumulation and signaling seem to possess a therapeutic potential in these pathologies. However, still little is known on the precise role of AGEs during skin aging. In this review the existing literature on AGEs and skin aging will be reviewed. In addition, existing and potential anti-AGE strategies that may be beneficial on skin aging will be discussed. PMID:23467327

  15. Advances in analytical chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendale, W. F.; Congo, Richard T.; Nielsen, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of computer programs based on multivariate statistical algorithms makes possible obtaining reliable information from long data vectors that contain large amounts of extraneous information, for example, noise and/or analytes that we do not wish to control. Three examples are described. Each of these applications requires the use of techniques characteristic of modern analytical chemistry. The first example, using a quantitative or analytical model, describes the determination of the acid dissociation constant for 2,2'-pyridyl thiophene using archived data. The second example describes an investigation to determine the active biocidal species of iodine in aqueous solutions. The third example is taken from a research program directed toward advanced fiber-optic chemical sensors. The second and third examples require heuristic or empirical models.

  16. Advanced powder processing

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    Gelcasting is an advanced powder forming process. It is most commonly used to form ceramic or metal powders into complex, near-net shapes. Turbine rotors, gears, nozzles, and crucibles have been successfully gelcast in silicon nitride, alumina, nickel-based superalloy, and several steels. Gelcasting can also be used to make blanks that can be green machined to near-net shape and then high fired. Green machining has been successfully applied to both ceramic and metal gelcast blanks. Recently, the authors have used gelcasting to make tooling for metal casting applications. Most of the work has centered on H13 tool steel. They have demonstrated an ability to gelcast and sinter H13 to near net shape for metal casting tooling. Also, blanks of H13 have been cast, green machined into complex shape, and fired. Issues associated with forming, binder burnout, and sintering are addressed.

  17. Room for advancement

    SciTech Connect

    Carrio, L.A. ); Sharpe, R. ); Bizzarri, R.E. ); Wilson, T.E. )

    1993-12-01

    The advanced biological nutrient removal (ABNR) process is a viable nutrient removal choice for wastewater treatment plants where site limitations and energy costs are a concern. Specifically, ABNR plants: can remove more than 60% of total nitrogen; achieve a high degree of phosphorus removal - primarily by chemical additions; use step aeration (step feed) to save tank volume and site space and to eliminate mixed liquor recirculation requirements; use less energy; use a supplemental source of carbon (typically, methanol) in small quantities to achieve higher levels of nitrogen removal; take advantage of the highest denitrification rates of raw wastewater; allow nitrification of low alkalinity wastewater with no chemical supplement; can be created from existing step aeration plants with only minor modifications; and can retain all the flexibility and wet-weather flow stability of conventional step aeration systems. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Biotechnological advances in Lilium.

    PubMed

    Bakhshaie, Mehdi; Khosravi, Solmaz; Azadi, Pejman; Bagheri, Hedayat; van Tuyl, Jaap M

    2016-09-01

    Modern powerful techniques in plant biotechnology have been developed in lilies (Lilium spp., Liliaceae) to propagate, improve and make new phenotypes. Reliable in vitro culture methods are available to multiply lilies rapidly and shorten breeding programs. Lilium is also an ideal model plant to study in vitro pollination and embryo rescue methods. Although lilies are recalcitrant to genetic manipulation, superior genotypes are developed with improved flower colour and form, disease resistance and year round forcing ability. Different DNA molecular markers have been developed for rapid indirect selection, genetic diversity evaluation, mutation detection and construction of Lilium linkage map. Some disease resistance-QTLs are already mapped on the Lilium linkage map. This review presents latest information on in vitro propagation, genetic engineering and molecular advances made in lily. PMID:27318470

  19. Advances in autism.

    PubMed

    Geschwind, Daniel H

    2009-01-01

    Autism is a common childhood neurodevelopmental disorder with strong genetic liability. It is not a unitary entity but a clinical syndrome, with variable deficits in social behavior and language, restrictive interests, and repetitive behaviors. Recent advances in the genetics of autism emphasize its etiological heterogeneity, with each genetic susceptibility locus accounting for only a small fraction of cases or having a small effect. Therefore, it is not surprising that no unifying structural or neuropathological features have been conclusively identified. Given the heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), approaches based on studying heritable components of the disorder, or endophenotypes, such as language or social cognition, provide promising avenues for genetic and neurobiological investigations. Early intensive behavioral and cognitive interventions are efficacious in many cases, but autism does not remit in the majority of children. Therefore, development of targeted therapies based on pathophysiologically and etiologically defined subtypes of ASD remains an important and achievable goal of current research. PMID:19630577

  20. Advanced Motor Drives Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsani, M.; Tchamdjou, A.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of advanced motor drive systems as a replacement for the hydrazine fueled APU units. The replacement technology must meet several requirements which are particular to the space applications and the Orbiter in general. Some of these requirements are high efficiency, small size, high power density. In the first part of the study several motors are compared, based on their characteristics and in light of the Orbiter requirements. The best candidate, the brushless DC is chosen because of its particularly good performance with regards to efficiency. Several power electronics drive technologies including the conventional three-phase hard switched and several soft-switched inverters are then presented. In the last part of the study, a soft-switched inverter is analyzed and compared to its conventional hard-switched counterpart. Optimal efficiency is a basic requirement for space applications and the soft-switched technology represents an unavoidable trend for the future.

  1. Advanced Telemetry Data Capturing

    SciTech Connect

    Paschke, G.A.

    2000-05-16

    This project developed a new generation or advanced data capturing process specifically designed for use in future telemetry test systems at the Kansas City Plant (KCP). Although similar data capturing processes are performed both commercially and at other DOE weapon facilities, the equipment used is not specifically designed to perform acceptance testing requirements unique to the KCP. Commercially available equipment, despite very high cost (up to $125,000), is deficient in reliability and long-term maintainability necessary in test systems at this facility. There are no commercial sources for some requirements, specifically Terminal Data Analyzer (TDA) data processing. Although other custom processes have been developed to satisfy these test requirements, these designs have become difficult to maintain and upgrade.

  2. Advanced practice registered nurse certification.

    PubMed

    Alleman, Kim; Houle, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) in nephrology began to be certified through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission (NNCC) in 2006. Since that time, the APRN Consensus Model has been developed, which addresses licensure, accreditation, certification, and education and which strongly recommends specialty certification for advanced practice nurses. This article discusses NNCC certification for advanced practice in nephrology nursing and describes the major components of the APRN Consensus Model. PMID:23923801

  3. Advanced turbocharger design study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culy, D. G.; Heldenbrand, R. W.; Richardson, N. R.

    1984-01-01

    The advanced Turbocharger Design Study consisted of: (1) the evaluation of three advanced engine designs to determine their turbocharging requirements, and of technologies applicable to advanced turbocharger designs; (2) trade-off studies to define a turbocharger conceptual design and select the engine with the most representative requirements for turbocharging; (3) the preparation of a turbocharger conceptual design for the Curtiss Wright RC2-32 engine selected in the trade-off studies; and (4) the assessment of market impact and the preparation of a technology demonstration plan for the advanced turbocharger.

  4. Advanced Coats' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Haik, B G

    1991-01-01

    Advanced Coats' disease and retinoblastoma can both present with the triad of a retinal detachment, the appearance of a subretinal mass, and dilated retinal vessels. Thus, even the most experienced observer may not be able to differentiate these entities on ophthalmoscopic findings alone. Coats' disease is the most common reason for which eyes are enucleated with the misdiagnosis of retinoblastoma. Ultrasonography is the auxiliary diagnostic test most easily incorporated into the clinical examination, and can be utilized repeatedly without biologic tissue hazard. Ultrasonically identifiable features allowing differentiation between Coats' disease and retinoblastoma include the topography and character of retinal detachment and presence or absence of subretinal calcifications. Ultrasonography is of lesser use in poorly calcified retinoblastoma and in detecting optic nerve or extraocular extension in heavily calcified retinoblastoma. CT is perhaps the single most valuable test because of its ability to: (a) delineate intraocular morphology, (b) quantify subretinal densities, (c) identify vascularities within the subretinal space through the use of contrast enhancement, and (d) detected associated orbital or intracranial abnormalities. Optimal computed tomographic studies, however, require multiple thin slices both before and after contrast introduction and expose the child to low levels of radiation if studies are repeated periodically. MR imaging is valuable for its multiplanar imaging capabilities, its superior contrast resolution, and its ability to provide insights into the biochemical structure and composition of tissues. It is limited in its ability to detect calcium, which is the mainstay of ultrasonic and CT differentiation. Aqueous LDH and isoenzyme levels were not valuable in distinguishing between Coats' disease and retinoblastoma. The value of aqueous NSE levels in the differentiation of advanced Coats' disease and exophytic retinoblastoma deserves

  5. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to

  6. Advanced Concepts. Chapter 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Mulqueen, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Before there is a funded space mission, there must be a present need for the mission. Space science and exploration are expensive, and without a well-defined and justifiable need, no one is going to commit significant funding for any space endeavor. However, as discussed in Chapter 1, applications of space technology and many and broad, hence there are many ways to determine and establish a mission need. Robotic science missions are justified by their science return. To be selected for flight, questions like these must be addressed: What is the science question that needs answering, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to answer it? Why does answering the question require an expensive space flight, instead of some ground-based alternative? If the question can only be answered by flying in space, then why is this approach better than other potential approaches? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to answer the question in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? There are also many ways to justify human exploration missions, including science return, technology advancement, as well as intangible reasons, such as national pride. Nonetheless, many of the questions that need answering, are similar to those for robotic science missions: Where are the people going, why, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to get there? What is the safest method to achieve the goal? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to get there and keep the crew alive in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? Another reason for some groups sending spacecraft into space is for profit. Telecommunications, geospatial imaging, and tourism are examples of proven, market-driven space missions and applications. For this specific set of users, the

  7. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  8. Advanced composites in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diefendorf, R. Judd; Hillig, William G.; Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Pipes, R. Byron; Perepezko, John H.; Sheehan, James E.

    1994-01-01

    The JTEC Panel on Advanced Composites surveyed the status and future directions of Japanese high-performance ceramic and carbon fibers and their composites in metal, intermetallic, ceramic, and carbon matrices. Because of a strong carbon and fiber industry, Japan is the leader in carbon fiber technology. Japan has initiated an oxidation-resistant carbon/carbon composite program. With its outstanding technical base in carbon technology, Japan should be able to match present technology in the U.S. and introduce lower-cost manufacturing methods. However, the panel did not see any innovative approaches to oxidation protection. Ceramic and especially intermetallic matrix composites were not yet receiving much attention at the time of the panel's visit. There was a high level of monolithic ceramic research and development activity. High temperature monolithic intermetallic research was just starting, but notable products in titanium aluminides had already appeared. Matrixless ceramic composites was one novel approach noted. Technologies for high temperature composites fabrication existed, but large numbers of panels or parts had not been produced. The Japanese have selected aerospace as an important future industry. Because materials are an enabling technology for a strong aerospace industry, Japan initiated an ambitious long-term program to develop high temperature composites. Although just starting, its progress should be closely monitored in the U.S.

  9. Advances in influenza vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reperant, Leslie A.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections yearly cause high morbidity and mortality burdens in humans, and the development of a new influenza pandemic continues to threaten mankind as a Damoclean sword. Influenza vaccines have been produced by using egg-based virus growth and passaging techniques that were developed more than 60 years ago, following the identification of influenza A virus as an etiological agent of seasonal influenza. These vaccines aimed mainly at eliciting neutralizing antibodies targeting antigenically variable regions of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, which requires regular updates to match circulating seasonal influenza A and B virus strains. Given the relatively limited protection induced by current seasonal influenza vaccines, a more universal influenza vaccine that would protect against more—if not all—influenza viruses is among the largest unmet medical needs of the 21st century. New insights into correlates of protection from influenza and into broad B- and T-cell protective anti-influenza immune responses offer promising avenues for innovative vaccine development as well as manufacturing strategies or platforms, leading to the development of a new generation of vaccines. These aim at the rapid and massive production of influenza vaccines that provide broad protective and long-lasting immunity. Recent advances in influenza vaccine research demonstrate the feasibility of a wide range of approaches and call for the initiation of preclinical proof-of-principle studies followed by clinical trials in humans. PMID:24991424

  10. Advanced Production Planning Models

    SciTech Connect

    JONES,DEAN A.; LAWTON,CRAIG R.; KJELDGAARD,EDWIN A.; WRIGHT,STEPHEN TROY; TURNQUIST,MARK A.; NOZICK,LINDA K.; LIST,GEORGE F.

    2000-12-01

    >This report describes the innovative modeling approach developed as a result of a 3-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The overall goal of this project was to provide an effective suite of solvers for advanced production planning at facilities in the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). We focused our development activities on problems related to operations at the DOE's Pantex Plant. These types of scheduling problems appear in many contexts other than Pantex--both within the NWC (e.g., Neutron Generators) and in other commercial manufacturing settings. We successfully developed an innovative and effective solution strategy for these types of problems. We have tested this approach on actual data from Pantex, and from Org. 14000 (Neutron Generator production). This report focuses on the mathematical representation of the modeling approach and presents three representative studies using Pantex data. Results associated with the Neutron Generator facility will be published in a subsequent SAND report. The approach to task-based scheduling described here represents a significant addition to the literature for large-scale, realistic scheduling problems in a variety of production settings.

  11. Advances in Urine Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Becker, Gavin J; Garigali, Giuseppe; Fogazzi, Giovanni B

    2016-06-01

    Urine microscopy is an important tool for the diagnosis and management of several conditions affecting the kidneys and urinary tract. In this review, we describe the automated instruments, based either on flow cytometry or digitized microscopy, that are currently in use in large clinical laboratories. These tools allow the examination of large numbers of samples in short periods. We also discuss manual urinary microscopy commonly performed by nephrologists, which we encourage. After discussing the advantages of phase contrast microscopy over bright field microscopy, we describe the advancements of urine microscopy in various clinical conditions. These include persistent isolated microscopic hematuria (which can be classified as glomerular or nonglomerular on the basis of urinary erythrocyte morphology), drug- and toxin-related cystalluria (which can be a clue for the diagnosis of acute kidney injury associated with intrarenal crystal precipitation), and some inherited conditions (eg, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency, which is associated with 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystalluria, and Fabry disease, which is characterized by unique urinary lamellated fatty particles). Finally, we describe the utility of identifying "decoy cells" and atypical malignant cells, which can be easily done with phase contrast microscopy in unfixed samples. PMID:26806004

  12. Advanced positron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variola, A.

    2014-03-01

    Positron sources are a critical system for the future lepton colliders projects. Due to the large beam emittance at the production and the limitation given by the target heating and mechanical stress, the main collider parameters fixing the luminosity are constrained by the e+ sources. In this context also the damping ring design boundary conditions and the final performance are given by the injected positron beam. At present different schemes are being taken into account in order to increase the production and the capture yield of the positron sources, to reduce the impact of the deposited energy in the converter target and to increase the injection efficiency in the damping ring. The final results have a strong impact not only on the collider performance but also on its cost optimization. After a short introduction illustrating their fundamental role, the basic positron source scheme and the performance of the existing sources will be illustrated. The main innovative designs for the future colliders advanced sources will be reviewed and the different developed technologies presented. Finally the positrons-plasma R&D experiments and the futuristic proposals for positron sources will reviewed.

  13. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Lei Zhou

    2000-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between Oct 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 2: Addition of a foam generation and breaker system), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (h) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members. The tasks Completed During This Quarter are Task 7 and Task 8.

  14. Advanced robot locomotion.

    SciTech Connect

    Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

  15. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2002-11-10

    The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

  16. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley J. Miller; Grant L. Schelkoph; Grant E. Dunham

    2000-12-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and recollection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hour parametric tests and 100-hour proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency.

  17. Recent advances of nanodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Grosswendt, B

    2004-01-01

    The early damage to genes and cells due to ionizing radiation is initiated by the overlay of the track structure of charged particles and of the structure of radiosensitive sub-cellular volumes. As a result of this overlay, a specified number of ionizations (the ionization cluster size) is formed per primary particle. Therefore, one of the aims of nanodosimetry is to determine ionization cluster-size distributions in nanometric volumes of liquid water, as a substitute to sub-cellular structures. After a short description of the main aspects of cluster-size formation by charged particles, an overview of the advanced measuring techniques that use millimetric target volumes filled with a low-pressure gas to simulate nanometric target volumes at unit density is given. Afterwards, physical principles are discussed which are applicable to convert ionization cluster-size distributions measured in gases into those for liquid water. Finally, a tentative possibility is proposed of how to relate parameters derived from cluster-size distributions in liquid water to parameters derived from radiation-induced radiobiological experiments. PMID:15353748

  18. Advanced hybrid gasification facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H.; Johnson, S.A.; Dixit, V.B.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of this procurement is to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology for electric power generation applications. The proprietary CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc. PyGas{trademark} staged gasifier has been selected as the initial gasifier to be developed under this program. The gasifier is expected to avoid agglomeration when used on caking coals. It is also being designed to crack tar vapors and ammonia, and to provide an environment in which volatilized alkali may react with aluminosilicates in the coal ash thereby minimizing their concentration in the hot raw coal gas passing through the system to the gas turbine. This paper describes a novel, staged, airblown, fixed-bed gasifier designed to solve both through the incorporation of pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification. It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration which occurs in a fixed-bed process when coal is gradually heated through the 400{degrees}F to 900{degrees}F range. In a pyrolyzer, the coal is rapidly heated such that coal tar is immediately vaporized. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can be chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NOx from fuel home nitrogen, moisture is minimized to control ammonia generation, and HCN in the upper gasifier region is partially oxidized to NO which reacts with NH3/HCN to form N2.

  19. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  20. Advances in cholangiocyte immunobiology

    PubMed Central

    Syal, Gaurav; Fausther, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Cholangiocytes, or bile duct epithelia, were once thought to be the simple lining of the conduit system comprising the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts. Growing experimental evidence demonstrated that cholangiocytes are in fact the first line of defense of the biliary system against foreign substances. Experimental advances in recent years have unveiled previously unknown roles of cholangiocytes in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Cholangiocytes can release inflammatory modulators in a regulated fashion. Moreover, they express specialized pattern-recognizing molecules that identify microbial components and activate intracellular signaling cascades leading to a variety of downstream responses. The cytokines secreted by cholangiocytes, in conjunction with the adhesion molecules expressed on their surface, play a role in recruitment, localization, and modulation of immune responses in the liver and biliary tract. Cholangiocyte survival and function is further modulated by cytokines and inflammatory mediators secreted by immune cells and cholangiocytes themselves. Because cholangiocytes act as professional APCs via expression of major histocompatibility complex antigens and secrete antimicrobial peptides in bile, their role in response to biliary infection is critical. Finally, because cholangiocytes release mediators critical to myofibroblastic differentiation of portal fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells, cholangiocytes may be essential in the pathogenesis of biliary cirrhosis. PMID:22961800

  1. Advanced optical instruments technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-01-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  2. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  3. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-07-30

    This is the fourth quarterly progress report for Year-3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between April 1, 2002 and June 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)''; (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions''; (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''; (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  4. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  5. Advanced communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, J. N.

    1980-01-01

    The increase in demand for satellite communications services brought about shortages in available transponder capacity, especially at C-band. Interest shifted to the Ku-band frequency and currently carriers are rapidly moving to secure orbital slots for future satellite development. Projections of communications service demands over the next decade indiate growth in voice, data, and video services such that saturation of both C-band and Ku-band will occur by 1990. Emphasis must and will shift to Ka-band (20/30 GHz) frequency for fixed-satellite service. Advanced technologies such as multibeam antennas coupled with on-board satellite switching to allow implementation in this band of very high capacity satellite systems will be applied to meet the demand. Satellite system concepts that are likely in the 1990's and are likely to bring a new dimension to satellite delivered communication service are presented. The NASA 30/20 GHz communications satellite system demonstration program is discussed with emphasis on the related technology development.

  6. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Shingledecker, John P

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  7. Advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1987-01-01

    Resent results of aerodynamic and acoustic research on both single and counter-rotation propellers are reviewed. Data and analytical results are presented for three propellers: SR-7A, the single rotation design used in the NASA Propfan Test Assessment (PTA); and F7-A7, the 8+8 counterrotating design used in the proof-of-concept Unducted Fan (UDF) engine. In addition to propeller efficiencies, cruise and takeoff noise, and blade pressure data, off-design phenomena involving formation of leading edge vortices are described. Aerodynamic and acoustic computational results derived from three-dimensional Euler and acoustic radiation codes are presented. Research on unsteady flows, which are particularly important for understanding counterrotation interaction noise, unsteady loading effects on acoustics, and flutter or forced response is described. The first results of three-dimensional unsteady Euler solutions are illustrated for a single rotation propeller at an angle of attack and for a counterrotation propeller. Basic experimental and theoretical results from studies of the unsteady aerodynamics of oscillating cascades are outlined. Finally, advanced concepts involving swirl recovery vanes and ultra bypass ducted propellers are discussed.

  8. Advances in cholangiocyte immunobiology.

    PubMed

    Syal, Gaurav; Fausther, Michel; Dranoff, Jonathan A

    2012-11-15

    Cholangiocytes, or bile duct epithelia, were once thought to be the simple lining of the conduit system comprising the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts. Growing experimental evidence demonstrated that cholangiocytes are in fact the first line of defense of the biliary system against foreign substances. Experimental advances in recent years have unveiled previously unknown roles of cholangiocytes in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Cholangiocytes can release inflammatory modulators in a regulated fashion. Moreover, they express specialized pattern-recognizing molecules that identify microbial components and activate intracellular signaling cascades leading to a variety of downstream responses. The cytokines secreted by cholangiocytes, in conjunction with the adhesion molecules expressed on their surface, play a role in recruitment, localization, and modulation of immune responses in the liver and biliary tract. Cholangiocyte survival and function is further modulated by cytokines and inflammatory mediators secreted by immune cells and cholangiocytes themselves. Because cholangiocytes act as professional APCs via expression of major histocompatibility complex antigens and secrete antimicrobial peptides in bile, their role in response to biliary infection is critical. Finally, because cholangiocytes release mediators critical to myofibroblastic differentiation of portal fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells, cholangiocytes may be essential in the pathogenesis of biliary cirrhosis. PMID:22961800

  9. Recent advances in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Iannuzzi, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoidosis, a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology, is characterized by a variable clinical presentation and course. During the past decade, advances have been made in the study of sarcoidosis. The multicenter ACCESS (A Case Control Etiologic Study of Sarcoidosis) trial recruited > 700 subjects with newly diagnosed sarcoidosis and matched control subjects. Investigators were unable to identify a single cause of sarcoidosis, but ACCESS paved the way for subsequent etiologic studies. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase protein has been identified as a potential sarcoidosis antigen. Genetic aspects of the disease have been elucidated further. Genome-wide scans have identified candidate genes. Gene expression analyses have defined cytokine dysregulation in sarcoidosis more clearly. Although the criteria for diagnosis have not changed, sarcoidosis remains a diagnosis of exclusion best supported by a tissue biopsy specimen that demonstrates noncaseating granulomas in a patient with compatible clinical and radiologic features of the disease. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of mediastinal lymph nodes has facilitated diagnosis, often eliminating the need for more invasive procedures, such as mediastinoscopy. PET scanning has proven valuable in locating occult sites of active disease. Currently, no reliable prognostic biomarkers have been identified. The tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, a relatively new class of agents, have been used in patients with refractory disease. It is unclear whether phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, prostaglandin analogs, or endothelin antagonists should be used for the treatment of sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension. PMID:21208877

  10. Advanced Crew Escape Suit.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    Design of the S1032 Launch Entry Suit (LES) began following the Challenger loss and NASA's decision to incorporate a Shuttle crew escape system. The LES (see Figure 1) has successfully supported Shuttle missions since NASA's Return to Flight with STS-26 in September 1988. In 1990, engineers began developing the S1035 Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) to serve as a replacement for the LES. The ACES was designed to be a simplified, lightweight, low-bulk pressure suit which aided self donning/doffing, provided improved comfort, and enhanced overall performance to reduce crew member stress and fatigue. Favorable crew member evaluations of a prototype led to full-scale development and qualification of the S1035 ACES between 1990 and 1992. Production of the S1035 ACES began in February 1993, with the first unit delivered to NASA in May 1994. The S1035 ACES first flew aboard STS-68 in August 1994 and will become the primary crew escape suit when the S1032 LES ends its service life in late 1995. The primary goal of the S1035 development program was to provide improved performance over that of the S1032 to minimize the stress and fatigue typically experienced by crew members. To achieve this, five fundamental design objectives were established, resulting in various material/configuration changes. PMID:11540717

  11. Advances in metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Wishart, David S

    2011-08-01

    One of the central challenges to metabolomics is metabolite identification. Regardless of whether one uses so-called 'targeted' or 'untargeted' metabolomics, eventually all paths lead to the requirement of identifying (and quantifying) certain key metabolites. Indeed, without metabolite identification, the results of any metabolomic analysis are biologically and chemically uninterpretable. Given the chemical diversity of most metabolomes and the character of most metabolomic data, metabolite identification is intrinsically difficult. Consequently a great deal of effort in metabolomics over the past decade has been focused on making metabolite identification better, faster and cheaper. This review describes some of the newly emerging techniques or technologies in metabolomics that are making metabolite identification easier and more robust. In particular, it focuses on advances in metabolite identification that have occurred over the past 2 to 3 years concerning the technologies, methodologies and software as applied to NMR, MS and separation science. The strengths and limitations of some of these approaches are discussed along with some of the important trends in metabolite identification. PMID:21827274

  12. Advances in infrared fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Guangming; Abouraddy, Ayman F.

    2015-05-01

    Infrared (IR) fibers that transmit radiation at wavelengths from ~ 2 μm up to ~ 25 μm, a spectrum that extends across both the mid-IR (MIR) and far-IR (FIR), has gained extensive attention concomitant with the recent availability of MIR semiconductors sources and detectors. Chalcogenide glasses (ChGs) are a leading candidate for IR fibers by virtue of their wide optical transmission windows and high nonlinearity in the IR region. After extensive studies since the 1960s, the development and applications of ChG IR fibers are primarily hindered by their unfavorable mechanical properties. Here, we summarize our recent advances in low-cost, robust multimaterial ChG IR fibers with broad transmission windows and low optical losses, based on our multimaterial fiber preforms produced by several fabrication methodologies. Hundreds of meters of fibers are thermally drawn in an ambient atmosphere with desired step-index structure from a macroscopic multimaterial preform that contains few grams of ChG. These simple and efficient processes overcome many of the traditional obstacles, and therefore enable rapid production in an industrial setting.

  13. Recent advances in SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    1998-08-28

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a medical imaging modality that combines conventional nuclear medicine imaging technique and methods of computed tomography (CT). From images that represent the biodistribution of the injected radiopharmaceutical in the patient, SPECT provides functional information that is unique. The first SPECT system was developed in the sixties. However, early progress of SPECT was hampered by the lack of adequate image reconstruction methods. The development of x-ray CT and image reconstruction methods in the seventies spurred a renewed interest in SPECT. In 1981, the first commercial SPECT system based on a single rotating camera was available for clinical use. Today, most modern SPECT systems consist of multiple cameras that rotate around the patients. They have better spatial resolution and higher detection efficiency as compared to the earlier single camera systems. Recently, a new generation of dual camera systems allowing for coincidence imaging of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals has emerged in the commercial market. Additionally, new quantitative image reconstruction methods are under development. They compensate for image degrading factors including attenuation, collimator-detector blurring and scatter. Also, they result in SPECT images with improved image quality and more accurately represent the three-dimensional radioactivity distribution in the patient. Such advances in radiopharmaceuticals, instrumentation, image reconstruction, compensation methods, and clinical applications have fueled a steady growth of SPECT as an important diagnostic tool in patient management.

  14. Materials for advanced batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, D.W.; Broadhead, J.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements of battery systems are considered along with some recent studies of materials of importance in aqueous electrochemical energy-storage systems, lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries, solid electrolytes, molten salt electrolytes in secondary batteries, the recharging of the lithium electrode in organic electrolytes, intercalation electrodes, and interface phenomena in advanced batteries. Attention is given to a lead-acid battery overview, the design and development of micro-reference electrodes for the lithium/metal-sulfide cell system, molten salt electrochemical studies and high energy density cell development, a selenium (IV) cathode in molten chloroaluminates, and the behavior of hard and soft ions in solid electrolytes. Other topics explored are related to the use of the proton conductor hydrogen uranyl phosphate tetrahydrate as the solid electrolyte in hydride-air batteries and hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells, the behavior of the passivating film in Li/SOCl2 cells under various conditions, and the analysis of surface insulating films in lithium nitride crystals.

  15. Advanced cement solidification system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, T.; Kuribayashi, H.; Todo, F.

    1993-12-31

    In order to easily and economically store and transport radioactive waste generated at nuclear power stations, it is essential to reduce the waste volume to the maximum extent. It is also necessary to transform the waste into a stable form for final disposal which will maintain its chemical and physical stability over a long period of time. For this purpose, the Advanced Cement Solidification Process (AC-process) was developed. The AC-process, which utilizes portland cement, can be applied to several kinds of waste such as boric acid waste, laboratory drain waste, incineration ash and spent ion exchange resin. In this paper, the key point of the AC-process, the pretreatment concept for each waste, is described. The AC-process has been adopted for two Japanese PWR stations: the Genkai Nuclear Power Station (Kyushu Electric Power Co.) and the Ikata Nuclear Power Station (Shikoku Electric Power Co.). Construction work has almost finished and commissioning tests are under way at both power stations.

  16. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymeric materials. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIM Materials Program, allows the authors, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of various thermoset resins will be studied because it holds the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components or in-situ curing of adhesives, including metal-to-metal. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  17. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIC Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of thermoset resins will be studied because it hold the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  18. [Advances in Molecular Cloning].

    PubMed

    Ashwini, M; Murugan, S B; Balamurugan, S; Sathishkumar, R

    2016-01-01

    "Molecular cloning" meaning creation of recombinant DNA molecules has impelled advancement throughout life sciences. DNA manipulation has become easy due to powerful tools showing exponential growth in applications and sophistication of recombinant DNA technology. Cloning genes has become simple what led to an explosion in the understanding of gene function by seamlessly stitching together multiple DNA fragments or by the use of swappable gene cassettes, maximizing swiftness and litheness. A novel archetype might materialize in the near future with synthetic biology techniques that will facilitate quicker assembly and iteration of DNA clones, accelerating the progress of gene therapy vectors, recombinant protein production processes and new vaccines by in vitro chemical synthesis of any in silico-specified DNA construct. The advent of innovative cloning techniques has opened the door to more refined applications such as identification and mapping of epigenetic modifications and high-throughput assembly of combinatorial libraries. In this review, we will examine the major breakthroughs in cloning techniques and their applications in various areas of biological research that have evolved mainly due to easy construction of novel expression systems. PMID:27028806

  19. Advanced software algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, K.; Dayton, S.

    1996-10-28

    Citibank was using a data collection system to create a one-time-only mailing history on prospective credit card customers that was becoming dated in its time to market requirements and as such was in need of performance improvements. To compound problems with their existing system, the assurance of the quality of the data matching process was manpower intensive and needed to be automated. Analysis, design, and prototyping capabilities involving information technology were areas of expertise provided by DOE-LMES Data Systems Research and Development (DSRD) program. The goal of this project was for Data Systems Research and Development (DSRD) to analyze the current Citibank credit card offering system and suggest and prototype technology improvements that would result in faster processing with quality as good as the current system. Technologies investigated include: a high-speed network of reduced instruction set computing (RISC) processors for loosely coupled parallel processing, tightly coupled, high performance parallel processing, higher order computer languages such as `C`, fuzzy matching algorithms applied to very large data files, relational database management system, and advanced programming techniques.

  20. Advanced stitching technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardino, Frank L.

    1992-01-01

    In the design of textile composites, the selection of materials and constructional techniques must be matched with product performance, productivity, and cost requirements. Constructional techniques vary. A classification of various textile composite systems is given. In general, the chopped fiber system is not suitable for structural composite applications because of fiber discontinuity, uncontrolled fiber orientation and a lack of fiber integration or entanglement. Linear filament yarn systems are acceptable for structural components which are exposed to simple tension in their applications. To qualify for more general use as structural components, filament yarn systems must be multi-directionally positioned. With the most sophisticated filament winding and laying techniques, however, the Type 2 systems have limited potential for general load-bearing applications because of a lack of filament integration or entanglement, which means vulnerability to splitting and delamination among filament layers. The laminar systems (Type 3) represented by a variety of simple fabrics (woven, knitted, braided and nonwoven) are especially suitable for load-bearing panels in flat form and for beams in a roled up to wound form. The totally integrated, advanced fabric system (Type 4) are thought to be the most reliable for general load-bearing applications because of fiber continuity and because of controlled multiaxial fiber orientation and entanglement. Consequently, the risk of splitting and delamination is minimized and practically omitted. Type 4 systems can be woven, knitted, braided or stitched through with very special equipment. Multiaxial fabric technologies are discussed.